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Sample records for european isolates reveals

  1. Genomic Admixture Analysis in European Populus spp. Reveals Unexpected Patterns of Reproductive Isolation and Mating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexer, Christian; Joseph, Jeffrey A.; van Loo, Marcela; Barbará, Thelma; Heinze, Berthold; Bartha, Denes; Castiglione, Stefano; Fay, Michael F.; Buerkle, C. Alex

    2010-01-01

    Admixture between genetically divergent populations facilitates genomic studies of the mechanisms involved in adaptation, reproductive isolation, and speciation, including mapping of the loci involved in these phenomena. Little is known about how pre- and postzygotic barriers will affect the prospects of “admixture mapping” in wild species. We have studied 93 mapped genetic markers (microsatellites, indels, and sequence polymorphisms, ∼60,000 data points) to address this topic in hybrid zones of Populus alba and P. tremula, two widespread, ecologically important forest trees. Using genotype and linkage information and recently developed analytical tools we show that (1) reproductive isolation between these species is much stronger than previously assumed but this cannot prevent the introgression of neutral or advantageous alleles, (2) unexpected genotypic gaps exist between recombinant hybrids and their parental taxa, (3) these conspicuous genotypic patterns are due to assortative mating and strong postzygotic barriers, rather than recent population history. We discuss possible evolutionary trajectories of hybrid lineages between these species and outline strategies for admixture mapping in hybrid zones between highly divergent populations. Datasets such as this one are still rare in studies of natural hybrid zones but should soon become more common as high throughput genotyping and resequencing become feasible in nonmodel species. PMID:20679517

  2. Comparative Genomics of Facultative Bacterial Symbionts Isolated from European Orius Species Reveals an Ancestral Symbiotic Association

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    Xiaorui Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pest control in agriculture employs diverse strategies, among which the use of predatory insects has steadily increased. The use of several species within the genus Orius in pest control is widely spread, particularly in Mediterranean Europe. Commercial mass rearing of predatory insects is costly, and research efforts have concentrated on diet manipulation and selective breeding to reduce costs and improve efficacy. The characterisation and contribution of microbial symbionts to Orius sp. fitness, behaviour, and potential impact on human health has been neglected. This paper provides the first genome sequence level description of the predominant culturable facultative bacterial symbionts associated with five Orius species (O. laevigatus, O. niger, O. pallidicornis, O. majusculus, and O. albidipennis from several geographical locations. Two types of symbionts were broadly classified as members of the genera Serratia and Leucobacter, while a third constitutes a new genus within the Erwiniaceae. These symbionts were found to colonise all the insect specimens tested, which evidenced an ancestral symbiotic association between these bacteria and the genus Orius. Pangenome analyses of the Serratia sp. isolates offered clues linking Type VI secretion system effector–immunity proteins from the Tai4 sub-family to the symbiotic lifestyle.

  3. Array comparative hybridisation reveals a high degree of similarity between UK and European clinical isolates of hypervirulent Clostridium difficile

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    Kuijper Ed J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is responsible for C. difficile associated disease in humans and is currently the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the western world. This current status has been linked to the emergence of a highly virulent PCR-ribotype 027 strain. The aim of this work was to identify regions of sequence divergence that may be used as genetic markers of hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strains and markers of the sequenced strain, CD630 by array comparative hybridisation. Results In this study, we examined 94 clinical strains of the most common PCR-ribotypes isolated in mainland Europe and the UK by array comparative genomic hybridisation. Our array was comprehensive with 40,097 oligonucleotides covering the C. difficile 630 genome and revealed a core genome for all the strains of 32%. The array also covered genes unique to two PCR-ribotype 027 strains, relative to C. difficile 630 which were represented by 681 probes. All of these genes were also found in the commonly occuring PCR-ribotypes 001 and 106, and the emerging hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 078 strains, indicating that these are markers for all highly virulent strains. Conclusions We have fulfilled the aims of this study by identifying markers for CD630 and markers associated with hypervirulence, albeit genes that are not just indicative of PCR-ribotype 027 strains. We have also extended this study and have defined a more stringent core gene set compared to those previously published due to the comprehensive array coverage. Further to this we have defined a list of genes absent from non-toxinogenic strains and defined the nature of the specific toxin deletion in the strain CD37.

  4. Comparative Genomics of Facultative Bacterial Symbionts Isolated from EuropeanOriusSpecies Reveals an Ancestral Symbiotic Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaorui; Hitchings, Matthew D; Mendoza, José E; Balanza, Virginia; Facey, Paul D; Dyson, Paul J; Bielza, Pablo; Del Sol, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Pest control in agriculture employs diverse strategies, among which the use of predatory insects has steadily increased. The use of several species within the genus Orius in pest control is widely spread, particularly in Mediterranean Europe. Commercial mass rearing of predatory insects is costly, and research efforts have concentrated on diet manipulation and selective breeding to reduce costs and improve efficacy. The characterisation and contribution of microbial symbionts to Orius sp. fitness, behaviour, and potential impact on human health has been neglected. This paper provides the first genome sequence level description of the predominant culturable facultative bacterial symbionts associated with five Orius species ( O. laevigatus, O. niger, O. pallidicornis, O. majusculus , and O. albidipennis ) from several geographical locations. Two types of symbionts were broadly classified as members of the genera Serratia and Leucobacter , while a third constitutes a new genus within the Erwiniaceae. These symbionts were found to colonise all the insect specimens tested, which evidenced an ancestral symbiotic association between these bacteria and the genus Orius . Pangenome analyses of the Serratia sp. isolates offered clues linking Type VI secretion system effector-immunity proteins from the Tai4 sub-family to the symbiotic lifestyle.

  5. Molecular characterization of Trichomonas gallinae isolates recovered from the Canadian Maritime provinces' wild avifauna reveals the presence of the genotype responsible for the European finch trichomonosis epidemic and additional strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurney, Scott; Kelly-Clark, Whitney K; Forzán, María J; Lawson, Becki; Tyler, Kevin M; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2015-07-01

    Finch trichomonosis, caused by Trichomonas gallinae, emerged in the Canadian Maritime provinces in 2007 and has since caused ongoing mortality in regional purple finch (Carpodacus purpureus) and American goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) populations. Trichomonas gallinae was isolated from (1) finches and rock pigeons (Columbia livia) submitted for post-mortem or live-captured at bird feeding sites experiencing trichomonosis mortality; (2) bird seed at these same sites; and (3) rock pigeons live-captured at known roosts or humanely killed. Isolates were characterized using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and iron hydrogenase (Fe-hyd) gene sequences. Two distinct ITS types were found. Type A was identical to the UK finch epidemic strain and was isolated from finches and a rock pigeon with trichomonosis; apparently healthy rock pigeons and finches; and bird seed at an outbreak site. Type B was obtained from apparently healthy rock pigeons. Fe-hyd sequencing revealed six distinct subtypes. The predominant subtype in both finches and the rock pigeon with trichomonosis was identical to the UK finch epidemic strain A1. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in Fe-hyd sequences suggest there is fine-scale variation amongst isolates and that finch trichomonosis emergence in this region may not have been caused by a single spill-over event.

  6. A meta-analysis of genome-wide data from five European isolates reveals an association of COL22A1, SYT1, and GABRR2 with serum creatinine level

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    Oostra Ben A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum creatinine (SCR is the most important biomarker for a quick and non-invasive assessment of kidney function in population-based surveys. A substantial proportion of the inter-individual variability in SCR level is explicable by genetic factors. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of SCR undertaken in five population isolates ('discovery cohorts', all of which are part of the European Special Population Network (EUROSPAN project. Genes showing the strongest evidence for an association with SCR (candidate loci were replicated in two additional population-based samples ('replication cohorts'. Results After the discovery meta-analysis, 29 loci were selected for replication. Association between SCR level and polymorphisms in the collagen type XXII alpha 1 (COL22A1 gene, on chromosome 8, and in the synaptotagmin-1 (SYT1 gene, on chromosome 12, were successfully replicated in the replication cohorts (p value = 1.0 × 10-6 and 1.7 × 10-4, respectively. Evidence of association was also found for polymorphisms in a locus including the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor rho-2 (GABRR2 gene and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2-J1 (UBE2J1 gene (replication p value = 3.6 × 10-3. Previously reported findings, associating glomerular filtration rate with SNPs in the uromodulin (UMOD gene and in the schroom family member 3 (SCHROOM3 gene were also replicated. Conclusions While confirming earlier results, our study provides new insights in the understanding of the genetic basis of serum creatinine regulatory processes. In particular, the association with the genes SYT1 and GABRR2 corroborate previous findings that highlighted a possible role of the neurotransmitters GABAA receptors in the regulation of the glomerular basement membrane and a possible interaction between GABAAreceptors and synaptotagmin-I at the podocyte level.

  7. Genetic comparison of a Croatian isolate and CEPH European founders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Pau; Vitart, Véronique; Hayward, Caroline; Tenesa, Albert; Zgaga, Lina; Juricic, Danica; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F; Haley, Chris S; Knott, Sara A

    2010-02-01

    Human isolates have been postulated as a good resource for the identification of QTL due to reduced genetic diversity and a more homogeneous environment. Isolates may also have increased linkage disequilibrium (LD) due to small effective population size and, either loss or increase in frequency of alleles that are rare in the general population from which they originate. Here we investigate the difference in allele and genotype frequencies, LD and homozygous tracts between an isolate-several villages from the island of Vis in Croatia-and an outbred population of European origin: the Hapmap CEPH founders. Using the HumanHap300 v1 Genotyping BeadChip, we show that our population does not differ greatly from the reference CEU outbred population despite having a slightly higher proportion of monomorphic loci, a slightly higher long-range LD, and a greater proportion of individuals with long homozygous tracts. We conclude that genotyping arrays should perform equally well in our isolate as in outbred European populations for disease mapping studies and that SNP-trait associations discovered in our well-characterized Croatian isolate should be valid in the general European population from which they descend. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Genetic relatedness between Japanese and European isolates of Clostridium difficile originating from piglets and their risk associated with human health

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    Masaru eUsui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colonization in pig intestine has been a public health concern. We analyzed C. difficile prevalence among piglets in Japan to clarify their origin and extent of the associated risk by using molecular and microbiological methods for both swine and human clinical isolates and foreign isolates. C. difficile was isolated from 120 neonatal piglet faecal samples. Toxin gene profile, antimicrobial susceptibilities, PCR ribotype, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA type of swine isolates were determined and compared with those of human clinical and foreign isolates. One-hundred C. difficile strains were isolated from 69 (57.5% samples, and 61 isolates (61% were toxin gene-positive. Some isolates were resistant to antimicrobials, contributing to antibiotic-associated diarrhoea by C. difficile. These results suggest that C. difficile, prevalent among Japanese pigs, is a potential risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Furthermore, PCR ribotype 078 (12 isolates, which has been linked to multiple outbreaks worldwide, was the third-most frequently isolated of the 14 PCR ribotypes identified. Moreover, MLVA revealed that all 12 PCR ribotype 078 isolates were genetically related to European PCR ribotype 078 strains found in both humans and pigs. To date, in Japan, many breeding pigs have been imported from European countries. The genetic relatedness of C. difficile isolates of Japanese swine origin to those of European origin suggests that they were introduced into Japan via imported pigs.

  9. Isolation and characterization of three mammalian orthoreoviruses from European bats.

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    Claudia Kohl

    Full Text Available In recent years novel human respiratory disease agents have been described in South East Asia and Australia. The causative pathogens were classified as pteropine orthoreoviruses with strong phylogenetic relationship to orthoreoviruses of flying foxes inhabiting these regions. Subsequently, a zoonotic bat-to-human transmission has been assumed. We report the isolation of three novel mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRVs from European bats, comprising bat-borne orthoreovirus outside of South East Asia and Australia and moreover detected in insectivorous bats (Microchiroptera. MRVs are well known to infect a broad range of mammals including man. Although they are associated with rather mild and clinically unapparent infections in their hosts, there is growing evidence of their ability to also induce more severe illness in dogs and man. In this study, eight out of 120 vespertilionid bats proved to be infected with one out of three novel MRV isolates, with a distinct organ tropism for the intestine. One isolate was analyzed by 454 genome sequencing. The obtained strain T3/Bat/Germany/342/08 had closest phylogenetic relationship to MRV strain T3D/04, isolated from a dog. These novel reoviruses provide a rare chance of gaining insight into possible transmission events and of tracing the evolution of bat viruses.

  10. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife

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    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C.; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation. PMID:27992523

  11. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife.

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    Stefan Monecke

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963, some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963 were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6. mecC-MRSA (n = 8 were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation.

  12. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation.

  13. First Toxoplasma gondii isolate from an aborted foetus of European bison (Bison bonasus bonasus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskwa, Bożena; Bień, Justyna; Kornacka, Aleksandra; Cybulska, Aleksandra; Goździk, Katarzyna; Krzysiak, Michał K; Reiterova, Katarina; Cabaj, Władysław

    2017-07-06

    The study was performed on a male European bison (Bison bonasus bonasus L.) foetus spontaneously aborted at the fourth or fifth month of pregnancy in the Białowieża Forest. Serum samples from the foetus and mother revealed the presence of antibodies against T. gondii (S/P% = 88% and 75%, respectively). Mobile extracellular tachyzoites were first observed in a Vero cell culture, 110 days following inoculation of brain homogenate. PCR amplification with TGR1E1 and TGR1E2 primers confirmed the presence of T. gondii DNA, which was classified as Type I by PCR-RFLP genotyping. The sequences of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and 5.8S ribosomal RNA (5.8S rRNA) genes; internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2), obtained from T. gondii isolate, have been deposited in GenBank (accession number KX459518.1). This is the first in vitro isolation and molecular identification of T. gondii from an aborted European bison foetus. The origin of this protozoan isolate indicates that the species is a significant threat to the European bison conservation program implemented in the Białowieża Forest.

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Brachyspira intermedia isolates from European layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Marc; Boyen, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Garmyn, An; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An

    2011-09-01

    A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 20 Brachyspira intermedia isolates obtained from different layer flocks in Belgium and The Netherlands between 2008 and 2010. The antimicrobial agents used were tylosin, tilmicosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, and lincomycin. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution patterns of tylosin, tilmicosin, lincomycin, and doxycycline were bimodal, demonstrating acquired resistance against doxycycline in three strains, against the macrolides in two strains, and against lincomycin in one strain. The MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin showed a monomodal distribution, but with tailing toward the higher MIC values, possibly suggesting low-level acquired resistance in six isolates. Sequencing revealed a G1058C mutation in the 16S rRNA gene in all doxycycline-resistant strains. The strain resistant to tylosin, tilmicosin, and lincomycin had an A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene.

  15. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum and Phytophthora citricola isolates on European Beech and Lilac

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    Inoculation experiments were conducted to compare the aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola isolates on European beech and lilac seedlings grown in a greenhouse. The isolates were obtained from bleeding cankers on European beech from five cities (Albany, Ithaca, Oyster Bay, P...

  16. Isolation rooms for highly infectious diseases: an inventory of capabilities in European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusco, F M; Puro, V; Baka, A

    2009-01-01

    Isolation of patients with highly infectious diseases (HIDs) in hospital rooms with adequate technical facilities is essential to reduce the risk of spreading disease. The European Network for Infectious Diseases (EUNID), a project co-funded by European Commission and involving 16 European Union...

  17. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Batts, William

    2009-01-01

    the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...... (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D...... in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate....

  18. Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the Early Neolithic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botigué, Laura R.; Song, Shiya; Scheu, Amelie; Gopalan, Shyamalika; Pendleton, Amanda L.; Oetjens, Matthew; Taravella, Angela M.; Seregély, Timo; Zeeb-Lanz, Andrea; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bobo, Dean; Daly, Kevin; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Veeramah, Krishna R.

    2017-01-01

    Europe has played a major role in dog evolution, harbouring the oldest uncontested Palaeolithic remains and having been the centre of modern dog breed creation. Here we sequence the genomes of an Early and End Neolithic dog from Germany, including a sample associated with an early European farming community. Both dogs demonstrate continuity with each other and predominantly share ancestry with modern European dogs, contradicting a previously suggested Late Neolithic population replacement. We find no genetic evidence to support the recent hypothesis proposing dual origins of dog domestication. By calibrating the mutation rate using our oldest dog, we narrow the timing of dog domestication to 20,000–40,000 years ago. Interestingly, we do not observe the extreme copy number expansion of the AMY2B gene characteristic of modern dogs that has previously been proposed as an adaptation to a starch-rich diet driven by the widespread adoption of agriculture in the Neolithic. PMID:28719574

  19. Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the Early Neolithic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botigué, Laura R; Song, Shiya; Scheu, Amelie; Gopalan, Shyamalika; Pendleton, Amanda L; Oetjens, Matthew; Taravella, Angela M; Seregély, Timo; Zeeb-Lanz, Andrea; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bobo, Dean; Daly, Kevin; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Veeramah, Krishna R

    2017-07-18

    Europe has played a major role in dog evolution, harbouring the oldest uncontested Palaeolithic remains and having been the centre of modern dog breed creation. Here we sequence the genomes of an Early and End Neolithic dog from Germany, including a sample associated with an early European farming community. Both dogs demonstrate continuity with each other and predominantly share ancestry with modern European dogs, contradicting a previously suggested Late Neolithic population replacement. We find no genetic evidence to support the recent hypothesis proposing dual origins of dog domestication. By calibrating the mutation rate using our oldest dog, we narrow the timing of dog domestication to 20,000-40,000 years ago. Interestingly, we do not observe the extreme copy number expansion of the AMY2B gene characteristic of modern dogs that has previously been proposed as an adaptation to a starch-rich diet driven by the widespread adoption of agriculture in the Neolithic.

  20. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, T.; Einer-Jensen, K.; Batts, W.; Ahrens, P.; Bjorkblom, C.; Kurath, G.; Bjorklund, H.; Lorenzen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR- 32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  1. Genotypic diversity of european Phytophthora ramorum isolates based on SSR analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris Van Poucke; Annelies Vercauteren; Martine Maes; Sabine Werres; Kurt Heungens

    2013-01-01

    in Scotland were genotyped using seven microsatellite markers as described by Vercauteren et al. (2010). Thirty multilocus genotypes were identified within the Scottish population, with 51 percent of the isolates belonging to the main European genotype EU1MG1 and 13 unique detected genotypes. Ten of those genotypes were site specific, often represented by...

  2. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR)

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Ruminant Coxiella burnetii Isolates of European Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; Ellis, Richard J.; Adam, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is responsible for Q fever, a worldwide zoonosis attributed to the inhalation of aerosols contaminated by livestock birth products. Six draft genome sequences of European C. burnetii isolates from ruminants are presented here. The availability of these genomes will help in under...

  4. Comparison of Campylobacter fla-SVR genotypes isolated from humans and poultry in three European regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, T M; Fernández-Astorga, A; Alonso, R; Marteinsson, V T; Magnússon, S H; Kristoffersen, A B; Hofshagen, M

    2009-09-01

    The genetic diversity of Campylobacter isolated from human infection and from poultry was assessed in strains originating in three different European regions in order to compare these two hosts and to investigate European regional differences. Randomly chosen isolates originated from Norway, Iceland and Basque Country in Spain were genotyped by sequencing of the short variable region (SVR) of flaA. A total of 293 strains were investigated, c. 100 per country with half originated from either host. The results indicate extensive diversity in both hosts and identified differences in the nature and distribution of genotypes between the countries. These differences could in part be related to geographical location, in that Campylobacter genotypes from Iceland and Norway were more similar to each other than either was to Basque Country. Differences between the countries exceeded the observed differences between human and poultry isolates within a country. Regional differences are extensive and should not be ignored when comparing genotyping data originating from different international studies.

  5. Detecting Genetic Isolation in Human Populations: A Study of European Language Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capocasa, Marco; Battaggia, Cinzia; Anagnostou, Paolo; Montinaro, Francesco; Boschi, Ilaria; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Coia, Valentina; Crivellaro, Federica; Bisol, Giovanni Destro

    2013-01-01

    The identification of isolation signatures is fundamental to better understand the genetic structure of human populations and to test the relations between cultural factors and genetic variation. However, with current approaches, it is not possible to distinguish between the consequences of long-term isolation and the effects of reduced sample size, selection and differential gene flow. To overcome these limitations, we have integrated the analysis of classical genetic diversity measures with a Bayesian method to estimate gene flow and have carried out simulations based on the coalescent. Combining these approaches, we first tested whether the relatively short history of cultural and geographical isolation of four “linguistic islands” of the Eastern Alps (Lessinia, Sauris, Sappada and Timau) had left detectable signatures in their genetic structure. We then compared our findings to previous studies of European population isolates. Finally, we explored the importance of demographic and cultural factors in shaping genetic diversity among the groups under study. A combination of small initial effective size and continued genetic isolation from surrounding populations seems to provide a coherent explanation for the diversity observed among Sauris, Sappada and Timau, which was found to be substantially greater than in other groups of European isolated populations. Simulations of micro-evolutionary scenarios indicate that ethnicity might have been important in increasing genetic diversity among these culturally related and spatially close populations. PMID:23418562

  6. Occurrence and characterization of plum pox virus strain D isolates from European Russia and Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Prikhodko, Yuri; Mitrofanova, Irina

    2016-02-01

    Numerous plum pox virus (PPV) strain D isolates have been found in geographically distant regions of European Russia and the Crimean peninsula on different stone fruit hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of their partial and complete genomes suggests multiple introductions of PPV-D into Russia. Distinct natural isolates from Prunus tomentosa were found to bear unique amino acid substitutions in the N-terminus of the coat protein (CP) that may contribute to the adaptation of PPV-D to this host. Serological analysis using the PPV-D-specific monoclonal antibody 4DG5 provided further evidence that mutations at positions 58 and 59 of the CP are crucial for antibody binding.

  7. Interconnectivity vs. isolation of prokaryotic communities in European deep-sea mud volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachiadaki, M. G.; Kormas, K. A.

    2013-05-01

    During the past two decades, European cold seep ecosystems have attracted the scientific interest and to date there are several studies which have investigated the community structure and biodiversity of individual sites. In order to gain a better insight into the biology, biodiversity, and biogeography of seep-associated microbial communities along Europe's continental margins, a comparative approach was applied in the present work. By exploiting the publicly available data on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sediments of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano, Gulf of Cádiz and the eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes/pockmarks (Anaximander area and Nile Fan), we investigated the prokaryotic biological components connecting these geographically isolated systems. The construction of interaction networks for both archaeal and bacterial shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) among the different sites, revealed the presence of persistent OTUs, which can be considered as "key-players". One archaeal OTU (HQ588641) belonging to the ANME-3 group and one δ-Proteobacteria (HQ588562) were found in all five investigated areas. Other Archaea OTUs shared between four sites or less, belonged to the ANME-2c, -2a, MBG-D, -B and Thaumarchaeota. All other shared Bacteria belonged to the δ- and γ-Proteobacteria, with the exception of one JS1 affiliate OTU. The distribution of the majority of the shared OTUs seems to be restricted in cold seeps, mud volcanoes and other marine methane-rich environments. Although the investigated sites were connected through a small number of OTUs, these microorganisms hold central ecophysiological roles in these sediments, namely methane- and sulfur-mediated mineralization.

  8. Interconnectivity vs. isolation of prokaryotic communities in European deep-sea mud volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Pachiadaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, European cold seep ecosystems have attracted the scientific interest and to date there are several studies which have investigated the community structure and biodiversity of individual sites. In order to gain a better insight into the biology, biodiversity, and biogeography of seep-associated microbial communities along Europe's continental margins, a comparative approach was applied in the present work. By exploiting the publicly available data on 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sediments of the Håkon Mosby mud volcano, Gulf of Cádiz and the eastern Mediterranean mud volcanoes/pockmarks (Anaximander area and Nile Fan, we investigated the prokaryotic biological components connecting these geographically isolated systems. The construction of interaction networks for both archaeal and bacterial shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs among the different sites, revealed the presence of persistent OTUs, which can be considered as "key-players". One archaeal OTU (HQ588641 belonging to the ANME-3 group and one δ-Proteobacteria (HQ588562 were found in all five investigated areas. Other Archaea OTUs shared between four sites or less, belonged to the ANME-2c, -2a, MBG-D, -B and Thaumarchaeota. All other shared Bacteria belonged to the δ- and γ-Proteobacteria, with the exception of one JS1 affiliate OTU. The distribution of the majority of the shared OTUs seems to be restricted in cold seeps, mud volcanoes and other marine methane-rich environments. Although the investigated sites were connected through a small number of OTUs, these microorganisms hold central ecophysiological roles in these sediments, namely methane- and sulfur-mediated mineralization.

  9. Experimental infection of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus isolates from European marine and farmed fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Slierendrecht, W.J.; King, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to infection with various isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was examined. A total of 8 experiments with rainbow trout ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 g was conducted for 139 isolates originating from wild marine fishes...... in European waters (115 isolates), farmed turbot from Scotland and Ireland (2 isolates), and farmed rainbow trout (22 isolates). The isolates were tested by immersion and/or intraperitoneal injection either as pooled or single isolates. The isolates from wild marine fishes did not cause mortality by immersion...... while some of the isolates caused mortality when injected. All VHSV isolates from farmed rainbow trout caused significant mortality by immersion. Currently, pathogenicity trials are the only way to differentiate VHSV isolates from wild marine fishes and farmed rainbow trout. The 2 farmed turbot isolates...

  10. Overcoming the dichotomy between open and isolated populations using genomic data from a large European dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Paolo; Dominici, Valentina; Battaggia, Cinzia; Pagani, Luca; Vilar, Miguel; Wells, R Spencer; Pettener, Davide; Sarno, Stefania; Boattini, Alessio; Francalacci, Paolo; Colonna, Vincenza; Vona, Giuseppe; Calò, Carla; Destro Bisol, Giovanni; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Human populations are often dichotomized into "isolated" and "open" categories using cultural and/or geographical barriers to gene flow as differential criteria. Although widespread, the use of these alternative categories could obscure further heterogeneity due to inter-population differences in effective size, growth rate, and timing or amount of gene flow. We compared intra and inter-population variation measures combining novel and literature data relative to 87,818 autosomal SNPs in 14 open populations and 10 geographic and/or linguistic European isolates. Patterns of intra-population diversity were found to vary considerably more among isolates, probably due to differential levels of drift and inbreeding. The relatively large effective size estimated for some population isolates challenges the generalized view that they originate from small founding groups. Principal component scores based on measures of intra-population variation of isolated and open populations were found to be distributed along a continuum, with an area of intersection between the two groups. Patterns of inter-population diversity were even closer, as we were able to detect some differences between population groups only for a few multidimensional scaling dimensions. Therefore, different lines of evidence suggest that dichotomizing human populations into open and isolated groups fails to capture the actual relations among their genomic features.

  11. European apple canker: morphophysiological variability and pathogenicity in isolates of Neonectria ditissima in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatas da Silva Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: European apple canker (EC is caused by Neonectria ditissima, a pathogen officially registered as a quarantine pest in 2012. Thirty-five isolates of N. ditissima of different geographical regions of southern Brazil from apple branches showing symptoms of EC were identified by the specific pair primers Ch1 and Ch2 and analyzed concerning the virulence on Gala apple cultivar and morphophysiological characteristics. The disease symptoms were characterized and the isolates compared based on average mycelium growth (AMG, mycelium growth index (MGI, colony color, conidia type, dimensions and growth on potato dextrose agar (PDA, malt agar (AM, and synthetic SNAY (SN culture media. Nineteen isolates showed the greatest AMG on PDA, forming three growth groups of 35.56 (GI, 52.71 (GII, and 62.67mm (GIII. Seven isolates showed MGI greater than 4.0mm diameter on PDA compared with that on AM and SN. The highest conidia production was on SN, and the predominant colony color in all media was white to beige with central pigmentation of brown and borders colored in shades of beige. There were significant differences among the average dimensions of micro- and macroconidia on PDA, AM, and SN. The pathogenicity was confirmed for all isolates despite of different morphophysiological characteristics. There was no correlation among isolates morphophysiological variability, virulence, and geographical origin.

  12. Social isolation as a risk factor for inadequate diet of older Eastern Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousova, Lucie

    2014-10-01

    Social isolation has been shown to be a risk factor for inadequate diet among older adults living in Western Europe and North America. This article investigates whether socially isolated older adults (65+) living in Eastern Europe also experience an increased risk of dietary inadequacy. The study used SHARE IV survey data collected in the Czech Republic (n = 2,867), Poland (n = 772), and Hungary (n = 1,353). Logistic regression models were estimated for each country separately to predict the likelihood of two proxies for dietary adequacy, having three meals a day and/or a serving of fruits or vegetables, by social isolation. Social isolation was associated with lower likelihood of having three meals a day among Czech older adults (OR 0.39) and with lower likelihood of having a daily serving of fruits or vegetables among Czech (OR 0.62) and Polish older adults (OR 0.35). No association between social isolation and either one of the outcomes was found in Hungary. Socially isolated Eastern European older adults may be at a higher risk of dietary inadequacy, particularly in the Czech Republic and Poland.

  13. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR......) database to extract demographics and outcomes of 58 PCLD patients. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for survival rates. Severe abdominal pain (75%) was the most prominent symptom, while portal hypertension (35%) was the most common complication in PCLD. The explantation of the polycystic liver...

  14. European multicenter study on antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from companion animal urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Cátia; Gama, Luís Telo; Belas, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    of antimicrobial resistant bacteria causing urinary tract infection (UTI) in companion animals in Europe. The antimicrobial susceptibility of 22 256 bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with UTI was determined. Samples were collected between 2008 and 2013 from 16 laboratories of 14 European countries....... The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance of the most common bacteria was determined for each country individually in the years 2012-2013 and temporal trends of bacteria resistance were established by logistic regression. RESULTS: The aetiology of uropathogenic bacteria differed between dogs and cats. For all...

  15. Genetic patterns in European geometrid moths revealed by the Barcode Index Number (BIN system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hausmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The geometrid moths of Europe are one of the best investigated insect groups in traditional taxonomy making them an ideal model group to test the accuracy of the Barcode Index Number (BIN system of BOLD (Barcode of Life Datasystems, a method that supports automated, rapid species delineation and identification. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study provides a DNA barcode library for 219 of the 249 European geometrid moth species (88% in five selected subfamilies. The data set includes COI sequences for 2130 specimens. Most species (93% were found to possess diagnostic barcode sequences at the European level while only three species pairs (3% were genetically indistinguishable in areas of sympatry. As a consequence, 97% of the European species we examined were unequivocally discriminated by barcodes within their natural areas of distribution. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BINs and traditionally recognized species for 67% of these species. Another 17% of the species (15 pairs, three triads shared BINs, while specimens from the remaining species (18% were divided among two or more BINs. Five of these species are mixtures, both sharing and splitting BINs. For 82% of the species with two or more BINs, the genetic splits involved allopatric populations, many of which have previously been hypothesized to represent distinct species or subspecies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms the effectiveness of DNA barcoding as a tool for species identification and illustrates the potential of the BIN system to characterize formal genetic units independently of an existing classification. This suggests the system can be used to efficiently assess the biodiversity of large, poorly known assemblages of organisms. For the moths examined in this study, cases of discordance between traditionally recognized species and BINs arose from several causes including overlooked species, synonymy, and cases where DNA barcodes revealed

  16. Genotypes and pathogenicity of cellulitis isolates reveal traits that modulate APEC virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Nicolle Lima; de Oliveira, Aline Luísa; Tejkowski, Thiago Moreira; Pavanelo, Daniel Brisotto; Rocha, Débora Assumpção; Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia Maria; de Brito, Benito Guimarães; Horn, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    We characterized 144 Escherichia coli isolates from severe cellulitis lesions in broiler chickens from South Brazil. Analysis of susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials revealed frequencies of resistance of less than 30% for most antimicrobials except tetracycline (70%) and sulphonamides (60%). The genotyping of 34 virulence-associated genes revealed that all the isolates harbored virulence factors related to adhesion, iron acquisition and serum resistance, which are characteristic of the avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) pathotype. ColV plasmid-associated genes (cvi/cva, iroN, iss, iucD, sitD, traT, tsh) were especially frequent among the isolates (from 66.6% to 89.6%). According to the Clermont method of ECOR phylogenetic typing, isolates belonged to group D (47.2%), to group A (27.8%), to group B2 (17.4%) and to group B1 (7.6%); the group B2 isolates contained the highest number of virulence-associated genes. Clonal relationship analysis using the ARDRA method revealed a similarity level of 57% or higher among isolates, but no endemic clone. The virulence of the isolates was confirmed in vivo in one-day-old chicks. Most isolates (72.9%) killed all infected chicks within 7 days, and 65 isolates (38.1%) killed most of them within 24 hours. In order to analyze differences in virulence among the APEC isolates, we created a pathogenicity score by combining the times of death with the clinical symptoms noted. By looking for significant associations between the presence of virulence-associated genes and the pathogenicity score, we found that the presence of genes for invasins ibeA and gimB and for group II capsule KpsMTII increased virulence, while the presence of pic decreased virulence. The fact that ibeA, gimB and KpsMTII are characteristic of neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC) suggests that genes of NMEC in APEC increase virulence of strains.

  17. Longitudinal genotyping of Candida dubliniensis isolates reveals strain maintenance, microevolution, and the emergence of itraconazole resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleischhacker, M

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the population structure of 208 Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from 29 patients (25 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 4 HIV negative) as part of a longitudinal study. The isolates were identified as C. dubliniensis by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and then genotyped using the Cd25 probe specific for C. dubliniensis. The majority of the isolates (55 of 58) were unique to individual patients, and more than one genotype was recovered from 15 of 29 patients. A total of 21 HIV-positive patients were sampled on more than one occasion (2 to 36 times). Sequential isolates recovered from these patients were all closely related, as demonstrated by hybridization with Cd25 and genotyping by PCR. Six patients were colonized by the same genotype of C. dubliniensis on repeated sampling, while strains exhibiting altered genotypes were recovered from 15 of 21 patients. The majority of these isolates demonstrated minor genetic alterations, i.e., microevolution, while one patient acquired an unrelated strain. The C. dubliniensis strains could not be separated into genetically distinct groups based on patient viral load, CD4 cell count, or oropharyngeal candidosis. However, C. dubliniensis isolates obtained from HIV-positive patients were more closely related than those recovered from HIV-negative patients. Approximately 8% (16 of 194) of isolates exhibited itraconazole resistance. Cross-resistance to fluconazole was only observed in one of these patients. Two patients harboring itraconazole-resistant isolates had not received any previous azole therapy. In conclusion, longitudinal genotyping of C. dubliniensis isolates from HIV-infected patients reveals that isolates from the same patient are generally closely related and may undergo microevolution. In addition, isolates may acquire itraconazole resistance, even in the absence of prior azole therapy.

  18. Partial characterization of a novel gammaherpesvirus isolated from a European badger (Meles meles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Malcolm; King, Donald P; Daniells, Clare; Stagg, David A; Gavier-Widen, Dolores

    2002-06-01

    A herpesvirus causing a cytopathic effect was isolated from pulmonary fibroblast cultures established from a European badger (Meles meles). A study was undertaken to classify and to assess some in-vitro growth characteristics of this virus. From a panel of 27 mammalian cell lines, in-vitro replication of the badger herpesvirus (BadHV) was only demonstrated with a mink lung cell line, suggesting a high degree of host specificity. Using PCR with degenerate primers, three independent fragments of the BadHV genome were sequenced. The largest of these fragments comprised a 6.2 kb segment including the DNA polymerase and glycoprotein B genes. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences demonstrated that the BadHV is novel and clearly grouped with members of the Gammaherpesvirinae. In view of the oncogenic and immunosuppressive potential of many related herpesviruses, it is possible that BadHV can impact on existing acute or chronic disease in badgers.

  19. Ornaments reveal resistance of North European cultures to the spread of farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Solange; d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The transition to farming is the process by which human groups switched from hunting and gathering wild resources to food production. Understanding how and to what extent the spreading of farming communities from the Near East had an impact on indigenous foraging populations in Europe has been the subject of lively debates for decades. Ethnographic and archaeological studies have shown that population replacement and admixture, trade, and long distance diffusion of cultural traits lead to detectable changes in symbolic codes expressed by associations of ornaments on the human body. Here we use personal ornaments to document changes in cultural geography during the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition. We submitted a binary matrix of 224 bead-types found at 212 European Mesolithic and 222 Early Neolithic stratigraphic units to a series of spatial and multivariate analyses. Our results reveal consistent diachronic and geographical trends in the use of personal ornaments during the Neolithisation. Adoption of novel bead-types combined with selective appropriation of old attires by incoming farmers is identified in Southern and Central Europe while cultural resistance leading to the nearly exclusive persistence of indigenous personal ornaments characterizes Northern Europe. We argue that this pattern reflects two distinct cultural trajectories with different potential for gene flow.

  20. Ornaments Reveal Resistance of North European Cultures to the Spread of Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, Solange; d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The transition to farming is the process by which human groups switched from hunting and gathering wild resources to food production. Understanding how and to what extent the spreading of farming communities from the Near East had an impact on indigenous foraging populations in Europe has been the subject of lively debates for decades. Ethnographic and archaeological studies have shown that population replacement and admixture, trade, and long distance diffusion of cultural traits lead to detectable changes in symbolic codes expressed by associations of ornaments on the human body. Here we use personal ornaments to document changes in cultural geography during the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition. We submitted a binary matrix of 224 bead-types found at 212 European Mesolithic and 222 Early Neolithic stratigraphic units to a series of spatial and multivariate analyses. Our results reveal consistent diachronic and geographical trends in the use of personal ornaments during the Neolithisation. Adoption of novel bead-types combined with selective appropriation of old attires by incoming farmers is identified in Southern and Central Europe while cultural resistance leading to the nearly exclusive persistence of indigenous personal ornaments characterizes Northern Europe. We argue that this pattern reflects two distinct cultural trajectories with different potential for gene flow. PMID:25853888

  1. Genetic studies revealed differences between European and North American populations of Calypogeia azurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buczkowska Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Calypogeia azurea, a widespread, subboreal-montane liverwort species, is one of a few representatives of the Calypogeia genus that are characterized by the occurrence of blue oil bodies. The aim of the study was to investigate the genetic variation and population structure of C. azurea originating from different parts of its distribution range (Europe and North America. Plants of C. azurea were compared with C. peruviana, another Calypogeia species with blue oil bodies. In general, 339 gametophytes from 15 populations of C. azurea were examined. Total gene diversity (HT estimated on the basis of nine isozyme loci of C. azurea at the species level was 0.201. The mean Nei’s genetic distance between European populations was equal to 0.083, whereas the mean genetic distance between populations originating from Europe and North America was 0.413. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA showed that 69% of C. azurea genetic variation was distributed among regions (Europe and North America, 15% - among populations within regions, and 16% - within populations. Our study revealed that C. azurea showed genetic diversity within its geographic distribution. All examined samples classified as C. azurea differed in respect of isozyme patterns from C. peruviana.

  2. Chloroplast DNA polymorphism reveals little geographical structure in Castanea sativa Mill. (Fagaceae) throughout southern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, S; Taurchini, D; Villani, F; Vendramin, G G

    2000-10-01

    The distribution of haplotypic diversity of 38 European chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) populations was investigated by PCR/RFLP analysis of regions of the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes in order to shed light on the history of this heavily managed species. The rapid expansion of chestnut starting from 3000 years ago is strongly related to human activities such as agricultural practice. This demonstrates the importance of human impact, which lasted some thousands of years, on the present-day distribution of the species. No polymorphism was detected for the single mitochondrial analysed region, while a total of 11 different chloroplast (cp) haplotypes were scored. The distribution of the cpDNA haplotypes revealed low geographical structure of the genetic diversity. The value of population subdivision, as measured by GSTc, is strikingly lower than in the other species of the family Fagaceae investigated. The actual distribution of haplotypic diversity may be explained by the strong human impact on this species, particularly during the Roman civilization of the continent, and to the long period of cultivation experienced during the last thousand years.

  3. Livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among human MRSA isolates, European Union/European Economic Area countries, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinross, Pete; Petersen, Andreas; Skov, Robert; Van Hauwermeiren, Evelyn; Pantosti, Annalisa; Laurent, Frédéric; Voss, Andreas; Kluytmans, Jan; Struelens, Marc J; Heuer, Ole; Monnet, Dominique L

    2017-11-01

    Currently, surveillance of livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in humans in Europe is not systematic but mainly event-based. In September 2014, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) initiated a questionnaire to collect data on the number of LA-MRSA from human samples (one isolate per patient) from national/regional reference laboratories in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries in 2013. Identification of LA-MRSA as clonal complex (CC) 398 by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was preferred, although surrogate methods such as spa-typing were also accepted. The questionnaire was returned by 28 laboratories in 27 EU/EEA countries. Overall, LA-MRSA represented 3.9% of 13,756 typed MRSA human isolates, but it represented ≥ 10% in five countries (Belgium, Denmark, Spain, the Netherlands and Slovenia). Seven of the reference laboratories did not type MRSA isolates in 2013. To monitor the dispersion of LA-MRSA and facilitate targeted control measures, we advocate periodic systematic surveys or integrated multi-sectorial surveillance.

  4. Livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among human MRSA isolates, European Union/European Economic Area countries, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinross, Pete; Petersen, Andreas; Skov, Robert; Van Hauwermeiren, Evelyn; Pantosti, Annalisa; Laurent, Frédéric; Voss, Andreas; Kluytmans, Jan; Struelens, Marc J; Heuer, Ole; Monnet, Dominique L

    2017-01-01

    Currently, surveillance of livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in humans in Europe is not systematic but mainly event-based. In September 2014, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) initiated a questionnaire to collect data on the number of LA-MRSA from human samples (one isolate per patient) from national/regional reference laboratories in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries in 2013. Identification of LA-MRSA as clonal complex (CC) 398 by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was preferred, although surrogate methods such as spa-typing were also accepted. The questionnaire was returned by 28 laboratories in 27 EU/EEA countries. Overall, LA-MRSA represented 3.9% of 13,756 typed MRSA human isolates, but it represented ≥ 10% in five countries (Belgium, Denmark, Spain, the Netherlands and Slovenia). Seven of the reference laboratories did not type MRSA isolates in 2013. To monitor the dispersion of LA-MRSA and facilitate targeted control measures, we advocate periodic systematic surveys or integrated multi-sectorial surveillance. PMID:29113628

  5. Novel avian oropharyngeal trichomonads isolated from European turtle doves (Streptopelia turtur) and racing pigeons (Columba livia): genetic and morphometric characterisation of clonal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Herrero, M C; Garijo-Toledo, M M; Liebhart, D; Ganas, P; Martínez-Díaz, R A; Ponce-Gordo, F; Carrero-Ruiz, A; Hess, M; Gómez-Muñoz, M T

    2017-11-01

    Extensive diversity has been described within the avian oropharyngeal trichomonad complex in recent years. In this study we developed clonal cultures from four isolates selected by their different ITS1/5.8S/ITS2 (ITS) genotype and their association with gross lesions of avian trichomonosis. Isolates were obtained from an adult racing pigeon and a nestling of Eurasian eagle owl with macroscopic lesions, and from a juvenile wood pigeon and an European turtle dove without clinical signs. Multi-locus sequence typing analysis of the ITS, small subunit of ribosomal rRNA (SSUrRNA) and Fe-hydrogenase (Fe-hyd) genes together with a morphological study by optical and scanning electron microscopy was performed. No significant differences in the structures were observed with scanning electron microscopy. However, the genetic characterisation revealed novel sequence types for the SSUrRNA region and Fe-hyd gene. Two clones were identified as Trichomonas gallinae in the MLST analysis, but the clones from the racing pigeon and European turtle dove showed higher similarity with Trichomonas tenax and Trichomonas canistomae than with T. gallinae at their ITS region, respectively. SSUrRNA sequences grouped all the clones in a clade that includes T. gallinae, T. tenax and T. canistomae. Further diversity was detected within the Fe-hyd locus, with a clear separation from T. gallinae of the clones obtained from the racing pigeon and the European turtle dove. In addition, morphometric comparison by optical microscopy with clonal cultures of T. gallinae revealed significant statistical differences on axostyle projection length in the clone from the European turtle dove. Morphometric and genetic data indicate that possible new species within the Trichomonas genus were detected. Taking in consideration the diversity in Trichomonas species present in the oral cavity of birds, a proper genetic analysis is highly recommended when outbreaks occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. Comparative "-omics" in Mycoplasma pneumoniae Clinical Isolates Reveals Key Virulence Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lluch-Senar

    Full Text Available The human respiratory tract pathogen M. pneumoniae is one of the best characterized minimal bacterium. Until now, two main groups of clinical isolates of this bacterium have been described (types 1 and 2, differing in the sequence of the P1 adhesin gene. Here, we have sequenced the genomes of 23 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. Studying SNPs, non-synonymous mutations, indels and genome rearrangements of these 23 strains and 4 previously sequenced ones, has revealed new subclasses in the two main groups, some of them being associated with the country of isolation. Integrative analysis of in vitro gene essentiality and mutation rates enabled the identification of several putative virulence factors and antigenic proteins; revealing recombination machinery, glycerol metabolism and peroxide production as possible factors in the genetics and physiology of these pathogenic strains. Additionally, the transcriptomes and proteomes of two representative strains, one from each of the two main groups, have been characterized to evaluate the impact of mutations on RNA and proteins levels. This study has revealed that type 2 strains show higher expression levels of CARDS toxin, a protein recently shown to be one of the major factors of inflammation. Thus, we propose that type 2 strains could be more toxigenic than type 1 strains of M. pneumoniae.

  7. Retention of 1.2 kbp of 'novel' genomic sequence in two European field isolates and some vaccine strains of Fowlpox virus extends open reading frame fpv241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmin, Susan A; Manvell, Ruth; Gough, Richard E; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Skinner, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of variant fowlpox viruses (FWPVs) and increasing field use of recombinants against avian influenza H5N1 emphasize the need to monitor vaccines and to distinguish them from field strains. Five commercial vaccines, two laboratory viruses and two European field isolates were characterized by PCR and sequencing at 18 loci differing between attenuated FP9 and its pathogenic progenitor. PCR failed to discriminate between the viruses and sequence determination revealed no significant differences at any locus, except for a polymorphic locus encompassed by deletion 24 (9.3 kbp) in FP9. Surprisingly, 'novel' previously unreported sequence (spanning 1.2 kbp) was found in both European field isolates and three of the vaccines. It was absent from the other two vaccines, removed by a 1.2 kbp deletion identical to that surprisingly also observed in the completely sequenced genome of FPV USDA. This locus (H9) adds a potentially useful tool for discriminating between FWPV field isolates and vaccines.

  8. Experimental susceptibility of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and turbot Scophthalmus maximus to European freshwater and marine isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, J.A.; Snow, M.; Skall, Helle Frank

    2001-01-01

    pathogenicity to Atlantic salmon. Virus was detected in some mortalities, however, demonstrating viral entry and replication. European marine VHS virus isolates do not appear to pose an imminent threat to the Atlantic salmon culture industry. Turbot were found to be refractive or of low susceptibility to marine...... of turbot culture to the VHS virus isolates that are enzootic to the European marine environment.......A number of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus isolates of European marine origin were shown to be of low pathogenicity or non-pathogenic to Atlantic salmon parr by waterborne infection. A reference freshwater VHS virus isolate known to be highly pathogenic to rainbow trout was also of low...

  9. Homozygous loss-of-function variants in European cosmopolitan and isolate populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Vera B; Svinti, Victoria; Prendergast, James G; Chau, You-Ying; Campbell, Archie; Patarcic, Inga; Barroso, Inês; Joshi, Peter K; Hastie, Nicholas D; Miljkovic, Ana; Taylor, Martin S; Enroth, Stefan; Memari, Yasin; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Wright, Alan F; Gyllensten, Ulf; Durbin, Richard; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Polašek, Ozren; Johansson, Åsa; Sauer, Sascha; Porteous, David J; Fraser, Ross M; Drake, Camilla; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Semple, Colin A; Wilson, James F

    2015-10-01

    Homozygous loss of function (HLOF) variants provide a valuable window on gene function in humans, as well as an inventory of the human genes that are not essential for survival and reproduction. All humans carry at least a few HLOF variants, but the exact number of inactivated genes that can be tolerated is currently unknown—as are the phenotypic effects of losing function for most human genes. Here, we make use of 1432 whole exome sequences from five European populations to expand the catalogue of known human HLOF mutations; after stringent filtering of variants in our dataset, we identify a total of 173 HLOF mutations, 76 (44%) of which have not been observed previously. We find that population isolates are particularly well suited to surveys of novel HLOF genes because individuals in such populations carry extensive runs of homozygosity, which we show are enriched for novel, rare HLOF variants. Further, we make use of extensive phenotypic data to show that most HLOFs, ascertained in population-based samples, appear to have little detectable effect on the phenotype. On the contrary, we document several genes directly implicated in disease that seem to tolerate HLOF variants. Overall HLOF genes are enriched for olfactory receptor function and are expressed in testes more often than expected, consistent with reduced purifying selection and incipient pseudogenisation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Indo-European and Asian origins for Chilean and Pacific chickens revealed by mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Jaime; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Mobegi, Victor A; Jianlin, Han; Alcalde, Jose A; Matus, Jose T; Hanotte, Olivier; Moran, Chris; Austin, Jeremy J; Ulm, Sean; Anderson, Atholl J; Larson, Greger; Cooper, Alan

    2008-07-29

    European chickens were introduced into the American continents by the Spanish after their arrival in the 15th century. However, there is ongoing debate as to the presence of pre-Columbian chickens among Amerindians in South America, particularly in relation to Chilean breeds such as the Araucana and Passion Fowl. To understand the origin of these populations, we have generated partial mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 41 native Chilean specimens and compared them with a previously generated database of approximately 1,000 domestic chicken sequences from across the world as well as published Chilean and Polynesian ancient DNA sequences. The modern Chilean sequences cluster closely with haplotypes predominantly distributed among European, Indian subcontinental, and Southeast Asian chickens, consistent with a European genetic origin. A published, apparently pre-Columbian, Chilean specimen and six pre-European Polynesian specimens also cluster with the same European/Indian subcontinental/Southeast Asian sequences, providing no support for a Polynesian introduction of chickens to South America. In contrast, sequences from two archaeological sites on Easter Island group with an uncommon haplogroup from Indonesia, Japan, and the Philippines [corrected] and may represent a genetic signature of an early Polynesian dispersal. Modeling of the potential marine carbon contribution to the Chilean archaeological specimen casts further doubt on claims for pre-Columbian chickens, and definitive proof will require further analyses of ancient DNA sequences and radiocarbon and stable isotope data from archaeological excavations within both Chile and Polynesia.

  11. Genetic analysis of paramyxovirus isolates from Pacific salmon reveals two independently co-circulating lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batts, William N; Falk, Knut; Winton, James R

    2008-12-01

    Viruses with the morphological and biochemical characteristics of the family Paramyxoviridae (paramyxoviruses) have been isolated from adult salmon returning to rivers along the Pacific coast of North America since 1982. These Pacific salmon paramyxoviruses (PSPV), which have mainly been isolated from Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, grow slowly in established fish cell lines and have not been associated with disease. Genetic analysis of a 505-base-pair region of the polymerase gene from 47 PSPV isolates produced 17 nucleotide sequence types that could be grouped into two major sublineages, designated A and B. The two independently co-circulating sublineages differed by 12.1-13.9% at the nucleotide level but by only 1.2% at the amino acid level. Isolates of PSPV from adult Pacific salmon returning to rivers from Alaska to California over a 25-year period showed little evidence of geographic or temporal grouping. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that these paramyxoviruses of Pacific salmon were most closely related to the Atlantic salmon paramyxovirus (ASPV) from Norway, having a maximum nucleotide diversity of 26.1% and an amino acid diversity of 19.0%. When compared with homologous sequences of other paramyxoviruses, PSPV and ASPV were sufficiently distinct to suggest that they are not clearly members of any of the established genera in the family Paramyxoviridae. In the course of this study, a polymerase chain reaction assay was developed that can be used for confirmatory identification of PSPV.

  12. Genome analysis of an orange stem pitting citrus tristeza virus isolate reveals a novel recombinant genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avijit; Brlansky, R H

    2010-08-01

    An orange stem pitting citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolate CTV-B165 was found to be symptomatically similar to other known CTV-VT isolates however molecular methods failed to classify it as an identifiable CTV genotype. The sequence variation of the Indian CTV-B165 isolate was compared to the three well known CTV genotypes, T36, T30, and VT. The genome of the predominant component of CTV-B165 was 19,247 nt in length with 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and was structurally identical to the other CTV isolates. All the completely sequenced CTV isolates except the VT isolate were 2-55 nt longer than the CTV-B165. In comparison to the other fully sequenced T36, T30 and VT genotypic isolates, CTV-B165 had nucleotide identity of 72-86% in ORF1 and 92-99% in ORFs 2-11. Sequence data of independent overlapping clones from the CTV-B165 genome showed highly divergent sequences of the overlapping region of 5'-UTR and ORF1a, the inter-domain region of ORF1a and the partial regions of ORF2. Phylogenetic analysis of five domains of ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 revealed that CTV-B165 isolate distinctly segregates from the existing three genotypes in the dendrograms and was supported by high bootstrap values and robust tree topology. The PHYLPRO graphical analysis showed multiple recombination signals with significant correlation values. The precise detection of recombination sites for different genomic regions in CTV sequences was supported by several recombination-detecting methods. Collectively, the phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the observed CTV-B165 genotype variation is an outcome of inter-genotype recombination. To determine the presence of the CTV-B165 genotype a pair of genome specific primers was designed and standardized for reliable detection of the novel CTV genotype by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA Clonal Complex (CC 398 isolated from UK animals belongs to European lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenaxi Sharma

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA clonal complex (CC 398 recovered from S. aureus isolated animals in the UK. To determine possible origins of 12 LA-MRSA CC398 isolates collected after screening more than a thousand S. aureus animal isolates from the UK between 2013- 2015, , whole genome sequences (WGS of CC398 European, including UK, and non-European isolates from diverse animal hosts were compared. Phylogenetic reconstruction applied to WGS data to assess genetic relatedness of all 89 isolates, clustered the 12 UK CC398 LA-MRSA within the European sub-lineages, although on different nodes; implicating multiple independent incursions into the UK, as opposed to a single introduction followed by clonal expansion. Three UK isolates from healthy pigs and one from turkey clustered within the cassette chromosome recombinases (ccrC S. aureus protein A (spa-type t011 European sub-lineage and three UK isolates from horses within the ccrA2B2 t011 European sub-lineage. The remaining UK isolates, mostly from pigs, clustered within the t034 European lineage. Presence of virulence, antimicrobial (AMR, heavy metal (HMR, and disinfectant (DR resistance genes were determined using an in-house pipeline. Most, including UK isolates, harboured resistance genes to ≥3 antimicrobial classes in addition to β-lactams. HMR genes were detected in most European ccrC positive isolates, with >80% harbouring czrC, encoding zinc and cadmium resistance; in contrast ~60% ccrC isolates within non-European lineages and 6% ccrA2B2 isolates showed this characteristic. The UK turkey MRSA isolate did not harbour φAVβ avian prophage genes (SAAV_2008 and SAAV_2009 present in US MSSA isolates from turkey and pigs. Absence of some of the major human-associated MRSA toxigenic and virulence genes in the UK LA-MRSA animal isolates was not unexpected. Therefore, we can conclude that the

  14. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) Clonal Complex (CC) 398 Isolated from UK Animals belong to European Lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenaxi; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Kearns, Angela M.; Doumith, Michel; Butaye, Patrick R.; Argudín, M. Angeles; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Pichon, Bruno; AbuOun, Manal; Rogers, Jon; Ellis, Richard J.; Teale, Christopher; Anjum, Muna F.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 recovered from S. aureus isolated animals in the UK. To determine possible origins of 12 LA-MRSA CC398 isolates collected after screening more than a thousand S. aureus animal isolates from the UK between 2013 and 2015, whole genome sequences (WGS) of CC398 European, including UK, and non-European isolates from diverse animal hosts were compared. Phylogenetic reconstruction applied to WGS data to assess genetic relatedness of all 89 isolates, clustered the 12 UK CC398 LA-MRSA within the European sub-lineages, although on different nodes; implicating multiple independent incursions into the UK, as opposed to a single introduction followed by clonal expansion. Three UK isolates from healthy pigs and one from turkey clustered within the cassette chromosome recombinases ccr C S. aureus protein A (spa)-type t011 European sub-lineage and three UK isolates from horses within the ccrA2B2 t011 European sub-lineage. The remaining UK isolates, mostly from pigs, clustered within the t034 European lineage. Presence of virulence, antimicrobial (AMR), heavy metal (HMR), and disinfectant (DR) resistance genes were determined using an in-house pipeline. Most, including UK isolates, harbored resistance genes to ≥3 antimicrobial classes in addition to β-lactams. HMR genes were detected in most European ccrC positive isolates, with >80% harboring czrC, encoding zinc and cadmium resistance; in contrast ~60% ccrC isolates within non-European lineages and 6% ccrA2B2 isolates showed this characteristic. The UK turkey MRSA isolate did not harbor φAVβ avian prophage genes (SAAV_2008 and SAAV_2009) present in US MSSA isolates from turkey and pigs. Absence of some of the major human-associated MRSA toxigenic and virulence genes in the UK LA-MRSA animal isolates was not unexpected. Therefore, we can conclude that the 12 UK LA

  15. Acute Isolated Paraplegia Revealing an Ewing Sarcoma of the Thoracic Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuriat, Pierre-Aurélien; Melloul, Sarah; Galmiche, Louise; Cristofori, Irene; Zerah, Michel; Beccaria, Kevin

    2017-11-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) infrequently affects the spine. Diagnosis is usually made several weeks following growing symptoms. In this report, we present the case of a child with ES localized at the upper thoracic level. ES was revealed by isolated acute complete paraplegia mimicking medullary stroke. The girl was operated for decompressive laminectomy and tumor removal. Afterwards, she received adjuvant therapy. Subsequently, the child showed a slow improvement of her leg sensitivity associated with a partial motor recovery. ES can affect the mobile spine. Acute symptomatology due to intratumoral hemorrhage and sudden spinal cord compression may suggest the diagnosis. Neurological outcomes following ES are generally poor.

  16. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Carter T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum to an isolated island ecosystem with naïve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai and KV115 (Hawaii that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion Avian malaria (P. relictum and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian

  17. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum) to an isolated island ecosystem with nai??ve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein) gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods: A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai) and KV115 (Hawaii) that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results: RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion: Avian malaria (P. relictum) and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian avifauna. This

  18. Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Høiby, Niels; Friis, H M

    1995-01-01

    in the other countries. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent wound isolate in Denmark, while Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli dominated in other European countries. Thus, in Denmark Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. (from...... ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more...

  19. Phytoliths in pottery reveal the use of spice in European prehistoric cuisine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Saul

    Full Text Available Here we present evidence of phytoliths preserved in carbonised food deposits on prehistoric pottery from the western Baltic dating from 6,100 cal BP to 5750 cal BP. Based on comparisons to over 120 European and Asian species, our observations are consistent with phytolith morphologies observed in modern garlic mustard seed (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb Cavara & Grande. As this seed has a strong flavour, little nutritional value, and the phytoliths are found in pots along with terrestrial and marine animal residues, these findings are the first direct evidence for the spicing of food in European prehistoric cuisine. Our evidence suggests a much greater antiquity to the spicing of foods than is evident from the macrofossil record, and challenges the view that plants were exploited by hunter-gatherers and early agriculturalists solely for energy requirements, rather than taste.

  20. Phytoliths in pottery reveal the use of spice in European prehistoric cuisine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Hayley; Madella, Marco; Fischer, Anders; Glykou, Aikaterini; Hartz, Sönke; Craig, Oliver E

    2013-01-01

    Here we present evidence of phytoliths preserved in carbonised food deposits on prehistoric pottery from the western Baltic dating from 6,100 cal BP to 5750 cal BP. Based on comparisons to over 120 European and Asian species, our observations are consistent with phytolith morphologies observed in modern garlic mustard seed (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb) Cavara & Grande). As this seed has a strong flavour, little nutritional value, and the phytoliths are found in pots along with terrestrial and marine animal residues, these findings are the first direct evidence for the spicing of food in European prehistoric cuisine. Our evidence suggests a much greater antiquity to the spicing of foods than is evident from the macrofossil record, and challenges the view that plants were exploited by hunter-gatherers and early agriculturalists solely for energy requirements, rather than taste.

  1. Knowledge and Attitudes of European Kosher Consumers as Revealed through Focus Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bergeaud-Blackler, Florence; Zivotofsky, Ari Z.; Miele, Mara

    2013-01-01

    International audience; There is a very small, yet important minority within the community of European Union kosher consumers. There is a great deal of research regarding objective aspects of the kosher religious as well as civil laws and their implementation, but comparatively little research about the subjective attitudes, opinions, and concerns of those who actually purchase and consume kosher food. Such information can be important for a variety of interested parties including suppliers, ...

  2. The genotypes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China revealed by sequence analysis of multiple molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Pan, Song; Wang, Guo-Ping; Tang, Min; Liu, Yong; Yang, Fan; Hong, Ni

    2013-01-01

    The genotypes of ten citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from central China were determined by examining multiple molecular markers (MMMs) using 11 primer pairs. The results revealed that one isolate contained a single T30 genotype, two isolates contained a single VT genotype, and the other seven isolates were mixtures of two or more genotypes. Sequence analysis of amplified MMMs showed a high genetic diversity in Chinese CTV populations. The genotypes resembling T36, RB and B165 were identified from Chinese CTV isolates for the first time. Our results suggest that genotype assignment of CTV cannot be based solely on the amplification profiles of MMMs, and sequencing of MMMs is required.

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Lactococcus garvieae Strains Isolated from Different Sources Reveals Candidate Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Miyauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus garvieae is a major pathogen for fish. Two complete (ATCC 49156 and Lg2 and three draft (UNIUD074, 8831, and 21881 genome sequences of L. garvieae have recently been released. We here present the results of a comparative genomic analysis of these fish and human isolates of L. garvieae. The pangenome comprised 1,542 core and 1,378 dispensable genes. The sequenced L. garvieae strains shared most of the possible virulence genes, but the capsule gene cluster was found only in fish-pathogenic strain Lg2. The absence of the capsule gene cluster in other nonpathogenic strains isolated from mastitis and vegetable was also confirmed by PCR. The fish and human isolates of L. garvieae contained the specific two and four adhesin genes, respectively, indicating that these adhesion proteins may be involved in the host specificity differences of L. garvieae. The discoveries revealed by the pangenomic analysis may provide significant insights into the biology of L. garvieae.

  4. Phylogenomics of Brazilian epidemic isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii reveals relationships of global outbreak strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M.; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB) species are emerging pathogens that cause various diseases including skin and respiratory infections. The species has undergone recent taxonomic nomenclature refinement, and is currently recognized as two subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (MAB-A) and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii (MAB-B). The recently reported outbreaks of MAB-B in surgical patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2009 and in cystic fibrosis patients in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2006 to 2012 underscore the need to investigate the genetic diversity of clinical MAB strains. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of two Brazilian MAB-B epidemic isolates (CRM-0019 and CRM-0020) derived from an outbreak of skin infections in Rio de Janeiro, two unrelated MAB strains from patients with pulmonary infections in the United States (US) (NJH8 and NJH11) and one type MAB-B strain (CCUG 48898) and compared them to 25 publically available genomes of globally diverse MAB strains. Genome-wide analyses of 27,598 core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed that the two Brazilian derived CRM strains are nearly indistinguishable from one another and are more closely related to UK outbreak isolates infecting CF patients than to strains from the US, Malaysia or France. Comparative genomic analyses of six closely related outbreak strains revealed geographic-specific large-scale insertion/deletion variation that corresponds to bacteriophage insertions and recombination hotspots. Our study integrates new genome sequence data with existing genomic information to explore the global diversity of infectious M. abscessus isolates and to compare clinically relevant outbreak strains from different continents. PMID:24055961

  5. ABrucellaspp. Isolate from a Pac-Man Frog (Ceratophrys ornata) Reveals Characteristics Departing from Classical Brucellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Lloréns, Pedro F; Quance, Chris R; Lawhon, Sara D; Stuber, Tod P; Edwards, John F; Ficht, Thomas A; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; O'Callaghan, David; Keriel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Brucella are highly infectious bacterial pathogens responsible for brucellosis, a frequent worldwide zoonosis. The Brucella genus has recently expanded from 6 to 11 species, all of which were associated with mammals; The natural host range recently expanded to amphibians after some reports of atypical strains from frogs. Here we describe the first in depth phenotypic and genetic characterization of a Brucella strains isolated from a frog. Strain B13-0095 was isolated from a Pac-Man frog ( Ceratophyrus ornate ) at a veterinary hospital in Texas and was initially misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi . We found that B13-0095 belongs to a group of early-diverging brucellae that includes Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and the B. inopinata -like strain BO2, with traits that depart significantly from those of the "classical" Brucella spp. Analysis of B13-0095 genome sequence revealed several specific features that suggest that this isolate represents an intermediate between a soil associated ancestor and the host adapted "classical" species. Like strain BO2, B13-0095 does not possess the genes required to produce the perosamine based LPS found in classical Brucella , but has a set of genes that could encode a rhamnose based O-antigen. Despite this, B13-0095 has a very fast intracellular replication rate in both epithelial cells and macrophages. Finally, another major finding in this study is the bacterial motility observed for strains B13-0095, BO1, and BO2, which is remarkable for this bacterial genus. This study thus highlights several novel characteristics in strains belonging to an emerging group within the Brucella genus. Accurate identification tools for such atypical Brucella isolates and careful evaluation of their zoonotic potential, are urgently required.

  6. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora infestans populations in the Nordic European countries reveals high genetic variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brurberg, May Bente; Elameen, Abdelhameed; Le, Ving Hong

    2011-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). The pathogen is highly adaptable and to get an overview of the genetic variation in the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden we have analyzed 200 isolates from...

  7. SEISMIC ISOLATION OF LEAD-COOLED REACTORS: THE EUROPEAN PROJECT SILER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASSIMO FORNI

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the main activities and results obtained so far, paying particular attention to the development of seismic isolators, and the interface components which must be installed between the isolated reactor building and the non-isolated parts of the plant, such as the pipe expansion joints and the joint-cover of the seismic gap.

  8. Millennial-scale faunal record reveals differential resilience of European large mammals to human impacts across the Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crees, Jennifer J; Carbone, Chris; Sommer, Robert S; Benecke, Norbert; Turvey, Samuel T

    2016-03-30

    The use of short-term indicators for understanding patterns and processes of biodiversity loss can mask longer-term faunal responses to human pressures. We use an extensive database of approximately 18,700 mammalian zooarchaeological records for the last 11,700 years across Europe to reconstruct spatio-temporal dynamics of Holocene range change for 15 large-bodied mammal species. European mammals experienced protracted, non-congruent range losses, with significant declines starting in some species approximately 3000 years ago and continuing to the present, and with the timing, duration and magnitude of declines varying individually between species. Some European mammals became globally extinct during the Holocene, whereas others experienced limited or no significant range change. These findings demonstrate the relatively early onset of prehistoric human impacts on postglacial biodiversity, and mirror species-specific patterns of mammalian extinction during the Late Pleistocene. Herbivores experienced significantly greater declines than carnivores, revealing an important historical extinction filter that informs our understanding of relative resilience and vulnerability to human pressures for different taxa. We highlight the importance of large-scale, long-term datasets for understanding complex protracted extinction processes, although the dynamic pattern of progressive faunal depletion of European mammal assemblages across the Holocene challenges easy identification of 'static' past baselines to inform current-day environmental management and restoration. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Antimicrobial activity of LFF571 and three treatment agents against Clostridium difficile isolates collected for a pan-European survey in 2008: clinical and therapeutic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, S.B.; Bauer, M.P.; Sanders, I.M.; Wilcox, M.H.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In November 2008, a study was performed with support from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) to obtain an overview of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) in European hospitals. A collection of 398 C. difficile isolates obtained from this hospital-based

  10. Exome Sequencing Reveals Mutations in AIRE as a Cause of Isolated Hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Chan, Alice; Lwin, Wint; Tian, Lifeng; Pellegrino da Silva, Renata; Kim, Cecilia E; Anderson, Mark S; Hakonarson, Hakon; Levine, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    Most cases of autosomal recessive hypoparathyroidism (HYPO) are caused by loss-of-function mutations in GCM2 or PTH. The objective of this study was to identify the underlying genetic basis for isolated HYPO in a kindred in which 3 of 10 siblings were affected. We studied the parents and the three adult affected subjects, each of whom was diagnosed with HYPO in the first decade of life. We collected clinical and biochemical data and performed whole exome sequencing analysis on DNA from the three affected subjects after negative genetic testing for known causes of HYPO. Whole exome sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing revealed that all three affected subjects were compound heterozygous for two previously reported mutations, c.967_979delCTGTCCCCTCCGC:p.(L323SfsX51) and c.995+(3_5)delGAGinsTAT, in AIRE, which encodes the autoimmune regulator protein that is defective in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1). Each parent carries one mutation, and all of the children of the patients are either heterozygous for one mutation or wild type. The affected sister developed premature ovarian failure, but the two affected brothers have no other features of APS-1 despite elevated serum levels of anti-interferon-α antibodies. Our findings indicate that biallelic mutations in AIRE can cause isolated HYPO as well as syndromic APS-1. The presence of antibodies to interferon-α provides a highly sensitive indicator for loss of AIRE function and represents a useful marker for isolated HYPO due to AIRE mutations.

  11. High risk population isolate reveals low frequency variants predisposing to intracranial aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja I Kurki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3% of the population develops saccular intracranial aneurysms (sIAs, a complex trait, with a sporadic and a familial form. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from sIA (sIA-SAH is a devastating form of stroke. Certain rare genetic variants are enriched in the Finns, a population isolate with a small founder population and bottleneck events. As the sIA-SAH incidence in Finland is >2× increased, such variants may associate with sIA in the Finnish population. We tested 9.4 million variants for association in 760 Finnish sIA patients (enriched for familial sIA, and in 2,513 matched controls with case-control status and with the number of sIAs. The most promising loci (p<5E-6 were replicated in 858 Finnish sIA patients and 4,048 controls. The frequencies and effect sizes of the replicated variants were compared to a continental European population using 717 Dutch cases and 3,004 controls. We discovered four new high-risk loci with low frequency lead variants. Three were associated with the case-control status: 2q23.3 (MAF 2.1%, OR 1.89, p 1.42×10-9; 5q31.3 (MAF 2.7%, OR 1.66, p 3.17×10-8; 6q24.2 (MAF 2.6%, OR 1.87, p 1.87×10-11 and one with the number of sIAs: 7p22.1 (MAF 3.3%, RR 1.59, p 6.08×-9. Two of the associations (5q31.3, 6q24.2 replicated in the Dutch sample. The 7p22.1 locus was strongly differentiated; the lead variant was more frequent in Finland (4.6% than in the Netherlands (0.3%. Additionally, we replicated a previously inconclusive locus on 2q33.1 in all samples tested (OR 1.27, p 1.87×10-12. The five loci explain 2.1% of the sIA heritability in Finland, and may relate to, but not explain, the increased incidence of sIA-SAH in Finland. This study illustrates the utility of population isolates, familial enrichment, dense genotype imputation and alternate phenotyping in search for variants associated with complex diseases.

  12. Opening the Big Black Box: European study reveals visitors' impressions of science laboratories

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "On 29 - 30 March the findings of 'Inside the Big Black Box'- a Europe-wide science and society project - will be revealed during a two-day seminar hosted by CERN*. The principle aim of Inside the Big Black Box (IN3B) is to determine whether a working scientific laboratory can capture the curiosity of the general public through visits" (1 page)

  13. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stärk Katharina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin – II" (ARBAO-II was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146 for the period 2003–2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories in European countries based on validated and harmonised methodologies. Available summary data of the susceptibility testing of the bacterial pathogens from the different laboratories were collected. Method Antimicrobial susceptibility data for several bovine pathogens were obtained over a three year period (2002–2004. Each year the participating laboratories were requested to fill in excel-file templates with national summary data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance from different bacterial species. A proficiency test (EQAS – external quality assurance system for antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted each year to test the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the participating laboratories. The data from this testing demonstrated that for the species included in the EQAS the results are comparable between countries. Results Data from 25,241 isolates were collected from 13 European countries. For Staphylococcus aureus from bovine mastitis major differences were apparent in the occurrence of resistance between countries and between the different antimicrobial agents tested. The highest frequency of resistance was observed for penicillin. For Mannheimia haemolytica resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphonamide were observed in France, the Netherlands and Portugal. All isolates of Pasteurella multocida isolated in Finland and most of those from Denmark, England (and Wales, Italy and Sweden were susceptible to the majority of the antimicrobials. Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus uberis isolates from Sweden were fully susceptible. For the other countries some resistance was observed to

  14. Historical and contemporary DNA indicate fisher decline and isolation occurred prior to the European settlement of California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody M Tucker

    Full Text Available Establishing if species contractions were the result of natural phenomena or human induced landscape changes is essential for managing natural populations. Fishers (Martes pennanti in California occur in two geographically and genetically isolated populations in the northwestern mountains and southern Sierra Nevada. Their isolation is hypothesized to have resulted from a decline in abundance and distribution associated with European settlement in the 1800s. However, there is little evidence to establish that fisher occupied the area between the two extant populations at that time. We analyzed 10 microsatellite loci from 275 contemporary and 21 historical fisher samples (1880-1920 to evaluate the demographic history of fisher in California. We did not find any evidence of a recent (post-European bottleneck in the northwestern population. In the southern Sierra Nevada, genetic subdivision within the population strongly influenced bottleneck tests. After accounting for genetic subdivision, we found a bottleneck signal only in the northern and central portions of the southern Sierra Nevada, indicating that the southernmost tip of these mountains may have acted as a refugium for fisher during the anthropogenic changes of the late 19(th and early 20(th centuries. Using a coalescent-based Bayesian analysis, we detected a 90% decline in effective population size and dated the time of decline to over a thousand years ago. We hypothesize that fisher distribution in California contracted to the two current population areas pre-European settlement, and that portions of the southern Sierra Nevada subsequently experienced another more recent bottleneck post-European settlement.

  15. Harmonised monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter isolates from food animals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Many Member States of the European Union (EU) currently monitor antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic agents, including Salmonella and Campylobacter. According to Directive 2003/99/EC, Member States shall ensure that the monitoring provides comparable data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance. The European Commission asked the European Food Safety Authority to prepare detailed specifications for harmonised schemes for monitoring antimicrobial resistance. The objective of these specifications is to lay down provisions for a monitoring and reporting scheme for Salmonella in fowl (Gallus gallus), turkeys and pigs, and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in broiler chickens. The current specifications are considered to be a first step towards a gradual implementation of comprehensive antimicrobial resistance monitoring at the EU level. These specifications propose to test a common set of antimicrobial agents against available cut-off values and a specified concentration range to determine the susceptibility of Salmonella and Campylobacter. Using isolates collected through programmes in which the sampling frame covers all epidemiological units of the national production, the target number of Salmonella isolates to be included in the antimicrobial resistance monitoring per Member State per year is 170 for each study population (i.e., laying hens, broilers, turkeys and slaughter pigs). The target number of Campylobacter isolates to be included in the antimicrobial resistance monitoring per Member State per year is 170 for each study population (i.e., broilers). The results of the antimicrobial resistance monitoring are assessed and reported in the yearly national report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and antimicrobial resistance.

  16. Temporal genetic variation as revealed by a microsatellite analysis of European sardine ( Sardina pilchardus) archived samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Splendiani, Andrea; Bonanomi, Sara

    2012-01-01

    ) that explain the genetic diversity variation, while the same parameters turned out to be more stable in the southern samples. In addition, we detected the presence of a genetic bottleneck and low effective population size ( Ne) values in several northern samples. Even if the northern and southern Adriatic...... of otoliths and scales from sampling locations of northern (Chioggia) and southern (Vieste) Adriatic Sea, with the aim to investigate the genetic effects of these stock biomass fluctuations. The northern samples showed significant reduction in observed heterozygosity ( HO) and mean number of alleles ( Na...... sardine samples belong to the same genetic stock, the more pronounced decrease in genetic variability recorded in the northern sample led us to speculate that a more intensive fishing pressure and a more pronounced oceanographic isolation of this area could have accentuated the effects of the genetic...

  17. Biomass traits and candidate genes for bioenergy revealed through association genetics in coppiced European Populus nigra (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwright, Mike Robert; Payne, Adrienne; Emiliani, Giovanni; Milner, Suzanne; Viger, Maud; Rouse, Franchesca; Keurentjes, Joost J B; Bérard, Aurélie; Wildhagen, Henning; Faivre-Rampant, Patricia; Polle, Andrea; Morgante, Michele; Taylor, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Second generation (2G) bioenergy from lignocellulosic feedstocks has the potential to develop as a sustainable source of renewable energy; however, significant hurdles still remain for large-scale commercialisation. Populus is considered as a promising 2G feedstock and understanding the genetic basis of biomass yield and feedstock quality are a research priority in this model tree species. We report the first coppiced biomass study for 714 members of a wide population of European black poplar (Populus nigra L.), a native European tree, selected from 20 river populations ranging in latitude and longitude between 40.5 and 52.1°N and 1.0 and 16.4°E, respectively. When grown at a single site in southern UK, significant Site of Origin (SO) effects were seen for 14 of the 15 directly measured or derived traits including biomass yield, leaf area and stomatal index. There was significant correlation (p < 0.001) between biomass yield traits over 3 years of harvest which identified leaf size and cell production as strong predictors of biomass yield. A 12 K Illumina genotyping array (constructed from 10,331 SNPs in 14 QTL regions and 4648 genes) highlighted significant population genetic structure with pairwise FST showing strong differentiation (p < 0.001) between the Spanish and Italian subpopulations. Robust associations reaching genome-wide significance are reported for main stem height and cell number per leaf; two traits tightly linked to biomass yield. These genotyping and phenotypic data were also used to show the presence of significant isolation by distance (IBD) and isolation by adaption (IBA) within this population. The three associations identified reaching genome-wide significance at p < 0.05 include a transcription factor; a putative stress response gene and a gene of unknown function. None of them have been previously linked to bioenergy yield; were shown to be differentially expressed in a panel of three selected genotypes from the collection and

  18. Transfer Analysis of Provenance Trials Reveals Macroclimatic Adaptedness of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RASZTOVITS, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse provenance tests of beech situated close to theSoutheastern-continental limits of the species, in order to develop a response model of adaptation andplasticity of populations on evolutionary-ecological basis, following sudden climatic changes as aresult of transplanting. Modelling of juvenile height was performed with the help of ecodistancevariables. The concept of transfer analysis and ecodistance is based on the hypothesis that phenotypicresponse to macroclimatic changes depends on the inherited adaptive potential of the population andon the magnitude and direction of experienced environmental change. In common garden experiments,the transfer to the planting site is interpreted as simulation of environmental change. The applicationof ecodistance of transfer for evaluating common garden experiments provides much neededquantitative information about response of tree populations to predicted climatic changes.The analysis of three field experiments of European beech in SE Europe invalidate earlier doubtsabout the existence of macroclimatic adaptation patterns in juvenile growth and justify restrictions ofuse of reproductive material on the basis of evolutionary ecology. The presented model illustrates thatresponse to climatic change is regionally divergent, depending on testing conditions and on hereditarytraits. In particular, climatic warming in the central-northern part of the range may lead to productionincrease. However, under the stressful and uncertain conditions at the lower (xeric limit of thespecies, growth depression and vitality loss are predicted. The deviating behaviour of higher elevationprovenances support their separate treatment.The results may be utilised in climate change adaptation and mitigation policy in forestry andnature conservation, to revise rules for use of reproductive material and also for validatingevolutionary and ecological hypotheses related to climate change effects.

  19. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002–2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Mevius, Dik J; Schroeter, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    (2002-2004). Each year the participating laboratories were requested to fill in excelfile templates with national summary data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance from different bacterial species. A proficiency test (EQAS - external quality assurance system) for antimicrobial susceptibility...... to the other bacterial species investigated. Conclusion: In general, isolates from Denmark, England (and Wales), the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland showed low frequencies of resistance, whereas many isolates from Belgium, France, Italy, Latvia and Spain were resistant to most antimicrobials tested......Background: The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin - II" (ARBAO-II) was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146) for the period 2003 - 2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories...

  20. European multicenter study on antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from companion animal urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, Cátia; Gama, Luís Telo; Belas, Adriana; Bergström, Karin; Beurlet, Stéphanie; Briend-Marchal, Alexandra; Broens, Els M; Costa, Marta; Criel, Delphine; Damborg, Peter; van Dijk, Marloes A M; van Dongen, A.M.; Dorsch, Roswitha; Espada, Carmen Martin; Gerber, Bernhard; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, Maria; Loncaric, Igor; Mion, Domenico; Misic, Dusan; Movilla, Rebeca; Overesch, Gudrun; Perreten, Vincent; Roura, Xavier; Steenbergen, Joachim; Timofte, Dorina; Wolf, Georg; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Schmitt, Sarah; Guardabassi, Luca; Pomba, Constança

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing concern regarding the increase of antimicrobial resistant bacteria in companion animals. Yet, there are no studies comparing the resistance levels of these organisms in European countries. The aim of this study was to investigate geographical and temporal trends of

  1. Diagnostic issues and capabilities in 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries: data from EuroNHID surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiberville Simon-Djamel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly infectious diseases (HIDs are defined as being transmissible from person to person, causing life-threatening illnesses and presenting a serious public health hazard. The sampling, handling and transport of specimens from patients with HIDs present specific bio-safety concerns. Findings The European Network for HID project aimed to record, in a cross-sectional study, the infection control capabilities of referral centers for HIDs across Europe and assesses the level of achievement to previously published guidelines. In this paper, we report the current diagnostic capabilities and bio-safety measures applied to diagnostic procedures in these referral centers. Overall, 48 isolation facilities in 16 European countries were evaluated. Although 81% of these referral centers are located near a biosafety level 3 laboratory, 11% and 31% of them still performed their microbiological and routine diagnostic analyses, respectively, without bio-safety measures. Conclusions The discrepancies among the referral centers surveyed between the level of practices and the European Network of Infectious Diseases (EUNID recommendations have multiple reasons of which the interest of the individuals in charge and the investment they put in preparedness to emerging outbreaks. Despite the fact that the less prepared centers can improve by just updating their practice and policies any support to help them to achieve an acceptable level of biosecurity is welcome.

  2. Genomic Comparison of Indigenous African and Northern European Chickens Reveals Putative Mechanisms of Stress Tolerance Related to Environmental Selection Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Damarius S; Weigend, Steffen; Simianer, Henner; Weigend, Annett; Rothschild, Max; Schmidt, Carl; Ashwell, Chris; Persia, Mike; Reecy, James; Lamont, Susan J

    2017-05-05

    Global climate change is increasing the magnitude of environmental stressors, such as temperature, pathogens, and drought, that limit the survivability and sustainability of livestock production. Poultry production and its expansion is dependent upon robust animals that are able to cope with stressors in multiple environments. Understanding the genetic strategies that indigenous, noncommercial breeds have evolved to survive in their environment could help to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying biological traits of environmental adaptation. We examined poultry from diverse breeds and climates of Africa and Northern Europe for selection signatures that have allowed them to adapt to their indigenous environments. Selection signatures were studied using a combination of population genomic methods that employed FST , integrated haplotype score (iHS), and runs of homozygosity (ROH) procedures. All the analyses indicated differences in environment as a driver of selective pressure in both groups of populations. The analyses revealed unique differences in the genomic regions under selection pressure from the environment for each population. The African chickens showed stronger selection toward stress signaling and angiogenesis, while the Northern European chickens showed more selection pressure toward processes related to energy homeostasis. The results suggest that chromosomes 2 and 27 are the most diverged between populations and the most selected upon within the African (chromosome 27) and Northern European (chromosome 2) birds. Examination of the divergent populations has provided new insight into genes under possible selection related to tolerance of a population's indigenous environment that may be baselines for examining the genomic contribution to tolerance adaptions. Copyright © 2017 Fleming et al.

  3. Genomic Comparison of Indigenous African and Northern European Chickens Reveals Putative Mechanisms of Stress Tolerance Related to Environmental Selection Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damarius S. Fleming

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is increasing the magnitude of environmental stressors, such as temperature, pathogens, and drought, that limit the survivability and sustainability of livestock production. Poultry production and its expansion is dependent upon robust animals that are able to cope with stressors in multiple environments. Understanding the genetic strategies that indigenous, noncommercial breeds have evolved to survive in their environment could help to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying biological traits of environmental adaptation. We examined poultry from diverse breeds and climates of Africa and Northern Europe for selection signatures that have allowed them to adapt to their indigenous environments. Selection signatures were studied using a combination of population genomic methods that employed FST, integrated haplotype score (iHS, and runs of homozygosity (ROH procedures. All the analyses indicated differences in environment as a driver of selective pressure in both groups of populations. The analyses revealed unique differences in the genomic regions under selection pressure from the environment for each population. The African chickens showed stronger selection toward stress signaling and angiogenesis, while the Northern European chickens showed more selection pressure toward processes related to energy homeostasis. The results suggest that chromosomes 2 and 27 are the most diverged between populations and the most selected upon within the African (chromosome 27 and Northern European (chromosome 2 birds. Examination of the divergent populations has provided new insight into genes under possible selection related to tolerance of a population’s indigenous environment that may be baselines for examining the genomic contribution to tolerance adaptions.

  4. The impact of Last Glacial climate variability in west-European loess revealed by radiocarbon dating of fossil earthworm granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, Olivier; Antoine, Pierre; Hatté, Christine; Landais, Amaëlle; Mathieu, Jérôme; Prud'homme, Charlotte; Rousseau, Denis-Didier

    2017-06-13

    The characterization of Last Glacial millennial-timescale warming phases, known as interstadials or Dansgaard-Oeschger events, requires precise chronologies for the study of paleoclimate records. On the European continent, such chronologies are only available for several Last Glacial pollen and rare speleothem archives principally located in the Mediterranean domain. Farther north, in continental lowlands, numerous high-resolution records of loess and paleosols sequences show a consistent environmental response to stadial-interstadial cycles. However, the limited precision and accuracy of luminescence dating methods commonly used in loess deposits preclude exact correlations of paleosol horizons with Greenland interstadials. To overcome this problem, a radiocarbon dating protocol has been developed to date earthworm calcite granules from the reference loess sequence of Nussloch (Germany). Its application yields a consistent radiocarbon chronology of all soil horizons formed between 47 and 20 ka and unambiguously shows the correlation of every Greenland interstadial identified in isotope records with specific soil horizons. Furthermore, eight additional minor soil horizons dated between 27.5 and 21 ka only correlate with minor decreases in Greenland dust records. This dating strategy reveals the high sensitivity of loess paleoenvironments to Northern Hemisphere climate changes. A connection between loess sedimentation rate, Fennoscandian ice sheet dynamics, and sea level changes is proposed. The chronological improvements enabled by the radiocarbon "earthworm clock" thus strongly enhance our understanding of loess records to a better perception of the impact of Last Glacial climate changes on European paleoenvironments.

  5. The impact of Last Glacial climate variability in west-European loess revealed by radiocarbon dating of fossil earthworm granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, Olivier; Antoine, Pierre; Hatté, Christine; Landais, Amaëlle; Mathieu, Jérôme; Prud'homme, Charlotte; Rousseau, Denis-Didier

    2017-06-01

    The characterization of Last Glacial millennial-timescale warming phases, known as interstadials or Dansgaard-Oeschger events, requires precise chronologies for the study of paleoclimate records. On the European continent, such chronologies are only available for several Last Glacial pollen and rare speleothem archives principally located in the Mediterranean domain. Farther north, in continental lowlands, numerous high-resolution records of loess and paleosols sequences show a consistent environmental response to stadial-interstadial cycles. However, the limited precision and accuracy of luminescence dating methods commonly used in loess deposits preclude exact correlations of paleosol horizons with Greenland interstadials. To overcome this problem, a radiocarbon dating protocol has been developed to date earthworm calcite granules from the reference loess sequence of Nussloch (Germany). Its application yields a consistent radiocarbon chronology of all soil horizons formed between 47 and 20 ka and unambiguously shows the correlation of every Greenland interstadial identified in isotope records with specific soil horizons. Furthermore, eight additional minor soil horizons dated between 27.5 and 21 ka only correlate with minor decreases in Greenland dust records. This dating strategy reveals the high sensitivity of loess paleoenvironments to Northern Hemisphere climate changes. A connection between loess sedimentation rate, Fennoscandian ice sheet dynamics, and sea level changes is proposed. The chronological improvements enabled by the radiocarbon “earthworm clock” thus strongly enhance our understanding of loess records to a better perception of the impact of Last Glacial climate changes on European paleoenvironments.

  6. Genomic view of bipolar disorder revealed by whole genome sequencing in a genetic isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Georgi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders.

  7. Historical Y. pestis Genomes Reveal the European Black Death as the Source of Ancient and Modern Plague Pandemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Maria A; Tukhbatova, Rezeda I; Feldman, Michal; Drath, Joanna; Kacki, Sacha; Beltrán de Heredia, Julia; Arnold, Susanne; Sitdikov, Airat G; Castex, Dominique; Wahl, Joachim; Gazimzyanov, Ilgizar R; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Herbig, Alexander; Bos, Kirsten I; Krause, Johannes

    2016-06-08

    Ancient DNA analysis has revealed an involvement of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis in several historical pandemics, including the second plague pandemic (Europe, mid-14(th) century Black Death until the mid-18(th) century AD). Here we present reconstructed Y. pestis genomes from plague victims of the Black Death and two subsequent historical outbreaks spanning Europe and its vicinity, namely Barcelona, Spain (1300-1420 cal AD), Bolgar City, Russia (1362-1400 AD), and Ellwangen, Germany (1485-1627 cal AD). Our results provide support for (1) a single entry of Y. pestis in Europe during the Black Death, (2) a wave of plague that traveled toward Asia to later become the source population for contemporary worldwide epidemics, and (3) the presence of an historical European plague focus involved in post-Black Death outbreaks that is now likely extinct. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii revealed highly diverse genotypes for isolates from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Ana Carolina Aguiar Vasconcelos; Andrade, Gláucia Manzan; Costa, Júlia Gatti Ladeia; Pinheiro, Breno Veloso; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Ferreira, Adriana Melo; Su, Chunlei; Januário, José Nélio; Vitor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from animals in Brazil have revealed high genetic diversity. Many of these isolates are virulent to mice. It is speculated that these isolates may also be virulent to humans. However, there is very limited data regarding T. gondii strains from human infection. Therefore, it is not clear whether there is any association between parasite genotypes and disease phenotypes. In this study, a total of 27 T. gondii strains were isolated from humans with congenital toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The genetic variability was assessed by restricted fragment length polymorphism in 11 loci (SAG1, 5' plus 3' SAG2, alternative [alt.] SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico). Genetic analysis of 24 strains revealed 14 different genotypes, including 7 previously identified from animals and 7 new types. The widespread genotype BrII accounted for 29% (7/24) of the isolates and was the dominant genotype involved in this study. This is the first report of genotyping of T. gondii isolates obtained from blood samples from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis. Genotypic characterization of these isolates suggests high genetic diversity of T. gondii in this human population in Brazil. Future studies are needed to determine the source of contamination of this human population.

  9. Mitogenomes reveal diversity of the European Lyme borreliosis vector Ixodes ricinus in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Giovanna; Kitchen, Andrew; Kim, Hie Lim; Ratan, Aakrosh; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; McGraw, John J; Kazimirova, Maria; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Schuster, Stephan C

    2016-08-01

    In Europe, the Ixodes ricinus tick is the most important vector of the etiological agents of Lyme borreliosis and several other emerging tick-borne diseases. Because tick-borne pathogens are dependent on their vectors for transmission, understanding the vector population structure is crucial to inform public health research of pathogen dynamics and spread. However, the population structure and dynamics of this important vector species are not well understood as most genetic studies utilize short mitochondrial and nuclear sequences with little diversity. Herein we obtained and analyzed complete mitochondrial genome (hereafter "mitogenome") sequences to better understand the genetic diversity and the population structure of I. ricinus from two long-standing tick-borne disease foci in northern Italy. Complete mitogenomes of 23 I. ricinus ticks were sequenced at high coverage. Out of 23 mitogenome sequences we identified 17 unique haplotypes composed of 244 segregating sites. Phylogenetic reconstruction using 18 complete mitogenome sequences revealed the coexistence of four highly divergent I. ricinus maternal lineages despite the narrow spatial scale over which these samples were obtained (100km). Notably, the estimated coalescence time of the 18 mitogenome haplotypes is ∼427 thousand years ago (95% HPD 330, 540). This divergence between I. ricinus lineages is consistent with the mitochondrial diversity of other arthropod vector species and indicates that long-term I. ricinus populations may have been less structured and larger than previously thought. Thus, this study suggests that a rapid and accurate retrieval of full mitochondrial genomes from this disease vector enables fine-resolution studies of tick intraspecies genetic relationships, population differentiation, and demographic history. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ancient DNA from European Early Neolithic Farmers Reveals Their Near Eastern Affinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Wolfgang; Balanovsky, Oleg; Sanchez, Juan J.; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Adler, Christina J.; Der Sarkissian, Clio S. I.; Brandt, Guido; Schwarz, Carolin; Nicklisch, Nicole; Dresely, Veit; Fritsch, Barbara; Balanovska, Elena; Villems, Richard; Meller, Harald; Alt, Kurt W.; Cooper, Alan

    2010-01-01

    In Europe, the Neolithic transition (8,000–4,000 b.c.) from hunting and gathering to agricultural communities was one of the most important demographic events since the initial peopling of Europe by anatomically modern humans in the Upper Paleolithic (40,000 b.c.). However, the nature and speed of this transition is a matter of continuing scientific debate in archaeology, anthropology, and human population genetics. To date, inferences about the genetic make up of past populations have mostly been drawn from studies of modern-day Eurasian populations, but increasingly ancient DNA studies offer a direct view of the genetic past. We genetically characterized a population of the earliest farming culture in Central Europe, the Linear Pottery Culture (LBK; 5,500–4,900 calibrated b.c.) and used comprehensive phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to locate its origins within the broader Eurasian region, and to trace potential dispersal routes into Europe. We cloned and sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable segment I and designed two powerful SNP multiplex PCR systems to generate new mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data from 21 individuals from a complete LBK graveyard at Derenburg Meerenstieg II in Germany. These results considerably extend the available genetic dataset for the LBK (n = 42) and permit the first detailed genetic analysis of the earliest Neolithic culture in Central Europe (5,500–4,900 calibrated b.c.). We characterized the Neolithic mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity and geographical affinities of the early farmers using a large database of extant Western Eurasian populations (n = 23,394) and a wide range of population genetic analyses including shared haplotype analyses, principal component analyses, multidimensional scaling, geographic mapping of genetic distances, and Bayesian Serial Simcoal analyses. The results reveal that the LBK population shared an affinity with the modern-day Near East and Anatolia, supporting a major

  11. Ancient DNA from European early neolithic farmers reveals their near eastern affinities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Haak

    Full Text Available In Europe, the Neolithic transition (8,000-4,000 B.C. from hunting and gathering to agricultural communities was one of the most important demographic events since the initial peopling of Europe by anatomically modern humans in the Upper Paleolithic (40,000 B.C.. However, the nature and speed of this transition is a matter of continuing scientific debate in archaeology, anthropology, and human population genetics. To date, inferences about the genetic make up of past populations have mostly been drawn from studies of modern-day Eurasian populations, but increasingly ancient DNA studies offer a direct view of the genetic past. We genetically characterized a population of the earliest farming culture in Central Europe, the Linear Pottery Culture (LBK; 5,500-4,900 calibrated B.C. and used comprehensive phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to locate its origins within the broader Eurasian region, and to trace potential dispersal routes into Europe. We cloned and sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable segment I and designed two powerful SNP multiplex PCR systems to generate new mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data from 21 individuals from a complete LBK graveyard at Derenburg Meerenstieg II in Germany. These results considerably extend the available genetic dataset for the LBK (n = 42 and permit the first detailed genetic analysis of the earliest Neolithic culture in Central Europe (5,500-4,900 calibrated B.C.. We characterized the Neolithic mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity and geographical affinities of the early farmers using a large database of extant Western Eurasian populations (n = 23,394 and a wide range of population genetic analyses including shared haplotype analyses, principal component analyses, multidimensional scaling, geographic mapping of genetic distances, and Bayesian Serial Simcoal analyses. The results reveal that the LBK population shared an affinity with the modern-day Near East and Anatolia, supporting

  12. Ancient DNA from European early neolithic farmers reveals their near eastern affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Wolfgang; Balanovsky, Oleg; Sanchez, Juan J; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Adler, Christina J; Der Sarkissian, Clio S I; Brandt, Guido; Schwarz, Carolin; Nicklisch, Nicole; Dresely, Veit; Fritsch, Barbara; Balanovska, Elena; Villems, Richard; Meller, Harald; Alt, Kurt W; Cooper, Alan

    2010-11-09

    In Europe, the Neolithic transition (8,000-4,000 B.C.) from hunting and gathering to agricultural communities was one of the most important demographic events since the initial peopling of Europe by anatomically modern humans in the Upper Paleolithic (40,000 B.C.). However, the nature and speed of this transition is a matter of continuing scientific debate in archaeology, anthropology, and human population genetics. To date, inferences about the genetic make up of past populations have mostly been drawn from studies of modern-day Eurasian populations, but increasingly ancient DNA studies offer a direct view of the genetic past. We genetically characterized a population of the earliest farming culture in Central Europe, the Linear Pottery Culture (LBK; 5,500-4,900 calibrated B.C.) and used comprehensive phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to locate its origins within the broader Eurasian region, and to trace potential dispersal routes into Europe. We cloned and sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable segment I and designed two powerful SNP multiplex PCR systems to generate new mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data from 21 individuals from a complete LBK graveyard at Derenburg Meerenstieg II in Germany. These results considerably extend the available genetic dataset for the LBK (n = 42) and permit the first detailed genetic analysis of the earliest Neolithic culture in Central Europe (5,500-4,900 calibrated B.C.). We characterized the Neolithic mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity and geographical affinities of the early farmers using a large database of extant Western Eurasian populations (n = 23,394) and a wide range of population genetic analyses including shared haplotype analyses, principal component analyses, multidimensional scaling, geographic mapping of genetic distances, and Bayesian Serial Simcoal analyses. The results reveal that the LBK population shared an affinity with the modern-day Near East and Anatolia, supporting a major

  13. Detection and characterisation of Plum pox virus (PPV isolates from Eastern Slovakia revealed the presence of three main viral strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Július Rozák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plum pox virus (PPV, the agent responsible for Sharka disease, is the most important viral pathogen of stone fruit trees world-wide, having an endemic status in Slovakia. To increase knowledge of PPV diversity in Slovakia, a set of 11 isolates, originated from the eastern part of the country, was characterised. The isolates were chip-budded from their original Prunus hosts to the susceptible GF305 indicators, exhibiting the symptoms of variable severity. A genomic region encompassing the partial NIb and the hypervariable 5´terminal region of the CP gene was amplified from all 11 isolates in RT-PCR and directly sequenced. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the grouping of the 11 Slovak isolates into 3 distinct clusters, representing the PPV-M (2 isolates, D (7 isolates and Rec strains (2 isolates. The strain affiliation of isolates was further confirmed by strain-specific RT-PCR, using which the presence of additional mixed infection by minor PPV variants was detected in 2 samples. The results further contribute to the understanding of PPV diversity in Slovakia and confirm the specificity and sensitivity of molecular approaches used for the virus strain determination.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity against 10 North American and European Lawsonia intracellularis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanaphansak, Suphot; Singer, Randall S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2009-03-02

    The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobials against 10 isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis, the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE). Antimicrobials tested included carbadox, chlortetracycline, lincomycin, tiamulin, tylosin and valnemulin. The MIC of each antimicrobial against L. intracellularis was determined using a tissue culture system and was identified as the lowest concentration that inhibited 99% of L. intracellularis growth, as compared to the antimicrobial-free control. Each antimicrobial concentration was evaluated for both intracellular and extracellular activity against L. intracellularis, an obligately intracellular bacterium. When tested for intracellular activity, carbadox, tiamulin, and valnemulin were the most active antimicrobials with MICs of 128mIcog/ml) showed the least activity. When tested for extracellular activity, valnemulin (MICs ranging from 0.125 to 4microg/ml) was the most active against most L. intracellularis isolates. Chlortetracycline (MICs ranging from 16 to 64microg/ml), tylosin (MICs ranging from 1 to >128microg/ml), and tiamulin (MICs ranging from 1 to 32microg/ml) showed intermediate activities. Lincomycin (MICs ranging from 32 to >128microg/ml) showed the least activity. Our in vitro results showed that each L. intracellularis isolate had a different antimicrobial sensitivity pattern and these data can be utilized as an in vitro guideline for the further antimicrobial evaluation of field L. intracellularis isolates.

  15. Genetic relationships among Enterococcus faecalis isolates from different sources as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Song, Y Q; Xu, H Y; Menghe, B L G; Zhang, H P; Sun, Z H

    2015-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is part of the natural gut flora of humans and other mammals; some isolates are also used in food production. So, it is important to evaluate the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among E. faecalis isolates from different sources. Multilocus sequence typing protocol was used to compare 39 E. faecalis isolates from Chinese traditional food products (including dairy products, acidic gruel) and 4 published E. faecalis isolates from other sources including human-derived isolates employing 5 housekeeping genes (groEL, clpX, recA, rpoB, and pepC). A total of 23 unique sequence types were identified, which were grouped into 5 clonal complexes and 10 singletons. The value of standardized index of association of the alleles (IA(S)=0.1465) and network structure indicated a high frequency of intraspecies recombination across these isolates. Enterococcus faecalis lineages also exhibited clearly source-clustered distributions. The isolates from dairy source were clustered together. However, the relationship between isolates from acidic gruel and one isolate from a human source was close. The MLST scheme presented in this study provides a sharable and continuously growing sequence database enabling global comparison of strains from different sources, and will further advance our understanding of the microbial ecology of this important species. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Group dynamics during the EXEMSI isolation study. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazes, C; Rosnet, E; Bachelard, C; Le Scanff, C; Rivolier, J

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the social behavior, interrelations, cohesion, efficiency and team formation of the crew during 60 days of isolation and confinement, to make a critical comparison of a variety of test methods used for this purpose and to formulate recommendations for their applications in selection, training and support for future studies of this kind. The study consisted of three phases: (1) the pre-isolation period, in which initial individual and group assessment were made to understand the motivation, characteristics, and styles of the crew members, the state of the crew, and to make a prognosis for the behavior of the group and its members, (2) the isolation period, with tests and observations to follow and analyze behavior and group dynamics of the crew, and to detect manifestations of stress, and (3) the post-isolation period with final assessment and debriefing. During these three periods individual and group tests were carried out. Direct methods, questionnaires and tests, as well as indirect methods, observations of behavior, were used. These had cognitive, affective-emotional and social components; they were quantitative, qualitative or a combination. Before isolation the crew members expressed strong confidence in the team and in their own personal capability. The leadership of the Commander seemed uncontested. Crew functioning during this period was conflict-free, but was structured in a rather rigid and defensive way (isolation of affects, denial of anxiety). Apparently, the members strongly needed to present a good image image of themselves. The relatively short period of the experiment, and the absence of real risk suggested that the crew would be able to maintain their cohesion, but in a real spaceflight situation this behavior could be inadequate and even dangerous. The pre-isolation prognosis for crew behavior during isolation was validated to a large extent. During isolation there were no clear manifestations of

  17. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Baltrus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species.

  18. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrus, David A; Nishimura, Marc T; Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R; Jones, Corbin D; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2011-07-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. © 2011 Baltrus et al.

  19. Field studies reveal strong postmating isolation between ecologically divergent butterfly populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S McBride

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Gene flow between populations that are adapting to distinct environments may be restricted if hybrids inherit maladaptive, intermediate phenotypes. This phenomenon, called extrinsic postzygotic isolation (EPI, is thought to play a critical role in the early stages of speciation. However, despite its intuitive appeal, we know surprisingly little about the strength and prevalence of EPI in nature, and even less about the specific phenotypes that tend to cause problems for hybrids. In this study, we searched for EPI among allopatric populations of the butterfly Euphydryas editha that have specialized on alternative host plants. These populations recall a situation thought typical of the very early stages of speciation. They lack consistent host-associated genetic differentiation at random nuclear loci and show no signs of reproductive incompatibility in the laboratory. However, they do differ consistently in diverse host-related traits. For each of these traits, we first asked whether hybrids between populations that use different hosts (different-host hybrids were intermediate to parental populations and to hybrids between populations that use the same host (same-host hybrids. We then conducted field experiments to estimate the effects of intermediacy on fitness in nature. Our results revealed strong EPI under field conditions. Different-host hybrids exhibited an array of intermediate traits that were significantly maladaptive, including four behaviors. Intermediate foraging height slowed the growth of larvae, while intermediate oviposition preference, oviposition site height, and clutch size severely reduced the growth and survival of the offspring of adult females. We used our empirical data to construct a fitness surface on which different-host hybrids can be seen to fall in an adaptive valley between two peaks occupied by same-host hybrids. These findings demonstrate how ecological selection against hybrids can create a strong barrier to gene

  20. How to make a European integrated market in small and isolated electricity systems? The case of the Canary Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Yannick [Universite de Paris-Sud 11, Groupe Reseaux Jean-Monnet-ADIS, 27 Avenue Lombart Bureau C 309, 92260 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Ramos Real, Francisco Javier [Departamento de Analisis Economico e Instituto de Desarrollo Regional, Camino de La Hornera s/n, Campus de Guajara, Universidad de La Laguna, 38071 La Laguna. SC de Tenerife (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    This paper presents a geographic dimension not often studied in the dynamics of creating an internal market for electricity within the European Union, namely the case of small European electricity systems like those found on the Greek islands of Cyprus and Crete. Our question, then, is how to achieve a suitable internal market for electricity in small and isolated systems. To address this issue, we identify the main problems to be overcome by introducing a methodology in which the Canary Islands experience is taken as a case study for understanding the challenges in creating an 'EU-like market for electricity'. Our results show that the design of the vertical industrial structure and the figure of the grid operator and its attributes are key features for the proper operation of any electrical system. We also stress the minor roles of other possible options to achieve this EU-compatible market by highlighting first, in the wholesale market, the call-for-tender solution to introduce more generation and the risk of using safety requirements as barriers to entry in these small markets, and second, in the supply activities, the potential problems of an improperly regulated tariff scheme. (author)

  1. Polyploid genome of Camelina sativa revealed by isolation of fatty acid synthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, Carolyn; Ditt, Renata F; Beilstein, Mark; Comai, Luca; Schroeder, Jesara; Goldstein, Elianna; Shewmaker, Christine K; Nguyen, Thu; De Rocher, Jay; Kiser, Jack

    2010-10-27

    Camelina sativa, an oilseed crop in the Brassicaceae family, has inspired renewed interest due to its potential for biofuels applications. Little is understood of the nature of the C. sativa genome, however. A study was undertaken to characterize two genes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, fatty acid desaturase (FAD) 2 and fatty acid elongase (FAE) 1, which revealed unexpected complexity in the C. sativa genome. In C. sativa, Southern analysis indicates the presence of three copies of both FAD2 and FAE1 as well as LFY, a known single copy gene in other species. All three copies of both CsFAD2 and CsFAE1 are expressed in developing seeds, and sequence alignments show that previously described conserved sites are present, suggesting that all three copies of both genes could be functional. The regions downstream of CsFAD2 and upstream of CsFAE1 demonstrate co-linearity with the Arabidopsis genome. In addition, three expressed haplotypes were observed for six predicted single-copy genes in 454 sequencing analysis and results from flow cytometry indicate that the DNA content of C. sativa is approximately three-fold that of diploid Camelina relatives. Phylogenetic analyses further support a history of duplication and indicate that C. sativa and C. microcarpa might share a parental genome. There is compelling evidence for triplication of the C. sativa genome, including a larger chromosome number and three-fold larger measured genome size than other Camelina relatives, three isolated copies of FAD2, FAE1, and the KCS17-FAE1 intergenic region, and three expressed haplotypes observed for six predicted single-copy genes. Based on these results, we propose that C. sativa be considered an allohexaploid. The characterization of fatty acid synthesis pathway genes will allow for the future manipulation of oil composition of this emerging biofuel crop; however, targeted manipulations of oil composition and general development of C. sativa should consider and, when possible

  2. Polyploid genome of Camelina sativa revealed by isolation of fatty acid synthesis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shewmaker Christine K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camelina sativa, an oilseed crop in the Brassicaceae family, has inspired renewed interest due to its potential for biofuels applications. Little is understood of the nature of the C. sativa genome, however. A study was undertaken to characterize two genes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, fatty acid desaturase (FAD 2 and fatty acid elongase (FAE 1, which revealed unexpected complexity in the C. sativa genome. Results In C. sativa, Southern analysis indicates the presence of three copies of both FAD2 and FAE1 as well as LFY, a known single copy gene in other species. All three copies of both CsFAD2 and CsFAE1 are expressed in developing seeds, and sequence alignments show that previously described conserved sites are present, suggesting that all three copies of both genes could be functional. The regions downstream of CsFAD2 and upstream of CsFAE1 demonstrate co-linearity with the Arabidopsis genome. In addition, three expressed haplotypes were observed for six predicted single-copy genes in 454 sequencing analysis and results from flow cytometry indicate that the DNA content of C. sativa is approximately three-fold that of diploid Camelina relatives. Phylogenetic analyses further support a history of duplication and indicate that C. sativa and C. microcarpa might share a parental genome. Conclusions There is compelling evidence for triplication of the C. sativa genome, including a larger chromosome number and three-fold larger measured genome size than other Camelina relatives, three isolated copies of FAD2, FAE1, and the KCS17-FAE1 intergenic region, and three expressed haplotypes observed for six predicted single-copy genes. Based on these results, we propose that C. sativa be considered an allohexaploid. The characterization of fatty acid synthesis pathway genes will allow for the future manipulation of oil composition of this emerging biofuel crop; however, targeted manipulations of oil composition and general

  3. Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype II isolated from European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis in Finland during surveillance from 1999 to 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadd, Tuija; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2010-01-01

    We examined the occurrence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in the main spawning stocks of wild European river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis in the rivers of Finland from 1999 to 2008. Pooled samples of internal organs (kidney, liver and heart or brain) from 2621 lampreys were examined...... genotype II. The partial G gene sequences obtained (nt 1 to 672–1129) of all 5 lamprey VHSV isolates were identical, and so were the entire G genes (nt 1 to 1524) of 2 isolates sequenced. The virulence of one of the lamprey isolates was evaluated by an experimental infection trial in rainbow trout...... Oncorhynchus mykiss fry. No mortality was induced postinfection by waterborne and intraperitoneal challenge, respectively, while 2 genotype Id isolates originating from Finnish rainbow trout caused marked mortality under the same conditions. The infection in the European river lamprey is thought...

  4. Interspecific tests of allelism reveal the evolutionary timing and pattern of accumulation of reproductive isolation mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Natasha A; Victorine, Anna; Wang, Richard J; Moyle, Leonie C

    2014-09-01

    Despite extensive theory, little is known about the empirical accumulation and evolutionary timing of mutations that contribute to speciation. Here we combined QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) analyses of reproductive isolation, with information on species evolutionary relationships, to reconstruct the order and timing of mutations contributing to reproductive isolation between three plant (Solanum) species. To evaluate whether reproductive isolation QTL that appear to coincide in more than one species pair are homologous, we used cross-specific tests of allelism and found evidence for both homologous and lineage-specific (non-homologous) alleles at these co-localized loci. These data, along with isolation QTL unique to single species pairs, indicate that >85% of isolation-causing mutations arose later in the history of divergence between species. Phylogenetically explicit analyses of these data support non-linear models of accumulation of hybrid incompatibility, although the specific best-fit model differs between seed (pairwise interactions) and pollen (multi-locus interactions) sterility traits. Our findings corroborate theory that predicts an acceleration ('snowballing') in the accumulation of isolation loci as lineages progressively diverge, and suggest different underlying genetic bases for pollen versus seed sterility. Pollen sterility in particular appears to be due to complex genetic interactions, and we show this is consistent with a snowball model where later arising mutations are more likely to be involved in pairwise or multi-locus interactions that specifically involve ancestral alleles, compared to earlier arising mutations.

  5. Interspecific Tests of Allelism Reveal the Evolutionary Timing and Pattern of Accumulation of Reproductive Isolation Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Natasha A.; Victorine, Anna; Wang, Richard J.; Moyle, Leonie C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive theory, little is known about the empirical accumulation and evolutionary timing of mutations that contribute to speciation. Here we combined QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) analyses of reproductive isolation, with information on species evolutionary relationships, to reconstruct the order and timing of mutations contributing to reproductive isolation between three plant (Solanum) species. To evaluate whether reproductive isolation QTL that appear to coincide in more than one species pair are homologous, we used cross-specific tests of allelism and found evidence for both homologous and lineage-specific (non-homologous) alleles at these co-localized loci. These data, along with isolation QTL unique to single species pairs, indicate that >85% of isolation-causing mutations arose later in the history of divergence between species. Phylogenetically explicit analyses of these data support non-linear models of accumulation of hybrid incompatibility, although the specific best-fit model differs between seed (pairwise interactions) and pollen (multi-locus interactions) sterility traits. Our findings corroborate theory that predicts an acceleration (‘snowballing’) in the accumulation of isolation loci as lineages progressively diverge, and suggest different underlying genetic bases for pollen versus seed sterility. Pollen sterility in particular appears to be due to complex genetic interactions, and we show this is consistent with a snowball model where later arising mutations are more likely to be involved in pairwise or multi-locus interactions that specifically involve ancestral alleles, compared to earlier arising mutations. PMID:25211473

  6. Two Trichosporon species isolated from Central-European mygalomorph spiders (Araneae: Mygalomorphae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneberg, Petr; Řezáč, Milan

    2013-04-01

    Trichosporon (Dikarya: Basidiomycota) is a genus of anamorphic yeasts typically associated with soil and water, although many species are causative agents of diseases in animals and man. Here we provide the first compelling evidence that spiders can be occasionally colonized by at least two Trichosporon species. Trichosporon dulcitum (Berkhout) Weijman 1979 was isolated from the exoskeleton of purse-web spider Atypus piceus, while Trichosporon porosum (Stautz) Middelhoven, Scorzetti & Fell 2001 was isolated from the exoskeleton of purse-web spider Atypus affinis. Both of the species were identified based on DNA sequence analysis of the host specimens displaying macroscopic signs of the superficial white mycosis on their exoskeleton. Only two specimens with macroscopic signs of superficial yeast growth were identified among the 125 individuals of A. affinis, A. piceus and Atypus muralis examined that were collected at various sites throughout the Czech Republic. The consistent burrow microclimate, uninterrupted occupancy of the single burrow for several subsequent years, and presence of prey remnants in the burrow below the purse-web may play a role in the course of infection of the mygalomorphs examined. The phylogenetic relationships of Trichosporon species are analyzed, concluding that association with invertebrates clusters predominantly among four groups of closely related species in independent Trichosporon clades.

  7. Multi-locus sequence typing confirms the clonality of Trichomonas gallinae isolates circulating in European finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, Petra; Jaskulska, Barbara; Lawson, Becki; Zadravec, Marko; Hess, Michael; Bilic, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Trichomonas gallinae emerged as the causative agent of an infectious disease of passerine birds in Europe leading to epidemic mortality of especially greenfinches Chloris chloris and chaffinches Fringilla coelebs. After the appearance of finch trichomonosis in the UK and Fennoscandia, the disease spread to Central Europe. Finch trichomonosis first reached Austria and Slovenia in 2012. In the present study the genetic heterogeneity of T. gallinae isolates from incidents in Austria and Slovenia were investigated and compared with British isolates. For this purpose comparative sequence analyses of the four genomic loci ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 18S rRNA, rpb1 and Fe-hydrogenase were performed. The results corroborate that one clonal T. gallinae strain caused the emerging infectious disease within passerine birds and that the disease is continuing to spread in Europe. The same clonal strain was also found in a columbid bird from Austria. Additionally, the present study demonstrates clearly the importance of multi-locus sequence typing for discrimination of circulating T. gallinae strains.

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Coding and Noncoding RNA Differences in NSCLC from African Americans and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Khadijah A; Zingone, Adriana; Toulabi, Leila; Boeckelman, Jacob; Ryan, Bríd M

    2017-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether racial differences in gene and miRNA expression translates to differences in lung tumor biology with clinical relevance in African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs). Experimental Design: The NCI-Maryland Case Control Study includes seven Baltimore City hospitals and is overrepresented with AA patients (∼40%). Patients that underwent curative NSCLC surgery between 1998 and 2014 were enrolled. Comparative molecular profiling used mRNA ( n = 22 AAs and 19 EAs) and miRNA ( n = 42 AAs and 55 EAs) expression arrays to track differences in paired fresh frozen normal tissues and lung tumor specimens from AAs and EAs. Pathway enrichment, predicted drug response, tumor microenvironment infiltration, cancer immunotherapy antigen profiling, and miRNA target enrichment were assessed. Results: AA-enriched differential gene expression was characterized by stem cell and invasion pathways. Differential gene expression in lung tumors from EAs was primarily characterized by cell proliferation pathways. Population-specific gene expression was partly driven by population-specific miRNA expression profiles. Drug susceptibility predictions revealed a strong inverse correlation between AA resistance and EA sensitivity to the same panel of drugs. Statistically significant differences in M1 and M2 macrophage infiltration were observed in AAs ( P profiling revealed clear differences in lung tumor biology between AAs and EAs. Increased participation by AAs in lung cancer clinical trials are needed to integrate, and leverage, transcriptomic differences with other clinical information to maximize therapeutic benefit in both AAs and EAs. Clin Cancer Res; 23(23); 7412-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. GAGA: a new algorithm for genomic inference of geographic ancestry reveals fine level population substructure in Europeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Lao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to detect genetic population substructure in humans are troubled by the fact that the vast majority of the total amount of observed genetic variation is present within populations rather than between populations. Here we introduce a new algorithm for transforming a genetic distance matrix that reduces the within-population variation considerably. Extensive computer simulations revealed that the transformed matrix captured the genetic population differentiation better than the original one which was based on the T1 statistic. In an empirical genomic data set comprising 2,457 individuals from 23 different European subpopulations, the proportion of individuals that were determined as a genetic neighbour to another individual from the same sampling location increased from 25% with the original matrix to 52% with the transformed matrix. Similarly, the percentage of genetic variation explained between populations by means of Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA increased from 1.62% to 7.98%. Furthermore, the first two dimensions of a classical multidimensional scaling (MDS using the transformed matrix explained 15% of the variance, compared to 0.7% obtained with the original matrix. Application of MDS with Mclust, SPA with Mclust, and GemTools algorithms to the same dataset also showed that the transformed matrix gave a better association of the genetic clusters with the sampling locations, and particularly so when it was used in the AMOVA framework with a genetic algorithm. Overall, the new matrix transformation introduced here substantially reduces the within population genetic differentiation, and can be broadly applied to methods such as AMOVA to enhance their sensitivity to reveal population substructure. We herewith provide a publically available (http://www.erasmusmc.nl/fmb/resources/GAGA model-free method for improved genetic population substructure detection that can be applied to human as well as any other species data in future

  10. GAGA: a new algorithm for genomic inference of geographic ancestry reveals fine level population substructure in Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Oscar; Liu, Fan; Wollstein, Andreas; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    Attempts to detect genetic population substructure in humans are troubled by the fact that the vast majority of the total amount of observed genetic variation is present within populations rather than between populations. Here we introduce a new algorithm for transforming a genetic distance matrix that reduces the within-population variation considerably. Extensive computer simulations revealed that the transformed matrix captured the genetic population differentiation better than the original one which was based on the T1 statistic. In an empirical genomic data set comprising 2,457 individuals from 23 different European subpopulations, the proportion of individuals that were determined as a genetic neighbour to another individual from the same sampling location increased from 25% with the original matrix to 52% with the transformed matrix. Similarly, the percentage of genetic variation explained between populations by means of Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) increased from 1.62% to 7.98%. Furthermore, the first two dimensions of a classical multidimensional scaling (MDS) using the transformed matrix explained 15% of the variance, compared to 0.7% obtained with the original matrix. Application of MDS with Mclust, SPA with Mclust, and GemTools algorithms to the same dataset also showed that the transformed matrix gave a better association of the genetic clusters with the sampling locations, and particularly so when it was used in the AMOVA framework with a genetic algorithm. Overall, the new matrix transformation introduced here substantially reduces the within population genetic differentiation, and can be broadly applied to methods such as AMOVA to enhance their sensitivity to reveal population substructure. We herewith provide a publically available (http://www.erasmusmc.nl/fmb/resources/GAGA) model-free method for improved genetic population substructure detection that can be applied to human as well as any other species data in future studies relevant to

  11. A pan-European epidemiological study reveals honey bee colony survival depends on beekeeper education and disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Antoine; Laurent, Marion; Ribière-Chabert, Magali; Saussac, Mathilde; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Budge, Giles E; Hendrikx, Pascal; Chauzat, Marie-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Reports of honey bee population decline has spurred many national efforts to understand the extent of the problem and to identify causative or associated factors. However, our collective understanding of the factors has been hampered by a lack of joined up trans-national effort. Moreover, the impacts of beekeeper knowledge and beekeeping management practices have often been overlooked, despite honey bees being a managed pollinator. Here, we established a standardised active monitoring network for 5 798 apiaries over two consecutive years to quantify honey bee colony mortality across 17 European countries. Our data demonstrate that overwinter losses ranged between 2% and 32%, and that high summer losses were likely to follow high winter losses. Multivariate Poisson regression models revealed that hobbyist beekeepers with small apiaries and little experience in beekeeping had double the winter mortality rate when compared to professional beekeepers. Furthermore, honey bees kept by professional beekeepers never showed signs of disease, unlike apiaries from hobbyist beekeepers that had symptoms of bacterial infection and heavy Varroa infestation. Our data highlight beekeeper background and apicultural practices as major drivers of honey bee colony losses. The benefits of conducting trans-national monitoring schemes and improving beekeeper training are discussed.

  12. A pan-European epidemiological study reveals honey bee colony survival depends on beekeeper education and disease control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Antoine; Laurent, Marion; Ribière-Chabert, Magali; Saussac, Mathilde; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Budge, Giles E.; Hendrikx, Pascal; Chauzat, Marie-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Reports of honey bee population decline has spurred many national efforts to understand the extent of the problem and to identify causative or associated factors. However, our collective understanding of the factors has been hampered by a lack of joined up trans-national effort. Moreover, the impacts of beekeeper knowledge and beekeeping management practices have often been overlooked, despite honey bees being a managed pollinator. Here, we established a standardised active monitoring network for 5 798 apiaries over two consecutive years to quantify honey bee colony mortality across 17 European countries. Our data demonstrate that overwinter losses ranged between 2% and 32%, and that high summer losses were likely to follow high winter losses. Multivariate Poisson regression models revealed that hobbyist beekeepers with small apiaries and little experience in beekeeping had double the winter mortality rate when compared to professional beekeepers. Furthermore, honey bees kept by professional beekeepers never showed signs of disease, unlike apiaries from hobbyist beekeepers that had symptoms of bacterial infection and heavy Varroa infestation. Our data highlight beekeeper background and apicultural practices as major drivers of honey bee colony losses. The benefits of conducting trans-national monitoring schemes and improving beekeeper training are discussed. PMID:28278255

  13. Light and Electron Microscopy of the European Beaver (Castor fiber) Stomach Reveal Unique Morphological Features with Possible General Biological Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryński, Wojciech; Palkowska, Katarzyna; Prusik, Magdalena; Targońska, Krystyna; Giżejewski, Zygmunt; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical, histological, and ultrastructural studies of the European beaver stomach revealed several unique morphological features. The prominent attribute of its gross morphology was the cardiogastric gland (CGG), located near the oesophageal entrance. Light microscopy showed that the CGG was formed by invaginations of the mucosa into the submucosa, which contained densely packed proper gastric glands comprised primarily of parietal and chief cells. Mucous neck cells represented stomach lumen. These data suggest that chief cells in the CGG develop from undifferentiated cells that migrate through the gastric gland neck rather than from mucous neck cells. Classical chief cell formation (i.e., arising from mucous neck cells) occurred in the mucosa lining the stomach lumen, however. The muscularis around the CGG consisted primarily of skeletal muscle tissue. The cardiac region was rudimentary while the fundus/corpus and pyloric regions were equally developed. Another unusual feature of the beaver stomach was the presence of specific mucus with a thickness up to 950 µm (in frozen, unfixed sections) that coated the mucosa. Our observations suggest that the formation of this mucus is complex and includes the secretory granule accumulation in the cytoplasm of pit cells, the granule aggregation inside cells, and the incorporation of degenerating cells into the mucus. PMID:24727802

  14. Light and electron microscopy of the European beaver (Castor fiber stomach reveal unique morphological features with possible general biological significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ziółkowska

    Full Text Available Anatomical, histological, and ultrastructural studies of the European beaver stomach revealed several unique morphological features. The prominent attribute of its gross morphology was the cardiogastric gland (CGG, located near the oesophageal entrance. Light microscopy showed that the CGG was formed by invaginations of the mucosa into the submucosa, which contained densely packed proper gastric glands comprised primarily of parietal and chief cells. Mucous neck cells represented <0.1% of cells in the CGG gastric glands and 22-32% of cells in the proper gastric glands of the mucosa lining the stomach lumen. These data suggest that chief cells in the CGG develop from undifferentiated cells that migrate through the gastric gland neck rather than from mucous neck cells. Classical chief cell formation (i.e., arising from mucous neck cells occurred in the mucosa lining the stomach lumen, however. The muscularis around the CGG consisted primarily of skeletal muscle tissue. The cardiac region was rudimentary while the fundus/corpus and pyloric regions were equally developed. Another unusual feature of the beaver stomach was the presence of specific mucus with a thickness up to 950 µm (in frozen, unfixed sections that coated the mucosa. Our observations suggest that the formation of this mucus is complex and includes the secretory granule accumulation in the cytoplasm of pit cells, the granule aggregation inside cells, and the incorporation of degenerating cells into the mucus.

  15. A pan-European epidemiological study reveals honey bee colony survival depends on beekeeper education and disease control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Jacques

    Full Text Available Reports of honey bee population decline has spurred many national efforts to understand the extent of the problem and to identify causative or associated factors. However, our collective understanding of the factors has been hampered by a lack of joined up trans-national effort. Moreover, the impacts of beekeeper knowledge and beekeeping management practices have often been overlooked, despite honey bees being a managed pollinator. Here, we established a standardised active monitoring network for 5 798 apiaries over two consecutive years to quantify honey bee colony mortality across 17 European countries. Our data demonstrate that overwinter losses ranged between 2% and 32%, and that high summer losses were likely to follow high winter losses. Multivariate Poisson regression models revealed that hobbyist beekeepers with small apiaries and little experience in beekeeping had double the winter mortality rate when compared to professional beekeepers. Furthermore, honey bees kept by professional beekeepers never showed signs of disease, unlike apiaries from hobbyist beekeepers that had symptoms of bacterial infection and heavy Varroa infestation. Our data highlight beekeeper background and apicultural practices as major drivers of honey bee colony losses. The benefits of conducting trans-national monitoring schemes and improving beekeeper training are discussed.

  16. Microsatellite markers reveal a strong geographical structure in European populations of Castanea sativa (Fagaceae): evidence for multiple glacial refugia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioni, Claudia; Martin, M Angela; Pollegioni, Paola; Cherubini, Marcello; Villani, Fiorella

    2013-05-01

    Large-scale studies on the genetic diversity of forest trees are relevant for the inventory, conservation, and management of genetic resources and provide an insight into the geographical origins of the species. This approach is appropriate to use with Castanea sativa, a tree of great economic importance and the only species from the genus Castanea in Europe. The history of C. sativa was deduced from fossil pollen data, but the large-scale genetic structure of this species needs to be elucidated. We evaluated the genetic diversity of C. sativa to define previously unclarified genetic relationships among the populations from Turkey and those from Greece and western Europe. The influence of natural events such as glaciations and human impact in terms of species distribution are discussed. • Wild chestnut trees (779) were sampled in 31 European sites. Six polymorphic microsatellites were used for the analysis. A set of measures of intra- and interpopulation genetic statistics were calculated. The population structure was inferred by using a Bayesian approach. • The population structure showed a genetic divergence between the eastern (Greek and Turkish) and western (Italian and Spanish) populations. Two gene pools and a zone of gene introgression in Turkey were revealed. • The inferred population structure shows a strong geographical correspondence with the hypothesized glacial refugia and rules out the migration of the chestnut from Turkey and Greece to Italy. The homogeneous gene pool observed in Italy and Spain could have been originated from common refugia along with human-mediated colonization.

  17. 520-d Isolation and confinement simulating a flight to Mars reveals heightened immune responses and alterations of leukocyte phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, B; Rykova, M; Feuerecker, M; Jäger, B; Ladinig, C; Basner, M; Hörl, M; Matzel, S; Kaufmann, I; Strewe, C; Nichiporuk, I; Vassilieva, G; Rinas, K; Baatout, S; Schelling, G; Thiel, M; Dinges, D F; Morukov, B; Choukèr, A

    2014-08-01

    During interplanetary exploration, chronic stress caused by long term isolation and confinement in the spacecraft is one of the major concerns of physical and psychological health of space travelers. And for human on Earth, more and more people live in an isolated condition, which has become a common social problem in modern western society. Collective evidences have indicated prolonged chronic stress could bring big influence to human immune function, which may lead to a variety of health problems. However, to what extent long-term isolation can affect the immune system still remains largely unknow. A simulated 520-d Mars mission provided an extraordinary chance to study the effect of prolonged isolation. Six healthy males participated in this mission and their active neuroendocrine and immune conditions were studied with saliva and blood samples from all participants on chosen time points during the isolation period. As a typical neuroendocrine parameter, stress hormone cortisol was measured in the morning saliva samples. Immune phenotype changes were monitored through peripheral leukocyte phenotype analysis. Using an ex vivo viral infection simulation assay we assessed the immune response changes characterized by the ability to produce representative endogenous pro-inflammatory cytokines. The results of this study revealed elevated cortisol levels, increased lymphocyte amount and heightened immune responses, suggesting that prolonged isolation acting as chronic stressors are able to trigger leukocyte phenotype changes and poorly controlled immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Limited prevalence of gaffkaemia (Aerococcus viridans var. homari) isolated from wild-caught European lobsters Homarus gammarus in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbing, P D; Pond, M J; Peeler, E; Small, H J; Greenwood, S J; Verner-Jeffreys, D

    2012-08-27

    Gaffkaemia, caused by Aerococcus viridans var. homari, causes fatal infections in Homarus spp. (clawed lobsters). Despite its high economic significance to the lobster fisheries in the USA and northern Europe, data on its prevalence in captured and wild populations, particularly in Europe, is scarce. Following an outbreak of gaffkaemia in a European lobster holding facility in South Wales (UK), a base-line survey was conducted for gaffkaemia in wild populations of European lobster Homarus gammarus around the coast of England and Wales. In addition, isolates recovered from the original outbreak and the survey were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and compared with previously characterised isolates from the USA, UK and Canada. Locally caught H. gammarus were sampled at 30 sites from around the coast of England and Wales between March 2006 and October 2008. Results confirmed that the prevalence of gaffkaemia in populations of H. gammarus was low, with only 9 positive isolates recovered from 952 samples examined. PFGE analysis showed that the isolates from the outbreak investigation shared the same pulsotype as A. viridans var. homari isolates from the USA, Norway and Canada, as well as an isolate (NCIMB 1119) reportedly recovered from an outbreak of European lobsters in England in the 1960s. This confirms earlier studies that suggest virulent strains of A. viridans var. homari show very limited geographical or temporal genetic variation and were introduced into the UK with American lobsters H. americanus.

  19. Characterization of genetically matched isolates of Campylobacter jejuni reveals that mutations in genes involved in flagellar biosynthesis alter the organism's virulence potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik-Kale, Preeti; Raphael, Brian H; Parker, Craig T; Joens, Lynn A; Klena, John D; Quiñones, Beatriz; Keech, Amy M; Konkel, Michael E

    2007-05-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic evidence suggests that not all Campylobacter jejuni isolates are pathogenic for humans. We hypothesized that differences in gene content or gene expression alter the degree of pathogenicity of C. jejuni isolates. A C. jejuni isolate (Turkey) recovered from a turkey and a second C. jejuni isolate (CS) recovered from a chicken differed in their degrees of in vitro and in vivo virulence. The C. jejuni Turkey isolate invaded INT 407 human epithelial cells and secreted the Cia (Campylobacter invasion antigen) proteins, while the C. jejuni CS isolate was noninvasive for human epithelial cells and did not secrete the Cia proteins. Newborn piglets inoculated with the C. jejuni Turkey isolate developed more severe clinical signs of campylobacteriosis than piglets inoculated with the C. jejuni CS isolate. Additional work revealed that flagellin was not expressed in the C. jejuni CS isolate. Microarray and real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that all flagellar class II genes were significantly downregulated in the C. jejuni CS isolate compared to the C. jejuni Turkey isolate. Finally, nucleotide sequencing of the flgR gene revealed the presence of a single residue that was different in the FlgR proteins of the C. jejuni Turkey and CS isolates. Complementation of the C. jejuni CS isolate with a wild-type copy of the flgR gene restored the isolate's motility. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that critical differences in gene content or gene expression can alter the pathogenic potential of C. jejuni isolates.

  20. [Relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia in the central nervous system revealed by isolated dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, O; Julian, A; Puyade, M; Bouyer, S; Meurin, E; Blondeau, S; Houeto, J L; Neau, J P

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 1.5% of dementia is due to curable aetiology. We report an isolated dementia syndrome due to a meningeal relapse of acute promyelocytic leukaemia with favourable outcome after appropriate treatment. A 72-year-old woman, in remission of an acute promyelocytic leukaemia, presented a loss of autonomy for several months due to corticosubcortical dementia. Lumbar puncture showed blast cells indicating meningeal relapse of leukaemia. Intrathecal chemotherapy and arsenic trioxide obtained biological and molecular remission as well as restoration of normal cognitive functions. In patients with hematologic past history such as acute promyelocytic leukaemia, an isolated cognitive impairment should alert physicians to search for an isolated neuromeningeal relapse. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative susceptibility of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries to antimicrobial agents licenced in veterinary medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Veldman, K.T.; Salmon, S.A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    The susceptibility of Streptococcus suis strains (n = 384) isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries to 10 antimicrobial agents was determined. For that purpose a microbroth dilution method was used according to CLSI recommendations. The following antimicrobial agents were tested:

  2. Seeing the Whole Elephant: Imaging Flow Cytometry Reveals Extensive Morphological Diversity within Blastocystis Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yason, John Anthony; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common protist isolated in humans and many animals. The parasite is a species complex composed of 19 subtypes, 9 of which have been found in humans. There are biological and molecular differences between Blastocystis subtypes although microscopy alone is unable to distinguish between these subtypes. Blastocystis isolates also display various morphological forms. Several of these forms, however, have not been properly evaluated on whether or not these play significant functions in the organism's biology. In this study, we used imaging flow cytometry to analyze morphological features of Blastocystis isolates representing 3 subtypes (ST1, ST4 and ST7). We also employed fluorescence dyes to discover new cellular features. The profiles from each of the subtypes exhibit considerable differences with the others in terms of shape, size and granularity. We confirmed that the classical vacuolar form comprises the majority in all three subtypes. We have also evaluated other morphotypes on whether these represent distinct life stages in the parasite. Irregularly-shaped cells were identified but all of them were found to be dying cells in one isolate. Granular forms were present as a continuum in both viable and non-viable populations, with non-viable forms displaying higher granularity. By analyzing the images, rare morphotypes such as multinucleated cells could be easily observed and quantified. These cells had low granularity and lower DNA content. Small structures containing nucleic acid were also identified. We discuss the possible biological implications of these unusual forms. PMID:26618361

  3. Genetic variability among Schistosoma japonicum isolates from the Philippines, Japan and China revealed by sequence analysis of three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fen; Li, Juan; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-02-01

    The present study examined sequence variability in the mitochondrial (mt) protein-coding genes cytochrome b (cytb), NADH dehydrogenase subunits 2 and 6 (nad2 and nad6) among 24 isolates of Schistosoma japonicum from different endemic regions in the Philippines, Japan and China. The complete cytb, nad2 and nad6 genes were amplified and sequenced separately from individual schistosome. Sequence variations for isolates from the Philippines were 0-0.5% for cytb, 0-0.6% for nad2, and 0-0.9% for nad6. Variation was 0-0.5%, 0.1-0.8%, 0-0.7% for corresponding genes for schistosome samples from mainland China. For worms in Japan, genetic variations were 0-0.2%, 0.1-0.2% and 0 for the three genes, respectively. Sequence variations were 0-1.0%, 0-1.8% and 0-1.1% for cytb, nad2 and nad6, respectively, among schistosome isolates from different geographical strains in the Philippines, Japan and China. Of the three countries, lowest sequence variations were found between isolates from mainland China and the Philippines and highest were detected between Japan and the Philippines in three mtDNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the combined sequences of cytb, nad2 and nad6 revealed that all isolates in the Philippines clustered together sistered to samples from Yunnan and Zhejiang provinces in China, while isolates from Yamanashi in Japan were in a solitary clade. These results demonstrated the usefulness of the combined three mtDNA sequences for studying genetic diversity and population structure among S. japonicum isolates from the Philippines, China and Japan.

  4. A Δ11 desaturase gene genealogy reveals two divergent allelic classes within the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Richard G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moth pheromone mating systems have been characterized at the molecular level, allowing evolutionary biologists to study how changes in protein sequence or gene expression affect pheromone phenotype, patterns of mating, and ultimately, the formation of barriers to gene exchange. Recent studies of Ostrinia pheromones have focused on the diversity of sex pheromone desaturases and their role in the specificity of pheromone production. Here we produce a Δ11 desaturase genealogy within Ostrinia nubilalis. We ask what has been the history of this gene, and whether this history suggests that changes in Δ11 desaturase have been involved in the divergence of the E and Z O. nubilalis pheromone strains. Results The Δ11 desaturase gene genealogy does not differentiate O. nubilalis pheromone strains. However, we find two distinct clades, separated by 2.9% sequence divergence, that do not sort with pheromone strain, geographic origin, or emergence time. We demonstrate that these clades do not represent gene duplicates, but rather allelic variation at a single gene locus. Conclusions Analyses of patterns of variation at the Δ11 desaturase gene in ECB suggest that this enzyme does not contribute to reproductive isolation between pheromone strains (E and Z. However, our genealogy reveals two deeply divergent allelic classes. Standing variation at loci that contribute to mate choice phenotypes may permit novel pheromone mating systems to arise in the presence of strong stabilizing selection.

  5. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants. PMID:26519390

  6. Isolated micropenis reveals partial androgen insensitivity syndrome confirmed by molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangoo, Amrit; Paris, Francoise; Philibert, Pascal; Audran, Francoise; Ten, Svetlana; Sultan, Charles

    2010-07-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) is the milder variant of androgen receptor (AR) defects. The subtle effects of AR mutations present in a patient with micropenis, peno-scrotal hypospadias, infertility, clitoromegaly and posterior labial fusion. We studied the association of isolated micropenis with the genetic defects resulting in androgen resistance, that is, AR gene defects and 5-alpha reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) deficiency. We describe two cases of isolated micropenis: one in a 14-year-old boy and the other in a 3-year-old boy who was followed until he was 10 years old. There were no findings of hypospadias, cryptorchidism or gynecomastia in either of these patients. Serum gonadotrophin and androgen levels were obtained and karyotyping was done. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation testing assessed the functional capacity of the testes. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes, and all exons of the SRD5A2 and AR genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In both patients, baseline testosterone (T) level was low and the values were elevated after hCG testing. The sequence of the SRD5A2 gene was normal in patient 1, and a heterozygous polymorphism, V89L, was found in patient 2. Two known mutations, P390S and A870V, were identified in patients 1 and 2, respectively. Mutations in the AR gene can be associated with isolated micropenis without other features of PAIS, such as hypospadias or gynecomastia. This underlines the importance of including AR gene analysis in the evaluation of isolated micropenis with normal plasma T to ensure proper management of the patient and appropriate genetic counseling for the family.

  7. Identification of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Transcript Sequences Expressed during Infection Reveals Isolate-Specific Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, A.; Stassen, J.H.; Seidl, M.F.; Bautor, J.; Parker, J. E.; Van den Ackerveken, G.

    2011-01-01

    Biotrophic plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that are important for infection of the host. The aim of this study was to identify effectors of the downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) that are expressed during infection of its natural host Arabidopsis thaliana. Infection-related transcripts were identified from Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) derived from leaves of the susceptible Arabidopsis Ws eds1-1 mutant inoculated with the highly virulent Hpa isolate Waco9. A...

  8. Comparative Analyses of a Cystic Fibrosis Isolate of Bordetella bronchiseptica Reveal Differences in Important Pathogenic Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Neelima; Nicholson, Tracy L.; Conover, Matt S.; Ganguly, Tridib

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects and causes disease in a wide variety of animals. B. bronchiseptica also infects humans, thereby demonstrating zoonotic transmission. An extensive characterization of human B. bronchiseptica isolates is needed to better understand the distinct genetic and phenotypic traits associated with these zoonotic transmission events. Using whole-genome transcriptome and CGH analysis, we report that a B. bronchiseptica cystic fibrosis isolate, T44625, contains a distinct genomic content of virulence-associated genes and differentially expresses these genes compared to the sequenced model laboratory strain RB50, a rabbit isolate. The differential gene expression pattern correlated with unique phenotypes exhibited by T44625, which included lower motility, increased aggregation, hyperbiofilm formation, and an increased in vitro capacity to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells. Using a mouse intranasal infection model, we found that although defective in establishing high bacterial burdens early during the infection process, T44625 persisted efficiently in the mouse nose. By documenting the unique genomic and phenotypic attributes of T44625, this report provides a blueprint for understanding the successful zoonotic potential of B. bronchiseptica and other zoonotic bacteria. PMID:24470470

  9. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  10. Staphylococcus epidermidis pan-genome sequence analysis reveals diversity of skin commensal and hospital infection-associated isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Sean; Mijares, Lilia A; Becker, Jesse; Blakesley, Robert W; Bouffard, Gerard G; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Gupta, Jyoti; Gurson, Natalie; Park, Morgan; Schmidt, Brian; Thomas, Pamela J; Otto, Michael; Kong, Heidi H; Murray, Patrick R; Segre, Julia A

    2012-07-25

    While Staphylococcus epidermidis is commonly isolated from healthy human skin, it is also the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections on indwelling medical devices. Despite its importance, few genome sequences existed and the most frequent hospital-associated lineage, ST2, had not been fully sequenced. We cultivated 71 commensal S. epidermidis isolates from 15 skin sites and compared them with 28 nosocomial isolates from venous catheters and blood cultures. We produced 21 commensal and 9 nosocomial draft genomes, and annotated and compared their gene content, phylogenetic relatedness and biochemical functions. The commensal strains had an open pan-genome with 80% core genes and 20% variable genes. The variable genome was characterized by an overabundance of transposable elements, transcription factors and transporters. Biochemical diversity, as assayed by antibiotic resistance and in vitro biofilm formation, demonstrated the varied phenotypic consequences of this genomic diversity. The nosocomial isolates exhibited both large-scale rearrangements and single-nucleotide variation. We showed that S. epidermidis genomes separate into two phylogenetic groups, one consisting only of commensals. The formate dehydrogenase gene, present only in commensals, is a discriminatory marker between the two groups. Commensal skin S. epidermidis have an open pan-genome and show considerable diversity between isolates, even when derived from a single individual or body site. For ST2, the most common nosocomial lineage, we detect variation between three independent isolates sequenced. Finally, phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized group of S. epidermidis strains characterized by reduced virulence and formate dehydrogenase, which we propose as a clinical molecular marker.

  11. Whole genome sequencing reveals mycobacterial microevolution among concurrent isolates from sputum and blood in HIV infected TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssengooba, Willy; de Jong, Bouke C; Joloba, Moses L; Cobelens, Frank G; Meehan, Conor J

    2016-08-05

    In the context of advanced immunosuppression, M. tuberculosis is known to cause detectable mycobacteremia. However, little is known about the intra-patient mycobacterial microevolution and the direction of seeding between the sputum and blood compartments. From a diagnostic study of HIV-infected TB patients, 51 pairs of concurrent blood and sputum M. tuberculosis isolates from the same patient were available. In a previous analysis, we identified a subset with genotypic concordance, based on spoligotyping and 24 locus MIRU-VNTR. These paired isolates with identical genotypes were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Of the 25 concordant pairs (49 % of the 51 paired isolates), 15 (60 %) remained viable for extraction of high quality DNA for whole genome sequencing. Two patient pairs were excluded due to poor quality sequence reads. The median CD4 cell count was 32 (IQR; 16-101)/mm(3) and ten (77 %) patients were on ART. No drug resistance mutations were identified in any of the sequences analyzed. Three (23.1 %) of 13 patients had SNPs separating paired isolates from blood and sputum compartments, indicating evidence of microevolution. Using a phylogenetic approach to identify the ancestral compartment, in two (15 %) patients the blood isolate was ancestral to the sputum isolate, in one (8 %) it was the opposite, and ten (77 %) of the pairs were identical. Among HIV-infected patients with poor cellular immunity, infection with multiple strains of M. tuberculosis was found in half of the patients. In those patients with identical strains, whole genome sequencing indicated that M. tuberculosis intra-patient microevolution does occur in a few patients, yet did not reveal a consistent direction of spread between sputum and blood. This suggests that these compartments are highly connected and potentially seed each other repeatedly.

  12. Ex vivo stretch reveals altered mechanical properties of isolated dystrophin-deficient hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Barnabei

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a progressive and fatal disease of muscle wasting caused by loss of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. In the heart, DMD results in progressive cardiomyopathy and dilation of the left ventricle through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Previous reports have shown that loss of dystrophin causes sarcolemmal instability and reduced mechanical compliance of isolated cardiac myocytes. To expand upon these findings, here we have subjected the left ventricles of dystrophin-deficient mdx hearts to mechanical stretch. Unexpectedly, isolated mdx hearts showed increased left ventricular (LV compliance compared to controls during stretch as LV volume was increased above normal end diastolic volume. During LV chamber distention, sarcomere lengths increased similarly in mdx and WT hearts despite greater excursions in volume of mdx hearts. This suggests that the mechanical properties of the intact heart cannot be modeled as a simple extrapolation of findings in single cardiac myocytes. To explain these findings, a model is proposed in which disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex perturbs cell-extracellular matrix contacts and promotes the apparent slippage of myocytes past each other during LV distension. In comparison, similar increases in LV compliance were obtained in isolated hearts from β-sarcoglycan-null and laminin-α(2 mutant mice, but not in dysferlin-null mice, suggesting that increased whole-organ compliance in mdx mice is a specific effect of disrupted cell-extracellular matrix contacts and not a general consequence of cardiomyopathy via membrane defect processes. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel and cell-death independent mechanism for the progressive pathological LV dilation that occurs in DMD.

  13. Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-10-24

    Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic diversity

  14. Supplementary Material for: Whole genome sequencing reveals genomic heterogeneity and antibiotic purification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Black, PA

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Whole genome sequencing has revolutionised the interrogation of mycobacterial genomes. Recent studies have reported conflicting findings on the genomic stability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during the evolution of drug resistance. In an age where whole genome sequencing is increasingly relied upon for defining the structure of bacterial genomes, it is important to investigate the reliability of next generation sequencing to identify clonal variants present in a minor percentage of the population. This study aimed to define a reliable cut-off for identification of low frequency sequence variants and to subsequently investigate genetic heterogeneity and the evolution of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from single colonies from 14 rifampicin mono-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates, as well as the primary cultures and follow up MDR cultures from two of these patients. The whole genomes of the M. tuberculosis isolates were sequenced using either the Illumina MiSeq or Illumina HiSeq platforms. Sequences were analysed with an in-house pipeline. Results Using next-generation sequencing in combination with Sanger sequencing and statistical analysis we defined a read frequency cut-off of 30 % to identify low frequency M. tuberculosis variants with high confidence. Using this cut-off we demonstrated a high rate of genetic diversity between single colonies isolated from one population, showing that by using the current sequencing technology, single colonies are not a true reflection of the genetic diversity within a whole population and vice versa. We further showed that numerous heterogeneous variants emerge and then disappear during the evolution of isoniazid resistance within individual patients. Our findings allowed us to formulate a model for the selective bottleneck which occurs during the course of infection, acting as a genomic purification event. Conclusions Our study demonstrated true levels of genetic

  15. Isolation rearing reveals latent antisnake behavior in California ground squirrels (Otospermophilus becheeyi) searching for predatory threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromborg, Chris T; Coss, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    This study of California ground squirrels (Otospermophilus beecheyi) investigated the long-term effects of isolation rearing on alarm-call recognition. Six wild-caught squirrels, trapped as yearlings, and six laboratory-reared squirrels were maintained in solitary cages for approximately 3 years prior to the study. Visual searching and olfactory searching were measured as squirrels emerged from their burrow-like nest box into a laboratory room after hearing repetitive playbacks of alarm calls or control sounds consisting of pulses of white-noise or ambient laboratory sounds. Before exiting completely after hearing alarm calls, both groups exhibited similar levels of visual searching that was reliably higher than after hearing the other sounds. After exiting completely, the laboratory-reared squirrels exhibited a reliably greater amount of olfactory investigation than the wild-caught squirrels. Five laboratory-reared squirrels turned around after exiting and inspected their dark nest-box opening, three of which tail flagged repeatedly and one threw substrate into the opening. Since pups recognize snakes and engage in this behavior, this latent expression of antisnake behavior illustrates its robust organizational properties in the appropriate burrow-like context irrespective of the presumed retardation of neural development known to occur in other species of rodent subjected to similar isolation rearing.

  16. Population structure analysis of the neglected parasite Thelazia callipaeda revealed high genetic diversity in Eastern Asia isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Shi, Ya Li; Han, Lu Lu; Xiong, Chen; Yi, Shi Qi; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zeng Xian; Shen, Ji Long; Cui, Jing; Wang, Zhong Quan

    2018-01-01

    Thelazia callipaeda is the causative agent of thelaziasis in canids, felids and humans. However, the population genetic structure regarding this parasite remains unclear. In this study, we first explored the genetic variation of 32 T. callipaeda clinical isolates using the following multi-molecular markers: cox1, cytb, 12S rDNA, ITS1 and 18S rDNA. The isolates were collected from 13 patients from 11 geographical locations in China. Next, the population structure of T. callipaeda from Europe and other Asian countries was analyzed using the cox1 sequences collected during this study and from the GenBank database. In general, the Chinese clinical isolates of T. callipaeda expressed high genetic diversity. Based on the cox1 gene, a total of 21 haplotypes were identified. One only circulated in European countries (Hap1), while the other 20 haplotypes were dispersed in Korea, Japan and China. There were five nucleotide positions in the cox1 sequences that were confirmed as invariable among individuals from Europe and Asia, but the sequences were distinct between these two regions. Population differences between Europe and Asian countries were greater than those among China, Korea and Japan. The T. callipaeda populations from Europe and Asia should be divided into two separate sub-populations. These two groups started to diverge during the middle Pleistocene. Neutrality tests, mismatch distribution and Bayesian skyline plot (BSP) analysis all rejected possible population expansion of T. callipaeda. The Asian population of T. callipaeda has a high level of genetic diversity, but further studies should be performed to explore the biology, ecology and epidemiology of T. callipaeda.

  17. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS REVEALS GENETIC VARIATIONS OF DENSOVIRUS ISOLATED FROM FIELD MOSQUITOES IN BANGKOK AND SURROUNDING REGIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Jotekratok, Ubonwan; Pattanakitsakul, Sa-Nga

    2015-03-01

    Screening for densoviruses (DNVs) from Aedes, Culex and Toxorhynchites mosquitoes collected in Bangkok and surrounding regions identified two clades of Aedes DNV; Ae. aegypti DNV (AaeDNV) and Ae. albopictus DNV (AalDNV) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). From nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of PCR amplicons of a fragment of DNV capsid gene, these DNVs were shown to be new DNV genetic variations similar to AaeDNV. Isolation and identification of densoviruses from indigenous field mosquitoes reside in natural habitat should be helpful in monitoring the distribution of DNVs in important mosquitoes, especially Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, vector for dengue and yellow fever viruses.

  18. De Novo Assembly of a Field Isolate Genome Reveals Novel Plasmodium vivax Erythrocyte Invasion Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, James; Chan, Ernest R.; Menard, Didier; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Barnwell, John; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Serre, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent sequencing of Plasmodium vivax field isolates and monkey-adapted strains enabled characterization of SNPs throughout the genome. These analyses relied on mapping short reads onto the P. vivax reference genome that was generated using DNA from the monkey-adapted strain Salvador I. Any genomic locus deleted in this strain would be lacking in the reference genome sequence and missed in previous analyses. Here, we report de novo assembly of a P. vivax field isolate genome. Out of 2,857 assembled contigs, we identify 362 contigs, each containing more than 5 kb of contiguous DNA sequences absent from the reference genome sequence. These novel P. vivax DNA sequences account for 3.8 million nucleotides and contain 792 predicted genes. Most of these contigs contain members of multigene families and likely originate from telomeric regions. Interestingly, we identify two contigs containing predicted protein coding genes similar to known Plasmodium red blood cell invasion proteins. One gene encodes the reticulocyte-binding protein gene orthologous to P. cynomolgi RBP2e and P. knowlesi NBPXb. The second gene harbors all the hallmarks of a Plasmodium erythrocyte-binding protein, including conserved Duffy-binding like and C-terminus cysteine-rich domains. Phylogenetic analysis shows that this novel gene clusters separately from all known Plasmodium Duffy-binding protein genes. Additional analyses showing that this gene is present in most P. vivax genomes and transcribed in blood-stage parasites suggest that P. vivax red blood cell invasion mechanisms may be more complex than currently understood. The strategy employed here complements previous genomic analyses and takes full advantage of next-generation sequencing data to provide a comprehensive characterization of genetic variations in this important malaria parasite. Further analyses of the novel protein coding genes discovered through de novo assembly have the potential to identify genes that influence key aspects of P

  19. Structural diversity of the vastus intermedius origin revealed by analysis of isolated muscle specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shuntaro; Ichimura, Koichiro; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    The quadriceps femoris (QF), a major extensor of the knee joint, plays an important role in human movement. However, descriptions of the three vastus muscles of the QF in anatomy textbooks remain confusing. We analyzed 33 QFs by a novel approach, using isolated muscle specimens to clarify the structures of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and vastus intermedius (VI) origins. The origins of the VL and VM were quite constant in shape and location, but the VI was much more structurally diverse. In typical cases (23 of 33), the origin of the VI attached muscularly to the anterior and lateral surface of the femoral shaft. It adjoined the origin of the VL at the lateral lip (LL) of the linea aspera to form a common origin. In some cases (10 of 33), the muscle belly and origin of the VI were much smaller than those in the typical cases; the origin of the VI attached only to the anterior surface of the femur and did not contact the LL. In addition, the muscle belly of the VI was narrow and almost corresponded to the width of the femoral shaft. The isolated muscle specimen is a useful tool for analyzing individual muscle structures, which can be difficult to observe by routine dissection. Using this method, it became clear that the VI is more structurally diverse in its origin than the VL and VM. Clin. Anat. 30:98-105, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Clinical Anatomy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Clinical Anatomists.

  20. Commonalities in Development of Pure Breeds and Population Isolates Revealed in the Genome of the Sardinian Fonni's Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Dayna L; Davis, Brian W; Cocco, Raffaella; Sechi, Sara; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Parker, Heidi G; Polli, Michele; Marelli, Stefano P; Crepaldi, Paola; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-10-01

    The island inhabitants of Sardinia have long been a focus for studies of complex human traits due to their unique ancestral background and population isolation reflecting geographic and cultural restriction. Population isolates share decreased genomic diversity, increased linkage disequilibrium, and increased inbreeding coefficients. In many regions, dogs and humans have been exposed to the same natural and artificial forces of environment, growth, and migration. Distinct dog breeds have arisen through human-driven selection of characteristics to meet an ideal standard of appearance and function. The Fonni's Dog, an endemic dog population on Sardinia, has not been subjected to an intensive system of artificial selection, but rather has developed alongside the human population of Sardinia, influenced by geographic isolation and unregulated selection based on its environmental adaptation and aptitude for owner-desired behaviors. Through analysis of 28 dog breeds, represented with whole-genome sequences from 13 dogs and ∼170,000 genome-wide single nucleotide variants from 155 dogs, we have produced a genomic illustration of the Fonni's Dog. Genomic patterns confirm within-breed similarity, while population and demographic analyses provide spatial identity of Fonni's Dog to other Mediterranean breeds. Investigation of admixture and fixation indices reveals insights into the involvement of Fonni's Dogs in breed development throughout the Mediterranean. We describe how characteristics of population isolates are reflected in dog breeds that have undergone artificial selection, and are mirrored in the Fonni's Dog through traditional isolating factors that affect human populations. Lastly, we show that the genetic history of Fonni's Dog parallels demographic events in local human populations. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Diversity of Vibrio navarrensis Revealed by Genomic Comparison: Veterinary Isolates Are Related to Strains Associated with Human Illness and Sewage Isolates While Seawater Strains Are More Distant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Keike; Kukuc, Cindy; Bier, Nadja; Taureck, Karin; Hammerl, Jens A; Strauch, Eckhard

    2017-01-01

    Strains of Vibrio navarrensis are present in aquatic environments like seawater, rivers, and sewage. Recently, strains of this species were identified in human clinical specimens. In this study, V. navarrensis strains isolated from livestock in Germany were characterized that were found in aborted fetuses and/or placentas after miscarriages. The veterinary strains were analyzed using phenotypical and genotypical methods and compared to isolates from marine environments of the Baltic Sea and North Sea. The investigated phenotypical traits were similar in all German strains. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to evaluate a phylogenetic relationship by performing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. For the SNP analysis, WGS data of two American human pathogenic strains and two Spanish environmental isolates from sewage were included. A phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of five protein-coding housekeeping genes (gyrB, pyrH, recA, atpA, and rpoB), was additionally performed. Both phylogenetic analyses reveal a greater distance of the environmental seawater strains to the other strains. The phylogenetic tree constructed from concatenated sequences of housekeeping genes places veterinary, human pathogenic and Spanish sewage strains into one cluster. Presence and absence of virulence-associated genes were investigated based on WGS data and confirmed by PCR. However, this analysis showed no clear pattern for the potentially pathogenic strains. The detection of V. navarrensis in human clinical specimens strongly suggests that this species should be regarded as a potential human pathogen. The identification of V. navarrensis strains in domestic animals implicates a zoonotic potential of this species. This could indicate a potential threat for humans, as according to the "One Health" concept, human, animal, and environmental health are linked. Future studies are necessary to search for reservoirs of these bacteria in the environment and/or in

  2. A Genome-Wide Analysis of Populations from European Russia Reveals a New Pole of Genetic Diversity in Northern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrunin, Andrey V.; Khokhrin, Denis V.; Filippova, Irina N.; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Bebyakova, Natalia A.; Bolotova, Natalia L.; Klovins, Janis; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rehnström, Karola; Ripatti, Samuli; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Macek, Milan; Krulišová, Veronika; Lubinski, Jan; Metspalu, Andres; Limborska, Svetlana A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies examined the fine-scale structure of human genetic variation in Europe. However, the European sets analyzed represent mainly northern, western, central, and southern Europe. Here, we report an analysis of approximately 166,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in populations from eastern (northeastern) Europe: four Russian populations from European Russia, and three populations from the northernmost Finno-Ugric ethnicities (Veps and two contrast groups of Komi people). These were compared with several reference European samples, including Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Poles, Czechs, Germans, and Italians. The results obtained demonstrated genetic heterogeneity of populations living in the region studied. Russians from the central part of European Russia (Tver, Murom, and Kursk) exhibited similarities with populations from central–eastern Europe, and were distant from Russian sample from the northern Russia (Mezen district, Archangelsk region). Komi samples, especially Izhemski Komi, were significantly different from all other populations studied. These can be considered as a second pole of genetic diversity in northern Europe (in addition to the pole, occupied by Finns), as they had a distinct ancestry component. Russians from Mezen and the Finnic-speaking Veps were positioned between the two poles, but differed from each other in the proportions of Komi and Finnic ancestries. In general, our data provides a more complete genetic map of Europe accounting for the diversity in its most eastern (northeastern) populations. PMID:23505534

  3. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  4. Ancient DNA from South-East Europe Reveals Different Events during Early and Middle Neolithic Influencing the European Genetic Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervella, Montserrat; Rotea, Mihai; Izagirre, Neskuts; Constantinescu, Mihai; Alonso, Santos; Ioana, Mihai; Lazăr, Cătălin; Ridiche, Florin; Soficaru, Andrei Dorian; Netea, Mihai G.; de-la-Rua, Concepcion

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the process of Neolithization for the genetic make-up of European populations has been hotly debated, with shifting hypotheses from a demic diffusion (DD) to a cultural diffusion (CD) model. In this regard, ancient DNA data from the Balkan Peninsula, which is an important source of information to assess the process of Neolithization in Europe, is however missing. In the present study we show genetic information on ancient populations of the South-East of Europe. We assessed mtDNA from ten sites from the current territory of Romania, spanning a time-period from the Early Neolithic to the Late Bronze Age. mtDNA data from Early Neolithic farmers of the Starčevo Criş culture in Romania (Cârcea, Gura Baciului and Negrileşti sites), confirm their genetic relationship with those of the LBK culture (Linienbandkeramik Kultur) in Central Europe, and they show little genetic continuity with modern European populations. On the other hand, populations of the Middle-Late Neolithic (Boian, Zau and Gumelniţa cultures), supposedly a second wave of Neolithic migration from Anatolia, had a much stronger effect on the genetic heritage of the European populations. In contrast, we find a smaller contribution of Late Bronze Age migrations to the genetic composition of Europeans. Based on these findings, we propose that permeation of mtDNA lineages from a second wave of Middle-Late Neolithic migration from North-West Anatolia into the Balkan Peninsula and Central Europe represent an important contribution to the genetic shift between Early and Late Neolithic populations in Europe, and consequently to the genetic make-up of modern European populations. PMID:26053041

  5. Novel European free-living, non-diazotrophic Bradyrhizobium isolates from contrasting soils that lack nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes – a genome comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frances Patricia; Clark, Ian M.; King, Robert; Shaw, Liz J.; Woodward, Martin J.; Hirsch, Penny R.

    2016-01-01

    The slow-growing genus Bradyrhizobium is biologically important in soils, with different representatives found to perform a range of biochemical functions including photosynthesis, induction of root nodules and symbiotic nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Consequently, the role of the genus in soil ecology and biogeochemical transformations is of agricultural and environmental significance. Some isolates of Bradyrhizobium have been shown to be non-symbiotic and do not possess the ability to form nodules. Here we present the genome and gene annotations of two such free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, named G22 and BF49, from soils with differing long-term management regimes (grassland and bare fallow respectively) in addition to carbon metabolism analysis. These Bradyrhizobium isolates are the first to be isolated and sequenced from European soil and are the first free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, lacking both nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes, to have their genomes sequenced and assembled from cultured samples. The G22 and BF49 genomes are distinctly different with respect to size and number of genes; the grassland isolate also contains a plasmid. There are also a number of functional differences between these isolates and other published genomes, suggesting that this ubiquitous genus is extremely heterogeneous and has roles within the community not including symbiotic nitrogen fixation. PMID:27162150

  6. Novel European free-living, non-diazotrophic Bradyrhizobium isolates from contrasting soils that lack nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes - a genome comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frances Patricia; Clark, Ian M.; King, Robert; Shaw, Liz J.; Woodward, Martin J.; Hirsch, Penny R.

    2016-05-01

    The slow-growing genus Bradyrhizobium is biologically important in soils, with different representatives found to perform a range of biochemical functions including photosynthesis, induction of root nodules and symbiotic nitrogen fixation and denitrification. Consequently, the role of the genus in soil ecology and biogeochemical transformations is of agricultural and environmental significance. Some isolates of Bradyrhizobium have been shown to be non-symbiotic and do not possess the ability to form nodules. Here we present the genome and gene annotations of two such free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, named G22 and BF49, from soils with differing long-term management regimes (grassland and bare fallow respectively) in addition to carbon metabolism analysis. These Bradyrhizobium isolates are the first to be isolated and sequenced from European soil and are the first free-living Bradyrhizobium isolates, lacking both nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes, to have their genomes sequenced and assembled from cultured samples. The G22 and BF49 genomes are distinctly different with respect to size and number of genes; the grassland isolate also contains a plasmid. There are also a number of functional differences between these isolates and other published genomes, suggesting that this ubiquitous genus is extremely heterogeneous and has roles within the community not including symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  7. A Brucella spp. Isolate from a Pac-Man Frog (Ceratophrys ornata) Reveals Characteristics Departing from Classical Brucellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Lloréns, Pedro F.; Quance, Chris R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Stuber, Tod P.; Edwards, John F.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; O'Callaghan, David; Keriel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Brucella are highly infectious bacterial pathogens responsible for brucellosis, a frequent worldwide zoonosis. The Brucella genus has recently expanded from 6 to 11 species, all of which were associated with mammals; The natural host range recently expanded to amphibians after some reports of atypical strains from frogs. Here we describe the first in depth phenotypic and genetic characterization of a Brucella strains isolated from a frog. Strain B13-0095 was isolated from a Pac-Man frog (Ceratophyrus ornate) at a veterinary hospital in Texas and was initially misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi. We found that B13-0095 belongs to a group of early-diverging brucellae that includes Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and the B. inopinata-like strain BO2, with traits that depart significantly from those of the “classical” Brucella spp. Analysis of B13-0095 genome sequence revealed several specific features that suggest that this isolate represents an intermediate between a soil associated ancestor and the host adapted “classical” species. Like strain BO2, B13-0095 does not possess the genes required to produce the perosamine based LPS found in classical Brucella, but has a set of genes that could encode a rhamnose based O-antigen. Despite this, B13-0095 has a very fast intracellular replication rate in both epithelial cells and macrophages. Finally, another major finding in this study is the bacterial motility observed for strains B13-0095, BO1, and BO2, which is remarkable for this bacterial genus. This study thus highlights several novel characteristics in strains belonging to an emerging group within the Brucella genus. Accurate identification tools for such atypical Brucella isolates and careful evaluation of their zoonotic potential, are urgently required. PMID:27734009

  8. A Brucella spp. Isolate from a Pac-Man Frog (Ceratophrys ornata Reveals Characteristics Departing from Classical Brucellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Franscico Soler Llorens

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucella are highly infectious bacterial pathogens responsible for brucellosis, a frequent worldwide zoonosis. The Brucella genus has recently expanded from 6 to 11 species, all of which were associated with mammals; The natural host range recently expanded to amphibians after some reports of atypical strains from frogs. Here we describe the first in depth phenotypic and genetic characterization of a Brucella strains isolated from a frog. Strain B13-0095 was isolated from a Pac-Man frog (Ceratophyrus ornate at a veterinary hospital in Texas and was initially misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi. We found that B13-0095 belongs to a group of early-diverging brucellae that includes Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and the B. inopinata-like strain BO2, with traits that depart significantly from those of the ‘classical’ Brucella spp. Analysis of B13-0095 genome sequence revealed several specific features that suggest that this isolate represents an intermediate between a soil associated ancestor and the host adapted ‘classical’ species. Like strain BO2, B13-0095 does not possess the genes required to produce the perosamine based LPS found in classical Brucella, but has a set of genes that could encode a rhamnose based O-antigen. Despite this, B13-0095 has a very fast intracellular replication rate in both epithelial cells and macrophages. Finally, another major finding in this study is the bacterial motility observed for strains B13-0095, BO1 and BO2, which is remarkable for this bacterial genus.This study thus highlights several novel characteristics in strains belonging to an emerging group within the Brucella genus. Accurate identification tools for such atypical Brucella isolates and careful evaluation of their zoonotic potential, are urgently required.

  9. The Pituitary Gland of the European Eel Reveals Massive Expression of Genes Involved in the Melanocortin System

    OpenAIRE

    Eirill Ager-Wick; Dirks, Ron P.; Erik Burgerhout; Rasoul Nourizadeh-Lillabadi; de Wijze, Daniëlle L.; Spaink, Herman P; van den Thillart, Guido E. E. J. M.; Katsumi Tsukamoto; Sylvie Dufour; Finn-Arne Weltzien; Henkel, Christiaan V.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones secreted from the pituitary gland regulate important processes such as development, growth and metabolism, reproduction, water balance, and body pigmentation. Synthesis and secretion of pituitary hormones are regulated by different factors from the hypothalamus, but also through feedback mechanisms from peripheral organs, and from the pituitary itself. In the European eel extensive attention has been directed towards understanding the different components of the brain-pituitary-gonad...

  10. Ancient DNA analysis reveals high frequency of European lactase persistence allele (T-13910 in medieval central europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annina Krüttli

    Full Text Available Ruminant milk and dairy products are important food resources in many European, African, and Middle Eastern societies. These regions are also associated with derived genetic variants for lactase persistence. In mammals, lactase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes the milk sugar lactose, is normally down-regulated after weaning, but at least five human populations around the world have independently evolved mutations regulating the expression of the lactase-phlorizin-hydrolase gene. These mutations result in a dominant lactase persistence phenotype and continued lactase tolerance in adulthood. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at C/T-13910 is responsible for most lactase persistence in European populations, but when and where the T-13910 polymorphism originated and the evolutionary processes by which it rose to high frequency in Europe have been the subject of strong debate. A history of dairying is presumed to be a prerequisite, but archaeological evidence is lacking. In this study, DNA was extracted from the dentine of 36 individuals excavated at a medieval cemetery in Dalheim, Germany. Eighteen individuals were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by molecular cloning and sequencing, of which 13 (72% exhibited a European lactase persistence genotype: 44% CT, 28% TT. Previous ancient DNA-based studies found that lactase persistence genotypes fall below detection levels in most regions of Neolithic Europe. Our research shows that by AD 1200, lactase persistence frequency had risen to over 70% in this community in western Central Europe. Given that lactase persistence genotype frequency in present-day Germany and Austria is estimated at 71-80%, our results suggest that genetic lactase persistence likely reached modern levels before the historic population declines associated with the Black Death, thus excluding plague-associated evolutionary forces in the rise of lactase persistence in this region. This new evidence sheds light on the dynamic

  11. Comparative studies on the administrative convergence revealed by national strategies of administrative reform in some South-Eastern European states

    OpenAIRE

    Matei, Lucica; Matei, Ani; Zanovschi, Diana; Stoian, Oana

    2010-01-01

    The paper has as main topic the administrative convergence and its reflection in the national strategies of administrative reform in some states in South Eastern Europe. Having a complex content, sometimes even ambigous, the administrative convergence will have as finality the integration in the European Administrative Space and the administrative reforms as support. From this prospect, the South-Eastern Europe has a certain specificity emphasised by: different positions of the states under d...

  12. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, R.S.; Mevius, D.J.; Schroeter, A.; Teale, C.; Meunier, D.; Butaye, P.; Franco, A.; Utinane, A.; Amado, A.; Moreno, M.; Greko, C.; Stark, K.D.; Berghold, C.; Myllyniemi, A.L.; Wasyl, D.; Sunde, M.; Aerestrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin ¿ II" (ARBAO-II) was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146) for the period 2003¿2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories in European

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus isolates revealed biotype 3 evolutionary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koton, Yael; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Bisharat, Naiel

    2014-01-01

    In 1996 a common-source outbreak of severe soft tissue and bloodstream infections erupted among Israeli fish farmers and fish consumers due to changes in fish marketing policies. The causative pathogen was a new strain of Vibrio vulnificus, named biotype 3, which displayed a unique biochemical and genotypic profile. Initial observations suggested that the pathogen erupted as a result of genetic recombination between two distinct populations. We applied a whole genome shotgun sequencing approach using several V. vulnificus strains from Israel in order to study the pan genome of V. vulnificus and determine the phylogenetic relationship of biotype 3 with existing populations. The core genome of V. vulnificus based on 16 draft and complete genomes consisted of 3068 genes, representing between 59 and 78% of the whole genome of 16 strains. The accessory genome varied in size from 781 to 2044 kbp. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole, core, and accessory genomes displayed similar clustering patterns with two main clusters, clinical (C) and environmental (E), all biotype 3 strains formed a distinct group within the E cluster. Annotation of accessory genomic regions found in biotype 3 strains and absent from the core genome yielded 1732 genes, of which the vast majority encoded hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, and mobile element proteins. A total of 1916 proteins (including 713 hypothetical proteins) were present in all human pathogenic strains (both biotype 3 and non-biotype 3) and absent from the environmental strains. Clustering analysis of the non-hypothetical proteins revealed 148 protein clusters shared by all human pathogenic strains; these included transcriptional regulators, arylsulfatases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, acetyltransferases, GGDEF family proteins, transposases, type IV secretory system (T4SS) proteins, and integrases. Our study showed that V. vulnificus biotype 3 evolved from environmental populations and formed a genetically

  14. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Vibrio Vulnificus Isolates Revealed Biotype 3 Evolutionary Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eKotton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 a common-source outbreak of severe soft tissue and bloodstream infections erupted among Israeli fish farmers and fish consumers due to changes in fish marketing policies. The causative pathogen was a new strain of Vibrio vulnificus, named biotype 3, which displayed a unique biochemical and genotypic profile. Initial observations suggested that the pathogen erupted as a result of genetic recombination between two distinct populations. We applied a whole genome shotgun sequencing approach using several V. vulnificus strains from Israel in order to study the pan genome of V. vulnificus and determine the phylogenetic relationship of biotype 3 with existing populations. The core genome of V. vulnificus based on 16 draft and complete genomes consisted of 3068 genes, representing between 59% and 78% of the whole genome of 16 strains. The accessory genome varied in size from 781 kbp to 2044 kbp. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole, core, and accessory genomes displayed similar clustering patterns with two main clusters, clinical (C and environmental (E, all biotype 3 strains formed a distinct group within the E cluster. Annotation of accessory genomic regions found in biotype 3 strains and absent from the core genome yielded 1732 genes, of which the vast majority encoded hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, and mobile element proteins. A total of 1916 proteins (including 713 hypothetical proteins were present in all human pathogenic strains (both biotype 3 and non-biotype 3 and absent from the environmental strains. Clustering analysis of the non-hypothetical proteins revealed 148 protein clusters shared by all human pathogenic strains; these included transcriptional regulators, arylsulfatases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, acetyltransferases, GGDEF family proteins, transposases, type IV secretory system (T4SS proteins, and integrases. Our study showed that V. vulnificus biotype 3 evolved from environmental populations and

  15. The European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) survey of candidaemia in Italy: in vitro susceptibility of 375 Candida albicans isolates and biofilm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorano, Anna Maria; Prigitano, Anna; Biraghi, Emanuela; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of 375 Candida albicans bloodstream isolates recovered during the European Confederation of Medical Mycology survey of candidaemia performed in Lombardia, Italy and to test the ability to form biofilm. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin was performed by broth microdilution following the NCCLS guidelines. Biofilm production was measured using the XTT reduction assay in 59 isolates selected as representative of different patterns of susceptibility to flucytosine and azoles. MICs (mg/L) at which 90% of the strains were inhibited were < or =0.25 for flucytosine, 0.25 for caspofungin, 4 for fluconazole and 0.06 for itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole. Flucytosine resistance was detected in five isolates and was associated with serotype B in 2/29 and serotype A in 3/346. Resistance to fluconazole was detected in 10 isolates; nine of these exhibited reduced susceptibility to the other azoles. Among the 10 patients with fluconazole-resistant C. albicans bloodstream infection, only one, an AIDS patient, had been previously treated with fluconazole. Biofilm production was observed in 23 isolates (39%) and was significantly associated with serotype B. No relationship was detected with the pattern of antifungal susceptibility. Resistance is uncommon in C. albicans isolates recovered from blood cultures, while biofilm production is a relatively frequent event. Periodic surveillance is warranted to monitor the incidence of in vitro antifungal resistance as well as of biofilm production.

  16. Subfossil leaves reveal a new upland hardwood component of the pre-European Piedmont landscape,Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J Elliott

    Full Text Available Widespread deforestation, agriculture, and construction of milldams by European settlers greatly influenced valley-bottom stream morphology and riparian vegetation in the northeastern USA. The former broad, tussock-sedge wetlands with small, anastomosing channels were converted into today's incised, meandering streams with unstable banks that support mostly weedy, invasive vegetation. Vast accumulations of fine-grained "legacy" sediments that blanket the regional valley-bottom Piedmont landscape now are being reworked from stream banks, significantly impairing the ecological health of downstream water bodies, most notably the Chesapeake Bay. However, potential restoration is impaired by lack of direct knowledge of the pre-settlement riparian and upslope floral ecosystems. We studied the subfossil leaf flora of Denlingers Mill, an obsolete (breached milldam site in southeastern Pennsylvania that exhibits a modern secondary forest growing atop thin soils, above bedrock outcrops immediately adjacent to a modified, incised stream channel. Presumably, an overhanging old-growth forest also existed on this substrate until the early 1700s and was responsible for depositing exceptionally preserved, minimally transported subfossil leaves into hydric soil strata, which immediately underlie post-European settlement legacy sediments. We interpret the eleven identified species of the subfossil assemblage to primarily represent a previously unknown, upland Red Oak-American Beech mixed hardwood forest. Some elements also appear to belong to a valley-margin Red Maple-Black Ash swamp forest, consistent with preliminary data from a nearby site. Thus, our results add significantly to a more complete understanding of the pre-European settlement landscape, especially of the hardwood tree flora. Compared with the modern forest, it is apparent that both lowland and upslope forests in the region have been modified significantly by historical activities. Our study

  17. Isolation of Chromatin from Dysfunctional Telomeres Reveals an Important Role for Ring1b in NHEJ-Mediated Chromosome Fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bartocci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When telomeres become critically short, DNA damage response factors are recruited at chromosome ends, initiating a cellular response to DNA damage. We performed proteomic isolation of chromatin fragments (PICh in order to define changes in chromatin composition that occur upon onset of acute telomere dysfunction triggered by depletion of the telomere-associated factor TRF2. This unbiased purification of telomere-associated proteins in functional or dysfunctional conditions revealed the dynamic changes in chromatin composition that take place at telomeres upon DNA damage induction. On the basis of our results, we describe a critical role for the polycomb group protein Ring1b in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ-mediated end-to-end chromosome fusions. We show that cells with reduced levels of Ring1b have a reduced ability to repair uncapped telomeric chromatin. Our data represent an unbiased isolation of chromatin undergoing DNA damage and are a valuable resource to map the changes in chromatin composition in response to DNA damage activation.

  18. The Pituitary Gland of the European Eel Reveals Massive Expression of Genes Involved in the Melanocortin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager-Wick, Eirill; Dirks, Ron P.; Burgerhout, Erik; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; de Wijze, Daniëlle L.; Spaink, Herman P.; van den Thillart, Guido E. E. J. M.; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Dufour, Sylvie; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Henkel, Christiaan V.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones secreted from the pituitary gland regulate important processes such as development, growth and metabolism, reproduction, water balance, and body pigmentation. Synthesis and secretion of pituitary hormones are regulated by different factors from the hypothalamus, but also through feedback mechanisms from peripheral organs, and from the pituitary itself. In the European eel extensive attention has been directed towards understanding the different components of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis, but little is known about the regulation of upstream processes in the pituitary gland. In order to gain a broader mechanistic understanding of the eel pituitary gland, we have performed RNA-seq transcriptome profiling of the pituitary of prepubertal female silver eels. RNA-seq reads generated on the Illumina platform were mapped to the recently assembled European eel genome. The most abundant transcript in the eel pituitary codes for pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor for hormones of the melanocortin system. Several genes putatively involved in downstream processing of pro-opiomelanocortin were manually annotated, and were found to be highly expressed, both by RNA-seq and by qPCR. The melanocortin system, which affects skin color, energy homeostasis and in other teleosts interacts with the reproductive system, has so far received limited attention in eels. However, since up to one third of the silver eel pituitary’s mRNA pool encodes pro-opiomelanocortin, our results indicate that control of the melanocortin system is a major function of the eel pituitary. PMID:24130881

  19. The pituitary gland of the European eel reveals massive expression of genes involved in the melanocortin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirill Ager-Wick

    Full Text Available Hormones secreted from the pituitary gland regulate important processes such as development, growth and metabolism, reproduction, water balance, and body pigmentation. Synthesis and secretion of pituitary hormones are regulated by different factors from the hypothalamus, but also through feedback mechanisms from peripheral organs, and from the pituitary itself. In the European eel extensive attention has been directed towards understanding the different components of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis, but little is known about the regulation of upstream processes in the pituitary gland. In order to gain a broader mechanistic understanding of the eel pituitary gland, we have performed RNA-seq transcriptome profiling of the pituitary of prepubertal female silver eels. RNA-seq reads generated on the Illumina platform were mapped to the recently assembled European eel genome. The most abundant transcript in the eel pituitary codes for pro-opiomelanocortin, the precursor for hormones of the melanocortin system. Several genes putatively involved in downstream processing of pro-opiomelanocortin were manually annotated, and were found to be highly expressed, both by RNA-seq and by qPCR. The melanocortin system, which affects skin color, energy homeostasis and in other teleosts interacts with the reproductive system, has so far received limited attention in eels. However, since up to one third of the silver eel pituitary's mRNA pool encodes pro-opiomelanocortin, our results indicate that control of the melanocortin system is a major function of the eel pituitary.

  20. Mitogenome sequencing reveals shallow evolutionary histories and recent divergence time between morphologically and ecologically distinct European whitefish (Coregonus spp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Magnus W.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Orlando, Ludovic

    2012-01-01

    an alternate use of such data to recover relationships and population history of closely related lineages with a shallow evolutionary history. Using a GS-FLX platform, we sequenced 106 mitogenomes from the Coregonus lavaretus (Europe) and Coregonus clupeaformis (North America) species complexes to investigate...... the evolutionary history of the endangered Danish North Sea houting (NSH) and other closely related Danish and Baltic European lake whitefish (ELW). Two well-supported clades were found within both ELW and NSH, probably reflecting historical introgression via Baltic migrants. Although ELW and NSH......-dependency effects. The estimate of c. 2700 bp was remarkably similar to results obtained using microsatellite markers. Within North American C. clupeaformis, the divergence time between the two lineages (Atlantic and Acadian) was estimated as between 20 000 and 60 000 bp. Under the assumption that NSH and ELW...

  1. Multiple SNP markers reveal fine-scale population and deep phylogeographic structure in European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus L.).

    KAUST Repository

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe

    2012-07-30

    Geographic surveys of allozymes, microsatellites, nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have detected several genetic subdivisions among European anchovy populations. However, these studies have been limited in their power to detect some aspects of population structure by the use of a single or a few molecular markers, or by limited geographic sampling. We use a multi-marker approach, 47 nDNA and 15 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), to analyze 626 European anchovies from the whole range of the species to resolve shallow and deep levels of population structure. Nuclear SNPs define 10 genetic entities within two larger genetically distinctive groups associated with oceanic variables and different life-history traits. MtDNA SNPs define two deep phylogroups that reflect ancient dispersals and colonizations. These markers define two ecological groups. One major group of Iberian-Atlantic populations is associated with upwelling areas on narrow continental shelves and includes populations spawning and overwintering in coastal areas. A second major group includes northern populations in the North East (NE) Atlantic (including the Bay of Biscay) and the Mediterranean and is associated with wide continental shelves with local larval retention currents. This group tends to spawn and overwinter in oceanic areas. These two groups encompass ten populations that differ from previously defined management stocks in the Alboran Sea, Iberian-Atlantic and Bay of Biscay regions. In addition, a new North Sea-English Channel stock is defined. SNPs indicate that some populations in the Bay of Biscay are genetically closer to North Western (NW) Mediterranean populations than to other populations in the NE Atlantic, likely due to colonizations of the Bay of Biscay and NW Mediterranean by migrants from a common ancestral population. Northern NE Atlantic populations were subsequently established by migrants from the Bay of Biscay. Populations along the Iberian

  2. Mycophilic or mycophobic? Legislation and guidelines on wild mushroom commerce reveal different consumption behaviour in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peintner, Ursula; Schwarz, Stefanie; Mešić, Armin; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Moreno, Gabriel; Saviuc, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Mycophiles forage for and pick vast quantities of a wide variety of wild mushroom species. As a result, mushroom intoxications are comparatively frequent in such countries with mycophiles. Thus, national governments are forced to release guidelines or enact legislation in order to ensure the safe commerce of wild mushrooms due to food safety concerns. It is in these guidelines and laws that one can observe whether a country is indeed mycophobic or mycophilic. Furthermore, these laws and guidelines provide valuable information on mushroom preferences and on the consumption habits of each country. As such we were interested in the questions as to whether mushroom consumption behaviour was different within Europe, and if it was possible to discover the typical or distinctive culinary preferences of Slavic or Romanic speaking people, people from special geographical regions or from different zones. This work is based on the analysis of edible mushroom lists available in specific guidelines or legislation related to the consumption and commerce of mushrooms in 27 European countries. The overall diversity of edible mushrooms authorised to be commercialised in Europe is very high. However, only 60 out of a total 268 fungal species can be cultivated. This highlights the importance of guidelines or legislation for the safe commerce of wild mushrooms. The species richness and composition of the mushrooms listed for commerce is very heterogeneous within Europe. The consumption behaviour is not only language-family-related, but is strongly influenced by geographical location and neighbouring countries. Indicator species were detected for different European regions; most of them are widespread fungi, and thus prove culture-specific preferences for these mushrooms. Our results highlight tradition and external input such as trade and cultural exchange as strong factors shaping mushroom consumption behaviour.

  3. Mycophilic or Mycophobic? Legislation and Guidelines on Wild Mushroom Commerce Reveal Different Consumption Behaviour in European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peintner, Ursula; Schwarz, Stefanie; Mešić, Armin; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Moreno, Gabriel; Saviuc, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Mycophiles forage for and pick vast quantities of a wide variety of wild mushroom species. As a result, mushroom intoxications are comparatively frequent in such countries with mycophiles. Thus, national governments are forced to release guidelines or enact legislation in order to ensure the safe commerce of wild mushrooms due to food safety concerns. It is in these guidelines and laws that one can observe whether a country is indeed mycophobic or mycophilic. Furthermore, these laws and guidelines provide valuable information on mushroom preferences and on the consumption habits of each country. As such we were interested in the questions as to whether mushroom consumption behaviour was different within Europe, and if it was possible to discover the typical or distinctive culinary preferences of Slavic or Romanic speaking people, people from special geographical regions or from different zones. This work is based on the analysis of edible mushroom lists available in specific guidelines or legislation related to the consumption and commerce of mushrooms in 27 European countries. The overall diversity of edible mushrooms authorised to be commercialised in Europe is very high. However, only 60 out of a total 268 fungal species can be cultivated. This highlights the importance of guidelines or legislation for the safe commerce of wild mushrooms. The species richness and composition of the mushrooms listed for commerce is very heterogeneous within Europe. The consumption behaviour is not only language-family-related, but is strongly influenced by geographical location and neighbouring countries. Indicator species were detected for different European regions; most of them are widespread fungi, and thus prove culture-specific preferences for these mushrooms. Our results highlight tradition and external input such as trade and cultural exchange as strong factors shaping mushroom consumption behaviour. PMID:23704957

  4. Mycophilic or mycophobic? Legislation and guidelines on wild mushroom commerce reveal different consumption behaviour in European countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Peintner

    Full Text Available Mycophiles forage for and pick vast quantities of a wide variety of wild mushroom species. As a result, mushroom intoxications are comparatively frequent in such countries with mycophiles. Thus, national governments are forced to release guidelines or enact legislation in order to ensure the safe commerce of wild mushrooms due to food safety concerns. It is in these guidelines and laws that one can observe whether a country is indeed mycophobic or mycophilic. Furthermore, these laws and guidelines provide valuable information on mushroom preferences and on the consumption habits of each country. As such we were interested in the questions as to whether mushroom consumption behaviour was different within Europe, and if it was possible to discover the typical or distinctive culinary preferences of Slavic or Romanic speaking people, people from special geographical regions or from different zones. This work is based on the analysis of edible mushroom lists available in specific guidelines or legislation related to the consumption and commerce of mushrooms in 27 European countries. The overall diversity of edible mushrooms authorised to be commercialised in Europe is very high. However, only 60 out of a total 268 fungal species can be cultivated. This highlights the importance of guidelines or legislation for the safe commerce of wild mushrooms. The species richness and composition of the mushrooms listed for commerce is very heterogeneous within Europe. The consumption behaviour is not only language-family-related, but is strongly influenced by geographical location and neighbouring countries. Indicator species were detected for different European regions; most of them are widespread fungi, and thus prove culture-specific preferences for these mushrooms. Our results highlight tradition and external input such as trade and cultural exchange as strong factors shaping mushroom consumption behaviour.

  5. New early Eocene vertebrate assemblage from western India reveals a mixed fauna of European and Gondwana affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ypresian Cambay Shale Formation at Vastan and Mangrol lignite mines in Gujarat, western India, has yielded a rich vertebrate fauna with numerous taxa of European affinities. Here we report a new, approximately contemporary vertebrate assemblage from two fossiliferous layers in the nearby mine of Tadkeshwar. These layers have yielded a similar mammal fauna with the co-occurrence of the perissodactyl-like cambaytheriid Cambaytherium thewissi, the adapoid primates Marcgodinotius indicus and cf. Asiadapis cambayensis, and the hyaenodontid Indohyaenodon raoi. The presence of these species in both Vastan and Tadkeshwar mines and at different levels suggests that the deposits between the two major lignite seams represent a single land mammal age. Apart from the aforementioned species there is a new, smaller species of Cambaytherium, and a new genus and species of esthonychid tillodont. This fauna also contains the first large early Eocene vertebrates from India, including an unidentified Coryphodon-like pantodont, a dyrosaurid crocodyliform and a new giant madtsoiid snake. Among the Tadkeshwar vertebrates several taxa are of Gondwana affinities, such as Pelomedusoides turtles, dyrosaurids, and large madtsoiids, attesting that the early Eocene was a crucial period in India during which Laurasian taxa of European affinities co-existed with relict taxa from Gondwana before the India-Asia collision. Our results suggest that terrestrial faunas could have dispersed to or from Europe during episodes of contact between the Indian subcontinent and different island blocks along the northern margin of the Neotethys, such as the Kohistan–Ladakh island-arc system. Gondwana taxa might represent remnants of ghost lineages shared with Madagascar, which reached the Indian subcontinent during the late Cretaceous; alternatively they might have come from North Africa and passed along the southern margin of the Neotethys to reach the Indian subcontinent. These

  6. Characterization of sour cherry isolates of plum pox virus from the Volga Basin in Russia reveals a new cherry strain of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasa, Miroslav; Prikhodko, Yuri; Predajňa, Lukáš; Nagyová, Alžbeta; Shneyder, Yuri; Zhivaeva, Tatiana; Subr, Zdeno; Cambra, Mariano; Candresse, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is the causal agent of sharka, the most detrimental virus disease of stone fruit trees worldwide. PPV isolates have been assigned into seven distinct strains, of which PPV-C regroups the genetically distinct isolates detected in several European countries on cherry hosts. Here, three complete and several partial genomic sequences of PPV isolates from sour cherry trees in the Volga River basin of Russia have been determined. The comparison of complete genome sequences has shown that the nucleotide identity values with other PPV isolates reached only 77.5 to 83.5%. Phylogenetic analyses clearly assigned the RU-17sc, RU-18sc, and RU-30sc isolates from cherry to a distinct cluster, most closely related to PPV-C and, to a lesser extent, PPV-W. Based on their natural infection of sour cherry trees and genomic characterization, the PPV isolates reported here represent a new strain of PPV, for which the name PPV-CR (Cherry Russia) is proposed. The unique amino acids conserved among PPV-CR and PPV-C cherry-infecting isolates (75 in total) are mostly distributed within the central part of P1, NIa, and the N terminus of the coat protein (CP), making them potential candidates for genetic determinants of the ability to infect cherry species or of adaptation to these hosts. The variability observed within 14 PPV-CR isolates analyzed in this study (0 to 2.6% nucleotide divergence in partial CP sequences) and the identification of these isolates in different localities and cultivation conditions suggest the efficient establishment and competitiveness of the PPV-CR in the environment. A specific primer pair has been developed, allowing the specific reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction detection of PPV-CR isolates.

  7. Analysis of the genetic diversity and structure across a wide range of germplasm reveals prominent gene flow in apple at the European level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrestarazu, Jorge; Denancé, Caroline; Ravon, Elisa; Guyader, Arnaud; Guisnel, Rémi; Feugey, Laurence; Poncet, Charles; Lateur, Marc; Houben, Patrick; Ordidge, Matthew; Fernandez-Fernandez, Felicidad; Evans, Kate M; Paprstein, Frantisek; Sedlak, Jiri; Nybom, Hilde; Garkava-Gustavsson, Larisa; Miranda, Carlos; Gassmann, Jennifer; Kellerhals, Markus; Suprun, Ivan; Pikunova, Anna V; Krasova, Nina G; Torutaeva, Elnura; Dondini, Luca; Tartarini, Stefano; Laurens, François; Durel, Charles-Eric

    2016-06-08

    The amount and structure of genetic diversity in dessert apple germplasm conserved at a European level is mostly unknown, since all diversity studies conducted in Europe until now have been performed on regional or national collections. Here, we applied a common set of 16 SSR markers to genotype more than 2,400 accessions across 14 collections representing three broad European geographic regions (North + East, West and South) with the aim to analyze the extent, distribution and structure of variation in the apple genetic resources in Europe. A Bayesian model-based clustering approach showed that diversity was organized in three groups, although these were only moderately differentiated (FST = 0.031). A nested Bayesian clustering approach allowed identification of subgroups which revealed internal patterns of substructure within the groups, allowing a finer delineation of the variation into eight subgroups (FST = 0.044). The first level of stratification revealed an asymmetric division of the germplasm among the three groups, and a clear association was found with the geographical regions of origin of the cultivars. The substructure revealed clear partitioning of genetic groups among countries, but also interesting associations between subgroups and breeding purposes of recent cultivars or particular usage such as cider production. Additional parentage analyses allowed us to identify both putative parents of more than 40 old and/or local cultivars giving interesting insights in the pedigree of some emblematic cultivars. The variation found at group and subgroup levels may reflect a combination of historical processes of migration/selection and adaptive factors to diverse agricultural environments that, together with genetic drift, have resulted in extensive genetic variation but limited population structure. The European dessert apple germplasm represents an important source of genetic diversity with a strong historical and patrimonial value. The present

  8. Multilocus sequence analysis of Thermoanaerobacter isolates reveals recombining, but differentiated, populations from geothermal springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Isaac D; Varghese, Litty B; Hemme, Christopher L; Wiegel, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Thermal environments have island-like characteristics and provide a unique opportunity to study population structure and diversity patterns of microbial taxa inhabiting these sites. Strains having ≥98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the obligately anaerobic Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter uzonensis were isolated from seven geothermal springs, separated by up to 1600 m, within the Uzon Caldera (Kamchatka, Russian Far East). The intraspecies variation and spatial patterns of diversity for this taxon were assessed by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 106 strains. Analysis of eight protein-coding loci (gyrB, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, recG, rplB, and rpoB) revealed that all loci were polymorphic and that nucleotide substitutions were mostly synonymous. There were 148 variable nucleotide sites across 8003 bp concatenates of the protein-coding loci. While pairwise F ST values indicated a small but significant level of genetic differentiation between most subpopulations, there was a negligible relationship between genetic divergence and spatial separation. Strains with the same allelic profile were only isolated from the same hot spring, occasionally from consecutive years, and single locus variant (SLV) sequence types were usually derived from the same spring. While recombination occurred, there was an "epidemic" population structure in which a particular T. uzonensis sequence type rose in frequency relative to the rest of the population. These results demonstrate spatial diversity patterns for an anaerobic bacterial species in a relative small geographic location and reinforce the view that terrestrial geothermal springs are excellent places to look for biogeographic diversity patterns regardless of the involved distances.

  9. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations ...

  10. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick; Kristiansson, Kati; Mattsson, Hannele; Nõukas, Margit; Sapkota, Yadav; Schick, Ursula; Porcu, Eleonora; Rüeger, Sina; McDaid, Aaron F; Porteous, David; Winkler, Thomas W; Salvi, Erika; Shrine, Nick; Liu, Xueping; Ang, Wei Q; Zhang, Weihua; Feitosa, Mary F; Venturini, Cristina; van der Most, Peter J; Rosengren, Anders; Wood, Andrew R; Beaumont, Robin N; Jones, Samuel E; Ruth, Katherine S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Tyrrell, Jessica; Havulinna, Aki S; Boers, Harmen; Mägi, Reedik; Kriebel, Jennifer; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Perola, Markus; Nieminen, Markku; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S; Geller, Frank; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Koponen, Päivikki; Lundqvist, Annamari; Rissanen, Harri; Bottinger, Erwin P; Afaq, Saima; Wojczynski, Mary K; Lenzini, Petra; Nolte, Ilja M; Sparsø, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Christensen, Kaare; Perls, Thomas T; Newman, Anne B; Werge, Thomas; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Chambers, John C; Koskinen, Seppo; Melbye, Mads; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Sinisalo, Juha; Peters, Annette; Meitinger, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Swertz, Morris A; Vartiainen, Erkki; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Murray, Anna; Bochud, Murielle; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hansen, Thomas F; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Mangino, Massimo; Province, Michael A; Deloukas, Panos; Kooner, Jaspal S; Freathy, Rachel M; Pennell, Craig; Feenstra, Bjarke; Strachan, David P; Lettre, Guillaume; Hirschhorn, Joel; Cusi, Daniele; Heid, Iris M; Hayward, Caroline; Männik, Katrin; Beckmann, Jacques S; Loos, Ruth J F; Nyholt, Dale R; Metspalu, Andres; Eriksson, Johan G; Weedon, Michael N; Salomaa, Veikko; Franke, Lude; Reymond, Alexandre; Frayling, Timothy M; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations at

  11. GWAS in an Amerindian ancestry population reveals novel systemic lupus erythematosus risk loci and the role of European admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Molineros, Julio; Howard, Timothy D.; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Elena; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Comeau, Mary E.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Adler, Adam; Acevedo-Vázquez, Eduardo; Cucho, Jorge Mariano; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Cardiel, Mario H.; Miranda, Pedro; Catoggio, Luis; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco; Gaffney, Patrick; Vyse, Timothy; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; James, Judith A.; Kimberly, Robert; Kaufman, Ken; Harley, John B.; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge; Moctezuma, José F.; García, Mercedes A.; Berbotto, Guillermo; Babini, Alejandra; Scherbarth, Hugo; Toloza, Sergio; Baca, Vicente; Nath, Swapan K.; Salinas, Carlos Aguilar; Orozco, Lorena; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Jacob, Chaim O.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Our aim was to perform the first genome-wide association study on individuals from the Americas enriched for Native American heritage. MATERIALS and METHODS We analyzed 3,710 individuals from four countries of Latin America and the Unites States diagnosed with SLE and healthy controls. Samples were genotyped with the HumanOmni1 BeadChip. Data of out-of-study controls was obtained for the HumanOmni2.5. Statistical analyses were performed using SNPTEST and SNPGWA. Data was adjusted for genomic control and FDR. Imputation was done using IMPUTE2, and HiBAG for classical HLA alleles. RESULTS The IRF5-TNPO3 region showed the strongest association and largest odds ratio (OR) (rs10488631, Pgcadj = 2.61×10−29, OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.88–2.39) followed by the HLA class II on the DQA2-DQB1 loci (rs9275572, Pgcadj = 1.11 × 10−16, OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.46–1.80; rs9271366, Pgcadj=6.46 × 10−12, OR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.71–2.50). Other known SLE loci associated were ITGAM, STAT4, TNIP1, NCF2 and IRAK1. We identified a novel locus on 10q24.33 (rs4917385, Pgcadj =1.4×10−8) with a eQTL effect (Peqtl=8.0 × 10−37 at USMG5/miR1307), and describe novel loci. We corroborate SLE-risk loci previously identified in European and Asians. Local ancestry estimation showed that HLA allele risk contribution is of European ancestral origin. Imputation of HLA alleles suggested that autochthonous Native American haplotypes provide protection. CONCLUSIONS Our results show the insight gained by studying admixed populations to delineate the genetic architecture that underlies autoimmune and complex diseases. PMID:26606652

  12. Multivariate analysis of physiological parameters reveals a consistent O3 response pattern in leaves of adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Markus; Deckmyn, Gaby; Op de Beeck, Maarten; Blumenröther, Manuela C; Oßwald, Wolfgang; Alexou, Maria; Jehnes, Sascha; Haberer, Kristine; Rennenberg, Heinz; Herbinger, Karin; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Bahnweg, Günther; Hanke, David; Wieser, Gerhard; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Matyssek, Rainer; Tausz, Michael

    2012-10-01

    • Increasing atmospheric concentrations of phytotoxic ozone (O(3) ) can constrain growth and carbon sink strength of forest trees, potentially exacerbating global radiative forcing. Despite progress in the conceptual understanding of the impact of O(3) on plants, it is still difficult to detect response patterns at the leaf level. • Here, we employed principal component analysis (PCA) to analyse a database containing physiological leaf-level parameters of 60-yr-old Fagus sylvatica (European beech) trees. Data were collected over two climatically contrasting years under ambient and twice-ambient O(3) regimes in a free-air forest environment. • The first principal component (PC1) of the PCA was consistently responsive to O(3) and crown position within the trees over both years. Only a few of the original parameters showed an O(3) effect. PC1 was related to parameters indicative of oxidative stress signalling and changes in carbohydrate metabolism. PC1 correlated with cumulative O(3) uptake over preceding days. • PC1 represents an O(3) -responsive multivariate pattern detectable in the absence of consistently measurable O(3) effects on individual leaf-level parameters. An underlying effect of O(3) on physiological processes is indicated, providing experimental confirmation of theoretical O(3) response patterns suggested previously. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Genetic transformation of European chestnut somatic embryos with a native thaumatin-like protein (CsTL1) gene isolated from Castanea sativa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, Elena; Valladares, Silvia; Allona, Isabel; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Vieitez, Ana M; Ballester, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    The availability of a system for direct transfer of antifungal candidate genes into European chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) would offer an alternative approach to conventional breeding for production of chestnut trees tolerant to ink disease caused by Phytophthora spp. For the first time, a chestnut thaumatin-like protein gene (CsTL1), isolated from chestnut cotyledons, has been overexpressed in three chestnut somatic embryogenic lines. Transformation experiments have been performed using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens Smith and Townsend vector harboring the neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) selectable and the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter genes. The transformation efficiency, determined on the basis of the fluorescence of surviving explants, was clearly genotype dependent and ranged from 32.5% in the CI-9 line to 7.1% in the CI-3 line. A total of 126 independent transformed lines were obtained. The presence and integration of chestnut CsTL1 in genomic DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CsTL1 expression was up to 13.5-fold higher in a transgenic line compared with its corresponding untransformed line. In only one of the 11 transformed lines tested, expression of the CsTL1 was lower than the control. The remaining 115 transformed lines were successfully subjected to cryopreservation. Embryo proliferation was achieved in all of the transgenic lines regenerated and the transformed lines showed a higher mean number of cotyledonary stage embryos and total number of embryos per embryo clump than their corresponding untransformed lines. Transgenic plants were regenerated after maturation and germination of transformed somatic embryos. Furthermore, due to the low plantlet conversion achieved, axillary shoot proliferation cultures were established from partially germinated embryos (only shoot development), which were multiplied and rooted according to procedures already

  14. Heterogeneity in the Infection Biology of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates in Three Infection Models Reveals an Invasive and Virulent Phenotype in a ST21 Isolate from Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Suzanne; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Chaloner, Gemma; Gibbs, Kirsty; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola; Wigley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although Campylobacter is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis in the world and the importance of poultry as a source of infection is well understood we know relatively little about its infection biology in the broiler chicken. Much of what we know about the biology of Campylobacter jejuni is based on infection of inbred or SPF laboratory lines of chickens with a small number of isolates used in most laboratory studies. Recently we have shown that both the host response and microbial ecology of C. jejuni in the broiler chicken varies with both the host-type and significantly between C. jejuni isolates. Here we describe heterogeneity in infection within a panel of C. jejuni isolates in two broiler chicken breeds, human intestinal epithelial cells and the Galleria insect model of virulence. All C. jejuni isolates colonised the chicken caeca, though colonisation of other parts of the gastrointestinal tract varied between isolates. Extra-intestinal spread to the liver varied between isolates and bird breed but a poultry isolate 13126 (sequence type 21) showed the greatest levels of extra-intestinal spread to the liver in both broiler breeds with over 70% of birds of the fast growing breed and 50% of the slower growing breed having C. jejuni in their livers. Crucially 13126 is significantly more invasive than other isolates in human intestinal epithelial cells and gave the highest mortality in the Galleria infection model. Taken together our findings suggest that not only is there considerable heterogeneity in the infection biology of C. jejuni in avian, mammalian and alternative models, but that some isolates have an invasive and virulent phenotype. Isolates with an invasive phenotype would pose a significant risk and increased difficulty in control in chicken production and coupled with the virulent phenotype seen in 13126 could be an increased risk to public health.

  15. Heterogeneity in the Infection Biology of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates in Three Infection Models Reveals an Invasive and Virulent Phenotype in a ST21 Isolate from Poultry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Humphrey

    Full Text Available Although Campylobacter is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis in the world and the importance of poultry as a source of infection is well understood we know relatively little about its infection biology in the broiler chicken. Much of what we know about the biology of Campylobacter jejuni is based on infection of inbred or SPF laboratory lines of chickens with a small number of isolates used in most laboratory studies. Recently we have shown that both the host response and microbial ecology of C. jejuni in the broiler chicken varies with both the host-type and significantly between C. jejuni isolates. Here we describe heterogeneity in infection within a panel of C. jejuni isolates in two broiler chicken breeds, human intestinal epithelial cells and the Galleria insect model of virulence. All C. jejuni isolates colonised the chicken caeca, though colonisation of other parts of the gastrointestinal tract varied between isolates. Extra-intestinal spread to the liver varied between isolates and bird breed but a poultry isolate 13126 (sequence type 21 showed the greatest levels of extra-intestinal spread to the liver in both broiler breeds with over 70% of birds of the fast growing breed and 50% of the slower growing breed having C. jejuni in their livers. Crucially 13126 is significantly more invasive than other isolates in human intestinal epithelial cells and gave the highest mortality in the Galleria infection model. Taken together our findings suggest that not only is there considerable heterogeneity in the infection biology of C. jejuni in avian, mammalian and alternative models, but that some isolates have an invasive and virulent phenotype. Isolates with an invasive phenotype would pose a significant risk and increased difficulty in control in chicken production and coupled with the virulent phenotype seen in 13126 could be an increased risk to public health.

  16. Nuclear and chloroplast DNA phylogeography reveals vicariance among European populations of the model species for the study of metal tolerance, Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Maxime; Vekemans, Xavier; Godé, Cécile; Frérot, Hélène; Castric, Vincent; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a pseudometallophyte involved in numerous molecular studies of the adaptation to anthropogenic metal stress. In order to test the representativeness of genetic accessions commonly used in these studies, we investigated the A. halleri population genetic structure in Europe. Microsatellite and nucleotide polymorphisms from the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, respectively, were used to genotype 65 populations scattered over Europe. The large-scale population structure was characterized by a significant phylogeographic signal between two major genetic units. The localization of the phylogeographic break was assumed to result from vicariance between large populations isolated in southern and central Europe, on either side of ice sheets covering the Alps during the Quaternary ice ages. Genetic isolation was shown to be maintained in western Europe by the high summits of the Alps, whereas admixture was detected in the Carpathians. Considering the phylogeographic literature, our results suggest a distinct phylogeographic pattern for European species occurring in both mountain and lowland habitats. Considering the evolution of metal adaptation in A. halleri, it appears that recent adaptations to anthropogenic metal stress that have occurred within either phylogeographic unit should be regarded as independent events that potentially have involved the evolution of a variety of genetic mechanisms. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Two novel Ty1-copia retrotransposons isolated from coffee trees can effectively reveal evolutionary relationships in the Coffea genus (Rubiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, Perla; Duroy, Pierre-Olivier; Dubreuil-Tranchant, Christine; Mafra D'Almeida Costa, Paulo; Duret, Caroline; Razafinarivo, Norosoa J; Couturon, Emmanuel; Hamon, Serge; de Kochko, Alexandre; Poncet, Valérie; Guyot, Romain

    2011-06-01

    In the study, we developed new markers for phylogenetic relationships and intraspecies differentiation in Coffea. Nana and Divo, two novel Ty1-copia LTR-retrotransposon families, were isolated through C. canephora BAC clone sequencing. Nana- and Divo-based markers were used to test their: (1) ability to resolve recent phylogenetic relationships; (2) efficiency in detecting intra-species differentiation. Sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP), retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism (REMAP) and retrotransposon-based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) approaches were applied to 182 accessions (31 Coffea species and one Psilanthus accession). Nana- and Divo-based markers revealed contrasted transpositional histories. At the BAC clone locus, RBIP results on C. canephora demonstrated that Nana insertion took place prior to C. canephora differentiation, while Divo insertion occurred after differentiation. Combined SSAP and REMAP data showed that Nana could resolve Coffea lineages, while Divo was efficient at a lower taxonomic level. The combined results indicated that the retrotransposon-based markers were useful in highlighting Coffea genetic diversity and the chronological pattern of speciation/differentiation events. Ongoing complete sequencing of the C. canephora genome will soon enable exhaustive identification of LTR-RTN families, as well as more precise in-depth analyses on contributions to genome size variation and Coffea evolution.

  18. Whole-genome sequencing of gentamicin-resistant Campylobacter coli isolated from U.S. retail meats reveals novel plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuansha; Mukherjee, Sampa; Hoffmann, Maria; Kotewicz, Michael L; Young, Shenia; Abbott, Jason; Luo, Yan; Davidson, Maureen K; Allard, Marc; McDermott, Patrick; Zhao, Shaohua

    2013-11-01

    Aminoglycoside resistance in Campylobacter has been routinely monitored in the United States in clinical isolates since 1996 and in retail meats since 2002. Gentamicin resistance first appeared in a single human isolate of Campylobacter coli in 2000 and in a single chicken meat isolate in 2007, after which it increased rapidly to account for 11.3% of human isolates and 12.5% of retail isolates in 2010. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that gentamicin-resistant C. coli isolates from retail meat were clonal. We sequenced the genomes of two strains of this clone using a next-generation sequencing technique in order to investigate the genetic basis for the resistance. The gaps of one strain were closed using optical mapping and Sanger sequencing, and this is the first completed genome of C. coli. The two genomes are highly similar to each other. A self-transmissible plasmid carrying multiple antibiotic resistance genes was revealed within both genomes, carrying genes encoding resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, streptothricin, and tetracycline. Bioinformatics analysis and experimental results showed that gentamicin resistance was due to a phosphotransferase gene, aph(2")-Ig, not described previously. The phylogenetic relationship of this newly emerged clone to other Campylobacter spp. was determined by whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which showed that it clustered with the other poultry isolates and was separated from isolates from livestock.

  19. Genomic characterisation of environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from dental unit waterlines revealed the insertion sequence ISPa11 as a chaotropic element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Antony T; Freschi, Luca; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Leduc, Annie; Boyle, Brian; Jean-Pierre, Fabrice; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Déziel, Eric; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J; Levesque, Roger C

    2017-09-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is well known to have a remarkable adaptive capacity allowing it to colonise many environments. A recent study on environmental isolates from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) hinted at a genetic clustering into two groups. Isolates from one of these groups, named cluster III, were shown to have unusual phenotypes for environmental isolates, such as an increased biofilm production. To have a better ecological view, more specifically on isolates from cluster III, the complete genomes of 39 isolates including 16 from DUWLs were sequenced. In addition to an investigation of antibiotic resistance and secretion system gene content, a molecular phylogeny allowed confirmation of the split of the 16 environmental isolates in two groups and also sheds light on a correlation between the phylogenetic positions and the serotypes of the isolates. Isolates from cluster III harboured insertion sequences ISPa11 inserted into the O-specific antigen biosynthesis clusters and the gene lasR, encoding for a master regulator of the quorum sensing. Investigation of key regulators revealed another truncated gene, gacS. Alteration in lasR and gacS genes was consistent with phenotypic assays confirming their inactivation. These results bring new perspectives regarding the ecological adaptive potential of P. aeruginosa. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Surveillance of Gram-negative bacteria: impact of variation in current European laboratory reporting practice on apparent multidrug resistance prevalence in paediatric bloodstream isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, J A; Cromwell, D A; Johnson, A; Planche, T; Sharland, M

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluates whether estimated multidrug resistance (MDR) levels are dependent on the design of the surveillance system when using routine microbiological data. We used antimicrobial resistance data from the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children (ARPEC) project. The MDR status of bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was defined using European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)-endorsed standardised algorithms (non-susceptible to at least one agent in three or more antibiotic classes). Assessment of MDR status was based on specified combinations of antibiotic classes reportable as part of routine surveillance activities. The agreement between MDR status and resistance to specific pathogen-antibiotic class combinations (PACCs) was assessed. Based on all available antibiotic susceptibility testing, the proportion of MDR isolates was 31% for E. coli, 30% for K. pneumoniae and 28% for P. aeruginosa isolates. These proportions fell to 9, 14 and 25%, respectively, when based only on classes collected by current ECDC surveillance methods. Resistance percentages for specific PACCs were lower compared with MDR percentages, except for P. aeruginosa. Accordingly, MDR detection based on these had low sensitivity for E. coli (2-41%) and K. pneumoniae (21-85%). Estimates of MDR percentages for Gram-negative bacteria are strongly influenced by the antibiotic classes reported. When a complete set of results requested by the algorithm is not available, inclusion of classes frequently tested as part of routine clinical care greatly improves the detection of MDR. Resistance to individual PACCs should not be considered reflective of MDR percentages in Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. REVEALING THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT EQUILIBRIUM THROUGH CATASTROPHE BONDS, SOCIAL CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE FOR THE EUROPEAN REINSURANCE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTIN LAURA-GABRIELA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper investigates the equilibrium for the three components of corporate sustainable development (SD by focusing on a sample of EU-based reinsurance companies, for the 2010-2013 period, while proposing, to our knowledge, an innovative approach from the perspective of the environmental and social components. In order to represent these two edges, two indexes are developed. The index representing the environmental component mirrors the presence on the catastrophe bonds market of the analysed companies. The second index revolves around the social component and concentrates on those achievements regarding the corporate support for the general community social advance. In methodological terms, the analysis is developed by considering both a static and a dynamic outline. The dynamic analysis is developed within a comparative framework for analysing the SD equilibrium, both at the level of the two indices and at the level of their main components. The static outline considers the cluster analysis in order to capture the SD balanced by grouping the companies in line with their social and environmental accomplishments and comparing the outcomes according to their economic performance. The main results reveal good social development equilibrium at the level of the analysed companies reflected through the association between better environmental and social achievements and higher economic performance

  2. REVEALING THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT EQUILIBRIUM THROUGH CATASTROPHE BONDS, SOCIAL CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE FOR THE EUROPEAN REINSURANCE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTIN LAURA-GABRIELA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper investigates the equilibrium for the three components of corporate sustainable development (SD by focusing on a sample of EU-based reinsurance companies, for the 2010-2013 period, while proposing, to our knowledge, an innovative approach from the perspective of the environmental and social components. In order to represent these two edges, two indexes are developed. The index representing the environmental component mirrors the presence on the catastrophe bonds market of the analysed companies. The second index revolves around the social component and concentrates on those achievements regarding the corporate support for the general community social advance. In methodological terms, the analysis is developed by considering both a static and a dynamic outline. The dynamic analysis is developed within a comparative framework for analysing the SD equilibrium, both at the level of the two indices and at the level of their main components. The static outline considers the cluster analysis in order to capture the SD balanced by grouping the companies in line with their social and environmental accomplishments and comparing the outcomes according to their economic performance. The main results reveal good social development equilibrium at the level of the analysed companies reflected through the association between better environmental and social achievements and higher economic performance.

  3. Biological and sequence analysis of a novel European isolate of Barley mild mosaic virus that overcomes the barley rym5 resistance gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyuka, K; McGrann, G; Alhudaib, K; Hariri, D; Adams, M J

    2004-08-01

    A Barley mild mosaic virus (BaMMV) isolate from France (BaMMV-Sil) capable of overcoming rym5-controlled resistance was inoculated to barley genotypes carrying various genes for resistance to the barley mosaic viruses. BaMMV-Sil was unable to infect genotypes carrying rym1, rym4, rym8, rym9, or rym11 but genotypes carrying rym3, rym5, rym6 or no known bymovirus resistance gene were susceptible. Plants carrying rym7 or rym10 showed partial resistance with delayed virus accumulation. The two genomic RNAs of BaMMV-Sil were sequenced and compared to published sequences and those of a further common strain isolate from the UK. Four amino acid differences were observed between BaMMV-Sil and European common strain isolates in the polypeptide encoded by RNA1, the RNA species which determines pathogenicity on the rym5 genotypes. Only two of these differences are likely to be functionally important (His rather than Gln at position1217 in the VPg cistron; His rather than Asp at position 1776 in the NIb cistron). Comparisons with related viruses in the genera Bymovirus and Potyvirus suggest that the change in the VPg, which occurs within a motif conserved amongst all viruses within the family Potyviridae, is the more likely cause of rym5 resistance-breaking.

  4. Whole-genome sequence of the first sequence type 27 Brucella ceti strain isolated from European waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvnjak, Sanja; Spicic, Silvio; Kusar, Darja

    2017-01-01

    Brucella spp. that cause marine brucellosis are becoming more important, as the disease appears to be more widespread than originally thought. Here, we report a whole and annotated genome sequence of Brucella ceti CRO350, a sequence type 27 strain isolated from a bottlenose dolphin carcass found...

  5. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S; McBee, Megan E; Dedon, Peter C

    2015-03-11

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Molecular analysis of clinical isolates previously diagnosed as Mycobacterium intracellulare reveals incidental findings of "Mycobacterium indicus pranii" genotypes in human lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Young; Park, Hye Yun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Jeon, Kyeongman; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Han, Seung-Jung; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-09-30

    Mycobacterium intracellulare is a major cause of Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease in many countries. Molecular studies have revealed several new Mycobacteria species that are closely related to M. intracellulare. The aim of this study was to re-identify and characterize clinical isolates from patients previously diagnosed with M. intracellulare lung disease at the molecular level. Mycobacterial isolates from 77 patients, initially diagnosed with M. intracellulare lung disease were re-analyzed by multi-locus sequencing and pattern of insertion sequences. Among the 77 isolates, 74 (96 %) isolates were designated as M. intracellulare based on multigene sequence-based analysis. Interestingly, the three remaining strains (4 %) were re-identified as "Mycobacterium indicus pranii" according to distinct molecular phylogenetic positions in rpoB and hsp65 sequence-based typing. In hsp65 sequevar analysis, code 13 was found in the majority of cases and three unreported codes were identified. In 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequevar analysis, all isolates of both species were classified within the Min-A ITS sequevar. Interestingly, four of the M. intracellulare isolates harbored IS1311, a M. avium-specific element. Two of three patients infected with "M. indicus pranii" had persistent positive sputum cultures after antibiotic therapy, indicating the clinical relevance of this study. This analysis highlights the importance of precise identification of clinical isolates genetically close to Mycobacterium species, and suggests that greater attention should be paid to nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease caused by "M. indicus pranii".

  7. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA reveals clonal relationships among enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from non-human primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Carvalho

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC strains are important agents of infantile diarrhea all over the world, gaining even greater importance in developing countries. EPEC have also been isolated from various animal species, but most isolates belong to serotypes that differ from those recovered from humans. However, it has been demonstrated that several isolates from non-human primates belong to the serogroups and/or serotypes related to those implicated in human disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic differences between thirteen strains isolated from non-human primates and the same number of strains isolated from human infections. Human isolates belonged to the same serogroup/serotype as the monkey strains and the evaluation was done by analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA. Dendrogram analysis showed that there was no clustering between human and monkey strains. Human and non-human isolates of the EPEC serotypes O127:H40 and O128:H2 shared 90 and 87% of their bands, respectively, indicating strong genomic similarity between the strains, leading to the speculation that they may have arisen from the same pathogenic clone. To our knowledge, this study is the first one comparing genomic similarity between human and non-human primate strains and the results provide further evidence that monkey EPEC strains correlate with human EPEC, as suggested in a previous investigation.

  8. Daptomycin antimicrobial activity tested against methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated in European medical centers (2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watters Amy A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide with potent activity and broad spectrum against Gram-positive bacteria currently used for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and bacteremia, including right sided endocarditis. We evaluated the in vitro activity of this compound and selected comparator agents tested against clinical strains of staphylococci and enterococci collected in European medical centers in 2005. Methods A total of 4,640 strains from 23 medical centers located in 10 European countries, Turkey and Israel (SENTRY Program platform were tested for susceptibility by reference broth microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and interpretative criteria. Mueller-Hinton broth was supplemented to 50 mg/L Ca++ for testing daptomycin. Results for oxacillin (methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci were analyzed separately. Results Oxacillin resistance rates among Staphylococcus aureus varied from 2.1% in Sweden to 42.5% in the United Kingdom (UK and 54.7% in Ireland (29.1% overall, while vancomycin resistance rates varied from 0.0% in France, Sweden and Switzerland to 66.7% in the UK and 71.4% in Ireland among Enterococcus faecium (17.9% overall. All S. aureus strains were inhibited at daptomycin MIC of 1 mg/L (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 mg/L; 100.0% susceptible and only one coagulase-negative staphylococci strain (0.1% showed an elevated (>1 mg/L daptomycin MIC value (4 mg/L. Among E. faecalis (MIC50/90, 0.5/1 mg/L; 100% susceptible the highest daptomycin MIC value was 2 mg/L; while among E. faecium (MIC50/90, 2/4 mg/L; 100% susceptible the highest MIC result was 4 mg/L. Conclusion Daptomycin showed excellent in vitro activity against staphylococci and enterococci collected in European medical centers in 2005 and resistance to oxacillin, vancomycin or quinupristin/dalfopristin did not compromise its activity overall against these

  9. Comparative genome analysis of Prevotella intermedia strain isolated from infected root canal reveals features related to pathogenicity and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yunfeng; Shen, Lu; Zou, Yan; Qi, Zhengnan; Yin, Jun; Jiang, Jie; Guo, Liang; He, Lin; Chen, Zijiang; Tang, Zisheng; Qin, Shengying

    2015-02-25

    Many species of the genus Prevotella are pathogens that cause oral diseases. Prevotella intermedia is known to cause various oral disorders e.g. periodontal disease, periapical periodontitis and noma as well as colonize in the respiratory tract and be associated with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis. It is of clinical significance to identify the main drive of its various adaptation and pathogenicity. In order to explore the intra-species genetic differences among strains of Prevotella intermedia of different niches, we isolated a strain Prevotella intermedia ZT from the infected root canal of a Chinese patient with periapical periodontitis and gained a draft genome sequence. We annotated the genome and compared it with the genomes of other taxa in the genus Prevotella. The raw data set, consisting of approximately 65X-coverage reads, was trimmed and assembled into contigs from which 2165 ORFs were predicted. The comparison of the Prevotella intermedia ZT genome sequence with the published genome sequence of Prevotella intermedia 17 and Prevotella intermedia ATCC25611 revealed that ~14% of the genes were strain-specific. The Preveotella intermedia strains share a set of conserved genes contributing to its adaptation and pathogenic and possess strain-specific genes especially those involved in adhesion and secreting bacteriocin. The Prevotella intermedia ZT shares similar gene content with other taxa of genus Prevotella. The genomes of the genus Prevotella is highly dynamic with relative conserved parts: on average, about half of the genes in one Prevotella genome were not included in another genome of the different Prevotella species. The degree of conservation varied with different pathways: the ability of amino acid biosynthesis varied greatly with species but the pathway of cell wall components biosynthesis were nearly constant. Phylogenetic tree shows that the taxa from different niches are scarcely distributed among clades. Prevotella intermedia ZT

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of Tropheryma whipplei strains reveals that diversity among clinical isolates is mainly related to the WiSP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, My-Van; Crapoulet, Nicolas; Barbry, Pascal; Raoult, Didier; Renesto, Patricia

    2007-10-02

    The aim of this study was to analyze the genomic diversity of several Tropheryma whipplei strains by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Fifteen clinical isolates originating from biopsy samples recovered from different countries were compared with the T. whipplei Twist strain. For each isolate, the genes were defined as either present or absent/divergent using the GACK analysis software. Genomic changes were then further characterized by PCR and sequencing. The results revealed a limited genetic variation among the T. whipplei isolates, with at most 2.24% of the probes exhibiting differential hybridization against the Twist strain. The main variation was found in genes encoding the WiSP membrane protein family. This work also demonstrated a 19.2 kb-pair deletion within the T. whipplei DIG15 strain. This deletion occurs in the same region as the previously described large genomic rearrangement between Twist and TW08/27. Thus, this can be considered as a major hot-spot for intra-specific T. whipplei differentiation. Analysis of this deleted region confirmed the role of WND domains in generating T. whipplei diversity. This work provides the first comprehensive genomic comparison of several T. whipplei isolates. It reveals that clinical isolates originating from various geographic and biological sources exhibit a high conservation rate, indicating that T. whipplei rarely interacts with exogenous DNA. Remarkably, frequent inter-strain variations were dicovered that affected members of the WiSP family.

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of Tropheryma whipplei strains reveals that diversity among clinical isolates is mainly related to the WiSP proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoult Didier

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to analyze the genomic diversity of several Tropheryma whipplei strains by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Fifteen clinical isolates originating from biopsy samples recovered from different countries were compared with the T. whipplei Twist strain. For each isolate, the genes were defined as either present or absent/divergent using the GACK analysis software. Genomic changes were then further characterized by PCR and sequencing. Results The results revealed a limited genetic variation among the T. whipplei isolates, with at most 2.24% of the probes exhibiting differential hybridization against the Twist strain. The main variation was found in genes encoding the WiSP membrane protein family. This work also demonstrated a 19.2 kb-pair deletion within the T. whipplei DIG15 strain. This deletion occurs in the same region as the previously described large genomic rearrangement between Twist and TW08/27. Thus, this can be considered as a major hot-spot for intra-specific T. whipplei differentiation. Analysis of this deleted region confirmed the role of WND domains in generating T. whipplei diversity. Conclusion This work provides the first comprehensive genomic comparison of several T. whipplei isolates. It reveals that clinical isolates originating from various geographic and biological sources exhibit a high conservation rate, indicating that T. whipplei rarely interacts with exogenous DNA. Remarkably, frequent inter-strain variations were dicovered that affected members of the WiSP family.

  12. AFLP analysis reveals high genetic diversity but low population structure in Coccidioides posadasii isolates from Mexico and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Canteros, Cristina; Castañón-Olivares, Laura Rosio; Reyes-Montes, María del Rocío

    2013-09-03

    Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii cause coccidioidomycosis, a disease that is endemic to North and South America, but for Central America, the incidence of coccidioidomycosis has not been clearly established. Several studies suggest genetic variability in these fungi; however, little definitive information has been discovered about the variability of Coccidioides fungi in Mexico (MX) and Argentina (AR). Thus, the goals for this work were to study 32 Coccidioides spp. isolates from MX and AR, identify the species of these Coccidioides spp. isolates, analyse their phenotypic variability, examine their genetic variability and investigate the Coccidioides reproductive system and its level of genetic differentiation. Coccidioides spp. isolates from MX and AR were taxonomically identified by phylogenetic inference analysis using partial sequences of the Ag2/PRA gene and their phenotypic characteristics analysed. The genetic variability, reproductive system and level of differentiation were estimated using AFLP markers. The level of genetic variability was assessed measuring the percentage of polymorphic loci, number of effective allele, expected heterocygosity and Index of Association (IA). The degree of genetic differentiation was determined by AMOVA. Genetic similarities among isolates were estimated using Jaccard index. The UPGMA was used to contsruct the corresponding dendrogram. Finally, a network of haplotypes was built to evaluate the genealogical relationships among AFLP haplotypes. All isolates of Coccidioides spp. from MX and AR were identified as C. posadasii. No phenotypic variability was observed among the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR. Analyses of genetic diversity and population structure were conducted using AFLP markers. Different estimators of genetic variability indicated that the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR had high genetic variability. Furthermore, AMOVA, dendrogram and haplotype network showed a small genetic differentiation

  13. Multilocus sequence typing of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale isolated from pigeons and birds of prey revealed new insights into its population structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Thieme

    2016-12-01

    The MLST results of ORT isolated from pigeons and birds of prey likely reflect evolutionary bacterial host adaptations but might also indicate a potential for interspecies transmission. Definite conclusions should be drawn carefully as so far a few strains from non-galliform birds were analyzed by MLST. By extending the number of ORT isolates and the range of potential avian hosts, the MLST database can provide a valuable resource in understanding transmission dynamics.

  14. Isolation of novel microsatellites using FIASCO by dual probe enrichment from Jatropha curcas L. and study on genetic equilibrium and diversity of Indian population revealed by isolated microsatellites

    KAUST Repository

    Pamidimarri, D. V N N Sudheer

    2010-03-11

    Jatropha curcas L. belongs to family Euphorbiaceae, native to South America attained significant importance for its seed oil which can be converted to biodiesel, a renewable energy source alternative to conventional petrodiesel. Very few attempts were made to isolate novel microsatellite markers and assessment of the extent of genetic equilibrium and diversity that exists in J. curcas. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to isolate the novel microsatellites and access genetic equilibrium, diversity that exists among 44 diverse germplasm collected from distinct geographical areas in India using isolated microsatellites. The overall efficiency of the enrichment of microsatellite by dual probe in the present study found to be 54% and among the sequences obtained the percentage of sequences having suitable flanking regions for the primer designing was found to be 89.58%. The mean co-efficient of genetic similarity (CGS) was found to be 0.97. The overall diversity obtained by microsatellites was found to be low in comparison with the diversity reported by multilocus markers systems observed in earlier studies; however, the good allele polymorphism was observed. The overall dendrogram of microsatellite analysis resulted in random clustering of germplasm and not in accordance to geographical area of collection. The present study, diversity analysis using microsatellite markers concludes the low genetic diversity and genetic disequlibrium of J. curcas in India and will provide pavement for further intra-population studies on narrow geographical areas to understand the population genetic structure, phylogeography and molecular ecological studies. The germplasm characterized, and the microsatellite markers isolated and characterized in the present study can be employed efficiently in breeding programs for genetic improvement of the species through marker assisted selection and QTL analysis, for further genetic resource management and help in making the J

  15. Analysis of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori in Pakistan reveals high degrees of pathogenicity and high frequencies of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Faisal; Campbell, Barry James; Alfizah, Hanafiah; Varro, Andrea; Zahra, Rabaab; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pritchard, David Mark

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori contributes to failure in eradicating the infection and is most often due to point and missense mutations in a few key genes. The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of H. pylori isolates from 46 Pakistani patients were determined by Etest. Resistance and pathogenicity genes were amplified, and sequences were analyzed to determine the presence of mutations. A high percentage of isolates (73.9%) were resistant to metronidazole (MTZ), with considerable resistance to clarithromycin (CLR; 47.8%) and amoxicillin (AML; 54.3%) also observed. Relatively few isolates were resistant to tetracycline (TET; 4.3%) or to ciprofloxacin (CIP; 13%). However, most isolates (n = 43) exhibited resistance to one or more antibiotics. MTZ-resistant isolates contained missense mutations in oxygen-independent NADPH nitroreductase (RdxA; 8 mutations found) and NADH flavin oxidoreductase (FrxA; 4 mutations found). In the 23S rRNA gene, responsible for CLR resistance, a new point mutation (A2181G) and 4 previously reported mutations were identified. Pathogenicity genes cagA, dupA, and vacA s1a/m1 were detected frequently in isolates which were also found to be resistant to MTZ, CLR, and AML. A high percentage of CagA and VacA seropositivity was also observed in these patients. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences showed uniform distribution of the 3' region of cagA throughout the tree. We have identified H. pylori isolates in Pakistan which harbor pathogenicity genes and worrying antibiotic resistance profiles as a result of having acquired multiple point and missense mutations. H. pylori eradication regimens should therefore be reevaluated in this setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Multi-locus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae isolates from three continents reveals hypervirulent and feline-associated clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjan Arvand

    Full Text Available Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of cat scratch disease and a variety of other disease manifestations in humans. Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease. In the present study, 182 human and feline B. henselae isolates from Europe, North America and Australia were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST to detect any associations between sequence type (ST, host species and geographical distribution of the isolates. A total of 14 sequence types were detected, but over 66% (16/24 of the isolates recovered from human disease corresponded to a single genotype, ST1, and this type was detected in all three continents. In contrast, 27.2% (43/158 of the feline isolates corresponded to ST7, but this ST was not recovered from humans and was restricted to Europe. The difference in host association of STs 1 (human and 7 (feline was statistically significant (P< or =0.001. eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7. These groups were broadly consistent with a neighbour-joining tree, although splits decomposition analysis was indicative of a history of recombination. These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

  17. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe L Assis

    Full Text Available Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV, have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005 molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  18. The genetic diversity of genus Bacillus and the related genera revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequences and ardra analyses isolated from geothermal regions of turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Coleri Cihan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously isolated 115 endospore-forming bacilli were basically grouped according to their temperature requirements for growth: the thermophiles (74%, the facultative thermophiles (14% and the mesophiles (12%. These isolates were taken into 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, and they were clustered among the 7 genera: Anoxybacillus, Aeribacillus, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Thermoactinomycetes. Of these bacilli, only the thirty two isolates belonging to genera Bacillus (16, Brevibacillus (13, Paenibacillus (1 and Thermoactinomycetes (2 were selected and presented in this paper. The comparative sequence analyses revealed that the similarity values were ranged as 91.4-100 %, 91.8- 99.2 %, 92.6- 99.8 % and 90.7 - 99.8 % between the isolates and the related type strains from these four genera, respectively. Twenty nine of them were found to be related with the validly published type strains. The most abundant species was B. thermoruber with 9 isolates followed by B. pumilus (6, B. lichenformis (3, B. subtilis (3, B. agri (3, B. smithii (2, T. vulgaris (2 and finally P. barengoltzii (1. In addition, isolates of A391a, B51a and D295 were proposed as novel species as their 16S rRNA gene sequences displayed similarities ≤ 97% to their closely related type strains. The AluI-, HaeIII- and TaqI-ARDRA results were in congruence with the 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. The ARDRA results allowed us to differentiate these isolates, and their discriminative restriction fragments were able to be determined. Some of their phenotypic characters and their amylase, chitinase and protease production were also studied and biotechnologically valuable enzyme producing isolates were introduced in order to use in further studies.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Actinomyces and related genera reveals an unusual clindamycin resistance among Actinomyces urogenitalis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, Claudia; Budia, Mabel; Palombarani, Susana; Rodriguez, Carlos Hernán; Ramírez, María Soledad; Arias, Barbara; Bonofiglio, Laura; Famiglietti, Angela; Mollerach, Marta; Almuzara, Marisa; Vay, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in Actinomyces and related genera are very limited in the literature. Data of predominant susceptibility profiles could contribute to the establishment of an accurate empirical treatment. A total of 113 isolates from clinical samples were included in this study. Each isolate was identified using phenotypic methods and MALDI-TOF/MS. When discrepancies were observed, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nine antimicrobial agents (penicillin, ceftriaxone, linezolid, tetracycline, clindamycin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and vancomycin) were tested against the species Actinotignum schaalii (n=23), Actinomyces turicensis (n=18), Actinomyces europaeus (n=13), Actinomyces naeslundii/Actinomyces viscosus group (n=12), Actinomyces urogenitalis (n=11), Actinomyces radingae (n=11), Actinomyces neuii (n=9), Actinomyces odontolyticus (n=8), Bifidobacterium scardovii (n=3), Actinomyces graevenitzii (n=2), Alloscardovia omnicolens (n=2) and Varibaculum cambriense (n=1). All of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin and linezolid. Almost all of the A. urogenitalis isolates (8/11) were resistant to clindamycin and showed susceptibility to erythromycin, suggesting an L-phenotype, however no determinants of clindamycin resistance (lnu and lsa genes) were detected by PCR. High MIC values to quinolones were observed in 54/113 isolates (47.8%). All of the A. urogenitalis isolates were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide relevant information for empirical management of infections caused by these organisms. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI screening parameters for the detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase production in clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsfuss, Silke; Bloemberg, Guido V; Giger, Jacqueline; Meyer, Vera; Hombach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI breakpoints following their revision in 2010, for the detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production in Enterobacteriaceae. 236 well-characterized clinical isolates (including 118 ESBL producers) were investigated by antibiotic disc testing with cefpodoxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, cefotaxime EUCAST (5 μg/disc), ceftazidime EUCAST (10 μg/disc), cefotaxime CLSI (30 μg/disc) and ceftazidime CLSI (30 μg/disc) with the Kirby-Bauer method. Additionally, synergy phenomena were recorded between amoxicillin/clavulanic acid discs (20/10 μg/disc) and cefepime (30 μg/disc), EUCAST cefotaxime (5 μg/disc), EUCAST ceftazidime (10 μg/disc), CLSI cefotaxime (30 μg/disc) and CLSI ceftazidime [30 μg/disc; disc approximation method (DAM)]. Overall sensitivity of the cefotaxime EUCAST non-susceptible breakpoint equalled sensitivity of the cefotaxime CLSI ESBL screening breakpoint (99.2%). With the ceftazidime EUCAST non-susceptible breakpoint, 27/118 ESBL-producing isolates were not detected, whereas the ceftazidime CLSI ESBL screening breakpoint missed 41/118 ESBL-producing isolates. For cefpodoxime the resistant EUCAST breakpoint showed higher sensitivity for ESBL detection compared with the CLSI ESBL screening breakpoint/disc content (100% versus 98.3%, respectively). Sensitivities of ceftazidime and cefotaxime DAM with CLSI or EUCAST disc contents were comparable (sensitivities ranging from 84.7% to 89.8%). DAM with cefepime displayed the highest overall sensitivity (96.6%). In AmpC-producing isolates, synergy of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid with cefepime showed sensitivity and specificity for ESBL detection of 100% and 97.4%, respectively. EUCAST non-susceptible breakpoints for ceftazidime and cefpodoxime detect more ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates compared with corresponding CLSI ESBL screening breakpoints. Implementation of the cefepime

  1. Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from herds of sheep in southern Brazil reveals the archetypal type II genotype and new non-archetypal genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Ramos, Tatiana; de Jesus Pena, Hilda Fátima; Dos Santos Junior, Alceu Gonçalves; de Faria Santos, Laura Maria Jorge; Cademartori, Beatris Gonzales; Oliveira, Solange; Gennari, Solange Maria; da Silva Ramos Rocha, Andréa; da Rosa Farias, Nara Amélia

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that, in Brazil and South America, strains of Toxoplasma gondii are often genotypically and biologically different from those found in countries on other continents. The objective of this study was to genotypically characterize T. gondii isolates from naturally infected sheep in herds in the southern region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, by means of the polymerase chain reaction with restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Five T. gondii isolates obtained from sheep in five municipalities in the state of Rio Grande do Sul were used. Application of multilocus PCR-RFLP multilocus using 12 genetic markers (SAG1, 5'3' SAG2, alt. SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, c22-8, c29-2, GRA6, L358, PK1, APICO and CS3) revealed four different genotypes in the five isolates studied: clonal type II (TgOvBrRS4), type BrIV (TgOvBrRS2 and TgOvBrRS3) and two new non-archetypal genotypes, ToxoDB-RFLP#270 and #271 (TgOvBrRS1 and TgOvBrRS5, respectively). The genotype structure found in the T. gondii isolates from naturally infected sheep in the southern region of Brazil was revealed to have high diversity. This study confirms the presence of rare circulation of the clonal type II genotype in Brazil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Four newly isolated fuselloviruses from extreme geothermal environments reveal unusual morphologies and a possible interviral recombination mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redder, Peter; Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Spindle-shaped virus-like particles are abundant in extreme geothermal environments, from which five spindle-shaped viral species have been isolated to date. They infect members of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Sulfolobus, and constitute the Fuselloviridae, a family of double-stranded DNA...

  3. Isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer is more common in young patients and following breast conserving therapy : Long-term results of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, Truuske; van der Hage, J.A.; Putter, H.; Bonnema, J.; Bartelink, H.; van de Velde, C.J.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for isolated loco-regional recurrence in patients treated for invasive stage I or H breast cancer. The study population comprised 3602 women who had undergone primary surgery for early stage breast cancer, who were enrolled in European

  4. Carbon Dynamics in Isolated Wetlands of the Northern Everglades Watershed is Revealed using Hydrogeophysical Methods and Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. D.; Job, M. J.; Comas, X.

    2016-12-01

    Peatlands play a critical role in the carbon (C) cycle by sequestering and storing a large fraction of the global soil C pool; and by producing and releasing significant amounts of greenhouse gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere. While most studies exploring these attributes have traditionally focused on boreal and subarctic biomes, wetlands in temperate and tropical climates (such as the Florida Everglades) have been understudied despite accounting for more than 20% of the global peatland C stock. We used a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR), aerial imagery, and direct measurements (gas traps) to estimate the contribution of subtropical isolated wetlands to the total C pool of the pine flatwoods landscape at the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP, Poinciana, FL). Measurements were collected within two types of isolated wetlands at the preserve, emergent and forested. Geophysical surveys were collected weekly to 1) define total peat thickness (i.e. from the surface to the mineral soil interface) and 2) estimate changes within the internal gas regime. Direct measurements of gas fluxes using gas traps and time-lapse cameras were used to estimate gas emissions (i.e. CH­4 and CO2). Aerial photographs were used to estimate surface area for each isolated wetland and develop a relationship between surface area and total wetland C production that is then applied to every isolated wetland in the preserve to estimate the total wetland C contribution. This work seeks to provide evidence that isolated wetlands within the central Florida landscape are key contributors of C to the atmosphere.

  5. Characterization of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae isolates recovered from adult patients with underlying chronic lung disease reveals genotypic and phenotypic traits associated with persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkal Garmendia

    Full Text Available Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen causing infection in adults suffering obstructive lung diseases. Existing evidence associates chronic infection by NTHi to the progression of the chronic respiratory disease, but specific features of NTHi associated with persistence have not been comprehensively addressed. To provide clues about adaptive strategies adopted by NTHi during persistent infection, we compared sequential persistent isolates with newly acquired isolates in sputa from six patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE identified three patients with consecutive persistent strains and three with new strains. Phenotypic characterisation included infection of respiratory epithelial cells, bacterial self-aggregation, biofilm formation and resistance to antimicrobial peptides (AMP. Persistent isolates differed from new strains in showing low epithelial adhesion and inability to form biofilms when grown under continuous-flow culture conditions in microfermenters. Self-aggregation clustered the strains by patient, not by persistence. Increasing resistance to AMPs was observed for each series of persistent isolates; this was not associated with lipooligosaccharide decoration with phosphorylcholine or with lipid A acylation. Variation was further analyzed for the series of three persistent isolates recovered from patient 1. These isolates displayed comparable growth rate, natural transformation frequency and murine pulmonary infection. Genome sequencing of these three isolates revealed sequential acquisition of single-nucleotide variants in the AMP permease sapC, the heme acquisition systems hgpB, hgpC, hup and hxuC, the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid kinase kdkA, the long-chain fatty acid transporter ompP1, and the phosphoribosylamine glycine ligase purD. Collectively, we frame a range of pathogenic traits and a repertoire of genetic variants in the

  6. The Acheta domesticus Densovirus, Isolated from the European House Cricket, Has Evolved an Expression Strategy Unique among Parvoviruses▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Jousset, Françoise-Xavière; Zadori, Zoltan; Szelei, Jozsef; Yu, Qian; Pham, Hanh Thi; Lépine, François; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Acheta domesticus densovirus (AdDNV), isolated from crickets, has been endemic in Europe for at least 35 years. Severe epizootics have also been observed in American commercial rearings since 2009 and 2010. The AdDNV genome was cloned and sequenced for this study. The transcription map showed that splicing occurred in both the nonstructural (NS) and capsid protein (VP) multicistronic RNAs. The splicing pattern of NS mRNA predicted 3 nonstructural proteins (NS1 [576 codons], NS2 [286 codons], and NS3 [213 codons]). The VP gene cassette contained two VP open reading frames (ORFs), of 597 (ORF-A) and 268 (ORF-B) codons. The VP2 sequence was shown by N-terminal Edman degradation and mass spectrometry to correspond with ORF-A. Mass spectrometry, sequencing, and Western blotting of baculovirus-expressed VPs versus native structural proteins demonstrated that the VP1 structural protein was generated by joining ORF-A and -B via splicing (splice II), eliminating the N terminus of VP2. This splice resulted in a nested set of VP1 (816 codons), VP3 (467 codons), and VP4 (429 codons) structural proteins. In contrast, the two splices within ORF-B (Ia and Ib) removed the donor site of intron II and resulted in VP2, VP3, and VP4 expression. ORF-B may also code for several nonstructural proteins, of 268, 233, and 158 codons. The small ORF-B contains the coding sequence for a phospholipase A2 motif found in VP1, which was shown previously to be critical for cellular uptake of the virus. These splicing features are unique among parvoviruses and define a new genus of ambisense densoviruses. PMID:21775445

  7. The Acheta domesticus densovirus, isolated from the European house cricket, has evolved an expression strategy unique among parvoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Jousset, Françoise-Xavière; Zadori, Zoltan; Szelei, Jozsef; Yu, Qian; Pham, Hanh Thi; Lépine, François; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The Acheta domesticus densovirus (AdDNV), isolated from crickets, has been endemic in Europe for at least 35 years. Severe epizootics have also been observed in American commercial rearings since 2009 and 2010. The AdDNV genome was cloned and sequenced for this study. The transcription map showed that splicing occurred in both the nonstructural (NS) and capsid protein (VP) multicistronic RNAs. The splicing pattern of NS mRNA predicted 3 nonstructural proteins (NS1 [576 codons], NS2 [286 codons], and NS3 [213 codons]). The VP gene cassette contained two VP open reading frames (ORFs), of 597 (ORF-A) and 268 (ORF-B) codons. The VP2 sequence was shown by N-terminal Edman degradation and mass spectrometry to correspond with ORF-A. Mass spectrometry, sequencing, and Western blotting of baculovirus-expressed VPs versus native structural proteins demonstrated that the VP1 structural protein was generated by joining ORF-A and -B via splicing (splice II), eliminating the N terminus of VP2. This splice resulted in a nested set of VP1 (816 codons), VP3 (467 codons), and VP4 (429 codons) structural proteins. In contrast, the two splices within ORF-B (Ia and Ib) removed the donor site of intron II and resulted in VP2, VP3, and VP4 expression. ORF-B may also code for several nonstructural proteins, of 268, 233, and 158 codons. The small ORF-B contains the coding sequence for a phospholipase A2 motif found in VP1, which was shown previously to be critical for cellular uptake of the virus. These splicing features are unique among parvoviruses and define a new genus of ambisense densoviruses.

  8. Genetic analysis reveals diversity and genetic relationship among Trichoderma isolates from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Al-Oweisi, Fatma A; Edwards, Simon G; Al-Nadabi, Hamed; Al-Fahdi, Ahmed M

    2015-07-28

    Trichoderma is one of the most common fungi in soil. However, little information is available concerning the diversity of Trichoderma in soil with no previous history of cultivation. This study was conducted to investigate the most common species and the level of genetic relatedness of Trichoderma species from uncultivated soil in relation to cultivated soil and potting media. A total of 24, 15 and 13 Trichoderma isolates were recovered from 84 potting media samples, 45 cultivated soil samples and 65 uncultivated soil samples, respectively. Analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the translation elongation factor gene (EF1) indicated the presence of 9 Trichoderma species: T. harzianum (16 isolates), T. asperellum (13), T. citrinoviride (9), T. orientalis (3), T. ghanense (3), T. hamatum (3), T. longibrachiatum (2), T. atroviride (2), and T. viride (1). All species were found to occur in potting media samples, while five Trichoderma species were recovered from the cultivated soils and four from the uncultivated soils. AFLP analysis of the 52 Trichoderma isolates produced 52 genotypes and 993 polymorphic loci. Low to moderate levels of genetic diversity were found within populations of Trichoderma species (H = 0.0780 to 0.2208). Analysis of Molecular Variance indicated the presence of very low levels of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.0002 to 0.0139) among populations of the same Trichoderma species obtained from the potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil. The study provides evidence for occurrence of Trichoderma isolates in soil with no previous history of cultivation. The lack of genetic differentiation among Trichoderma populations from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil suggests that some factors could have been responsible for moving Trichoderma propagules among the three substrates. The study reports for the first time the presence of 4 Trichoderma species in Oman: T

  9. Phosphoproteome analysis of functional mitochondria isolated from resting human muscle reveals extensive phosphorylation of inner membrane protein complexes and enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Leon, Ileana R; Bak, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    . In skeletal muscle, mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We performed a phosphoproteomic study of functional mitochondria isolated from human muscle biopsies with the aim to obtain a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial phosphoproteins....... Future comparative phosphoproteome analysis of mitochondria from healthy and diseased individuals will provide insights into the role of abnormal phosphorylation in pathologies, such as type 2 diabetes....

  10. New Sequence Types of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolated from a Malaysian Aquaculture Pond, as Revealed by Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Soon Man; Eng, Wilhelm Wei Han; Lee, Yin Peng; Gui, Kimberly; Gan, Han Ming

    2017-05-11

    The acquisition of Photorhabdus insect-related (Pir) toxin-like genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus has been linked to hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in shrimp. We report the whole-genome sequences of genetically virulent and avirulent V. parahaemolyticus isolated from a Malaysian aquaculture pond and show that they represent previously unreported sequence types of V. parahaemolyticus. Copyright © 2017 Foo et al.

  11. What the Face and Body Reveal: In-Group Emotion Effects and Stereotyping of Emotion in African American and European American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuminello, Elizabeth R.; Davidson, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether 3- to 7-year-old African American and European American children's assessment of emotion in face-only, face + body, and body-only photographic stimuli was affected by in-group emotion recognition effects and racial or gender stereotyping of emotion. Evidence for racial in-group effects was found, with European American…

  12. Phylodynamic analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio cholerae isolates from Haiti reveals diversification driven by positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A; Mohr, David; Prosperi, Mattia; Veras, Nazle M; Jubair, Mohammed; Strickland, Samantha L; Rashid, Mohammad H; Alam, Meer T; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Katz, Lee S; Tarr, Cheryl L; Colwell, Rita R; Morris, J Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2014-12-23

    Phylodynamic analysis of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is a powerful tool to investigate underlying evolutionary processes of bacterial epidemics. The method was applied to investigate a collection of 65 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti collected between 2010 and 2012. Characterization of isolates recovered from environmental samples identified a total of four toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates, four non-O1/O139 isolates, and a novel nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate with the classical tcpA gene. Phylogenies of strains were inferred from genome-wide SNPs using coalescent-based demographic models within a Bayesian framework. A close phylogenetic relationship between clinical and environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains was observed. As cholera spread throughout Haiti between October 2010 and August 2012, the population size initially increased and then fluctuated over time. Selection analysis along internal branches of the phylogeny showed a steady accumulation of synonymous substitutions and a progressive increase of nonsynonymous substitutions over time, suggesting diversification likely was driven by positive selection. Short-term accumulation of nonsynonymous substitutions driven by selection may have significant implications for virulence, transmission dynamics, and even vaccine efficacy. Cholera, a dehydrating diarrheal disease caused by toxigenic strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, emerged in 2010 in Haiti, a country where there were no available records on cholera over the past 100 years. While devastating in terms of morbidity and mortality, the outbreak provided a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary dynamics of V. cholerae and its environmental presence. The present study expands on previous work and provides an in-depth phylodynamic analysis inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms of clinical and environmental strains from dispersed geographic settings in

  13. Analysis of complete nucleotide sequences of Angolan hepatitis B virus isolates reveals the existence of a separate lineage within genotype E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara V Lago

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus genotype E (HBV/E is highly prevalent in Western Africa. In this work, 30 HBV/E isolates from HBsAg positive Angolans (staff and visitors of a private hospital in Luanda were genetically characterized: 16 of them were completely sequenced and the pre-S/S sequences of the remaining 14 were determined. A high proportion (12/30, 40% of subjects tested positive for both HBsAg and anti-HBs markers. Deduced amino acid sequences revealed the existence of specific substitutions and deletions in the B- and T-cell epitopes of the surface antigen (pre-S1- and pre-S2 regions of the virus isolates derived from 8/12 individuals with concurrent HBsAg/anti-HBs. Phylogenetic analysis performed with 231 HBV/E full-length sequences, including 16 from this study, showed that all isolates from Angola, Namibia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (n = 28 clustered in a separate lineage, divergent from the HBV/E isolates from nine other African countries, namely Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Madagascar, Niger, Nigeria and Sudan, with a Bayesian posterior probability of 1. Five specific mutations, namely small S protein T57I, polymerase Q177H, G245W and M612L, and X protein V30L, were observed in 79-96% of the isolates of the separate lineage, compared to a frequency of 0-12% among the other HBV/E African isolates.

  14. Insights into the Dekkera bruxellensis genomic landscape: comparative genomics reveals variations in ploidy and nutrient utilisation potential amongst wine isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R; Zeppel, Ryan; Chambers, Paul J; Curtin, Chris D

    2014-02-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis is a major contaminant of industrial fermentations, such as those used for the production of biofuel and wine, where it outlasts and, under some conditions, outcompetes the major industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to investigate the level of inter-strain variation that is present within this economically important species, the genomes of four diverse D. bruxellensis isolates were compared. While each of the four strains was shown to contain a core diploid genome, which is clearly sufficient for survival, two of the four isolates have a third haploid complement of chromosomes. The sequences of these additional haploid genomes were both highly divergent from those comprising the diploid core and divergent between the two triploid strains. Similar to examples in the Saccharomyces spp. clade, where some allotriploids have arisen on the basis of enhanced ability to survive a range of environmental conditions, it is likely these strains are products of two independent hybridisation events that may have involved multiple species or distinct sub-species of Dekkera. Interestingly these triploid strains represent the vast majority (92%) of isolates from across the Australian wine industry, suggesting that the additional set of chromosomes may confer a selective advantage in winery environments that has resulted in these hybrid strains all-but replacing their diploid counterparts in Australian winery settings. In addition to the apparent inter-specific hybridisation events, chromosomal aberrations such as strain-specific insertions and deletions and loss-of-heterozygosity by gene conversion were also commonplace. While these events are likely to have affected many phenotypes across these strains, we have been able to link a specific deletion to the inability to utilise nitrate by some strains of D. bruxellensis, a phenotype that may have direct impacts in the ability for these strains to compete with S. cerevisiae.

  15. Insights into the Dekkera bruxellensis genomic landscape: comparative genomics reveals variations in ploidy and nutrient utilisation potential amongst wine isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Borneman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis is a major contaminant of industrial fermentations, such as those used for the production of biofuel and wine, where it outlasts and, under some conditions, outcompetes the major industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to investigate the level of inter-strain variation that is present within this economically important species, the genomes of four diverse D. bruxellensis isolates were compared. While each of the four strains was shown to contain a core diploid genome, which is clearly sufficient for survival, two of the four isolates have a third haploid complement of chromosomes. The sequences of these additional haploid genomes were both highly divergent from those comprising the diploid core and divergent between the two triploid strains. Similar to examples in the Saccharomyces spp. clade, where some allotriploids have arisen on the basis of enhanced ability to survive a range of environmental conditions, it is likely these strains are products of two independent hybridisation events that may have involved multiple species or distinct sub-species of Dekkera. Interestingly these triploid strains represent the vast majority (92% of isolates from across the Australian wine industry, suggesting that the additional set of chromosomes may confer a selective advantage in winery environments that has resulted in these hybrid strains all-but replacing their diploid counterparts in Australian winery settings. In addition to the apparent inter-specific hybridisation events, chromosomal aberrations such as strain-specific insertions and deletions and loss-of-heterozygosity by gene conversion were also commonplace. While these events are likely to have affected many phenotypes across these strains, we have been able to link a specific deletion to the inability to utilise nitrate by some strains of D. bruxellensis, a phenotype that may have direct impacts in the ability for these strains to compete with S

  16. Biochemical and genetical analysis reveal a new clade of biovar 3 Dickeya spp. strains isolated from potato in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Slawiak, M.; Beckhoven, van, J.R.C.M.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Czajkowski, R.L.; Grabe, G.; Wolf, van der, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Sixty-five potato strains of the soft rot-causing plant pathogenic bacterium Dickeya spp., and two strains from hyacinth, were characterised using biochemical assays, REP-PCR genomic finger printing, 16S rDNA and dnaX sequence analysis. These methods were compared with nineteen strains representing six Dickeya species which included the type strains. A group of twenty-two potato strains isolated between 2005-2007 in the Netherlands, Poland, Finland and Israel were characterised as belonging t...

  17. Temporally isolated lineages of Pink salmon reveal unique signatures of selection on distinct pools of standing genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten; Waples, R.K.; Seeb, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    gorbuscha) using genome scans coupled with inference from a haploid-assisted linkage map. Pink salmon have a strict 2-year semelparous life history which has resulted in temporally isolated (allochronic) lineages that remain sympatric through sharing of spawning habitats in alternate years. The lineages...... differ in a range of adaptive traits, suggesting different genetic backgrounds. We used genotyping by sequencing of haploids to generate a high-density linkage map with 7035 loci and screened an existing panel of 8036 loci for signatures of selection. The linkage map enabled identification of novel...

  18. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Galeano, María José; Rubio, Leticia; Bertalmío, Ana; Maeso, Diego; Rivas, Fernando; Colina, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23). Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36) in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD) and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1) the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2) the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program. PMID:26205407

  19. In vitro Quinolones Susceptibility Analysis of Chinese Mycoplasma bovis Isolates and their Phylogenetic Scenarios based upon QRDRs of DNA Topoisomerases Revealing a Unique Transition in ParC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Mustafa1,2,3, Jingjing Qi1,2, Xiaoliang Ba1,2, Yingyu Chen1,4, Changmin Hu1,2, Xiaole Liu1,2, Lingling Tu5, Qingjie Peng5, Huanchun Chen1,2 and Aizhen Guo1,2*

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma bovis can cause different systemic problems in cattle, and recently has been resulted in huge economic losses in China. In vitro susceptibilities of 26 twice sub-cultured Chinese M. bovis field isolates were determined at physiological pH including PG45 through broth micro-dilution method. Except Huanggang isolate, all isolates and PG45 were in the sensitive range for levofloxacin, lomefloxacin and ciprofloxacin, whereas, for norfloxacin and nalidixic acid, they had shown intermediate resistant and complete resistant patterns, respectively. The multiple sequence analysis revealed point mutations in QRDRs of gyrA and parC genes of Huanggang isolate resulting in amino acid substitutions at positions 83 (S-F in GyrA (E. coli numbering and 80 (S-I in ParC proteins, the latter is reported for first time in M. bovis. Conclusively, fluoroquinolones are the potential veterinary therapeutic agents for mycoplasmosis in China and resistance to these agents comes through point mutations in QRDRs of gyrA and parC genes with ParC and GyrA mutation orientation.

  20. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Benítez-Galeano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36 in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1 the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2 the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program.

  1. Genetic characterization of Aino and Peaton virus field isolates reveals a genetic reassortment between these viruses in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Tohru; Aizawa, Maki; Kato, Tomoko; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Tomoyuki

    2010-10-01

    Sequence determination and phylogenetic analysis were conducted using the S, M and L RNA segments of the 10 Aino, 6 Peaton and 1 Sango virus (AINOV, PEAV and SANV) field isolates of the genus Orthobunyavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, respectively. The Japanese AINOV strains were genetically stable, but the sequence differences between the Japanese and Australian AINOV strains were considerably larger than those among the Japanese AINOV strains. A similar result was found in the genetic relationship among Japanese and Australian PEAVs, and SANV which was isolated in Nigeria and was thought as a synonym of PEAV, suggesting that geographic separation contributed significantly to the evolution of those viruses. The Australian AINOV strain B7974 is more closely related to the Australian PEAV strain CSIRO110 than to the Japanese AINOV strains in the S and L RNA segments, while the phylogenetic position of the M RNA segment of the B7974 strain was clustered with those of the Japanese AINOV strains. Our findings indicate that the B7974 strain is a reassortment with the M RNA segment derived from AINOV and the S and L RNA segments derived from an Australian PEAV. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional and genetic studies of isolated cells from parathyroid tumors reveal the complex pathogenesis of parathyroid neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuhong; Hogue, Joyce; Dixit, Darshana; Koh, James; Olson, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid adenomas (PAs) causing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) are histologically heterogeneous yet have been historically viewed as largely monotypic entities arising from clonal expansion of a single transformed progenitor. Using flow cytometric analysis of resected adenomatous parathyroid glands, we have isolated and characterized chief cells, oxyphil cells, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. The parathyroid chief and oxyphil cells produce parathyroid hormone (PTH), express the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), and mobilize intracellular calcium in response to CASR activation. Parathyroid tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are T cells by immunophenotyping. Under normocalcemic conditions, oxyphil cells produce ∼50% more PTH than do chief cells, yet display significantly greater PTH suppression and calcium flux response to elevated calcium. In contrast, CASR expression and localization are equivalent in the respective parathyroid cell populations. Analysis of tumor clonality using X-linked inactivation assays in a patient-matched series of intact tumors, preparatively isolated oxyphil and chief cells, and laser-captured microdissected PA specimens demonstrate polyclonality in 5 of 14 cases. These data demonstrate the presence of functionally distinct oxyphil and chief cells within parathyroid primary adenomas and provide evidence that primary PA can arise by both clonal and polyclonal mechanisms. The clonal differences, biochemical activity, and relative abundance of these parathyroid adenoma subpopulations likely reflect distinct mechanisms of disease in PHPT. PMID:24510902

  3. Phenotyping and genetic characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates from Turkey revealing arise of different features specific to geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Sinem; Bulut, Ece; Durul, Bora; Uner, Ilhan; Kur, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, M Dilek; Kirmaci, Hüseyin Avni; Tel, Yasar Osman; Zeyrek, Fadile Y; Soyer, Yesim

    2017-01-16

    192 Food samples (commonly consumed 8 food types), 355 animal samples (animal feces of bovine, ovine, goat and chicken) and 50 samples from clinical human cases in Sanliurfa city, Turkey in a year were collected to determine the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica mosaic in Turkey. 161 Salmonella isolates represented 17 serotypes, 20 sequence types (STs) and 44 PFGE patterns (PTs). 3 serotypes, S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium and S. Kentucky, were recovered from three different hosts. The highest discriminatory power was obtained by PFGE (SID=0.945), followed by MLST (SID=0.902) and serotyping (SID=0.885) for all isolates. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes (aadA1, aadA2, strA, strB, aphA 1-Iab , bla TEM-1 , bla PSE-1 , tetA) was highly correlated with phenotypic profiles of aminoglycoside, ß-lactam and tetracycline groups (kappa >0.85). From our knowledge, this is the first study reporting spatial and temporal distribution of Salmonella species through phenotypic and genetic approaches over farm to fork chain in Turkey. Thus, our data provided further information for evolution, ecology and transmission of Salmonella in Turkey. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from healthy Brazilian schoolchildren using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis reveals two highly polymorphic taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Fabiano Gomes Boriollo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of C. albicans oral isolates from 75 healthy schoolchildren from eight schools located in different geographic areas of Piracicaba city, São Paulo state, Brazil, was established using isoenzymes marker (Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis - MLEE and cluster analysis. Patterns of monoclonal and polyclonal oral colonization by C. albicans within and between groups of schoolchildren were identified. However, significant divergence between the observed and the expected genotypic frequencies (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test was not detected in the geographically adjacent groups, suggesting the hypothesis that populations of healthy schoolchildren do not correspond to the selection factor (differential survival of strains. Two highly polymorphic and distantly genetically related taxa (A and B were identified within the total population of yeasts, each contained subgroups (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1 and B2 and clusters of moderately related strains (from I to X, suggesting the existence of strains restricted or not to certain groups of geographically limited, healthy students. However, the coexistence of identical strains in healthy schoolchildren from the same school (geographically related reinforces the hypothesis of oral transmission, where the sources of propagation could be explored. Furthermore, this could also be used in current and retrospective analyses of C. albicans isolated from immunocompetent and immunocompromised people, in order to detect commensal or potentially pathogenic yeast groups, predominantly in candidiasis, and in the development of strategies to prevent transmission or human propagation.

  5. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from healthy brazilian schoolchildren using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis reveals two highly polymorphic taxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Barros, Letizia Monteiro; Bassi, Rodrigo Carlos; Garcia, José Antonio Dias; Costa, Ana Maria Duarte Dias; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Höfling, José Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of C. albicans oral isolates from 75 healthy schoolchildren from eight schools located in different geographic areas of Piracicaba city, São Paulo state, Brazil, was established using isoenzymes marker (Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis – MLEE) and cluster analysis. Patterns of monoclonal and polyclonal oral colonization by C. albicans within and between groups of schoolchildren were identified. However, significant divergence between the observed and the expected genotypic frequencies (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test) was not detected in the geographically adjacent groups, suggesting the hypothesis that populations of healthy schoolchildren do not correspond to the selection factor (differential survival) of strains. Two highly polymorphic and distantly genetically related taxa (A and B) were identified within the total population of yeasts, each contained subgroups (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1 and B2) and clusters of moderately related strains (from I to X), suggesting the existence of strains restricted or not to certain groups of geographically limited, healthy students. However, the coexistence of identical strains in healthy schoolchildren from the same school (geographically related) reinforces the hypothesis of oral transmission, where the sources of propagation could be explored. Furthermore, this could also be used in current and retrospective analyses of C. albicans isolated from immunocompetent and immunocompromised people, in order to detect commensal or potentially pathogenic yeast groups, predominantly in candidiasis, and in the development of strategies to prevent transmission or human propagation. PMID:24031720

  6. Stable Isotopic Signatures in the Isolated Brine Cyroecosystem of Lake Vida Reveal Evidence of both Abiotic and Biotic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A. E.; Ostrom, N. E.; Glazer, B. T.; McKay, C.; Kenig, F.; Loeffler, F. E.; Fritsen, C. H.; Doran, P. T.

    2011-12-01

    Lake Vida in the Victoria Valley of East Antarctica harbors ice-entrained brine that has been isolated from surface processes for several thousand years. The brine conditions (permanently dark, temperature of -13.4 °C, lack of oxygen, and pH of 6.2) and geochemistry are highly unusual. As an example, the brine contains excessive quantities of both reduced and oxidized nitrogen in nearly all forms, which in several cases are the highest levels found among natural ecosystems on Earth. Though this cryoecosystem appears to be relatively inhospitable, we have evidence that microbial life persists in abundance (cell levels over 107 cells per mL), is capable of protein production at in situ temperatures, and harbors a unique, but not necessarily novel, assemblage of bacterial phylotypes spanning at least eight phyla. In order to assess in situ microbial activities occurring today and in the past, and test hypotheses concerning energy generation in the brine cryoecosystem, the stable isotope signatures of nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen have been characterized in liquid and dissolved gas phases of the brine. The data provide evidence for both biotic and potentially abiotic formation of different fractions. The site preference of 15N-nitrous oxide (-3.64) suggests that the primary source of this dissolved gas, which is found at levels as high as 86 μM, is biologically produced by denitrification pathways. This appears to be consistent with detection of Marinobacter and Psychrobacter-related bacterial rRNA gene sequences and isolates in the brine microbial community. On the other hand, dissolved hydrogen present in the brine harbors an δH-H2 isotope signature suggesting that abiotic (potentially via serpentinization) or biotic production is equivocal based on the significant levels of fractionation observed. We postulate however, that a serpentinization production route is more favorable in this system that lies in a basin comprised of Ferrar dolerite sills and granite

  7. The Proteome of the Isolated Chlamydia trachomatis Containing Vacuole Reveals a Complex Trafficking Platform Enriched for Retromer Components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Aeberhard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis is an important human pathogen that replicates inside the infected host cell in a unique vacuole, the inclusion. The formation of this intracellular bacterial niche is essential for productive Chlamydia infections. Despite its importance for Chlamydia biology, a holistic view on the protein composition of the inclusion, including its membrane, is currently missing. Here we describe the host cell-derived proteome of isolated C. trachomatis inclusions by quantitative proteomics. Computational analysis indicated that the inclusion is a complex intracellular trafficking platform that interacts with host cells' antero- and retrograde trafficking pathways. Furthermore, the inclusion is highly enriched for sorting nexins of the SNX-BAR retromer, a complex essential for retrograde trafficking. Functional studies showed that in particular, SNX5 controls the C. trachomatis infection and that retrograde trafficking is essential for infectious progeny formation. In summary, these findings suggest that C. trachomatis hijacks retrograde pathways for effective infection.

  8. Protein markers of cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumor-initiating cells reveal subpopulations in freshly isolated ovarian cancer ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wintzell My

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In ovarian cancer, massive intraperitoneal dissemination is due to exfoliated tumor cells in ascites. Tumor-initiating cells (TICs or cancer stem cells and cells showing epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT are particularly implicated. Spontaneous spherical cell aggregates are sometimes observed, but although similar to those formed by TICs in vitro, their significance is unclear. Methods Cells freshly isolated from malignant ascites were separated into sphere samples (S-type samples, n=9 and monolayer-forming single-cell suspensions (M-type, n=18. Using western blot, these were then compared for expression of protein markers of EMT, TIC, and of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. Results S-type cells differed significantly from M-type by expressing high levels of E-cadherin and no or little vimentin, integrin-β3 or stem cell transcription factor Oct-4A. By contrast, M-type samples were enriched for CD44, Oct-4A and for CAF markers. Independently of M- and S-type, there was a strong correlation between TIC markers Nanog and EpCAM. The CAF marker α-SMA correlated with clinical stage IV. This is the first report on CAF markers in malignant ascites and on SUMOylation of Oct-4A in ovarian cancer. Conclusions In addition to demonstrating potentially high levels of TICs in ascites, the results suggest that the S-type population is the less tumorigenic one. Nanoghigh/EpCAMhigh samples represent a TIC subset which may be either M- or S-type, and which is separate from the CD44high/Oct-4Ahigh subset observed only in M-type samples. This demonstrates a heterogeneity in TIC populations in vivo which has practical implications for TIC isolation based on cell sorting. The biological heterogeneity will need to be addressed in future therapeutical strategies.

  9. A Year of Infection in the Intensive Care Unit: Prospective Whole Genome Sequencing of Bacterial Clinical Isolates Reveals Cryptic Transmissions and Novel Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, David J; Burton, Joshua N; Lee, Choli; Stackhouse, Bethany; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Cookson, Brad T; Shendure, Jay; Salipante, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequencing holds promise as a disruptive technology in clinical microbiology, but it has not yet been applied systematically or comprehensively within a clinical context. Here, over the course of one year, we performed prospective collection and whole genome sequencing of nearly all bacterial isolates obtained from a tertiary care hospital's intensive care units (ICUs). This unbiased collection of 1,229 bacterial genomes from 391 patients enables detailed exploration of several features of clinical pathogens. A sizable fraction of isolates identified as clinically relevant corresponded to previously undescribed species: 12% of isolates assigned a species-level classification by conventional methods actually qualified as distinct, novel genomospecies on the basis of genomic similarity. Pan-genome analysis of the most frequently encountered pathogens in the collection revealed substantial variation in pan-genome size (1,420 to 20,432 genes) and the rate of gene discovery (1 to 152 genes per isolate sequenced). Surprisingly, although potential nosocomial transmission of actively surveilled pathogens was rare, 8.7% of isolates belonged to genomically related clonal lineages that were present among multiple patients, usually with overlapping hospital admissions, and were associated with clinically significant infection in 62% of patients from which they were recovered. Multi-patient clonal lineages were particularly evident in the neonatal care unit, where seven separate Staphylococcus epidermidis clonal lineages were identified, including one lineage associated with bacteremia in 5/9 neonates. Our study highlights key differences in the information made available by conventional microbiological practices versus whole genome sequencing, and motivates the further integration of microbial genome sequencing into routine clinical care.

  10. Genetic analysis of the isolated Faroe Islands reveals SORCS3 as a potential multiple sclerosis risk gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Stefanie; Stenager, Egon; Binzer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    of 0.34 in cases but was not present in any controls (p = 0.0008). CONCLUSION: This study revealed an oversharing in case-case-pairs of a segment spanning 63 SNPs and the entire SORCS3. While not previously associated with MS, SORCS3 appears to be important in neuronal plasticity through its binding...... of neurotrophin factors and involvement in glutamate homeostasis. Although additional work is needed to scrutinise the genetic effect of the SORCS3-covering haplotype, this study suggests that SORCS3 may also be important in MS pathogenesis....

  11. Baseline brain activity changes in patients with clinically isolated syndrome revealed by resting-state functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou; Duan, Yunyun; Liang, Peipeng; Jia, Xiuqin; Yu, Chunshui [Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Ye, Jing [Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dong, Huiqing [Dept. of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Li, Kuncheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China)], E-mail: likuncheng1955@yahoo.com.cn

    2012-11-15

    Background A clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) is the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous task-related functional MRI studies demonstrate functional reorganization in patients with CIS. Purpose To assess baseline brain activity changes in patients with CIS by using the technique of regional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as an index in resting-state fMRI. Material and Methods Resting-state fMRIs data acquired from 37 patients with CIS and 37 age- and sex-matched normal controls were compared to investigate ALFF differences. The relationships between ALFF in regions with significant group differences and the EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale), disease duration, and T2 lesion volume (T2LV) were further explored. Results Patients with CIS had significantly decreased ALFF in the right anterior cingulate cortex, right caudate, right lingual gyrus, and right cuneus (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons using Monte Carlo simulation) compared to normal controls, while no significantly increased ALFF were observed in CIS. No significant correlation was found between the EDSS, disease duration, T2LV, and ALFF in regions with significant group differences. Conclusion In patients with CIS, resting-state fMRI demonstrates decreased activity in several brain regions. These results are in contrast to patients with established MS, in whom ALFF demonstrates several regions of increased activity. It is possible that this shift from decreased activity in CIS to increased activity in MS could reflect the dynamics of cortical reorganization.

  12. Dynamic Profiling of Insulin Secretion and ATP Generation in Isolated Human and Mouse Islets Reveals Differential Glucose Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Pingitore

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rodent islets are often used for basic science research but they do not always recapitulate signalling events in human islets. This study evaluated the glucose-dependent responses of human and mouse islets in terms of dynamic insulin secretion, metabolic coupling and the role of glucose transporters. Methods: Glucose-induced insulin secretion from isolated mouse and human islets was profiled by perifusion and islet ATP levels were measured by chemoluminescence assay. Glucose transporter expression was determined by qPCR and western blotting. Results: Human islets show a left-shifted glucose concentration-insulin secretion profile compared to mouse islets. These data are consistent with glucose transporter expression, with human islets expressing mainly GLUT1 and GLUT3, and GLUT2 being the predominant transporter in mouse islets. Using the GLUT1 inhibitor STF-31 we unveiled an important role for GLUT1 for differences in glucose-induced insulin secretion profiles observed between the two species. Conclusion: The high affinity of GLUT1/3 for glucose reflects the left-shifted glucose-induced insulin secretory response of human islets and the impairment of insulin secretion from human islets after STF-31 treatment indicates an important role for GLUT1 in human islet stimulus-secretion coupling. Our data provide further insight into key differences between insulin secretion regulation in mouse and human islets.

  13. Phylogeography of the tropical planktonic foraminifera lineage globigerinella reveals isolation inconsistent with passive dispersal by ocean currents.

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    Agnes K M Weiner

    Full Text Available Morphologically defined species of marine plankton often harbor a considerable level of cryptic diversity. Since many morphospecies show cosmopolitan distribution, an understanding of biogeographic and evolutionary processes at the level of genetic diversity requires global sampling. We use a database of 387 single-specimen sequences of the SSU rDNA of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinella as a model to assess the biogeographic and phylogenetic distributions of cryptic diversity in marine microplankton on a global scale. Our data confirm the existence of multiple, well isolated genetic lineages. An analysis of their abundance and distribution indicates that our sampling is likely to approximate the actual total diversity. Unexpectedly, we observe an uneven allocation of cryptic diversity among the phylogenetic lineages. We show that this pattern is neither an artifact of sampling intensity nor a function of lineage age. Instead, we argue that it reflects an ongoing speciation process in one of the three major lineages. Surprisingly, four of the six genetic types in the hyperdiverse lineage are biogeographically restricted to the Indopacific. Their mutual co-occurrence and their hierarchical phylogenetic structure provide no evidence for an origin through sudden habitat fragmentation and their limitation to the Indopacific challenges the view of a global gene flow within the warm-water provinces. This phenomenon shows that passive dispersal is not sufficient to describe the distribution of plankton diversity. Rather, these organisms show differentiated distribution patterns shaped by species interactions and reflecting phylogenetic contingency with unique histories of diversification rates.

  14. Genomic Characteristics of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum Pig Isolates and Wild Boar Isolates Reveal the Unique Presence of a Putative Mobile Genetic Element with tetW for Pig Farm Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Sayaka; Maruyama, Fumito; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Okuma, Moriya; Ushida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Genomic analysis was performed on seven strains of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum, a Sus-associated Bifidobacterium. Three strains from the feces of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) and four strains from the rectal feces of free-range Japanese wild boars (S. s. scrofa) were compared. The phylogenetic position of these isolates suggested by genomic analyses were not concordant with that suggested by 16S rRNA sequence. There was biased distribution of genes for virulence, phage, metabolism of aromatic compounds, iron acquisition, cell division, and DNA metabolism. In particular four wild boar isolates harbored fiber-degrading enzymes, such as endoglucanase, while two of the pig isolates obtained from those grown under an intensive feeding practice with routine use of antimicrobials, particularly tetracycline harbored a tetracycline resistance gene, which was further proved functional by disk diffusion test. The tetW gene is associated with a serine recombinase of an apparently non-bifidobacterial origin. The insertion site of the tetW cassette was precisely defined by analyzing the corresponding genomic regions in the other tetracycline-susceptible isolates. The cassette may have been transferred from some other bacteria in the pig gut. PMID:28861055

  15. Genomic Characteristics of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum Pig Isolates and Wild Boar Isolates Reveal the Unique Presence of a Putative Mobile Genetic Element with tetW for Pig Farm Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuchida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analysis was performed on seven strains of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum, a Sus-associated Bifidobacterium. Three strains from the feces of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus and four strains from the rectal feces of free-range Japanese wild boars (S. s. scrofa were compared. The phylogenetic position of these isolates suggested by genomic analyses were not concordant with that suggested by 16S rRNA sequence. There was biased distribution of genes for virulence, phage, metabolism of aromatic compounds, iron acquisition, cell division, and DNA metabolism. In particular four wild boar isolates harbored fiber-degrading enzymes, such as endoglucanase, while two of the pig isolates obtained from those grown under an intensive feeding practice with routine use of antimicrobials, particularly tetracycline harbored a tetracycline resistance gene, which was further proved functional by disk diffusion test. The tetW gene is associated with a serine recombinase of an apparently non-bifidobacterial origin. The insertion site of the tetW cassette was precisely defined by analyzing the corresponding genomic regions in the other tetracycline-susceptible isolates. The cassette may have been transferred from some other bacteria in the pig gut.

  16. Deep Sequencing Analysis Reveals the Mycoviral Diversity of the Virome of an Avirulent Isolate of Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomäus, Anika; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani represents an important plant pathogenic Basidiomycota species complex and the host of many different mycoviruses, as indicated by frequent detection of dsRNA elements in natural populations of the fungus. To date, eight different mycoviruses have been characterized in Rhizoctonia and some of them have been reported to modulate its virulence. DsRNA extracts of the avirulent R. solani isolate DC17 (AG2-2-IV) displayed a diverse pattern, indicating multiple infections with mycoviruses. Deep sequencing analysis of the dsRNA extract, converted to cDNA, revealed that this isolate harbors at least 17 different mycovirus species. Based on the alignment of the conserved RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) domain, this viral community included putative members of the families Narnaviridae, Endornaviridae, Partitiviridae and Megabirnaviridae as well as of the order Tymovirales. Furthermore, viruses, which could not be assigned to any existing family or order, but showed similarities to so far unassigned species like Sclerotinia sclerotiorum RNA virus L, Rhizoctonia solani dsRNA virus 1, Aspergillus foetidus slow virus 2 or Rhizoctonia fumigata virus 1, were identified. This is the first report of a fungal isolate infected by 17 different viral species and a valuable study case to explore the diversity of mycoviruses infecting R. solani.

  17. Deep Sequencing Analysis Reveals the Mycoviral Diversity of the Virome of an Avirulent Isolate of Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Bartholomäus

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani represents an important plant pathogenic Basidiomycota species complex and the host of many different mycoviruses, as indicated by frequent detection of dsRNA elements in natural populations of the fungus. To date, eight different mycoviruses have been characterized in Rhizoctonia and some of them have been reported to modulate its virulence. DsRNA extracts of the avirulent R. solani isolate DC17 (AG2-2-IV displayed a diverse pattern, indicating multiple infections with mycoviruses. Deep sequencing analysis of the dsRNA extract, converted to cDNA, revealed that this isolate harbors at least 17 different mycovirus species. Based on the alignment of the conserved RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp domain, this viral community included putative members of the families Narnaviridae, Endornaviridae, Partitiviridae and Megabirnaviridae as well as of the order Tymovirales. Furthermore, viruses, which could not be assigned to any existing family or order, but showed similarities to so far unassigned species like Sclerotinia sclerotiorum RNA virus L, Rhizoctonia solani dsRNA virus 1, Aspergillus foetidus slow virus 2 or Rhizoctonia fumigata virus 1, were identified. This is the first report of a fungal isolate infected by 17 different viral species and a valuable study case to explore the diversity of mycoviruses infecting R. solani.

  18. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  19. Strong genetic structure revealed by multilocus patterns of variation in Giardia duodenalis isolates of patients from Galicia (NW-Iberian Peninsula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabín-García, Luis B; Bartolomé, Carolina; Abal-Fabeiro, José L; Méndez, Santiago; Llovo, José; Maside, Xulio

    2017-03-01

    We report a survey of genetic variation at three coding loci in Giardia duodenalis of assemblages A and B obtained from stool samples of patients from Santiago de Compostela (Galicia, NW-Iberian Peninsula). The mean pooled synonymous diversity for assemblage A was nearly five times lower than for assemblage B (0.77%±0.30% and 4.14%±1.65%, respectively). Synonymous variation in both assemblages was in mutation-drift equilibrium and an excess of low-frequency nonsynonymous variants suggested the action of purifying selection at the three loci. Differences between isolates contributed to 40% and 60% of total genetic variance in assemblages A and B, respectively, which revealed a significant genetic structure. These results, together with the lack of evidence for recombination, support that (i) Giardia assemblages A and B are in demographic equilibrium and behave as two genetically isolated populations, (ii) infections are initiated by a reduced number of individuals, which may be genetically diverse and even belong to different assemblages, and (iii) parasites reproduce clonally within the host. However, the observation of invariant loci in some isolates means that mechanisms for the homogenization of the genetic content of the two diploid nuclei in each individual must exist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of subtelomeric sequences of porcine chromosomes for translocation screening reveals errors in the pig genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, R E; Fonseka, G; Frodsham, R; Archibald, A L; Lawrie, M; Walling, G A; Griffin, D K

    2017-08-01

    Balanced chromosomal aberrations have been shown to affect fertility in most species studied, often leading to hypoprolificacy (reduced litter size) in domestic animals such as pigs. With an increasing emphasis in modern food production on the use of a small population of high quality males for artificial insemination, the potential economic and environmental costs of hypoprolific boars, bulls, rams etc. are considerable. There is therefore a need for novel tools to facilitate rapid, cost-effective chromosome translocation screening. This has previously been achieved by standard karyotype analysis; however, this approach relies on a significant level of expertise and is limited in its ability to identify subtle, cryptic translocations. To address this problem, we developed a novel device and protocol for translocation screening using subtelomeric probes and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Probes were designed using BACs (bacterial artificial chromosomes) from the subtelomeric region of the short (p-arm) and long (q-arm) of each porcine chromosome. They were directly labelled with FITC or Texas Red (p-arm and q-arm respectively) prior to application of a 'Multiprobe' device, thereby enabling simultaneous detection of each individual porcine chromosome on a single slide. Initial experiments designed to isolate BACs in subtelomeric regions led to the discovery of a series of incorrectly mapped regions in the porcine genome assembly (from a total of 82 BACs, only 45 BACs mapped correctly). Our work therefore highlights the importance of accurate physical mapping of newly sequenced genomes. The system herein described allows for robust and comprehensive analysis of the porcine karyotype, an adjunct to classical cytogenetics that provides a valuable tool to expedite efficient, cost effective food production. © 2017 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  1. Genetic variability among Hymenolepis nana isolates from different geographical regions in China revealed by sequence analysis of three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tian; Gao, De-Zhen; Zhu, Wei-Ning; Fang, Su-Fang; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Liu, Guo-Hua; Lin, Rui-Qing

    2016-11-01

    Hymenolepis nana is a common tapeworm that parasitizes in the small intestine of rodent animals and humans. The present study examined the sequence diversity of three mitochondrial (mt) genes namely NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 (nad5), small subunit ribosomal RNA (rrnS), and ATPase subunit 6 (atp6) of H. nana from mice in different geographical regions of China. A part of the nad5 (pnad5), complete rrnS and atp6 genes were amplified separately from individual H. nana isolates using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then sequenced. The sequences of pnad5, rrnS, and atp6 were 710 bp, 704-711 bp, and 516 bp in length, respectively. The A + T contents of the sequences were 70.1-73.5% (pnad5), 70.1-71.7% (rrnS), and 76.6-77.9% (atp6). Sequence variation within H. nana was 0-1.4% for atp6, 0-1.7% for rrnS, and 0-0.7% for pnad5. The inter-specific sequence differences between H. nana and Hymenolepis diminuta were significantly higher, which was 31.6-31.7% (pnad5), 16.1-17.6% (rrnS), and 26.5-27.1% (atp6). Phylogenetic analysis based on the combined three sequences using the maximum parsimony (MP) method supported that H. nana is a species complex or "cryptic" species. These findings demonstrated clearly the usefulness of the three mtDNA sequences for population genetics and systematic studies of H. nana of human and animal health significance.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of two emergent human adenovirus type 14 respiratory pathogen isolates in China reveals similar yet divergent genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiwei; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Yu, Zhiwu; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Yan, Yuqian; Li, Min; Seto, Donald

    2017-11-01

    Human adenovirus type 14 (HAdV-B14p) was originally identified as an acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen in The Netherlands in 1955. For approximately fifty years, few sporadic infections were observed. In 2005, HAdV-B14p1, a genomic variant, re-emerged and was associated with several large ARD outbreaks across the U.S. and, subsequently, in Canada, the U.K., Ireland, and China. This strain was associated with an unusually higher fatality rate than previously reported for both this prototype and other HAdV types in general. In China, HAdV-B14 was first observed in 2010, when two unrelated HAdV-B14-associated ARD cases were reported in Southern China (GZ01) and Northern China (BJ430), followed by three subsequent outbreaks. While comparative genomic analysis, including indel analysis, shows that the three China isolates, with whole genome data available, are similar to the de Wit prototype, all are divergent from the U.S. strain (303600; 2007). Although the genomes of strains GZ01 and BJ430 are nearly identical, as per their genome type characterization and percent identities, they are subtly divergent in their genome mutation patterns. These genomes indicate possibly two lineages of HAdV-B14 and independent introductions into China from abroad, or subsequent divergence from one; CHN2012 likely represents a separate sub-lineage. Observations of these simultaneously reported emergent strains in China add to the understanding of the circulation, epidemiology, and evolution of these HAdV pathogens, as well as provide a foundation for developing effective vaccines and public health strategies, including nationwide surveillance in anticipation of larger outbreaks with potentially higher fatality rates associated with HAdV-B14p1.

  3. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  4. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  5. DNA barcodes reveal that the widespread European tortricid moth Phalonidia manniana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is a mixture of two species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutanen, Marko; Aarvik, Leif; Huemer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    , 1845, sp. rev. Their biologies also differ, P. manniana feeding in stems of Mentha and Lycopus (Lamiaceae) and P. udana feeding in stems of Lysimachia thyrsiflora and L. vulgaris (Primulaceae). We provide re-descriptions of both taxa and DNA barcodes for North European Phalonidia and Gynnidomorpha...

  6. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates from Pakistan during 2009–2013 reveals circulation of new sub genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddique, Naila, E-mail: naila.nrlpd@gmail.com [National Reference Laboratory for Poultry Diseases, Animal Sciences Institute, National Agricultural Research Center, Islamabad (Pakistan); Naeem, Khalid; Abbas, Muhammad Athar; Ali Malik, Akbar; Rashid, Farooq; Rafique, Saba; Ghafar, Abdul; Rehman, Abdul [National Reference Laboratory for Poultry Diseases, Animal Sciences Institute, National Agricultural Research Center, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-09-15

    Despite observing the standard bio-security measures at commercial poultry farms and extensive use of Newcastle disease vaccines, a new genotype VII-f of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) got introduced in Pakistan during 2011. In this regard 300 ND outbreaks recorded so far have resulted into huge losses of approximately USD 200 million during 2011–2013. A total of 33 NDV isolates recovered during 2009–2013 throughout Pakistan were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a new velogenic sub genotype VII-f circulating in commercial and domestic poultry along with the earlier reported sub genotype VII-b. Partial sequencing of Fusion gene revealed two types of cleavage site motifs; lentogenic {sup 112}GRQGRL{sup 117} and velogenic {sup 112}RRQKRF{sup 117} along with some point mutations indicative of genetic diversity. We report here a new sub genotype of virulent NDV circulating in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan and provide evidence for the possible genetic diversity which may be causing new NDV out breaks. - Highlights: • The first report of isolation of new genotype VII-f of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in Pakistan. • We report the partial Fusion gene sequences of new genotype VII-f of virulent NDV from Pakistan. • We report the phylogenetic relationship of new NDV strains with reported NDV strains. • Provide outbreak history of new virulent NDV strain in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan. • We provide possible evidence for the role of backyard poultry in NDV outbreaks.

  7. Evolutionary patterns of two major reproduction candidate genes (Zp2 and Zp3 reveal no contribution to reproductive isolation between bovine species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beja-Pereira Albano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been established that mammalian egg zona pellucida (ZP glycoproteins are responsible for species-restricted binding of sperm to unfertilized eggs, inducing the sperm acrosome reaction, and preventing polyspermy. In mammals, ZP apparently represents a barrier to heterospecific fertilization and thus probably contributes to reproductive isolation between species. The evolutionary relationships between some members of the tribe Bovini are complex and highly debatable, particularly, those involving Bos and Bison species for which interspecific hybridization is extensively documented. Because reproductive isolation is known to be a major precursor of species divergence, testing evolutionary patterns of ZP glycoproteins may shed some light into the speciation process of these species. To this end, we have examined intraspecific and interspecific genetic variation of two ZP genes (Zp2 and Zp3 for seven representative species (111 individuals from the Bovini tribe, including five species from Bos and Bison, and two species each from genera Bubalus and Syncerus. Results A pattern of low levels of intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific divergence was detected for the two sequenced fragments each for Zp2 and Zp3. At intraspecific level, none of neutrality tests detected deviations from neutral equilibrium expectations for the two genes. Several haplotypes in both genes were shared by multiple species from Bos and Bison. Conclusions Here we argue that neither ancestral polymorphism nor introgressive hybridization alone can fully account for haplotype sharing among species from Bos and Bison, and that both scenarios have contributed to such a pattern of haplotype sharing observed here. Additionally, codon-based tests revealed strong evidence for purifying selection in the Zp3 coding haplotype sequences and weak evidence for purifying selection in the Zp2 coding haplotype sequences. Contrary to a general genetic pattern that

  8. Screening of bacterial isolates from various European soils for in vitro antagonistic activity towards Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum : Site-dependent composition and diversity revealed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adesina, Modupe F.; Lembke, Antje; Costa, Rodrigo; Speksnijder, Arien; Smalla, Kornelia

    2007-01-01

    A cultivation-based approach was used to determine the in vitro antagonistic potential of soil bacteria towards Rhizoctonia solani AG3 and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini (Foln3). Four composite soil samples were collected from four agricultural sites with previous documentation of disease

  9. Screening of bacterial isolates from various European soils for in vitro antagonistic activity towards Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum: Site-dependent composition and diversity revealed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adesina, M.F.; Lembke, A.; Costa, R.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Smalla, K.

    2007-01-01

    A cultivation-based approach was used to determine the in vitro antagonistic potential of soil bacteria towards Rhizoctonia solani AG3 and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini (Foln3). Four composite soil samples were collected from four agricultural sites with previous documentation of disease

  10. Genomic Analysis of Xanthomonas oryzae Isolates from Rice Grown in the United States Reveals Substantial Divergence from Known X. oryzae Pathovars ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, L. R.; Hamilton, J. P.; Buell, C. R.; Tisserat, N. A.; Verdier, V.; Zink, F.; Leach, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    The species Xanthomonas oryzae is comprised of two designated pathovars, both of which cause economically significant diseases of rice in Asia and Africa. Although X. oryzae is not considered endemic in the United States, an X. oryzae-like bacterium was isolated from U.S. rice and southern cutgrass in the late 1980s. The U.S. strains were weakly pathogenic and genetically distinct from characterized X. oryzae pathovars. In the current study, a draft genome sequence from two U.S. Xanthomonas strains revealed that the U.S. strains form a novel clade within the X. oryzae species, distinct from all strains known to cause significant yield loss. Comparative genome analysis revealed several putative gene clusters specific to the U.S. strains and supported previous reports that the U.S. strains lack transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors. In addition to phylogenetic and comparative analyses, the genome sequence was used for designing robust U.S. strain-specific primers, demonstrating the usefulness of a draft genome sequence in the rapid development of diagnostic tools. PMID:21515727

  11. The Environmental Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate DSM30011 Reveals Clues into the Preantibiotic Era Genome Diversity, Virulence Potential, and Niche Range of a Predominant Nosocomial Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, Alejandro M.; Borges, Vítor; Cameranesi, María M.; Taib, Najwa; Espariz, Martín; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Gomes, João Paulo; Salcedo, Suzana P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii represents nowadays an important nosocomial opportunistic pathogen whose reservoirs outside the clinical setting are obscure. Here, we traced the origins of the collection strain A. baumannii DSM30011 to an isolate first reported in 1944, obtained from the enriched microbiota responsible of the aerobic decomposition of the resinous desert shrub guayule. Whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis based on core genes confirmed DSM30011 affiliation to A. baumannii. Comparative studies with 32 complete A. baumannii genomes revealed the presence of 12 unique accessory chromosomal regions in DSM30011 including five encompassing phage-related genes, five containing toxin genes of the type-6 secretion system, and one with an atypical CRISPRs/cas cluster. No antimicrobial resistance islands were identified in DSM30011 agreeing with a general antimicrobial susceptibility phenotype including folate synthesis inhibitors. The marginal ampicillin resistance of DSM30011 most likely derived from chromosomal ADC-type ampC and blaOXA-51-type genes. Searching for catabolic pathways genes revealed several clusters involved in the degradation of plant defenses including woody tissues and a previously unreported atu locus responsible of aliphatic terpenes degradation, thus suggesting that resinous plants may provide an effective niche for this organism. DSM30011 also harbored most genes and regulatory mechanisms linked to persistence and virulence in pathogenic Acinetobacter species. This strain thus revealed important clues into the genomic diversity, virulence potential, and niche ranges of the preantibiotic era A. baumannii population, and may provide an useful tool for our understanding of the processes that led to the recent evolution of this species toward an opportunistic pathogen of humans. PMID:28934377

  12. The Environmental Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate DSM30011 Reveals Clues into the Preantibiotic Era Genome Diversity, Virulence Potential, and Niche Range of a Predominant Nosocomial Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repizo, Guillermo D; Viale, Alejandro M; Borges, Vítor; Cameranesi, María M; Taib, Najwa; Espariz, Martín; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Gomes, João Paulo; Salcedo, Suzana P

    2017-09-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii represents nowadays an important nosocomial opportunistic pathogen whose reservoirs outside the clinical setting are obscure. Here, we traced the origins of the collection strain A. baumannii DSM30011 to an isolate first reported in 1944, obtained from the enriched microbiota responsible of the aerobic decomposition of the resinous desert shrub guayule. Whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis based on core genes confirmed DSM30011 affiliation to A. baumannii. Comparative studies with 32 complete A. baumannii genomes revealed the presence of 12 unique accessory chromosomal regions in DSM30011 including five encompassing phage-related genes, five containing toxin genes of the type-6 secretion system, and one with an atypical CRISPRs/cas cluster. No antimicrobial resistance islands were identified in DSM30011 agreeing with a general antimicrobial susceptibility phenotype including folate synthesis inhibitors. The marginal ampicillin resistance of DSM30011 most likely derived from chromosomal ADC-type ampC and blaOXA-51-type genes. Searching for catabolic pathways genes revealed several clusters involved in the degradation of plant defenses including woody tissues and a previously unreported atu locus responsible of aliphatic terpenes degradation, thus suggesting that resinous plants may provide an effective niche for this organism. DSM30011 also harbored most genes and regulatory mechanisms linked to persistence and virulence in pathogenic Acinetobacter species. This strain thus revealed important clues into the genomic diversity, virulence potential, and niche ranges of the preantibiotic era A. baumannii population, and may provide an useful tool for our understanding of the processes that led to the recent evolution of this species toward an opportunistic pathogen of humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Analysis using national databases reveals a positive association between dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids with TV watching and diabetes in European females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pither, Jason; Botta, Amy; Maity, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have increased in parallel to sedentary behavior and diabetes across the world. To test any putative association between dietary PUFA and sedentary behavior or diabetes in females, we obtained country-specific, cross-sectional data on sedentary activity and diabetes prevalence from European Cardiovascular Statistics 2012. Age and gender-specific, nutritional data from each country were obtained from nutritional surveys as well. Socioeconomic (GDP), physical environment (urbanization index) and climatic confounders were accounted for each country. Upon analysis, we found a strong, positive association between sedentary lifestyle in 11-yr old girls (> = 2 hours of TV/ weekday) and dietary PUFA across 21 European countries. Further, a weak association of dietary PUFA and a strong relationship of per-capita GDP was established with elevated fasting blood glucose [(> = 7.0 mmol/L; or on medication] among 25+ year old adult females across 23 countries in Europe. In summary, we present novel ecological evidence that dietary PUFA is strongly associated with sedentary behavior among pre-teen girls and weakly associated with diabetes among adult women across Europe. In the latter group, per-capita GDP was a significant predictor for diabetes as well. Therefore, we recommend that prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) be implemented to evaluate if ubiquitous presence of dietary PUFA and low socioeconomic status are possible confounders when intervening to treat/prevent sedentary lifestyle or diabetes in female subjects in Western nations.

  14. Histopathological effects of chronic aqueous exposure to bis(tri-n-butyltin)oxide (TBTO) to environmentally relevant concentrations reveal thymus atrophy in European flounder (Platichthys flesus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinwis, G.C.M., E-mail: g.c.m.grinwis@uu.n [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University of Utrecht, P.O. Box 80.158, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Wester, P.W. [Laboratory for Toxicology, Pathology and Genetics, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Vethaak, A.D. [Deltares, Unit Coastal and Marine Systems, P.O. Box 177, 2600 MH Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    Although the use of tributyltin in antifouling paints has been banned, this compound is still a serious pollutant of the marine environment. This paper describes a unique study in which European flounder (Platichthys flesus) were chronically (8 months) exposed to bis(tri-n-butyltin)oxide (TBTO) in the water under controlled laboratory conditions. Residue levels in selected tissues (liver, muscle) and general health status indices were measured and the effects on several organs (gills, liver, mesonephros, ovary/testis, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract) were examined histopathologically. Additionally, morphometric analysis of the thymus was performed. The major finding is that exposure of flounder to 5 mug TBTO/l over a period of 8 months, resulting in body burdens comparable to high field levels, induced significant reduction of thymus volume, possibly affecting immunocompetence of the animals. Chronic exposure of European flounder to tributyltin is therefore likely to affect the general health status of this species in heavily polluted aquatic environments. - Current levels of tributyltin antifouling contamination are still likely to affect the general health status of estuarine flatfish in heavily polluted environments.

  15. Analysis using national databases reveals a positive association between dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids with TV watching and diabetes in European females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Pither

    Full Text Available In recent years, dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have increased in parallel to sedentary behavior and diabetes across the world. To test any putative association between dietary PUFA and sedentary behavior or diabetes in females, we obtained country-specific, cross-sectional data on sedentary activity and diabetes prevalence from European Cardiovascular Statistics 2012. Age and gender-specific, nutritional data from each country were obtained from nutritional surveys as well. Socioeconomic (GDP, physical environment (urbanization index and climatic confounders were accounted for each country. Upon analysis, we found a strong, positive association between sedentary lifestyle in 11-yr old girls (> = 2 hours of TV/ weekday and dietary PUFA across 21 European countries. Further, a weak association of dietary PUFA and a strong relationship of per-capita GDP was established with elevated fasting blood glucose [(> = 7.0 mmol/L; or on medication] among 25+ year old adult females across 23 countries in Europe. In summary, we present novel ecological evidence that dietary PUFA is strongly associated with sedentary behavior among pre-teen girls and weakly associated with diabetes among adult women across Europe. In the latter group, per-capita GDP was a significant predictor for diabetes as well. Therefore, we recommend that prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs be implemented to evaluate if ubiquitous presence of dietary PUFA and low socioeconomic status are possible confounders when intervening to treat/prevent sedentary lifestyle or diabetes in female subjects in Western nations.

  16. Phylogeographic analysis of a temperate-deciduous forest restricted plant (Bupleurum longiradiatum Turcz.) reveals two refuge areas in China with subsequent refugial isolation promoting speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cai; Wang, Chang-Bao; Ma, Xiang-Guang; Liang, Qian-Long; He, Xing-Jin

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of climate-induced oscillations and complicated geological conditions on the evolutionary processes responsible for species formation in presently fragmented temperate forest habitats, located in continental East Asia. In addition to this, we also investigate the heavily debated issue of whether temperate forests migrated southwards during such glacial periods or, alternatively, whether there existed refugia within north China, enabling localized survival of temperate forests within this region. In order to achieve these, we surveyed the phylogeography of Bupleurum longiradiatum Turcz. (a herbaceous plant solely confined to temperate forests) constructed from sequence variation in three chloroplast (cp) DNA fragments: trnL-trnF, psbA-trnH and rps16. Our analyses show high genetic diversity within species (h(T)=0.948) and pronounced genetic differentiation among groups (yellow and purple flowers) with a significant phylogeographical pattern (N(ST)>G(ST), Ptemperate forests in northern China during the last glacial maximum or earlier cold periods. Bupleurum longiradiatum var. porphyranthum formed a single taxon based on molecular data. This specific formation process suggests that the historical vicariance factors, i.e. climate-induced eco-geographic isolation through the biotic displacement of temperate-deciduous forest habitats, enhanced the divergence of the yellow and purple flower lineages at different spatial-temporal scales and over glacial and interglacial periods. Additionally, geological conditions that restricted gene flow might also be responsible for the observed high genetic and geographic differentiation. A nested clade analysis (NCA) revealed that allopatric fragmentation was a major factor responsible for the phylogeographic pattern observed, and also supported a role for historical vicariance factors. Our results therefore support the inference that Quaternary refugial isolation promoted allopatric speciation of

  17. Changes in allelic frequency over time in European bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties revealed using DArT and SSR markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orabi, Jihad; Jahoor, Ahmed; Backes, Gunter Martin

    2014-01-01

    the genetic diversity and allelic frequencies among the accessions based on spring- versus winter-wheat type as well as between landraces and cultivars. We also analyzed the changes in genetic diversity and allelic frequencies in these samples over time. We observed separation based on both vernalization type......A collection of 189 bread wheat landraces and cultivars, primarily of European origin, released between 1886 and 2009, was analyzed using two DNA marker systems. A set of 76 SSR markers and ~7,000 DArT markers distributed across the wheat genome were employed in these analyses. All of the SSR...... and release date. Interestingly, we detected a decrease in genetic diversity in wheat accessions released over the period from 1960 to 1980. However, our results also showed that modern plant breeding have succeeded in maintaining genetic diversity in modern wheat cultivars. Studying allelic frequencies using...

  18. Comparative genome analysis of VSP-II and SNPs reveals heterogenic variation in contemporary strains of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated from cholera patients in Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Daisuke; Morita, Masatomo; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Tamaki; Takemura, Taichiro; Yamashiro, Tetsu; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shinoda, Sumio; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease and a major public health problem in many developing countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Since the Bay of Bengal is considered the epicenter for the seventh cholera pandemic, it is important to understand the genetic dynamism of Vibrio cholerae from Kolkata, as a representative of the Bengal region. We analyzed whole genome sequence data of V. cholerae O1 isolated from cholera patients in Kolkata, India, from 2007 to 2014 and identified the heterogeneous genomic region in these strains. In addition, we carried out a phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome single nucleotide polymorphisms to determine the genetic lineage of strains in Kolkata. This analysis revealed the heterogeneity of the Vibrio seventh pandemic island (VSP)-II in Kolkata strains. The ctxB genotype was also heterogeneous and was highly related to VSP-II types. In addition, phylogenetic analysis revealed the shifts in predominant strains in Kolkata. Two distinct lineages, 1 and 2, were found between 2007 and 2010. However, the proportion changed markedly in 2010 and lineage 2 strains were predominant thereafter. Lineage 2 can be divided into four sublineages, I, II, III and IV. The results of this study indicate that lineages 1 and 2-I were concurrently prevalent between 2007 and 2009, and lineage 2-III observed in 2010, followed by the predominance of lineage 2-IV in 2011 and continued until 2014. Our findings demonstrate that the epidemic of cholera in Kolkata was caused by several distinct strains that have been constantly changing within the genetic lineages of V. cholerae O1 in recent years.

  19. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Human Clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates Reveals Misidentification and Misunderstandings of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella variicola, and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linson, Sarah E.; Ojeda Saavedra, Matthew; Cantu, Concepcion; Davis, James J.; Brettin, Thomas; Olsen, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major threat to public health, causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The emergence of highly drug-resistant strains is particularly concerning. There has been a recognition and division of Klebsiella pneumoniae into three distinct phylogenetic groups: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella variicola, and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae. K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae have often been described as opportunistic pathogens that have less virulence in humans than K. pneumoniae does. We recently sequenced the genomes of 1,777 extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from human infections and discovered that 28 strains were phylogenetically related to K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae. Whole-genome sequencing of 95 additional non-ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from patients found 12 K. quasipneumoniae strains. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis initially identified all patient isolates as K. pneumoniae, suggesting a potential pitfall in conventional clinical microbiology laboratory identification methods. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed extensive sharing of core gene content and plasmid replicons among the Klebsiella species. For the first time, strains of both K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae were found to carry the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) gene, while another K. variicola strain was found to carry the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) gene. K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae infections were not less virulent than K. pneumoniae infections, as assessed by in-hospital mortality and infection type. We also discovered evidence of homologous recombination in one K. variicola strain, as well as one strain from a novel Klebsiella species, which challenge the current understanding of interrelationships between clades of Klebsiella. IMPORTANCE Klebsiella

  20. Quantitative cytochemical analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in living isolated hepatocytes of European flounder for rapid analysis of xenobiotic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winzer, K.; van Noorden, C. J.; Köhler, A.

    2001-01-01

    There is a great need for rapid but reliable assays to determine quantitatively effects of xenobiotics on biological systems in environmental research. Hepatocytes of European flounder are sensitive to low-dose toxic stress. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is the major source of NADPH in

  1. Likelihood and Bayesian analyses reveal major genes affecting body composition, carcass, meat quality and the number of false teats in a Chinese European pig line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Roy Pascale

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Segregation analyses were performed using both maximum likelihood – via a Quasi Newton algorithm – (ML-QN and Bayesian – via Gibbs sampling – (Bayesian-GS approaches in the Chinese European Tiameslan pig line. Major genes were searched for average ultrasonic backfat thickness (ABT, carcass fat (X2 and X4 and lean (X5 depths, days from 20 to 100 kg (D20100, Napole technological yield (NTY, number of false (FTN and good (GTN teats, as well as total teat number (TTN. The discrete nature of FTN was additionally considered using a threshold model under ML methodology. The results obtained with both methods consistently suggested the presence of major genes affecting ABT, X2, NTY, GTN and FTN. Major genes were also suggested for X4 and X5 using ML-QN, but not the Bayesian-GS, approach. The major gene affecting FTN was confirmed using the threshold model. Genetic correlations as well as gene effect and genotype frequency estimates suggested the presence of four different major genes. The first gene would affect fatness traits (ABT, X2 and X4, the second one a leanness trait (X5, the third one NTY and the last one GTN and FTN. Genotype frequencies of breeding animals and their evolution over time were consistent with the selection performed in the Tiameslan line.

  2. Transcriptomic and proteomic insight into the effects of a defined European mistletoe extract in Ewing sarcoma cells reveals cellular stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardziok, M; Meierhofer, D; Börno, S; Timmermann, B; Jäger, S; Boral, Sengül; Eggert, A; Delebinski, C I; Seifert, G

    2017-04-28

    The hydrophobic triterpenes, oleanolic and betulinic acid as well as the hydrophilic mistletoe lectins and viscotoxins possess anticancer properties. They do all occur in combination in European mistletoe (Viscum album L.). Commercial Viscum album L. extracts are aqueous, excluding the insoluble triterpenes. We have previously shown that mistletoe lectins and triterpene acids are effective against Ewing sarcoma in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. We recreated a total mistletoe effect (viscumTT) by combining an aqueous extract (viscum) and a triterpene extract (TT) solubilised with cyclodextrins and analysed the effects of viscumTT and the single extracts on TC-71 Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro by transcriptomic and proteomic profiling. Treatment with the extracts strongly impacted Ewing sarcoma cell gene and protein expression. Apoptosis-associated and stress-activated genes were upregulated, proteasomal protein abundance enhanced and ribosomal and spliceosomal proteins downregulated. The mechanism of action of viscum, TT and viscumTT in TC-71 and MHH-ES-1 cells suggests the involvement of the unfolded protein response. While viscum and viscumTT extract treatment indicate response to oxidative stress and activation of stress-mediated MAPK signalling, TT extract treatment suggests the involvement of TLR signalling and autophagy. Since the combinatory extract viscumTT exerts highly effective pro-apoptotic effects on Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro, this phytopolychemotherapy could be a promising adjuvant therapeutic option for paediatric patients with Ewing sarcoma.

  3. Loss of genetic variation in Greek hatchery populations of the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L. as revealed by microsatellite DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. LOUKOVITIS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in four reared stocks of European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L., originating from Greek commercial farms, was assessed using five polymorphic microsatellite markers and was compared with that of three natural populations from Greece and France. The total number of alleles per marker ranged from 8 to 22 alleles, and hatchery samples showed the same levels of observed heterozygosity with samples from the wild but substantially smaller allelic richness and expected heterozygosity. The genetic differentiation of cultivated samples between them as well as from the wild origin fish was significant as indicated by Fst analysis. All population pairwise comparisons were statistically significant, except for the pair of the two natural Greek populations. Results of microsatellite DNA analysis herein showed a 37 % reduction of the mean allele number in the hatchery samples compared to the wild ones, suggesting random genetic drift and inbreeding events operating in the hatcheries. Knowledge of the genetic variation in D. labrax cultured populations compared with that in the wild ones is essential for setting up appropriate guidelines for proper monitoring and management of the stocks either under traditional practices or for the implementation of selective breeding programmes.

  4. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica; Porrero, María Concepción; Kraushaar, Britta; Argudín, María Angeles; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Monaco, Monica; Stegger, Marc; Aarestrup, Frank M; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex(CC)1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100%) similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A) mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A)-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC)1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over.

  5. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alba

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Sequence Type (ST1, Clonal Complex(CC1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA- lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100% similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over.

  6. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica; Porrero, María Concepción; Kraushaar, Britta; Argudín, María Angeles; Nykäsenoja, Suvi; Monaco, Monica; Stegger, Marc; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex(CC)1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in Italian dairy cattle herds. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences between ST1 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from cattle and pig herds in Italy and Europe and human isolates. Sixty-tree animal isolates from different holdings and 20 human isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa-typing, SCCmec typing, and by micro-array analysis for several virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and strain/host-specific marker genes. Three major PFGE clusters were detected. The bovine isolates shared a high (≥90% to 100%) similarity with human isolates and carried the same SCCmec type IVa. They often showed genetic features typical of human adaptation or present in human-associated CC1: Immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes sak and scn, or sea; sat and aphA3-mediated aminoglycoside resistance. Contrary, typical markers of porcine origin in Italy and Spain, like erm(A) mediated macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB, and of vga(A)-mediated pleuromutilin resistance were always absent in human and bovine isolates. Most of ST(CC)1 MRSA from dairy cattle were multidrug-resistant and contained virulence and immunomodulatory genes associated with full capability of colonizing humans. As such, these strains may represent a greater human hazard than the porcine strains. The zoonotic capacity of CC1 LA-MRSA from livestock must be taken seriously and measures should be implemented at farm-level to prevent spill-over. PMID:26322785

  7. Barcoding of Central European Cryptops centipedes reveals large interspecific distances with ghost lineages and new species records from Germany and Austria (Chilopoda, Scolopendromorpha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesener, Thomas; Voigtländer, Karin; Decker, Peter; Oeyen, Jan Philip; Spelda, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In order to evaluate the diversity of Central European Myriapoda species in the course of the German Barcode of Life project, 61 cytochrome c oxidase I sequences of the genus Cryptops Leach, 1815, a centipede genus of the order Scolopendromorpha, were successfully sequenced and analyzed. One sequence of Scolopendra cingulata Latreille, 1829 and one of Theatops erythrocephalus Koch, 1847 were utilized as outgroups. Instead of the expected three species (Cryptops parisi Brolemann, 1920; Cryptops anomalans Newport, 1844; Cryptops hortensis (Donovan, 1810)), analyzed samples included eight to ten species. Of the eight clearly distinguishable morphospecies of Cryptops, five (Cryptops parisi; Cryptops croaticus Verhoeff, 1931; Cryptops anomalans; Cryptops umbricus Verhoeff, 1931; Cryptops hortensis) could be tentatively determined to species level, while a further three remain undetermined (one each from Germany, Austria and Croatia, and Slovenia). Cryptops croaticus is recorded for the first time from Austria. A single specimen (previously suspected as being Cryptops anomalans), was redetermined as Cryptops umbricus Verhoeff, 1931, a first record for Germany. All analyzed Cryptops species are monophyletic and show large genetic distances from one another (p-distances of 13.7–22.2%). Clear barcoding gaps are present in lineages represented by >10 specimens, highlighting the usefulness of the barcoding method for evaluating species diversity in centipedes. German specimens formally assigned to Cryptops parisi are divided into three clades differing by 8.4–11.3% from one another; their intra-lineage genetic distance is much lower at 0–1.1%. The three clades are geographically separate, indicating that they might represent distinct species. Aside from Cryptops parisi, intraspecific distances of Cryptops spp. in Central Europe are low (<3.3%). PMID:27081331

  8. Cytomorphology review of 100 newly diagnosed lower-risk MDS patients in the European LeukemiaNet MDS (EUMDS) registry reveals a high inter-observer concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Swart, Louise; Smith, Alex; MacKenzie, Marius; Symeonidis, Argiris; Neukirchen, Judith; Mikulenková, Dana; Vallespí, Teresa; Zini, Gina; Paszkowska-Kowalewska, Malgorzata; Kruger, Anton; Saft, Leonie; Fenaux, Pierre; Bowen, David; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Čermák, Jaroslav; Stauder, Reinhard; Tatic, Aurelia; Holm, Mette Skov; Malcovati, Luca; Mądry, Krzysztof; Droste, Jackie; Blijlevens, Nicole; de Witte, Theo; Germing, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    The European LeukemiaNet MDS (EUMDS) registry is collecting data of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients belonging to the IPSS low or intermediate-1 category, newly diagnosed by local cytologists. The diagnosis of MDS can be challenging, and some data report inter-observer variability with regard to the assessment of the MDS subtype. In order to ensure that correct diagnoses were made by the participating centres, blood and bone marrow slides of 10% of the first 1000 patients were reviewed by an 11-person panel of cytomorphologists. All slides were rated by at least 3 panel members (median 8 panel members; range 3-9). Marrow slides from 98 out of 105 patients were of good quality and therefore could be rated properly according to the WHO 2001 classification, including assessment of dysplastic lineages. The agreement between the reviewers whether the diagnosis was MDS or non-MDS was strong with an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.85. Six cases were detected not to fit the entry criteria of the registry, because they were diagnosed uniformly as CMML or AML by the panel members. The agreement by WHO 2001 classification was strong as well (ICC = 0.83). The concordance of the assessment of dysplastic lineages was substantial for megakaryopoiesis and myelopoiesis and moderate for erythropoiesis. Our data show that in general, the inter-observer agreement was high and a very low percentage of misdiagnosed cases had been entered into the EUMDS registry. Further studies including histomorphology are warranted.

  9. Metabolic versatility and indigenous origin of the archaeon Thermococcus sibiricus, isolated from a siberian oil reservoir, as revealed by genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali A; Beletsky, Alexey V; Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2009-07-01

    Thermococcus species are widely distributed in terrestrial and marine hydrothermal areas, as well as in deep subsurface oil reservoirs. Thermococcus sibiricus is a hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon isolated from a well of the never flooded oil-bearing Jurassic horizon of a high-temperature oil reservoir. To obtain insight into the genome of an archaeon inhabiting the oil reservoir, we have determined and annotated the complete 1,845,800-base genome of T. sibiricus. A total of 2,061 protein-coding genes have been identified, 387 of which are absent in other members of the order Thermococcales. Physiological features and genomic data reveal numerous hydrolytic enzymes (e.g., cellulolytic enzymes, agarase, laminarinase, and lipases) and metabolic pathways, support the proposal of the indigenous origin of T. sibiricus in the oil reservoir, and explain its survival over geologic time and its proliferation in this habitat. Indeed, in addition to proteinaceous compounds known previously to be present in oil reservoirs at limiting concentrations, its growth was stimulated by cellulose, agarose, and triacylglycerides, as well as by alkanes. Two polysaccharide degradation loci were probably acquired by T. sibiricus from thermophilic bacteria following lateral gene transfer events. The first, a "saccharolytic gene island" absent in the genomes of other members of the order Thermococcales, contains the complete set of genes responsible for the hydrolysis of cellulose and beta-linked polysaccharides. The second harbors genes for maltose and trehalose degradation. Considering that agarose and laminarin are components of algae, the encoded enzymes and the substrate spectrum of T. sibiricus indicate the ability to metabolize the buried organic matter from the original oceanic sediment.

  10. Large-scale mitochondrial DNA analysis in Southeast Asia reveals evolutionary effects of cultural isolation in the multi-ethnic population of Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Myanmar is the largest country in mainland Southeast Asia with a population of 55 million people subdivided into more than 100 ethnic groups. Ruled by changing kingdoms and dynasties and lying on the trade route between India and China, Myanmar was influenced by numerous cultures. Since its independence from British occupation, tensions between the ruling Bamar and ethnic minorities increased. Results Our aim was to search for genetic footprints of Myanmar’s geographic, historic and sociocultural characteristics and to contribute to the picture of human colonization by describing and dating of new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. Therefore, we sequenced the mtDNA control region of 327 unrelated donors and the complete mitochondrial genome of 44 selected individuals according to highest quality standards. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses of the entire mtDNA genomes uncovered eight new haplogroups and three unclassified basal M-lineages. The multi-ethnic population and the complex history of Myanmar were reflected in its mtDNA heterogeneity. Population genetic analyses of Burmese control region sequences combined with population data from neighboring countries revealed that the Myanmar haplogroup distribution showed a typical Southeast Asian pattern, but also Northeast Asian and Indian influences. The population structure of the extraordinarily diverse Bamar differed from that of the Karen people who displayed signs of genetic isolation. Migration analyses indicated a considerable genetic exchange with an overall positive migration balance from Myanmar to neighboring countries. Age estimates of the newly described haplogroups point to the existence of evolutionary windows where climatic and cultural changes gave rise to mitochondrial haplogroup diversification in Asia. PMID:24467713

  11. Use of combined microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to reveal interactions between uranium and Microbacterium sp. A9, a strain isolated from the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chapon, Virginie [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Coppin, Fréderic; Floriani, Magali [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vercouter, Thomas [CEA, DEN, DANS, DPC SEARS, LANIE, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Sergeant, Claire [Univ Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Camilleri, Virginie [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Berthomieu, Catherine [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Février, Laureline, E-mail: laureline.fevrier@irsn.fr [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Microbacterium sp. A9 develops various detoxification mechanisms. • Microbacterium sp. A9 promotes metal efflux from the cells. • Microbacterium sp. A9 releases phosphate to prevent uranium entrance in the cells. • Microbacterium sp. A9 stores U intracellularly as autunite. - Abstract: Although uranium (U) is naturally found in the environment, soil remediation programs will become increasingly important in light of certain human activities. This work aimed to identify U(VI) detoxification mechanisms employed by a bacteria strain isolated from a Chernobyl soil sample, and to distinguish its active from passive mechanisms of interaction. The ability of the Microbacterium sp. A9 strain to remove U(VI) from aqueous solutions at 4 °C and 25 °C was evaluated, as well as its survival capacity upon U(VI) exposure. The subcellular localisation of U was determined by TEM/EDX microscopy, while functional groups involved in the interaction with U were further evaluated by FTIR; finally, the speciation of U was analysed by TRLFS. We have revealed, for the first time, an active mechanism promoting metal efflux from the cells, during the early steps following U(VI) exposure at 25 °C. The Microbacterium sp. A9 strain also stores U intracellularly, as needle-like structures that have been identified as an autunite group mineral. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this strain exhibits a high U(VI) tolerance based on multiple detoxification mechanisms. These findings support the potential role of the genus Microbacterium in the remediation of aqueous environments contaminated with U(VI) under aerobic conditions.

  12. Genomic comparison of multi-drug resistant invasive and colonizing Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from diverse human body sites reveals genomic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao William W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a significant global pathogen, with a surprisingly rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance and spread within hospitals and health care institutions. This study examines the genomic content of three A. baumannii strains isolated from distinct body sites. Isolates from blood, peri-anal, and wound sources were examined in an attempt to identify genetic features that could be correlated to each isolation source. Results Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multi-locus sequence typing and antibiotic resistance profiles demonstrated genotypic and phenotypic variation. Each isolate was sequenced to high-quality draft status, which allowed for comparative genomic analyses with existing A. baumannii genomes. A high resolution, whole genome alignment method detailed the phylogenetic relationships of sequenced A. baumannii and found no correlation between phylogeny and body site of isolation. This method identified genomic regions unique to both those isolates found on the surface of the skin or in wounds, termed colonization isolates, and those identified from body fluids, termed invasive isolates; these regions may play a role in the pathogenesis and spread of this important pathogen. A PCR-based screen of 74 A. baumanii isolates demonstrated that these unique genes are not exclusive to either phenotype or isolation source; however, a conserved genomic region exclusive to all sequenced A. baumannii was identified and verified. Conclusions The results of the comparative genome analysis and PCR assay show that A. baumannii is a diverse and genomically variable pathogen that appears to have the potential to cause a range of human disease regardless of the isolation source.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in a university hospital in Nepal reveals the emergence of a novel epidemic clonal lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Shovita; Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Ohara, Hiroshi; Shimada, Kayo; Satou, Kazuhito; Teruya, Kuniko; Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Sherchand, Jeevan Bdr; Rijal, Basista Psd; Hirano, Takashi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii has become a serious medical problem worldwide. To clarify the genetic and epidemiological properties of MDR A. baumannii strains isolated from a medical setting in Nepal, 246 Acinetobacter spp. isolates obtained from different patients were screened for MDR A. baumannii by antimicrobial disk susceptibility testing. Whole genomes of the MDR A. baumannii isolates were sequenced by MiSeq™ (Illumina), and the complete genome of one isolate (IOMTU433) was sequenced by PacBio RS II. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from single nucleotide polymorphism concatemers. Multilocus sequence types were deduced and drug resistance genes were identified. Of the 246 Acinetobacter spp. isolates, 122 (49.6%) were MDR A. baumannii, with the majority being resistant to aminoglycosides, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones but not to colistin and tigecycline. These isolates harboured the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA as well as bla(NDM-1), bla(OXA-23) or bla(OXA-58). MDR A. baumannii isolates belonging to clonal complex 1 (CC1) and CC2 as well as a novel clonal complex (CC149) have spread throughout a medical setting in Nepal. The MDR isolates harboured genes encoding carbapenemases (OXA and NDM-1) and a 16S rRNA methylase (ArmA). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Inverse European Latitudinal Cline at the timeless Locus of Drosophila melanogaster Reveals Selection on a Clock Gene: Population Genetics of ls-tim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonato, Valeria; Vanin, Stefano; Costa, Rodolfo; Tauber, Eran; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2017-11-01

    The spread of adaptive genetic variants in populations is a cornerstone of evolutionary theory but with relatively few biologically well-understood examples. Previous work on the ls-tim variant of timeless, which encodes the light-sensitive circadian regulator in Drosophila melanogaster, suggests that it may have originated in southeastern Italy. Flies characterized by the new allele show photoperiod-related phenotypes likely to be adaptive in seasonal environments. ls-tim may be spreading from its point of origin in Italy by directional selection, but there are alternative explanations for its observed clinal geographical distribution, including balancing selection and demography. From population analyses of ls-tim frequencies collected on the eastern side of the Iberian Peninsula, we show that ls-tim frequencies are inverted compared with those in Italy. This pattern is consistent with a scenario of directional selection rather than latitude-associated balancing selection. Neutrality tests further reveal the signature of directional selection at the ls-tim site, which is reduced a few kb pairs either side of ls-tim. A reanalysis of allele frequencies from a large number of microsatellite loci do not demonstrate any frequent ls-tim-like spatial patterns, so a general demographic effect or population expansion from southeastern Italy cannot readily explain current ls-tim frequencies. Finally, a revised estimate of the age of ls-tim allele using linkage disequilibrium and coalescent-based approaches reveals that it may be only 300 to 3000 years old, perhaps explaining why it has not yet gone to fixation. ls-tim thus provides a rare temporal snapshot of a new allele that has come under selection before it reaches equilibrium.

  15. Genomic characterization of the European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax reveals the presence of a novel uncoupling protein (UCP) gene family member in the teleost fish lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncoupling proteins (UCP) are evolutionary conserved mitochondrial carriers that control energy metabolism and therefore play important roles in several physiological processes such as thermogenesis, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), growth control, lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin secretion. Despite their importance in various physiological processes, their molecular function remains controversial. The evolution and phylogenetic distribution may assist to identify their general biological function and structure-function relationships. The exact number of uncoupling protein genes in the fish genome and their evolution is unresolved. Results Here we report the first characterisation of UCP gene family members in sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, and then retrace the evolution of the protein family in vertebrates. Four UCP genes that are shared by five other fish species were identified in sea bass genome. Phylogenetic reconstitution among vertebrate species and synteny analysis revealed that UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 evolved from duplication events that occurred in the common ancestor of vertebrates, whereas the novel fourth UCP originated specifically in the teleost lineage. Functional divergence analysis among teleost species revealed specific amino acid positions that have been subjected to altered functional constraints after duplications. Conclusions This work provides the first unambiguous evidence for the presence of a fourth UCP gene in teleost fish genome and brings new insights into the evolutionary history of the gene family. Our results suggest functional divergence among paralogues which might result from long-term and differential selective pressures, and therefore, provide the indication that UCP genes may have diverse physiological functions in teleost fishes. Further experimental analysis of the critical amino acids identified here may provide valuable information on the physiological functions of UCP genes. PMID:22577775

  16. Activity of telavancin against Gram-positive pathogens isolated from bone and joint infections in North American, Latin American, European and Asia-Pacific nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Flamm, Robert K; Castanheira, Mariana; Sader, Helio S; Smart, Jennifer I; Mendes, Rodrigo E

    2017-06-01

    Telavancin was tested against a worldwide collection of Gram-positive pathogens (967) isolated from bone and joint infections (BJI). Most BJI isolates were from the United States (US) (49.9%) followed by Europe (26.4%), Latin America (LATAM; 14.4%), and Asia-Pacific (APAC; 9.3%). Organisms were tested by broth microdilution susceptibility methods. S. aureus (66.4%; range of 48.9% in APAC to 71.2% in LATAM) was the most common pathogen and had a 35.7% methicillin resistance (MRSA) rate and telavancin MIC50/90 of 0.03/0.06μg/mL (100% susceptible). MRSA isolates that were daptomycin resistant (0.2%) were telavancin susceptible. CoNS (12.1% of BJI) had telavancin MIC50/90 at 0.06/0.06μg/mL, and 13.7% were teicoplanin resistant. Enterococci had telavancin MIC50/90 at 0.12/0.25μg/mL, but telavancin inhibited vancomycin-susceptible isolates at ≤0.25μg/mL. All streptococci were telavancin susceptible (MIC90, 0.03-0.06μg/mL). The in vitro results presented here warrant further investigations to access the role of telavancin for BJI/osteomyelitis treatment caused by Gram-positive cocci. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative organisms isolated from patients hospitalized in intensive care units in United States and European hospitals (2009-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) represents a great challenge, especially those caused by Gram-negative organisms. Rapid introduction of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial to reduce mortality; resistance rates in the ICU can be elevated due to antimicrobial selection pressure. We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from patients hospitalized in ICUs (ICU patients). The isolates were consecutively collected as part of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program from January 2009 to December 2011 and tested for susceptibility to multiple antimicrobial agents at a central laboratory by reference broth microdilution methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility results for 5989 bacterial isolates from ICU patients (3445 from the United States [USA] and 2544 from Europe [EU]) were analyzed and compared to those of 17,244 organisms from non-ICU patients (9271 from USA and 7973 from EU). Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most frequently isolated organisms from ICU patients, followed by Enterobacter spp., Serratia spp., Haemophilus influenzae, Acinetobacter spp., and Proteus mirabilis. Susceptibility rates were generally lower among ICU isolates compared to non-ICU organisms. E. coli isolates from ICU patients exhibited elevated extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-phenotype rates (13.7% in USA and 16.6% in EU); furthermore, only amikacin (90.5-94.8% susceptibility), colistin (99.8-100.0% inhibited at ≤2 μg/mL), imipenem (95.5-96.0%), meropenem (95.4-95.8%), and tigecycline (96.3-98.0%) exhibited good activity against Klebsiella spp. ESBL-phenotype rates have increased among both E. coli and Klebsiella spp. from ICU patients in the USA and in Europe, with the most noticeable increase among Klebsiella spp. from Europe (from 27.5% in 2009 to 41.8% in 2011; P = 0.015 and odds ratio = 0.89 [95% confidence interval, 1.13-3.18]). Meropenem susceptibility among

  18. Rapid isolation of microsatellite DNAs and identification of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions in the fish rotan (Perccottus glenii) invading European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Timothy L.; Eackles, Michael S.; Reshetnikov, Andrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Human-mediated translocations and subsequent large-scale colonization by the invasive fish rotan (Perccottus glenii Dybowski, 1877; Perciformes, Odontobutidae), also known as Amur or Chinese sleeper, has resulted in dramatic transformations of small lentic ecosystems. However, no detailed genetic information exists on population structure, levels of effective movement, or relatedness among geographic populations of P. glenii within the European part of the range. We used massively parallel genomic DNA shotgun sequencing on the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing platform to identify nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA sequences in P. glenii from European Russia. Here we describe the characterization of nine nuclear microsatellite loci, ascertain levels of allelic diversity, heterozygosity, and demographic status of P. glenii collected from Ilev, Russia, one of several initial introduction points in European Russia. In addition, we mapped sequence reads to the complete P. glenii mitochondrial DNA sequence to identify polymorphic regions. Nuclear microsatellite markers developed for P. glenii yielded sufficient genetic diversity to: (1) produce unique multilocus genotypes; (2) elucidate structure among geographic populations; and (3) provide unique perspectives for analysis of population sizes and historical demographics. Among 4.9 million filtered P. glenii Ion Torrent PGM sequence reads, 11,304 mapped to the mitochondrial genome (NC_020350). This resulted in 100 % coverage of this genome to a mean coverage depth of 102X. A total of 130 variable sites were observed between the publicly available genome from China and the studied composite mitochondrial genome. Among these, 82 were diagnostic and monomorphic between the mitochondrial genomes and distributed among 15 genome regions. The polymorphic sites (N = 48) were distributed among 11 mitochondrial genome regions. Our results also indicate that sequence reads generated

  19. A genome-wide association study for equine recurrent airway obstruction in European Warmblood horses reveals a suggestive new quantitative trait locus on chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, D; Rieder, S; Leeb, T; Gerber, V; Neuditschko, M

    2017-12-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), also known as heaves, is an asthma-like respiratory disease. Its development is strongly influenced by environmental risk factors such as sensitization and exposure to moldy hay, straw bedding and stabling indoors. A hereditary component has been documented in previous studies; however, so far no causative genetic variant that influences the risk of developing RAO has been identified. In this study, we revised an existing dataset and selected 384 horses for genotyping on the Affymetrix high-density equine SNP array. We performed an allelic case-control genome-wide association study, which revealed a suggestively significant association on equine chromosome 13 at 32 843 309 bp. This SNP is located in the protein-coding gene TXNDC11, which is possibly involved in the folding process of the multiprotein complexes DUOX1 and DUOX2. In humans, these proteins are known to take part in regulating the production of H2 O2 in the respiratory tract epithelium as well as in MUC5AC mucin expression. Therefore, TXNDC11 may be considered a functional candidate gene, and further research is needed to explore its potential role in RAO-affected horses. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  20. Genetic diversity assessment of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp ciceris isolates of Indian chickpea fields as revealed by the SRAP marker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soren, K R; Gangwar, Priyanka; Khatterwani, Payal; Chaudhary, Ram Ganesh; Datta, Subhojit

    2016-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the precise geographical distribution and racial complexity of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceris (Foc) isolates representing 12 states of 4 agro-climatic zones of India at morphological, pathogenic and molecular level. The DNA based sequence related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers was employed to differentiate Foc isolates at genome level. The genotypic data output of the isolates was examined for diversity parameter as marker's Polymorphic percentage (PM %), Polymorphic Information Content (PIC), Marker Index (MI) and Gene Diversity Index (DI). As a result, 15 primers used in this study could generated total of 154 reproducible alleles ranging from 100-2100 bp (average allele per marker 10.26) in size, of that 149 (97%) were found to be polymorphic. The neighbor-joining analysis effectively classified the isolates of North East Plain Zone (NEPZ), Central Zone (CZ), North West Plain Zone (NWPZ) and South Zone (SZ) into four clusters. In summary, DNA based marker analysis could differentiate as per isolates geographical location, however pathogenic interaction of isolates from same geographical location could not match the genetic differentiation. Accordingly, considering the present complexity in racial profile, precise classification based on homologs virulence genes specific to races would give a more meaningful in correlating isolates with their native geographical distribution and helps in future resistance breeding programs for sustainable management of vascular wilt disease.

  1. A 5-year Survey Reveals Increased Susceptibility to Glycopeptides for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Patients in a Chinese Burn Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections are prevalent in burn wards, and are especially serious in S. aureus bacteremia (SAB patients. Glycopeptides and daptomycin are effective against MRSA infections, but MIC creeps can reduce their efficacy. Our object was to perform a molecular epidemiological investigation of S. aureus isolates in our burn center and to evaluate MICs for antimicrobials against SAB-associated MRSA isolates. A total of 259 S. aureus isolates, obtained from August 2011 to July 2016, were used in this study. Multiple molecular typing was used for molecular epidemiological analysis. E-tests were used to determine MICs of vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin for SAB-associated MRSA isolates. MIC values were stratified by collection date or source and compared. Spearman's test was used to analyze MICs correlations amongst tested antimicrobials. ST239-MRSA-III-t030-agrI clone was found to be dominant in both SAB and non-SAB patients, and significantly more in SAB patients (P < 0.0001. SAB-MRSA isolates exhibited decreased MICs for vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin during the 5-year period. Compared to those isolated from catheters or wounds, SAB-MRSA isolates from the bloodstream were less susceptible to vancomycin and daptomycin, but more susceptible to teicoplanin. MICs Correlation was found only between vancomycin and daptomycin in MRSA isolates from the bloodstream (rho = 0.250, P = 0.024. In conclusion, our results suggest that MRSA infections are still serious problems in burn centers. In contrast to most other studies, we observed increased susceptibility to glycopeptides and daptomycin against SAB-associated MRSA in our center from 2011 to 2016, suggesting the use of glycopeptides does not lead to MIC creeps. Isolates from different sites of the body may exhibit different levels of susceptibility and change trend over time for different antimicrobials, antimicrobials selection for MRSA

  2. DNA sequencing reveals limited heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA gene from the rrnB operon among five Mycoplasma hominis isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, T; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the intraspecies heterogeneity within the 16S rRNA gene of Mycoplasma hominis, five isolates with diverse antigenic profiles, variable/identical P120 hypervariable domains, and different 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns were analysed. The 16S rRNA gene from the rrnB operon was amplified...... by PCR and the PCR products were sequenced. Three isolates had identical 16S rRNA sequences and two isolates had sequences that differed from the others by only one nucleotide....

  3. Electron microscopy and in vitro deneddylation reveal similar architectures and biochemistry of isolated human and Flag-mouse COP9 signalosome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockel, Beate [Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Schmaler, Tilo; Huang, Xiaohua [Division of Molecular Biology, Department of General, Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Dubiel, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.dubiel@charite.de [Division of Molecular Biology, Department of General, Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Deneddylation rates of human erythrocyte and mouse fibroblast CSN are very similar. • 3D models of native human and mouse CSN reveal common architectures. • The cryo-structure of native mammalian CSN shows a horseshoe subunit arrangement. - Abstract: The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a regulator of the ubiquitin (Ub) proteasome system (UPS). In the UPS, proteins are Ub-labeled for degradation by Ub ligases conferring substrate specificity. The CSN controls a large family of Ub ligases called cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which ubiquitinate cell cycle regulators, transcription factors and DNA damage response proteins. The CSN possesses structural similarities with the 26S proteasome Lid complex and the translation initiation complex 3 (eIF3) indicating similar ancestry and function. Initial structures were obtained 14 years ago by 2D electron microscopy (EM). Recently, first 3D molecular models of the CSN were created on the basis of negative-stain EM and single-particle analysis, mostly with recombinant complexes. Here, we compare deneddylating activity and structural features of CSN complexes purified in an elaborate procedure from human erythrocytes and efficiently pulled down from mouse Flag-CSN2 B8 fibroblasts. In an in vitro deneddylation assay both the human and the mouse CSN complexes deneddylated Nedd8-Cul1 with comparable rates. 3D structural models of the erythrocyte CSN as well as of the mouse Flag-CSN were generated by negative stain EM and by cryo-EM. Both complexes show a central U-shaped segment from which several arms emanate. This structure, called the horseshoe, is formed by the PCI domain subunits. CSN5 and CSN6 point away from the horseshoe. Compared to 3D models of negatively stained CSN complexes, densities assigned to CSN2 and CSN4 are better defined in the cryo-map. Because biochemical and structural results obtained with CSN complexes isolated from human erythrocytes and purified by Flag-CSN pulldown from mouse B8 fibroblasts

  4. Comparative genome analysis of Lactobacillus casei strains isolated from Actimel and Yakult products reveals marked similarities and points to a common origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P; Kant, Ravi; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-09-01

    The members of the Lactobacillus genus are widely used in the food and feed industry and show a remarkable ecological adaptability. Several Lactobacillus strains have been marketed as probiotics as they possess health-promoting properties for the host. In the present study, we used two complementary next-generation sequencing technologies to deduce the genome sequences of two Lactobacillus casei strains LcA and LcY, which were isolated from the products Actimel and Yakult, commercialized as probiotics. The LcA and LcY draft genomes have, respectively, an estimated size of 3067 and 3082 Mb and a G+C content of 46.3%. Both strains are close to identical to each other and differ by no more than minor chromosomal re-arrangements, substitutions, insertions and deletions, as evident from the verified presence of one insertion-deletion (InDel) and only 29 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In terms of coding capacity, LcA and LcY are predicted to encode a comparable exoproteome, indicating that LcA and LcY are likely to establish similar interactions with human intestinal cells. Moreover, both L. casei LcA and LcY harboured a 59.6 kb plasmid that shared high similarities with plasmids found in other L. casei strains, such as W56 and BD-II. Further analysis revealed that the L. casei plasmids constitute a good evolution marker within the L. casei species. The plasmids of the LcA and LcY strains are almost identical, as testified by the presence of only three verified SNPs, and share a 3.5 kb region encoding a remnant of a lactose PTS system that is absent from the plasmids of W56 and BD-II but conserved in another smaller L. casei plasmid (pLC2W). Our observations imply that the results obtained in animal and human experiments performed with the Actimel and Yakult strains can be compared with each other as these strains share a very recent common ancestor. © 2013 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for

  5. When isolated at full receptivity, in vitro fertilized wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) egg cells reveal [Ca2+]cyt oscillation of intracellular origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pónya, Zsolt; Corsi, Ilaria; Hoffmann, Richárd; Kovács, Melinda; Dobosy, Anikó; Kovács, Attila Zoltán; Cresti, Mauro; Barnabás, Beáta

    2014-01-01

    During in vitro fertilization of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.) in egg cells isolated at various developmental stages, changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) were observed. The dynamics of [Ca2...

  6. Differences in Genome Content among Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Patients with Gastritis, Duodenal Ulcer, or Gastric Cancer Reveal Novel Disease-Associated Genes▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-González, Carolina; Salama, Nina R.; Burgeño-Ferreira, Juan; Ponce-Castañeda, Veronica; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori establishes a chronic infection in the human stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer, and more severe diseases are associated with virulence genes such as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The aim of this work was to study gene content differences among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in a Mexican-Mestizo patient population. H. pylori isolates from 10 patients with nonatrophic gastritis, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 9 patients with gastric cancer were studied. Multiple isolates from the same patient were analyzed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and strains with unique patterns were tested using whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We studied 42 isolates and found 1,319 genes present in all isolates, while 341 (20.5%) were variable genes. Among the variable genes, 127 (37%) were distributed within plasticity zones (PZs). The overall number of variable genes present in a given isolate was significantly lower for gastric cancer isolates. Thirty genes were significantly associated with nonatrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer, 14 (46.6%) of which were within PZs and the cag PAI. Two genes (HP0674 and JHP0940) were absent in all gastric cancer isolates. Many of the disease-associated genes outside the PZs formed clusters, and some of these genes are regulated in response to acid or other environmental conditions. Validation of candidate genes identified by aCGH in a second patient cohort allowed the identification of novel H. pylori genes associated with gastric cancer or duodenal ulcer. These disease-associated genes may serve as biomarkers of the risk for severe gastroduodenal diseases. PMID:19237517

  7. Genetic typing reveals monomorphism between antimony sensitive and resistant Leishmania donovani isolates from visceral leishmaniasis or post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis cases in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba Raju, B V; Gurumurthy, Srividya; Kuhls, Katrin; Bhandari, Vasundhra; Schnonian, Gabriele; Salotra, Poonam

    2012-10-01

    Resistance to pentavalent antimonials has emerged as a major hurdle to the treatment and control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar (KA), caused by Leishmania donovani. In India, over 60% of KA patients are unresponsive to the first-line drug sodium antimony gluconate (SAG). Resistance determinants in laboratory strains are partly known; however, the mechanism operating in field isolates is not well understood. In this study, we attempted to analyze the genetic polymorphism between SAG sensitive and resistant parasites using a total of 52 L. donovani isolates obtained either from bone marrow of VL patients or from skin lesions of post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) patients that constitute an important reservoir of parasite. The clinical isolates were analyzed in comparison with L. donovani parasites from reference strains belonging to distinct geographical locations, at internal transcribed spacer 1 region; coding region of gp63 and nine microsatellite repeat regions. Our results demonstrated that both SAG resistant (n = 26) and sensitive (n = 19) Indian isolates, whether causing VL or PKDL, were monomorphic at all the genetic loci tested, unlike the L. donovani in East African or Leishmania infantum in Mediterranean countries where intraspecies variations exist at these loci. Further, the Indian isolates were found closest to the Kenyan isolates of L. donovani on the basis of fragment analysis of microsatellite markers.

  8. MLST-Based Population Genetic Analysis in a Global Context Reveals Clonality amongst Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii VNI Isolates from HIV Patients in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennio Ferreira-Paim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is an important fungal infection in immunocompromised individuals, especially those infected with HIV. In Brazil, despite the free availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART in the public health system, the mortality rate due to Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis is still high. To obtain a more detailed picture of the population genetic structure of this species in southeast Brazil, we studied 108 clinical isolates from 101 patients and 35 environmental isolates. Among the patients, 59% had a fatal outcome mainly in HIV-positive male patients. All the isolates were found to be C. neoformans var. grubii major molecular type VNI and mating type locus alpha. Twelve were identified as diploid by flow cytometry, being homozygous (AαAα for the mating type and by PCR screening of the STE20, GPA1, and PAK1 genes. Using the ISHAM consensus multilocus sequence typing (MLST scheme, 13 sequence types (ST were identified, with one being newly described. ST93 was identified from 81 (75% of the clinical isolates, while ST77 and ST93 were identified from 19 (54% and 10 (29% environmental isolates, respectively. The southeastern Brazilian isolates had an overwhelming clonal population structure. When compared with populations from different continents based on data extracted from the ISHAM-MLST database (mlst.mycologylab.org they showed less genetic variability. Two main clusters within C. neoformans var. grubii VNI were identified that diverged from VNB around 0.58 to 4.8 million years ago.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Isolates from Dairy Cattle and Humans in New York and Washington States Reveals Source and Geographic Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Laura M; Wiedmann, Martin; den Bakker, Henk; Siler, Julie; Warchocki, Steven; Kent, David; Lyalina, Svetlana; Davis, Margaret; Sischo, William; Besser, Thomas; Warnick, Lorin D; Pereira, Richard V

    2017-06-15

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica can be spread from cattle to humans through direct contact with animals shedding Salmonella as well as through the food chain, making MDR Salmonella a serious threat to human health. The objective of this study was to use whole-genome sequencing to compare antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Newport, and Dublin isolated from dairy cattle and humans in Washington State and New York State at the genotypic and phenotypic levels. A total of 90 isolates were selected for the study (37 S Typhimurium, 32 S Newport, and 21 S Dublin isolates). All isolates were tested for phenotypic antibiotic resistance to 12 drugs using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. AMR genes were detected in the assembled genome of each isolate using nucleotide BLAST and ARG-ANNOT. Genotypic prediction of phenotypic resistance resulted in a mean sensitivity of 97.2 and specificity of 85.2. Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim resistance was observed only in human isolates (P New York State differed from those from Washington State based on the presence/absence of plasmid replicons, as well as phenotypic AMR susceptibility/nonsusceptibility (P Salmonella enterica and associated AMR determinants, which can be transferred to humans through different routes. Previous studies have sought to assess the degree to which AMR livestock- and human-associated Salmonella strains overlap, as well as the spatial distribution of Salmonella's associated AMR determinants, but have often been limited by the degree of resolution at which isolates can be compared. Here, a comparative genomics study of livestock- and human-associated Salmonella strains from different regions of the United States shows that while many AMR genes and phenotypes were confined to human isolates, overlaps between the resistomes of bovine and human-associated Salmonella isolates were observed on numerous occasions, particularly for S Newport. We have also shown that whole

  10. European communion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2013-01-01

    Political theory of European union, through an engagement between political concepts and theoretical understandings, provides a means of identifying the EU as a political object. It is argued that understanding the projects, processes and products of European union, based on ‘sharing’ or ‘communion......’, provides a better means of perceiving the EU as a political object rather than terms such as ‘integration’ or ‘co-operation’. The concept of ‘European communion’ is defined as the ‘subjective sharing of relationships’, understood as the extent to which individuals or groups believe themselves to be sharing...... relations (or not), and the consequences of these beliefs for European political projects, processes and products. By exploring European communion through an engagement with contemporary political theory, using very brief illustrations from the Treaty of Lisbon, the article also suggests that European...

  11. Genotypic characterisation by PFGE of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis phage types 1, 4, 6, and 8 isolated from animal and human sources in three European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laconcha, I.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Rementeria, A.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 101 strains of Salmonella Enteritidis phage types (PT) 1, 4, 6, and 8 from Denmark, England and Spain were studied by PFGE to elucidate genetic relationships among strains isolated from animal, human and environmental sources between 1983 and 1997. Analysis with Xba I, Bin I and Spe I...... profile A10-A10-A1 was predominant and specific for this phage type. It is concluded that PFGE, in combination with phage typing, represents a suitable tool for the epidemiological typing of Salmonella Enteritidis strains which could be used for investigations or surveillance of the international spread...

  12. Update on the in vitro activity of daptomycin tested against 17,193 Gram-positive bacteria isolated from European medical centers (2005-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, H S; Moet, G; Jones, R N

    2009-11-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 17,193 Gram-positive isolates consecutively collected from 28 medical centers in 12 countries in europe and israel in 2005-2007 were evaluated by Clinical and laboratory Standards institute (CLSI) broth microdilution methods supplemented with calcium to 50 mg/l for testing daptomycin. Overall, the rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was 28.3%, varying from 32.3% in 2005 to 27.1% in 2006 and 28.5% in 2007. Vancomycin resistance rates were 0.8% and 21.5% among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium, respectively. Among E. faecium, vancomycin resistance increased from 17.9% in 2005 to 26.3% in 2007, and varied from 0.0% in Spain, Sweden and Switzerland to as high as 54.6% in ireland for 2007. All isolates tested, except for seven CoNS (0.2%; 3,234 tested) were considered susceptible to daptomycin using breakpoints established by the United States food and Drug Administration, the CLSI and the EUCAST. Daptomycin was very active against all Gram-positive species with the highest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results being 1, 4, 2 and 4 mg/l for S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, E. faecalis and E. faecium, respectively. Daptomycin activity was not adversely influenced by resistance to oxacillin among staphylococci or to vancomycin among enterococci.

  13. Early breakdown of isolation revealed by marriage behaviour in a Ladin-speaking community (Gardena Valley, South Tyrol, Italy, 1825-1924).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueresi, Paola

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate marriage behaviour from 1825 to 1924 in an Alpine valley inhabited by Ladin speakers (Gardena Valley, South Tyrol, Italy), where the particular geographic, linguistic and economic characteristics may have influenced the level of reproductive isolation. A total of 2183 marriage acts from the two main parishes of Santa Cristina and Ortisei were examined. Birth and residence endogamy, inbreeding coefficients from dispensations and from isonymy, birth place distribution of the spouses and isonymic relationships were analysed in four 25-year sub-periods. All the indicators considered point to a lower level of reproductive isolation at Ortisei, a main centre for the woodcarving industry, which appeared to be experiencing an early and effective breakdown of isolation. Marriage behaviour in the Gardena Valley between 1825 and 1924 seems to have been mostly influenced by socioeconomic factors rather than linguistic and cultural ones.

  14. Molecular characterization of Ambler class A to D β-lactamases, ISAba1, and integrons reveals multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolates in northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Liu, Bin; Chen, Yan; Huang, Honglan; Wang, Guoqing; Li, Fan; Ni, Zhaohui

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of various Ambler class A to D β-lactamases, ISAba1, and class 1 and 2 integrons as well as the clonal relatedness in 105 Acinetobacter spp. isolates found in northeastern China was investigated. All 105 Acinetobacter spp. isolates were determined to be multidrug resistant (MDR), and the resistance rates to carbapenem agents were approximately 50%. PER, IMP, AmpC, and OXA-23 were found to be dominant β-lactamases belonging to different classes, respectively. This is the first report of the coexistence of blaPER, blaIMP, blaAmpC, and blaOXA-23-like genes in Acinetobacter spp. isolates from northeastern China. ISAba1 was found upstream of the blaOXA-23-like gene in 87.8% (36/41) strains and upstream of the blaOXA-51-like gene in 26.5% (13/49) strains. ISAba3-like element was found upstream of the blaOXA-58-like gene in one blaOXA-58-like-positive strain. The presence of IntI1 was detected in 63.8% (67/105) of the isolates and the most prevalent gene cassettes were aacA4, aadA1, and catB8. The highly prevalent isolates belong to international clonal lineage (ICL)-II. These results indicate that the wide horizontal and clonal spread of MDR Acinetobacter spp. isolates harbouring multiple β-lactamase genes has become a serious problem in northeastern China.

  15. Parallel phylogenetic analyses using the N, G or Nv gene from a fixed group of VHSV isolates reveal the same overall genetic typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Ahrens, Peter; Lorenzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    by a G gene fragment (nt 360 to 720) or the Nv gene (366 nt), although these regions had different characteristics with respect to resolution of Genotype I sublineages and resolution within Sub-lineage Ia. Phylogenetic analysis based on the deduced amino acid sequences was also performed....... The phylogenetic relationship between the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the isolates corresponded best in the case of the N gene/protein. For the 6 other genomic regions, genetically distant isolates occasionally grouped together when compared at protein levels. No clear relationship between the G gene...

  16. Genome-wide association study in a high-risk isolate for multiple sclerosis reveals associated variants in STAT3 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakkula, Eveliina; Leppä, Virpi; Sulonen, Anna-Maija

    2010-01-01

    only a fraction of the genetic risk. To expose potentially rare, high-impact alleles, we conducted a GWAS of 68 distantly related cases and 136 controls from a high-risk internal isolate of Finland with increased prevalence and familial occurrence of MS. The top 27 loci with p ... in STAT3 is a risk allele for Crohn disease, implying that STAT3 represents a shared risk locus for at least two autoimmune diseases. This study also demonstrates the potential of special isolated populations in search for variants contributing to complex traits....

  17. Genetic diversity within the genus Francisella as revealed by comparative analyses of the genomes of two North American isolates from environmental sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaramappa Shivakumara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen that causes tularemia in humans and the public health importance of this bacterium has been well documented in recent history. Francisella philomiragia, a distant relative of F. tularensis, is thought to constitute an environmental lineage along with Francisella novicida. Nevertheless, both F. philomiragia and F. novicida have been associated with human disease, primarily in immune-compromised individuals. To understand the genetic relationships and evolutionary contexts among different lineages within the genus Francisella, the genome of Francisella spp. strain TX07-7308 was sequenced and compared to the genomes of F. philomiragia strains ATCC 25017 and 25015, F. novicida strain U112, and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. Results The size of strain ATCC 25017 chromosome was 2,045,775 bp and contained 1,983 protein-coding genes. The size of strain TX07-7308 chromosome was 2,035,931 bp and contained 1,980 protein-coding genes. Pairwise BLAST comparisons indicated that strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 contained 1,700 protein coding genes in common. NUCmer analyses revealed that the chromosomes of strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 were mostly collinear except for a few gaps, translocations, and/or inversions. Using the genome sequence data and comparative analyses with other members of the genus Francisella (e.g., F. novicida strain U112 and F. tularensis strain Schu S4, several strain-specific genes were identified. Strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 contained an operon with six open reading frames encoding proteins related to enzymes involved in thiamine biosynthesis that was absent in F. novicida strain U112 and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. Strain ATCC 25017 contained an operon putatively involved in lactose metabolism that was absent in strain TX07-7308, F. novicida strain U112, and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. In contrast, strain TX07-7308 contained an operon putatively

  18. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the

  19. Selective Europeanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoch Jovanovic, Tamara; Lynggaard, Kennet

    2014-01-01

    political contexts at the European level. We further show how the “translation” of international norms to a domestic context has worked to reinforce the original institutional setup, dating back to the mid-1950s. The translation of European-level minority policy developed in the 1990s and 2000s works most...

  20. Isolation and RFLP genotyping of toxoplasma gondii in free-range chicken(Gallus domesticus) in Grenada, West Indies, revealed widespread and dominance of clonal type III parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the present cross sectional study were to estimate the prevalence and to isolate and genotype Toxoplasma gondii in free range chickens from Grenada, West Indies. Using the modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 39 (26.9%) of 145 free-range chickens with ...

  1. Experimental neosporosis in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) with oocysts and tachyzoites of two recent isolates of Neospora caninum reveals resistance to infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of birds in the biological cycle of Neospora caninum is not clear. Here, we report unsuccessful Neospora infection in Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) using two isolates of N. caninum. In experiment #1 conducted in Brazil, 30 White Leghorn chickens were orally inoculated with viabl...

  2. Variable Nucleotide Tandem-Repeat Analysis Revealing a Unique Group of Leptospira interrogans Serovar Pomona Isolates Associated with California Sea Lions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Pomona is commonly isolated from a variety of wildlife and domesticated livestock. It is difficult to assess whether disease outbreaks with serovar Pomona in given animal populations are due to endemic infections or accidental exposure. Unlike many leptospiral serovars...

  3. Genomic analysis reveals multi-drug resistance clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 hypervirulent isolates causing neonatal invasive disease in southern mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmondo Campisi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide (CPS type, pilus islands (PIs distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease (EOD and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD. Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases, particularly among LOD strains (n=11, followed by types Ib (n=5, V (n=3, Ia (n=2 and II (n=1. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17.The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistances could in part explain

  4. Comparative genomics of Australian isolates of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici reveals extensive polymorphism in candidate effector genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Mithur Upadhyaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The wheat stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt, is one of the most destructive pathogens of wheat. In this study, a draft genome was built for a founder Australian Pgt isolate of pathotype (pt. 21-0 (collected in 1954 by next generation DNA sequencing. A combination of reference-based assembly using the genome of the previously sequenced American Pgt isolate CDL 75-36-700-3 (p7a and de novo assembly were performed resulting in a 92 Mbp reference genome for Pgt isolate 21-0. Approximately 13 Mbp of de novo assembled sequence in this genome is not present in the p7a reference assembly. This novel sequence is not specific to 21-0 as it is also present in three other Pgt rust isolates of independent origin.The new reference genome was subsequently used to build a pan-genome based on five Australian Pgt isolates. Transcriptomes from germinated urediniospores and haustoria were separately assembled for pt. 21-0 and comparison of gene expression profiles showed differential expression in ~10% of the genes each in germinated spores and haustoria. A total of 1,924 secreted proteins were predicted from the 21-0 transcriptome, of which 520 were classified as haustorial secreted proteins (HSPs. Comparison of 21-0 with two presumed clonal field derivatives of this lineage (collected in 1982 and 1984 that had evolved virulence on four additional resistance genes (Sr5, Sr11, Sr27, SrSatu identified mutations in 25 HSP effector candidates, some of which could explain their novel virulence phenotypes.

  5. Molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli hemolysin gene (EHEC-hlyA)-harboring isolates from cattle reveals a diverse origin and hybrid diarrheagenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari Badouei, Mahdi; Morabito, Stefano; Najafifar, Arash; Mazandarani, Emad

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the occurrence of Escherichia coli strains harboring the gene encoding enterohemorrhagic E. coli hemolysin (EHEC-HlyA) in cattle and the association of this gene with various diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes. First, the bovine E. coli isolates were screened for EHEC-hlyA gene by PCR, and then they were characterized for the phylogenetic groups and the presence of the major virulence genes of different DEC pathotypes. In total, 25 virulence gene profiles were observed in 54 EHEC-hlyA+ isolates that reflect a considerable heterogeneity. The EHEC-hlyA+ strains were mostly associated with EHEC (72%), while only 7.4% were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We also showed the presence of estA gene of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in 6 isolates (11.1%). Interestingly, two of the estA+ strains showed hybrid pathotypes with one carrying eae/estA (EPEC/ETEC), and the other one stx2/astA/estA (EHEC/ETEC). None of the isolates were related to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC). The EHEC-plasmid encoded genes occurred in seven different combinations with EHEC-hlyA/saa/subA/espP being the most prevalent (46.3%). All stx-/eae+ strains carried O island 57 (OI-57) molecular marker(s) that may indicate these to be the progenitors of EHEC or strains losing stx. The most prevalent phylogroup was B1 (61.1%), but the most heterogeneous strains including the hybrid strains belonged to A phylogroup. Overall, our results indicate that cattle EHEC-hlyA encoding E. coli isolates consist of diverse diarrheagenic strains with the possible existence of hybrid pathotypes. Future studies are required to clarify the evolutionary aspects and clinical significance of these strains in humans and domestic animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of the IKr blockers moxifloxacin, dofetilide and E-4031 in five screening models of pro-arrhythmia reveals lack of specificity of isolated cardiomyocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalos, L; Varkevisser, R; Jonsson, Mkb

    2012-01-01

    obtained from the normal rabbit. Arrhythmic outcome was defined as Torsade de Pointes (TdP) in the animal models, and early afterdepolarizations (EADs) in the cell models. Key results At clinically relevant concentrations (5-12 µM), moxifloxacin was free of pro-arrhythmic properties in all assays...... open new opportunities to identify pro-arrhythmic compounds. In the present study, five assays were employed, in the same laboratory, to investigate their sensitivity and specificity for elucidating pro-arrhythmic properties of I(Kr) blocking drugs using moxifloxacin (safe compound) and dofetilide or E...... with the exception of the isolated CM, in which 10 µM induced EADs in 35% of the CAVB CM and in 23% of the rabbit CM. At supra-therapeutic concentrations (=100 µM), moxifloxacin was pro-arrhythmic in the isolated rabbit CM (33%), in the hESC-CM clusters (18%), and in the methoxamine rabbit (17%). The unsafe agents...

  7. Characterization of Hymenobacter isolates from Victoria Upper Glacier, Antarctica reveals five new species and substantial non-vertical evolution within this genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Jonathan L; Foght, Julia M

    2011-01-01

    We isolated several Hymenobacter-like strains from Victoria Upper Glacier, Antarctica, basal ice that diverged substantially from currently defined Hymenobacter species according to their 16S rRNA and gyrB gene phylogenies. All strains were psychrotolerant, heterotrophic aerobes which grew preferentially on low salt and low nutrient strength agar. Further phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization of these isolates supported their assignment as five novel species: H. algoricola sp. nov., H. antarcticus sp. nov., H. elongatus sp. nov., H. fastidiosus sp. nov., and H. glaciei sp. nov. Remarkable among these data was the prevalence of horizontal gene transfers and phenotypic variation, even between apparently closely related strains. These results suggest extensive non-vertical evolution within the genus Hymenobacter, and may reflect evolutionary trajectories resulting from dormancy, e.g., during interment in glacial ice.

  8. Genomic Comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 Isolates from 2009 and 2011 Reveals Plasmid, and Prophage Heterogeneity, Including Shiga Toxin Encoding Phage stx2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    domestic animals and survive in meat products makes these organisms a particularly common cause of foodborne infections [2,3]. In addition some E. coli...Bioinformatics 22: 2688– 2690. 53. Price MN, Dehal PS, Arkin AP (2010) FastTree 2–approximately maximum- likelihood trees for large alignments. PLoS One 5...Identification and Characterization of CTX-M-Producing Shigella Isolates in the United States. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 54: 2269–2270. 82. Bush K

  9. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  10. European Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Bjørn

    Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"......Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"...

  11. Comparison of complete genome sequences of dog rabies viruses isolated from China and Mexico reveals key amino acid changes that may be associated with virus replication and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fulai; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhong, Xiangfu; Han, Na; Song, Yunfeng; Zhao, Ling; Cui, Min; Rayner, Simon; Fu, Zhen F

    2014-07-01

    Rabies is a global problem, but its impact and prevalence vary across different regions. In some areas, such as parts of Africa and Asia, the virus is prevalent in the domestic dog population, leading to epidemic waves and large numbers of human fatalities. In other regions, such as the Americas, the virus predominates in wildlife and bat populations, with sporadic spillover into domestic animals. In this work, we attempted to investigate whether these distinct environments led to selective pressures that result in measurable changes within the genome at the amino acid level. To this end, we collected and sequenced the full genome of two isolates from divergent environments. The first isolate (DRV-AH08) was from China, where the virus is present in the dog population and the country is experiencing a serious epidemic. The second isolate (DRV-Mexico) was taken from Mexico, where the virus is present in both wildlife and domestic dog populations, but at low levels as a consequence of an effective vaccination program. We then combined and compared these with other full genome sequences to identify distinct amino acid changes that might be associated with environment. Phylogenetic analysis identified strain DRV-AH08 as belonging to the China-I lineage, which has emerged to become the dominant lineage in the current epidemic. The Mexico strain was placed in the D11 Mexico lineage, associated with the West USA-Mexico border clade. Amino acid sequence analysis identified only 17 amino acid differences in the N, G and L proteins. These differences may be associated with virus replication and virulence-for example, the short incubation period observed in the current epidemic in China.

  12. Yellow tails in the Red Sea: phylogeography of the Indo-Pacific goatfish Mulloidichthys flavolineatus reveals isolation in peripheral provinces and cryptic evolutionary lineages

    KAUST Repository

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria

    2015-10-20

    Aim: Broadly distributed reef fishes tend to have high gene flow mediated by a pelagic larval phase. Here, we survey a reef-associated fish distributed across half the tropical oceans, from the Red Sea to the central Pacific. Our goal is to determine whether genetic structure of the broadly distributed Yellowstripe Goatfish (Mulloidichthys flavolineatus) is defined by biogeographical barriers, or facilitated via larval dispersal. Location: Red Sea, Indian Ocean, Pacific Ocean Methods: Specimens were obtained at 19 locations from the Red Sea to Hawai\\'i. Genetic data include mtDNA cytochrome b (n = 217) and 12 microsatellite loci (n = 185). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), structure, a parsimony network and coalescence analyses were used to resolve recent population history and connectivity. Results: Population structure was significant (mtDNA ϕST = 0.68, P < 0.001; microsatellite FST = 0.08, P < 0.001), but mostly driven by samples from the North-western (NW) Indian Ocean (including the Red Sea) and Hawai\\'i. There was little population structure across the Indian Ocean to the central Pacific. Hawai\\'i was distinguished as an isolated population (mtDNA ϕST = 0.03-0.08, P = n.s.; microsatellites FST = 0.05-0.10, P < 0.001). Specimens from the NW Indian Ocean clustered as a distinct phylogenetic lineage that diverged approximately 493 ka (d = 1.7%), which indicates that these fish persisted in isolation through several Pleistocene glacial cycles. Main conclusions: These data reinforce the emerging themes that: (1) phylogeographical breaks within species often coincide with biogeographical breaks based on species distributions, and (2) populations on the periphery of the range (NW Indian Ocean and Hawai\\'i) are isolated and may be evolutionary incubators producing new species. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Whole Genome Sequencing of 39 Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Sequence Type 199 Isolates Revealed Switches from Serotype 19A to 15B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz, Oliwia; Lucas, Marie; Brandt, Christian; Herrmann, Leonie; Albersmeier, Andreas; Rückert, Christian; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; van der Linden, Mark; Kalinowski, Jörn; Pletz, Mathias W

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen that causes different invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD). The pneumococcal polysaccharide capsule is a main virulence factor. More than 94 capsule types have been described, but only a limited number of capsule types accounted for the majority of IPD cases before the introduction of pneumococcal vaccines. After the introduction of the conjugated pneumococcal vaccine PCV7, which covered the seven most frequent serotypes in IPD in the USA, an increase in IPD caused by non-vaccine serotypes was observed, and serotype 19A, which belongs to sequence type (ST) 199, was among the most prevalent STs. After the introduction of the extended vaccine PCV13, which includes serotype 19A, serogroup 15B/C increased in IPD. Therefore, whole genome sequences of 39 isolates of ST199 from Germany (collected between 1998 and 2011) with serotype 19A (n = 24) and serogroup 15B/C (n = 15) were obtained using an Illumina platform and were analysed to identify capsular switches within ST199. Two 19A to 15B/C serotype switch events were identified. Both events occurred before the introduction of PCV7, which indicates that a capsular switch from 19A to 15B among ST199 isolates is not unusual and is not directly linked to the vaccination. The observed serotype replacement appears to be the result of a vacant niche due to the displacement of vaccine serotypes that is now successfully occupied by ST199 clones.

  14. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal Pleistocene isolation followed by high gene flow in a wide ranging, but endangered, freshwater mussel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Monroe, E M; Elderkin, C L; Berg, D J

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater organisms of North America have had their contemporary genetic structure shaped by vicariant events, especially Pleistocene glaciations. Life history traits promoting dispersal and gene flow continue to shape population genetic structure. Cumberlandia monodonta, a widespread but imperiled (IUCN listed as endangered) freshwater mussel, was examined to determine genetic diversity and population genetic structure throughout its range. Mitochondrial DNA sequences and microsatellite loci were used to measure genetic diversity and simulate demographic events during the Pleistocene using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to test explicit hypotheses explaining the evolutionary history of current populations. A phylogeny and molecular clock suggested past isolation created two mtDNA lineages during the Pleistocene that are now widespread. Two distinct groups were also detected with microsatellites. ABC simulations indicated the presence of two glacial refugia and post-glacial admixture of them followed by simultaneous dispersal throughout the current range of the species. The Ouachita population is distinct from others and has the lowest genetic diversity, indicating that this is a peripheral population of the species. Gene flow within this species has maintained high levels of genetic diversity in most populations; however, all populations have experienced fragmentation. Extirpation from the center of its range likely has isolated remaining populations due to the geographic distances among them. PMID:24149656

  15. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) within the European marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, M.; Cunningham, C.O.; Melvin, W.T.; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    A ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay (RPA) has been used to detect nucleotide sequence variation within the nucleoprotein gene of 39 viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates of European marine origin. The classification of VHSV isolates based on RPA cleavage patterns permitted the identification of ten distinct groups of viruses based on differences at the molecular level. The nucleotide sequence of representatives of each of these groupings was determined and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This revealed grouping of the European marine isolates of VHSV into three genotypes circulating within distinct geographic areas. A fourth genotype was identified comprising isolates originating from North America. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that VHSV isolates recovered from wild caught fish around the British Isles were genetically related to isolates responsible for losses in farmed turbot. Furthermore, a relationship between naturally occurring marine isolates and VHSV isolates causing mortality among rainbow trout in continental Europe was demonstrated. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus within the European marine environment. Virus Res. 63, 35-44. Available from: 

  16. VNTR diversity in Yersinia pestis isolates from an animal challenge study reveals the potential for in vitro mutations during laboratory cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Amy J.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Busch, Joseph D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Shuey, Megan M.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Schupp, James M.; Smith, Susan; Rocke, Tonie E.; Klein, Paul; Wagner, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mutation rates and other evolutionary forces shape the population structure of bacteria in nature. Although easily overlooked, similar forces are at work in the laboratory and may influence observed mutations. Here, we investigated tissue samples and Yersinia pestis isolates from a rodent laboratory challenge with strain CO92 using whole genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). We identified six VNTR mutations that were found to have occurred in vitro during laboratory cultivation rather than in vivo during the rodent challenge. In contrast, no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations were observed, either in vivo or in vitro. These results were consistent with previously published mutation rates and the calculated number of Y. pestis generations that occurred during the in vitro versus the in vivo portions of the experiment. When genotyping disease outbreaks, the potential for in vitro mutations should be considered, particularly when highly variable genetic markers such as VNTRs are used.

  17. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  18. Combined lipidomic and proteomic analysis of isolated human islets exposed to palmitate reveals time-dependent changes in insulin secretion and lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Roomp

    Full Text Available Studies on the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have linked the accumulation of lipid metabolites to the development of beta-cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. In most in vitro models of T2DM, rodent islets or beta-cell lines are used and typically focus is on specific cellular pathways or organs. Our aim was to, firstly, develop a combined lipidomics and proteomics approach for lipotoxicity in isolated human islets and, secondly, investigate if the approach could delineate novel and/ or confirm reported mechanisms of lipotoxicity. To this end isolated human pancreatic islets, exposed to chronically elevated palmitate concentrations for 0, 2 and 7 days, were functionally characterized and their levels of multiple targeted lipid and untargeted protein species determined. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the islets increased on day 2 and decreased on day 7. At day 7 islet insulin content decreased and the proinsulin to insulin content ratio doubled. Amounts of cholesterol, stearic acid, C16 dihydroceramide and C24:1 sphingomyelin, obtained from the lipidomic screen, increased time-dependently in the palmitate-exposed islets. The proteomic screen identified matching changes in proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis indicating up-regulated cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis in the islets. Furthermore, proteins associated with immature secretory granules were decreased when palmitate exposure time was increased despite their high affinity for cholesterol. Proteins associated with mature secretory granules remained unchanged. Pathway analysis based on the protein and lipid expression profiles implicated autocrine effects of insulin in lipotoxicity. Taken together the study demonstrates that combining different omics approaches has potential in mapping of multiple simultaneous cellular events. However, it also shows that challenges exist for effectively combining lipidomics and proteomics in primary cells. Our

  19. Whole genome sequencing of field isolates reveals a common duplication of the Duffy binding protein gene in Malagasy Plasmodium vivax strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Menard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent human malaria parasite, causing serious public health problems in malaria-endemic countries. Until recently the Duffy-negative blood group phenotype was considered to confer resistance to vivax malaria for most African ethnicities. We and others have reported that P. vivax strains in African countries from Madagascar to Mauritania display capacity to cause clinical vivax malaria in Duffy-negative people. New insights must now explain Duffy-independent P. vivax invasion of human erythrocytes.Through recent whole genome sequencing we obtained ≥ 70× coverage of the P. vivax genome from five field-isolates, resulting in ≥ 93% of the Sal I reference sequenced at coverage greater than 20×. Combined with sequences from one additional Malagasy field isolate and from five monkey-adapted strains, we describe here identification of DNA sequence rearrangements in the P. vivax genome, including discovery of a duplication of the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP gene. A survey of Malagasy patients infected with P. vivax showed that the PvDBP duplication was present in numerous locations in Madagascar and found in over 50% of infected patients evaluated. Extended geographic surveys showed that the PvDBP duplication was detected frequently in vivax patients living in East Africa and in some residents of non-African P. vivax-endemic countries. Additionally, the PvDBP duplication was observed in travelers seeking treatment of vivax malaria upon returning home. PvDBP duplication prevalence was highest in west-central Madagascar sites where the highest frequencies of P. vivax-infected, Duffy-negative people were reported.The highly conserved nature of the sequence involved in the PvDBP duplication suggests that it has occurred in a recent evolutionary time frame. These data suggest that PvDBP, a merozoite surface protein involved in red cell adhesion is rapidly evolving, possibly in response to constraints imposed by

  20. Chestnut, European (Castanea sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, Elena; Valladares, Silvia; Vieitez, Ana M; Ballester, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Development of a system for direct transfer of antifungal candidate genes into European chestnut (Castanea sativa) would provide an alternative approach to conventional breeding for production of chestnut trees that are tolerant to ink disease caused by Phytophthora spp. Overexpression of genes encoding PR proteins (such as thaumatin-like proteins), which display antifungal activity, may represent an important advance in control of the disease. We have used a chestnut thaumatin-like protein gene (CsTL1) isolated from European chestnut cotyledons and have achieved overexpression of the gene in chestnut somatic embryogenic lines used as target material. We have also acclimatized the transgenic plants and grown them on in the greenhouse. Here, we describe the various steps of the process, from the induction of somatic embryogenesis to the production of transgenic plants.

  1. TRI12 based quantitative real-time PCR assays reveal the distribution of trichothecene genotype of F. graminearum and F. culmorum isolates in Danish small grain cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L. K.; Jensen, J. D.; Rodríguez, A.

    2012-01-01

    in wheat. The NIV genotype was found at low levels in most samples. Study of genotype composition within the Danish F. graminearum and F. culmorum population was based on principal component analysis (PCA). PCA revealed that the dominating genotype of F. graminearum in wheat is 15ADON. For barley, the PCA...... analysis indicated that the F. graminearum population consisted of all three genotypes, and in triticale, the F. graminearum population consisted mainly of 15ADON genotype. F. culmorum/F. cerealis showed correlation to the NIV genotype in wheat and triticale but not in barley. F. culmorum/F. cerealis also...

  2. In vitro characterization of Lactobacillus brevis KU15006, an isolate from kimchi, reveals anti-adhesion activity against foodborne pathogens and antidiabetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung-Ho; Jeon, Hye-Lin; Yang, Seo-Jin; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the functional and probiotic properties of three lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains isolated from kimchi. The selected LAB strains, which had potential probiotic functions, were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis as Lactobacillus brevis G1, L. brevis KU15006, and Lactobacillus curvatus KCCM 200173. All LAB strains were able to tolerate incubation at pH 2.5 with 0.3% pepsin for 3 h and with 0.3% Oxgall for 24 h and showed similar enzyme production levels, antimicrobial activities, and antibiotic susceptibilities. L. brevis G1 and KU15006 presented higher adhesion ability, auto-aggregation, and cell surface hydrophobicity than Lactobacillus rhamnosus KCTC 12202BP, a commercial strain used as positive control. All LAB strains showed 50-60% co-aggregation activity with selected foodborne pathogens. L. brevis KU15006 showed anti-adhesion activity against Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. In addition, cell-free supernatant and cell-free extract from L. brevis KU15006 displayed the highest inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase. These results indicate that L. brevis KU15006 has the best properties, with pathogen antagonistic and antidiabetic activity, for use in probiotic products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. When Isolated at Full Receptivity, in Vitro Fertilized Wheat (Triticum aestivum, L. Egg Cells Reveal [Ca2+]cyt Oscillation of Intracellular Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Pónya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During in vitro fertilization of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L. in egg cells isolated at various developmental stages, changes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt were observed. The dynamics of [Ca2+]cyt elevation varied, reflecting the difference in the developmental stage of the eggs used. [Ca2+]cyt oscillation was exclusively observed in fertile, mature egg cells fused with the sperm cell. To determine how [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells is generated, egg cells were incubated in thapsigargin, which proved to be a specific inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-ATPase in wheat egg cells. In unfertilized egg cells, the addition of thapsigargin caused an abrupt transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that an influx pathway for Ca2+ is activated by thapsigargin. The [Ca2+]cyt oscillation seemed to require the filling of an intracellular calcium store for the onset of which, calcium influx through the plasma membrane appeared essential. This was demonstrated by omitting extracellular calcium from (or adding GdCl3 to the fusion medium, which prevented [Ca2+]cyt oscillation in mature egg cells fused with the sperm. Combined, these data permit the hypothesis that the first sperm-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt depletes an intracellular Ca2+ store, triggering an increase in plasma membrane Ca2+ permeability, and this enhanced Ca2+ influx results in [Ca2+]cyt oscillation.

  4. A difference gel electrophoresis study on thylakoids isolated from poplar leaves reveals a negative impact of ozone exposure on membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Sacha; Sergeant, Kjell; Hoffmann, Lucien; Dizengremel, Pierre; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny; Jolivet, Yves

    2011-07-01

    Populus tremula L. x P. alba L. (Populus x canescens (Aiton) Smith), clone INRA 717-1-B4, saplings were subjected to 120 ppb ozone exposure for 28 days. Chloroplasts were isolated, and the membrane proteins, solubilized using the detergent 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), were analyzed in a difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) experiment comparing control versus ozone-exposed plants. Extrinsic photosystem (PS) proteins and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) subunits were detected to vary in abundance. The general trend was a decrease in abundance, except for ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR), which increased after the first 7 days of exposure. The up-regulation of FNR would increase NAPDH production for reducing power and detoxification inside and outside of the chloroplast. Later on, FNR and a number of PS and ATPase subunits decrease in abundance. This could be the result of oxidative processes on chloroplast proteins but could also be a way to down-regulate photochemical reactions in response to an inhibition in Calvin cycle activity.

  5. Genetic structure in contemporary south Tyrolean isolated populations revealed by analysis of Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and Alu polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Irene; Mueller, Jakob C; Stefanov, Stefan A; De Grandi, Alessandro; Volpato, Claudia Beu; Pinggera, Gerd K; Mayr, Agnes; Ogriseg, Martin; Ploner, Franz; Meitinger, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter P

    2006-08-01

    Most of the inhabitants of South Tyrol in the eastern Italian Alps can be considered isolated populations because of their physical separation by mountain barriers and their sociocultural heritage. We analyzed the genetic structure of South Tyrolean populations using three types of genetic markers: Y-chromosome, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and autosomal Alu markers. Using random samples taken from the populations of Val Venosta, Val Pusteria, Val Isarco, Val Badia, and Val Gardena, we calculated genetic diversity within and among the populations. Microsatellite diversity and unique event polymorphism diversity (on the Y chromosome) were substantially lower in the Ladin-speaking population of Val Badia compared to the neighboring German-speaking populations. In contrast, the genetic diversity of mtDNA haplotypes was lowest for the upper Val Venosta and Val Pusteria. These data suggest a low effective population size, or little admixture, for the gene pool of the Ladin-speaking population from Val Badia. Interestingly, this is more pronounced for Ladin males than for Ladin females. For the pattern of genetic Alu variation, both Ladin samples (Val Gardena and Val Badia) are among the samples with the lowest diversity. An admixture analysis of one German-speaking valley (Val Venosta) indicates a relatively high genetic contribution of Ladin origin. The reduced genetic diversity and a high genetic differentiation in the Rhaetoroman- and German-speaking South Tyrolean populations may constitute an important basis for future medical genetic research and gene mapping studies in South Tyrol.

  6. European Cinema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the face of renewed competition from Hollywood since the early 1980s and the challenges posed to Europe's national cinemas by the fall of the Wall in 1989, independent filmmaking in Europe has begun to re-invent itself. European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood re-assesses the different

  7. Telemedicine and European law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Stefaan

    2003-01-01

    A Directive of the European Union was first published in 2000, which dealt with telemedicine as part of its provisions. This E-Commerce Directive, as it became known, was subjected to further study which revealed some problems relative to the practice of telemedicine. Among the subjects discussed in this paper are those of privacy, data protection, free movement of services, the impact of electronic communication and ethical issues.

  8. Phylogeography of a widespread small carnivore, the western spotted skunk (Spilogale gracilis) reveals temporally variable signatures of isolation across western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam W; McDonough, Molly M; Guerra, Gema I; Rheude, Margaret; Dragoo, Jerry W; Ammerman, Loren K; Dowler, Robert C

    2017-06-01

    We analyzed phylogeographic patterns in the western spotted skunk, Spilogale gracilis Merriam, 1890 (Carnivora: Mephitidae) in relation to historical events associated with Pre-Pleistocene Divergence (PPD) and Quaternary climate change (QCC) using mitochondrial DNA from 97 individuals distributed across Western North America. Divergence times were generated using BEAST to estimate when isolation in putative refugia occurred. Patterns and timing of demographic expansion was performed using Bayesian skyline plot. Putative climatic refugia resulting from Quaternary climate change were identified using paleoecological niche modeling and divergence dates compared to major vicariant events associated with Pre-Pleistocene conditions. We recovered three major mitochondrial clades corresponding to western North America (California, Baja, and across the Great Basin), east-central North America (Texas, central Mexico, New Mexico), and southwestern Arizona/northwestern Mexico. Time to most recent common ancestor for S. gracilis occurred ~1.36 Ma. Divergence times for each major clade occurred between 0.25 and 0.12 Ma, with signature of population expansion occurring 0.15 and 0.10 Ma. Ecological niche models identified three potential climatic refugia during the Last Interglacial, (1) west coast of California and Oregon, (2) northwestern Mexico, and (3) southern Texas/northeastern Mexico as well as two refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum, (1) western USA and (2) southern Texas/northeastern Mexico. This study supports PPD in shaping species-level diversity compared to QCC-driven changes at the intraspecific level for Spilogale, similar to the patterns reported for other small mammals (e.g., rodents and bats). Phylogeographic patterns also appear to have been shaped by both habitat and river vicariance, especially across the desert southwest. Further, continuing climate change during the Holocene coupled with anthropogenic modifications during the Anthropocene appears to

  9. Comparative genomics of oral isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico genome subtraction does not reveal accessory DNA associated with severe early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5% to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  10. On the near UV photophysics of a phenylalanine residue: conformation-dependent ππ* state deactivation revealed by laser spectroscopy of isolated neutral dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquais, Yohan; Gloaguen, Eric; Alauddin, Mohammad; Brenner, Valérie; Tardivel, Benjamin; Mons, Michel

    2014-10-28

    The primary step of the near UV photophysics of a phenylalanine residue is investigated in one- and two-color pump-probe R2PI nanosecond experiments carried out on specific conformers of the Ac-Gly-Phe-NH2 molecule and related neutral compounds isolated in a supersonic expansion. Compared to toluene, whose ππ* state photophysics is dominated by intersystem crossing with a lifetime of ∼80 ns at the origin, the first ππ* state of Phe in the peptide environment is systematically found to be shorter-lived. The lifetime at the origin of transition is found to be significantly shortened in the presence of a primary amide (-CONH2) group (20-60 ns, depending on the conformer considered), demonstrating the existence of an additional non-radiative relaxation channel related to this chemical group. The quenching effect induced by the peptide environment is still more remarkable beyond the origin of the ππ* state, since vibronic bands of one of the 4 conformers observed (the 27-ribbon conformation) become barely detectable in the ns R2PI experiment, suggesting a significant conformer-selective lifetime shortening (below 100 ps). These results on dipeptides, which extend previous investigations on shorter Phe-containing molecules (N-Ac-Phe-NH2 and N-Ac-Phe-NH-Me), confirm the existence of conformer-dependent non-radiative deactivation processes, whose characteristic timescales range from tens of ns down to hundreds of ps or below. This dynamics is assigned to two distinct mechanisms: a first one, consistent with an excitation energy transfer from the optically active ππ* state to low-lying amide nπ* excited states accessed through conical intersections, especially in the presence of a C-terminal primary amide group (-CONH2); a second one, responsible for the short lifetimes in 2(7) ribbon structures, would be more specifically triggered by phenyl ring vibrational excitations. Implications in terms of spectroscopic probing of Phe in a peptide environment, especially

  11. Genome Sequence Analysis of Vibrio cholerae clinical isolates from 2013 in Mexico reveals the presence of the strain responsible for the 2010 Haiti outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2017-01-01

    VPI-2, VSP-1 and VSP-2, and of the integrative element SXT. The genomic structure of the 4 isolates was similar to that of V. cholerae strain 2010 EL-1786, identified during the epidemic in Haiti in 2010. This study shows that molecular epidemiology is a very powerful tool to monitor, prevent and control diseases of public health importance in Mexico. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of Chaetomium isolates based on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolates Cg7, Cg8, and Cg9 were closely related to the Australian isolates but distantly related to the isolates from New Zealand. However, all these isolates clustered in the same Australia group as evident in the evolutionary history analysis using parsimony method. European isolate MU-2009 and Australian isolates NA26 ...

  13. The Geographic Distribution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isolates within three Italian Neighboring Winemaking Regions Reveals Strong Differences in Yeast Abundance, Genetic Diversity and Industrial Strain Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Viel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the interest for natural fermentations has been re-evaluated in terms of increasing the wine terroir and managing more sustainable winemaking practices. Therefore, the level of yeast genetic variability and the abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae native populations in vineyard are becoming more and more crucial at both ecological and technological level. Among the factors that can influence the strain diversity, the commercial starter release that accidentally occur in the environment around the winery, has to be considered. In this study we led a wide scale investigation of S. cerevisiae genetic diversity and population structure in the vineyards of three neighboring winemaking regions of Protected Appellation of Origin, in North-East of Italy. Combining mtDNA RFLP and microsatellite markers analyses we evaluated 634 grape samples collected over 3 years. We could detect major differences in the presence of S. cerevisiae yeasts, according to the winemaking region. The population structures revealed specificities of yeast microbiota at vineyard scale, with a relative Appellation of Origin area homogeneity, and transition zones suggesting a geographic differentiation. Surprisingly, we found a widespread industrial yeast dissemination that was very high in the areas where the native yeast abundance was low. Although geographical distance is a key element involved in strain distribution, the high presence of industrial strains in vineyard reduced the differences between populations. This finding indicates that industrial yeast diffusion it is a real emergency and their presence strongly interferes with the natural yeast microbiota.

  14. Transformation of a plasmid-free, genital tract isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis with a plasmid vector carrying a deletion in CDS6 revealed that this gene regulates inclusion phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Clarke, Ian N

    2013-03-01

    The development of a plasmid-based genetic transformation protocol for Chlamydia trachomatis provides the basis for the detailed investigation of the function of the chlamydial plasmid and its individual genes or coding sequences (CDS). In this study we constructed a plasmid vector with CDS6 deleted (pCDS6KO) from the original Escherichia coli/C. trachomatis shuttle vector pGFP::SW2. pCDS6KO was transformed into a clinical isolate of C. trachomatis from Sweden that is plasmid-free (C. trachomatis SWFP-). Penicillin-resistant transformants expressing the green fluorescent protein were selected. These transformants did not stain with iodine, indicating that this property is regulated by CDS6 or its gene product. In addition, mature inclusions of C. trachomatis SWFP- transformed by pCDS6KO displayed an identical morphological phenotype to the untransformed plasmid-free recipient host. In this phenotype the morphology of inclusions was altered with the chlamydiae lining the periphery of the inclusion leaving a 'hole' in the centre. These green fluorescent inclusions appear 'doughnut-shaped' with an empty centre when examined under blue light, giving rise to a characteristic 'black hole' phenotype. Our study demonstrates the power of the new genetic system for investigating chlamydial gene function using gene deletion technology. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Old European Couples' Retirement Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario; Ranzani, Marco

    This study investigates old European couples' retirement choices in order to bridge the gap between the European and the American literature. The typical European family approaching retirement is a dual-earner family: the dataset used in this paper reveals that 78 percent of working males...... correlated with education, age, and health status, together with partner's employment status, partner's education and partner's health status. We also perform a sensitivity analysis in order to check whether the results on the correlation of health status are robust to two alternative measures of health...

  16. TRI12 based quantitative real-time PCR assays reveal the distribution of trichothecene genotypes of F. graminearum and F. culmorum isolates in Danish small grain cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L K; Jensen, J D; Rodríguez, A; Jørgensen, L N; Justesen, A F

    2012-07-16

    Quantitative real-time PCR assays, based on polymorphisms in the TRI12 gene of the trichothecene pathway, were developed to identify and quantify the trichothecene genotypes producing 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3ADON), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15ADON) or nivalenol (NIV) in the Fusarium graminearum species complex, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium cerealis and Fusarium pseudograminearum. These assays were applied on a total of 378 field samples of cereal grain of wheat, barley, triticale, rye and oats collected from 2003 to 2007 to study the trichothecene genotype composition in Danish cereals. The three genotypes, 3ADON, 15ADON and NIV were found in all five cereal species, great annual variation in the occurrence of the trichothecene genotypes was evident with considerable variation between the samples. 3ADON was the dominant genotype in barley, triticale, rye and oats while 15ADON was most dominant in wheat. The NIV genotype was found at low levels in most samples. Study of genotype composition within the Danish F. graminearum and F. culmorum population was based on principal component analysis (PCA). PCA revealed that the dominating genotype of F. graminearum in wheat is 15ADON. For barley, the PCA analysis indicated that the F. graminearum population consisted of all three genotypes, and in triticale, the F. graminearum population consisted mainly of 15ADON genotype. F. culmorum/F. cerealis showed correlation to the NIV genotype in wheat and triticale but not in barley. F. culmorum/F. cerealis also showed some correlation to 3ADON especially in wheat and triticale. Selected wheat and barley samples from 1957 to 2000 showed low amounts of F. graminearum and F. culmorum in general but with a dominance of the 3ADON genotype. 15ADON was not detected in these samples, except for very low amounts in the sample representing the years from 1997 to 2000. Detection of low amounts of the 15ADON genotype in these historical samples and the relatively high amounts of 15ADON

  17. Pirating European Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Timus

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Open Science has gained a lot of attention not only within the academic community but also among policy-makers. Some international publishers have been active in moving towards open access publications and research data, but, overall, modest results have been achieved so far. In this context, the digital piracy engines emerge as vital actors in disseminating and determining the impact of research. This study examines the Sci-Hub downloads data in order to uncover patterns of piracy in European Studies research. We identify journals and the subjects of articles that have been pirated the most. We also study the geographical distribution of download requests. The analysis reveals that the readers are mostly interested in subjects reflecting the current major European challenges, specifically populism and the economic crisis. Both developing countries as well as the ‘old’ EU members are active in illegal downloads.

  18. Full genome characterization of human influenza A/H3N2 isolates from Asian countries reveals a rare amantadine resistance-conferring mutation and novel PB1-F2 polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan eZaraket

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses evolve at a high rate requiring continuous monitoring to maintain the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral drugs. We performed next generation sequencing analysis of 100 influenza A/H3N2 isolates collected in four Asian countries (Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, and Vietnam during 2012-2015. Phylogenetic analysis revealed several reassortment events leading to the circulation of multiple clades within the same season. This was particularly evident during the 2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. Importantly, our data showed that certain lineages appeared to be fitter and were able to persist into the following season. The majority of A/H3N2 viruses continued to harbor the M2-S31N mutation conferring amantadine-resistance. In addition, an S31D mutation in the M2-protein, conferring a similar level of resistance as the S31N mutation, was detected in three isolates obtained in Japan during the 2014/2015 season. None of the isolates possessed the NA-H274Y mutation conferring oseltamivir-resistance, though a few isolates were found to contain mutations at the catalytic residue 151 (D151A/G/N or V of the NA protein. These variations did not alter the susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors and were not detected in the original clinical specimens, suggesting that they had been acquired during their passage in MDCK cells. Novel polymorphisms were detected in the PB1-F2 open-reading frame resulting in truncations in the protein of 24-34 aminoacids in length. Thus, this study has demonstrated the utility of monitoring the full genome of influenza viruses to allow the detection of the potentially fittest lineages. This enhances our ability to predict the strain(s most likely to persist into the following seasons and predict the potential degree of vaccine match or mismatch with the seasonal influenza season for that year. This will enable the public health and clinical teams to prepare for any related healthcare burden, depending on whether the vaccine

  19. Retrospective genomic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains from different places in India reveals the presence of ctxB-7 allele found in Haitian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE, R; Ramamurthy, T; Sarkar, B L; Mukhopadhyay, A K; Pazhani, G P; Sarkar, S; Dutta, S; Nair, G B

    2017-08-01

    A total of 45 strains of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated from 10 different places in India where they were associated with cases of cholera between the years 2007 and 2008 were examined by molecular methods. With the help of phenotypic and genotypic tests the strains were confirmed to be O1 El Tor biotype strains with classical ctxB gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis by double - mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR showed 16 of these strains carried the ctxB-7 allele reported in Haitian strains. Sequencing of the ctxB gene in all the 45 strains revealed that in 16 strains the histidine at the 20th amino acid position had been replaced by asparagine and this single nucleotide polymorphism did not affect cholera toxin production as revealed by beads enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This study shows that the new ctxB gene sequence was circulating in different places in India. Seven representatives of these 45 strains analysed by pulsed - field gel electrophoresis showed four distinct Not I digested profiles showing that multiple clones were causing cholera in 2007 and 2008.

  20. Papillomatosis in a European bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literák, I; Tomita, Y; Ogawa, T; Shirasawa, H; Smíd, B; Novotny, L; Adamec, M

    2006-01-01

    Five European bison (Bison bonasus) from three European zoos were shipped to the Bukovské Vrchy Hills (Slovakia) in June 2004 and kept together in an acclimatization enclosure. The European bison were released into the wild in December 2004. At that time, papillomas were found at the medial canthus of the left eye of a 12-yr-old female bison. Cutaneous papillomatosis was confirmed histologically. Negative stain transmission electron microscopic examination revealed papillomavirus in the papillomas, and papillomavirus DNA also was detected using the polymerase chain reaction with FAP59 and FAP64 primers. The amplified 413 bp DNA sequence was identical to that of BAPV2 bovine papillomavirus. This paper is the first report of papillomatosis in European bison.

  1. Comparative Population Genomics of the Borrelia burgdorferi Species Complex Reveals High Degree of Genetic Isolation among Species and Underscores Benefits and Constraints to Studying Intra-Specific Epidemiological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, Maude; Gonnet, Mathieu; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Abrial, David; Claude, Alexandre; Gasqui, Patrick; Choumet, Valérie; Charras-Garrido, Myriam; Garnier, Martine; Faure, Benjamin; Sertour, Natacha; Dorr, Nelly; De Goër, Jocelyn; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Bailly, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis, one of the most frequently contracted zoonotic diseases in the Northern Hemisphere, is caused by bacteria belonging to different genetic groups within the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, which are transmitted by ticks among various wildlife reservoirs, such as small mammals and birds. These features make the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex an attractive biological model that can be used to study the diversification and the epidemiology of endemic bacterial pathogens. We investigated the potential of population genomic approaches to study these processes. Sixty-three strains belonging to three species within the Borrelia burgdorferi complex were isolated from questing ticks in Alsace (France), a region where Lyme disease is highly endemic. We first aimed to characterize the degree of genetic isolation among the species sampled. Phylogenetic and coalescent-based analyses revealed clear delineations: there was a ∼50 fold difference between intra-specific and inter-specific recombination rates. We then investigated whether the population genomic data contained information of epidemiological relevance. In phylogenies inferred using most of the genome, conspecific strains did not cluster in clades. These results raise questions about the relevance of different strategies when investigating pathogen epidemiology. For instance, here, both classical analytic approaches and phylodynamic simulations suggested that population sizes and migration rates were higher in B. garinii populations, which are normally associated with birds, than in B. burgdorferi s.s. populations. The phylogenetic analyses of the infection-related ospC gene and its flanking region provided additional support for this finding. Traces of recombination among the B. burgdorferi s.s. lineages and lineages associated with small mammals were found, suggesting that they shared the same hosts. Altogether, these results provide baseline evidence that can be used to formulate

  2. Biotechnology and the European public

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaskell, George; Allum, Nick; Bauer, Martin; Durant, John; Allansdottir, Agnes; Bonfadelli, Heinz; Boy, Daniel; de Cheveigne, Suzanne; Fjaestad, Bjorn; Gutteling, Jan M.; Hampel, Juergen; Jelsoe, Erling; Correia Jesuino, Jorge; Kohring, Matthias; Kronberger, Nicole; Midden, Cees; Hviid Nielsen, Torben; Przestalski, Andrzej; Rusanen, Timo; Sakellaris, George; Torgersen, Helge; Twardowski, Tomasz; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    The latest European sample survey of public perceptions of biotechnology reveals widespread opposition to genetically modified (GM) food in much of Europe, but public attitudes to medical and environmental applications remain positive. Data from the fourth Eurobarometer survey carried out in

  3. Characterization of imipenem resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Aogáin, M; Kulah, C; Rijnsburger, M; Celebi, G; Savelkoul, P H M; O'Gara, F; Mooij, M J

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa threatens the efficacy of this important anti-pseudomonal antibiotic class. Between 2003 and 2006, an increase in the number of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates at the Zonguldak Karaelmas University Hospital was observed (Zonguldak, Turkey). To assess the imipenem resistance mechanisms emerging in these P. aeruginosa isolates, they were characterized by amplified fragment length polymorphism typing, which revealed diversity among imipenem-resistant isolates as well as two clonally related outbreak groups. The molecular mechanism of carbapenem resistance was characterized in a representative isolate from each clonal group. Mutational disruption of oprD was the most frequently encountered resistance mechanism (23/27 isolates). © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  4. Targeted isolation, sequence assembly and characterization of two white spruce (Picea glauca BAC clones for terpenoid synthase and cytochrome P450 genes involved in conifer defence reveal insights into a conifer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritland Carol

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conifers are a large group of gymnosperm trees which are separated from the angiosperms by more than 300 million years of independent evolution. Conifer genomes are extremely large and contain considerable amounts of repetitive DNA. Currently, conifer sequence resources exist predominantly as expressed sequence tags (ESTs and full-length (FLcDNAs. There is no genome sequence available for a conifer or any other gymnosperm. Conifer defence-related genes often group into large families with closely related members. The goals of this study are to assess the feasibility of targeted isolation and sequence assembly of conifer BAC clones containing specific genes from two large gene families, and to characterize large segments of genomic DNA sequence for the first time from a conifer. Results We used a PCR-based approach to identify BAC clones for two target genes, a terpene synthase (3-carene synthase; 3CAR and a cytochrome P450 (CYP720B4 from a non-arrayed genomic BAC library of white spruce (Picea glauca. Shotgun genomic fragments isolated from the BAC clones were sequenced to a depth of 15.6- and 16.0-fold coverage, respectively. Assembly and manual curation yielded sequence scaffolds of 172 kbp (3CAR and 94 kbp (CYP720B4 long. Inspection of the genomic sequences revealed the intron-exon structures, the putative promoter regions and putative cis-regulatory elements of these genes. Sequences related to transposable elements (TEs, high complexity repeats and simple repeats were prevalent and comprised approximately 40% of the sequenced genomic DNA. An in silico simulation of the effect of sequencing depth on the quality of the sequence assembly provides direction for future efforts of conifer genome sequencing. Conclusion We report the first targeted cloning, sequencing, assembly, and annotation of large segments of genomic DNA from a conifer. We demonstrate that genomic BAC clones for individual members of multi-member gene

  5. European energy security : Challenges and green opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Heshmati, Almas; Abolhosseini, Shahrouz

    2017-01-01

    This research reviews relevant literature on the current state and effectiveness of developing renewable energy on energy security in general, and on energy security in the European Union in particular. The paper elaborates on primary energy import sources, possible alternatives, and how energy security is affected by the sources of supply. It also gives an analysis of the effects of the Ukrainian crisis, the isolation of Iran on diversification sources, and on European energy security. It ex...

  6. Federal and European Union Policy Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dosenrode, Søren

    By using the policy cycle approach, this paper compares the policy-process in a number of Anglo-Saxon type federations with the policy-process in continental-European style federations from within the European Union (EU) area.  The comparison would reveal: a) distinct different styles of policy...... making in European style federations in relation with the Anglo-Saxon ones. b) that the policy-process in the EU resembles that of the European style federations, and c) the Constitutional Treaty (CT) or a possible CT-light would strengthen the federal policy-making characteristics already present...

  7. Comparative analysis of complete genome sequences of European subtype tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks, long-tailed ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus), and human blood in the Asian part of Russia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demina, T. V.; Tkachev, S. E.; Kozlova, I. V.; Doroshchenko, E. K.; Lisak, O. V.; Suntsova, O. V.; Verkhozina, M. M.; Dzhioev, Y. P.; Paramonov, A. I.; Tikunov, A. Y.; Tikunova, N. V.; Zlobin, V. I.; Růžek, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2017), s. 547-553 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : TBEV * complete genome * European subtype * Western Siberia * Eastern Siberia * nucleotide * Amino acid sequence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.230, year: 2016

  8. Livestock-Associated Methicillin Resistant and Methicillin Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type (CC)1 in European Farmed Animals: High Genetic Relatedness of Isolates from Italian Cattle Herds and Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, Patricia; Feltrin, Fabiola; Cordaro, Gessica

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type (ST)1, Clonal Complex( CC) 1, SCCmec V is one of the major Livestock-Associated (LA-) lineages in pig farming industry in Italy and is associated with pigs in other European countries. Recently, it has been increasingly detected in ...

  9. International collaborative study on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolated from animals, humans, food and the environment in 13 European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldman, Kees; Cavaco, Lina; Mevius, Dik

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was initiated to collect retrospective information on the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolates in Europe and to identify the responsible genes. METHODS: Databases of national reference laboratories...

  10. European consumers and beef safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Wezemael, Lynn; Verbeke, Wim; Kügler, Jens Oliver

    2010-01-01

    consumption decision making process. Eight focus group discussions were performed with a total of 65 beef consumers in four European countries. Content analysis revealed that European consumers experienced difficulties in the assessment of the safety of beef and beef products and adopted diverging uncertainty......European beef consumption has been gradually declining during the past decades, while consumers' concerns about beef safety have increased. This paper explores consumer perceptions of and interest in beef safety and beef safety information, and their role in beef safety assessment and the beef...... reduction strategies. These include the use of colour, labels, brands and indications of origin as cues signalling beef safety. In general, consumer trust in beef safety was relatively high, despite distrust in particular actors....

  11. EUROPEAN AUSTERITY WITHOUT GROWTH? EUROPEAN GROWTH WITHOUT EUROPEAN DEMOCRACY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montani Guido

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The European project is facing a crisis. Citizens no longer understand what the EU is about. Young people and the new ruling class have forgotten the clear message of the European project launched just after the Second World War "No wars ever again among Europeans." The founding fathers of the European Union are mentioned in history textbooks, but today Europe is felt as an irritating bureaucracy. In Europe, peace and economic stability are considered as a natural state, a gift from above. Why keep a useless EU alive? The state of the European Union is swiftly degenerating. In almost all the member states, the anti-European forces are gaining ground. Populism is not a new ideology and is not necessarily European: let's recall Peronism. In today's Europe populism is the new manifestation of nationalism. In Italy the Lega Nord is in Berlusconi's eurosceptic government. In France, the National Front is endangering UMP's hegemony. In Belgium the rows between the Flemish and the Walloons threatens the state's unity. In the Netherlands, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Austria and Finland, populist forces are either in the government or strongly influencing the government. National-populism is different from the nationalism of the past. De Gaulle's nationalism was an ideology founded on the "grandeur" of France's history and on a certain idea of Europe, which was "l'Europe de patrie", a kind of European unity accepting French leadership in world politics. Today national-populism is a form of micro-nationalism: it opposes the European project but without having a serious alternative. This is why populism is dangerous. Its real goal is not only the breaking down of the European Union but also the disintegration of the old nation states into micro-ethnic states, as what happened in former Yugoslavia.

  12. Analysis of VanA vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates from Saudi Arabian hospitals reveals the presence of clonal cluster 17 and two new Tn 1546 lineage types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Khan (Mushtaq); M. van der Wal (Martin); D.J. Farrell (David); L. Cossins (Luke); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); A. Alaidan (Alwaleed); J.P. Hays (John)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives; The aim of this study was to characterize 34 vancomycin-resistant VanA Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from two hospitals in Saudi Arabia and to assess Tn 1546 variation within these isolates. Methods: PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genotypes, antibiotic

  13. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of a Duck-Origin GPV-Related Parvovirus from Cherry Valley Ducklings in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    Full Text Available A newly emerged duck parvovirus, which causes beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS in Cherry Valley ducks, has appeared in Northern China since March 2015. To explore the genetic diversity among waterfowl parvovirus isolates, the complete genome of an identified isolate designated SDLC01 was sequenced and analyzed in the present study. Genomic sequence analysis showed that SDLC01 shared 90.8%-94.6% of nucleotide identity with goose parvovirus (GPV isolates and 78.6%-81.6% of nucleotide identity with classical Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of 443 nucleotides (nt of the fragment A showed that SDLC01 was highly similar to a mule duck isolate (strain D146/02 and close to European GPV isolates but separate from Asian GPV isolates. Analysis of the left inverted terminal repeat regions revealed that SDLC01 had two major segments deleted between positions 160-176 and 306-322 nt compared with field GPV and MDPV isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of Rep and VP1 encoded by two major open reading frames of parvoviruses revealed that SDLC01 was distinct from all GPV and MDPV isolates. The viral pathogenicity and genome characterization of SDLC01 suggest that the novel GPV (N-GPV is the causative agent of BADS and belongs to a distinct GPV-related subgroup. Furthermore, N-GPV sequences were detected in diseased ducks by polymerase chain reaction and viral proliferation was demonstrated in duck embryos and duck embryo fibroblast cells.

  14. Educating in European Identity?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Enrique Banús

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades, the claim for a "European identity" has been manifested sometimes as a solution for the citizens' distance to the European project, sometimes also as a precondition for a further...

  15. Kant's Theory of European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

      Abstract:Immanuel Kant developed a rather wide range of concepts to describe the process of an "ever broader union" of European states. Kant's theory posed a dilemma with two aspects. On the one hand republican states were free, and on the other they were obliged to follow rules of a union...... of states, for instance regulations of non-intervention. Debates have focused this dilemma as if it was a real contradiction. The argument in the present paper is that there is no such contradiction. To the contrary, in his philosophy of reflective judgement, Kant describes the compelling duty......, but to let it cooperate with other states rather than to isolate it. Kant observes a guarantee that such a form of integration could emerge and succeed, because the military powers of Europe had to develop complexities of separated powers in their organisation of states. Underneath the unity of isolated...

  16. The Europeanization of Health Care Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Dorte Sindbjerg; Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines the Europeanization process and the impact of the European Union (EU) on national healthcare policies, using the example of Denmark. The analysis reveals that although health policy formally falls within the competence of member states, the impact of the EU is becoming increasi......The paper examines the Europeanization process and the impact of the European Union (EU) on national healthcare policies, using the example of Denmark. The analysis reveals that although health policy formally falls within the competence of member states, the impact of the EU is becoming...... increasingly conspicuous and has contributed to a gradual restructuring of healthcare boundaries as well as of some of its organizing principles. Furthermore, the process and impact have a de-structuring effect on the more traditional governance tools used in relation to healthcare. The paper concludes...

  17. The 2014 European Elections in Romania – Media Frames and Their Implications in the Europeanization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Ștefăniță

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the implications of the media in two major processes at the EU level – the process of Europeanization and the process of building a European identity. So, it analyses European subjects, by focusing on the visibility and the media framing of these subjects during the 2014 EU Parliament elections. Recent theoretical studies in the domain show that media could be one of the actors that might be responsible for influencing the Europeanization process – either in the sense of enabling the emergence and functioning of a European public sphere or in the sense of even preventing its birth. Thus, our empirical research aims at investigating the degree of Europeanization of the Romanian media discourse in order to reveal the current situation regarding the public sphere in Romania today. Since the content analysis indicates a low degree of visibility of the European issues and rather low levels of issue-specific frames that might sustain the development of a mature European identity, we can conclude that media still have to struggle to accomplish the transition from the national level to the European(ized one.

  18. Conservation genetics and population history of the threatened European mink Mustela lutreola, with an emphasis on the west European population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaux, J R; Hardy, O J; Justy, F; Fournier, P; Kranz, A; Cabria, M; Davison, A; Rosoux, R; Libois, R

    2005-07-01

    In species of great conservation concern, special attention must be paid to their phylogeography, in particular the origin of animals for captive breeding and reintroduction. The endangered European mink lives now in at least three well-separated populations in northeast, southeast and west Europe. Our aim is to assess the genetic structure of these populations to identify 'distinct population segments' (DPS) and advise captive breeding programmes. First, the mtDNA control region was completely sequenced in 176 minks and 10 polecats. The analysis revealed that the western population is characterized by a single mtDNA haplotype that is closely related to those in eastern regions but nevertheless, not found there to date. The northeast European animals are much more variable (pi = 0.012, h = 0.939), with the southeast samples intermediate (pi = 0.0012, h = 0.469). Second, 155 European mink were genotyped using six microsatellites. The latter display the same trends of genetic diversity among regions as mtDNA [gene diversity and allelic richness highest in northeast Europe (H(E) = 0.539, R(S) = 3.76), lowest in west Europe (H(E) = 0.379, R(S) = 2.12)], and provide evidences that the southeast and possibly the west populations have undergone a recent bottleneck. Our results indicate that the western population derives from a few animals which recently colonized this region, possibly after a human introduction. Microsatellite data also reveal that isolation by distance occurs in the western population, causing some inbreeding because related individuals mate. As genetic data indicate that the three populations have not undergone independent evolutionary histories for long (no phylogeographical structure), they should not be considered as distinct DPS. In conclusion, the captive breeding programme should use animals from different parts of the species' present distribution area.

  19. Globalization and Europeanization. A Projection on a European Model of Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Matei

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The specialized studies and literature present moreover and insistently the connection between globalization and Europeanization, more precisely between globalization and a European model of integration, whose features aim to set up a global-type European society. The development of the European model of integration starts with economic elements, it reveals nowadays the Economic and Monetary Union and in perspective it will be structured within a sui generis system of transnational governance. The values of the European model of integration become fundamental values of a social process, with powerful economic and political determinations, aiming the multi-causal interference between individual, community and European construction. This process, remarked increasingly in the specialized literature, being assigned with the name of Europeanization, has got original, functional features in the spectrum of significations of the globalization paradigm. As essential global-type formula, within Europeanization, we shall find models with economic, political or social finality, integrating also a model of administration among the latter ones. When we say administration, we refer to its up dated and adequate contents to the new European developments. This assertion derives from a less economic modality to conceptualize the relationship between globalization and Europeanization, presenting Europeanization more as a political adaptation to globalization and even a political expression of globalization. In this context, the development of a system for European governance on several levels (local, regional, national, intergovernmental and supranational suggests its evolution towards globalization. In fact, the literature specific for Europeanization asserts the fact that the European model has also features with integrative nature related to the supranational and trans-governmental dimensions, as well as features with normative nature in view of harmonization

  20. Genetic diversity and structure in Leishmania infantum populations from southeastern Europe revealed by microsatellite analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The dynamic re-emergence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in south Europe and the northward shift to Leishmania-free European countries are well-documented. However, the epidemiology of VL due to Leishmania infantum in southeastern (SE) Europe and the Balkans is inadequately examined. Herein, we aim to re-evaluate and compare the population structure of L. infantum in SE and southwestern (SW) Europe. Methods Leishmania strains collected from humans and canines in Turkey, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania and Croatia, were characterized by the K26-PCR assay and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) and MLM Types were analyzed by model- and distance- based algorithms to infer the population structure of 128 L. infantum strains. Results L. infantum MON-1 was found predominant in SE Europe, whilst 16.8% of strains were MON-98. Distinct genetic populations revealed clear differentiation between SE and SW European strains. Interestingly, Cypriot canine isolates were genetically isolated and formed a monophyletic group, suggesting the constitution of a clonal MON-1 population circulating among dogs. In contrast, two highly heterogeneous populations enclosed all MON-1 and MON-98 strains from the other SE European countries. Structure sub-clustering, phylogenetic and Splitstree analysis also revealed two distinct Croatian subpopulations. A mosaic of evolutionary effects resulted in consecutive sub-structuring, which indicated substantial differentiation and gene flow among strains of both zymodemes. Conclusions This is the first population genetic study of L. infantum in SE Europe and the Balkans. Our findings demonstrate the differentiation between SE and SW European strains; revealing the partition of Croatian strains between these populations and the genetic isolation of Cypriot strains. This mirrors the geographic position of Croatia located in central Europe and the natural

  1. Europeanization and transnational states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsson, Bengt; Lægreid, Per; Pedersen, Ove K.

    This work investigates what happens to an organized political unit when it becomes part of a larger entity and, in particular, how increased European integration and the tentative moves towards a transnational state will affect the European Union's nation state. Europeanization and the transforma......This work investigates what happens to an organized political unit when it becomes part of a larger entity and, in particular, how increased European integration and the tentative moves towards a transnational state will affect the European Union's nation state. Europeanization...... in central government agencies. It concludes that the consequences of Europeanization can be described as the growth of a transnational administration where identities as well as loyalties are created in processes that transcend the borders of states....

  2. Financiële spanning en informeel sociaal isolement: De rol van macro-economische omstandigheden en sociale zekerheidsuitgaven in 32 Europese landen in het decennium na de eeuwwisseling/Financial strain and informal social isolation: The role of macro-economic circumstances and social protection expenditure in 32 European countries in the decade after the turn of the century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark Visser; Maurice Gesthuizen; Peer Scheepers

    2013-01-01

      This study examines to what extent financial strain, that is, difficulties to cope on one's income, is related to informal social isolation, that is, lacking social contacts with friend, relatives and colleagues...

  3. The Honey Bee Pathosphere of Mongolia: European Viruses in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevegmid, Khaliunaa; Neumann, Peter; Yañez, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and pathogens are apparent key factors for the detrimental health of managed European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera. Apicultural trade is arguably the main factor for the almost global distribution of most honey bee diseases, thereby increasing chances for multiple infestations/infections of regions, apiaries, colonies and even individual bees. This imposes difficulties to evaluate the effects of pathogens in isolation, thereby creating demand to survey remote areas. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for 14 honey bee pathogens in Mongolia (N = 3 regions, N = 9 locations, N = 151 colonies), where honey bee colonies depend on humans to overwinter. In Mongolia, honey bees, Apis spp., are not native and colonies of European A. mellifera subspecies have been introduced ~60 years ago. Despite the high detection power and large sample size across Mongolian regions with beekeeping, the mite Acarapis woodi, the bacteria Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae, the microsporidian Nosema apis, Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus and Lake Sinai virus strain 2 were not detected, suggesting that they are either very rare or absent. The mite Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae and four viruses (Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus, Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Chronic bee paralysis virus) were found with different prevalence. Despite the positive correlation between the prevalence of V. destructor mites and DWV, some areas had only mites, but not DWV, which is most likely due to the exceptional isolation of apiaries (up to 600 km). Phylogenetic analyses of the detected viruses reveal their clustering and European origin, thereby supporting the role of trade for pathogen spread and the isolation of Mongolia from South-Asian countries. In conclusion, this survey reveals the distinctive honey bee pathosphere of Mongolia, which offers opportunities for exciting future research. PMID:26959221

  4. The Honey Bee Pathosphere of Mongolia: European Viruses in Central Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliunaa Tsevegmid

    Full Text Available Parasites and pathogens are apparent key factors for the detrimental health of managed European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera. Apicultural trade is arguably the main factor for the almost global distribution of most honey bee diseases, thereby increasing chances for multiple infestations/infections of regions, apiaries, colonies and even individual bees. This imposes difficulties to evaluate the effects of pathogens in isolation, thereby creating demand to survey remote areas. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for 14 honey bee pathogens in Mongolia (N = 3 regions, N = 9 locations, N = 151 colonies, where honey bee colonies depend on humans to overwinter. In Mongolia, honey bees, Apis spp., are not native and colonies of European A. mellifera subspecies have been introduced ~60 years ago. Despite the high detection power and large sample size across Mongolian regions with beekeeping, the mite Acarapis woodi, the bacteria Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae, the microsporidian Nosema apis, Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus and Lake Sinai virus strain 2 were not detected, suggesting that they are either very rare or absent. The mite Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae and four viruses (Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus, Deformed wing virus (DWV and Chronic bee paralysis virus were found with different prevalence. Despite the positive correlation between the prevalence of V. destructor mites and DWV, some areas had only mites, but not DWV, which is most likely due to the exceptional isolation of apiaries (up to 600 km. Phylogenetic analyses of the detected viruses reveal their clustering and European origin, thereby supporting the role of trade for pathogen spread and the isolation of Mongolia from South-Asian countries. In conclusion, this survey reveals the distinctive honey bee pathosphere of Mongolia, which offers opportunities for exciting future research.

  5. Do current European policies support soil multifunctionality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Katharina; Glaesner, Nadia; de Vries, Wim

    2017-04-01

    Soils are multifunctional. Maximising one function, e.g. production of biomass, is often at the costs of the other functions, e.g. water purification, carbon sequestration, nutrient recycling, habitat provision. Sustainable soil management actually means the minimization of trade-offs between multiple soil functions. While Europe does not have a policy that explicitly focuses on soil functions, a number of policies exist in the agricultural, environmental and climate domains that may affect soil functions, in particular food production, water purification, climate change mitigation, biodiversity conservation. The objective of this study was to identify gaps and overlaps in existing EU legislation that is related to soil functions. We conducted a cross-policy analysis of 19 legislative policies at European level. Results revealed two key findings: (i) soil functions are addressed in existing legislation but with the approach to their conservation rather than their improvement. (ii) Different legislations addressed isolated soil functions but there is no policy in place that actually addressed the soil multifunctionality, which is the integrated balancing of the multitude of functions. Because soil degradation is ongoing in Europe, it raises the question whether existing legislation is sufficient for maintaining soil resources and achieving sustainable soil management. Addressing soil functions individually in various directives fails to account for the multifunctionality of soil. Here, research has a role to play to better reveal the interacting processes between soil functions and their sensitivity to soil management decisions and to translate such understanding into policy recommendation. We conclude the presentation with some insights into a research approach that integrates the soil systems into the socio-economic systems to improve the understanding of soil management pressures, soil functional reactions and their impacts on societal value systems, including

  6. Adaptive differences between Phytophthora ramorum isolates from Europe and North America: evidence for separate subspecies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive Brasier; Susan Kirk; Joan Rose

    2006-01-01

    The comparative risk to trees posed by European (E.U.) versus North American (U.S.) isolates of Phytophthora ramorum, the possible risk posed by genetic recombination between them, and whether European versus North American isolates represented discrete sub-populations was investigated. Population samples of E.U. and U.S. isolates were compared for...

  7. High similarity between isolates of pepino mosaic virus suggests a common origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, J.Th.J.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.; Roenhorst, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The almost simultaneous outbreaks of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato crops in different European and non-European countries, was reason to have a closer look at the relationship between these isolates and the original isolate from pepino. Fifteen isolates from tomato from different locations and the

  8. The sequencing of the complete genome of a Tomato black ring virus (TBRV) and of the RNA2 of three Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV) isolates from grapevine reveals the possible recombinant origin of GCMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiaro, M; Yahyaoui, E; Martelli, G P; Elbeaino, T

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome of a Tomato black ring virus isolate (TBRV-Mirs) (RNA1, 7,366 nt and RNA2, 4,640 nt) and the RNA2 sequences (4,437; 4,445; and 4,442 nts) of three Grapevine chrome mosaic virus isolates (GCMV-H6, -H15, and -H27) were determined. All RNAs contained a single open reading frame encoding polyproteins of 254 kDa (p1) and 149 kDa (p2) for TBRV-Mirs RNA1 and RNA2, respectively, and 146 kDa for GCMV RNA2. p1 of TBRV-Mirs showed the highest identity with TBRV-MJ (94 %), Beet ringspot virus (BRSV, 82 %), and Grapevine Anatolian ringspot virus (GARSV, 66 %), while p2 showed the highest identity with TBRV isolates MJ (89 %) and ED (85 %), followed by BRSV (65 %), GCMV (58 %), and GARSV (57 %). The amino acid identity of RNA2 sequences of four GCMV isolates (three from this study and one from GenBank) ranged from 91 to 98 %, the homing protein being the most variable. The RDP3 program predicted putative intra-species recombination events for GCMV-H6 and recognized GCMV as a putative inter-species recombinant between GARSV and TBRV. In both cases, the recombination events were at the movement protein level.

  9. Comparative sequence analysis revealed altered chromosomal organization and a novel insertion sequence encoding DNA modification and potentially stress-related functions in an Escherichia coli O157:H7 foodborne isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently described the complete genome of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain NADC 6564, an isolate of strain 86-24 linked to the 1986 disease outbreak. In the current study, we compared the chromosomal sequence of NADC 6564 to the well-characterized chromosomal sequences of ...

  10. Social isolation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cacioppo, John T; Hawkley, Louise C; Norman, Greg J; Berntson, Gary G

    2011-01-01

    ..., reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced. Social isolation represents a lens through which to investigate these behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms...

  11. Cross-species amplification of 41 microsatellites in European cyprinids: A tool for evolutionary, population genetics and hybridization studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles André

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyprinids display the most abundant and widespread species among the European freshwater Teleostei and are known to hybridize quite commonly. Nevertheless, a limited number of markers for conducting comparative differentiation, evolutionary and hybridization dynamics studies are available to date. Findings Five multiplex PCR sets were optimized in order to assay 41 cyprinid-specific polymorphic microsatellite loci (including 10 novel loci isolated from Chondrostoma nasus nasus, Chondrostoma toxostoma toxostoma and Leuciscus leuciscus for 503 individuals (440 purebred specimens and 63 hybrids from 15 European cyprinid species. The level of genetic diversity was assessed in Alburnus alburnus, Alburnoides bipunctatus, C. genei, C. n. nasus, C. soetta, C. t. toxostoma, L. idus, L. leuciscus, Pachychilon pictum, Rutilus rutilus, Squalius cephalus and Telestes souffia. The applicability of the markers was also tested on Abramis brama, Blicca bjoerkna and Scardinius erythrophtalmus specimens. Overall, between 24 and 37 of these markers revealed polymorphic for the investigated species and 23 markers amplified for all the 15 European cyprinid species. Conclusions The developed set of markers demonstrated its performance in discriminating European cyprinid species. Furthermore, it allowed detecting and characterizing hybrid individuals. These microsatellites will therefore be useful to perform comparative evolutionary and population genetics studies dealing with European cyprinids, what is of particular interest in conservation issues and constitutes a tool of choice to conduct hybridization studies.

  12. European disparities in the incidence and outcomes of children with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chesnaye, N.C.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we primarily aim to reveal health inequalities and improve outcomes in the European paediatric renal replacement therapy (RRT) population. Despite commitments and progress made by European Union Member States towards reducing health inequalities, we demonstrate that geographical

  13. Molecular analysis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 reveals a specific spectrum of molecular mutations with prognostic impact: a study on 123 patients and 27 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The only cytogenetic aberration defining a myelodysplastic syndrome subtype is the deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, which, along with morphological features, leads to the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. These patients show a good prognosis and respond to treatment such as lenalidomide, but some cases progress to acute myeloid leukemia; however, the molecular mutation pattern is rarely characterized. Therefore, we investigated a large cohort of 123 myelodysplastic syndrome patients with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, diagnosed following the World Health Organization classifications 2008 and 2016, by sequencing 27 genes. A great proportion of patients showed no or only one mutation. Only seven genes showed mutation frequencies >5% (SF3B1, DNMT3A, TP53, TET2, CSNK1A1, ASXL1, JAK2). However, the pattern of recurrently mutated genes was comparable to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes by comparison to a reference cohort, except that of TP53 which was significantly more often mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. As expected, SF3B1 was frequently mutated and correlated with ring sider-oblasts, while JAK2 mutations correlated with elevated platelet counts. Surprisingly, SF3B1 mutations led to significantly worse prognosis within cases with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, but showed a comparable outcome to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes with SF3B1 mutation. However, addressing genetic stability in follow-up cases might suggest different genetic mechanisms for progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia compared to overall myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:28642303

  14. Revealed Competition for Greenfield Investments between European Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Burger (Martijn); G.A. van der Knaap (Bert); R.S. Wall (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn the modern economy, cities are assumed to be in fierce competition over attracting foreign investments in leading sectors of the world economy. Despite the rich theoretical discourse on these 'wars', it remains unclear which territories are competing with each other over which types

  15. THE EUROPEAN BUSINESS CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ion

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction of European Monetary Union has raised several questions about the existence of a common business cycle, a European one. The lack of cyclical synchronization would complicate the monetary and fiscal policies in the Union, being a negative

  16. European Home Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.

    2009-01-01

    An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes......An important aim of the european energy performance of buildings directive is to improve the overall energy efficiency of new homes...

  17. European Industry, 1700 - 1870

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadberry, Stephen; Fremdling, Rainer; Solar, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of the development of European industry between 1700 and 1870, drawing in particular on the recent literature that has emerged following the formation of the European Historical Economics Society in 1991. The approach thus makes use of economic analysis and quantitative

  18. The European Programme Manager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne; Bergman, E.; Ehlers, S.

    The publication is a result of a cooperation between organisations in six European countries with the aim to develop a common European education for programme managers. It contains of a description of the different elements of the education together with a number of case-studies from the counties...

  19. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2003-01-01

    The theme adressed by this paper is the opportunities for European Works Councils (EWCs) of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme adressed by this paper is the opportunities for European Works Councils (EWCs) of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  20. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2004-01-01

    The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  1. Introduction: European climate leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurzel, R.K.W.; Liefferink, J.D.; Connelly, J.

    2017-01-01

    There is no shortage of would-be leaders in EU climate change politics. The EU institutions (e.g. European Council, Council of the EU, Commission and the European Parliament (EP)), member states and societal actors have all, though to varying degrees and at different time periods, tried to offer

  2. Europeanization : A Poststructuralist Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuman-Stanivukovic, Senka

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation begins from the hypothesis that the direction and extent of Europeanization depends on domestic perception of the European Union and its norms. Accordingly, it was my empirical ambition to study how competing articulations of the EU and its norms constructed debates in EU member

  3. European media law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castendyk, O.; Dommering, E.; Scheuer, A.

    2008-01-01

    European Union legislation concerning electronic communications media is firmly established as an essential part of the law in the field in Europe. From relevant provisions of the European Convention of Human Rights and the EC Treaty to numerous directives, the most recent being the Audiovisual

  4. Whole genome of Klebsiella aerogenes PX01 isolated from San Jacinto River sediment west of Baytown, Texas reveals the presence of multiple antibiotic resistance determinants and mobile genetic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rupa; Iken, Brian; Damania, Ashish

    2017-12-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes is a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae which is widely distributed in water, air and soil. It also forms part of the normal microbiota found in human and animal gastrointestinal tracts. Here we report the draft genome sequence (chromosome and 1 plasmid) of K. aerogenes strain PX01 compiled at the scaffold level from 97 contigs totaling 5,262,952 bp. K. aerogenes PX01 was isolated from sediment along the northern face of Burnet Bay west of Baytown, Texas. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into NCBI GenBank under the accession NJBB00000000.

  5. Whole genome of Klebsiella aerogenes PX01 isolated from San Jacinto River sediment west of Baytown, Texas reveals the presence of multiple antibiotic resistance determinants and mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Iyer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella aerogenes is a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae which is widely distributed in water, air and soil. It also forms part of the normal microbiota found in human and animal gastrointestinal tracts. Here we report the draft genome sequence (chromosome and 1 plasmid of K. aerogenes strain PX01 compiled at the scaffold level from 97 contigs totaling 5,262,952 bp. K. aerogenes PX01 was isolated from sediment along the northern face of Burnet Bay west of Baytown, Texas. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into NCBI GenBank under the accession NJBB00000000.

  6. Isolated Aortitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... among others. In some cases, biologics like anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs such as infliximab or rituximab have been used. Isolated aortitis occurring with retroperitoneal fibrosis has been treated with tamoxifen, an anti- ...

  7. The European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP)--a sentinel approach in the European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Gianfranco; Cole, Michelle; Unemo, Magnus; Hoffmann, Steen; Ison, Catherine; van de Laar, Marita

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is monitored in the European Union/European Economic Area through the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP) coordinated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Euro-GASP includes a sentinel surveillance programme which aims to detect in a timely manner changes in resistance patterns and inform treatment guidelines. The programme aims to test a representative number of isolates from each European Union/European Economic Area member state per year for a range of therapeutically relevant antimicrobials through a biannual hybrid centralised/decentralised system. Testing is supported by an External Quality Assurance programme and a laboratory training programme. Participation in the programme has increased to 21 countries in 2012. Euro-GASP has been able to detect the rapid spread of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cefixime across Europe in 2010 and 2011. Results from the programme have informed changes in European treatment guidelines for gonorrhoea and led to the development of the 'Response plan to control and manage the threat of multidrug resistant gonorrhoea in Europe'. Future challenges for Euro-GASP include supporting countries to participate in Euro-GASP through decentralised testing, improving timeliness and epidemiological data quality, and increasing participation from Eastern Europe.

  8. The Rise of the Information Society amongst European Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajan, Florin D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the information society discourse in the European Union in relation to the European Commission's eLearning programmes, based on selected academics' conceptualisation of the term. It reveals a mixed picture of the perceptions that academics have of the information society in their respective countries. The findings indicate…

  9. Emerging fungal pathogen Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in wild European snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklinos, Lydia H. V.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Bohuski, Elizabeth A.; Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, Julia; Wright, Owen; Fitzpatrick, Liam; Petrovan, Silviu; Durrant, Chris; Linton, Chris; Baláž, Vojtech; Cunningham, Andrew A; Lawson, Becki

    2017-01-01

    Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging disease of conservation concern in eastern North America. Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, the causative agent of SFD, has been isolated from over 30 species of wild snakes from six families in North America. Whilst O. ophiodiicola has been isolated from captive snakes outside North America, the pathogen has not been reported from wild snakes elsewhere. We screened 33 carcasses and 303 moulted skins from wild snakes collected from 2010–2016 in Great Britain and the Czech Republic for the presence of macroscopic skin lesions and O. ophiodiicola. The fungus was detected using real-time PCR in 26 (8.6%) specimens across the period of collection. Follow up culture and histopathologic analyses confirmed that both O. ophiodiicola and SFD occur in wild European snakes. Although skin lesions were mild in most cases, in some snakes they were severe and were considered likely to have contributed to mortality. Culture characterisations demonstrated that European isolates grew more slowly than those from the United States, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that isolates from European wild snakes reside in a clade distinct from the North American isolates examined. These genetic and phenotypic differences indicate that the European isolates represent novel strains of O. ophiodiicola. Further work is required to understand the individual and population level impact of this pathogen in Europe.

  10. Susceptibility of pike Esox lucius to a panel of Ranavirus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ann Britt Bang; Ersbøll, A. K.; Ariel, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the pathogenicity of ranaviruses to a wild European freshwater fish species, pike Esox lucius fry were challenged with the following Ranavirus isolates: epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), European sheatfish virus (ESV), European catfish virus (ECV), pike-perch irido......In order to study the pathogenicity of ranaviruses to a wild European freshwater fish species, pike Esox lucius fry were challenged with the following Ranavirus isolates: epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), European sheatfish virus (ESV), European catfish virus (ECV), pike...... and NZeelV and can be a vector for ECV and FV3. Statistical analysis of the factors associated with positive virus re-isolation showed that the number of fish in the sample influenced the outcome of virus re-isolation. Moreover, the likelihood of positive virus re-isolation significantly differed among...

  11. Fouling and boring organisms that deteriorate various European ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... European and tropical woods at Turkish seas ... Identification of the organisms obtained from wood panels revealed the presence of ... Moreover, mechanical ..... Oliver AC (1974) Timber for marine and freshwater construction.

  12. First report on the isolation of Aureimonas altamirensis from a patient with peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy Schröttner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of Aureimonas altamirensis (a rare opportunistic pathogen with a yet unresolved pathogenicity from the ascites fluid of a patient with bacterial peritonitis is reported. The strain was first identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and the result was confirmed using 16S rDNA sequencing. An antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST guidelines published in 2013, revealing sensitivity to all antibiotics tested. The patient was treated effectively with levofloxacin.

  13. Update of European bioethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2015-01-01

    , the principles of autonomy, dignity, integrity and vulnerability are proposed as the most important ethical principles for respect for the human person in biomedical and biotechnological development. This approach to bioethics and biolaw is presented here in a short updated version that integrates the earlier......This paper presents an update of the research on European bioethics undertaken by the author together with Professor Peter Kemp since the 1990s, on Basic ethical principles in European bioethics and biolaw. In this European approach to basic ethical principles in bioethics and biolaw...... research in a presentation of the present understanding of the basic ethical principles in bioethics and biolaw....

  14. Democratic Citizenship: European referents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María PUIG GUTIÉRREZ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Let’s sense beforehand in this article a tour concerning the educational European policies that favors the development of a democratic citizenship. The aim that we chase is to understand the way in which nowadays it is being interpreted and stimulated the Citizenship education from European Union. for it we offer a conceptual delimiting of «Citizenship education» and later, we show an analysis of the principal documents and materials elaborated principally by the Council of Europe that mark the way followed by European Union as for education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC.

  15. First Insight into Genetic Diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Albania Obtained by Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis and Spoligotyping Reveals the Presence of Beijing Multidrug-Resistant Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafaj, Silva; Zhang, Jian; Hauck, Yolande; Pourcel, Christine; Hafizi, Hasan; Zoraqi, Grigor; Sola, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    We characterized a set of 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex clinical isolates from tuberculosis (TB) patients in Albania, typing them with a 24-locus variable-number tandem-repeat-spoligotyping scheme. Depending on the cluster definition, 43 to 49 patients were distributed into 15 to 16 clusters which were likely to be epidemiologically linked, indicative of a recent transmission rate of 28 to 34%. This result suggests that TB is under control in Albania. However, two multidrug-resistant (MDR) Beijing genotypes harboring the same S531A mutation on the rpoB gene were also found, suggesting a potential recent transmission of MDR TB. Three brand new genotypes, Albania-1 to Albania-3, are also described. PMID:19279172

  16. First insight into genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in Albania obtained by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and spoligotyping reveals the presence of beijing multidrug-resistant isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafaj, Silva; Zhang, Jian; Hauck, Yolande; Pourcel, Christine; Hafizi, Hasan; Zoraqi, Grigor; Sola, Christophe

    2009-05-01

    We characterized a set of 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex clinical isolates from tuberculosis (TB) patients in Albania, typing them with a 24-locus variable-number tandem-repeat-spoligotyping scheme. Depending on the cluster definition, 43 to 49 patients were distributed into 15 to 16 clusters which were likely to be epidemiologically linked, indicative of a recent transmission rate of 28 to 34%. This result suggests that TB is under control in Albania. However, two multidrug-resistant (MDR) Beijing genotypes harboring the same S531A mutation on the rpoB gene were also found, suggesting a potential recent transmission of MDR TB. Three brand new genotypes, Albania-1 to Albania-3, are also described.

  17. Genetic and morphological differentiation in Populus nigra L.: isolation by colonization or isolation by adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWoody, Jennifer; Trewin, Harriet; Taylor, Gail

    2015-06-01

    Identifying processes underlying the genetic and morphological differences among populations is a central question of evolutionary biology. Forest trees typically contain high levels of neutral genetic variation, and genetic differences are often correlated with geographic distance between populations [isolation by distance (IBD)] or are due to historic vicariance events [isolation by colonization (IBC)]. In contrast, morphological differences are largely due to local adaptation. Here, we examined genetic (microsatellite) and morphological (from a common garden experiment) variation in Populus nigra L., European black poplar, collected from 13 sites across western Europe and grown in a common garden in Belgium. Significant genetic differentiation was observed, with populations from France displaying greater admixture than the distinct Spanish and central European gene pools, consistent with previously described glacial refugia (IBC). Many quantitative traits displayed a bimodal distribution, approximately corresponding to small-leaf and large-leaf ecotypes. Examination of nine climatic variables revealed the sampling locations to have diverse climates, and although the correlation between morphological and climatic differences was significant, the pattern was not consistent with strict local adaptation. Partial Mantel tests based on multivariate summary statistics identified significant residual correlation in comparisons of small-leaf to large-leaf ecotypes, and within the small-leaf samples, but not within large-leaf ecotypes, indicating that variation within the small-leaf morphotype in particular may be adaptive. Some small-leaf populations experience climates very similar to those in large-leaf sites. We conclude that adaptive differentiation and persistent IBC acted in combination to produce the genetic and morphological patterns observed in P. nigra. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. European surveillance study on antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-positive anaerobic cocci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazier, J; Chmelar, D; Dubreuil, L

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of microorganisms frequently isolated from local and systemic infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical strains isolated in 10 European countries were investigated. After identification of 299 GPAC...... to both agents. The majority of resistant isolates were identified as F. magna and originated from blood, abscesses and soft tissue infections....

  19. A novel escapable social interaction test reveals that social behavior and mPFC activation during an escapable social encounter are altered by post-weaning social isolation and are dependent on the aggressiveness of the stimulus rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Dayton J; Ahern, Megan A; Baynard, Jessica; Wall, Vanessa L; Bland, Sondra T

    2017-01-15

    Post-weaning social isolation (PSI) has been shown to increase aggressive behavior and alter medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) function in social species such as rats. Here we developed a novel escapable social interaction test (ESIT) allowing for the quantification of escape and social behaviors in addition to mPFC activation in response to an aggressive or nonaggressive stimulus rat. Male rats were exposed to 3 weeks of PSI (ISO) or group (GRP) housing, and exposed to 3 trials, with either no trial, all trials, or the last trial only with a stimulus rat. Analysis of social behaviors indicated that ISO rats spent less time in the escape chamber and more time engaged in social interaction, aggressive grooming, and boxing than did GRP rats. Interestingly, during the third trial all rats engaged in more of the quantified social behaviors and spent less time escaping in response to aggressive but not nonaggressive stimulus rats. Rats exposed to nonaggressive stimulus rats on the third trial had greater c-fos and ARC immunoreactivity in the mPFC than those exposed to an aggressive stimulus rat. Conversely, a social encounter produced an increase in large PSD-95 punctae in the mPFC independently of trial number, but only in ISO rats exposed to an aggressive stimulus rat. The results presented here demonstrate that PSI increases interaction time and aggressive behaviors during escapable social interaction, and that the aggressiveness of the stimulus rat in a social encounter is an important component of behavioral and neural outcomes for both isolation and group-reared rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular characterization of Danish Cryptosporidium parvum isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.; Ahrens, Peter; Juel, Cynthia Dawn

    2002-01-01

    was characterized as C. meleagridis. The porcine Cryptosporidium isolates (N = 4) revealed a pattern which was genetically distinct from human and bovine isolates. Cryptosporidium in a hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus L.) was identified for the first time. By microsatellite sequencing the hedgehog isolate showed...

  1. CERN welcomes European science

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On 3 and 4 October CERN will host a special workshop for Marie Curie fellows. This programme is a key plank in the EU's strategy for creating a European research area.     With thousands of scientists from all over the continent working together, CERN is already an exemplary European science showcase. On 3 and 4 October, the Laboratory will contribute further to unifying all European science by hosting a special workshop for EU-funded Marie Curie fellows. This scheme gives young researchers from around the continent the mobility to go to wherever Europe's best facilities in their chosen field happen to be. The event that will take place at CERN, entitled 'Special workshop of Marie Curie Fellows on research and training in physics and technology', organised together with the European Commission, is a continuation of a series of workshops with the aim, among others, of promoting young researchers, supporting their training and mobility, and facilitating the interdisciplinary dissemination of knowledge. Dur...

  2. European Economic Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, James A.

    1971-01-01

    Recounts the history and problems of European Economic Integration from the first post World War II organization, the OEEC, to the EEC (Common Market) and the EFTA. Suggestions for further reading are included. (JB)

  3. European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  4. The European University Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraio, Cinzia; Bonaccorsi, Andrea; Geuna, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a new and systematic characterization of 488 universities, from 11 European countries: Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and UK. Using micro indicators built on the integrated Aquameth database, we characterize the Euro...

  5. European mobility cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Nielsen, Thomas A. Sick

    2016-01-01

    More targeted European policies promoting green travel patterns require better knowledge on differing mobility cultures across European regions. As a basis for this, we clustered the EU population into eight mobility styles based on Eurobarometer data. The mobility styles - including, for example......-economic resources. In a second step, the 28 EU member countries were clustered into six country clusters based on their representation of mobility styles. The country clusters indicate the existence of considerably different mobility cultures across the EU. Sub-regions can be identified that have highly different...... positions on the path towards sustainable mobility and therefore different requirements towards European platforms and support measures, e.g. for 'Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans'. The country clusters can provide a starting point for future communication and targeting of European efforts in sustainable...

  6. European Cyber Security Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Bendiek, Annegret

    2012-01-01

    The gradually developing European cyber security policy tries to establish minimum standards in all EU member states with regard to prevention, resilience and international cooperation. It aims to foster national security without compromising democratic principles or unduly limiting individual liberties. However, it is hard to find a balance between these goals, and the EU’s measures thus inevitably raise questions about the democratic implications of European cyber security policy. Are the i...

  7. Timetabling on European Corridors

    OpenAIRE

    Lischke, Andreas; Führer, B. (Bernhard); Garavagno, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Path Allocation Re-engineering of Timetable Networks for European Railways (PARTNER) project aims to demonstrate a new way of train path allocation and assembly along international corridors towards a faster and more coordinated railway infrastructure capacity management. PARTNER will assist two neighbour infrastructure managers to develop a common understanding of the effects of international train paths. The results of a survey of European infrastructure managers and railway underta...

  8. European Physical Society awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The winners of the 2004 Accelerator Prizes, awarded by the European Physical Society's Interdivisional Group on Accelerators (EPS-IGA), have been announced. Vladmir Shiltsev (Fermilab) and Igor Meshkov (JINR, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna) will be presented with their awards during the 9th European Particle Accelerator Conference, EPAC'04, on 8 July 2004 in Lucerne. Both physicists will also give a talk about their work. More details on: http://epac.web.cern.ch/

  9. European Banking Union

    OpenAIRE

    Breuss, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing Euro crisis and the worse economic development in Europe than in the USA are grounded, not the least in the delayed implementation of reforms of the banking sector. Whereas the leaks in economic governance of EMU have been fixed the banking sector is still not stabilised, even five years after Lehman Brothers. From the grand solution of a "European Banking Union" (EBU) only the first pillar, the European Bank Supervision with the single supervisory mechanism (SSM) will come into e...

  10. European DHC Research Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltshire, Robin; Williams, Jonathan (Building Research Establishment, BRE, Bucknalls Lane, Watford (United Kingdom)); Werner, Sven (Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering, Halmstad (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    Euroheat and Power is now working towards a European Technology Platform for District Heating and Cooling. In response to this important European DHC research initiative, a preliminary detailed list of research issues within 18 dimensions was elaborated and communicated to more than 100 people in February 2008. After additions and comments received, an updated list of research issues was again distributed in July 2008. This paper contains the current list of suggested research issues

  11. Molecular, ultrastructural, and biological characterization of Pennsylvania isolates of Plum pox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, William L; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Gildow, Fred E; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Levy, Laurene E; Mavrodieva, Vessela; Richwine, Nancy; Welliver, Ruth; Luster, Douglas G

    2011-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) was identified in Pennsylvania in 1999. The outbreak was limited to a four-county region in southern Pennsylvania. Initial serological and molecular characterization indicated that the isolates in Pennsylvania belong to the D strain of PPV. The Pennsylvania isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, electron microscopy, host range, and vector transmission to determine how these isolates related to their previously studied European counterparts. Genetically, Pennsylvania (PPV-Penn) isolates were more closely related to each other than to any other PPV-D strains, and isolates from the United States, Canada, and Chile were more closely related to each other than to European isolates. The PPV-Penn isolates exist as two clades, suggesting the possibility of multiple introductions. Electron microscopy analysis of PPV-Penn isolates, including cytopathological studies, indicated that the virions were similar to other Potyvirus spp. PPV-Penn isolates had a herbaceous host range similar to that of European D isolates. There were distinct differences in the transmission efficiencies of the two PPV-Penn isolates using Myzus persicae and Aphis spiraecola as vectors; however, both PPV-Penn isolates were transmitted by M. persicae more efficiently than a European D isolate but less efficiently than a European M isolate.

  12. First detection of Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus and Grapevine rupestris vein feathering virus, and new phylogenetic groups for Grapevine fleck virus and Hop stunt viroid isolates, revealed from grapevine field surveys in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola FIORE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the prevalence of virus and viroid infections was conducted in a grapevine field collection in Valencia, Spain. Samples of autochthonous and traditional grapevine cultivars were collected during November 2011 and tested for the presence of fourteen viruses and five viroids, using RT-PCR. The prevalent viruses were Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV: 49% infected samples and Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 (GLRaV-2: 15% of samples. GLRaV-1, GLRaV-3, GLRaV-4 (variants 4 and 5, Grapevine fanleaf virus, Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV, Grapevine rupestris vein feathering virus (GRVFV and Grapevine virus A were also detected. Hop stunt viroid (HSVd: 92% of plants infected and Grapevine yellow speckle viroid 1 (6% of plants were also detected. Mixed infections with two, and up to six different viruses and/or viroids were common. Only five samples (4% were free from 19 pathogens tested. This is the first report of GLRaV-4 (variants 4 and 5 in the Valencia region of Spain, and the first record of GRSPaV and GRVFV in this country. Phylogenetic analyses performed with the sequences of these viruses showed that the Spanish isolates of GLRaV-4, GFkV and HSVd belong to new phylogenetic groups.

  13. Transformation of a plasmid-free, genital tract isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis with a plasmid vector carrying a deletion in CDS6 revealed that this gene regulates inclusion phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Persson, Kenneth; Bjartling, Carina; Clarke, Ian N

    2013-01-01

    The development of a plasmid-based genetic transformation protocol for Chlamydia trachomatis provides the basis for the detailed investigation of the function of the chlamydial plasmid and its individual genes or coding sequences (CDS). In this study we constructed a plasmid vector with CDS6 deleted (pCDS6KO) from the original Escherichia coli/C. trachomatis shuttle vector pGFP::SW2. pCDS6KO was transformed into a clinical isolate of C. trachomatis from Sweden that is plasmid-free (C. trachomatis SWFP–). Penicillin-resistant transformants expressing the green fluorescent protein were selected. These transformants did not stain with iodine, indicating that this property is regulated by CDS6 or its gene product. In addition, mature inclusions of C. trachomatis SWFP– transformed by pCDS6KO displayed an identical morphological phenotype to the untransformed plasmid-free recipient host. In this phenotype the morphology of inclusions was altered with the chlamydiae lining the periphery of the inclusion leaving a ‘hole’ in the centre. These green fluorescent inclusions appear ‘doughnut-shaped’ with an empty centre when examined under blue light, giving rise to a characteristic ‘black hole’ phenotype. Our study demonstrates the power of the new genetic system for investigating chlamydial gene function using gene deletion technology. PMID:23620154

  14. Habermas on European Constitution and European Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Biró-Kaszás

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For the last two decades or so philosophers have been reflecting on a set of practical and political concerns in connection with the new political structural arrangements beyond the nation-state. In this article two essays by Jürgen Habermas shall be examined. An attempt shall be made to tackle Habermas’ philosophical concepts of personal and collective identity as well as the role that a constitution may play in building the post-national constellation. It has been shown that Habermas has normative answers. Firstly, according to him, the fragile balance between the legal order and the particular cultures and traditions of a community has to be protected by the constitutional state. For that reason the political culture has to be “decoupled” from the majority culture. Secondly, the democratically structured attempt to achieve shared meaning has to find the delicate balance between the context-transcending universal normative claims and the claims of particular individual and collective life. Thirdly, it is possible to expand legally mediated civil solidarity trans-nationally, across Europe – we may recognize this development as the emergence of European identity –, since the process of democratic will-formation of citizens may get loose from the structures provided by the state if both shared democratic political cultures as well as a European-wide public sphere exist. The European Constitution may have a catalytic function in materialization of these conditions. It has been shown that in his deliberations Habermas tried to find a reflective equilibrium between the normative and the empirical.

  15. Partial Characterization of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Isolates from Ticks of Southern Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Oksana O; Dubina, Dmytro O; Vynograd, Nataliya O; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2017-08-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is the most common tick-borne viral infection in Eurasia; thousands of human cases are annually reported from several European countries. Several tick species are vectors of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), while TBE appears to be spreading from the Eurasian continent westward to Europe. Fifteen study sites were chosen from five territories of southern Ukraine, including Odessa, Mykolaiv, Kherson Oblast, the Autonomous Republic of Crimea, and Sevastopol. Tick collection was performed in spring season of three consecutive years (1988-1990) using either flagging technique or direct collection of specimens feeding on cattle. A total of 15,243 tick imagoes and nymphs were collected from nine species, including Dermacentor marginatus, D. reticulatus, Haemaphysalis parva, H. punctata, Hyalomma marginatum, Ixodes ricinus, Rhipicephalus bursa, R. rossicus, and R. sanguineus, pooled in 282 monospecific samples. Supernatant of grinded pool was used for inoculation to suckling mice for virus isolation. Eight TBEV isolates were identified from ticks among six study sites. Ticks showed a minimum infection rate from 0.11% to 0.81%. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein gene of seven isolates, assigned all to the European subtype (TBEV-Eu) showing a maximum identity of 97.17% to the "Pan" TBEV-Eu reference strain. Compared to 104 TBEV-Eu isolates they clustered within the same clade as the Pan reference strain and distinguished from other TBEV-Eu isolates. Amino acid sequence analysis of the South Ukrainian TBEV-Eu isolates revealed the presence of four amino acid substitutions 67 (N), 266 (R), 306 (V), and 407 (R), in the ectodomains II and III and in the stem-anchor region of the E protein gene. This study confirmed TBEV-Eu subtype distribution in the southern region of Ukraine, which eventually overlaps with TBEV-FE (Far Eastern subtype) and TBEV-Sib (Siberian subtype) domains, showing the heterogeneity of TBEV circulating in

  16. A European perspective on e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2004-01-01

    E-learning at Work , edited by Anne Marie Kanstrup. Roskilde Universitetsforlag, pages Pp.15-29. 2004 Short description: Based on a survey of 149 European e-learning and adult vocational training projects, the author presents examples of how ICT facilitates a positive change and development...... that focus is on designing the technical tools rather than on the use of tools for e-learning in general, where ICT is just one integrated element among many: objective, motivation, ways to learning, profession, workplace etc. The rojects also reveal that different European countries move at different paces...... of workplace-related learning. Abstract: Based on a survey of 149 European e-learning and adult vocational training projects, the author presents examples of how ICT facilitates a positive change and development of workplace-related learning.The chapter ends with a suggestion for a historical categorisation...

  17. Y chromosome haplogroup distribution in Indo-European speaking tribes of Gujarat, western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Priyanka; Aggarwal, Aastha; Mitra, Siuli; Italia, Yazdi M; Saraswathy, Kallur N; Chandrasekar, Adimoolam; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out in the Indo-European speaking tribal population groups of Southern Gujarat, India to investigate and reconstruct their paternal population structure and population histories. The role of language, ethnicity and geography in determining the observed pattern of Y haplogroup clustering in the study populations was also examined. A set of 48 bi-allelic markers on the non-recombining region of Y chromosome (NRY) were analysed in 284 males; representing nine Indo-European speaking tribal populations. The genetic structure of the populations revealed that none of these groups was overtly admixed or completely isolated. However, elevated haplogroup diversity and FST value point towards greater diversity and differentiation which suggests the possibility of early demographic expansion of the study groups. The phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 paternal lineages, of which six haplogroups: C5, H1a*, H2, J2, R1a1* and R2 accounted for a major portion of the Y chromosome diversity. The higher frequency of the six haplogroups and the pattern of clustering in the populations indicated overlapping of haplogroups with West and Central Asian populations. Other analyses undertaken on the population affiliations revealed that the Indo-European speaking populations along with the Dravidian speaking groups of southern India have an influence on the tribal groups of Gujarat. The vital role of geography in determining the distribution of Y lineages was also noticed. This implies that although language plays a vital role in determining the distribution of Y lineages, the present day linguistic affiliation of any population in India for reconstructing the demographic history of the country should be considered with caution.

  18. Transnational European Television Drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib; Redvall, Eva Novrup; Helles, Rasmus

    This book deals with the role of television drama in Europe as enabler of transnational, cultural encounters for audiences and the creative community. It demonstrates that the diversity of national cultures is a challenge for European TV drama but also a potential richness and source of creative...... variation. Based on data on the production, distribution and reception of recent TV drama from several European countries, the book presents a new picture of the transnational European television culture. The authors analyse main tendencies in television policy and challenges for national broadcasters...... coming from new global streaming services. Comparing cases of historical, contemporary and crime drama from several countries, this study shows the importance of creative co-production and transnational mediated cultural encounters between national cultures of Europe....

  19. The Europeanization of Eurosceptics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutceac Segesten, Anamaria; Bossetta Jr, Michael Joseph

    with the case of Sweden. Sweden is a good example because it has a high density of internet use, a politically active population as reflected in voter turnout and many politicians and political parties with a web presence. The main research questions of the paper are: Which actors are involved in the Swedish...... of a Europeanized network of anti-European voices for European integration and democracy. We plan to operationalize our research question through the use of webcrawling (i.e. Issue Crawler) and social media analytic softwares (Twitonomy and Bluenod). Using these softwares we will be able to discern whether...... or not non-Swedish Twitter users are participating in and/or affecting the Swedish Eurosceptic dialogue on social media....

  20. European Analytical Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, B.; Grasserbauer, M.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year, we have invited Professor Manfred Grasserbauer of the Vienna University of Technology to present some of the current challenges...... for European analytical chemistry. During the period 2002–07, Professor Grasserbauer was Director of the Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (EC), Ispra, Italy. There is no doubt that many challenges exist at the present time for all of us representing...... a major branch of chemistry, namely analytical chemistry. The global financial crisis is affecting all branches of chemistry, but analytical chemistry, in particular, since our discipline by tradition has many close links to industry. We have already noticed decreased industrial commitment with respect...

  1. European Universe Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P.; Miley, G.; Westra van Holthe, F.; Schrier, W.; Reed, S.

    2011-10-01

    The European Universe Awareness (EU-UNAWE) programme uses the beauty and grandeur of the cosmos to encourage young children, particularly those from underprivileged backgrounds, to develop an interest in science and technology and to foster a sense of global citizenship. EU-UNAWE is already active in 40 countries and comprises a global network of almost 500 astronomers, teachers and other educators. The programme was recently awarded a grant of 1.9 million euros by the European Union so that it can be further developed in five European countries and South Africa. The grant will be used to organise teacher training workshops and to develop educational materials, such as an astronomy news service for children and games. During this presentation we will outline some of the biggest achievements of EU-UNAWE to date and discuss future plans for the programme.

  2. The European Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martinelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available European identity is not only a scientifically interesting question, but also a politically important issue: in fact, sixty years after the signing of the Treaty of Rome, the European Union finds itself for the first time facing risks that threaten its own existence. The European Union is a limited and incomplete project because Europe’s economic integration has not been accompanied by a genuine supranational political union and greater cultural integration. The deficit of democratic representation and cultural integration is due to the fact that the community process is based only on economic rationality and not on a feeling of common belonging. In the current situation in which the Union faces difficult challenges which threaten to undermine the future, it necessary to affirm the policy of interests with a policy of identity. In this essay, we will first concentrate on the concept of identity – that is on the nucleus of values and common institutions –; then we will discuss how the European identity has changed over time (also in relation to national identities and what are the mechanisms that may favour its taking root in the current situation. The European project of political unification needs to be re-emphasized, finding the way to a European collective identity, not contrasted with but alongside the different national identities, referring to loyalty and shared commitment to a whole collection of cultural values: fundamental human rights, civil liberties, democratic political institutions, rule of law, freedom of movement of people, goods and capital, social justice and non-violent resolution of conflicts.

  3. Isolated Intraorbital Frontosphenoidal Synostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermiller, Paul A; Yeom, Kristen W; Menard, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    Unilateral anterior plagiocephaly is most commonly the result of deformational plagiocephaly or unilateral coronal synostosis, a premature fusion of the frontoparietal suture. However, other sutures within the coronal ring have been implicated in producing anterior cranial asymmetries. These fusions can occur in isolation or in concert with adjacent sutures. The frontosphenoidal suture is one such suture within the coronal ring that has been involved both concomitantly with and independently of frontoparietal suture fusion. Although isolated frontosphenoidal synostosis has been presented previously in the literature, these reports include patients with fusion of the extraorbital portion of the frontosphenoidal suture. This clinical report presents the first clearly documented patient of isolated frontosphenoidal synostosis that occurs entirely within the intraorbital region.The patient presented to Plastic Surgery Clinic at 3 months of age with left frontal flattening, supraorbital rim retrusion, and temporal bulging that was noted soon after birth. Computed tomography analysis revealed an isolated fusion of the greater and lesser wings of the sphenoid bone to the frontal bone on the left side. The patient had no family history of cranial anomalies and genetic testing was negative for mutations. The infant was treated with a cranial orthotic for 3 months, underwent open fronto-orbital advancement and cranial vault remodeling at 6 months, and continued wearing a cranial orthotic for another 4.5 months. Following surgical and orthotic treatment, the patient achieved a satisfactory result.

  4. European Gas Dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Antonsen, Iben; Bieber, Martin; Gandrup, Tobias; Lehmann, Tina; Weinberger, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    The focal point of the project is, as it is implied in the title, European gas dependency, to be more specific; the dependency of Russian gas. We chose Russia, because the EU's import of gas is mainly supplied by Russia. We present background information and knowledge to describe why the case is of relevance and that a situation of dependency exists. We solely look at the dependency from the European Union's point of view, taking point of departure in the Green Paper. The Green Paper is a pap...

  5. European Values and Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Theisen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Good Governance, Social Market Economy, Culture and Education are the decisive elements for Human Development. We need a third way between the extremes of the Utopian Global Free Market and a new nationalism. A Social Market Economy and the European Model of a Union could be such third way. For a new Social Market Economy we need a renaissance of the European dialectics between culture and society, idealism and materialism, religion and enlightenment, solidarity and profitability. The balancing of those poles is deeply rooted in our best traditions. 

  6. A European study on the relationship between antimicrobial use and antimicrobial resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronzwaer, SLAM; Cars, O; Buchholz, U; Molstad, S; Goettsch, W; Veldhuijzen, IK; Kool, JL; Sprenger, MJW; Degener, JE

    In Europe, antimicrobial resistance has been monitored since 1998 by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). We examined the relationship between penicillin nonsusceptibility of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and antibiotic sales. Information was collected

  7. Molecular Typing of Turkish Apple Chlorotic Leaf Spot Virus Isolates Based on Partial Coat Protein Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ulubas Serce

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV isolates from various hosts and geographic locations in Turkey were molecularly characterized by RFLP, nucleotide sequence analysis and the construction of a phylogenetic tree including ACLSV isolates from GenBank. Based on nucleotide sequence alignment and the phylogenetic tree, we proposed a classification of ACLSV isolates in which isolates were divided into three major groups. The first group contained mainly Far-Eastern isolates, the second group the Hungarian (eastern-European ACLSV isolates, and the third group, which contained isolates of variable characteristics, was again divided into two subgroups, subgroup I containing mixed European isolates, and subgroup II containing central European isolates. Three representative Turkish ACLSV isolates belonged to the third group; of these, one was from the mixed European cluster (subgroup I and two from the central European cluster (subgroup II. The nucleotide sequence divergence and geographic origin of the ACLSV isolates were correlated, which indicated the possible extraction of the Turkish isolates.

  8. Causality in Europeanization Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Kennet

    2012-01-01

    to develop discursive institutional analytical frameworks and something that comes close to the formulation of hypothesis on the effects of European Union (EU) policies and institutions on domestic change. Even if these efforts so far do not necessarily amount to substantive theories or claims of causality...

  9. Measuring European selves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antalikova, Radka

    Taking the perspective of cross-cultural psychology, the current thesis sets out to investigate self in a European context. For this purpose, the thesis first thoroughly reviews the most prominent conceptualizations of self in cross-cultural psychology, specifically focusing on disentangling...... to the field of cross-cultural psychology, specifically highlighting the utility of autobiographical memories as measures of self....

  10. European Psychology Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANA SCHÖN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID compiled an extensive list of European psycho-logical organizations, comprised of university departments, research institutions, professional associa-tions and publishing houses. The list is available on the ZPID website, together with a web mapping applet that indicates the exact geographical location of the organizations.

  11. European Pine Shoot Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    William E. Miller; Arthur R. Hastings; John F. Wootten

    1961-01-01

    In the United States, the European pine shoot moth has caused much damage in young, plantations of red pine. It has been responsible for reduced planting of red pine in many areas. Although attacked trees rarely if ever die, their growth is inhibited and many are, deformed. Scotch pine and Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arnold) are usually not so badly damaged. Swiss...

  12. Inequalities in European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musterd, S.; Ostendorf, W.; Smith, S.J.; Elsinga, M.; Eng, O.S.; Fox O’Mahony, L.; Wachter, S.

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of inequalities in European cities are a big fear for many governments at the state and urban levels. Journalists, as well as many scholars who are dealing with urban issues, express their fears about the development of social, ethnic, and spatial divisions. Population categories

  13. European 'Stabilisation through Association'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen

    ’s success in repeatedly reconciling a divided continent and complemented its efforts to build peace beyond its borders. But does the EU (continue to) deserve such praise? This contribution examines European peacebuilding from the early inte-gration of post-World War Two economies, through the uniting...

  14. European Integration and Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bobica

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available According to many, the term globalization is able to explain any phenomenon whatsoever, be it positive or negative, that takes place within the global social system. It seems like a sort of magical formula, which is to be found in the speeches of all sorts of people, be they economists, politicians, businessmen or sociologists. However this magical formula of globalization has its limitations, since it encompasses a certain amount of quibbling, beyond which not many can pass. In the context of globalization there appears the question on its role in the process of European integration. Is European integration a part of this global process or, quite on the contrary, does it present certain distinctive features, as it moulds itself differently from the globalization phenomenon? A clear-cut answer seems difficult because of the various aspects involved. Not only the general phenomenon of globalization, but also the economic integration on European level is based on the liberalization of markets and on the opening of national economies towards the exterior,having as direct consequence the intensification of trade exchanges. If from a global point of view one may talk of a market fundamentalism in that the market principles know no boundary, European integration on the other hand implies not only market economy, but also a guided and monitored action of Member Statesaccording to the needs of the whole entity, also taking into consideration - as far as possible – all aspects and consequences on social level.

  15. Becoming Pan-European?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz-Forberg, Hagen; Brüggemann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    be platforms of a transnational European discourse. Four ideal-types of transnational media can be distinguished: (1) national media with a transnational mission, (2) international media, (3) pan-regional media and (4) global media. Within this framework the article analyses transnational media in Europe...

  16. European Metals Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Vereecken, Jean

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the papers that will be presented at 'EMC '91 '-the European Metals Conference-to be held in Brussels, Belgium, from 15 to 20 September 1991, and organized by Benelux Metallurgie, GDMB (Gesellschaft Deutscher Metallhutten­ und Bergleute) and IMM (the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy). 'EMC '91' is the first of an intended major series organized at the European level with the aim of bringing together all those who are involved with the extraction and processing of non-ferrous metals-European metallurgists and their international colleagues-to provide them with the opportunity to exchange views on the state and evolution of their industry. The programme covers all the different aspects of the metallurgy of non-ferrous metals from mining to fabricated products. Particular attention is being paid to the European non -ferrous industry with respect to changes in demand, the technology used, pressures on the environment and the competitive position of manufacturers. The contributions of the...

  17. AND THE EUROPEAN UNION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regulations governing the production and use of genetically modified organisms have been developed in the United Kingdom since 1976. Regulations covering the release of transgenic organisms into the environment were initially voluntary. Since 1990, the European Economic Commission (EEC) Directive. 90/219 and ...

  18. European Music Year 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  19. Molecular typing of monophasic Salmonella 4,[5]:i:- strains isolated in Belgium (2008-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Cécile; Bertrand, Sophie; Mattheus, Wesley; Dierick, Katelijne; Wattiau, Pierre

    2014-01-31

    To assess the distribution of Salmonella 4,[5]:i:- subtypes in the Belgian food chain and compare it to the subtypes associated with human infections, a molecular assessment was initiated. Two hundred fifty-three Salmonella isolates serotyped as 4,[5]:i:- during the period 2008-2011 in Belgium and originating from animal productions, food or human clinical samples were analysed by a specific duplex PCR. One hundred ninety-four isolates (76.7%) fit the profile of a S. Typhimurium monophasic variant as defined by the European Food Safety Authority. The other isolates possessed but did not express the phase II flagellin gene (23.3%). Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) revealed many but closely related profiles in the fljB-negative S. Typhimurium monophasic variant isolates. Some MLVA types were associated with both human and animal isolates but no unique source of human contamination could be demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum, P. citricola I, and P. plurivora from European Beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola cause bleeding cankers on European beech trees in the northeastern United States. Inoculation experiments were conducted to compare the aggressiveness of P. cactorum and P. citricola isolates on stems, leaf disks, and roots of European beech and common lilac s...

  1. The Europeanness of European cinema: Identity, meaning, globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, Gertjan

    2015-01-01

    According to its editors, the aim of The Europeanness of European cinema is ‘to revisit the issue of the significance of European cinema as a category in the wake of the recent acceleration in transnational filmmaking and globalization as a whole’ (p. 7). Taking the transnational prominence of European cinema as a starting point, the anthology’s introduction presents some brief reflections about what ‘Europeanness’ – the central, overarching concept for the various chapters – has meant histor...

  2. Nonpathogenic Isolates of the Citrus Black Spot Fungus, Guignardia citricarpa, Identified as a Cosmopolitan Endophyte of Woody Plants, G. mangiferae (Phyllosticta capitalensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baayen, R P; Bonants, P J M; Verkley, G; Carroll, G C; van der Aa, H A; de Weerdt, M; van Brouwershaven, I R; Schutte, G C; Maccheroni, W; de Blanco, C Glienke; Azevedo, J L

    2002-05-01

    ABSTRACT The population structure of Guignardia citricarpa sensu lato (anamorph: Phyllosticta citricarpa), a fungus of which strains pathogenic to citrus are subject to phytosanitary legislation in the European Union and the United States, was investigated. Internal transcribed spacer sequences revealed two phylogenetically distinct groups in G. citricarpa. This distinction was supported by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis that also supported the exclusion of two isolates that had apparently been misclassified as G. citricarpa. On cherry decoction agar, but not on other media, growth rates of group I isolates were lower than those of group II isolates. Conidial dimensions were similar, but group I isolates formed conidia with barely visible mucoid sheaths, whereas those of group II formed conidia with thick sheaths. Cultures of isolates belonging to group I produced rare infertile perithecia, whereas fertile perithecia were formed by most isolates of group II. Colonies of isolates belonging to group I were less dark than those of group II, with a wider translucent outer zone and a lobate rather than entire margin. On oatmeal agar, exclusively group I isolates formed a yellow pigment. Group I harbored strains from citrus fruits with classical black spot lesions (1 to 10 mm in diameter) usually containing pycnidia. Group II harbored endophytic strains from a wide range of host species, as well as strains from symptomless citrus fruits or fruits with minute spots (citrus black spot, justifying its exclusion from quarantine measures.

  3. Working towards a European Geological Data Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Rob; Hughes, Richard; Pedersen, Mikael; Serrano, Jean-Jacques; Lee, Kathryn A.; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Robida, François

    2013-04-01

    The increasing importance of geological information for policy, regulation and business needs at European and international level has been recognized by the European Parliament and the European Commission, who have called for the development of a common European geological knowledge base. The societal relevance of geoscience data/information is clear from many current issues such as shale gas exploration (including environmental impacts), the availability of critical mineral resources in a global economy, management and security with regard to geohazards (seismic, droughts, floods, ground stability), quality of (ground-)water and soil and societal responses to the impacts of climate change. The EGDI-Scope project responds to this, aiming to prepare an implementation plan for a pan-European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI), under the umbrella of the FP7 e- Infrastructures program. It is envisaged that the EGDI will build on geological datasets and models currently held by the European Geological Surveys at national and regional levels, and will also provide a platform for datasets generated by the large number of relevant past, ongoing and future European projects which have geological components. With European policy makers and decision makers from (international) industry as the main target groups (followed by research communities and the general public) stakeholder involvement is imperative to the successful realization and continuity of the EGDI. With these ambitions in mind, the presentation will focus on the following issues, also based on the first results and experiences of the EGDI-Scope project that started mid-2012: • The organization of stakeholder input and commitment connected to relevant 'use cases' within different thematic domains; a number of stakeholder representatives is currently involved, but the project is open to more extensive participation; • A large number of European projects relevant for data delivery to EGDI has been reviewed

  4. European core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandrini, G.; Binder, H.; Homberg, V.; Saltuari, L.; Tarkka, I.; Smania, N.; Corradini, C.; Giustini, A.; Katterer, C.; Picari, L.; Diserens, K.; Koenig, E.; Geurts, A.C.; Anghelescu, A.; Opara, J.; Tonin, P.; Kwakkel, G.; Golyk, V.; Onose, G.; Perennou, D.; Picelli, A.

    2017-01-01

    To date, medical education lacks Europe-wide standards on neurorehabilitation. To address this, the European Federation of NeuroRehabilitation Societies (EFNR) here proposes a postgraduate neurorehabilitation training scheme. In particular, the European medical core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

  5. European and Integration Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kaveshnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soviet scientific school of pan-European integration studies began to emerge in the 1960s at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations (Russian Academy of Science. Among the leading scientists who have developed methodological approaches of Soviet integration studies were M.M. Maximova, Y.A. Borko, Y. Shishkov, L.I. Capercaillie. Later, a new center for integration studies became the Institute of Europe, created in 1987. It was led by such renowned scientists as Academicians V.V. Zhurkin and N.P. Shmelev. In the 1980s the subject of the integration process in Europe attracted attention of experts from MGIMO. An important role in the development of school of integration research in the USSR was played by a MGIMO professor, head of the chair of history of international relations and foreign policy of the USSR V.B. Knyazhinskiy. His work contributed to the deliverance of the national scientific community from skepticism about the prospects for European integration. Ideas of V.B. Knyazhinsky are developed today in MGIMO by his followers A.V. Mal'gin and T.V. Ur'eva. In the mid-1990s, having retired from diplomatic service, professor Yu. Matveevskiy started to work at MGIMO. With a considerable practical experience in the field, he produced a series of monographs on the history of European integration. In his works, he analyses the development of integration processes in Western Europe from their inception to the present day, showing the gradual maturation of the necessary spiritual and material prerequisites for the start of integration and traces the various stages of the "integration". In the late 1990s, the growing demand from the domestic business and government for professionals who are capable of interacting with the European Union, has produced the necessary supply in the form of educational programs based on accumulated scientific knowledge. Setting up a discipline "European Integration" was a major step in the development

  6. Multidisciplinary investigation of a multicountry outbreak of Salmonella Stanley infections associated with turkey meat in the European Union, August 2011 to January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinross, P; van Alphen, L; Martinez Urtaza, J; Struelens, M; Takkinen, J; Coulombier, D; Makela, P; Bertrand, S; Mattheus, W; Schmid, D; Kanitz, E; Rucker, V; Krisztalovics, K; Paszti, J; Szogyenyi, Z; Lancz, Z; Rabsch, W; Pfefferkorn, B; Hiller, P; Mooijman, K; Gossner, C

    2014-05-15

    Between August 2011 and January 2013, an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley (S. Stanley) infections affected 10 European Union (EU) countries, with a total of 710 cases recorded. Following an urgent inquiry in the Epidemic Intelligence Information System for food- and waterborne diseases (EPIS-FWD) on 29 June 2012, an international investigation was initiated including EU and national agencies for public health, veterinary health and food safety. Two of three local outbreak investigations undertaken by affected countries in 2012 identified turkey meat as a vehicle of infection. Furthermore, routine EU monitoring of animal sources showed that over 95% (n=298) of the 311 S. Stanley isolates reported from animal sampling in 2011 originated from the turkey food production chain. In 2004–10, none had this origin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile analysis of outbreak isolates and historical S. Stanley human isolates revealed that the outbreak isolates had a novel PFGE profile that emerged in Europe in 2011. An indistinguishable PFGE profile was identified in 346 of 464 human, food, feed, environmental and animal isolates from 16 EU countries: 102 of 112 non-human isolates tested were from the turkey production chain. On the basis of epidemiological and microbiological evidence, turkey meat was considered the primary source of human infection, following contamination early in the animal production chain.

  7. The Shoah within European identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the Epilogue of Postwar, titled: From the House ofthe Dead: An essay on Modern European memory, Tony Judt concludes that: ‘those who would become full Europeans in the dawn of the twenty-first century must first assume a new and far more oppressive heritage. Today the pertinent European reference

  8. Future European biogas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, A. K.P.; Ehimen, E. A.; Holm-Nielsen, J. B.

    2017-01-01

    Biogas is expected to play an important role in reaching the future energy policy targets of the European Union (EU). The sustainability of biogas substrates has however been recently critically discussed due to the increasing shares of agricultural land used for energy crop production.The aim...... were animal manure, straw by-products from cereal production, and excess grass from rotational and permanent grasslands and meadows. The biogas energy potential from the investigated biomass was projected to range from 1.2·103 to 2.3·103 PJ y-1 in year 2030 in the EU28, depending on the biomass...... availability. Alone the biogas energy potential projected in the scenario representing low substrate availability corresponds to a doubling of the European biogas production in 2015. The results shows that sustainable alternatives to the use of maize are present in all the member states of the EU28...

  9. European Patterns of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas Fehmerling; Ejrnæs, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Social Survey (ESS) Round 4 (2008), the article finds that satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the government is an important predictor alongside the institutional macro-level variable. The article combines a critical tradition, which suggests that political participation is motivated by a feeling...... of dissatisfaction with the government and feelings of being member of a discriminated group affect the level of extra-parliamentary participation, and second, how different welfare regimes condition the extend to which these groups chose to act. In a comparative multilevel design, using data from the European...... of dissatisfaction with an institutional perspective in which certain institutional conditions are seen as enablers for citizens to actively participate in political life. Our results show that the overall level of extra-parliamentary activity in the Scandinavian countries is higher than in the other European...

  10. Do Europeans Like Nudges?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisch, Lucia A.; Sunstein, Cass R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many governments have shown a keen interest in “nudges” — approaches to law and policy that maintain freedom of choice, but that steer people in certain directions. Yet to date, there has been little evidence on whether citizens of various societies support nudges and nudging. We...... report the results of nationally representative surveys in six European nations: Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and the United Kingdom. We find strong majority support for nudges of the sort that have been adopted, or under serious consideration, in democratic nations. Despite the general...... European consensus, we find markedly lower levels of support for nudges in two nations: Hungary and Denmark. We are not, in general, able to connect support for nudges with distinct party affiliations....

  11. Stature of early Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanussen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The ancestors of modern Europeans arrived in Europe at least 40,000 years before present. Pre-glacial maximum Upper Palaeolithic males (before 16,000 BC) were tall and slim (mean height 179 cm, estimated average body weight 67 kg), while the females were comparably small and robust (mean height 158 cm, estimated average body weight 54 kg). Late Upper Palaeolithic males (8000-6600 BC) were of medium stature and robusticity (mean height 166 cm, estimated average body weight 62 kg). Stature further decreased to below 165 cm with estimated average body weight of 64 kg in Neolithic males of the Linear Band Pottery Culture, and to 150 cm with estimated average body weight of 49 kg in Neolithic females. The body stature of European males remained within the range of 165 to 170 cm up to the end of the 19th century.

  12. European Corporate Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Teichmann, Christoph

    This fully updated new edition provides the best-known practical overview of the law regarding companies, business activities, and capital markets in Europe, at both the European Union (EU) and Member State levels. It incorporates analysis of recent developments including the impact of global......; - a company’s freedom to incorporate in a jurisdiction not its own; - competition among the legal forms of different Member States; and - safeguarding of employee involvement in cross-border transactions. With respect to national law, the laws of Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain...... initiatives in such aspects of the corporate environment as regulation of financial institutions and non-financial reporting obligations with a view to sustainability and other social responsibility concerns. The authors, all leading experts in European corporate law, describe current and emerging trends...

  13. The Eurovision Song Contest, Preferences and European Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari; Tingvall, Patrik Gustavsson

    Already Beckerman (1956) and Linder (1961) suggested that international trade is not determined by supply side factors alone - perceptions about foreign countries and country preferences matter. We explore the relation between exports, cultural distance, income differences and country preferences...... as revealed by voting in the European Song Contest. We conclude that preferences influence trade through several channels, and that results of the European Song Contest are a robust predictor of bilateral trade....

  14. The Eurovision Song Contest, Preferences and European Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Kokko, Ari; Gustavsson Tingvall, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Already Beckerman (1956) and Linder (1961) suggested that international trade is not determined by supply side factors alone – perceptions about foreign countries and country preferences matter. We explore the relation between exports, cultural distance, income differences and country preferences as revealed by voting in the European Song Contest. We conclude that preferences influence trade through several channels, and that results of the European Song Contest are a robust predictor of bila...

  15. Isolated tricuspid valve infective endocarditis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-07

    Jul 7, 1990 ... Case 2. Initial chest radiograph showing rounded shadows with cavitation. Fig. 2. Case 2. Chest radiograph showing progression to effusion. nuc/eacum was Isolated from repeated blood cultures. Two- dimensional echocardiography revealed vegetations on the tricuspid valve (Fig. 3). The patient was now ...

  16. Providencia stuartii Isolates from Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikonomou, Olga; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Phee, Lynette M.; Betts, Jonathan; Mevius, Dik; Wareham, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Providencia stuartii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. We describe an outbreak due to a multidrug-resistant strain over a 4-month period in a critical care unit in Athens. Molecular typing revealed each of the isolates to be clonally related with coresistance to cephalosporins,

  17. European Automotive Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Clenci, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The volume includes selected and reviewed papers from the European Automotive Congress held in Bucharest, Romania, in November 2015. Authors are experts from research, industry and universities coming from 14 countries worldwide. The papers are covering the latest developments in fuel economy and environment, automotive safety and comfort, automotive reliability and maintenance, new materials and technologies, traffic and road transport systems, advanced engineering methods and tools, as well as advanced powertrains and hybrid and electric drives.

  18. Geography of European Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitin Dmitry V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the role of international migration has increased dramatically in most European countries. The growth in migration has made some authors proclaim the beginning of a second Migration Period that could transform the social and cultural identity of Europe. The article presents an analysis of international migration geography in Europe in the last twenty-five years. The authors identify the main trends in migration, provide migration profiles of European countries, and propose a classification based on the recent changes in the migrant stock. Changes in the migrant stock (total emigration and immigration reflect the level of involvement in international and global processes. They can serve as an indicator of a country’s attractiveness for both foreigners and the country’s citizens. The study shows that European countries are increasingly split into ‘immigrant’ and ‘emigrant’ states. The authors describe spatial patterns of migration. The volume and localisation of migration flows in Europe are affected not only by cultural and historical circumstance, such as a colonial past or a common language. The scale of immigrant influx often does not depend on a donor country’s demographic potential or the level of its socio-economic development. The links between the place of origin and destination are often more complex than it might initially seem. The authors stress the importance of a differentiated immigration policy taking into account ethnic and cultural features of host societies.

  19. From Bologna to Berlin 1999-2003: The Initial Steps of the Bologna Process and Creation of the European Higher Education Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Timothy Scott

    2011-01-01

    The processes of European integration and the forming of the European Union begun at the end of World War II did not include education as part of that agenda. As revealed in a review of the literature, education came into the process through indirect means. The processes of European integration and the forming of the European Union have fostered…

  20. European Law in the Making:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten

    the legal service of the High Authority from early on promoted a ‘constitutional’ interpretation of European law, but where the member state, as well as most legal experts, still considered European law a subset of international law. How did the Court of Justice of the ECSC manoeuvre between...... on European law in the making.......Traditionally, the Court of Justice of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) has mainly been considered the somewhat dull predecessor to the more famous Court of Justice of the European Communities, which in 1963-64 ‘constitutionalised’ the Treaties of Rome with the seminal judgments of Van...

  1. Eastern Dimension of the European Neighbourhood Policy: Europeanization Mutual Trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Latkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the Europeanization policy of the European Union towards the Eastern Partnership participant countries. Suffering from the lack of clear strategy and ultimate goal in the European Neighbourhood Policy the European Union enhances external democratization and its governance in post soviet states without immediate Union's membership perspective. Underestimation of common neighbourhood geopolitical duality in the context of growing rivalry between European (EU and Eurasian (Custom Union/Eurasian Economic Union integration gravitation centers presents the Eastern partners of the EU with a fierce dilemma of externally forced immediate geopolitical and civilizational choice while not all of them are well prepared to such a choice. The mutual Europeanization trap here to be studied both for the EU and its Eastern partners (involving Russia is a deficiency of regulating cooperation mechanism in the situation of European and Eurasian free trades zones overlapping. Vilnius Summit 2013 results test the "European aspirations" of the New Independent States and upset the ongoing process of the European Neighbourhood Policy in the context of growing economic interdependence in Wider Europe. Besides, the Ukrainian crisis escalation during 2014 as a new seat of tension provokes unbalance of the whole European security system and creates new dividing lines in Europe from Vancouver to Vladivostok.

  2. Isolation and identification of Archanobacterium pyogenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biochemical tests of the 48 isolated bacterial strains revealed that all the strains were beta-hemolytic on blood agar, hydrolyzed gelatin and starch were unable to hydrolyze esculin or reduce nitrate and did not produce urease which was typical characteristics of A. pyogene. Identification of the isolated strains was further ...

  3. Trichobilharzia anseri n. sp. (Schistosomatidae: Digenea), a new visceral species of avian schistosomes isolated from greylag goose (Anser anser L.) in Iceland and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouet, D; Kolářová, L; Patrelle, C; Ferté, H; Skírnisson, K

    2015-08-01

    Parasitological investigations carried out on birds in Iceland and France highlight the presence of four species of avian schistosomes from greylag geese (Anser anser L.): the european nasal species Trichobilharzia regenti and three visceral species, among which an unknown species isolated from blood vessels of the large intestine and liver. Morphological and molecular analyzes of different parasite stages (eggs, adults) revealed new species of Trichobilharzia genus – Trichobilharzia anseri sp. nov. Studies on host-parasite relationship under natural conditions, showed that the life-cycle includes the snail Radix balthica (syn. R. peregra) as intermediate host. The cercariae, already isolated in Iceland from two ponds of the Reykjavik capital area – the Family park and Tjörnin Lake – are the same as those isolated in 1999 by Kolářová et al. during the first study on Icelandic parasitic agents of cercarial dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Extraction, isolation, and characterization of globulin proteins from Lupinus albus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Pedro; Canela, Nuria; Katakis, Ioanis; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2011-03-23

    Lupin has recently been added to the list of allergens requiring mandatory advisory labeling on foodstuffs sold in the European Union, and since December 2008, all products containing even trace amounts of lupin must be labeled correctly. Lupin globulins consist of two major globulins called α-conglutin (11S and "legumin-like") and β-conglutin (7S and "vicilin-like") and another additional two globulins, γ-conglutin and δ-conglutin, which are present in lower amounts. We report on a methodology to facilitate the extraction of each of these proteins using centrifugation and isolation by anion-exchange chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. The isolated subunits were characterized using reducing and non-reducing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blotting, and peptide mass fingerprinting, all of which revealed that the individual protein subunits are highly pure and can be used as immunogens for the production of antibodies specific for each of the conglutin fractions, as well as standards, and the extraction protocol can be used for the selective extraction of each of the subunits from foodstuffs, thus facilitating a highly accurate determination of the lupin concentration. Furthermore, the subunits can be used to elucidate information regarding the toxicity of each of the subunits, by looking at their interaction with the IgE antibodies found in the serum of individuals allergic to lupin, providing critical information for the definition of the requirements of analytical assays for the detection of lupin in foodstuffs.

  5. The European populist challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Stavrakakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s Europe, the word ‘populism’ usually refers to right-wing populism or the populist extreme right. Is, however, the concept of ‘populism’ the proper theoreticopolitical instrument through which such identifications should be perceived, categorized and debated? What are the implications (direct and indirect of such a naming? And what are the risks for critical analysis and for democratic politics in the European context? The hypothesis explored in this essay is that sticking to a restrictive association between ‘populism’ and the extreme right poses certain dangers that have to be seriously taken into account, especially in times of crisis. For a start, it is often premised on a rather simplistic euro-centrism that reduces the broad conceptual spectrum covered by the category ‘populism’ in its global use to a very particular European experience and then essentializes the resulting association, over-extending its scope. In addition, the category ‘populism’ is aften used to describe political forces, identities and discourses in which the role of ‘the people’ is only secondary or peripheral, to the extent that it has to coincide with strongly hierarchical and elitist visions of society. What complicates things even further is that, within the context of the European (economic and political crisis, whoever questions/ resists the austerity agenda – especially on the left – is increasingly discredited and denounced as an irresponsible populist. Indeed, it is not by coincidence that doubts are increasingly voiced both in the theoretical and in the political literature regarding the rationale behind such a strong association between populism and the extreme right. A series of points will thus be raised that may help us develop a plausible theoretico-political strategy in the new emerging conditions from a discursive perspective.*

  6. Dynamics of introduced populations of Phragmidium violaceum and implications for biological control of European blackberry in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, D R; Evans, K J; Baker, J; Harvey, P R; Scott, E S

    2008-09-01

    Phragmidium violaceum causes leaf rust on the European blackberry (Rubus fruticosus L. aggregate). Multiple strains of this pathogen have been introduced into southern Australia for the biological control of at least 15 taxa of European blackberry, a nonindigenous, invasive plant. In climates conducive to leaf rust, the intensity of disease varies within and among infestations of the genetically variable host. Genetic markers developed from the selective amplification of microsatellite polymorphic loci were used to assess the population genetic structure and reproductive biology of P. violaceum within and among four geographically isolated and diseased infestations of the European blackberry in Victoria, Australia. Despite the potential for long-distance aerial dispersal of urediniospores, there was significant genetic differentiation among all populations, which was not associated with geographic separation. An assessment of multilocus linkage disequilibrium revealed temporal and geographic variation in the occurrence of random mating among the four populations. The presence of sexual spore states and the results of genetic analyses indicated that recombination, and potentially random migration and genetic drift, played an important role in maintaining genotypic variation within populations. Recombination and genetic differentiation in P. violaceum, as well as the potential for metapopulation structure, suggest the need to release additional, genetically diverse strains of the biocontrol agent at numerous sites across the distribution of the Australian blackberry infestation for maximum establishment and persistence.

  7. Dynamics of Introduced Populations of Phragmidium violaceum and Implications for Biological Control of European Blackberry in Australia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, D. R.; Evans, K. J.; Baker, J.; Harvey, P. R.; Scott, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    Phragmidium violaceum causes leaf rust on the European blackberry (Rubus fruticosus L. aggregate). Multiple strains of this pathogen have been introduced into southern Australia for the biological control of at least 15 taxa of European blackberry, a nonindigenous, invasive plant. In climates conducive to leaf rust, the intensity of disease varies within and among infestations of the genetically variable host. Genetic markers developed from the selective amplification of microsatellite polymorphic loci were used to assess the population genetic structure and reproductive biology of P. violaceum within and among four geographically isolated and diseased infestations of the European blackberry in Victoria, Australia. Despite the potential for long-distance aerial dispersal of urediniospores, there was significant genetic differentiation among all populations, which was not associated with geographic separation. An assessment of multilocus linkage disequilibrium revealed temporal and geographic variation in the occurrence of random mating among the four populations. The presence of sexual spore states and the results of genetic analyses indicated that recombination, and potentially random migration and genetic drift, played an important role in maintaining genotypic variation within populations. Recombination and genetic differentiation in P. violaceum, as well as the potential for metapopulation structure, suggest the need to release additional, genetically diverse strains of the biocontrol agent at numerous sites across the distribution of the Australian blackberry infestation for maximum establishment and persistence. PMID:18641150

  8. mcr-1 is borne by highly diverse Escherichia coli isolates since 2004 in food-producing animals in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Garch, F; Sauget, M; Hocquet, D; LeChaudee, D; Woehrle, F; Bertrand, X

    2017-01-01

    In November 2015, a plasmid-mediated colistin resistance, MCR-1, was described in animals, food and humans in China, and it was considered as a potential emerging threat to public health. Therefore, we screened for the mcr-1 gene a European collection of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli (n=218) and Salmonella spp. (n=74) isolated from diseased food-producing animals between 2004 and 2014 and characterized the mcr-1-positive clones. Screening for mcr-1 gene was performed by PCR on isolates for which inhibition diameter was coli isolates were then characterized by phylogrouping, multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion testing or by broth microdilution. Among the collection, 42 E. coli and three Salmonella spp. were positive for mcr-1, with continuous detection since 2004 mainly from bovine and swine digestive infections. Most of the mcr-1-positive strains were resistant to amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole but remained susceptible to cephalosporins, carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam. All but one isolate were resistant to colistin, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of >2 mg/L. Most of the mcr-1-positive E. coli belonged to the phylogroup A with two prevalent clonal complexes, CC10 and CC165, in which sequence type 10 and sequence type 100 were overrepresented and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing revealed a high diversity of pulsotypes. MCR-1 was detected yearly in European food-producing animal since 2004 with a high diversity of pulsotypes supporting the dissemination of mcr-1 via plasmids. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from Great Nicobar Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, R; Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Birah, Ajanta; Thimmegowda, Geetha G

    2013-06-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soil samples of Great Nicobar Islands, one of the "hottest biodiversity hotspots," where no collection has been characterized previously. The 36 new Bt isolates were obtained from 153 samples analyzed by crystal protein production with light/phase-contrast microscopy, determination of cry gene profile by SDS-PAGE, evaluation of toxicity against Coleopteran, and Lepidopteran insect pests, finally cloning and sequencing. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of 66-35 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed >130, 130, 73, and 18 kDa bands. The variations in crystal morphology and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the isolates of Bt revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Based on the toxicity test, 50 % of isolates were toxic to Ash weevils, 16 % isolates were toxic to cotton bollworm, 38 % isolates were toxic both to ash weevil as well as cotton bollworm, while 11 % of the isolates did not exhibit any toxicity. PCR analysis unveiled prepotency of cry1B- and cry8b-like genes in these isolates. This study appoints the first isolation and characterization of local B. thuringiensis isolates in Great Nicobar Islands. Some of these isolates display toxic potential and, therefore, could be adopted for future applications to control some agriculturally important insect pests in the area of integrated pest management for sustainable agriculture.

  10. European Network Against Racism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Pristed

    of discussions about intersectionality, the article investigates ENAR´s attention and ability to integrate questions of e.g. gender, sexuality or age in their policy input, given the potentially rigid compartmentalisation of discrimination strands within the European Commission´s system of civil society...... consultations. The article therefore overall aims to assess ENAR´s position as potentially hemmed in between 1) the Commission vs. member organisations’ expectations for its focus and modus operandi and 2) attention to intersectional discrimination vs. potential compartmentalisation within the Commission...

  11. Cooperative strategies European perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Killing, J Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cooperative Strategies: European Perspectives is one of three geographically targeted volumes in which the contributors present the most current research on topics such as advances in theories of cooperative strategies, the formation of cooperative alliances, the dynamics of partner relationships, and the role of information and knowledge in cooperative alliances. Blending conceptual insights with empirical analyses, the contributors highlight commonalities and differences across national, cultural, and trade zones. The chapters in this volume are anchored in a wide set of theoretical approaches, conceptual frameworks, and models, illustrating how rich the area of cooperative strategies is for scholarly inquiry.

  12. European Regional Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Brian Canizaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, beginning with the publication in 2003 of Liane Lefaivre and Alexander Tzonis’ 'Critical Regionalism', followed by my 'Architectural Regionalism: Collected Writings on Place, Identity, Modernity and Tradition 'in 2007, there has been a quiet resurgence in the discourse of architectural regionalism.' 'Leuven University Press’s 'Regionalism and Modernity: Architecture in Western Europe 1914–1940 'continues in this direction, with eleven chapters devoted to variations of the regionalist tendency in European architecture focused primarily on Belgium and France, but also Great Britain, Italy, and Germany.