WorldWideScience

Sample records for european gas sector

  1. Liberalization of the European gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwark, B.; Finger, M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural gas is the fastest growing fossil fuel worldwide, and by 2030, natural gas will replace coal as the second largest fuel, after oil. In particular, the growing use of natural gas in electricity generation rises the demand and changes the image of gas as substitute for light oil for heating. Due to its complete supply dependency, Switzerland will be affected by the European gas market developments. A new market organization, which requires legal and entrepreneurial decisions in Switzerland, emerges from the liberalization process of the energy markets in the European Union. (author)

  2. Natural gas demand in the European household sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Asche, Frank; Tveteras, Ragnar

    2005-08-01

    This paper analyzes the residential natural gas demand per capita in 12 European countries using a dynamic log linear demand model, which allows for country-specific elasticity estimates in the short- and long-run. The explanatory variables included lagged demand per capita, heating degree days index, real prices of natural gas, light fuel oil, electricity, and real private income per capita. The short-run own-price and income elasticity tend to be very inelastic, but with greater long-run responsiveness. By splitting the data set in two time periods, an increase in the own-price elasticities were detected for the European residential natural gas demand market as a whole. We have provided support for employing a heterogeneous estimator such as the shrinkage estimator. But the empirical results also motivate a further scrutiny of its properties. (Author)

  3. Asymmetric regulation measures in the European gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clastres, C.

    2003-01-01

    Like most of the privatized utilities, the gas market needs to be regulated in order for the positive benefits of competition to fully develop. In addition to the issues of eligibility and access, the regulators have had to deal with several other obstacles, and among other things have raised questions concerning the supply of gas. Asymmetric regulation (release gas and market share reduction measures) is one of the possible responses, making it possible to facilitate access to both resources and consumers. The British regulator was the first to introduce this type of regulation during the 1990's. More recently, Spain and Italy have also adopted it. Although we can find a number of similarities in the causes justifying the use of such regulation, the results obtained vary from one country to another. It appears that they are dependent upon a number of variables including: the existence of national production, the structure of the gas market and finally the level of penetration and growth of gas in various business sectors. (authors)

  4. Version 2.0 of the European Gas Model. Changes and their impact on the German gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmert, David; Petrov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015 ACER, the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators, presented an updated version of its target model for the inner-European natural gas market, also referred to as version 2.0 of the Gas Target Model. During 2014 the existing model, originally developed by the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) and launched in 2011, had been analysed, revised and updated in preparation of the new version. While it has few surprises to offer, the new Gas Target Model contains specifies and goes into greater detail on many elements of the original model. Some of the new content is highly relevant to the German gas sector, not least the deliberations on the current key issues, which are security of supply and the ability of the gas markets to function.

  5. The energy sector abroad. Part 12. The Czech Republic. Spider in the European natural gas web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holwerda, B.

    1998-01-01

    The natural gas industry in the Czech Republic is one of the oldest in Europe. In the past, natural gas has played a modest role in the Czech energy supply: coal and town gas from coal and lignite were the major energy sources. However, more and more use is made of natural gas, imported from Russia (Gazprom) and Norway. Besides, the Czech natural gas distribution, transportation and storage system occupies a key position in the Central-European natural gas network

  6. The liberalization of the European gas sector and the strategic positioning of firms: A dynamic approach for corporate competence building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avadikyan, A.; Amesse, F.; Cohendet, P.; Heraud, J-A.

    2002-01-01

    A framework to explain how competitive changes occurring in one sector can affect both the dynamics of required competencies and the frontiers with adjacent sectors is proposed. When applied to the natural gas sector, the results provide a better understanding of how competencies in the sector evolve according to the new market structure and the strategic movements engaged in by the different players. The proposed framework combines the two approaches -- evolution and strategy -- to show that a firm's competencies define both membership in a specific sector and its distinctiveness from its competitors. To define the strategic positioning process the concept of core competencies is introduced, i.e. competencies developed by firms through their specific history which, when combined in a specific manner with new competencies could give them sustainable competitive advantage. Finally, the authors explain the concept of dynamic capabilities, which rely on a set of organizational and strategic processes needed to integrate, develop and create new competencies in order to initiate, or to adapt to market changes. The final conclusion is that the recent liberalization of the European gas and power sectors weakened institutional entry barriers, a phenomenon which compelled operators traditionally protected by regional or national monopolies to compete with other potential actors. With specific reference to the gas, power and oil industries it is stated that if they had relatively clear frontiers in the past, these frontiers have now become increasingly permeable. However, this weakening of institutional barriers has a beneficial consequence: it allows companies to deploy strategies to take advantage of new growth and rent appropriation opportunities. Examples of adaptation by European oil companies, power companies and natural gas firms are used to illustrate the principles embodied in the proposed framework. 18 refs., 1 fig

  7. Supply prospects and network integration in the European natural gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, B.

    1998-01-01

    At least for the next 10-15 years, natural gas will be the fastest growing energy form in Europe, with a higher rate of growth in consumption (from a lower base) in central Europe than in western Europe. Although most of the prospective demand until 2010 is covered by signed import contracts and indigenous production, important additional gas supply capacity still has to be developed out of a plenitude of reserves within and (in the long run primarily) outside western and central Europe. The real problem is how to mobilise the reserves economically and direct them towards the European market, in competition with other markets. Europe has a sophisticated transmission system whose development has gone hand-in-hand with long-term import agreements. Among the missing links is the Interconnector, which, at the end of 1998, is due to integrate the UK and Ireland into mainland Europe. This is expected to enhance security of supply in both areas, to balance prices and maybe also to foster ideas of liberalisation. Overall, the European gas industry is in an excellent position to develop the supply of gas in an environmentally benign way. The future belongs all the more to natural gas, the fewer the mistakes that are made when it comes to matters of legal frameworks and taxation

  8. Renewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions from the waste sectors of European Union member states: a panel data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Hélde Araujo; De Melo Faria, Alexandre Magno; Fuinhas, José Alberto; Marques, António Cardoso

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a rich debate about the environmental degradation that results from exposure to solid urban waste. Growing public concern with environmental issues has led to the implementation of various strategic plans for waste management in several developed countries, especially in the European Union. In this paper, the relationships were assessed between economic growth, renewable energy extraction and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the waste sector. The Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis was analysed for the member states of the European Union, in the presence of electricity generation, landfill and GHG emissions for the period 1995 to 2012. The results revealed that there is no inverted-U-shaped relationship between income and GHG emissions in European Union countries. The renewable fuel extracted from waste contributes to a reduction in GHG, and although the electricity produced also increases emissions somewhat, they would be far greater if the waste-based generation of renewable energy did not take place. The waste sector needs to strengthen its political, economic, institutional and social communication instruments to meet its aims for mitigating the levels of pollutants generated by European economies. To achieve the objectives of the Horizon 2020 programme, currently in force in the countries of the European Union, it will be necessary to increase the share of renewable energy in the energy mix.

  9. Estimating elasticities of demand for natural gas in the European household sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Asche, Frank; Tveteras, Ragnar

    2005-12-15

    This paper analyzes the residential natural gas demand in 12 European countries using a dynamic loglinear demand model, which allows for country-specific elasticity estimates in the short-run and long run. The explanatory variables include a heating degree days index, real prices of natural gas, light fuel oil, electricity, and real private income per capita. Our data set is a country panel with annual observations from 1978 to 2002. Short panel data sets like this represents a challenge for econometric estimation, as standard estimators often provide implausible estimates of elasticities. The demand model is estimated using both homogeneous and heterogeneous estimators, with a particular focus on the shrinkage estimator (an empirical Bayes estimator). The shrinkage short-run own-price and income elasticity tend to be very inelastic, but with greater long-run responsiveness. We provide support for employing a heterogeneous estimator such as the shrinkage estimator. But the empirical results also motivate a further scrutiny of its properties. We also consider the problem of reporting t-statistics of shrinkage estimators in the empirical Bayes (EB) framework and the problem of using the delta method to approximate the elasticities. The delta method biases upward the t-statistics of the shrinkage elasticities. An alternative approach, the bootstrap sampling methods obtained more reliable confidence intervals. We call into question - is the traditional way of constructing confidence intervals or t-statistics of the shrinkage estimator to naive. (Author)

  10. Panorama 2015 - Greenhouse gas emissions in the road transport sector: moving towards inclusion in the European system of CO2 allowances?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussy, Paula; Portenart, Philomene; Afriat, Marion; Alberola, Emilie

    2014-12-01

    In the year 2000, out of 41.8 Gt of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, almost 10% came from transports sector. In Europe, this share of transports GHG emissions rises to 21% and emissions are forecast to rise. Against this background, should the road transport sector be included in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme and thereby contribute to national GHG emission reduction targets? (authors)

  11. Version 2.0 of the European Gas Model. Changes and their impact on the German gas sector; Das europaeische Gas Target Model 2.0. Aenderungen und Auswirkungen auf den deutschen Gassektor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmert, David; Petrov, Konstantin [DNV GL, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In January 2015 ACER, the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators, presented an updated version of its target model for the inner-European natural gas market, also referred to as version 2.0 of the Gas Target Model. During 2014 the existing model, originally developed by the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) and launched in 2011, had been analysed, revised and updated in preparation of the new version. While it has few surprises to offer, the new Gas Target Model contains specifies and goes into greater detail on many elements of the original model. Some of the new content is highly relevant to the German gas sector, not least the deliberations on the current key issues, which are security of supply and the ability of the gas markets to function.

  12. Natural gas in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalim, Z.

    1991-01-01

    A report is presented on 'Natural Gas in the European Community'. Aspects discussed include the challenges facing the gas industry in the EC, the development of the European gas industry, the structure and role of European gas companies, the sources of European supply, gas contracts and the influences that operate on sales into end markets, electricity generation from natural gas, evolving markets for natural gas in the EC, life in the private sector using British Gas as a role model and country profiles for eleven European countries. (UK)

  13. Benchmark of European strategies of development of gas production and valorisation sectors. European inventory and synthetic sheets per country - Intermediate report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    After a European inventory and a discussion of the evolution of the number of methanization installations, of the evolution of biogas production, and of the situation and main economic levers in European countries, this report proposes sheets of data and analysis for Germany, Italy, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Sweden. For each of these countries, the document proposes an historical overview and some key figures on various aspects (types and number of installations, biogas production and valorisation, resources and processed quantities, technologies, digestates, costs of installation and financing modes, jobs and enterprises in the sector), a comment of the national strategy (actors, strategy regarding renewable energy, climate protection and waste processing, regulatory and financial incentive measures, regulatory context and administrative management), and perspectives (maximum potential, development perspectives)

  14. European natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thackeray, Fred

    1999-11-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Main issues; Natural gas consumption and supply: statistics and key features of individual countries; Sectoral natural gas consumption; Indigenous production; Imports; Prices and taxes; The spot market: The interconnector; Forecasts of production and consumption and contracted imports; Progress of markets liberalisation; Effects of environmentalist developments; Transmission networks and storage; Some principal players. (Author)

  15. The gas sector in Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, G.

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas in Canada represents 29% of the primary energy and 42% of the energy used in the industrial sector. The biggest users are the manufacturing industries for which the low cost of natural gas and the quality of products resulting from its use represent a serious advantage in a more and more competitive market. This document takes stock of the situation of natural gas and gas-related technologies in Quebec. The first part recalls the historical evolution of the gas distribution network in Quebec and its present day situation. Then, some technical-economical data about the consumption of natural gas in Quebec are presented according to the sectors of use. The third part treats of the R and D activities linked with the gas sector, in particular the activities of the two main research organizations: the technical centre of natural gas and the research group in gas technologies of the Polytechnique school of Montreal. (J.S.)

  16. European Competition Law in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, P.

    2001-09-01

    The first part gives an overview on the implementation of the Electricity Directive 96/92 in the member states of the European Union and on the still missing preconditions for a single market in the electricity sector. The second part deals with the main elements of the European merger control (market definition, market domination), the decisions in the electricity sector and analyses the impact of the Electricity Directive 96/92 EG on future merger decisions in this sector. The third part examines the role of the articles 81 and 82 EGV to secure competition in the electricity market. (author)

  17. Public Sector and Europeanization Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica Matei

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasises the role of the market-type mechanisms within the activity of the organisations from the public sector. The end of the 20th century was defined by the effects of the public sector reform. The public sector is placed within the cultural and political environment of each country and the reforms have aimed to redefine the structures of the state organisations in the economy and the relationships such as market-government, government-bureaucracy, government- citizens, bureaucracy-citizens, civil servants-politicians-citizens. The public sector reform, achieved at the managerial systems, organisational structures and regulations levels is accompanied by specific and structural reforms. Accepting the market-type mechanisms instead of bureaucratic mechanisms, meaning not the simple provision of public services but the creation of some governmental “actors”, functioning completely on commercial bases, supporting the development of the partnerships between the public and private sector, introducing privatisation is achieved in view of creating “the facilitating state”. We discuss about “facilities” such as citizens and society involvement in public businesses, making public administration more citizen-friendly and the state closer to the public need. The citizens’ involvement, as customers in the flow of the public service contributes to creating an organic ensemble characterised by two fundamental dimensions: level and type of influence of the customers and the private-public dichotomy. Synthesising, the relationships and market mechanisms enable to the public sector to get closer to the public needs and to create a modern administration based on efficiency, effectiveness and openness towards change.

  18. Public Sector and Europeanization Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica Matei

    2006-02-01

    Accepting the market-type mechanisms instead of bureaucratic mechanisms, meaning not the simple provision of public services but the creation of some governmental “actors”, functioning completely on commercial bases, supporting the development of the partnerships between the public and private sector, introducing privatisation is achieved in view of creating “the facilitating state”. We discuss about “facilities” such as citizens and society involvement in public businesses, making public administration more citizen-friendly and the state closer to the public need. The citizens’ involvement, as customers in the flow of the public service contributes to creating an organic ensemble characterised by two fundamental dimensions: level and type of influence of the customers and the private-public dichotomy. Synthesising, the relationships and market mechanisms enable to the public sector to get closer to the public needs and to create a modern administration based on efficiency, effectiveness and openness towards change.

  19. The European Natural Gas Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correlje, A.F.

    The European Union started the introduction of competition in the European market for natural gas. Today, mid-2016, the process of restructuring is still going on. In parallel, important changes in geopolitical, environmental and technological determinants can be observed in the European and global

  20. Elements for a European gas policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmois, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    This report first discusses the role of gas in the European energy mix, and more particularly how it can be developed in the transport sector to replace oil, in the building and housing sector for heating and hot water production, and in the industry. The author also draws some lessons from the German experience with gas where power plants could not find their place in electricity production whereas lignite mines have been used with a maximum negative impact on the environment. This shows that the share of gas in the energy mix will not increase spontaneously, but will have to take carbon cost into account. Then, the author discusses the potential of shale gas in Europe, comments the first economic and geological lessons learned from the experience of the USA. He comments and discusses the environmental risks related to the exploitation of shale gases, and proposes an overview of European perspectives for gas in terms of reserves, infrastructures, supply and demand. The author outlines the European policy is to be reviewed, notably regarding the value of carbon. Some propositions are finally made regarding gas purchase contract negotiation, gas transport and storage infrastructures in Europe, supply security and strategic storages, investments in energy consumption efficiency in industries as well as for households

  1. Market opening: how will European gas supply evolve?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delon, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    With the implementation of the gas directive, European gas companies are facing many new challenges. Some concern the upstream gas sector in particular, notably with the new rules of competition in Europe, the changes in the structure of gas industries and their adaptation to the new Europe-wide market. For this first round table to the 116. gas conference, chaired by Sophie Mayeux, journalist and editor of the Est Eco journal, four representatives of major European companies and one representative of the banking sector examined the possible future scenarios for gas supply in Europe. (authors)

  2. The role of the European Bank in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, John

    1994-01-01

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development was established in 1991 and is owned by the western industrialized countries, including Canada, and the former communist countries of Europe and Central Asia. Its purpose is to assist the latter to make the transition from command to market economies in a democratic framework. In the energy sector, most of the EBRD's lending has been in the oil and gas sector in Russia, but it is open for business in other sectors and in all countries of operation. Unlike other development banks, the EBRD is prepared to finance nuclear power projects. The bank is also prepared to finance conventional power plants where these would permit the closure of obsolete or unsafe nuclear plants. In the oil and gas sector, most of the EBRD's lending has related to private sector, joint venture projects aimed at oil field rehabilitation and development. The private sector ventures supported by the Bank normally involve joint stock companies owned 50 per cent by western partners and 50 per cent by Russian state oil companies, which are being privatized or are operating according to private sector principles. (author)

  3. Central European gas market perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanous, Jan

    1999-01-01

    This presentation deals with (1) Definition of the Central European market, (2) Factors driving up consumption of natural gas in Central and Eastern Europe, (3) Role of natural gas in regional energy consumption, (4) Position of natural gas in individual country markets, (5) Future sources of imported natural gas into the region. The Central European market are the eleven countries Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, and Slovenia, with a total population of 121 million. This market is comparable to combined France and Italy in terms of population, but only 30% of its size in terms of GDP

  4. The European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagland, Jan

    2001-01-01

    An increasing amount of natural gas is flowing into continental Europe, one of the largest gas markets in the world. There are three main sources of gas: Africa, Russia and Norway. Norway is an important supplier of gas, but may be vulnerable to competition. The demand for gas is increasing on a global basis and the largest increase is expected in Asia, followed by America and Europe. It is expected that Norwegian gas deliveries will be a principle source of natural gas for North Europe in the next years and that they will take an increasing part of the British market as the gas deliveries from the British shelf is going down. The European gas market is likely to become liberalized according to the EU's competition- and gas directives. This will not necessarily be a problem, and Norway may be able to increase the export of gas to Great Britain considerably from the year 2010, perhaps up to 40 billion standard m3 per year. Russia is expected to take an increased share of the European gas market, especially in East- and Central Europe, Germany and North Italy. But large investments in existing fields, new developments and new strategic pipelines are necessary

  5. The role of the European Bank in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.

    1993-01-01

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development was established in 1991 to assist central and eastern European countries in making the transition from command economies to market economies. The Bank provides loans, equity investments, guarantees, advice, and technical cooperation to qualified applicants through its merchant banking and development banking operations. In the energy sector, the Bank recognizes that the energy resources of eastern Europe are enormous but so are the problems associated with their development. Since its foundation, most of the Bank's energy-related lending has been in the oil and gas sector in Russia and the Baltic countries. The Bank has approved eight projects in that sector with total capital costs of ca US$1.7 billion. Major problem areas to be overcome include uneconomic domestic pricing, high energy intensity and pollution, inadequate legal frameworks, inappropriate tax structures, and institutional complexity. Canadian firms have been actively involed in Bank-financed projects in the Russian oil and gas sector, and two such projects are briefly described. They comprise joint ventures with Russian enterprises or associations and include rehabilitation of Siberian oil fields and drilling new wells in the Komi (Arctic) region. A common feature of these projects is that they were well under way before the Bank got involved, but the Bank brings the benefits of additional financing and providing moral support and expertise which can be useful in overcoming administrative and regulatory difficulties

  6. Short Summary European Reports on Retail Sector, Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector, Food and Beverages Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    This document is composed of European synthesis reports on retail trade, the agro-food sector, and the motor vehicle sales and repair sector. They are based on the most important findings of the European report and the 12 national reports for each sector. Section 1, "Retail Sector," deals in part 1 with the structure of retailing in the…

  7. European gas oil markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, D.

    1991-04-01

    The developments over the past five years of the bulk markets for gas oil in Europe are examined using advanced econometric techniques to study the related issues of pricing efficiency and hedge efficiency. The study attempts to preserve the fluctuations of the actual data as these provide insights into the process of price discovery. The markets studied include the spot, forward and futures markets and looks for evidence of differentiated markets. (UK)

  8. Preparation for the competitive European electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mombauer, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Energy - alongside knowledge, creativity and capital - is one of the fundamental necessities of humankind. Modern life is indeed dependent on energy, especially electricity and natural gas, the grid-connected energies, for its power, heating, cooling and traffic. To ensure security in the supply of energy, world energy hunger must be taken into account. Competition for primary energy resources will increase and the processes for their transformation from raw materials into consumable energy will have to be made more efficient, environmentally friendly and sustainable. Research into new sources of energy has to continue. After the respectable results of the industrial sector to decouple growth and energy consumption in future the transport and building sectors will have to intensify their efforts to reduce energy use intensity

  9. Natural gas opportunities, utilization and trades (in a European context)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corke, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The historical development of natural gas consumption in Europe has relied heavily on requirements for space heating energy in the residential/commercial sector and for process energy and feedstock in the industrial sector. This paper reviews historical gas utilization trends and considers how these are likely to develop in the future. In addition to the above somewhat negative factors, the bright outlook for gas utilization in both large scale and small scale power and cogeneration facilities is reviewed and the implications of power industry restructuring for natural gas utilization are discussed. Finally, the outlook for overall European natural gas demand and trade is briefly considered. (author)

  10. The strategy of players on the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecarpentier, A.

    2006-01-01

    One result of opening up the European gas market to competition has been to increase the number and diversity of the players involved, whether producers, suppliers or electric utilities. However, while the gas on offer is still controlled by a handful of market players given the increasing importance of state-owned companies from exporting countries outside Europe, the downstream gas sector continues to show a strong concentration of incumbent operators seeking a dominant position in the supply of gas. (author)

  11. The strategy of players on the European gas market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecarpentier, A

    2006-07-01

    One result of opening up the European gas market to competition has been to increase the number and diversity of the players involved, whether producers, suppliers or electric utilities. However, while the gas on offer is still controlled by a handful of market players given the increasing importance of state-owned companies from exporting countries outside Europe, the downstream gas sector continues to show a strong concentration of incumbent operators seeking a dominant position in the supply of gas. (author)

  12. The Impact of Wind Power on European Natural Gas Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    Due to its clean burning properties, low investment costs and flexibility in production, natural gas is often put forward as the ideal partner fuel for wind power and other renewable sources of electricity generation with strongly variable output. This working paper examines three vital questions associated with this premise: 1) Is natural gas indeed the best partner fuel for wind power? 2) If so, to what extent will an increasing market share of wind power in European electricity generation affect demand for natural gas in the power sector? and 3) Considering the existing European natural gas markets, is natural gas capable of fulfilling this role of partner for renewable sources of electricity?.

  13. Regulatory reform in Mexico's natural gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In recent years Mexico has implemented remarkable structural changes in its economy. However, until recently its large and key energy sector was largely unreformed. This is now changing. In 1995 the Mexican Government introduced legislative changes permitting private sector involvement in natural gas storage, transportation and distribution. Subsequent directives set up a detailed regulatory framework. These developments offer considerable promise, not only for natural gas sector development but also for growth in the closely linked electricity sector. This study analyses the changes which have taken place and the rationale for the regulatory framework which has been established. The study also contains recommendations to assist the Government of Mexico in effectively implementing its natural gas sector reforms and in maximizing the benefits to be realised through the new regulatory framework. (author)

  14. Sectoral variation in consequences of intra-European labour migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    Intra-European labour migration has divergent labour market consequences across institutional settings and economic sectors. Some sectors experience increasing pressure on industrial relations and labour market segmentation while others do not experience such effects, and it remains unclear how...

  15. Serbian gas sector in the spotlight of oil and gas agreement with Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brkic, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    The Russian natural gas industry is the world's largest producer and transporter of natural gas. This paper identifies the benefits for Serbia as transient country to European Union for Russian natural gas through South Stream gas-line in the current political context of implementation of gas agreement. On the other hand, according to the Agreement on Stabilization and Integration to European Union, Serbia is obligatory to implement reforms in energy sector and its energy policy must be in accordance with the European Union policy. Republic of Serbia has produced and consumed natural gas domestically since 1952, but has always been net importer. Strategy of Energy Development in Serbia and especially, National Action Plan for the gasification on the territory of Republic of Serbia dedicated special attention to gas economy development in respect with expected contribution in efficient energy use and environmental policy protection in the country.

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbuthi, P.N.

    1998-01-01

    This study quantifies greenhouse gas emissions from Kenya's energy activities. It is organised in four major sections, namely, an overview of the energy sector; data sources and methodology of analysis; results and recommendations for future climate change mitigation

  17. The European Gas Market. A Reality Check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmigiani, Laura

    2013-01-01

    With the approach of the 2014 deadline for the completion of a truly European liberalised energy market, there is growing concern on the adequacy of the market structure with the changed economic and geopolitical environment. Market-based and short-term approaches have been fostered for both gas and electricity markets. Energy and climate policies have therefore a primary function in designing the basic rules for these markets to develop. This study addresses two key issues related to the market design envisaged for the gas sector in Europe. The first raises questions about the adequacy of the market design proposed for the gas market with respect to security of supply. In fact, despite a higher dependence to external gas sources, the gas system has been developing all over Europe and it is becoming a key component of the European energy mix, in particular thanks to its back-up role for intermittent electricity generation and its lower content of CO 2 emissions with respect to coal. The external dimension of the gas market is thus taking a greater place in the approach to gas supply strategies. Security of supply is a key component in the gas sector and cannot be ignored in the creation of a European gas market. Moreover, the oligopolistic characteristic of the supply side has to be carefully assessed as it is well recognized that two countries (Norway and Russia) provide up to almost 60% of total external supplies. The study therefore investigates to what extent the gas market design and its implementation rules take into consideration this dimension. It will be argued that the gas target model envisaged by regulators and the EC, by aiming at increasing the number of market exchanges based on market hubs or virtual exchange points, will not significantly contribute to security of supply. On the contrary, a greater concentration could be an undesired outcome of this process. The second issue thus relates to the more practical on-going reforms that establish common

  18. The European Market for Seasonal Gas Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, A.

    2006-02-01

    European demand for gas will grow in the years to come. Simultaneously, gas production in Europe will decrease and imported gas will be needed to replace indigenous production. Gas demand is not constant during the year. There are variations in demand on different timescales ranging from seasonal to hourly. Variations in demand are characterised by two main parameters: working volume and deliverability. Working volume - the amount of gas that can be supplied above the baseload production volume during a long (cold) period- is primarily needed to cope with the summer-winter pattern of gas consumption. Most of the summer-winter pattern comes from the temperature sensitive gas consumption by households and service industries. Gas usage by industry and the power sector are more evenly spread throughout the year and need less working volume. Deliverability - the amount of gas per hour that can be generated on a (very) cold day above the baseload capacity - is the ability to produce large volumes during short periods, e.g. for extremely cold days, or during peak periods during a day. In this paper we argue that a large amount of additional working volume will be required over the coming years. First, flexible European production will be replaced by long-distance import gas, and second, the gas market is expected to grow further. Todays market appears focus mainly on cavems for storage volume. Cavems have little working volume but are ideal for trading purposes. Consequently, Europe may be facing a deficit in working volume, i.e. the ability to cope with seasonal changes in demand. This paper aims to widen the discussion of this matter and give rise to this concern by setting out a broad analysis, exploring the market drivers for seasonal storage and identifying the public interest issues for this market. Chapter 2 gives an overview of demand for and supply characteristics of gas flexibility. Chapter 3 describes the role of gas storage facilities in the gas market

  19. Prospects of the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjarstad, J.; Johnsson, F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses prospects for increased consumption of natural gas within the European Union (EU) up to 2030. Particular emphasis is on the power generation sector, where the main growth in demand is expected to occur, on supply and infrastructural constraints and on future price of natural gas. It can be concluded that EU gas-import needs will increase substantially up to 2010, driven by a combination of rapid increase in demand in southern Europe and declining production in northern Europe. As a result there will be an increased import dependency which will affect security of supply, not only in the gas sector but also in the electricity sector. Gas demand after 2010 will partially depend on the level of continued CO 2 emission restrictions, a possible nuclear phase-out in the UK, Germany and Belgium and to what extent the option to store CO 2 in subsurface reservoirs will be applied. However, supplies of gas are plentiful, at least in the medium-term up to 2010/2015, and a number of new countries will emerge as substantial suppliers to the European gas market, increasing competition and possibly leading to a situation of oversupply between 2008 and 2012 which in turn may create a downward pressure on gas prices. In addition, the US market may, pending on demand and indigenous production, experience considerable oversupply between around 2008 and 2015, reducing the possibilities of conducting arbitrage between the two main markets in the Atlantic basin and further contributing to a downward pressure on the gas price. On the other hand, the oil price will continue to be a major determinant of the gas price and a tight oil supply/demand balance will create an upward pressure on the gas price. Global liquefaction and regasification capacity is expected to more than double between now and 2010 leading to a more flexible and global gas trading and increasing spot sales and although the cost of LNG has decreased substantially over the past three decades it is

  20. Norwegian Natural Gas. Liberalization of the European Gas Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austvik, Ole Gunnar

    2003-01-01

    regulatory regimes. It is shown how multipart tariffs may give the best ''second best'' results, but that first best result may never be achieved. The liberalization of the European gas market is not an isolated phenomenon. In the OECD countries, a large number of sectors have been liberalized over the last couple of decades. Chapter 9 discusses the changes in the North American gas markets (USA and Canada) and in Great Britain, and the relevance these experiences may have for the understanding of the European market. Chapter 10 discusses the role of natural gas in international affairs. Particular focus is put on the US embargo of Soviet gas in 1982. Chapter 11 discusses consuming countries supply security for natural gas, natural gas as the environment's best friend and the use of Strategic Gas Reserves (SGRs) to mitigate a crisis, in the same way as the Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPRs) is assumed to do in the oil market. Based on these deliberations, Chapter 12 focuses on consequences of a more liberal European gas market for important variables for Norway as an exporter. In particular the effects on prices and taxes, contractual forms and modulation, existing and new long-term contracts, security of supply and environmental concerns are discussed. The impact on the formulation of a Norwegian gas strategy is discussed in Chapter 13. This applies to the organization of production, transportation and sale of natural gas. It also applies to energy related policies of the EU and of EU countries and strategies of other natural gas exporters, like Russia. Some implications of foreign and security policy character are discussed

  1. Today or not today: Deregulating the Russian gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryev, Yuli

    2007-01-01

    Although Russia is the world's biggest producer of natural gas, its ability to maintain timely and reliable supply to meet the growing global demand has come under question in recent months. The gas war with Ukraine notwithstanding, concern has been raised by a number of observers that underinvestment in the gas sector will lead to a systemic failure of the state monopolist OAO Gazprom to increase or even maintain current levels of production. Yet with a quarter of European gas coming from Russia, and with increasing presence of Gazprom in European downstream operations (such as Germany, Hungary, and other CIS states) as well as seemingly closer ties with Algeria, another major supplier of gas to Europe, there has been a strong reaction from Europe's policy-makers to decrease dependence on Russian gas. Deregulating and liberalising the gas sector would see the lifting of restrictions to foreign or independent investors wishing to gain access to Russian reserves, as well as the unhindered access to the pipeline infrastructure and export markets. It would also signal the unbundling of Gazprom and an end to the artificially low price of gas to the domestic consumer. This paper discusses whether deregulation is the optimal way to raise capital, attract investment and increase supply security for Russia's Western neighbours. In doing so, the paper identifies the objectives of the EU as the importer whilst trying to align them with the objectives of the Russian Federation as the exporter, in the current political context

  2. Shale gas. Opportunities and challenges for European energy markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Joode, J.; Plomp, A.J.; Ozdemir, O. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    The outline of the presentation shows the following elements: Introduction (Shale gas revolution in US and the situation in the EU); What could be the impact of potential shale gas developments on the European gas market?; How may shale gas developments affect the role of gas in the transition of the power sector?; and Key messages. The key messages are (1) Prospects for European shale gas widely differ from US case (different reserve potential, different competition, different market dynamics); (2) Shale gas is unlikely to be a game changer in Europe; and (3) Impact of shale gas on energy transition in the medium and long term crucially depends on gas vs. coal prices and the 'penalty' on CO2 emissions.

  3. Natural gas in the transportation sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ask, T Oe; Einang, P M; Stenersen, D [MARINTEK (Norway)

    1996-12-01

    The transportation sector is responsible for more than 50% of all oil products consumed, and it is the fastest growing oil demand sector and the fastest growing source of emissions. During the last 10 years there have been a considerable and growing effort in developing internal combustion gas engines. This effort has resulted in gas engines with efficiencies comparable to the diesel engines and with emissions considerably lower than engines burning conventional fuels. This development offers us opportunities to use natural gas very efficiently also in the transportation sector, resulting in reduced emissions. However, to utilize all the built in abilities natural gas has as engine fuel, the natural gas composition must be kept within relatively narrow limits. This is the case with both diesel and gasoline today. A further development require therefore specified natural gas compositions, and the direct use of pipeline natural gas as today would only in limited areas be acceptable. An interesting possibility for producing a specified natural gas composition is by LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) production. (EG)

  4. Russian gas in the west European market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    The paper relates to the Russian supply of natural gas to the west European market. Following themes are discussed: The resource basis of the gas industry; analysis of the European gas market; projects for Russian gas supply to Europe; international co-operation

  5. Search for efficiency on the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier Muluala, V.L.

    1997-03-01

    The first part of this work is devoted to the structural analysis of the natural gas industry. After a characterization of the gas activities in the European context, the theoretical tools allowing the determination of the natural structure of gas industries are presented in a critical manner. The second part examines the re-structuration dynamics of gas activities. The deregulation logic, which favours the liberalization of the gas sector, and the post-deregulation strategies that could be implemented by the actors are analyzed. According to the analysis of these strategies, it seems that a vertical reintegration of gas activities is possible. (J.S.)

  6. Gas sector developments in Trinidad and Tobago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, G.

    1997-01-01

    The outlook for the natural gas industry in Trinidad and Tobago was discussed. The country's proven reserves, as of January 1997, were estimated at 16.1 trillion cubic feet. The National Gas Company (NGC) is key to expansion of the country's gas business. In 1996 NGC sold 683 million cubic feet of natural gas. The petrochemical sector accounted for 57.6 per cent of sales, power generation 22.4 per cent and metal and other heavy industry 19 per cent. Amoco, Enron and British Gas are the principal suppliers. Natural gas demand in Trinidad and Tobago is predicted to surpass the 1.5 billion cubic feet per day threshold by the year 2001, rising to 2.1 billion cubic feet per day by 2006. During the 1997-2001 period, gas sales to the petrochemical sector will increase by a compounded average of 24 per cent per year due to new plant expansions in the methanol and ammonia sectors. Trinidad expects to be firmly established as the world's leading exporter of methanol and ammonia by the year 2001. Increased gas sales will also be stimulated by the proposed establishment of an aluminium smelter in Trinidad. 1 tab., 1 fig

  7. Centre of the European gas market. The European Autumn Gas Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hasselt, F.; Van der Wal, W.; Ruinen, H.

    1998-01-01

    From the results of the 1997 European Autumn Gas Conference in Barcelona, Spain, it appears that the European gas industry is mainly focused on the liberalization of the European energy market. The main topic of the Conference was 'dealing with surplus'. A brief overview is given of the natural gas trade developments in the European countries. 1 ill., 1 tab. 2 ills

  8. Gauging gas sector opportunities in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    The future prospects for use of liquefied natural gas in Asia were examined, combined with a description of the opportunities and risks of investing in the Asian energy sector. It was concluded that the marked increase in energy demand makes market development for natural gas in Asia similar to what it was in North America several decades ago. Rapid economic development has increased the value of electricity, and natural gas is seen as the ideal fuel to generate it, as well as helping to combat local air pollution. Some of the barriers to expanded natural gas use include structural problems resulting from government action (or inaction), lack of an efficient distribution system and stable pricing for natural gas. Nevertheless, interest is growing, and however slowly, progress is inevitable At the same time, it should be emphasized that while the prospects are good for the domestic gas sector, there is yet no country where a foreign firm has been permitted to bring natural gas into the country, either by pipeline, or as liquid natural gas. 7 figs

  9. Sectoral Approaches to Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This paper explores sectoral approaches as a new set of options to enhance the effectiveness of greenhouse gas reduction policies and to engage emerging economies on a lower emission path. It surveys existing literature and recent policy trends in international climate change discussions, and provides an overview of sectoral approaches and related issues for trade-exposed, greenhouse-gas intensive industries (cement, iron and steel and aluminium). It is also based on interviews conducted by the IEA Secretariat in Australia, China, Europe, Japan, and the United States. Sectoral approaches were also discussed during workshops on technology and energy efficiency policies in industry, following the IEA's mandate under the Gleneagles Plan of Action.

  10. The players on the European gas market - 2008 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecarpentier, Armelle

    2008-02-01

    In a context of growing dependence on extra-European sources, a growth potential in gas use for power generation and the acceleration of the liberalization process, the 2008 Edition of 'The Players on the European Gas Market' offers a unique detailed review of the positioning of players in both the upstream (production, reserves) and downstream (wholesale and retail supply) sectors of the gas chain. This 140-pages report, includes 55 tables and 29 figures, and presents an in-depth description of the European gas industry by country. The Survey 'The Players on the European Gas Market' provides: - The analysis of new upstream areas and production growth prospects, - Company rankings in terms of reserve and production volumes, - The complete overview of the whole European gas market (market characteristics, supply sources, consuming outlets, effective competition), - Strategies and key facts of the wholesale suppliers to Europe, - An in-depth review of national market structures, - The detailed positioning and analysis of national market power of the numerous companies involved in gas supply

  11. IMPLEMENTATION OF BASEL III IN THE EUROPEAN BANKING SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Sbarcea

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, which is part of a larger research project aimed at the expected impact of Basel III on commercial banks in Romania, I decided to analyse the implementation and transposition of the new international prudential requirements into European regulations, which are of particular interest for the Romanian banking sector. I started this analysis by highlighting the peculiarities of the European banking sector at aggregate level, but also as a cross-country survey, to later highlight the views of European regulations on prudential supervision and differences to international regulations.

  12. European gas market developments. Opportunities and threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Oostvoorn, F.

    1998-09-01

    The paper is based on two studies conducted by ECN, namely a study entitled 'An analysis of the West-European gas market: a company approach' and another entitled 'Developments of gas markets across Europe' to be published in November 1998. The paper addresses the past driving factors responsible for the increasing share of gas in the EU energy demand. Furthermore it very briefly discusses the rising dependency of the European Union (EU) on gas imports from non-EU sources such as Russia and the expected gas-to-gas competition in a large number of EU countries in the next decades. 25 refs

  13. The Harmonization of Public Sector Accounting in European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam; Alijarde, Isabel Brusca; Chow, Danny

    accounting standards in Member States. The suitability of IPSAS for the Member States” (European Commission, 2013b). This report takes into account the Public Consultation on the suitability of the IPSAS for EU Member States. The European Commission (2013b, p. 8) considers that IPSASs cannot easily......The European Commission is working on several fronts to achieve the implementation of uniform and comparable accruals-based accounting practices for the European Union Member States and for all the sectors of General Government, that is, Central Government, State Government, Local Government...... and Social Security, considering that at the same time it can help ensure high quality statistics (European Commission, 2013a). In 2012 Eurostat issued a Public Consultation on the suitability of the IPSAS for EU Member States, later publishing the report “Towards implementing harmonised public sector...

  14. Natural gas industry in European Community and european single market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadoret, I.

    1992-01-01

    Common Market of natural gas is dominated by some companies. In several Member Countries, one company only manages the whole industry. European Economic Community thinks this type of structure induce hindrances to free circulation of natural gas in Europe. 10 refs

  15. Issues related to gas use by European power utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonchere, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-fired combined cycle frequently appears as a least-cost option for newly built power plants. Moreover, this option also brings obvious environmental benefits. But, power utilities, facing unavoidable long term uncertainties about electricity demand are not at ease with long term commitments such a a take-or-pay formula or a price indexation not reflecting the market place in the power generation industry. Due to the flexibilities in the management of existing power plants (deferred closures, etc...) or even on the demand side (load shifting, peak clipping, etc...), early decision making is not compulsory. Therefore, a gas breakthrough in the power sector interfuel competition will require a mutual understanding of constraints and flexibilities faced by partners: gas sellers and power utilities. A fair rent sharing between them would certainly be a prerequisite to a large but possibly temporary access of natural gas to the European power sector. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. Benchmarking European Gas Transmission System Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter; Trinkner, Urs

    This is the final report for the pan-European efficiency benchmarking of gas transmission system operations commissioned by the Netherlands Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM), Den Haag, on behalf of the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) under the supervision of the authors....

  17. Impact of carbon constraint on the European electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankeviciute, Loreta

    2010-01-01

    Two sets of factors will be decisive for the future evolution of European electricity sector: on the one hand, the necessity of new wave of investments for the renewal and the expansion of production capacities and, on the other hand, the emergency and the reinforcement of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) constraints imposed by European policies and directives. The general idea of thesis is that European Emissions Trading system (ETS) is the instrument that can facilitate the decarbonization of European electricity system. However, the necessary conditions ought to be brought together in the context of liberalisation in terms of risk management, market architecture and setting up of the complementary public policy instruments, in order for the carbon price signal to be effective. The purpose of the thesis is to provide details on these conditions and to examine the potentials scenarios for the evolution of European electricity production mix under the carbon constraint. The introduction of liberalisation in the electricity industry conditions significantly the investment choice. The analysis of theoretical market model allows demonstrating organisational inadequacy for developing an optimal technological mix and for adapting to long-term issues due to the extreme difficulty of interpreting the price signals. Indeed, the logic of a market and a concurrence disadvantages the investments in capital-intensive technologies, even though some of them less polluting like renewable energies, nuclear, hydraulic and thermal technologies integrating carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). In face of numerous uncertainties, the role of long-term risk management becomes therefore crucial. The employment of transaction cost theory allows studying the combinations of vertical arrangements that remain necessary in order to manage the risk and to facilitate the investments (e.g. vertical integration). The introduction of ETS overlaps with the market risks inherent to liberalisation

  18. European scale climate information services for water use sectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van M.T.H.; Donnelly, Chantal; Strömbäck, Lena; Capell, René; Ludwig, Fulco

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a climate information service for pan-European water use sectors that are vulnerable to climate change induced hydrological changes, including risk and safety (disaster preparedness), agriculture, energy (hydropower and cooling water use for thermoelectric power) and

  19. Growth in European gas demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, B.

    1993-01-01

    The last three decades witnessed mainly the development of gas pipeline systems as a result of major onshore and offshore gas strikes in the fifties and sixties as well as the increase in gas sales on market segments which has been previously cornered by oil and coal products. Power generation currently is an additional potential market for which the availability of adequate resources plays a major role

  20. Norwegian gas supplies for the European market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the Norwegian key role in the European gas market with increasing market shares. The supply capacity in a long-term perspective can be 65-70 bcm/year or more if export prices support the development of new and more costly gas resources. The main challenges for the Norwegian shelf are discussed. 5 figs

  1. Liberalising the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, M.

    2002-01-01

    Europe's natural gas market is changing radically. The several national markets dominated by monopolistic suppliers are integrating into one European market in which production and trade are subject to competition, while transport through the networks will be unbundled and placed under regulatory influence. What will be the consequences of these changes on natural gas prices, supply security and the environment?

  2. The future of European natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausems, D.

    1991-01-01

    Western Europe's natural gas markets abound with opportunities. They also contain major challenges. This paper presents a revealing assessment of both the challenges and the opportunities that arise from those markets. It also explains some of the surprising ways in which the European Commission and Dutch gas industry will influence gas markets throughout the Continent. Gas consumption is well-established and expanding in a small group of European nations. These countries rely on an equally small collection of suppliers, both within and beyond the Community's borders, to provide the required volumes of natural gas. Because supply and demand are likely to grow at significantly different rates, it is suggested what a major market imbalance could materialize before the end of the decade. Averting major gas supply problems beyond the year 2000 will require multi-billion dollar commitments by producers and will necessitate long-term take-or-pay contacts backed by strong and financially healthy buyers

  3. Gas and coal competition in the EU Power Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many assets, a confluence of factors - including flat electricity demand, rising use of renewable energy sources, falling wholesale electricity market prices, high gas prices relative to coal and low CO 2 prices - has eroded the competitiveness of natural gas in the EU power sector. The share of natural gas in the EU electricity mix has decreased from 23% in 2010 to 20.5% in 2012. By contrast, coal-fired power stations have been operating at high loads, increasing coal demand by the sector. This thorough analysis by CEDIGAZ of gas, coal and CO 2 dynamics in the context of rising renewables is indispensable to understand what is at stake in the EU power sector and how it will affect future European gas demand. Main findings of the report: - Coal is likely to retain its cost advantage into the coming decade: The relationship between coal, gas and CO 2 prices is a key determinant of the competition between gas and coal in the power sector and will remain the main driver of fuel switching. A supply glut on the international coal market (partly because of an inflow of US coal displaced by shale gas) has led to a sharp decline in coal prices while gas prices, still linked to oil prices to a significant degree, have increased by 42% since 2010. At the same time, CO 2 prices have collapsed, reinforcing coal competitiveness. Our analysis of future trends in coal, gas and CO 2 prices suggests that coal competitive advantage may well persist into the coming decade. - But coal renaissance may still be short-lived: Regulations on emissions of local pollutants, i.e. the Large Plant Combustion Directive (LCPD) and the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) that will succeed it in 2016, will lead to the retirement of old, inefficient coal-fired power plants. Moreover, the rapid development of renewables, which so far had only impacted gas-fired power plants is starting to take its toll on hard coal plants' profitability. This trend is reinforced by regulation at EU or

  4. Changes in the European gas business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehle, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives a view on some of the changes that the European gas business is currently undergoing and the possible effects of these changes. There are two major items that stand out in this respect covering the continued deregulation of the UK gas market and the final content of EU's gas Directive. No participant in the European gas business will be unaffected by these two events. According to the author, the dynamics of these changes to the gas business will create interesting business opportunities for those companies and individuals that are anticipating the future and willing to take risks in order to succeed. Topics are: Infrastructure; the market - supply and demand; main changes. 14 figs

  5. Multi-sectoral action for child safety-a European study exploring implicated sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Beatrice; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Förster, Katharina; MacKay, Morag; Vincenten, Joanne; Brand, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    Injury to children in Europe, resulting in both death and disability, constitutes a significant burden on individuals, families and society. Inequalities between high and low-income countries are growing. The World Health Organisation Health 2020 strategy calls for inter-sectoral collaboration to address injury in Europe and advocates the whole of government and whole of society approaches to wicked problems. In this study we explore which sectors (e.g. health, transport, education) are relevant for four domains of child safety (intentional injury, water, road and home safety). We used the organigraph methodology, originally developed to demonstrate how organizations work, to describe the governance of child safety interventions. Members of the European Child Safety Alliance, working in the field of child safety in 24 European countries, drew organigraphs of evidence-based interventions. They included the different actors involved and the processes between them. We analyzed the organigraphs by counting the actors presented and categorizing them into sectors using a pre-defined analysis framework. We received 44 organigraphs from participants in 24 countries. Twenty-seven sectors were identified across the four domains. Nine of the 27 identified sectors were classified as 'core sectors' (education, health, home affairs, justice, media, recreation, research, social/welfare services and consumers). This study reveals the multi-sectoral nature of child safety in practice. It provides information for stakeholders working in child safety to help them implement inter-sectoral child safety interventions taking a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach to health governance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Actual questions in Slovak and European nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2010-01-01

    The close cohesion of research and education underlines the development of all research areas and contributes to their sustainability. In the paper, new approaches of European Commission (DG RTD Energy) to nuclear power engineering development (focused on area fission and reactor systems) and applications also for Slovak conditions are discussed in details. Research, education and training increase not only economical factor and technical development, but imply the higher level of safety culture by design or operation of nuclear installations. The paper will be focused on the actual questions in frame of Slovak as well as European nuclear sector.

  7. The determining factors of natural gas demand in domestic sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadoret, I.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas plays an important role in domestic sector. For example, in France, Italy, Germany and United-Kingdom the natural gas share in energy demand of domestic sector is respectively 26%, 44%, 34% and 63%. A study of energy policies, natural gas industry structure and tarification system of this four countries indicates that gas development is linked to the government and petroleum companies policy. Econometric models estimation show by another way that when natural gas is introduced in domestic sector, the demand follows the distribution network. When the market is saturated, the demand changes with energy price and household income. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Three Target Sectors for a European Investment Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, Lionel; Douillard, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    While the president of the European Commission is getting ready to present the 'Juncker package' announced in July 2014, to revive activity in Europe through investment, what are the sectors in which these investments may be concentrated? The overall analysis of investment gaps in the euro zone has confirmed the requirement for a European macro-economic revival effort that involves investment, public or private, undertaken very quickly, even though this diagnosis varies depending on the country. The drivers of a European investment strategy are fiscal, regulatory and financial and are based on the selection of projects for the future. This third 'Note d'analyse' addresses the topic of investment potential in three key sectors: transport, energy and the digital sector, for which the amount of additional investment could reach euro 120 billion per year and thus, over three years, be higher than the forecasts in the Juncker plan. This maximalist amount mainly corresponds to the implementation of an ambitious energy-climate policy. Given current budgetary constraints, carefully selecting the desired investments, for which their social utility must be validated, is imperative: socioeconomic evaluation is the appropriate approach, particularly for taking into account the environmental externalities that now justify significant investments in the ecological transition. (authors)

  9. Corporate strategies for European gas markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    In January 1992, the Commission of the European Economic Community issued a proposal for accelerating the process of building up a single market for natural gas. After the first step, already taken, to introduce price transparency, the Commission is willing to introduce progressively Third Party Access (T.P.A.) and the freedom of establishment in all segments of the natural gas industry: L.N.G. terminals, storage facilities, transmission lines and public distribution. 1 tab

  10. Structural change in Europe's gas markets: three scenarios for the development of the European gas market to 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, A.; Bowitz, E.; Roland, K.

    2000-01-01

    Against the background of the European Union's Gas Directive, and the emergence of new players and markets in Europe's gas sector, this paper explores how company actions could shape the future for the gas industry. Starting with an examination of company strategies this paper develops three scenarios for the future: a 'Gradual Transformation' scenario where a single European gas market develops that is essentially oligopolistic in nature; a 'Vertical Integration' scenario, where upstream and downstream gas companies merge to form a vertically integrated gas supplier; and a 'Pull the Plug' scenario, where the current market structure decomposes into a competitive market. These scenarios are examined in terms of their impact on gas prices, demand and the distribution of gas rent along the supply chain. The paper highlights the fact that the EU's gas Directive is not sufficient for the introduction of competition into Europe's gas markets, but that company actions will be the key determinant, and they may favour alternative market structures. (Author)

  11. Panorama 2015 - Gas and Coal Competition in the EU Power Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    Never have the fossil-fueled thermal European power sector, and natural gas in this sector, seen such a crisis. EON's recent announcement of its future withdrawal from fossil-fueled thermal power generation illustrates the difficulties faced by producers in Germany. But the whole European power sector is in deep crisis, and natural gas is its first victim. Faced with a flat electricity demand in Europe, the rapid development of renewable energies, and competition from coal, natural gas is losing market share and its consumption is in decline. In 2013, total gas consumption in the European Union (EU) fell for the third year running. Projections for 2014 are no better, consumption is forecast to decline by approximately 10%, greatly affected by the mild winter of 2013/2014 compared with the previous one which was particularly cold over a long period. The milder temperatures impact the need for heating, therefore consumption in the residential/services sectors and also the demand for electricity. The International Energy Agency (IEA) is now predicting that European consumption will not get back to its 2010 level until 2032. (author)

  12. The Europeanization of regulation of the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrijsen, S.A.C.M.; Nauta, T.

    2010-01-01

    The main question of this article is how the ongoing Europeanization of regulation relates to the restrictive manner in which the Dutch legislator interprets the principle of legality with respect to the qualification of the independent regulating authorities. To answer this question, research focuses first of all on which demands are imposed by European law on the constitutional position and qualification of the national regulating authorities that implement the energy directives. Anticipating the consequences of the third generation of energy directives for the position of the national authorities, attention is subsequently paid to the question whether any tension exists between European requirements for the regulation of the energy sector and the manner in which the national legislator interprets the principle of legality. [nl

  13. Norwegian gas on the European market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noreng, Oeystein

    1999-01-01

    Article. Norsk Hydro's acquisition of Saga has made the organization of Norwegian gas sales a very topical issue. Traditionally, Norwegian gas has been sold on long-term take-or-pay contracts where the sales volume is secured and the price is linked to the prices of other energy carriers, primarily oil. Norway has sold large volumes of gas to the continent and has an increasing share of the market. However, the long-term contracts place most of the price risk on the seller. Although the sale is guaranteed, earnings are low. Statoil, the largest seller of Norwegian gas, has so far earned much more by transporting the gas to the continent than by producing and selling it. The long-term take-or-pay contracts are no longer safe. In Germany, the power market is quickly opening for competition, implying falling prices and lapsing long-term contracts. A similar development is likely to occur in the gas market. From Norwegian quarters there has been little interest in establishing oneself in the gas markets on the continent, which worries the author. However, the traditional contracts will have to be renegotiated so that the prices will reflect the real competition in the market. It is argued that a sensible Norwegian strategy will be to prepare for a new world for gas, not to hold tight to historical positions. It is suggested that old plans to establish a gas transport company, Gassledd, should be revived. Such a company would be subject to the European Gas Directive and would have to admit a third party. It is likely that the Norwegian opposition to liberalization of the European gas market will one day appear poorly thought out, and that defensive considerations have overshadowed new opportunities

  14. The ties between the strategy of players on the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecarpentier, A.

    2006-01-01

    One result of opening up the European gas market to competition has been to increase the number and diversity of the players involved, whether producers, suppliers or electric utilities. However, while the gas on offer is still controlled by a handful of market players given the increasing importance of state-owned companies from exporting countries outside Europe, the downstream gas sector continues to show a strong concentration of incumbent operators seeking a dominant position in the supply of gas. (author)

  15. Europe's Common Market: Natural gas sector normatives and certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musazzi, V.

    1992-01-01

    Europe's Common Market offers an interesting challenge to its member countries' natural gas distribution system operators in that which regards the creation of a European-wide natural gas control board, and European standardization and regulatory committees contemporaneously guaranteeing a free market for suppliers, as well as, consumer protection. Relative legislation and normatives activities will be deemed the responsibility of the European administrative structure and the the European Normatives Committee respectively. This paper briefly illustrates the progress that has been accomplished thus far in the standardization of technical aspects. Focus is on the certification of natural gas distribution system constructors

  16. The single European energy market: the electricity supply sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The completion of the Internal Market in the Community by the end of 1992 has become a key objective and the focal point of the revival of the European Community. Within this overall objective, the development of the Single European Energy Market, the Internal Energy market, is a major element. The energy objectives for the Community, adopted in 1986 by the Council of Ministers and relating to targets in the energy sector to be achieved by 1995, contain what are effectively the aims of the Internal Energy Market. This is in a reference to the need for greater integration, free from barriers to trade, of the Internal Energy Market with a view to improving security of supply, reducing costs and improving economic competitiveness. In the light of these aims, the Commission drew up, in 1988, an inventory of potential obstacles to the achievement of the Internal Energy Market. This was accepted by the Council, together with a list of suggested priority areas of work, and has formed the basis of the Commission's efforts to move forward as quickly as possible in the development of the Internal Energy Market, in all branches of the energy sector. The impact on the electricity sector, in particular, is considered here. (author)

  17. Natural gas to buoy Trinidad and Tobago petroleum sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Trinidad and Tobago's petroleum sector remains at a crossroads. While heavily reliant on oil and gas for domestic energy consumption and hard currency export earnings, the small Caribbean island nation faces some tough choices in reviving its hydrocarbon sector in the 1990s. Exploration and production of crude oil have stagnated in recent years, and domestic refinery utilization remains low at 36%. However, substantial natural gas reserves in Trinidad and Tobago offer the promise of a burgeoning natural gas based economy with an eye to liquefied natural gas and gas based petrochemical exports. Any solutions will involve considerable outlays by the government as well as a sizable infusion of capital by foreign companies. Therein lie some of the hard choices. The article describes the roles of oil and gas, foreign investment prospects, refining status, refining problems, gas sector foreign investment, and outlook for the rest of the 1990's

  18. Metering in the gas supply sector; Metering in der Gasversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernekinck, U. [RWE Westfalen-Weser-Ems, Recklinghausen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    The new conditions of competition in the gas supply sector have strongly increased the requirements on gas grid operators. Mainly an exact gas metering and -accouting will become more and more important. The systems and procedures are presented in detail in this contribution. (GL)

  19. Impact of the economic recession on the European power sector's CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Declercq, Bruno; Delarue, Erik; D'haeseleer, William

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the economic recession on CO 2 emissions in the European power sector, during the years 2008 and 2009. Three main determinants of the power sector's emissions are identified: the demand for electricity, the CO 2 price, and fuel prices. A counterfactual scenario has been set up for each of these, i.e., what these parameters would have been if not affected by the recession. A simulation model of the European power sector is then employed, comparing a historical reference simulation (taking the parameters as actually occurred) with the counterfactual scenarios. The lower electricity demand (due to the recession) is shown to have by far the largest impact, accounting for an emission reduction of about 175 Mton. The lower CO 2 price (due to the recession) resulted in an increase in emissions by about 30 Mton. The impact of fuel prices is more difficult to retrieve; an indicative reduction of about 17 Mton is obtained, mainly as a consequence of the low gas prices in 2009. The simulated combined impact of the parameters results in an emission reduction of about 150 Mton in the European power sector over the years 2008 and 2009 as a consequence of the recession. - Research highlights: → CO 2 emissions are simulated for the European power sector. → Emissions reduced drastically because of the economic recession in 2008 and 2009. → Lower electricity demand had highest impact and accounts for reduction of about 175 Mton. → Impact of different CO 2 and fuel prices on emissions is more limited.

  20. Estimation of European Union residential sector space cooling potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubcionis, Mindaugas; Carlsson, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Data on European residential space cooling demands are scarce and often of poor quality. This can be concluded from a review of the Comprehensive Assessments on the energy efficiency potential in the heating and cooling sector performed by European Union Member States under Art. 14 of the Energy Efficiency Directive. This article estimates the potential space cooling demands in the residential sector of the EU and the resulting impact on electricity generation and supply systems using the United States as a proxy. A georeferenced approach was used to establish the potential residential space cooling demand in NUTS-3 regions of EU. The total potential space cooling demand of the EU was estimated to be 292 TW h for the residential sector in an average year. The additional electrical capacity needed was estimated to 79 GW. With proper energy system development strategies, e.g. matching capacity of solar PV with cooling demand, or introduction of district cooling, the stresses on electricity system from increasing cooling demand can be mitigated. The estimated potential of space cooling demand, identified in this paper for all EU Members States, could be used while preparing the next iteration of EU MS Comprehensive Assessments or other energy related studies. - Highlights: • An estimation of EU space cooling demand potential in residential sector is presented. • An estimate of space cooling demand potential is based on using USA data as a proxy. • Significant cooling demand increase can be expected. • Cooling demand increase would lead to increased stress in energy supply systems. • Proper policies and strategies might measurably decrease the impact on energy systems.

  1. The European Community programmes in the sector of wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamantaras, K.; Ferrero, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    The wind technology market has known a considerable evolution over the last decade. From the early eighties - when there were only a few kilowatts of the research prototype wind turbines installed - the total installed capacity within the European Community has reached nowadays more than 765 MW in commercial machines. This expansion has been brought about with the aid of important R and D energy technology programmes run by national governments, and by the Commission of European Communities with its research, development, demonstration and market development programmes, such as the JOULE, demonstration and THERMIE programmes. This paper presents the activities of the Community demonstration and THERMIE programmes in the wind energy sector from 1983 to 1992. Reference is also made to the Community programmes JOULE II and ALTENER. (au)

  2. Price discovery in European natural gas markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Emma; Swieringa, John

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first high-frequency investigation of price discovery within the physical and financial layers of Europe's natural gas markets. Testing not only looks at short-term return dynamics, but also considers each security's contribution to price equilibrium in the longer-term. Results show that UK natural gas futures traded on the Intercontinental Exchange display greater price discovery than physical trading at various hubs throughout Europe. - Highlights: • We use intraday data to gauge price discovery in European natural gas markets. • We explore short and long-term dynamics in physical and financial market layers. • Results show ICE's UK natural gas futures are the main venue for price discovery

  3. The gas market and sector in France. Situation and predictions 2018 - Sector and competitive analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Through a detailed analysis of market determining factors, of evolutions of supply and demand, and of major events in firms life, this set of two reports proposes an analysis of the recent situation of the gas sector and of the evolutions of the competitive game. The first report on situation and predictions which is updated three times a year, proposes a synthesis on the consequences of the evolution of the economic environment, on major trends noticed for the sector, and on predictable evolutions. It proposes the most recent predictions regarding natural gas consumption in France and the turnover of the gas sector. It highlights recent events for companies of the sector: takeovers, investments, restructuring, introduction of new products, and so on. It proposes a sector-based dashboard which contains all the critical figures useful to analyse the sector situation (activity determining factors, key figures for the sector and its environment). The second report (the annual one) proposes an overview of trends and competition within the gas sector. It gives an overview of some basic aspects of the activity (sector organisation, gas categories, main customer markets, gas consumption in industry), and of its determining factors, analyses the sector environment (sites connected to the natural gas network, evolution of average temperatures in France, production by chemical industry, by the food industry, and by metallurgy and oil refining, thermal production of electricity, regulatory evolution regarding supports to energy efficiency, and new opportunities). The evolution of the sector activity is analysed through its trends and indicators (turnovers, gas consumption, butane-propane deliveries, wholesale prices, regulated tariffs). The economic structure is also analysed: aspects related to the upstream part (extraction, injection of biogas, natural gas main input and output points, transport and storage, natural gas distribution), and aspects related to gas provision

  4. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading for the Transport Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, Kristina; Belhaj, Mohammed; Gode, Jenny; Saernholm, Erik; Zetterberg, Lars; Aahman, Markus

    2006-12-01

    In this study we have analysed different options to apply emissions trading for greenhouse gas emissions to the transport sector. The main focus has been on the EU transport sector and the possibility to include it in the current EU ETS in the trading period beginning in 2013. The purpose was to study how different alternatives will affect different actors. Focus has been on three sub-sectors; road transport, aviation and shipping. The railway sector has only been treated on a general level. The study includes the following three parts: 1. An economic analysis of the consequences of greenhouse gas emissions trading for the transport sector including an analysis of how the total cost for reaching an emission target will be affected by an integrated emissions trading system for the transport sector and the industry (currently included sectors) compared to separate systems for the sectors, 2. An analysis of design possibilities for the different sub-sectors. Discussion of positive and negative aspects with different choices of design parameters, such as trading entity, covered greenhouse gases, allocation of emission allowances and monitoring systems, 3. Examination of the acceptance among different actors for different options of using greenhouse gas emissions trading in the transport sector. When setting up an emissions trading scheme there are a number of design parameters that have to be analysed in order to find an appropriate system, with limited administrative and transaction costs and as small distortions as possible to competitiveness

  5. A complementarity model for the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, Ruud; Gabriel, Steven A.; Holz, Franziska; Zhuang, Jifang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed and comprehensive complementarity model for computing market equilibrium values in the European natural gas system. Market players include producers and their marketing arms which we call 'traders', pipeline and storage operators, marketers, LNG liquefiers, regasifiers, tankers, and three end-use consumption sectors. The economic behavior of producers, traders, pipeline and storage operators, liquefiers and regasifiers is modeled via optimization problems whose Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) optimality conditions in combination with market-clearing conditions form the complementarity system. The LNG tankers, marketers and consumption sectors are modeled implicitly via appropriate cost functions, aggregate demand curves, and ex post calculations, respectively. The model is run on several case studies that highlight its capabilities, including a simulation of a disruption of Russian supplies via Ukraine

  6. The European gas market from a Belgian point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouma, J.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The European gas distribution industry will be faced with real challenges during the coming ten years. Additional import of natural gas from non-European Community countries will be required in view of the growing demand and the concomitant decrease in gas production in the European Community. This implies that facilities for the long-distance transport of gas will have to be built and that considerable investments are required. It is argued that the recommendation for the liberalization of the gas market by the Commission of the European Communities is unsuited to face future developments of the European gas market. (A.S.)

  7. Effects of a Liberalized European Gas Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austvik, Ole Gunnar

    2003-01-01

    After World War II a position that for some time was called ''left-liberal'' tried to reconcile the values of individual freedom with social justice and a more egalitarian distribution of income. According to this perception, the government should let markets work if they satisfy social goals. However, if markets are non-competitive, either by nature or cartelization, often a public authority or a regulator must intervene in order to secure social goals, such as the provision of important goods and services, to avoid excessive pricing practices etc. If the results from competitive markets achieved either by actual competition or by public regulations bring about unacceptable injustice or inequality between persons, groups or regions, governments should intervene to correct this by redistributing income through taxes and subsidies, partnership schemes with the industry, and so on. For the functioning of natural gas markets, the most crucial element is the cost of, and access to, transportation. Cost of gas transportation is often characterized by strong elements of scale and scope economies, making transporting firms natural monopolies in the markets in which they operate. In Europe, many public utilities operating as natural monopolies were nationalized in the aftermath of World War II. Being monopolists by nature (but sometimes only by law) they were considered bottlenecks in the development of each nation's competitiveness. Probably the most frequently used argument explaining these firms' inefficient use of resources, has been the lack of competition. Liberalization of a market represents a departure from the ''one management'' approach. However, the particular aspect of by-nature non-competitive markets, such as major parts of the European gas market, is that the goals of competition cannot be achieved only by removal of trade barriers. If the most efficient operation of a market is done by one, or only a few, firms, these must be made to behave in a way that

  8. New modes of governance in the Spanish electricity and gas sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Leonor Moral [Public and Constitutional Law Universidad de Granada Department of Administrative Law, Law Faculty Plaza de la Universidad s/n 18071 Granada, (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    This paper analyses the institutional framework of the Spanish electricity and gas markets from their emergence at the beginning of the twentieth century until the liberalisation process encouraged by the European Union. European processes of liberalisation involving the introduction of regulation and competition and the application of non-hierarchical modes have raised the number of both public and private actors taking part in sectoral governance. However, none of these modes is new for the sector. A historical perspective shows the conditions under which the threat of governmental intervention and the discretion granted to sectoral governance differed significantly between sectors. While the threat to nationalise and monopolise the electricity sector contributed to the creation of a private agent and a model of self-regulation with a large measure of discretion, in the gas sector the public presence was strong and control tight. Thus, the paper concludes that one should not presuppose that old modes of governance are strongly governmental and hierarchical. The opposite proves to be the case in the Spanish electricity sector, where new modes of governance are now more linked to hierarchy. (Author).

  9. A European nuclear sector to face future energy challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legee, F.; Thais, F.

    2010-01-01

    Very early Europe chose the way of nuclear energy to produce electricity but progressively different countries followed different policies and now the nuclear landscape of the European Union is various: some countries are full-fledged, some stopped their program a long ago and others are in a phase-out period. The stakes of the climatic change and a framed strategy of the European Union have led to a renewal of the nuclear option. Great-Britain has already launched a program of new power plants. Poland, Bulgaria, Slovenia and Hungary want to develop nuclear energy to be less dependant on Russian oil and gas exports. In other countries like Germany, Austria, Sweden we can notice a positive change in favour of nuclear power of their public opinion. A recent OECD study shows that nuclear power stays largely competitive in Europe despite rising construction costs. The harmonization of the nuclear safety regulations throughout Europe appears clearly as an objective of the European Union. As for the management of radioactive wastes the European Union favors the disposal in deep geological layers, but as for the options: direct storage or reprocessing, a common European policy is out of reach at the moment. (A.C.)

  10. The market of natural gas for the power plant sector under the obligation of CO{sub 2} reduction. A model supported analysis of the European energy market; Der Erdgasmarkt fuer den Kraftwerkssektor unter CO{sub 2}-Minderungsverpflichtungen. Eine modellgestuetzte Analyse des europaeischen Energiemarktes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlwitz, Holger

    2007-02-12

    The contribution under consideration describes the development of a certificate market model for natural gas, electricity and carbon dioxide for the analysis of the significance of the natural gas market for power stations under the obligation of the reduction of carbon dioxide. The author of this contribution develops the integrated PERSEUS EEM model. Thus, strategic questions in the European energy sector can be analyzed quantitatively by means of the multi periodical linear optimization. Russia, Algeria and Norway dominate in the offer of natural gas in Europe. The use of gas-fired power stations is the most important strategy for the reduction of the emissions of carbon dioxide. The comparison of the generation of current from natural gas for the scenario EuETS with the scenario NoETS shows a higher generation of electricity from natural gas in the scenario EuETS. Within the time period of consideration, France, Great Britain, Poland and Czech Republic are the largest supplier of CO{sub 2} emission trading in the scenario EuETS. With this model, substantial fundamental connections of the markets for natural gas, electricity and CO{sub 2} certificate could be analyzed simultaneously for the first time.

  11. A strategic model of European gas supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, Franziska; Hirschhausen, Christian von; Kemfert, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Structural changes in the European natural gas market such as liberalization, increasing demand, and growing import dependency have triggered new attempts to model these markets accurately. This paper proposes a model of the European natural gas supply including the possibility of strategic behavior of the agents along the value-added chain. We structure it as a two-stage-game of successive natural gas exports to Europe (first stage) and wholesale trade within Europe (second stage). In the case of non-cooperative Cournot competition at both stages, which is the most realistic scenario, this yields a market outcome with double marginalization, that is suppliers at both stages generate a mark-up, at the expense of the final customers. Our results suggest that the main suppliers of natural gas to Europe remain dominant (Norway, the Netherlands), although some lose market shares (Algeria, UK, and especially Russia). Traditional exports will be complemented in the future by overseas supplies of LNG from the Middle East, Nigeria, Trinidad and Tobago which are becoming competitive. The model also enables us to identify transport infrastructure bottlenecks; we find that transport capacity on the upstream market is sufficient but the capacity constraint is binding for many intra-EU trade relations. (Author)

  12. CO{sub 2} abatement policies in the power sector under an oligopolistic gas market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecking, Harald

    2014-09-15

    The paper at hand examines the power system costs when a coal tax or a fixed bonus for renewables is combined with CO{sub 2} emissions trading. It explicitly accounts for the interaction between the power and the gas market and identifies three cost effects: First, a tax and a subsidy both cause deviations from the cost-efficient power market equilibrium. Second, these policies also impact the power sector's gas demand function as well as the gas market equilibrium and therefore have a feedback effect on power generation quantities indirectly via the gas price. Thirdly, by altering gas prices, a tax or a subsidy also indirectly affects the total costs of gas purchase by the power sector. However, the direction of the change in the gas price, and therefore the overall effect on power system costs, remains ambiguous. In a numerical analysis of the European power and gas market, I find using a simulation model integrating both markets that a coal tax affects gas prices ambiguously whereas a fixed bonus for renewables decreases gas prices. Furthermore, a coal tax increases power system costs, whereas a fixed bonus can decrease these costs because of the negative effect on the gas price. Lastly, the more market power that gas suppliers have, the stronger the outlined effects will be.

  13. CO2 abatement policies in the power sector under an oligopolistic gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecking, Harald

    2014-01-01

    The paper at hand examines the power system costs when a coal tax or a fixed bonus for renewables is combined with CO 2 emissions trading. It explicitly accounts for the interaction between the power and the gas market and identifies three cost effects: First, a tax and a subsidy both cause deviations from the cost-efficient power market equilibrium. Second, these policies also impact the power sector's gas demand function as well as the gas market equilibrium and therefore have a feedback effect on power generation quantities indirectly via the gas price. Thirdly, by altering gas prices, a tax or a subsidy also indirectly affects the total costs of gas purchase by the power sector. However, the direction of the change in the gas price, and therefore the overall effect on power system costs, remains ambiguous. In a numerical analysis of the European power and gas market, I find using a simulation model integrating both markets that a coal tax affects gas prices ambiguously whereas a fixed bonus for renewables decreases gas prices. Furthermore, a coal tax increases power system costs, whereas a fixed bonus can decrease these costs because of the negative effect on the gas price. Lastly, the more market power that gas suppliers have, the stronger the outlined effects will be.

  14. Panorama 2009 - greenhouse gas emissions and the transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The fact that the transport sector is growing quickly brings advantages, such as quick access to any geographical location on earth, but also disadvantages: noise, congestion and polluting emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), the greenhouse gas (GHG) primarily responsible for global warming. In the effort to bring GHG emissions under control, improving results in the transport sector is a prime long-term objective. What proportion of CO 2 emissions generated at global and national level are due to the road, air, maritime and rail transport sectors, respectively? What mechanisms can be used to reduce GHG emissions in the transport sector at large?

  15. Building the gas sector in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrocarbon reserves in Mexico, ranked 8th in the world, were discussed. On January 1, 1996, Mexico's hydrocarbon proven reserves were 62.1 billion barrels ( a decline of some 10 billion barrels since 1984). Of this 48.8 billion corresponded to crude oil and 13.3 billion to natural gas. Mexico's natural gas pipeline network includes 10,280 kilometres in transmission and 2,211 kilometres in distribution, concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and in the central and northern regions of the country. A new regulatory framework for natural gas, passed in Congress in 1995, was outlined. The new amendments were designed to strengthen the natural gas industry through private investment in the storage, transportation and distribution of natural gas. Stages for third party access were identified. Increased North American regional integration by interconnections between Mexican, American and Canadian pipeline networks, and the effects of such integration on investments, were examined. figs

  16. Sector report: Malaysia. Upstream oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is one of a series designed to introduce British exporters to the opportunities offered by the Malaysian market in oil and natural gas. The report includes Malaysia's oil and gas reserves, production, exploration, major profits upstream, production sharing contracts, pipeline construction, operators in production, service sector, and Petronas. (UK)

  17. European Gas Market Liberalisation. Competition versus security of supply?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, N.

    2009-01-01

    The problem statement encompasses two basic questions: (1) Which variables determine regulatory regimes and economic performance in European gas markets?; and (2) Can we empirically determine the effect of regulation-for-competition, as applied in the European Union, on the economic performance in the European gas markets? In the first part (chapters 1-5), the theoretical groundwork is laid out and conceptual clarifications are provided. In chapter 2, the main concepts such as governance and regulation, and their interrelations, are determined and the public regulation approach to be followed is outlined. The third chapter discusses our theoretical framework and the support required from other New Institutional approaches to deduce expectations regarding the convergence of regulatory regimes and its effect on economic performance. The fourth chapter contributes to answering our first research question by displaying the relevant variables and outlining how these can be operationalised. Based on the concepts of regulatory comprehensiveness and policy convergence, in chapter 5, a methodology is developed to measure best-practice in terms of regulation-for-competition. The second part (chapters 6-9) covers the first empirical analysis which is quantitative in design and emphasises effects originating at the Community level. Chapter 6 summarises the evolution of European gas policy at the Community level and searches for major changes in general or energy policy objectives and examines their prioritisation. Chapter 7 addresses the formal institutions on the second layer of the fourlayer model. Chapter 8 analyses converging and diverging trends within regulatory regimes in European gas markets. Chapter 9 sets out to assess the extent to which regulation-for-competition, as prescribed by the European provisions, can be empirically studied for its effect on economic performance in the European gas sector. To answer our second main research question, we discuss the effects

  18. Role of natural gas in meeting an electric sector emissions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    With advances in natural gas extraction technologies, there is an increase in availability of domestic natural gas, and natural gas is gaining a larger share of use as a fuel in electricity production. At the power plant, natural gas is a cleaner burning fuel than coal, but uncertainties exist in the amount of methane leakage occurring upstream in the extraction and production of natural gas. At high leakage levels, these methane emissions could outweigh the benefits of switching from coal to natural gas. This analysis uses the MARKAL linear optimization model to compare the carbon emissions profiles and system-wide global warming potential of the U.S. energy system over a series of model runs in which the power sector is asked to meet a specific CO2 reduction target and the availability of natural gas changes. Scenarios are run with a range of upstream methane emission leakage rates from natural gas production. While the total CO2 emissions are reduced in most scenarios, total greenhouse gas emissions show an increase or no change when both natural gas availability and methane emissions from natural gas production are high. Article presents summary of results from an analyses of natural gas resource availability and power sector emissions reduction strategies under different estimates of methane leakage rates during natural gas extraction and production. This was study was undertaken as part of the Energy Modeling Forum Study #31:

  19. Gas and coal competition in the EU power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    According to a new report by CEDIGAZ, the International Centre for Natural Gas Information, gas has lost its attractiveness against coal in the EU power sector. Its demand by the sector decreased by one third during the past three years and its prospects are very weak in this decade. The Association warns that un-profitability of combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) and the retirement of old coal plants due to stringent air regulation may lead to the closure of one third of the current fleet and poses a serious security of supply issue that has to be addressed urgently

  20. Efficiency in the European agricultural sector: environment and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Victor; Madaleno, Mara; Macedo, Pedro; Robaina, Margarita; Marques, Carlos

    2018-04-22

    This article intends to compute agriculture technical efficiency scores of 27 European countries during the period 2005-2012, using both data envelopment analysis (DEA) and stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) with a generalized cross-entropy (GCE) approach, for comparison purposes. Afterwards, by using the scores as dependent variable, we apply quantile regressions using a set of possible influencing variables within the agricultural sector able to explain technical efficiency scores. Results allow us to conclude that although DEA and SFA are quite distinguishable methodologies, and despite attained results are different in terms of technical efficiency scores, both are able to identify analogously the worst and better countries. They also suggest that it is important to include resources productivity and subsidies in determining technical efficiency due to its positive and significant exerted influence.

  1. Rents in the European power sector due to carbon trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Cruciani, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) has imposed a price on the allowances for CO 2 emissions of electricity companies. Integrating this allowance price into the price of electricity earns a rent for companies who have received these allowances for free. During Phase I, 2005-2007, rents corresponding to the aggregate value of allocated allowances amounted to roughly EUR 13 billion per year. However, due to the specific price-setting mechanism in electricity markets true rents were considerably higher. This is due to the fact that companies also that have not received any allowances gain additional infra-marginal rents to the extent that their variable costs are below the new market price after inclusion of the allowance price. Producers with low carbon emissions and low marginal costs thus also benefit substantially from carbon pricing. This paper develops a methodology to determine the specific interaction of the imposition of such a CO 2 constraint and the price-setting mechanism in the electricity sector under the assumption of marginal cost pricing in a liberalized European electricity market. The article thus provides an empirical estimate of the true total rents of power producers during Phase I of the EU-ETS (2005-2007). The EU ETS generated in Phase I additional rents in excess of EUR 19 billion per year for electricity producers. These transfers are distributed very unevenly between different electricity producers. In a second step, the paper assesses the impact of switching from free allocation to an auctioning of allowances in 2013. We show that such a switch to auctioning will continue to create additional infra-marginal rents for certain producers and will leave the electricity sector as a whole better off than before the introduction of the EU ETS. (author)

  2. Manufacturing preparations for the European Vacuum Vessel Sector for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Lawrence; Arbogast, Jean François; Bayon, Angel; Bianchi, Aldo; Caixas, Joan; Facca, Aldo; Fachin, Gianbattista; Fernández, José; Giraud, Benoit; Losasso, Marcello; Löwer, Thorsten; Micó, Gonzalo; Pacheco, Jose Miguel; Paoletti, Roberto; Sanguinetti, Gian Paolo; Stamos, Vassilis; Tacconelli, Massimiliano; Trentea, Alexandru; Utin, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    The contract for the seven European Sectors of the ITER Vacuum Vessel, which has very tight tolerances and high density of welding, was placed at the end of 2010 with AMW, a consortium of three companies. The start-up of the engineering, including R and D, design and analysis activities of this large and complex contract, one of the largest placed by F4E, the European Domestic Agency for ITER, is described. The statutory and regulatory requirements of ITER Organization and the French Nuclear Safety regulations have made the design development subject to rigorous controls. AMW was able to make use of the previous extensive R and D and prototype work carried out during the past 9 years, especially in relation to advanced welding and inspection techniques. The paper describes the manufacturing methodology with the focus on controlling distortion with predictions by analysis, avoiding use of welded-on jigs, and making use of low heat input narrow-gap welding with electron beam welding as far as possible and narrow-gap TIG when not. Further R and D and more than ten significant mock-ups are described. All these preparations will help to assure the successful manufacture of this critical path item of ITER.

  3. The euro as a quotation and invoicing currency in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartenbroekz, C.; Pauwels, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The impact of the introduction of the euro will not be limited to the European economics, but will also have an influence worldwide. Indeed the new currency is really qualified to become an international currency. Under these circumstances, oil and gas sector participants should consider taking the opportunity to make us of he new currency in their transactions. However, even if new opportunities do exist, some opposition could be expressed for operational and geopolitical reasons. (authors)

  4. European wood pellet market integration - A study of the residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Olle; Hillring, Bengt; Vinterbaeck, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The integration of European energy markets is a key goal of EU energy policy, and has also been the focal point of many scientific studies in recent years. International markets for coal, oil, natural gas and electricity have previously been investigated in order to determine the extent of the respective markets. This study enhances this field of research to bioenergy markets. Price series data and time series econometrics are used to determine whether residential sector wood pellet markets of Austria, Germany and Sweden are integrated. The results of the econometric tests show that the German and Austrian markets can be considered to be integrated, whereas the Swedish market is separate from the other two countries. Although increased internationalization of wood pellet markets is likely to contribute to European price convergence and market integration, this process is far from completed. (author)

  5. European key issues concerning natural gas: Dependence and vulnerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reymond, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Due to the high demand for natural gas from emerging countries and because natural gas has become an increasingly valuable resource is electricity production, natural gas demand should increase. This paper re-examines the geopolitical key issues related to natural gas as well as the uneven distribution of natural gas resources on a worldwide scale. This paper proposes to define the significance of liquefied natural gas in gas exchanges and it analyses the problem of European gas vulnerability using several indicators

  6. The greenhouse gas intensity of the tourism sector: The case of Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perch-Nielsen, Sabine; Sesartic, Ana; Stucki, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouse gas intensity is a ratio comparing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of an activity or economic sector to the economic value it generates. In recent years, many countries have calculated the GHG intensity of their economic sectors as a basis for policy making. The GHG intensity of tourism, however, has not been determined since tourism is not measured as an economic sector in the national accounts. While for tourism-reliant countries it would be useful to know this quantity, a number of difficulties exist in its determination. In this study, we determine the GHG intensity of tourism's value added in Switzerland by means of a detailed bottom-up approach with the main methodological focus on how to achieve consistent system boundaries. For comparison, we calculate the tourism sector's GHG intensity for selected European countries using a simpler top-down approach. Our results show that the Swiss tourism sector is more than four times more GHG intensive than the Swiss economy on average. Of all tourism's sub-sectors, air transport stands out as the sector with by far largest emissions (80%) and highest GHG intensity. The results for other countries make similar, if not as pronounced, patterns apparent. We discuss the results and possible mitigation options against the background of the goal to prevent dangerous climate change.

  7. ERP System Implementation: An Oil and Gas Exploration Sector Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok; Mishra, Deepti

    Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems provide integration and optimization of various business processes which leads to improved planning and decision quality, smoother coordination between business units resulting in higher efficiency, and quicker response time to customer demands and inquiries. This paper reports challenges, opportunities and outcome of ERP implementation in Oil & Gas exploration sector. This study will facilitate in understanding transition, constraints and implementation of ERP in this sector and also provide guidelines from lessons learned in this regard.

  8. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Ia Rue du Can, Stephane; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Integrated assessment models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Results of these scenarios are typically presented for a number of world regions and end-use sectors, such as industry, transport, and buildings. Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, however, require more detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. This paper presents sectoral trend for two of the scenarios produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon dioxide emissions over the past 30 years are examined and contrasted with projections over the next 30 years. Macro-activity indicators are analyzed as well as trends in sectoral energy and carbon demand. This paper also describes a methodology to calculate primary energy and carbon dioxide emissions at the sector level, accounting for the full energy and emissions due to sectoral activities. (author)

  9. New structures in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangen, Kristian

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a background for assessing elements of change in the European gas market that in the long run may produce new framework conditions for Norwegian gas exports. It will also serve as an empirical basis for further studies. The main question is: What can the extension of the pipeline network and the growing number of actors tell us about future competition in spite of the fact that both Russia, Algeria and Norway have non-contracted capacity in the pipelines they are building. A number of uncertainties make it hard to draw any clear conclusions about a totally different competitive situation than only a few years ago. In the Netherlands groups of former distribution companies are threatening Gasunies' monopoly while Ruhrgas' attempt to expand into Austria may lead to gas to gas competition there. Signs of a similar development are seen in Italy and Spain as well. Increasing competition can be explained partly by the growing number of actors downstream in the gas market - in trade, transmission and among the large consumers, the electricity producers, the consequence of direct volumes and of shorter duration which in itself promotes competition. Several large pipeline projects have been carried through in co-operation between several actors which indicates that new types of projects are being developed in order to reduce risks for each actor. These will be easier to realise in the absence of long-term ''take-or-pay'' contracts at company level, what we may call companies rhetoric and argumentation as a result of comprehensive market positioning. Furthermore it seems likely that a kind of spot market will develop. Even if we can expect that only small volumes will be traded through this channel at first. Such a development may have considerable influence on prices in the long run. 5 tabs, 29 refs

  10. Women in Canada's oil and gas sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherk, S. [AGRA Earth and Environmental Ltd., St. John' s, NF (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    This text presents a summary of the report: Women in Canada's Oil and Gas Sector, gathered for the Oil and Gas Sector Programme Pakistan (OGSP). The OGSP aims to strengthen Pakistan's capacity to manage its oil and gas resources more sustainably through policy advice, privatization assistance, appropriate regulatory mechanisms, technology transfer and specialized petroleum training. The OGSP promotes gender equity and women's participation in its project activities and within the petroleum industry in Pakistan and Canada. The purpose of this report was to identify current levels of female labour force participation in the Canadian petroleum sector, examine barriers to women's entry and promotion within the petroleum sector, and present strategies used by petroleum companies to promote the complete participation of their female employees. The report concluded that although women are not yet equally represented in Canada's petroleum industry, the industry is moving in the right direction. For example, there are more women in petroleum-related university programs, more associations dedicated to promoting women in science and engineering, organizational change within companies in support of the principles of diversity. While monitoring and overcoming barriers to women's participation should continue, these positive steps should be supported, in order to ensure that Canada's oil and gas sector benefits fully from the new approaches, ideas and alternative working styles that women bring to their work. 4 tabs.

  11. Regulation Strategy in Natural Gas Sector. The Romanian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralia Angelescu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a methodological analysis to evaluate the regulation strategy in Romanian natural gas sector. The market oriented reforms are not only associated with the gap between internal prices and world prices. In the same time, the market oriented reforms are mixed with the other forms of government intervention. The industry network theory provides a good pillar for maintaining natural monopoly in public utilities. The conclusions which are presented in this article offer a good theory for the activity of the National Authority of Regulation in Romanian natural gas sector.

  12. The deregulation of the Italian natural gas industry and diversification processes in the down-stream sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazioli, R.; Quaglino, S.; Di Domenico, M.

    2000-01-01

    The opening of the italian gas market , due to the privatisation and liberalisation process, has been implemented by the important normative evolution of this sector both at european and national level. The debate following this process in the gas market has focussed, basically, on the up-stream sector leaving aside the important down-stream sector also concerning gas local distribution and sales. In this article it is paid more attention to the down-stream sector considering the firms' evolution from a basic mono utility to multi utility and multi services organisational structure. This potential firms' evolution in the italian gas market will be considered also referring to specific international experience in this market [it

  13. The energy sector abroad. Part 5. Norwegian energy sector large exporter of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Some facts about the Norwegian natural gas and oil industry are presented. In 1995 the industries took 12.5% of GNP and no less than 47.6% of export revenues. The use of natural gas in Norway is low. In 1996 Norway exported 37.9 billion m 3 of natural gas. It is planned to double that volume within the next 10 years. Therefore, a strategic alliance between two major foreign competitors (Gasunie in the Netherlands and Gazprom in the Russian Federation) was not met with enthusiasm. The three most important companies in the Norwegian oil and gas industry are Statoil, Norsk Hydro, and Saga Petroleum. Overall turnover of the sector in 1994 was 40.6 billion Dutch guilders. Some 17,500 people are directly employed by the sector. 5 ills., 5 tabs

  14. Institutionalizing cross-border cooperatives on European level in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulusma, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    The third energy package proposes the establishment of an Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) and the establishment of a European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity (ENTSOE) and a European Network of Transmission System Operators for Gas (ENTSOG). This legislative initiative is a response to the need to further liberalise the energy sector and to create one single energy market. The proposals wish to remedy the lack of regulatory oversight for cross border issues and the existence of a regulatory gap on cross-border issues. This article addresses these proposals and places them in a historical context. The proposals indicate that the European legislator to some degree intends to institutionalize cross border cooperation of regulators and of transmission system operators. So far cross-border cooperation mostly has been brought about on a voluntary basis and not on the basis of European law. Also this cooperation takes place on a voluntary basis and largely outside the scope of the European Commission. If the proposals are excepted they will result in new forms of cooperation in the energy sector. The Agency will be a community body with legal personality that, besides having an advisory role, will in some circumstances be able to take binding decisions. Therefore it will entail more than voluntary cooperation and be a step closer to the establishment of a European regulator. With the creation of ENTSOG and ENTSOE cooperation between transmission system operators will for the first time be obligatory and take place on the basis of European legislation. It will therefore be a new phenomenon. Nevertheless, it is not always clear from the proposals what the result in practice will be nor how the new organizations will relate to each other, to the Commission and to the national regulators and transmission system operators. Currently, the main question is whether the proposals will be adopted by the Council and the European

  15. Marketing strategy for the BC oil and gas service sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-10-29

    The British Columbia (BC) oil and gas service sector is collaborating with the BC Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) to enhance the competitiveness of oil and gas service providers in Northeast BC. The MEM agreed to provide one-time funding to develop this marketing strategy for the oil and gas sector, particularly for small to medium-sized companies with limited resources. This document is also a resource tool for suppliers in the sector that have developed and are implementing their own marketing plans and wish to enhance elements of their own plans. The strategy also outlines the potential role of associations in Northeast BC that represent the service sector. It links their marketing activities with the activities of individual service providers. Local service providers (LSP) include companies in a wide range of businesses such as drilling support, transportation, health and safety services, and construction. Six issues that directly impact the competitiveness of LSPs were also presented along with recommendations for participants in the service sector, associations and individual companies. tabs., figs., 11 appendices.

  16. Marketing strategy for the BC oil and gas service sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The British Columbia (BC) oil and gas service sector is collaborating with the BC Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM) to enhance the competitiveness of oil and gas service providers in Northeast BC. The MEM agreed to provide one-time funding to develop this marketing strategy for the oil and gas sector, particularly for small to medium-sized companies with limited resources. This document is also a resource tool for suppliers in the sector that have developed and are implementing their own marketing plans and wish to enhance elements of their own plans. The strategy also outlines the potential role of associations in Northeast BC that represent the service sector. It links their marketing activities with the activities of individual service providers. Local service providers (LSP) include companies in a wide range of businesses such as drilling support, transportation, health and safety services, and construction. Six issues that directly impact the competitiveness of LSPs were also presented along with recommendations for participants in the service sector, associations and individual companies. tabs., figs., 11 appendices

  17. Gas Transport Services. West European Gas Transmission Tariff Comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-07-01

    Since 1999, the Dutch gas transmission company, Gastransport Services (GTS), has commissioned an independent consultant to prepare reports comparing gas transportation tariffs across Western Europe on an annual basis. This report describes the tariffs in force at 1 February 2006. The previous report was published in May 2005, and reported on the tariffs which were in force at 1 January 2005. Since then several companies have published revised carriage arrangements, or have adjusted their tariffs (e.g. to reflect inflation, or for other reasons). In this report we compare the GTS tariff with the transportation tariffs in eleven other countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. This means that all West European countries with Third Party Access to gas transmission systems (except Finland) are covered in this report. In this main part of the report, we concentrate on showing charts which illustrate the comparisons of tariffs, at various distances, volumes and load factors. This gives an overall picture of the tariffs offered by each company, rather than concentrating on particular cases. The detailed calculations for each of the 45 cases are shown in the Appendix to this report, and the conclusions from the cases are shown in a colour-coded chart in the Summary and Conclusions.

  18. Qualification Needs, Approaches and Strategies in the Second-Hand Sector A European Good Practice Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arold, Heike

    2008-01-01

    Against the background of changing consumer behaviour and environmental policies, a growing second-hand sector is expected. In order to ensure quality and professionalism within companies operating in this sector, it is necessary to develop a unified Europe-wide and sector-specific qualification which is geared to real working processes and requirements. This good practice report describes the training and qualification structures in the European second-hand sector. In addition, occupational ...

  19. Contagion effects of the global financial crisis in us and European real economy sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenourgios Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically investigates the contagion effects of the Global Financial Crisis (2007-2009 from the financial sector to the real economy by examining nine sectors of US and developed European region. We provide a regional analysis by testing stock market contagion on the aggregate level and the sector level, on the global level and the domestic/regional level. Results show evidence of global contagion in US and developed European aggregate stock market indices and all US sector indices, implying the limited benefits of portfolio diversification. On the other hand, most of the European regional sectors seem to be immune to the adverse effects of the crisis. Finally, all non-financial sectors of both geographical areas seem to be unaffected by their domestic financial systems. These findings have important implications for policy makers, investors and international organizations.

  20. Gas fuels for the transport sector; Denmark; Gas til transportsektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    Recent analyses suggest that especially biogas, but also natural gas in macroeconomic terms will be attractive propellants, including for heavy transport. To implement a Danish expansion of gas infrastructure for transportation, the report recommends the following essential elements: 1) A Danish rollout should be closely linked to contracts with fleet owners with heavy vehicles / taxis / vans and the like, thus ensuring high utilization of filling stations; 2) About 10 larger, flexible CNG filling stations set up at major fleet owners is estimated as sufficient for an initial deployment phase, strategically distributed in and around Copenhagen, the major cities and along the main road network from Sweden to Germany; 3) A certain time-limited funding for the construction of infrastructure is likely to cause a rapid spread, if desired, and if other business conditions are in place; 4) There is a need for adjustment of tax terms - the rules for green taxes should be adjusted, and it should be considered to lower the taxes on CNG and biogas; 5) Natural gas mixed with biogas should be an integral element of a comprehensive strategy to ensure maximum CO{sub 2} displacement. (LN)

  1. The First Steps Towards Harmonizing Public Sector Accounting for European Union Member States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam; Alijarde, Isabel Brusca

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the process that led the European Commission to the decision to develop European Public Sector Accounting Standards (EPSAS) for harmonizing public sector accounting practices within the European Union. The paper finds that there was limited scope in terms of stakeholder...... participation in the public consultation that served as a basis for the decision. In addition, the decision to adopt EPSAS for EU member states raises questions on the relationship between regional and global governance in the area of public sector accounting....

  2. Market Barriers to Increased Efficiency in the European On-road Freight Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarnink, S.; Faber, J.; Den Boer, E.

    2012-10-15

    There are numerous technical and operational measures available to improve the fuel efficiency of truck fleets, but many of these measures are currently not universally implemented. Even cost-effective measures (i.e., measures which can be implemented with net fuel savings that outweigh the initial technology costs and potentially at a net profit) are often not adopted. The main barrier is the lack of information on the fuel savings of individual technical measures for trucks and especially trailers. While many transport companies and all original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are aware that certain technologies exist, few respondents believe that these technologies are cost-effective. As a result of this belief, the supply of fuel-saving technologies from OEMs is limited. This report aims to better understand the reasons for the limited adoption of cost-effective fuel-saving technologies and to inform the policy-making process in the European Union and abroad, and specifically to provide input to the European Commission's strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from HDVs. The primary goal of the study is to identify the barriers to the implementation of technologies that improve fuel efficiency in the European road freight transport sector. For this report, the existence and importance of barriers were analyzed through surveys of and interviews with transport companies, OEMs, shippers and logistics service providers.

  3. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the Ontario automotive sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-11-01

    A variety of options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the automotive sector in Ontario over the next decade were discussed. Each option was assessed in terms of practicality and implications for implementation. I was concluded that improvements in fuel economy anticipated from advancing technology, with or without new mandated standards, will not be enough to offset the impact of growth in vehicle fleet size and kilometres driven. If the goal is to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions, other measures such as reducing the fleet size and vehicle kilometres travelled and accelerated vehicle retirement (scrappage) programs must be considered. Key constraints on expansion of the alternative fuel fleet were identified. These include: (1) limited availability of an adequate range of alternative fuel vehicles at competitive prices, (2) limited refuelling facility infrastructure in the case of natural gas, limited range and fuel storage capacity for natural gas; (3)current limited fuel ethanol production capacity, and (4) market perceptions of performance, reliability and safety. tabs

  4. The European Gas and Oil Market: The Role of Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbo, F.

    2008-01-01

    The research question of this paper is related to the role of Norway in the European gas and oil market. This study aims to give a presentation of the energy policy in Norway and Norwegian participation at the European level. The first chapter will introduce Norwegian relations with Europe. For the purpose of my research, I will focus mainly on Norwegian energy policy in the second chapter, presenting Norway's oil industry in chapter 2.1.; Norwegian gas production in chapter 2.2.; and the Norwegian electrical power system in chapter 2.3. The sub-chapter 2.4. will analyse in detail the activity of the largest Norwegian oil and gas company, StatoilHydro. The third chapter will be dedicated to Norway's green energy policy (wind, sun and water), etc. The fourth chapter looks at the European perspective and will examine the European strategic gas and oil market in a globalized world. The fifth chapter will present Norway's participation in the European gas and oil market. Such strategic research must also include a look at the European Union's (EU) energy market development between Russia and Norway, which will be presented in chapter six. And finally, Norway's contribution to the development of an EU energy policy in fighting climate change will be emphasised in chapter seven. This research will analyse the following central issues: - Norwegian oil industry, - Norwegian gas production, - Norwegian electrical power system, - Norwegian challenges in the European gas and oil market. (author)

  5. Gas transportation tariffs in the european union market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, A.

    2001-01-01

    In a liberalised market, it is an indubitable competitive advantage for a firm to accede at the gas grid with a low cost. The comparison among gas transportation tariffs of 18 European gas transportation companies for a big industrial consumer, shows that Italy is in the medium-high position of the ranking [it

  6. Open innovation in the European space sector : existing practices, constraints and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Burg, E.; Giannopapa, C.G.; Reymen, I.M.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    To enhance innovative output and societal spillover of the European space sector, the open innovation approach is becoming popular. Yet, open innovation, referring to innovation practices that cross borders of individual firms, faces constraints. To explore these constraints and identify

  7. Evaluation of Economic Merger Control Techniques Applied to the European Electricity Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandezande, Leen; Meeus, Leonardo; Delvaux, Bram; Van Calster, Geert; Belmans, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    With European electricity markets not yet functioning on a competitive basis and consolidation increasing, the European Commission has said it intends to more intensively apply competition law in the electricity sector. Yet economic techniques and theories used in EC merger control fail to take sufficiently into account some specific features of electricity markets. The authors offer suggestions to enhance their reliability and applicability in the electricity sector. (author)

  8. The European gas market at the 2008 prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    Because of the opening of European energy markets to competition and to the dynamism of gas consumption, the natural gas market has become very attractive. In parallel, the development of infrastructures (in particular for the LNG industry) offer setting up possibilities to newcomers. Moreover, the synergies linked to the gas/electricity convergence diminish the boundary between electricity and gas markets. In this context, the historical operators of European gas markets have to face the offensive of oil and electric power companies. This study tackles the following questions: what are the gas demand evolution prospects? What are the most attractive consumption areas? How gas prices will change in mid-term? What is the competitive intensity of national markets? Which commercial positioning is to be adopted? What future for dual offers? What is the advantage of regulated activities for operators? Who are the best positioned actors? What will be the mid-term role of Gazprom? What are the mid-term prospects of European market reconfiguration? This study analyses the strategy and positioning of the main European gas operators and shows their forces and weaknesses. It includes a financial comparison of the 20 main groups present in the European natural gas market. This analysis allows to propose 4 scenarios of mid-term evolution for this market. (J.S.)

  9. Financial Integration Through Benchmarks: The European Banking Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Moerman (Gerard); R.J. Mahieu (Ronald); C.G. Koedijk (Kees)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractEuropean banking regulation has been harmonized to a high degree over the last few decades. Nevertheless, the European banking industry remains fragmented as shown by the relatively high market shares of banks in their home countries. In this paper we concentrate on the integration

  10. Training in the Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector. Report for the FORCE Programme. European Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Felix; And Others

    Trends in training for employment in the motor vehicle repair and sales sectors in the 12 European Community (EC) countries were identified through a review of 12 national reports that were prepared by 16 research teams involved in an EC study on continuing training in the motor vehicle sales and repair sector. Special attention was paid to the…

  11. Interest organizations across economic sectors : explaining interest group density in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Joost; Carroll, Brendan J.; Braun, Caelesta; Chalmers, Adam W.; Destrooper, Tine; Lowery, David; Otjes, Simon; Rasmussen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The number of interest organizations (density) varies across policy domains, political issues and economic sectors. This shapes the nature and outcomes of interest representation. In this contribution, we explain the density of interest organizations per economic sector in the European Union on the

  12. Interest organizations across economic sectors: explaining interest group density in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Joost; Carroll, Brendan; Braun, Caelesta; Chalmers, Adam; De Strooper, Tine; Lowery, David; Otjes, Simon; Rasmussen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The number of interest organizations (density) varies across policy domains, political issues and economic sectors. This shapes the nature and outcomes of interest representation. In this contribution, we explain the density of interest organizations per economic sector in the European Union on the

  13. Innovation in the European energy sector and regulatory responses to it : Guest editorial note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, T.; Butenko, Anna; Heldeweg, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    The European energy sector is an important economic sector that is also traditionally highly regulated. With the increasing tempo in which innovations in technology and markets occur, catalysed inter alia by the energy transition and accompanied by new formats of innovation (disruptive and

  14. Innovation in the European energy sector and regulatory responses to it : Guest editorial note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, Thomas; Butenko, Anna; Heldeweg, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    The European energy sector is an important economic sector that is also traditionally highly regulated. With the increasing tempo in which innovations in technology and markets occur, catalysed inter alia by the energy transition and accompanied by new formats of innovation (disruptive and

  15. African Financial Sectors and the European Debt Crisis : Will Trouble Blow across the Sahara?

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    The exposure of African financial sectors to global risks, including the likely fall-out of the on-going European debt crisis, continues to be limited. African financial sectors have received much recognition for their steady growth performance and resilience during and after the 2008 global financial crisis. Many of the transmission channels for global risks and financial contagion to fin...

  16. DETERMINING THE DYNAMICS OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN NATURAL GAS SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naciye Güliz UĞUR

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the factors affecting customer satisfaction of the offered services in the natural gas distribution industry. Defining the factors affecting the satisfaction of the offered services are among the instruments which will be used to cope with increased competition and become a preferred institution. For this purpose a questionnaire is developed and implemented with 2043 participants in order to determine the factors of customer satisfaction in the natural gas sector. Within this research, the factors are examined according to several demographic variables to analyze if they differ depending the variables. Findings reveal that, in natural gas industry, customer satisfaction of the offered services vary according to ownership, age, gender, level of education and subscription period satisfaction.

  17. Natural gas supply strategies for European energy market actors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girault, Vincent

    2007-06-01

    The liberalization of the European energy markets leads to the diversification of supplies. Hence, we analyse the natural gas importation problem in a power producer point of view. Upstream and downstream natural gas markets are concentrated. In this oligopoly context, our topic is to focus on strategies which modify natural gas sourcing price. This by studying the surplus sharing on the natural gas chain. A European firm can bundle gas and electricity outputs to increase its market share. Therefore, a bundling strategy of a power producer in competition with a natural gas reseller on the final European energy market increases upstream natural gas price. Bundling also acts as a raising rival cost strategy and reduces the rivals' profit. Profits opportunities incite natural gas producers to enter the final market. Vertical integration between a natural gas producer and a European gas reseller is a way, for producers, to catch end consumer surplus. Vertical integration results in the foreclosure of the power producer on the upstream natural gas market. To be active on the natural gas market, the power producer could supply bundles. But, this strategy reallocates the rent. The integrated firm on natural gas gets the rent of electricity market in expenses of the power producer. Then, a solution for the power producer is to supply gas and electricity as complements. Then, we consider a case where vertical integration is not allowed. Input price discrimination by a monopolist leads to a lower natural gas price for the actor which diversifies its supplying sources. Furthermore, a bundling strategy increases the gap between the price proposed to the firm which also diversify its output and the firm which is fully dependent from the producer to supply natural gas on final market. (author)

  18. Reducing the Green House Gas Emissions from the Transportation Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewande Akinnikawe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, two thirds of the carbon monoxide and about one third of carbon dioxide emissions come from the transportation sector. Ways to reduce these emissions in the future include replacing gasoline and diesel by biofuels, or by blend of biofuels with conventional gasoline and diesel, or by compressed natural gas (CNG, or by replacing internal combustion engines by electric motors powered by hydrogen fuel cells or battery-powered electric vehicles recharged from the electric grid. This presentation will review these technologies the fuel production pathways, when they are likely to be available, and by what fraction transportation sector green house gas emissions could be reduced by each. A well-to-wheels (WTW analysis is performed on each vehicle/ fuel technology using the GREET model and the total energy use, the CO 2 emissions, NO x emissions, SO x emissions for the life cycle of the vehicle technologies are calculated. Prospects for reducing foreign oil dependence as well as mitigating green house gases emission from the transportation sector will be considered in the analysis.

  19. Russian natural gas policy and its possible effects on European gas markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, O.; Locatelli, C.

    1997-01-01

    There is a growing perception among Western European gas experts that Russia has developed a considerable gas surplus - the Russian gas bubble. Thus, the question clearly arises how much gas is available for export and how much gas, over the next 15 to 20 years, can the Russian quasi-monopolist Gazprom market in Western Europe. We consider that Gazprom's export strategy mirrors the approach of Russia's natural gas policy towards the Western European market. In this paper, we will focus on the characteristics of Gazprom's export strategy, its underlying logic, and its impact on Western European gas markets. As a consequence of Gazprom's export strategy, the Russian gas company faces today a price quantity dilemma. Gazprom's problem is to place as much gas as possible in the growing Western European gas market, without destroying downstream gas prices. We argue that Gazprom has adopted a market share expansion and downstream vertical integration strategy, aimed at capturing a part of the downstream gas rent. Although this strategy appears to have initiated a form of gas to gas competition in a number of European consumer markets, this strategy is not based on an aggressive price policy. However, in order to live up to its ambitions, there is a chance that Gazprom will have to somewhat relax traditional contract clauses, such as contract length, indexation terms and take or pay conditions. (author)

  20. ROMANIA’S NEGOTIATIONS WITH EUROPEAN UNION REGARDING AGRICULTURAL SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard IONESCU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of negotiations considering the agricultural and alimentary sectors results, from the one hand from their importance in Romanian economy, from the fact that, on the results of negotiations held with EU officials depends the re-launching capacity of these sectors, of Romanian agro-alimentary market,the amendment of their contribution to general economic increase, durable rural development and population life standard improvement generally and specially to the one in rural medium. But, on the other hand, these negotiations importance is also generated by the fact that the Romania’s agriculture structural problems are hard to solve, the disequilibrium from agricultural sector are bigger compare to the ones of other states and their rectifying is more difficult.

  1. How much room is left for European gas incumbents?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwark, Bastian

    2007-07-01

    In the context of the liberalization of the European natural gas market former monopolists face a challenge to react to market opening by realigning their strategies. Three major groups of companies can be identified that are capable to influence the European gas market significantly each with a distinctive competitive advantage. They consist of the historical gas incumbents, the power incumbents moving into gas as well as the integrated oil and gas producers moving downwards the supply chain by enlarging their supply division. The aim of the paper is to identify the strategic opportunities of the aforementioned three groups and to asses their success. The analysis is done by means of 22 selected companies that are highly active in the EU gas market. An assessment of their market data and comparisons between the three groups will be done. The firms will be matched according to the potential strategic groups and an outlook given in terms of the development of competition in the European gas market. The results sustain the assumption that the playing field for European gas incumbents is going to decrease as both electricity incumbents and integrated oil and gas producers have significant competitive advantages in their potential moves. (auth)

  2. A review of the oil and gas sector in Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, M.J.; Pulsipher, A.G. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Center for Energy Studies

    2007-02-15

    Kazakhstan is endowed with significant oil and gas resources and is expected to become one of the world's top 10 oil producers within the next decade. The high cost of doing business in the country, however, means that Kazakhstan will need to improve its institutional framework to successfully compete for Western investment. A large degree of risk and uncertainty continues to plague the oil and gas sector as the government makes significant changes to the petroleum tax legislation and takes an aggressive approach in ''rebalancing'' contractual arrangements with industry. High levels of bureaucracy, regulatory burden, and corruption persist, and economic factors appear to be subordinated increasingly to geopolitical objectives aimed to strengthen relationships with China and Russia. The rapid pace of change and the high degree of uncertainty present significant challenges and risk to foreign investment. The purpose of this paper is to review the oil and gas sector in Kazakhstan and highlight recent developments in the petroleum legislation, business climate and government policy. (author)

  3. A review of the oil and gas sector in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Pulsipher, Allan G.

    2007-01-01

    Kazakhstan is endowed with significant oil and gas resources and is expected to become one of the world's top 10 oil producers within the next decade. The high cost of doing business in the country, however, means that Kazakhstan will need to improve its institutional framework to successfully compete for Western investment. A large degree of risk and uncertainty continues to plague the oil and gas sector as the government makes significant changes to the petroleum tax legislation and takes an aggressive approach in 'rebalancing' contractual arrangements with industry. High levels of bureaucracy, regulatory burden, and corruption persist, and economic factors appear to be subordinated increasingly to geopolitical objectives aimed to strengthen relationships with China and Russia. The rapid pace of change and the high degree of uncertainty present significant challenges and risk to foreign investment. The purpose of this paper is to review the oil and gas sector in Kazakhstan and highlight recent developments in the petroleum legislation, business climate and government policy

  4. European gas markets and Russian LNG. Prospects for the development of European gas markets and model simulations of possible new LNG supplies from year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldegard, Tom [Foundation for Research in Economics and Business Administration, Bergen (Norway)

    1996-07-01

    The study aims at clarifying the framework for possible LNG exports from Northern Russia and focuses on the European natural gas markets. The first stage provides general background information on the market structure and related topics. In the second stage this information is used to develop a formal market model and subject it to simulations with various assumptions of the future gas supply. The model is described and results from simulations are given. In the first stage facts from the history of the European natural gas market are outlined. Underlying conditions for the development of natural gas markets in Europe are addressed. The EU has been promoting trade liberalisation in the energy sector but most counties resist freer gas trade across the boarders. New infrastructure development for natural gas are either underway or planned. Some important projects are mentioned. Gas in a global perspective is discussed. The cost structure of the LNG chain is mentioned and an overview of existing LNG export capacities world-wide and major reception terminals in Europe and the USA is given. The second stage employs a scenario analysis to evaluate the economic effects of hypothetical LNG deliveries from Northern Russia. The model is developed for the analysis of West European natural gas markets and designed to allow users to create a structural system of interconnected producers and market regions. Basic assumptions for the evolution of natural gas markets till 2005 is developed and base case scenarios calculated for the years 2000 and 2005 and used as a point of reference for the alternative scenarios considered. According to the analysis the introduction of a new LNG supplier in the European gas market will inflict a substantial loss upon all the existing producers. The primary keys to this result are the assumptions made for gas demand and supply capacity. The LNG alternative will hardly be approved for purely economic reasons as long as the Russians maintain

  5. European gas markets and Russian LNG. Prospects for the development of European gas markets and model simulations of possible new LNG supplies from year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldegard, Tom

    1996-01-01

    The study aims at clarifying the framework for possible LNG exports from Northern Russia and focuses on the European natural gas markets. The first stage provides general background information on the market structure and related topics. In the second stage this information is used to develop a formal market model and subject it to simulations with various assumptions of the future gas supply. The model is described and results from simulations are given. In the first stage facts from the history of the European natural gas market are outlined. Underlying conditions for the development of natural gas markets in Europe are addressed. The EU has been promoting trade liberalisation in the energy sector but most counties resist freer gas trade across the boarders. New infrastructure development for natural gas are either underway or planned. Some important projects are mentioned. Gas in a global perspective is discussed. The cost structure of the LNG chain is mentioned and an overview of existing LNG export capacities world-wide and major reception terminals in Europe and the USA is given. The second stage employs a scenario analysis to evaluate the economic effects of hypothetical LNG deliveries from Northern Russia. The model is developed for the analysis of West European natural gas markets and designed to allow users to create a structural system of interconnected producers and market regions. Basic assumptions for the evolution of natural gas markets till 2005 is developed and base case scenarios calculated for the years 2000 and 2005 and used as a point of reference for the alternative scenarios considered. According to the analysis the introduction of a new LNG supplier in the European gas market will inflict a substantial loss upon all the existing producers. The primary keys to this result are the assumptions made for gas demand and supply capacity. The LNG alternative will hardly be approved for purely economic reasons as long as the Russians maintain

  6. Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Catering sector - Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the respective national and supranational actors (i.e. trade unions and employer organisations) in the field of industrial relations in the contract catering sector in the Netherlands. In order to determine their relative importance in the

  7. Growing like mushrooms? Sectoral evidence from four large European economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldi, C.; Sapio, S.

    This paper follows a stream of literature on the empirics of sectoral growth rates, originated by Castaldi and Dosi (Income levels and income growth. Some new cross-country evidence and some interpretative puzzles. LEM Working Paper 2004-18, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, 2004)

  8. Growing like mushrooms? Sectoral evidence from four large European economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldi, C.; Sapio, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper follows a stream of literature on the empirics of sectoral growth rates, originated by Castaldi and Dosi (Income levels and income growth. Some new cross-country evidence and some interpretative puzzles. LEM Working Paper 2004-18, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, 2004)

  9. The importance of North Sea gas to European energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probert, R.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas can, of course, be transported over very long distances but, because of the economics of gas transmission, its impact is most often local. This has certainly been the case with North Sea gas, which has clearly contributed significantly to European energy supply and will continue to do so for some time to come. The historical importance of the discovery of gas in the North Sea has been that it has enabled natural gas industries to grow rapidly in North West Europe. Without North Sea gas and Dutch gas it is difficult to see how town gas would have been replaced in North West Europe. Certainly, a much smaller natural gas industry would have emerged. North Sea gas has inevitably had the greatest impact on gas markets in the countries of the European Community and this will remain the case in future. Nevertheless, it is inevitable that gas will, in future, flow across more national boundaries than in the past, and that North Sea gas will have an important part to play in meeting the Central European demand for competitively priced, secure supplies. This paper discusses the United Kingdom market for gas and future demand both in the United Kingdom and more widely in Europe. An examination of the availability of gas supplies from the North Sea suggests that it is unlikely that there will be a surplus of gas for export from the United Kingdom continental shelf. Norway will remain the main source of exports, with the Netherlands also in a strong position. Transportation and political aspects are also considered. (author)

  10. Commercial sector gas cooling technology frontier and market share analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pine, G.D.; Mac Donald, J.M.; McLain, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method, developed for the Gas Research Institute of the United States, that can assist planning for commercial sector natural gas cooling systems R and D. These systems are higher in first cost than conventional electric chillers. Yet, engine-driven chiller designs exist which are currently competitive in U.S. markets typified by high electricity or demand charges. Section II describes a scenario analysis approach used to develop and test the method. Section III defines the technology frontier, a conceptual tool for identifying new designs with sales potential. Section IV describes a discrete choice method for predicting market shares of technologies with sales potential. Section V shows how the method predicts operating parameter, cost, and/or performance goals for technologies without current sales potential (or for enhancing a frontier technology's sales potential). Section VI concludes with an illustrative example for the Chicago office building retrofit market

  11. Lobbying in the European union – regulation and public sector economics perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Dvořáková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lobbying has become an inseparable companion of the decision-making process and firms but also other social actors (non-governmental organizations, individuals, private and civil sector are forced to reflect this fact, if they want to promote their interests effectively and if they want to avoid regulation that would harm their interests. The paper analyses the regulation of lobbying in European institutions and focuses on two major institutions which are under pressure of the lobbyists, the European Commission and the European Parliament. The paper discusses and presents the both ways of regulation which occur in the European institutions- the concept of self-regulation and the binding Code of Conduct under the Rules of Procedure in the European Parliament.The paper contains also possible economic consequences of lobbying based on the Public Sector Economics perspective and the methodology of the principal-agent relationship.

  12. European Human Resources Observatory for the Nuclear Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flore, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Institute for Energy and Transport provides support to European Union policies and technology innovation to ensure sustainable, safe, secure and efficient energy production, distribution and use and to foster sustainable and efficient transport in Europe. Briefly outlined are the organization, bottom-up approach and top-down approach

  13. Employability and the psychological contract in European ICT sector SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholarios, D.; van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.; van der Schoot, E.; Bozionelos, N.; Epitropaki, O.; Knauth, P.; Marzec, I.; Mikkelsen, A.; van der Heijde, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the employability of information and communication technology (ICT) professionals from the perspective of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The first stage of analysis, based on over 100 interviews with managers of ICT supplier companies in seven European countries

  14. European standards applied by Gas Transmission System Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witek, M.; Kuchta, K.; Oleszkiewicz, J.; Teperek, T.

    2005-01-01

    The lecture described actual state of implementation of European standards concerning transmission of natural gas and underlined their importance for proper performance of Transmission System Operator (TSO). European standards implemented to Polish Standards as PN-EN, necessary for TSO, related to design, construction and operation of high pressure gas network were also described. The lecture underlined as well the impact of standards application on preparation process of national regulations. They obligate TSO to create the technical conditions that ensure safety of gas transmission network functioning as well as environmental and surroundings safety. (authors)

  15. Russian and European gas interdependence: Could contractual trade channel geopolitics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, Dominique; Locatelli, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In a framework of international political economics, this article analyses the increasing distance between Russia and the European Union (EU) in their interdependent relationship with regard to gas. The representations of economic risks associated with the dominant position of the Russian seller in the European gas market are analysed in terms of industrial economics. Then the relevance of possible responses by the EU is analysed in relation to the reality of alleged risks of gas dependence: the tentative EU-Russia regulatory unification, the creation of a single gas negotiator, and the support to a denser pan-European network, with additional entry points and sources of supply and increased market integration in order to increase the contestability of the markets

  16. Greenhouse gas mitigation potentials in the livestock sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Mario; Henderson, Benjamin; Havlík, Petr; Thornton, Philip K.; Conant, Richard T.; Smith, Pete; Wirsenius, Stefan; Hristov, Alexander N.; Gerber, Pierre; Gill, Margaret; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Valin, Hugo; Garnett, Tara; Stehfest, Elke

    2016-05-01

    The livestock sector supports about 1.3 billion producers and retailers, and contributes 40-50% of agricultural GDP. We estimated that between 1995 and 2005, the livestock sector was responsible for greenhouse gas emissions of 5.6-7.5 GtCO2e yr-1. Livestock accounts for up to half of the technical mitigation potential of the agriculture, forestry and land-use sectors, through management options that sustainably intensify livestock production, promote carbon sequestration in rangelands and reduce emissions from manures, and through reductions in the demand for livestock products. The economic potential of these management alternatives is less than 10% of what is technically possible because of adoption constraints, costs and numerous trade-offs. The mitigation potential of reductions in livestock product consumption is large, but their economic potential is unknown at present. More research and investment are needed to increase the affordability and adoption of mitigation practices, to moderate consumption of livestock products where appropriate, and to avoid negative impacts on livelihoods, economic activities and the environment.

  17. Comparative Study and Critical Analysis of Sustainability Reporting in the Oil and Gas Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Prakash M.

    2006-01-01

    Oil and Gas sector is one of the largest and major economic sectors globally. It is also one of the most critical in terms of being a basic driver for all other economic activities worldwide. In the recent times we have seen large scale volatility in Oil and Gas prices and a surge in huge profits for Oil and Gas sector companies. Oil and Gas sector is also one of the major sectors with tremendous impact on not just environmental factors but also on Social and Economic factors. All major Oil a...

  18. Gas allocation plans based on failures scenarios: PETROBRAS-Gas and Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faertes, Denise; Vieira, Flavia; Saker, Leonardo; Heil, Luciana [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Galvao, Joao [DNV, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present gas allocation plans developed for PETROBRAS Gas and Power Sector, considering failure to supply scenarios that could occur along gas supply network. Those scenarios, as well as the associated contingency plans, were identified and validated by an experienced team, composed by engineers and operators from different PETROBRAS sectors. The key issue of concern was the anticipation of possible undesired scenarios that could imply on contract shortfalls, the evaluation of possible maneuvers, taking into account best gas delivery allocation. Different software were used for the simulation of best gas supply allocation and for the verification of delivery pressure and conditions for final consumers. The ability of being capable of dealing with undesired or crisis scenarios, based on suitable anticipation levels, is, nowadays, a highly valuable attribute to be presented by competitive corporations, for best crisis management and prompt recovery response. Those plans are being used by Gas and Power Gas Operation Control Centre and as an input for reliability modeling of gas supply chain. (author)

  19. Dynamic analysis of natural gas distribution sector in Bahia: case study of the Gas State Company entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    For the Natural Gas Distribution Sector in Bahia, some preliminary scenarios and theoretical concerns are presented under the perspectives of the Gas State Company entry. These scenarios are derived from the going institutional changes and physical expansion of the Sector with the increasing natural gas usage. The study has the objective of anticipating, for the State Government and its partners in the Company, the strategies and relevant problems for a successful entrance into this Sector. (author)

  20. Size, Role and Performance in the Oil and Gas Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mansell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas sector is a key driver of the Canadian and Albertan economies. Directly and indirectly it typically accounts for roughly half of Alberta’s GDP, as well as one-third of the country’s business investment and a quarter of business profits — and rising global demand will only add to these figures. However, that energy sector is also a changeable place populated by companies of all shapes and sizes, from small Emerging Juniors to wellestablished Majors whose daily production capacities are hundreds or thousands of times greater. The sector’s assorted firms have different structures and ambitions, respond in distinct ways to market forces and have unique impacts on the economy. These differences in size, role and performance must be reflected in energy and related economic policies if they are to be effective in achieving policy goals. For example, they must recognize that the smallest firms are not always the fastest growers or the most innovative; that Intermediates are the most highly leveraged, with the highest debt-to-equity ratios; and that while Majors tend to have the lowest average cost per well drilled, they also (along with Emerging Juniors have the highest operating costs. Despite the industry’s critical importance, relatively little hard data has been made available concerning companies’ structure, behaviour and performance, based on size. This paper goes a considerable way toward filling that gap, bringing together comprehensive datasets on 340 public oil and gas firms to chart essential patterns and trends, so policymakers and industry watchers can better understand the complexity and functioning of this important sector.

  1. Western European gas: economic versus strategic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppard, Michael.

    1994-01-01

    Concerns over the export of Russian gas to Western Europe are aired in this paper. Although gas deliveries continue to flow to the economic benefit of both buyers and seller, some critics fear supply disruptions, of the sort common in the old Soviet Union. Proponents of the scheme argue for its economic benefits and dismiss concerns of the strategic leverage it gives the Russian Federation, pointing out that Western Europe's dependence on imported oil is much higher than upon natural gas. The technology for gas storage is seen as a priority to defeat the strategic importance of possible supply disruptions. It is argued that the United Kingdom will eventually distance itself economically from Germany, France, Italy and Spain in terms of its energy policy as our policy of diversification moves away from their commitment to free market forces. (UK)

  2. A Sectoral Approach to Training in the Printing Industry and the Hospital Sector. Synthesis Report of a Study in Five European Countries. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmerdam, John

    The development of sectoral training systems in two economic sectors--the printing industry and the sector of health care in hospitals--was examined in a study that entailed parallel research projects in five European countries: Belgium, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom. The study was based on the assumption that the…

  3. New European context for gas producers/operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyirmendjian, J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the European Union towards more integration would enter a new phase if the draft Third Directive regarding the natural gas industry and the deregulation of gas markets would be validated as it stands. The stakes for gas producing/operating companies are very high: they must position themselves either as networks and installations companies or as production and trading companies - meaning regulation and recurring revenues or the opportunities and risks of production and trade. Changes such these, added to the globalisation of gas flows linked to the development of liquefied natural gas (LNG), require more investments than in the past. These additional investments and this technological progress nevertheless give hope that this transformation will not noticeably weaken the security of gas supplies within the European Union (EU) despite the greater volatility of the markets, which are increasingly dominated by the strategies of financial operators. The author reviews the history of the development of the gas distribution networks in Europe and discusses details of the new draft directive aiming at more competition on a market that has been dominated so far by vertical structures. Similarities and differences to the deregulation of the European electricity market are discussed. The divergent attitudes of the EU Member States and the negotiation strategy of the European Commission are discussed. Merges of gas and electricity utilities are on the agenda. The author then reviews the current situation of natural gas consumption and supplies and the transportation and distribution facilities. Political factors influencing the security of supply are discussed. Underground gas storage facilities are crucial in this context. Several projects for new main gas pipelines are discussed. Diversification of supply sources is considered as of strategic relevance. The article is richly illustrated and includes several maps and diagrams.

  4. European natural gas economics in a global context: the longer run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radetzki, M.

    1996-01-01

    Introductory comments on the conference theme and the papers to be presented at this 1995 meeting of SNS Energy were provided. The conference was devoted to 'European Natural Gas Economics', a topic particularly appropriate at this time, in view of the widening of the market as a result of the integration of Central and Eastern European countries following the default of the Soviet Union. Other factors affecting the future of the natural gas market in Europe, such as the recent challenge by Wingas to Ruhrgas' dominance in Germany, the emergence of a spot gas market in the UK, and the threat to prevailing arrangements by the Interconnector, soon to bring gas from the UK to the Continent, were also cited. Papers scheduled for presentation on natural ags supply, on gas prices and gas shares in different sectors of the energy market, on interaction between governments, the EU Commission and the main market actors in shaping the natural gas market, and on the extension of gas use to new geographical regions were briefly characterized

  5. European preparations for the ITER VV sectors manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Lawrence; Arbogast, Jean-Francois; Bayon, Angel; Galvan, Stefano; Giraud, Benoit; Ioki, Kimihiro; Losasso, Marcello; Mico, Gonzalo; Stamos, Vassilis; Trentea, Alexandru; Utin, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    For the benefit of the bidders for the Call-for-Tender for the 7 sectors of the ITER Vacuum Vessel, launched in early 2010, a large amount of relevant technical information was included to ensure a rapid start to successful manufacture programme, without the need for a full-scale prototype, which would cause an unacceptable delay to the ITER schedule. The methodology of the logical structures of the specification and the additional planned mock-ups are described and the results from nearly a decade of R and D and manufacturing studies carried out inside the EU under the auspices of EFDA and F4E are also summarised. The work covers the evolution of novel manufacturing schemes and technologies, including a modular special local machining centre for making holes in the shell of the vessel with weld preparation included. New results from the combined studies by three parties, and using a round-robin trial system on the UT inspection of single-sided welds, including the successful control of the root side are described. A full-scale, partial prototype has demonstrated the successful construction segments using jigs to control the distortion from conventional welding, from the inner shell to the outer shell, and then the joining of the segments to form a part sector. The paper also summarises the results from the prototype segment, manufactured without jigs and using only EB welds. In order to be able to achieve the required as-welded tight tolerances, two specialised computational techniques have been developed, using SYSWELD and ANSYS codes and calibrated with the mock-ups in order to efficiently predict welding distortions. Based on this successful practical and theoretical work, computer models of the complete poloidal segments or sectors, including jigs, were can now generated and used to investigate many welding sequences in order to optimise the construction and achieve all the tolerances.

  6. European Union gas market liberalization: a windfall effect for Russia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Natural gas has a growing importance in the European Union energy. However, because of the lack of resources in its territory, the EU is highly dependent on imports to meet its gas needs. In parallel, since 1998 the EU seeks the creation of a single and liberalized natural gas market. The aim of this thesis is to investigate whether the gas market liberalization can create a risk for importers' bargaining power and more widely to the gas security of supply of the EU. The first chapter provides an overview of the European gas market. It deals with the implementation of the process of gas market liberalization, the external dependency of the EU and the weakness of gas supply diversity. Using findings from the previous chapter, the second one proposes a model from the cooperative game theory to analyze the effects of the EU natural gas market liberalization on importers' bargaining power. It shows that the liberalization weakens importers' bargaining power vis-a-vis external suppliers, where Russia is the leader. It also shows that the implementation of a European gas purchasing agency offers a counter-power to the EU that balances bargaining power. The third chapter focuses on the development of LNG in the world and more specifically in the EU market. The development of LNG in Europe allows the entry of new operators on the upstream and, thus, increases competition among the EU's suppliers for the benefit of importers' bargaining power. The last chapter analyzes the impact of US shale gas development on the EU gas market. Thus, it shows that development is accompanied by an uncertainty about the future gas demand in the EU and by a reconsideration of the EU's long-term contracts. (author)

  7. The European Gas Market Looking for its Golden Age?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoun, Marie-Claire; Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2015-10-01

    The EU gas policy has to deal with a new landscape on the supply and demand sides. This study examines five major recent evolutions of the EU gas market: the relations with Russia, LNG coming back to Europe, the decrease of Groningen production, the contrasted evolutions of shale gas and the perspectives of EU natural gas demand. The European energy market has to face numerous challenges to achieve a successful energy transition, preserve its competitiveness and ensure its security of supply. While the EU Communication on Energy Union published in February 2015 has today given new impetus to Europe's gas policy, this policy has to deal with a new environment both in terms of supply and demand. On the supply side, the new strategy must henceforth deal with complex relations with Russia. Tensions between Russia and Ukraine along with economic sanctions against Russia have led Gazprom - the EU's leading supplier - to review its strategy towards Europe. While the 'Power of Siberia' project is already underway, Russia's own pivot towards Asia as announced by Vladimir Putin is turning out to be more difficult than expected: China and Russia have still not been able to find an agreement on the Western route. For some time, Gazprom seemed to want to cut its involvement in European gas assets significantly, due to problems with market liberalization rules. Today, Moscow is sending mixed messages to Europe, first by announcing the Turkish Stream project to deliver gas to Europe's gates, and then by extending the Nord Stream pipeline. The renewed interest in the EU market by Gazprom is indicative of the importance of this market, which provides the Russian company with the bulk of its gas revenues. Europe also has to deal with faster than expected declines in its own output. The Groningen field in the Netherlands, the EU's main gas producer, has suffered major restrictions since January 2014, due to significant earthquake risks. The Dutch government has to ensure the safety

  8. Lessons learnt from a sectoral analysis of greenhouse gas mitigation potential in the Balkans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulou, E.; Mirasgedis, S.; Sarafidis, Y.; Gakis, N.; Hontou, V.; Lalas, D.P.; Steiner, D.; Tuerk, A.; Fruhmann, C.; Pucker, J.

    2015-01-01

    Balkan countries in the process of joining the European Union shall adopt greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets and implement appropriate mitigation policies and measures. This paper presents a simplified methodological framework based on marginal abatement cost curves for estimating the technical and economic mitigation potential at sectoral level (buildings and road transport) in selected Balkan countries. The results of the analysis provide to decision makers useful information regarding the availability of background data, the potential for setting ambitious mitigation targets, and detailed tools for assisting the selection of policies and measures to meet these targets. The analysis performed shows that a significant part of the greenhouse gas emissions abatement potential can be achieved through win–win measures. The incorporation of environmental externalities associated with these interventions, estimated through benefits transfer, further improves the economic performance of these measures, especially in the buildings sector. Moreover, the implementation of these measures is shown to result in positive macroeconomic effects through increases in GDP (gross domestic product) and creation of new jobs. Finally, the rebound effect may restrict the estimated greenhouse gas emission reductions in the buildings of the countries examined due to the low energy performance of the existing building stock. - Highlights: • Analysis of the technical and economic GHG mitigation potential in western Balkans. • Marginal abatement cost curves highlight several win–win interventions. • Incorporation of environmental benefits improves the performance of measures. • Mitigation measures result in significant positive macroeconomic effects. • The investment costs and the rebound effect may influence measures' effectiveness.

  9. Exploring the public-private sector wage gap in European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Christofides, Louis N.; Michael, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the public-private sector pay gap for 27 European countries, using the 2008 EU SILC. The coefficients of conditional (on personal and job characteristics) public sector controls give a first impression on wage differences, while decompositions into explained and unexplained components (also accounting for selectivity) allow for a more complete analysis, which helps to identify possible causes of the gap. Regional patterns exist. Separate subsample decompositions based on age, educ...

  10. American shale gas in the European air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, L.

    2015-01-01

    Belgian scientists have detected ethane in atmosphere samples from Switzerland. The origin of this ethane is highly likely to be linked to the production of shale gas in Northern America. These concentrations of ethane have been increasing by 5% a year since 2009 while they had been steadily decreasing by about 1% a year over the 2 previous decades. These releases of ethane are massive since they are detected in Europe while ethane's lifetime in the atmosphere is only 2 months. Ethane is exclusively released from natural gas leaks during extraction operations or tank filling. A measurement campaign involving infrared spectrometry stations around the world have shown that ethane is released only in the northern hemisphere. It also appears that the beginning of the increase coincides with the beginning of the industrial exploitation of shale gas in the U.S. (A.C.)

  11. 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijns, A.J.H.; Valougeorgis, D.; Colin, S.; Baldas, L.

    2012-01-01

    PREFACE The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch

  12. Report on the oil and gas sector in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    After a brief introduction on the economic and political situation in Ecuador, the state of the country's oil and gas sector is reviewed. Before 1967, all oil came from wells along the Pacific coast, but with discoveries in the Amazon Basin, the opening of the trans-Ecuador pipeline, and creation of the state oil company CEPE (renamed Petroecuador in 1990) by the early 1970s, a boom in the industry occurred. Current proven reserves stand at 1.2-1.5 billion bbl of oil and 140 billion ft 3 of natural gas. Current production is generally around 300,000 bbl/d, mostly from the Petroecuador-Texaco consortium block in the Amazon Basin. Petroecuador now operates the main oil export pipeline and has subsidiaries responsible for exploration and production, refining, and the marketing of petroleum and its derivatives. In recent years Petroecuador has imported about $60 million worth of goods annually, offering a market opportunity for foreign companies supplying goods and services to the oil and gas industry. Market opportunities of interest to Canadian companies are outlined, local procedures for doing business are presented, and lists of Canadian and Ecuadorian contacts are provided. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  13. TAXATION OF FINANCIAL SECTOR AFTER THE CRISIS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Eugenia-Ramona

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Taxation of financial sector is an important issue of the actual fiscal policy, especially after the economic crisis impact. By taxing the financial sector, it is intended taxation of financial transactions, and financial activities. European Union supports the taxation of the financial system and makes proposals in this regard. This paper tries to reveal the major aspects concerning the taxation of financial sector, both theoretical and empirical aspects. It will analyze the reasons which justify the application of such taxes, but also difficulties involved in practice. Another major objective of this paper is to examine the role of taxation in the financial sector as important regulatory instrument. This subject is debated in European Commission papers and by many economists. There are underlined the necessity of such tax, the impact and the economic efficiency. Our purpose is to identify if this kind of tax is good for our economy and what can be the impact from budgetary point of view. For finding this answers the paper realize a complex analysis of the types of taxes applied on financial sector in countries which already adopted this kind of taxes, like United Kingdom, Austria, Hungary, Cyprus. We believe that the financial sector should be charged, because was responsible in great measure the economic crisis impact. A potential tax applied to financial sector is considered as an important source of budget revenues. This article tries to explore the possible tax measures for financial sector according to the major principle of public finance –equity and efficiency. Special attention will be given to the need to implement financial sector taxation in Romania. In the years before the crisis banks and entire financial sector in Romania recorded significant profits. For this reason such tax is justified given that this sector is exempt from VAT. Applying such a tax would reduce the budget deficit and on the long term will

  14. LIBERALISATION OF THE ELECTRICITY SECTOR IN THE EUROPEAN UNION: PRESENT STATE AND SOME OPEN QUESTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, A.

    2007-07-01

    The liberalisation of the electricity sector started approximately 10 to 15 years ago, depending on the country. Nonetheless, there is still no general agreement on the liberalisation model this sector should follow, mainly because of the discussion of whether the liberalisation is an end in itself, or a means for -basically- lower energy prices. The complexity of the sector and the resilience of the incumbents' market power have currently placed the liberalisation process at a crossroad. In the EU, entrenched national interests are another obstacle to deal with. In this article, we first give an overview of the different liberalisation processes in the electricity sector and then summarize the pending challenges from an EU perspective. Next, we argue that the EU should focus on conditions aiming at implementing an effective liberalisation process, rather than on a formal liberalisation approach. We show how asymmetries between non-sector regulations in the European states and among companies create an uneven playing field, contrary to the European vision of an internal competitive energy market. We end the article studying the compatibility of the current European regulatory framework with the upcoming challenges in the energy sector. (auth)

  15. A model for predicting Inactivity in the European Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Themistokles Lazarides

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The paper will addresses the issue of inactivity and will try to detect its causes using econometric models. The Banking sector of Europe has been under transformation or restructuring for almost half a century. Design/methodology/approach – Probit models and descriptive statistics have been used to create a system that predicts inactivity. The data was collected from Bankscope. Findings – The results of the econometric models show that from the six groups of indicators, four have been found to be statistically important (performance, size, ownership, corporate governance. These findings are consistent with the theory. Research limitations/implications – The limitation is that Bankscope does not provide any longitudinal data regarding ownership, management structure and there are some many missing values before 2007 for some of the financial ratios and data. Originality/value – The paper's value and innovation is that it has given a systemic approach to find indicators of inactivity.

  16. Increased use of gas in the country: Norway as a part of an European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerndalen, Joergen; Nese, Gjermund

    2005-06-01

    Norwegian authorities want natural gas to be increasingly used in Norway. The development and establishment of a Norwegian market for gas demands large investments in infrastructure. These investments would have to be done with a large uncertainty attached to future gas prices and - volumes in such a market. As a consequence of Norwegian gas participating in an international market many of the frame conditions for the extension of a future internal market for gas would be set by the international development. In this article several factors connected to the market structure and pricing principles in the European gas market are pointed out. The focus is on the historical development and on what is viewed as essential facts in the development of a future European gas market. The development seems firstly to influence the development in the EU work for an internal market for gas through a gradual liberalisation of the national markets. This work has apparently had a reducing effect on the gas prices to the customers in the liberalised parts of the markets. It is however, stressed that the approach of gradual liberalisation may prove to have some negative consequences for the development of efficient competition in the gas markets. Another aspect mentioned is the development towards spot markets for gas the so-called ''gas hubs'' and more short-term competition types. This type of gas trade is expected to more and more replace the traditional long-term take-on-pay-contracts. In reality it would be the prices noted in the ''gas hubs'' that represent the alternative profits for the Norwegian gas producers and therefore mainly would determine the prices on the future internal gas market. Consequently the Norwegian authorities may play a main role in determining the conditions for an increased use of gas in Norway but the price of gas and consequently the extent of such an internal market as to sold gas volume would mainly be determined by the development in the European

  17. The impact of CO{sub 2} emissions trading on the European transport sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaageson, Per

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report is to analyse how a common European scheme for CO{sub 2} emissions trading covering all sectors of society would affect the transport sector. Transport externalities other than CO{sub 2} are assumed to be internalised by kilometer charging. This means road fuels will no longer be subject to taxation. The European Union's commitment under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol can be reached at a marginal abatement cost around 65 Euro per tonne of CO{sub 2} in a case where emissions trading replaces all current taxes on fossil fuels. In a case where emissions trading is supplementary to today's energy and carbon taxes, the current average taxation (45-50 Euro per tonne CO{sub 2}) and the shadow price of the emission permits (33 Euro per tonne) would together give a total marginal abatement cost around 80 Euro per tonne Of CO{sub 2}. Having to buy emission permits would significantly raise the cost of fuel and electricity used in rail, aviation and short sea shipping, as these modes are currently not taxed at all. The resulting long-term (2025) improvement in specific energy efficiency is estimated at around 25 per cent compared to trend for rail and 20 and 40 per cent respectively for aviation and sea transport. A combination of CO{sub 2} emissions trading and km charging would moderately raise the variable cost of driving a gasoline car. The cost of using diesel vehicles would rise considerably in most Member States. Annual mileage per car would therefore decline somewhat. The fuel, however, would become cheaper than today (especially gasoline) and this would reduce the incentive to buy fuel-efficient vehicles. The reform would thus hamper the introduction of new, more efficient, technologies that might be needed for meeting more long-term commitments. Emissions trading would not encourage the introduction of biofuels in road transport. The incremental cost of producing ethanol or RME is much too high and cannot be expected to fall to the

  18. Optimal policy for mitigating emissions in the European transport sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Piera, Patrizio; Sennai, Mesfun; Igor, Staritsky; Berien, Elbersen; Tijs, Lammens; Florian, Kraxner

    2017-04-01

    A geographic explicit techno-economic model, BeWhere (www.iiasa.ac.at/bewhere), has been developed at the European scale (Europe 28, the Balkans countries, Turkey, Moldavia and Ukraine) at a 40km grid size, to assess the potential of bioenergy from non-food feedstock. Based on the minimization of the supply chain from feedstock collection to the final energy product distribution, the model identifies the optimal bioenergy production plants in terms of spatial location, technology and capacity. The feedstock of interests are woody biomass (divided into eight types from conifers and non-conifers) and five different crop residuals. For each type of feedstock, one or multiple technologies can be applied for either heat, electricity or biofuel production. The model is run for different policy tools such as carbon cost, biofuel support, or subsidies, and the optimal mix of technologies and biomass needed is optimized to reach a production cost competitive against the actual reference system which is fossil fuel based. From this approach, the optimal mix of policy tools that can be applied country wide in Europe will be identified. The preliminary results show that high carbon tax and biofuel support contribute to the development of large scale biofuel production based on woody biomass plants mainly located in the northern part of Europe. Finally the highest emission reduction is reached with low biofuel support and high carbon tax evenly distributed in Europe.

  19. The challenge of a greener European construction sector: Views on technology-driven (eco)innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jofre, Sergio

    , particular emphasis is given to the description and discussion of technology-driven eco-innovation initiatives such us nanotechnologies for a greener construction. Although the scope of this report covers the European construction sector, most data presented is at an EU scale. In this context, particular...

  20. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector: a perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, I.; Dias, S.F.; Degomme, O.; Devillé, W.; Kennedy, P.; Kovats, A.; Meyer, S. de; Vettenburg, N.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  1. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector: a perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, I.; Dias, S.F.; Degomme, O.; Devillé, W.; Kennedy, P.; Kováts, A.; De Meyer, S.; Vettenburg, N.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  2. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector : A perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, Ines; Dias, Sonia F.; Degomme, Olivier; Devillé, Walter; Kennedy, Patricia; Kováts, András; De Meyer, Sara; Vettenburg, Nicole; Roelens, Kristien; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  3. Incorporating the catering sector in nutrition policies of WHO European Region: is there a good recipe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, Carl; Roberfroid, Dominique; Huybregts, Lieven; Van Camp, John; Kolsteren, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    To review how countries of the WHO European Region address issues related to the catering sector in their nutrition policy plans. Documentary analysis of national nutrition policy documents from the policy database of the WHO Regional Office for Europe by a multidisciplinary research team. Recurring themes were identified and related information extracted in an analysis matrix. Case studies were performed for realistic evaluation. Fifty-three member states of the WHO European Region in September 2007. The catering sector is a formally acknowledged stakeholder in national nutrition policies in about two-thirds of countries of the European region. Strategies developed for the catering sector are directed mainly towards labelling of foods and prepared meals, training of health and catering staff, and advertising. Half of the countries reviewed propose dialogue structures with the catering sector for the implementation of the policy. However, important policy fields remain poorly developed, such as strategies for stimulating and monitoring actual implementation of policies. Others are simply lacking, such as strategies to ensure affordability of healthy out-of-home eating or to enhance accountability of stakeholders. It is also striking that strategies for the private sector are rarely developed. Important policy issues are still embryonic. As evidence is accumulating on the impact of out-of-home eating on the increase of overweight, member states are advised to urgently develop operational frameworks and instruments for participatory planning and evaluation of stakeholders in public health nutrition policy.

  4. Liberalising European electricity markets: opportunities and risks for a sustainable power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, M.

    2003-01-01

    The process of liberalising European electricity markets, encompassing a wide range of restructuring activities, has mainly been spurred by the attempt to increase the economic efficiency of the whole sector. This process might be used to trigger a development towards a sustainable power sector by increasing the use of renewable energy sources and enhancing energy efficiency on the supply and demand side. However, by taking a closer look at the current trends of the European electricity markets, it becomes obvious that the liberalisation not only implies opportunities but also risks for the creation of a sustainable power sector. Many of these risks are due to market distortions and imperfections caused by the delay in creating a fully functional single European market. Thus, in the short-term, the market liberalisation tends to constitute more risks than opportunities without government actions to prevent these risks. In the long run, though, the efficiency gains of the sector and the appearance of new market factors are likely to bring forth the opportunities of liberalisation and actively foster a transformation towards a sustainable electricity sector. (author)

  5. AN ANALYSIS OF THE ROMANIAN FISHERY SECTOR IN THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius STANCIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of the fishery sector represents one of the European Union’s priorities due to the positive impact it has on food security and to its potential to ensure nutritious and quality food at an affordable price as compared to other animal-origin resources. The Community policy in the fishery sector focuses on reducing the Community market dependence on imports and on the sustainable development of business in this domain. Romania aligned with the Community policies and, therefore, important funds were allocated to the national fishery sector. The diversified natural resources, the possibility to use friendly technologies, the qualified staff, the tradition in the domain, and the existence of a number of niche markets all represent motivations for the development of the Romanian fishery sector. The present paper proposes an analysis of the Romanian fishery production and of the European financing effects on the specialized companies. Despite the fact that there have been important resources allocated to the sector and there is a slight positive evolution, the absorption of funds was difficult. The results of the investment may be observed after a long period of time, this is why Romania is still dependent on fishery product imports. Aquaculture represents the main segment towards which the European funds were directed, including in our country, thus providing the greatest part of the income and employment in the domain.

  6. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Urban Planning and Construction. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European Climate Change Policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to climate change impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national, regional and local level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on urban planning and infrastructure in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the urban planning sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting. Some of the other stakeholder meetings, such as the meeting on human health, have a strong connection with the urban planning agenda. Therefore, some actions in the sector report on adaptation and human health relate to urban planning and infrastructure considerations

  7. Assessment of demand for natural gas from the electricity sector in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.R.; Dhar, Subash; Victor, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Electricity sector is among the key users of natural gas. The sustained electricity deficit and environment policies have added to an already rising demand for gas. This paper tries to understand gas demand in future from electricity sector. This paper models the future demand for gas in India from...... the electricity sector under alternative scenarios for the period 2005–2025, using bottom-up ANSWER MARKAL model. The scenarios are differentiated by alternate economic growth projections and policies related to coal reforms, infrastructure choices and local environment. The results across scenarios show that gas...... competes with coal as a base-load option if price difference is below US $ 4 per MBtu. At higher price difference gas penetrates only the peak power market. Gas demand is lower in the high economic growth scenario, since electricity sector is more flexible in substitution of primary energy. Gas demand...

  8. The European gas industry at a corner of its history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadonneix, P.

    1996-01-01

    The closing session of the 113. gas conference has been delivered by Mr Pierre Gadonneix, chairman of Gaz de France. This session has been held when the discussion on the European Union gaseous organization begins. This discussion has to determine the environment of Gaz de France for the future years. (O.M.)

  9. Gas and electricity price in the European Union in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-11-01

    This document indicates and comments the evolution of gas and electricity prices in the different countries of the European Union. As far as natural gas is concerned, it outlines that taxes on gas are higher in Nordic countries, and that prices are increasing everywhere (for industry as well as for households). As far as electricity is concerned, price is rather cheap in France compared to the other countries. Graphs indicate the evolution of electricity prices between 2010 and 2011 in the different countries for industry and households. Even if a decrease has been noticed in some countries, the general trend is to an increase (between 5 and 10% in average)

  10. Close to the wind. A European strategy for the (top)sectors in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    The formation of a new government in the Netherlands in 2010 caused a change of wind. The government opted for topsectors to boost the competitiveness of the Dutch economy, by designing a comprehensive policy agenda for the top nine sectors, which were identified as Water, Food, Horticulture, High Tech, Life Sciences, Chemistry, Energy, Logistics and the Creative Industry. The two main questions in this request for advice are: (1) What are the visible trends and developments in European research and innovation policy and what impact will they have on the Netherlands?; (2) How can the Netherlands best respond to changing policy context at European level to ensure that European research priorities and Dutch priorities keep matching? The advice of the Council starts with an overview of key developments and trends that are relevant to Dutch and European research and innovation policy. It does so against the background of a number of important challenges such as the economic crisis, globalisation and a paucity of private investment. The new European 'Innovation Union' policy aims to tackle these challenges and to enhance the competitiveness of Europe in relation to emerging economies as those of the BRIC countries. In this context, the EU believes that research and innovation can be used not only as a means of tackling major social challenges but also as a way out of the downward spiral of the economic crisis. New to this European policy is the added emphasis on knowledge utilisation and innovation. This shift may alter the desirable approach of the Netherlands to European policy. The Council then analyses the basic principles for the Dutch position in Europe and sets out the opportunities and threats of various policies under the Innovation Union for the top (and other) sectors. From this analysis, the Council draws conclusions about the relationship between the use of Dutch and European policy to strengthen Dutch and European sectors. Recommendations are (1

  11. NATGAS. A Model of the European Natural Gas Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, M; Zwart, G.

    2006-02-01

    The NATural GAS model is an integrated model of the European wholesale gas market providing long-run projections of supply, transport, storage and consumption patterns in the model region, aggregated in 5-year periods, distinguishing two seasons (winter and summer). Model results include levels of investment in the various branches, output and consumption, depletion of reserves and price levels. The NATGAS model computes long-term effects of policy measures on future gas production and gas prices in Europe. NATGAS is an equilibrium model describing behaviour of gas producers, investors in infrastructure (pipeline, LNG capacity, as well as storage), traders and consumers. NATGAS covers the main European demand regions, including the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands and Italy. Moreover, it covers the main origins of supply on the European market, such as Russia, Norway, Algeria, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and LNG. In this memorandum, we first discuss the theoretical background as well as the model specifications. Afterwards, we describe the data we used, present some results and assess validity by computing sensitivities and comparing with current developments

  12. European energy security: The future of Norwegian natural gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederbergh, Bengt; Jakobsson, Kristofer; Aleklett, Kjell

    2009-01-01

    The European Union (EU) is expected to meet its future growing demand for natural gas by increased imports. In 2006, Norway had a 21% share of EU gas imports. The Norwegian government has communicated that Norwegian gas production will increase by 25-40% from today's level of about 99 billion cubic meters (bcm)/year. This article shows that only a 20-25% growth of Norwegian gas production is possible due to production from currently existing recoverable reserves and contingent resources. A high and a low production forecast for Norwegian gas production is presented. Norwegian gas production exported by pipeline peaks between 2015 and 2016, with minimum peak production in 2015 at 118 bcm/year and maximum peak production at 127 bcm/year in 2016. By 2030 the pipeline export levels are 94-78 bcm. Total Norwegian gas production peaks between 2015 and 2020, with peak production at 124-135 bcm/year. By 2030 the production is 96-115 bcm/year. The results show that there is a limited potential for increased gas exports from Norway to the EU and that Norwegian gas production is declining by 2030 in all scenarios. Annual Norwegian pipeline gas exports to the EU, by 2030, may even be 20 bcm lower than today's level.

  13. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Water Management. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European climate change policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to Climate Change Impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national and regional level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on the water cycle and water resources management and prediction of extreme events in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the Water Resources sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting on 11 April, 2006

  14. A strategic model of European gas supply (GASMOD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, Franziska; Hirschhausen, Christian von; Kemfert, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the European natural gas supply, GASMOD, which is structured as a two-stage-game of successive natural gas exports to Europe (upstream market) and wholesale trade within Europe (downstream market) and which explicitly includes infrastructure capacities. We compare three possible market scenarios: Cournot competition in both markets, perfect competition in both markets, and perfect competition in the downstream with Cournot competition in the upstream market (EU liberalization). We find that Cournot competition in both markets is the most accurate representation of today's European natural gas market, where suppliers at both stages generate a mark-up at the expense of the final customer (double marginalization). Our results yield a diversified supply portfolio with newly emerging (LNG) exporters gaining market shares. Enforcing competition in the European downstream market would lead to lower prices and higher quantities by avoiding the welfare-reducing effects of double marginalization. Binding infrastructure capacity restrictions strongly influence the results, and we identify bottlenecks mainly for intra-European trade relations whereas transport capacity in the upstream market is globally sufficient in the Cournot scenario. (author)

  15. Panorama 2016 - The revival of mergers and acquisitions in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fosse, Florian; Hache, Emmanuel; Portenart, Philomene

    2015-12-01

    The oil and gas sector remains fertile ground for mergers and acquisitions (M and A). This sector represented between 5% and 15% of total transactions from 2008 to 2014. Since 2008, M and A transactions in the sector have been dominated by a triad made up of a region (North America), a business segment (upstream oil and gas) and a type of key player (independent operators). (authors)

  16. Stepwise multiple regression method of greenhouse gas emission modeling in the energy sector in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa-Wiecek, Alicja

    2015-04-01

    The energy sector in Poland is the source of 81% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Poland, among other European Union countries, occupies a leading position with regard to coal consumption. Polish energy sector actively participates in efforts to reduce GHG emissions to the atmosphere, through a gradual decrease of the share of coal in the fuel mix and development of renewable energy sources. All evidence which completes the knowledge about issues related to GHG emissions is a valuable source of information. The article presents the results of modeling of GHG emissions which are generated by the energy sector in Poland. For a better understanding of the quantitative relationship between total consumption of primary energy and greenhouse gas emission, multiple stepwise regression model was applied. The modeling results of CO2 emissions demonstrate a high relationship (0.97) with the hard coal consumption variable. Adjustment coefficient of the model to actual data is high and equal to 95%. The backward step regression model, in the case of CH4 emission, indicated the presence of hard coal (0.66), peat and fuel wood (0.34), solid waste fuels, as well as other sources (-0.64) as the most important variables. The adjusted coefficient is suitable and equals R2=0.90. For N2O emission modeling the obtained coefficient of determination is low and equal to 43%. A significant variable influencing the amount of N2O emission is the peat and wood fuel consumption. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. European Gas Appliances Directive and the Dutch Decree on Gas Appliances. Special section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bruin, B.; Venhorst, T.; Van Tricht, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Gas Appliances Decree is the Dutch translation of the European Gas Appliances Directive. The Decree and the EU Directive contain substantial information, provided they will be read carefully. The EU Directive lays down general safety requirements for gas appliances. They serve as a practical tool for manufacturers and service engineers. In two articles, the Directive is explained, addressing uncertainties and answering important questions. 5 ills

  18. European natural gas market at the turn of the century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudino, M.; Pasetto, R.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas use is expected to rise briskly in the nineties under the joint thrust of technological development and environmental advantages. The situation will differ from country to country but there will be an overall increase which will require new supply projects. The paper examines the opportunities of growth in demand for the different sectors of use in Eastern and Western Europe. The possible supply sources are indicated as well as the necessary investments. The impact of policy options on market development are examined with particular reference to the proposed EEC directive on the internal market in natural gas

  19. Acquits communautaire in quality management in the energy sector -Central and Eastern European Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristikj, Julija

    1997-01-01

    Energy is considered as one of the main infrastructure components, and efficient energy sectors are corner stones for the economic growth of the Central and Eastern European Countries on their way towards gaining EU membership. Therefore, energy is considered as one of the main directions of action within the PHARE Programme with trans-European dimensions. Five years ago started the implementation of the PHARE Multi-country Energy Programme, the efforts of which have been oriented to three main strategic axes: energy policy, energy supply, as well as energy efficiency and environment. (author)

  20. Qualification Needs, Approaches and Strategies in the Second-Hand Sector. A European Good-Practice Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arold, Heike; Koring, Claudia; Windelband, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Against the background of changing consumer behaviour and environmental policies, a growing second-hand sector is expected. In order to ensure quality and professionalism within companies operating in this sector, it is necessary to develop a unified Europewide and sector-specific qualification which is geared to real working processes and requirements. This good practice report describes the training and qualification structures in the European second-hand sector. In addition, occupational a...

  1. China's natural gas consumption and subsidies—From a sector perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ting; Lin, Boqiang

    2014-01-01

    China's natural gas consumption is growing rapidly and it has being driven by economic growth, industrialization and urbanization. In addition, the country's low-carbon development strategy, government-controlled gas price, and some other factors also contribute to the surging gas consumption. This paper studies China's natural gas consumption in residential, industrial and commercial sectors. We adopt the cointegration test and error correction model to study the relationships of explanatory factors and gas consumption of different sectors and climate factor is included into the analysis. In order to find the direction of natural gas pricing reform and establish the benchmark gas price, this paper also estimates the size of gas price subsidy by using price-gap approach. Our findings are as follows: In the long term, China's residential sector is more sensitive to price than the other two. Urbanization is an important factor promoting industrial and commercial gas consumption. Prices of other energies have an influence on natural gas consumption significantly due to the substitutability between energies. The slow-moving and unsatisfying pricing reforms on refined oil and natural gas lead to positive price elasticity of natural gas in the commercial sector, which implies that a further energy price reform is still stringent for China. - Highlights: • We figured out the price elasticity of different sectors. • We figured out the income elasticity of different sectors. • We introduced temperature factor into the study of natural gas consumption. • We study the natural gas subsidy of different sectors

  2. What to do with the European shale gas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geoffron, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    After having briefly recalled the European objectives in terms of reduction of greenhouse emissions, this article discusses the trends and perspectives for energy supply with the emergence of the possibility of exploitation of shale gases. It notices and comments the different answers given by European countries regarding the compatibility of shale gas with energy transition, and the possible counterbalancing of imports from South Mediterranean countries, from the Middle East and from Russia. It evokes studies performed in the USA on the impact of the exploitation and production of shale gas and oil on prices, on job creation, and on the oil and chemical industry. It notices that, despite the here-above mentioned objectives, coal is still a leading energy source in Europe, notably in Germany. The article comments the possible impact of non conventional hydrocarbons on supply security for Europe, on the attitude of the USA, and on the competition with Asia for the access to energy sources

  3. Russian natural gas exports-Will Russian gas price reforms improve the European security of supply?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagen, Eirik Lund; Tsygankova, Marina

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we use both theoretical and numerical tools to study potential effects on Russian gas exports from different Russian domestic gas prices and production capacities in 2015. We also investigate whether a fully competitive European gas market may provide incentives for Gazprom, the dominant Russian gas company, to change its export behaviour. Our main findings suggest that both increased domestic gas prices and sufficient production capacities are vital to maintain Gazprom's market share in Europe over the next decade. In fact, Russia may struggle to carry out its current long-term export commitments if domestic prices are sufficiently low. At the same time, if Russian prices approach European net-back levels, Gazprom may reduce exports in favour of a relatively more profitable domestic market

  4. Exploiting Synergies in European Wind and Hydrogen Sectors: A Cost-benefit Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    SHAW SUZANNE; PETEVES ESTATHIOS

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a ¿¿wind-hydrogen strategy¿¿, is analysed using a costbenefit approach to evaluate the final impact...

  5. Factors affecting labour productivity in the SME sector of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Gołaś

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of labour productivity analysis in micro, small and medium enterprises of EU countries. The analysis was conducted on the basis of European Commission for Enterprise and Industry data from 2008. The results of regression analysis point that the technical equipment of work, the share of value added and value of production in revenues are the most important factors influencing the labour productivity in the SME sector.

  6. Structural change in European power and gas industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    After decades of stability the European power and gas industries are now undergoing fundamental changes. Made possible by policy reforms and technological developments, these changes are largely driven by commercial forces which have developed their own momentum and dynamics. New commercial risks are a key feature of the emerging market order and companies cannot protect themselves through a ''no move strategy''. This report explores the key changes and examines the emerging commercial strategies in response to the new environment. (author)

  7. Changing patterns of competition in European gas markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heren, P.

    1996-01-01

    Despite a period of statism in the European natural gas market, the author argues that economic, political and regulatory pressures are approaching which will force dramatic change in the market, and identifies factors relating to pipeline capacity, competition, prices and market changes and fuel use which will drive the changes. A historical perspective is used as a framework to explain the inevitability of these changes. (UK)

  8. From Caspian to Turkey: The Southern European Gas Corridor's Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebiere, Noemie

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of global energy demand and the raise of conflicts for the control of energy resources and supply routes, energy security is becoming a major issue for the European Union, but also for suppliers and transit countries. The recent crisis in Ukraine highlights the role of gas as a strategic weapon in the Russian external policy and reinforces the need of the European countries to diversify energy sources and supply routes. The southern European gas corridor, which carries hydrocarbons of the Caspian region to Europe through Turkey, is as a key project of E.U. and U.S. strategy to ensure the energy security of Europe. However, with the current instability in the Middle East and the difficulty to set-up an agreement in the Iranian nuclear negotiations, the issue of the ability of the southern gas corridor to be supplied with enough amount of resources remains hypothetical. In this respect, this approach analyses the deep interactions between energy issues, territorial security, political aims and economic interests

  9. Gas sector expansion: production monopoly versus free prices; Expansao do setor de gas: monopolio na producao versus precos livres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Maria Paula de Souza [Agencia de Servicos Publicos de Energia do Estado do Espirito Santo (ASPE), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the necessary conditions to develop Brazil's natural gas sector with production, reserves, main uses, sources, inputs, main players, laws, regulatory aspects, prices, supply, demand, market, monopoly and free competition. (author)

  10. The integration of Scandinavia with the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radetzki, M.

    1996-01-01

    The prospects of increase in the natural gas consumption in the Scandinavian countries were examined, highlighting the most critical ingredient, namely the costs and logistics of a pipeline from the Norwegian fields through Sweden and Finland, to link up with existing pipelines carrying Russian gas. Present prospects were seen to be less than promising despite the fact that Norwegian gas appears to be competitive with alternate fuels along the pipeline route. Reasons given were erratic energy policies of the two countries, which would tend to discourage the private sector to make the necessary long-term investment without political guarantees. Such guarantees were not likely to be forthcoming in the near future, given the political ideologies that dominate the Scandinavian scene in the 1990s. 15 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  11. Challenging issues in the design and manufacturing of the European sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dans, Andres; Jucker, P.; Bayon, A.; Arbogast, J.-F.; Caixas, J.; Fernández, J.; Micó, G.; Pacheco, J.; Trentea, A.; Stamos, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ITER Vacuum Vessel was described with its features and particularities. • Engineering and CAD design of Sector 5 is finish; the work of sectors 3 and 4 is ongoing. • Fabrication Mock Ups almost finished with an important know-how acquired. • Procurement of raw material (plates and forgings) started. • Qualification of welding, NDT and forming close to be finished. - Abstract: Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency for the ITER project, has to supply seven sectors as part of the European contribution to the project. F4E signed the Procurement Agreement with ITER Organization (IO) in 2009. After a call for tender in 2010, the contract for the manufacturing of seven sectors was placed in October 2010 to a consortium of three Italian companies, Ansaldo, Mangiarotti and Walter Tosto (AMW). The first sector in the manufacturing route is Sector 5 (later will come 4, 3, 2, 9, 8, 7). This paper will cover: the status of the engineering activities, design, procurement and preparation to begin the manufacturing in 2013. Also will be presented the statutory and regulatory requirements of the French Nuclear Safety regulator and the status of the relevant R and D mock-ups to demonstrate manufacturing feasibility control of distortions (using predictions with analysis and algorithms to change in real time the manufacturing route in order to correct such distortions, inspectability and metrology). Another important aspect at this stage of the manufacturing is qualification of activities like welding, Non-destructive Examination and Hot Forming. This paper describes the status of the activities currently in process in order to meet with the challenging design, schedule and high quality requirements of the project

  12. Challenging issues in the design and manufacturing of the European sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dans, Andres, E-mail: andresdans@gmail.com; Jucker, P.; Bayon, A.; Arbogast, J.-F.; Caixas, J.; Fernández, J.; Micó, G.; Pacheco, J.; Trentea, A.; Stamos, V.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER Vacuum Vessel was described with its features and particularities. • Engineering and CAD design of Sector 5 is finish; the work of sectors 3 and 4 is ongoing. • Fabrication Mock Ups almost finished with an important know-how acquired. • Procurement of raw material (plates and forgings) started. • Qualification of welding, NDT and forming close to be finished. - Abstract: Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency for the ITER project, has to supply seven sectors as part of the European contribution to the project. F4E signed the Procurement Agreement with ITER Organization (IO) in 2009. After a call for tender in 2010, the contract for the manufacturing of seven sectors was placed in October 2010 to a consortium of three Italian companies, Ansaldo, Mangiarotti and Walter Tosto (AMW). The first sector in the manufacturing route is Sector 5 (later will come 4, 3, 2, 9, 8, 7). This paper will cover: the status of the engineering activities, design, procurement and preparation to begin the manufacturing in 2013. Also will be presented the statutory and regulatory requirements of the French Nuclear Safety regulator and the status of the relevant R and D mock-ups to demonstrate manufacturing feasibility control of distortions (using predictions with analysis and algorithms to change in real time the manufacturing route in order to correct such distortions, inspectability and metrology). Another important aspect at this stage of the manufacturing is qualification of activities like welding, Non-destructive Examination and Hot Forming. This paper describes the status of the activities currently in process in order to meet with the challenging design, schedule and high quality requirements of the project.

  13. No hesitation: the gas sector of French industry opts for internationalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roze, J.

    1997-01-01

    Since French energy reserves are not big enough, additional energy had to be developed abroad or imported. Using skills acquired on fast-growing markets, the manufacturers of transmission pipelines, equipments, and operating devices have also made a determined turn to external markets. In the business strategy of this sector, internationalization has become deeply rooted because the gas services market is worldwide and the gas applications are being developed around the world. French companies in the gas sector, whether dealing with natural gas or with liquefied petroleum gas, have been able to develop the synergy and partnerships, amongst themselves or with foreign companies, necessary to conquer new markets. (J.S.)

  14. The relationship between the political authorities and the commercial actors in the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjelde, Jarle Christian

    1998-01-01

    In summarizing the reasons for the fall of the Roman empire one has found about 210 significant ones. Without too much comparison the Roman empire and the EU natural gas market have similarities in connections between political authorities and the commercial actors in the European natural gas market. The area has consisted of several independent markets with different solutions that from 1988 has been tried integrated in an inner energy market. Several governmental and private actors have interest in this sector and both inhabitants and businesses are affected by alterations in a national natural gas market. This process is not yet finished. The thesis gives a broad description of the topic by including as many as possible of the EU member states. The topic is large and complex and the author has had to make a choice which parts to emphasize. There are chapters on the theoretical basis, the natural gas industry, what factors may explain the relationship between the political authorities and the commercial actors in the national natural gas market in each EU member and how does the EU Commission goals regarding free competition in the energy market affect the relationship between the political authorities and commercial actors in the national natural gas market

  15. The Eastring gas pipeline in the context of the Central and Eastern European gas supply challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišík, Matúš; Nosko, Andrej

    2017-11-01

    Ever since the 2009 natural gas crisis, energy security has been a crucial priority for countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Escalating in 2014, the conflict between Ukraine and Russia further fuelled negative expectations about the future development of energy relations for the region predominantly supplied by Russia. As a response to the planned cessation of gas transit through the Brotherhood pipeline, which brings Russian gas to Europe via Ukraine and Slovakia, the Slovak transmission system operator Eustream proposed the Eastring pipeline. This Perspective analyses this proposal and argues that neither the perceived decrease in Slovak energy security nor the loss of economic rent from the international gas transit should be the main policy driver behind such a major infrastructure project. Although marketed as an answer to current Central and Eastern European gas supply security challenges, the Eastring pipeline is actually mainly focused on issues connected to the Slovak gas transit.

  16. Gazprom vs. other Russian gas producers: The evolution of the Russian gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunden, Lars Petter; Fjaertoft, Daniel; Overland, Indra; Prachakova, Alesia

    2013-01-01

    The non-Gazprom gas producers (NGPs) doubled their share of the Russian domestic gas market between 2000 and 2010 and have continued growing since then. For several years especially Novatek expanded. More recently, Rosneft has emerged as a key player, not least through its purchase of TNK-BP. This article begins with an overview of the companies in the Russian gas sector, their resource bases and capacities, and subsequently examines whether differences in field development costs and export market access may make it rational for Gazprom to continue ceding market share to the NGPs. With rising costs of Gazprom's queue of greenfield developments, any delays in Gazprom's investment program may be compensated through increased NGP production. The article argues that the NGPs are ready to fill the gap, may be allowed to do so and are already increasing their market share in an increasingly competitive market. The stage may now be set for a continued gradual transformation of the Russian gas market, in which the interests of Gazprom and the NGPs may be complementary or may be pitted against each other, but those of the Russian Federation are in any case likely to be better fulfilled than in the past. - Highlights: • Other Russian gas producers, especially Novatek and Rosneft, are taking market shares from Gazprom. • Gazprom has a monopoly on exports and has had a de facto monopoly on the domestic pipeline grid through its control over trunk pipelines. • Gazprom's greenfield projects are more expensive than those of other producers. • Gazprom's loss of market shares to other producers in the domestic market may actually be in Gazprom's interest

  17. European Energy Policy and Its Effects on Gas Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Victorita Stefana Anda

    The goal of this study is to examine the effects of the energy policies of the European Union (EU) on its gas security in the period 2006 to 2016. While energy security is often given a broad meaning, this paper focuses on its external dimension: the EU?s relations with external gas suppliers. It is grounded on four pillars drawing from the compounded institutionalist and liberal theoretical frameworks: regulatory state, rational-choice, external governance, and regime effectiveness. The research question was investigated through a qualitative methodology with two main components: a legislative analysis and four case studies representing the main gas supply options--Russia, North African exporting countries, Norway, and liquefied natural gas (LNG). They highlighted that the EU framed the need for gas security mainly in the context of political risks associated with Russian gas supply, but it almost never took into account other equally important risks. Moreover, the research revealed two main issues. First, that the deeper and the more numerous EU?s energy policies were, the bigger was the magnitude of the effect. Specifically, competitiveness and infrastructure policies had the largest magnitude, while the sustainability and security of supply policies had the smallest effect. Second, EU energy policies only partially diminished the economic and political risks in relation to foreign gas suppliers. To conclude, to a certain extent the EU?s efforts made a positive contribution to the external dimension of the EU?s gas security, but the distinguishing trait remains that there is no consistency in terms of the magnitude of the effect and its nature.

  18. Inventory of Green House Gas Emissions from the Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbuthi, P.N

    1998-01-01

    The presentation highlighted two features of Kenya's energy sector namely: imported petroleum fuel for modern sector and wood fuel for domestic and informal sectors. The main objectives was to evaluate the amount and type of Green House emitted between 1989 and 1992 from the total national fuel wood consumption, the charcoal production, total charcoal consumption and the generation of possible recommendations on possible options available in the energy sector to mitigate against adverse effects of human induced climate change impacts. Under fossil fuels, the paper looked at emissions resulting from combustion of liquid fossil fuels, burning coal for energy, crude oil refining, storage and handling, whilst under traditional biomass fuels, fuel wood burned from energy, charcoal production and consumption, Nitrous Oxides were targeted

  19. Post-Soviet gas sector restructuring in the CIS: a political economy approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschhausen, C. von; Engerer, H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper analyses progress and obstacles to gas sector reform in the most important CIS-Countries (Russia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan), taking a political economy perspective. This reform process is embedded in a very specific post-Soviet institutional framework stemming from the legacy of socialism. Firstly, we review the evolution of the gas sector for the period 1992-1998. The paper then identifies the post-Soviet specifies of gas sector restructuring, to which any reform strategy and technical assistance have to he adapted. We derive concrete, process-oriented policy conclusions to accelerate the reform process in a market-oriented way. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the perspectives of gas sector restructuring in this geopolitically strategic area of the world. (author)

  20. European Experience after The Gas Directive On The Business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Tore

    1999-07-01

    The Gas Directive came into effect in August 1998. Its main building block is Third Party Access (TPA) to gas transmission and distribution. The transposition into national law in the Member States is in progress as planned. A much higher percentage of the market will be open to competition than the minimum required in the Gas Directive. This presentation asserts that those who have attempted to predict the outcome, the process and the timing of the ongoing development are largely people or organizations with vested interests either way or people who have simply ''transposed'' the UK model into a Continental setting. But there are much more important issues for the European gas industry than the EU liberalization process per se. The presentation discusses what the people in Shell call the Low Oil Price World, then the ''Tokyo'' implementation and then gas fundamentals in Europe. Finally, an attempt is given to see how the political and commercial processes that are already under way may unfold in the future.

  1. ForGATE - A Forest Sector Greenhouse Gas Assessment Tool for Maine: Calibration and Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Hennigar; Luke Amos-Binks; Ryan Cameron; John Gunn; David A. MacLean; Mark Twery

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the background calibration, inputs, and outputs of ForGATE, a forest sector greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting tool designed primarily to communicate information relevant to the evaluation of projected net GHG exchange in the context of Maine's forests, the Northeast forest sector, and alternative national or regional carbon (C) accounting...

  2. Natural gas and deregulation in the European Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The gas market is progressively moving towards new organizations under the effect of deregulation initiated in the United States, the United Kingdom and transposed to other countries, particularly in Europe, at least for the member countries of the European Union. Within the framework provided by this overall trend, Cedigaz proposes a study titled 'Natural Gas and Deregulation' in order to describe the main developments affecting these markets on account of deregulation. This report is structured on the basis of three main topics (market organization, marketing modes, pricing) which appears to be the most cogent in terms of deregulation. This grouping by major topics accordingly offers a relatively synthetic view of the main trends which could be observed in the European market, for example. The analysis is largely based on the example of the American market and, to a lesser extent, on the British situation. Incidentally, it has adapted the terms 'regulated market' to define conventional markets and 'deregulated market' to define markets which have incorporated the principle of Third Party Access (TPA). This is obviously a mere convention, since in both cases, the gas market, a network market, is regulated either by the State or by an independent agency. Also noteworthy is the diversity of the regulation methods for the network markets. While an underlying principle prevails throughout, particularly the introduction of TPA, political and energy considerations alike are liable to condition strongly the final structure of a given market. The apparently comparable British and American experience thus display substantial differences. In other words, one should not imagine a sudden transposition of either case to the European market. The different States preserve considerable leeway to guide market developments in one direction or another. On the whole, deregulation is not a frozen process, but has to adapt permanently to developments in a market stage-managed by

  3. Geopolitics of European natural gas demand: Supplies from Russia, Caspian and the Middle East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgin, Mert

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses issues of natural gas which raise questions about European energy security. It first focuses on the rising gas demand of the EU27 and elaborates alleged risks of dependence on Russia such as Gazprom's disagreement with Ukraine, which became an international gas crisis in January 2006 and also more recently in January 2009. Incentives and barriers of Europe's further cooperation with selected Caspian (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan) and Middle Eastern (Iran, Iraq and Egypt) countries are discussed. Supplies from Caspian are analyzed with a particular focus on Russia's role and the vested interests in the region. Supplies from the Middle East are elaborated with regard to Iran's huge and Iraq's emerging potentials in terms of natural gas reserves and foreign direct investments in the energy sector. The geopolitical analysis leads to a conclusion that the best strategy, and what seems more likely, for the EU is to include at least two countries from Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran and Iraq within its natural gas supply system.

  4. Geopolitics of European natural gas demand: Supplies from Russia, Caspian and the Middle East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgin, Mert, E-mail: mert.bilgin@bahcesehir.edu.t [Bahcesehir University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, Political Science and International Relations Department, Ciragan Caddesi Besiktas, 34353 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    This paper addresses issues of natural gas which raise questions about European energy security. It first focuses on the rising gas demand of the EU27 and elaborates alleged risks of dependence on Russia such as Gazprom's disagreement with Ukraine, which became an international gas crisis in January 2006 and also more recently in January 2009. Incentives and barriers of Europe's further cooperation with selected Caspian (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan) and Middle Eastern (Iran, Iraq and Egypt) countries are discussed. Supplies from Caspian are analyzed with a particular focus on Russia's role and the vested interests in the region. Supplies from the Middle East are elaborated with regard to Iran's huge and Iraq's emerging potentials in terms of natural gas reserves and foreign direct investments in the energy sector. The geopolitical analysis leads to a conclusion that the best strategy, and what seems more likely, for the EU is to include at least two countries from Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran and Iraq within its natural gas supply system.

  5. Geopolitics of European natural gas demand. Supplies from Russia, Caspian and the Middle East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgin, Mert [Bahcesehir University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, Political Science and International Relations Department, Ciragan Caddesi Besiktas, 34353 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    This paper addresses issues of natural gas which raise questions about European energy security. It first focuses on the rising gas demand of the EU27 and elaborates alleged risks of dependence on Russia such as Gazprom's disagreement with Ukraine, which became an international gas crisis in January 2006 and also more recently in January 2009. Incentives and barriers of Europe's further cooperation with selected Caspian (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan) and Middle Eastern (Iran, Iraq and Egypt) countries are discussed. Supplies from Caspian are analyzed with a particular focus on Russia's role and the vested interests in the region. Supplies from the Middle East are elaborated with regard to Iran's huge and Iraq's emerging potentials in terms of natural gas reserves and foreign direct investments in the energy sector. The geopolitical analysis leads to a conclusion that the best strategy, and what seems more likely, for the EU is to include at least two countries from Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran and Iraq within its natural gas supply system. (author)

  6. Examining market power in the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, R.G.; Gabriel, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a mixed complementarity equilibrium model for the European natural gas market. This model has producers as Cournot players with conjectured supply functions relative to their rivals. As such, these producers can withhold production to increase downstream prices for greater profits. The other players are taken to be perfectly competitive and are combined with extensive pipeline, seasonal, and other data reflecting the current state of the market. Four market scenarios are run to analyze the extent of market power by these producers as well as the importance of pipeline and storage capacity. (author)

  7. Examining market power in the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egging, Rudolf G.; Gabriel, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a mixed complementarity equilibrium model for the European natural gas market. This model has producers as Cournot players with conjectured supply functions relative to their rivals. As such, these producers can withhold production to increase downstream prices for greater profits. The other players are taken to be perfectly competitive and are combined with extensive pipeline, seasonal, and other data reflecting the current state of the market. Four market scenarios are run to analyze the extent of market power by these producers as well as the importance of pipeline and storage capacity

  8. Cultural Economy. The economic impact of the cultural sector from a European perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Colombo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Culture is playing an increasingly important role in the economic development of industrialised countries. Thus, the management of large cultural events and the relationship between cultural management and cultural policies will be key elements in the development of the so-called cultural economy. This article looks at the concept of cultural economy, in terms of the appearance of the idea and the different European methodological positions. The case of the Berlin International Film Festival is taken as an example to show the importance of cultural management with regard to economic development of the sector. This case study also allows for the analysis of the increasingly complex forms of cultural management adopted, as well as their effects on the regulation of the cultural market and their links to other basic economic sectors in urban development.

  9. The European renewable energy target for 2030 – An impact assessment of the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knopf, Brigitte; Nahmmacher, Paul; Schmid, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The European Union set binding targets for the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) and the share of renewable energy (RE) in final energy consumption by 2020. The European Council agreed to continue with this strategy through to 2030 by setting a RE target of 27% in addition to a GHG reduction target of 40%. We provide a detailed sectoral impact assessment by analyzing the implications for the electricity sector in terms of economic costs and the regional distribution of investments and shares of electricity generated from renewable energy sources (RES-E). According to the Impact Analysis by the European Commission the 27% RE target corresponds to a RES-E share of 49%. Our model-based sensitivity analysis on underlying technological and institutional assumptions shows that the cost-effective RES-E share varies between 43% and 56%. Secondly, we quantify the economic costs of these variants and those which would be incurred with higher shares. The long-term additional costs for higher RES-E shares would be less than 1% of total system costs. The third aspect relates to the regional distribution of EU-wide efforts for upscaling renewables. We point out that delivering high RES-E shares in a cost-effective manner involves considerably different efforts by the Member States. -- Highlights: •A renewable (RES) target of 27% is the cost-effective share for 40% GHG reduction. •For the electricity sector the RES-E share varies between 43% and 56%. •Long-term costs for higher RES-E shares are less than 1% of total system costs. •There are large differences in RES deployment and costs between Member States. •A lack of a governance mechanism makes the EU-wide RES target difficult to achieve

  10. The liberalization of the European gas market and its consequences for Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.; Locatelli, C.

    2002-01-01

    Russia is the world biggest natural gas producer, with output of 581 bn m 3 in 2001, and is also a key supplier of the European gas market (around 30% of current European Union gas imports). Therefore gas exports rank with oil exports as an essential variable of Russian economic policy, and any institutional evolution of its gas export markets is crucial for Russia's economy as well as its gas industry. Liberalization of the European gas market will have major consequences for main suppliers, and therefore for Russia. (author)

  11. The liberalization of the European gas market and its consequences for Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finon, D.; Locatelli, C

    2002-07-01

    Russia is the world biggest natural gas producer, with output of 581 bn m{sup 3} in 2001, and is also a key supplier of the European gas market (around 30% of current European Union gas imports). Therefore gas exports rank with oil exports as an essential variable of Russian economic policy, and any institutional evolution of its gas export markets is crucial for Russia's economy as well as its gas industry. Liberalization of the European gas market will have major consequences for main suppliers, and therefore for Russia. (author)

  12. On the Pricing of Step-Up Bonds in the European Telecom Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, David; Mortensen, Allan

    This paper investigates the pricing of step-up bonds, i.e. corporatebonds with provisions stating that the coupon payments increase as thecredit rating level of the issuer declines. To assess the risk-neutral ratingtransition probabilities necessary to price these bonds, we introduce...... a newcalibration method within the reduced-form rating-based model of Jarrow,Lando, and Turnbull (1997). We also treat split ratings and adjust forrating outlook. Step-up bonds have been issued in large amounts in theEuropean telecom sector, and we find that, through most of the sample,step-up bonds issued...

  13. Analysis of the renewable energy sector in Spain at the European level comparative; Analisis del sector de las energias renovables en Espana. Estudio comparativo a nivel europeo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, F. J.

    2011-07-01

    The energy sector, in particular renewable energy, represents a strategic sector for the Spanish and European industry. Policy decisions to its regulation or deregulation is critical. Regulatory frameworks mark a way to contrast their effectiveness and efficiency. However, it is necessary to deepen the theoretical foundations as the natural capital or the limits to growth, to place in a framework more accurately. This article presents specific data on the economic, fiscal, labor and environmental conditions to date has involved the promotion of this sector and its international impact. (Author)

  14. Incentives needed for foreign participation on China's natural gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, J.; Chandler, W.

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a workshop organized by Battelle Memorial Institute's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, July 31, 1997, to identify ways to expand natural gas use in China. The workshop was attended by representatives from four natural gas companies active in China, the US Department of Energy, and the Natural Resources Defense Council. To ensure a frank discussion, it was agreed that none of the companies' comments would be made for attribution. However, the companies attending were all major firms with deep commitments to China. The workshop resulted in recommendations to the Chinese government for boosting the exploration and development activities of these companies and to the US government for supporting those efforts. This paper includes a section which summarizes the recommendations that came out of the workshop. After describing the gas resource base, the paper discusses gas trade and drivers of greater natural gas use

  15. Impact of renewables deployment on the CO2 price and the CO2 emissions in the European electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, Kenneth; Delarue, Erik; D'haeseleer, William

    2013-01-01

    As of 2005, electricity generators in Europe operate under the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS). At the same time, European Member States have launched support mechanisms to stimulate the deployment of renewable electricity sources (RES-E). RES-E injections displace CO 2 emissions within the sectors operating under the EU ETS and they reduce the demand for European Union Allowances (EUAs), thereby reducing the EUA price. This paper presents the results of an ex post analysis to quantify the impact of RES-E deployment on the EUA price and CO 2 emissions in the Western and Southern European electricity sector during the period from 2007 to 2010, following from an operational partial equilibrium model of the electricity sector. This study shows that the CO 2 displacement from the electricity sector to other ETS sectors due to RES-E deployment can be up to more than 10% of historical CO 2 emissions in the electricity sector. The EUA price decrease caused by RES-E deployment turns out to be likely significant. - Author-Highlights: • We assessed the impact of renewables deployment in the period 2007–2010. • Impact on CO 2 emissions in the electricity sector and the CO 2 price is considered. • CO 2 emissions decreased by up to 10% of historical emissions. • CO 2 price decrease due to renewables turns out to be likely significant

  16. The development of European gas markets. Environmental, economic and political perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, J.; Moe, A.; Martinsen, K.D.

    1996-01-01

    By reviewing past history and developments in the European gas markets and European energy policy, this book identifies the driving forces for future market development. Topics covered include future gas demand and potential supplies, inter-fuel competition and the likely structure of gas markets in Europe in the future. (UK)

  17. An Introduction of Gas Business and Its Competitiveness for Electricity Sector in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, A.; Sumardi, I.

    2007-07-01

    Gas Industry becomes the most important energy business in Indonesia, since Indonesia is not the oil exporter country any longer recently. The large gap between production and consumption of gas shows that the availability of this energy is huge, and lack of accessibility and acceptability. The utilization of gas, especially for electricity sector is very low, with only 7% of total consumption. Some experiences in Indonesia shows that not all of stakeholders and participants in this gas business know comprehensively about the basic system of gas system; what is gas contract; the anatomy of gas contract; the relationship and systematic flow diagram between seller and buyer; the natural gas development; the gas pricing; and so on. This paper obtains the framework of the real gas business in Indonesia and gives the real example of its competitiveness among the other energy types used in electricity sector. An understanding that aims in promoting sustainable economic growth and the security of supply in electricity sector in Indonesia is also discussed in detail. (auth)

  18. Exploiting synergies in European wind and hydrogen sectors: A cost-benefit assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Suzanne; Peteves, Estathios

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a 'wind-hydrogen strategy', is analysed using a cost-benefit approach to evaluate the final impact at the level of the end-consumer when this strategy is implemented. The analysis is conducted for four scenarios, based on different levels of: wind energy penetration in the electricity network area, hydrogen energy price, and environmental taxation on fuels. The effect of technological learning on the outcome is also analysed for the period up to 2050. The results of the analysis indicate that the relative value of the wind energy in the electricity market compared to the hydrogen market is a deciding factor in the attractiveness of the strategy; here the wind energy penetration in the network is a key consideration. Finally, in order to exploit learning effects from linking European wind and hydrogen sectors, action would need to be taken in the short term. (author)

  19. Influence of Atlantic SST anomalies on the atmospheric circulation in the Atlantic-European sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kestenare

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of observational data suggest that Sea Surface Temperature (SST anomalies in the Atlantic Ocean have a significant influence on the atmospheric circulation in the Atlantic-European sector in early winter and in spring. After reviewing this work and showing that the spring signal is part of a global air-sea interaction, we analyze for comparison an ensemble of simulations with the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model in T42 resolution forced by the observed distribution of SST and sea ice, and a simulation with the ECHAM4/OPA8 coupled model in T30 resolution. In the two cases, a significant influence of the Atlantic on the atmosphere is detected in the Atlantic-European sector. In the forced mode, ECHAM4 responds to SST anomalies from early spring to late summer, and also in early winter. The forcing involves SST anomalies not only in the tropical Atlantic, but also in the whole tropical band, suggesting a strong ENSO influence. The modeled signal resembles that seen in the observations in spring, but not in early winter. In the coupled mode, the Atlantic SST only has a significant influence on the atmosphere in summer. Although the SST anomaly is confined to the Atlantic, the summer signal shows some similarity with that seen in the forced simulations. However, there is no counterpart in the observations.

  20. Independents in European Gas Markets after liberalisation - downstream integration of upstream oil and gas companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eikeland, Per Ove

    2005-01-01

    A central objective of gas market liberalisation in Europe in the 1990s was to increase competition by opening end-use markets for independent suppliers. Upstream oil and gas companies in Europe reacted to this opportunity by announcing strategies to integrate forward in European gas markets. By late 2004, however, upstream companies still recorded generally weak downstream strategy implementation in Europe. The article concludes that this general implementation gap should be explained by political failure in EU member states to abolish gas market barriers to entry for independents. Variation between companies in degree of implementation should be explained by variation in conditions in the companies' home markets / wider business spheres and internal company factors. (Author)

  1. A system dynamic model for production and consumption policy in Iran oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, Behdad; Ali Pourfakhraei, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    A system dynamic model is presented, which considers the feedback between supply and demand and oil revenue of the existing system in Iran considering different sectors of the economy. Also the export of the oil surplus and the injection of the gas surplus into the oil reservoirs are seen in the model by establishing a balance between supply and demand. In this model the counter-effects and existing system feedbacks between supply and demand and oil revenue can be seen considering different sectors of the economy. As a result, the effects of oil and gas policies in different scenarios for different sectors of Iran's economy together with the counter-effects of energy consumption and oil revenue are examined. Three scenarios, which show the worst, base and ideal cases, are considered to find future trends of major variables such as seasonal gas consumption in power plants, seasonal injected gas in oil reservoirs, economic growth in the industrial sector, oil consumption in the transportation sector, industrial gas consumption and exported gas. For example, it is shown that the exported gas will reach between 500 and 620 million cubic-meter per day in different scenarios and export revenues can reach up to $500 billion by 2025. - Research Highlights: →A system dynamic model analyzing the feedback between supply, demand and oil revenue is built. →The export of the oil surplus and the injection of the gas surplus into oil reservoirs are modeled. →Effects of oil and gas policies in different scenarios are examined for Iran's economy. →Counter-effects of energy consumption and oil revenue are examined. →Exported gas will reach between 500 and 620 million cubic-meter per day in different scenarios. →Export revenues can reach up to $500 billion by 2025.

  2. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paranhos, Elizabeth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Boyd, William [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Carlson, Ken [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Domestic natural gas production was largely stagnant from the mid-1970s until about 2005. However, beginning in the late 1990s, advances linking horizontal drilling techniques with hydraulic fracturing allowed drilling to proceed in shale and other formations at much lower cost. The result was a slow, steady increase in unconventional gas production. The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset from the wider dialogue on natural gas; regarding the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity; existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and changes in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns; natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices; and demand for natural gas in the electric sector.

  3. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  4. Project management techniques used in the European Vacuum Vessel sectors procurement for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losasso, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.losasso@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Ortiz de Zuniga, Maria; Jones, Lawrence; Bayon, Angel; Arbogast, Jean-Francois; Caixas, Joan; Fernandez, Jose; Galvan, Stefano; Jover, Teresa [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Ioki, Kimihiro [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lewczanin, Michal; Mico, Gonzalo; Pacheco, Jose Miguel [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Preble, Joseph [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Stamos, Vassilis; Trentea, Alexandru [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer File name contains the directory tree structure with a string of three-letter acronyms, thereby enabling parent directory location when confronted with orphan files. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The management of the procurement procedure was carried out in an efficient and timely manner, achieving precisely the contract placement date foreseen at the start of the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contract start-up has been effectively implemented and a flexible project management system has been put in place for an efficient monitoring of the contract. - Abstract: The contract for the seven European Sectors of the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) was placed at the end of 2010 with a consortium of three Italian companies. The task of placing and the initial take-off of this large and complex contract, one of the largest placed by F4E, the European Domestic Agency for ITER, is described. A stringent quality controlled system with a bespoke Vacuum Vessel Project Lifecycle Management system to control the information flow, based on ENOVIA SmarTeam, was developed to handle the storage and approval of Documentation including links to the F4E Vacuum Vessel system and ITER International Organization System interfaces. The VV Sector design and manufacturing schedule is based on Primavera software, which is cost loaded thus allowing F4E to carry out performance measurement with respect to its payments and commitments. This schedule is then integrated into the overall Vacuum Vessel schedule, which includes ancillary activities such as instruments, preliminary design and analysis. The VV Sector Risk Management included three separate risk analyses from F4E and the bidders, utilizing two different methodologies. These efforts will lead to an efficient and effective implementation of this contract, vital to the success of the ITER machine, since the Vacuum Vessel is the biggest single work package of Europe's contribution to ITER and

  5. Environmental regulation and competitiveness: Empirical evidence on the Porter Hypothesis from European manufacturing sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubashkina, Yana; Galeotti, Marzio; Verdolini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the “weak” and “strong” versions of Porter Hypothesis (PH) focusing on the manufacturing sectors of 17 European countries between 1997 and 2009. The hypothesis that well-crafted and well-enforced regulation would benefit both the environment and the firm was originally proposed by Porter (1991) and Porter and van der Linde (1995). To date, the literature has analyzed the impact of environmental regulation on innovation and on productivity mostly in separate analyses and focusing on the USA. The few existing contributions on Europe study the effect of environmental regulation either on green innovation or on performance indicators such as exports. We instead look at overall innovation and productivity impacts. First, focusing on overall innovative activity allows us to account for potential opportunity costs of induced innovations. Second, productivity impacts are arguably the most relevant indicators for the “strong” PH. As a proxy of environmental policy stringency we use pollution abatement and control expenditures (PACE), one of the few sectoral level indicators available. We remedy upon its main drawback, namely potential endogeneity, by adopting an instrumental variable estimation approach. We find evidence of a positive impact of environmental regulation on the output of innovation activity, as proxied by patents, thus providing support in favor of the “weak” PH. This result is in line with most of the literature. On the other front, we find no evidence in favor of the “strong” PH, as productivity appears to be unaffected by the degree of pollution control and abatement efforts. -- Highlights: •Weak and strong Porter Hypothesis. •Panel of manufacturing sectors of 17 European countries between 1997 and 2009. •Look at overall innovation and productivity impacts. •Pollution abatement & control expenditures proxy of environmental policy stringency. •Account for potential endogeneity of PACE by adopting

  6. Modelling the rebound effect with network theory: An insight into the European freight transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzzenenti, Franco; Basosi, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a two pronged approach to the study of the rebound effect, with the aim of assessing the magnitude of the effect in the European freight transport sector and proposing a new modelling framework based on network theory. The (direct) rebound effect is assessed with: 1) an econometric regression; 2) a model based on network theory and statistical mechanics. According to the econometric model the European road freight transport sector undergone a negative rebound between of −74% between 1998 and 2007 and −146% between 1998 and 2011. The network analysis delivers an estimation of network rebound ranging between −29.37% and −7.25. Overall, these results indicate that energy efficiency in Europe, between 1998 and 2011, succeed in reducing the energy consumptions amid an increasing demand for transports. Results on rebound estimation depend on the decision of using GDP as an exogenous variable, an assumption that leaves questions open about the causality chain between growth and transports. Furthermore, the network analysis highlights a structural change –a migration of production factors offshore, that might partially explain this negative effect. In this view, rebound effect analysis on a local or regional scale is becoming more and more uncertain in a globally interconnected economic context. - Highlights: • An evaluation of direct rebound effect in the freight transports with an econometric model is performed. • A new concept of rebound effect based on network theory is presented and implemented. • A comparative analysis of the two different approaches is developed. • Both models indicate that the there was a negative rebound effect in European freight transports. • Network theory proved to be a promising approach to energy systems and rebound effect modelling.

  7. Point Climat no. 17 'The role of the forestry sector in reducing European emissions: the European Commission starts with a tally'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellassen, Valentin; Deheza, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Briefs' presents, in a few pages, hot topics in climate change policy. This issue addresses the following points: On March 12 2012, after two years of consultations and reviews, the European Commission published a decision proposal regarding the inclusion of the land use and forestry sector in European climate policy. The aim of this proposal is to impose accounting rules that are consistent with the decisions of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and to harmonise them between Member States. Meanwhile, the issue of economic incentives aimed at guaranteeing the sector's contribution to climate mitigation is postponed until a later date

  8. Health sector solidarity: a core European value but with broadly varying content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Although the concept of solidarity sits at the center of many European health sector debates, the specific groups eligible for coverage, the financing arrangements, and the range of services and benefits that, together, compose the operational content of solidarity have all changed considerably over time. In prior economic periods, solidarity covered considerably fewer services or groups of the population than it does today. As economic and political circumstances changed, the content of solidarity changed with them. Recent examples of these shifts are illustrated through a discussion of health reforms in Netherlands, Germany and also Israel (although not in Europe, the Israeli health system is similar in structure to European social health insurance systems). This article suggests that changed economic circumstances in Europe since the onset of the 2008 financial crisis may lead to re-configuring the scope and content of services covered by solidarity in many European health systems. A key issue for policymakers will be protecting vulnerable populations as this re-design occurs.

  9. The oil and gas sector in the brazilian economy

    OpenAIRE

    Guilhoto, Joaquim J.M.; Ichihara, Silvio Massaru; Postali, Fernando Antonio Slaibe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a research conducted to measure the importance of the oil and gas complex in the Brazilian economy and in its states, henceforth called O&G. Initially, the efforts were concentrated on the construction of an interregional input-output system for the 27 states of the Brazilian economy at the level of 42 industries, for the year of 2002. By using this system, it was possible to make an analysis of the role played by the oil and gas complex in the Brazi...

  10. Cooperation between West and East German gas transmission companies - an example of collaboration with Eastern European gas suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geweke, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the future, it can be assumed there will be a new quality of co-operation between the East and the West. The tremendous growth in demand for natural gas in Europe necessitates the development of new, increasingly distant gas resources. The investment required can not be raised by a few countries on their own. A strategy is needed for all states integrated in the European natural gas transmission system. Due to their geographic location, Eastern and Southern European countries have a key role to play. Central Europe will become the heart of the international natural gas business. Then the future co-operation between East and Western Europe must be taken into account. An important prerequisite for equal partners in the European gas industry will be coordination, if natural gas is to continue to make a growing contribution to an environmentally compatible and efficient energy supply in all European states and beyond. (orig.)

  11. The gas release programs to increase competition in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clastres, Cedric

    2005-01-01

    Regulators have implemented asymmetric regulation measures, such as gas release programs and market share targets, because of European gas supply features and gas market specificities. Empirical experiences show in line with economic theory that these regulation measures favour entry and competition without deterring investments. If we look at impacts on competition, they are mitigated. Some positive effects result from the increase in consumption or in importation and transportation infrastructure developments. But these regulations can also encourage anti-competitive behaviours like collusion, cream-skimming, reverse cherry picking or inefficient entries. Gas release measures establish a link between the incumbent and its competitors. A system of constraints on operators capacities can also appear. Thus, pricing or quantity strategies are more complex. Equilibrium prices are more volatile and very different of competition mark-up. The incumbent, for high gas release quantities and low supplies, can increase its costs to make more profit. This Raising Rivals' Costs strategy often occur if the gas release price is closer to supply costs. This strategy does not impact on consumers surplus but decreases welfare. The regulator can restore incentives to efficiency by setting gas release proportion function of incumbent's supplies. This proportion must be high enough to have a positive impact on the market because of incumbent's incentives to efficiency and greater total quantities sold by the two operators. But, on another way, it must not be too high as it could, thus, increase the probability of Raising Rivals' Costs or favour collusive strategies. (author) [fr

  12. Simulating the Impacts of Climate Extremes Across Sectors: The Case of the 2003 European Heat Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, J.; Zhao, F.; Reyer, C.; Breuer, L.; Coll, M.; Deryng, D.; Eddy, T.; Elliott, J. W.; Francois, L. M.; Friend, A. D.; Gerten, D.; Gosling, S.; Gudmundsson, L.; Huber, V.; Kim, H.; Lotze, H. K.; Orth, R.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Tittensor, D.; Vautard, R.; van Vliet, M. T. H.; Wada, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Increased occurrence of extreme climate or weather events is one of the most damaging consequences of global climate change today and in the future. Estimating the impacts of such extreme events across different human and natural systems is crucial for quantifying overall risks from climate change. Are current models fit for this task? Here we use the 2003 European heat wave and drought (EHW) as a historical analogue for comparable events in the future, and evaluate how accurately its impacts are reproduced by a multi-sectoral "super-ensemble" of state-of-the-art impacts models. Our study combines, for the first time, impacts on agriculture, freshwater resources, terrestrial and marine ecosystems, energy, and human health in a consistent multi-model framework. We identify key impacts of the 2003 EHW reported in the literature and/or recorded in publicly available databases, and examine how closely the models reproduce those impacts, applying the same measure of impact magnitude across different sectors. Preliminary results are mixed: While the EHW's impacts on water resources (streamflow) are reproduced well by most global hydrological models, not all crop and natural vegetation models reproduce the magnitude of impacts on agriculture and ecosystem productivity, respectively, and their performance varies by country or region. A hydropower capacity model matches reported hydropower generation anomalies only in some countries, and estimates of heat-related excess mortality from a set of statistical models are consistent with literature reports only for some of the cities investigated. We present a synthesis of simulated and observed impacts across sectors, and reflect on potential improvements in modeling and analyzing cross-sectoral impacts.

  13. Towards European organisation for integrated greenhouse gas observation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukolehto, Marjut; Vesala, Timo; Sorvari, Sanna; Juurola, Eija; Paris, Jean-Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is one the most challenging problems that humanity will have to cope with in the coming decades. The perturbed global biogeochemical cycles of the greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide) are a major driving force of current and future climate change. Deeper understanding of the driving forces of climate change requires full quantification of the greenhouse gas emissions and sinks and their evolution. Regional greenhouse gas budgets, tipping-points, vulnerabilities and the controlling mechanisms can be assessed by long term, high precision observations in the atmosphere and at the ocean and land surface. ICOS RI is a distributed infrastructure for on-line, in-situ monitoring of greenhouse gases (GHG) necessary to understand their present-state and future sinks and sources. ICOS RI provides the long-term observations required to understand the present state and predict future behaviour of the global carbon cycle and greenhouse gas emissions. Linking research, education and innovation promotes technological development and demonstrations related to greenhouse gases. The first objective of ICOS RI is to provide effective access to coherent and precise data and to provide assessments of GHG inventories with high temporal and spatial resolution. The second objective is to provide profound information for research and understanding of regional budgets of greenhouse gas sources and sinks, their human and natural drivers, and the controlling mechanisms. ICOS is one of several ESFRI initiatives in the environmental science domain. There is significant potential for structural and synergetic interaction with several other ESFRI initiatives. ICOS RI is relevant for Joint Programming by providing the data access for the researchers and acting as a contact point for developing joint strategic research agendas among European member states. The preparatory phase ends in March 2013 and there will be an interim period before the legal entity will

  14. National green house gas inventory for electric sector for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, D.; Lopez Lopez, I.

    1998-01-01

    In the paper background characterization of existing in 1990 National Electric System is made including isolate plants. The structure of primary energy sources used for electricity generation, including the start up consumption is presented. The Green House Gas calculation constitutes the objective of the work. Used methodology is described. Results and sensitivity analysis is presented

  15. Decarbonising meat : Exploring greenhouse gas emissions in the meat sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aan Den Toorn, S. I.; Van Den Broek, M. A.; Worrell, E.

    Consumption of meat is an important source of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and deep decarbonisation of the whole meat production chain is required to be able to meet global climate change (CC) mitigation goals. Emissions happen in different stages of meat production ranging from agricultural

  16. Governing the Gas Sector in Lebanon | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The second is managing the extraction process effectively. The third challenge is the management of gas revenues in a way that promotes inclusive development. This project will ... La religion, l'action sociale et la politique - étude de l'influence des organisations confessionnelles sur les politiques publiques au Liban.

  17. Natural gas industry in Italy. Analysis, scenarios for european union regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazioli, R.; Ricci, A.; Valentini, A.; Baratta, R.; Battaglia, A.; Conticelli, M.; Antonioli, B.; Beccarello, M.

    2000-01-01

    Natural gas represents an energy source in strong expansion in the last years, not only in Italy but in all european countries. The forecasting and scenarios show an increasing in demand of natural gas consumption [it

  18. Energy consumption and GHG emissions from the upstream oil and gas sector in Canada: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, A.; Timilsina, G.

    2004-01-01

    After electricity generation, the oil and gas sector is the most emission intensive industry in Canada. This paper presents statistical data and research by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI). The aim of the research was to provide a comparative evaluation between Alberta's energy consumption and Canada-wide consumption. Data revealed that energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased faster in Alberta in comparison to the rest of Canada, but have slowed since 1997, while emissions in the rest of Canada still continued to increase. Aggregate emission intensities were presented. It was noted that there were no significant changes in fuel mix in either Alberta or the country as a whole. Key factors contributing to rapid increase in energy consumption and GHG emissions after 1996 were: increased energy intensive production and increased use of natural gas. Charts of oil and gas use were presented in energy consumption, economic output and GHG emissions, also indicating that Canadian trends followed Alberta trends. A list of reduction measures in the oil and gas sector were provided, with figures of total reductions and cost. Future actions were outlined and included: ratification of the Kyoto Accord, the negotiation of sectoral agreements, important elements such as cost cap and percentages of reduction; the limited ability to reduce emissions at lower cost per tonne within the oil and gas sector; technology breakthroughs; and adoption of new practices such as the use of alternate fuels in energy intensive processes. tabs, figs

  19. Energy consumption and GHG emissions from the upstream oil and gas sector in Canada: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, A.; Timilsina, G. [Canadian Energy Research Inst., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    After electricity generation, the oil and gas sector is the most emission intensive industry in Canada. This paper presents statistical data and research by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI). The aim of the research was to provide a comparative evaluation between Alberta's energy consumption and Canada-wide consumption. Data revealed that energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased faster in Alberta in comparison to the rest of Canada, but have slowed since 1997, while emissions in the rest of Canada still continued to increase. Aggregate emission intensities were presented. It was noted that there were no significant changes in fuel mix in either Alberta or the country as a whole. Key factors contributing to rapid increase in energy consumption and GHG emissions after 1996 were: increased energy intensive production and increased use of natural gas. Charts of oil and gas use were presented in energy consumption, economic output and GHG emissions, also indicating that Canadian trends followed Alberta trends. A list of reduction measures in the oil and gas sector were provided, with figures of total reductions and cost. Future actions were outlined and included: ratification of the Kyoto Accord, the negotiation of sectoral agreements, important elements such as cost cap and percentages of reduction; the limited ability to reduce emissions at lower cost per tonne within the oil and gas sector; technology breakthroughs; and adoption of new practices such as the use of alternate fuels in energy intensive processes. tabs, figs.

  20. Environmental compensation application in the oil and gas sector; Aplicacao da compensacao ambiental no segmento de oleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lucia H.C.; Pollis, Altaira M. [ICF Consultoria do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Marco A.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE)

    2004-07-01

    The regulation of the law no 9.985, of July 18, 2000, by the decree no 4.340, of August 22, 2002, awake the productive sector to the imposition to the entrepreneur that must destine the amount of at least 0,5% of the total costs foreseen for the hole undertaking implementation, to implement or maintain environmental conservation units. The most of the environmental agencies have been applied 0,5%. The IBAMA uses a methodology to establish the impact level and the range between 0,5% and 5% to define the environmental compensation percentage and is questionable. Then, until now, this legal requirement have been applied in a heterogeneous form to the environmental licensing. The various applied criterions, the huge subjectivity in the impact level assessment, and the influence of this requirement in the licensing schedule, associate to the oil and gas sector project costs point to a relevant impact in the feasibility of the oil and gas sector projects. Based in the percentages that IBAMA had established for the oil and gas sector was esteemed some costs destined to the environmental compensation. The law implementation without inhibition of investments in the country depends on the involved sectors articulation. (author)

  1. Technical change and efficiency measures. The post-privatisation in the gas distribution sector in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we use a stochastic frontier approach to analyse the technical change in the post-privatisation period in the gas distribution sector in Argentina. We found that there is both a catching up effect and a shift in the frontier, which shows that the sector as a whole improved its efficiency in the reviewed period. Moreover, this phenomenon holds not only for the average but also for every firm in the sample

  2. European future natural gas demand and supply diversification: key issues for Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Elschner, E.

    1996-01-01

    After the breakdown of the former Soviet Union and the COMECON the demarcation line between western Europe and central/eastern Europe has disappeared. The central and eastern European economies as a whole and their gas industries as well as the western European gas companies are preparing for the future enlarged market in creating the prerequisites to participate successfully in such a market and to seize the opportunities this market is offering. The framework for this future European Gas Market has to be created now. The European gas industries and gas markets are in transition and are in a process of reshaping, with the following challenges: (1) In Central and Eastern European countries: To complete the privatization and restructuring process from centrally-planned economies to market-oriented structures with deregulated prices, market-oriented tariff systems and new legal and regulatory frameworks. These are the essential prerequisites for an integration of the central and eastern European countries into a single European gas market and the basis for an effective and successful trans border gas co-operation between east and west. (2) In western European countries: To pursue nearly similar processes of restructuring which are underway: privatization by reducing state participation and influence in gas and energy companies, with the accent on liberalization and deregulation of market structures with fewer market entry barriers, and more competition by reducing the influence of state or private monopolies. Gas companies are undertaking cost-efficiency measures to be prepared to meet the requirements of more competitive market structures and also of a more advanced internationalized gas business. The fundamental rules on which western European gas industries based their operations up to now have to be reconsidered. The old western European structures which have developed under the shelter of governmental protection are under pressure from several sources. EU energy

  3. PREFACE: 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows (GasMems 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijns, Arjan; Valougeorgis, Dimitris; Colin, Stéphane; Baldas, Lucien

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is to advance research in Europe and worldwide in the field of gas micro flows as well as to improve global fundamental knowledge and to enable technological applications. Gas flows in microsystems are of great importance and touch almost every industrial field (e.g. fluidic microactuators for active control of aerodynamic flows, vacuum generators for extracting biological samples, mass flow and temperature micro-sensors, pressure gauges, micro heat-exchangers for the cooling of electronic components or for chemical applications, and micro gas analyzers or separators). The main characteristic of gas microflows is their rarefaction, which for device design often requires modelling and simulation both by continuous and molecular approaches. In such flows various non-equilibrium transport phenomena appear, while the role played by the interaction between the gas and the solid device surfaces becomes essential. The proposed models of boundary conditions often need an empirical adjustment strongly dependent on the micro manufacturing technique. The 1st European Conference on Gas Micro Flows is organized under the umbrella of the recently established GASMEMS network (www.gasmems.eu/) consisting of 13 participants and six associate members. The main objectives of the network are to structure research and train researchers in the fields of micro gas dynamics, measurement techniques for gaseous flows in micro experimental setups, microstructure design and micro manufacturing with applications in lab and industry. The conference takes place on June 6-8 2012, at the Skiathos Palace Hotel, on the beautiful island of Skiathos, Greece. The conference has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement ITN GASMEMS no. 215504. It owes its success to many people. We would like to acknowledge the support of all members of the Scientific Committee and of all

  4. BIG hydrogen: hydrogen technology in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The BIG Hydrogen workshop was held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on February 13, 2006. About 60 representatives of industry, academia and government attended this one-day technical meeting on hydrogen production for the oil and gas industry. The following themes were identified from the presentations and discussion: the need to find a BIG hydrogen replacement for Steam Methane Reformer (SMR) because of uncertainty regarding cost and availability of natural gas, although given the maturity of SMR process (reliability, known capital cost) how high will H2 prices have to rise?; need for a national strategy to link the near-term and the longer-term hydrogen production requirements, which can take hydrogen from chemical feedstock to energy carrier; and in the near-term Canada should get involved in demonstrations and build expertise in large hydrogen systems including production and carbon capture and sequestration

  5. Energy-saving options for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from the Mongolian energy sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorjpurev, J.; Purevjal, O.; Erdenechimeg, Ch. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Energy sector is the largest contributor to GHG emission in Mongolia. The Energy sector emits 54 percent of CO2 and 4 percent of methane. All emissions of other greenhouse gases are accounted from energy related activities. The activities in this sector include coal production, fuel combustion, and biomass combustion at the thermal power stations and in private houses (stoves) for heating purposes. This paper presents some important Demand-side options considered for mitigation of CO2 emissions from energy sector such as Energy Conservation in Industrial Sector and in Buildings. Changes in energy policies and programmes in the Mongolian situation that promote more efficient and sustainable practices are presented in the paper. These energy saving measures will not only help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but will also promote economic development and alleviate other environmental problems.

  6. A socio-economic impact assessment of the European launcher sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Luca del; Scatteia, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    In a context where the economic strains are challenging European policies as well as the very fabric of governmental contributions to public life, innovation and efficacy of public policy in research are called upon to support growth in Europe and to sustain employment and entrepreneurial capacities. Governments need evidence that the investments in space, while providing strategic tools to implement sovereign policies, create jobs and build the competitive European economy of the future. This is particularly true when the decisions at stake have a potential bearing on the future of the European space sector for at least the next 30 years, as it has been the case for the ESA Council at ministerial level meeting in December 2014. On that occasion, Ministers took the decision to start the development of a new Ariane 6 launcher and Vega evolutions having a critical bearing on the Member States' strategic industrial capabilities and on the sustainability of the European guaranteed access to space. Given the importance of the subject, and following similar studies undertaken in the past for e.g. the Ariane 1-4 programme, the Agency has requested an independent consulting team to perform a dedicated study to assess ex-post the direct, indirect and induced socio-economic impacts of the Ariane 5 programme (mid-term evaluation) and of the Vega programme (early evaluation) globally, at European level, and within the economies and industries of each ESA Member State. This paper presents the assessment of the socio-economic impacts allowing the evaluation of the return on public investments in launchers through ESA in a wider perspective, going beyond the purely economic terms. The scope of the assessment covered in total approximately 25 ESA programmatic and activity lines and 30,000 commitments from 1986 to end 2012. In the framework of the study, the economic impact of the European launcher programmes is measured through a GDP impact defined as the straight economic

  7. The role of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, A.

    2003-06-01

    LNG market is vibrant, offers considerable prospects for growth, and could contribute to meeting the EU's growing demand for gas. However, possibly even more so than for pipeline supplies, prospective LNG supply sources have alternative markets. Competition for supplies will drive part of the market. The US gas market, in particular, with its growing need for gas imports, could become a major magnet for LNG, in direct competition with the European market. Failure to recognise this in European energy and regulatory policies could limit Europe's ability to secure this gas for its own markets

  8. Pipelines to Brussels: Natural gas exporters' strategies in a changing European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claes, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    On the political level several different processes will influence the future of the European gas market. The possibilities of large increases in demand due to environmental concerns, and economic development, particularly in Eastern Europe, are beginning to change the buyer's market of the 1980's into a seller's market in the 1990's. Turning to the individual producers, one should not rule out a possible extension of the Dutch export contracts beyond 2010, but the main actors are likely to be the Russian Federation and Norway, as the Algerians are unlikely to stabilize their economy and the political uncertainties. The Russian Federation and Norway seem to be in the best position to capture the demand increase assumed in the next ten to twenty years. However, if the demand forecasts of today turn out to be accurate, there is no reason to worry about future competition between the Russian Federation and Norway. The demand increase would give room for both producers to export large volumes to the European market. Even a conservative estimate of gas demand at about 300 billion m 3 in the year 2010, does give 90 billion m 3 to be filled in by additional deliveries. The ''environmental-scenario'', where a substantial number of coal and oil fired power stations are replaced with gas stations, could easily push demand up to 450 billion m 3 . In this scenario gas would take a larger share of the total energy consumption in Europe. This could make importers more concerned with diversification of their gas imports. On the other hand, the pressure for cleaner fuels could obtain a higher priority than diversification, especially if the political situation stabilizes in the exporting countries: the Russian Federation and Algeria. It could come to a choice between a concentration of gas imports from the Russian Federation and Norway, and the more polluting use of coal and oil. The solution to this choice is not obvious. 26 refs., 11 figs

  9. Basel III Global Liquidity Standards: Critical Discussion and Impact onto the European Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Bučková

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Together with the Basel III regulatory equity rules, two liquidity ratios have been published. Resulting from the illiquidity of some banks during the financial crisis in 2008, these ratios shall help to prevent further crisis in the European banking sector. But do they really fulfill their aim? This article presents the new liquidity ratios, the actual liquidity situation in banks and describes the consequences for banks at a simplified example. It has to be stated that implementing more detailed liquidity frameworks into the banking supervision process is necessary. The financial crisis in 2008 showed that several banks did not have adequate liquidity risk models and processes to prevent illiquidity. But the LCR and the NSFR seem to be wrong methods. Both ratios will increase. The implementation of both ratios has to be done very carefully in order to prevent this.

  10. Thesis: the ''evolutions of the long term European gas market - organisation and costs''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouvry, V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the main conclusions of the thesis defended by the author on January 30, 1998: recalls of some characteristics of the European gas market, the stakes of the gas market liberation, the regulatory aspects, the tariffs problem, the competition in the gas marketing segment, and different possible modeling of the gas market evolution (contracts, costs, competition). (J.S.)

  11. Hot continent: South America is open for fast growth in the natural gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A. E.

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for participation in the rapid expansion of the natural gas sector in South America following privatization and deregulation initiatives, were examined on a country-by-country basis. In Colombia and Venezuela opportunities exist primarily in domestic development of the gas sector, whereas in the countries of the southern cone - Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay - the situation is said to be ripe for energy sector integration. Currently, a second regional pipeline link, with a capacity of 129 Bcf/year, is nearing completion, which will carry gas from west Argentina to Santiago, Chile, to supplement the 77 Bcf/year pipeline carrying gas from Bolivia to the Argentine border, where it connects with a trunk line to supply the Buenos Aires market. A Canadian Energy Research Institute study, to be published in the summer of 1997, focuses on the various pipeline links being put forward to integrate the gas resources in the southern cone with existing and potential gas markets. The integration scenarios examined are predicted to reveal both economic and commercial merit for the pipeline corridors. Canadian energy and pipeline companies are said to be well positioned to take advantage of the opportunities resulting from these initiatives, and to help making the vision of an integrated gas pipeline network in the southern cone of South America a reality

  12. Decarbonizing the European electricity sector. Modeling and policy analysis for electricity and CO_2 infrastructure networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, Pao-Yu Charly Robin

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation uses three models to analyze different decarbonization strategies for combating global climate change: The cost minimizing mixed-integer model CCTS-Mod examines the economics of Carbon Capture, Transport, and Storage (CCTS) for the electricity and industry sector; the welfare maximizing quadratically constrained model ELMOD focuses on different trajectories for renewable energy sources (RES) and transmission grid expansions; and the equilibrium model ELCO combines the insights of the individual sectors to a combined CCTS and electricity investment and dispatch model. Modeling results show that an investment in CCTS is beneficial for the iron and steel sector once the CO_2 certificate price exceeds 50 Euros/t CO_2. The threshold is 75 Euros/t CO_2 for the cement industry and 100 Euros/t CO_2 for the electricity sector. Additional revenues from using CO_2 for enhanced oil recovery (CO_2-EOR) lead to an earlier adoption of CCTS in the North Sea region. The lack of economies of scale results in increasing CO_2 storage costs of more than 30%, while transport costs even double. Research from the last years, however, indicates that CCTS is unlikely to play an important role in decarbonizing the electricity sector. The identified reasons for this are incumbents' resistance to structural change, wrong technology choices, over-optimistic cost estimates, a premature focus on energy projects instead of industry, and the underestimation of transport and storage issues. Keeping global temperature rise below 2 C therefore implies the phase-out of fossilfueled power plants and, in particular, of CO_2-intensive coal power plants. The low CO_2 price established by the European Emissions Trading Scheme is insufficient to induce a fuel switch in the medium term. Therefore, supplementary national measures are necessary to reduce coal-based power generation; i.a. feed-in tariffs for RES, minimum CO_2 prices, or emissions performance standards. Analyses for Germany show

  13. NATURAL GAS - A CHANCE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF SERBIAN ENERGY SECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstic, S.; Djajic, N.; Kukobat, M.

    2007-07-01

    Republic Serbia has produced and consumed natural gas domestically since 1952, but has always been net importer. Strategy of Energy Development in Serbia and, especially, National Action Plan for the Gasification on the Territory of Republic of Serbia dedicated special attention to gas economy development in respect with expected contribution in efficient energy use and environmental policy protection in our country. Option of expanded share of natural gas in fulfilling energy requirements in future is reasonable, considering natural gas with its energetic, ecological and economical characteristics as very suitable fuel. Also, in mid-term and most probably in long-term period, the gas import is expected to be more advantageous than oil import. The paper deals the basic features of natural gas consumption in Serbia in nineties and analyses the further development in gas sector for next period until 2015 based on strategic analyses. (auth)

  14. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

  15. Cost efficiency in the Swiss gas distribution sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsi, Mehdi; Filippini, Massimo; Kuenzle, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the cost structure of gas distribution utilities in Switzerland. Three stochastic frontier models are applied to a panel of 26 companies operating from 1996 to 2000. Efficiency is assumed to be constant over time. The analysis highlights the importance of output characteristics such as customer density and network size. The results suggest that the utilities could slightly reduce their operating costs by improving efficiency. There is no evidence of significant unexploited scale economies. However, our analysis indicates that the estimates of scale economies could be sensitive to the assumptions regarding the variation of output with output characteristics

  16. Evaluation of the energy efficiency evolution in the European road freight transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzzenenti, F.; Basosi, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate energy efficiency in the European freight transport sector over three decades, according to a variety of indicators, methodologies and databases. The aim is, on the one hand, of determining major drawbacks in energy efficiency metrics, on the other hand, identifying a possible trend in the sector. The present analysis shows that energy efficiency evaluation is generally subject to misinterpretation and distortion with regard to the methods and data source adopted. Two different indicators (energy intensity and fuel economy) were initially taken into account to select the most suitable for evaluating vehicles' efficiency. Fuel economy was then adopted and measured according to two different methodologies (top-down and bottom-up). We then considered all the possible sources of distortion (data sources employed, methods of data detection, speed of detection, power enhancement, size factor) with the aim of accomplishing a sound estimation. Fuel economy was eventually divided with the maximum power available (adjusted fuel economy), to account for the power shift of vehicles, that represents a further efficiency improvement.

  17. Sectoral and regional impacts of the European carbon market in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robaina Alves, Margarita; Rodriguez, Miguel; Roseta-Palma, Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Across Europe, CO 2 emission allowances represent one of the main policy instruments to comply with the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. In this paper we use microdata to address two issues regarding the impact of the European Carbon Market (EU ETS). First, we analyze the sectoral effects of the EU ETS in Portugal. The goal is to study the distributive consequences of imbalances, with the novelty of taking into account firm financial data to put values into context. We show that a large majority of installations in most sectors had surpluses and the opportunity to raise remarkable revenues in some cases. We also look at the regional impact, since the pre-existing specialization of different regions in the production of different goods and services might lead to an uneven economic impact of the allowance market. In particular, Portuguese data indicate a distribution of revenue from low income to high income regions, or rather, between installations located in those regions. We focus on the first phase of the EU ETS, using data for each one of the 244 Portuguese installations in the market as well as financial data for 80% of these installations, although we also present data for 2008 and 2009. - Research highlights: → Analysis of distributional impact of the EU ETS for Portuguese sectors and regions. → EU ETS microdata, economic data and firm financial data used to provide context. → Most installations had surpluses and in some cases may have raised notable revenues. → There seems to be an income distribution effect from low to high-income regions. → Thermoelectric generation most likely to be short, but results vary with rainfall.

  18. Sectoral and regional impacts of the European carbon market in Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robaina Alves, Margarita, E-mail: mrobaina@ua.p [GOVCOPP and Department of Economics, Management and Industrial Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rodriguez, Miguel [Department of Applied Economics, University of Vigo, Facultade Empresariais e Turismo, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Roseta-Palma, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.roseta@iscte.p [Department of Economics and UNIDE, ISCTE-Lisbon University Institute, Av. Forcas Armadas, 1629-026 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    Across Europe, CO{sub 2} emission allowances represent one of the main policy instruments to comply with the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. In this paper we use microdata to address two issues regarding the impact of the European Carbon Market (EU ETS). First, we analyze the sectoral effects of the EU ETS in Portugal. The goal is to study the distributive consequences of imbalances, with the novelty of taking into account firm financial data to put values into context. We show that a large majority of installations in most sectors had surpluses and the opportunity to raise remarkable revenues in some cases. We also look at the regional impact, since the pre-existing specialization of different regions in the production of different goods and services might lead to an uneven economic impact of the allowance market. In particular, Portuguese data indicate a distribution of revenue from low income to high income regions, or rather, between installations located in those regions. We focus on the first phase of the EU ETS, using data for each one of the 244 Portuguese installations in the market as well as financial data for 80% of these installations, although we also present data for 2008 and 2009. - Research highlights: {yields} Analysis of distributional impact of the EU ETS for Portuguese sectors and regions. {yields} EU ETS microdata, economic data and firm financial data used to provide context. {yields} Most installations had surpluses and in some cases may have raised notable revenues. {yields} There seems to be an income distribution effect from low to high-income regions. {yields} Thermoelectric generation most likely to be short, but results vary with rainfall.

  19. Methodology for reporting 2011 B.C. public sector greenhouse gas emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    In order to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, British Columbia promulgated legislation under which the public sector is expected to become carbon neutral starting in 2010 and provincial public sector organizations (PSOs) must report their emissions annually. The aim of this report is to present the emission factors and methodology for calculating and reporting PSO emissions used in 2011. Emission factors represent the amount of greenhouse gas emitted from a specific activity. This document provides emission factors for all in scope categories: stationary sources, indirect emissions, mobile sources and business travel; it also presents a sample calculation of greenhouse gas emissions. The government of British Columbia developed SMARTTool, a web-based program which calculates and reports emissions from stationary sources, indirect emissions and mobile sources. In addition the SMART Travel Emissions Calculator was created to report business travel greenhouse gas emissions through SMARTTool.

  20. Trading in the rain. Rainfall and European power sector emissions. Research note no. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Analysts often say that temperature and rainfall have an impact on the price of CO 2 , as they influence the conditions of electric power supply and demand. Rainfall mainly affects the capacity of hydropower production, the third largest source of electricity in Europe and by far the leading source of renewable energy. The variability of hydroelectric volumes is indeed usually offset by other, higher-emitting sources of electricity, which has repercussions on the European allowances trading market. In 2005, rainfall was unusually low in several European countries: in the Iberian peninsula and in France, drought is believed to have brought about a rise of approximately 15 Mt CO 2 in power sector emissions. In contrast, hydrological conditions were particularly good in the Nordic countries, allowing them to reduce CO 2 emissions in the region as a whole through hydropower-based exports. The additional allowances demand would therefore have been 'only' about 9 Mt CO 2 . To make the interaction with the CO 2 market easier to understand, an indicator of rainfall in Europe must include this compensating phenomenon resulting from the heterogeneity of the climatic conditions and volumes produced in Europe

  1. European CO2 emission trends: A decomposition analysis for water and aviation transport sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, V.; Galmarini, S.

    2012-01-01

    A decomposition analysis is used to investigate the main factors influencing the CO 2 emissions of European transport activities for the period 2001–2008. The decomposition method developed by Sun has been used to investigate the carbon dioxide emissions intensity, the energy intensity, the structural changes and the economy activity growth effects for the water and the aviation transport sectors. The analysis is based on Eurostat data and results are presented for 14 Member States, Norway and EU27. Results indicate that economic growth has been the main factor behind the carbon dioxide emissions increase in EU27 both for water and aviation transport activities. -- Highlights: ► Decomposition analysis is used to investigate factors that influenced the energy-related CO 2 emissions of European transport. ► Economic growth has been the main factor affecting the energy-related CO 2 emissions increases. ► Investigating the CO 2 emissions drivers is the first step to define energy efficiency policies and emission reduction strategies.

  2. The Italian energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The energy sector in Italy, as in Europe and in many other areas of the world, is undergoing rapid and profound changes. The 1986 ratification of the European Single Act was intended to create a European internal market, where circulation of people, capital, goods, and services would reach the highest possible liberalization. In 1988, in the document The Energy Internal Market, the European Union (EU) commission stressed the need for creation of an internal energy market--free of obstacles--to increase security of supply, to reduce costs, and to strengthen the competitiveness of the European economic system. In 1990, the Community Council adopted directives to implement the EU energy sector. This article describes Italy's role as part of the EU energy sector. It covers the following topics: the Italian energy sector; electricity vs gas transportation; project finance; recent developments advance Italian power industry; specifying powerplant components -- Italian stype; buyers' guide to Italian equipment, services

  3. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  4. European Experience and Ukrainian Realities in the Policy of Financial Support Entrepreneurial Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Savchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim/purpose - We want to provide recommendations to bridge the gap in access to financing of the entrepreneurial sector in Ukraine based on the analysis of European experience, EBF approaches, financial funds for SMEs and the current state of the credit market in Ukraine. Design/methodology/approach - We used the general scientific methods of knowledge, conceptual tenets of the theory of market economy, abstract logical analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, historical (to determine the nature and causes of bank investment in SMEs, refine categories and terms; formalization, systems analysis (to determine factors of investment banking, institutional and legal environment; statistical, retrospective analysis. The results of surveys conducted by the EBF on the issues of support and development of SMEs are used, own research of 120 Ukrainian SMEs, which was conducted during the period from January to July 2016. The nature of the research questions was reinforced by the decision to survey only SMEs. Independent reporting (from entrepreneurs or CEOs was used to account for both business activity and the external sources of information. Findings - Policy initiatives should primarily be developed at the national level in the field of lending to SMEs based on the European experience and Ukrainian realities; it is necessary to develop an understanding of the need for access to certain types of information; SMEs are the main providers and the most valuable source of credit information. Research implications/limitations - When using the methods of calculation creditworthiness perhaps to take into account the methods for assessing the quality of management, the image of the enterprise, ISO certificates. Originality/value/contribution - Based on the cross-country comparison of the EU and Ukraine, highlight the necessity of focusing on some legal unification of SME lending procedures for the development of a culture of sustainable entrepreneurship

  5. Developments on the European energy market. Part 1. Natural gas supply. Extra import covers growing natural gas demand in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    This first part of a series on developments in the European gas market features the growth in gas supply. 35% of the gas demand must be covered from sources outside Europe. For the future additional imports are required from countries such as the Russian Federation, Algeria and Nigeria. Over the next few years the artificial link between ga and oil prices will disappear, bringing the gas price to a structurally lower level. It will be of crucial importance that gas suppliers will not be able to form cartels to keep prices high. All competing projects will curb price increases on the European market, but will definitely result in more freedom of choice for European natural gas consumers

  6. Cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gases mitigation measures in the European agro-forestry sector: a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povellato, Andrea; Bosello, Francesco; Giupponi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, climate change has become an increasing concern for scientists, public opinions and policy makers. Due to the pervasive nature of its impacts for many important aspects of human life, climate change is likely to influence and be influenced by the most diverse policy or management choices. This is particularly true for those interventions affecting agriculture and forestry: they are strongly dependent on climate phenomena, but also contribute to climate evolution being sources of and sinks for greenhouse gases (GHG). This paper offers a survey of the existing literature assessing cost-effectiveness and efficiency of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies or the effects of broader economic reforms in the agricultural and forestry sectors. The focus is mainly on European countries. Different methodological approaches, research questions addressed and results are examined. The main findings are that agriculture can potentially provide emissions reduction at a competitive cost, mainly with methane abatement, while carbon sequestration seems more cost-effective with appropriate forest management measures. Afforestation, cropland management and bioenergy are less economically viable measures due to competition with other land use. Mitigation policies should be carefully designed either to balance costs with expected benefits in terms of social welfare. Regional variability is one of the main drawbacks to fully assess the cost-effectiveness of different measures. Integration of models to take into account both social welfare and spatial heterogeneity seems to be the frontier of the next model generation

  7. Renewable energy and CCS in German and European power sector decarbonization scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludig, Sylvie

    2013-11-06

    system costs are lower when transmission and storage are available. Restrictions on transmission expansion induce high amounts of storage since high local shares of solar PV lead to large output variations. In contrast, a highly interconnected European power grid allows for optimized renewable power generation siting in regions with highest potentials, which requires large-scale transmission expansions but limits total power system costs. Results from a detailed study for Germany show that the level of power demand is strongly relevant for the realization of high renewable shares and ambitious decarbonization targets. A broad technology portfolio allows to hedge against the failure to meet efficiency goals for electricity demand. CCS is necessary to reach ambitious government targets if power demand is not sufficiently decreased by efficiency measures, as is offshore wind energy. Even in case of decreasing demand, at least one of both technologies needs to be available. The choice of transmission expansion corridors is strongly influenced by technology availability: in scenarios without offshore wind energy, north-south interconnections, which are crucial in all other scenarios, only play a minor role. The studies in this thesis show that a large-scale decarbonization of the German and European power sectors is achievable through large shares of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation. CCS is not a prerequisite for successful CO{sub 2} emission strategies, but allows reaching mitigation targets at a lower cost. A portfolio of renewable energy integration options is essential to manage temporal and spatial fluctuations; the optimal technology mix is determined by the underlying power system.

  8. The deregulation of the Italian natural gas industry and diversification processes in the down-stream sector; I riflessi dell'apertura del mercato italiano del gas naturale sul riposizionamento strategico degli operatori nel settore down-stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazioli, R. [Ferrara Univ., Ferrara (Italy); Quaglino, S. [Cap Gemini Ernst and Young, Energy Division, Milan (Italy); Di Domenico, M. [Milan Bocconi Univ., Milan (Italy). Istituto di Economia delle Fonti di Energia

    2000-07-01

    The opening of the italian gas market , due to the privatisation and liberalisation process, has been implemented by the important normative evolution of this sector both at european and national level. The debate following this process in the gas market has focussed, basically, on the up-stream sector leaving aside the important down-stream sector also concerning gas local distribution and sales. In this article it is paid more attention to the down-stream sector considering the firms' evolution from a basic mono utility to multi utility and multi services organisational structure. This potential firms' evolution in the italian gas market will be considered also referring to specific international experience in this market. [Italian] L'apertura del mercato italiano del gas naturale e' la conseguenza, principalmente, dei processi di privatizzazione e liberalizzazione che sono seguiti alla normativa europea e nazionale che disciplinano tale mercato. Il dibattito seguito a questo processo si e' essenzialmente focalizzato sul settore up-stream e poca attenzione e' stata invece rivolta all'importante settore down-stream, ossia la distribuzione locale e la vendita. Su tale settore si focalizza l'attenzione di questo articolo nell'intento di delineare i possibili scenari di sviluppo delle imprese operanti che, da una semplice strutura mono-utility, si evolvano verso una struttura multi-utility e multi-service.

  9. The CO2 emissions of the European power sector: economic drivers and the climate-energy policies' contribution. Working Paper No. 2014 - 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghmans, Nicolas; Cheze, Benoit; Alberola, Emilie; Chevallier, Julien

    2014-10-01

    In the frame of the ongoing debate on the 2030 energy and climate policies in the European Union, this article provides the first assessment of the effectiveness of European energy and climate policies on the CO 2 emissions reductions. This ex-post analysis deals with the CO 2 emissions of the electricity sector covered by the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) during its phases I and II (2005-2012). We analyze the contribution of different variables (including climate and energy policies, energy prices, economic activity and technical features of plants) in the evolution of CO 2 emissions from electricity production plants in Europe. The empirical results allow drawing a number of conclusions regarding the causes of the downward trend in the carbon emissions generated by power production covered by the EU ETS between 2005 and 2012. First, we show that the increased use of renewable energy in electricity production has played a dominant role in the fall in CO 2 emissions in the power sector. Second, the analysis confirms that the economic downturn has played a significant role, although not a dominant one. Third, price substitution effects between coal and gas also seem to have affected carbon emissions. Last but not least, we identify that the price of carbon has also pushed down power CO 2 emissions. (authors)

  10. The State Policy for Natural Gas Sector / Sektor Gazu Ziemnego W Polityce Państwa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szurlej, Adam

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews the state policy for natural gas sector. A particular attention has been given to how the assumptions of gas demand, import volumes and gas production from domestic reserves have developed in strategic documents. The restructuring of natural gas sector has been brought closer on the example of PGNiG S.A. (Polish Oil and Gas Company), and changes in the domestic gas market resulting from the implementation of EU law have been discussed as well. Major changes in the domestic gas market in the period of 1990-2011 have been presented along with the cooperation between Poland and Russia regarding the natural gas supply for the Polish market. W artykule dokonano przeglądu polityki państwa wobec sektora gazu ziemnego. W sposób szczególny przeanalizowano jak kształtowały się w dokumentach strategicznych prognozy w zakresie zapotrzebowania na gaz, wielkości importu i wydobycia gazu ze złóż krajowych. Przybliżono także restrukturyzację sektora gazu ziemnego na przykładzie PGNiG oraz zmiany na krajowym rynku gazu wynikające z implementacji prawa UE. Wskazano najważniejsze zmiany na krajowym rynku gazu ziemnego w latach 1990-2011 oraz scharakteryzowano współpracę polsko - rosyjską w zakresie dostaw gazu do Polski.

  11. Issues in Energy Economics Led by Emerging Linkages between the Natural Gas and Power Sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, Jeremy B.

    2007-01-01

    Fuel prices in 2006 continued at record levels, with uranium continuing upward unabated and coal, SO 2 emission allowances, and natural gas all softening. This softening did not continue for natural gas, however, whose prices rose, fell and rose again, first following weather influences and, by the second quarter of 2007, continuing at high levels without any support from fundamentals. This article reviews these trends and describes the remarkable increases in fuel expenses for power generation. By the end of 2005, natural gas claimed 55% of annual power sector fuel expenses, even though it was used for only 19% of electric generation. Although natural gas is enormously important to the power sector, the sector also is an important driver of the natural gas market-growing to over 28% of the market even as total use has declined. The article proceeds to discuss globalization, natural gas price risk, and technology developments. Forces of globalization are poised to affect the energy markets in new ways-new in not being only about oil. Of particular interest in the growth of intermodal traffic and its a little-understood impacts on rail traffic patterns and transportation costs, and expected rapidly expanding LNG imports toward the end of the decade. Two aspects of natural gas price risk are discussed: how understanding the use of gas in the power sector helps define price ceilings and floors for natural gas, and how the recent increase in the natural gas production after years of record drilling could alter the supply-demand balance for the better. The article cautions, however, that escalation in natural gas finding and development costs is countering the more positive developments that emerged during 2006. Regarding technology, the exploitation of unconventional natural gas was one highlight. So too was the queuing up of coal-fired power plants for the post-2010 period, a phenomenon that has come under great pressure with many consequences including increased

  12. Development trends in the Azerbaijan oil and gas sector: Achievements and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciarreta, Aitor; Nasirov, Shahriyar

    2012-01-01

    This article is study of Azerbaijan oil and gas industry. It illustrates the business climate, the impact of this sector on Azerbaijan's economy including role of SOFAZ and highlights recent developments in the energy production and the main concepts of . Meanwhile, the article establishes the government policy by indentifying several factors that influenced to attract foreign investment to oil and gas sector and examines significant challenges that still remain for further development of the country's oil industry. - Highlights: ► In this study, we review the oil and gas sector in Azerbaijan and describe the main government policies for attracting foreign investment to the sector. ► We showed that providing a predictable legislative and regulatory framework and attractive conditions for oil contracting encourages foreign investment inflows to the country. ► Issues such as the lack of independent regulatory institutions, rehabilitation of oil refineries and resolution of the legal status of the Caspian Sea remain major challenges for further development of the oil and gas industries.

  13. The impact of the new public management: Challenges for coordination and cohesion in European public sectors (review essay)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven); G. Hammerschmid (Gerhard)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNew Public Management has been around for a quarter of a century in European public sectors, yet despite the movement’s emphasis on indicators and evidence, there have been surprisingly few encompassing evaluations. In this paper, we provide an overview of academic evaluation and

  14. Energy and competition: research on the legal changes induced by the liberalization of the electricity and gas sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The liberalization of the electricity and gas sectors, as triggered by the European Community right, has generated deep juridical mutations. These mutations are, first, linked with market organization. In front of the diversity of the national organizations in both sectors, the European Community right could not impose a unique model of liberalization. It has established a set of common rules and principles to the different member states with the aim of ensuring the development of a competitive market. The introduction of competition gives access to the different activities of these sectors to the newcomers. However, because of their characteristics, competition cannot apply uniformly to the overall activities in concern. Two logics, one of natural monopoly, and the other of competition, will thus cohabit together. Moreover, the introduction of competition is managed. This management is characterized by the search for a new equilibrium between competition and general interest imperatives and by the creation of a new regulation authority at the institutional level. These mutations are also linked with market operation. Liberalization leads to a multiplication and an increase of the complexity of the contractual relations between the operators, the control of which is fundamental to ensure a good market operation. This mutation of operations is followed by a mutation of operators. Those are submitted to a dissociation trend of their activities in order to prevent discriminations and to fight against cross subventions. On the other hand, the operators' mutation shows a huge recombination movement which is characterized by a multiplication of concentration operations, leading to a remodeling of the market structure. (J.S.)

  15. Annual European Union greenhouse gas inventory 1990-2011 and inventory report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendolovska, V. [DG CLIMA, Brussels (Belgium); Fernandez, R. [EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark); Mandl, N.; Gugele, B.; Ritter, M. [ETC/ACM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    This report is the annual submission of the greenhouse gas inventory of the European Union to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. It presents greenhouse gas emissions between 1990 and 2011 for EU-27, EU-15, individual Member States and economic sector. Total GHG emissions, without LULUCF, in the EU-27 decreased by 18.4 % between 1990 and 2011 (-1 024 million tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents). Emissions decreased by 3.3 % (155.0 million tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents) between 2010 and 2011. In 2011, total GHG emissions in the EU-15, without LULUCF, were 14.7 % (624 million tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents) below 1990 levels, and 14.9 % (635 million tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents) below its Kyoto base year levels. Emissions decreased by 4.2 % (159.6 million tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents) between 2010 and 2011. Under the Kyoto Protocol, the EU agreed to reduce its GHG emissions by 8 % by 2008.2012 compared to its 'base year'. This can be achieved by a combination of existing and planned domestic policies and measures, the use of carbon sinks, and the use of Kyoto mechanisms. Since 2009, total GHG emissions have been below the EU-15 Kyoto target. (LN)

  16. Price elasticity of natural gas demand in the power generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, P.F.

    1990-01-01

    Today, the demand for energy by the electric generation sector is highly competitive and price-responsive. Previous estimates of the price elasticity of natural gas demand in this sector have focused primarily on data from the 1960s and 1970s. Such estimates fail to take full account of economic, regulatory, and legislative developments that have altered the structure of the electric generation market during the 1980s. Structural changes include an increased ability of utilities to choose among generating options, the increase in non-utility generators, the amending of the Fuel Use Act, and a more competitive market for electricity. An accurate estimate of price elasticity requires a refocusing on data from the post-1983 period. The purpose of this paper is to answer two questions: how price responsive (elastic) is natural gas demand in this market; and what changes in natural gas demand elasticity have occurred over time

  17. Economic analysis of the expected environmental impact of the Single European Market through the transport, waste and energy sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brutscher, S.

    1993-01-01

    Similarly to other studies the present dissertation presupposes that the Single European Market will lead to an increase in transport waste quantities, and energy consumption and consequently to greater environmental pollution. Of central importance here is the concept of ''expletive costs'' introduced in this paper which describes that damage to the natural and human environment which is not compensated. It forms out that the sectors of transport, waste, and energy alone will most probably send the expletive costs of the Single European Market into astronomic dimensions. In view of the interdependencies of these three sectors it seems doubtful whether the economic benefit to be expected from the establishment of the Single European Market can justify the additional environmental damage thus caused. (HP) [de

  18. The contribution of the industry sector to the construction of a European area of safety and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiss, W.; Parker, G.; Glibert, M.

    2010-01-01

    The European Atomic Forum (FORATOM) is a trade association representing the European nuclear industry. Its main purpose is to promote the use of nuclear energy in Europe by representing the interests of this important and multi-faceted industrial sector. The European nuclear industry recognized that with the deregulation of the electricity market, diversity of national regulations could seriously distort competition. Therefore harmonizing regulatory practices is the best way of ensuring that the industry can evolve within a stable legal framework. In order to pool resources, the licensees launched mid 2005 ENISS (European Nuclear Installation Safety Standard Initiative) under the umbrella of FORATOM. The EU institutions have in recent years acknowledged nuclear energy as a key component of Europe's energy mix. Major European survey shows public acceptance of nuclear energy is on the increase. Support for discussion and debate on nuclear energy has been supported over the past few years by the European Union through the establishment of the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG) and the European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF). FORATOM and ENISS have been a keen supporter and participant of the ENEF process. The European Nuclear Industry considers that the existing arrangements for ensuring nuclear safety in the EU under the guidance of international nuclear organisations, conventions and under the control of the national safety authorities have delivered excellent safety records. However, the industry has a role to play in the further harmonization processes and is therefore willing to contribute to the dialogue with all possible stakeholders. (author)

  19. Increased competition on the supply side of the Western European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golombek, R.; Gjelsvik, E.; Rosendahl, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper analyzes how the supply side of the Western European natural gas market may react if the demand side becomes competitive. The authors show--using a numerical model of the Western European natural gas market--that once the demand side of the market is liberalized, each gas-producing country has an incentive to break up its gas sellers. The model therefore suggests that there may be numerous producers in a liberalized natural gas market. Hence, in a liberalized market consumers will not be exploited by suppliers

  20. European ability to cope with a gas crisis. Comparison between 2009 and 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Nuria; Zaccarelli, Nicola; Bolado-Lavín, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation (EU) No 994/2010 concerning measures to safeguard security of gas supply was adopted following the 2009 commercial dispute between Ukraine and Russia which yield to a gas disruption. Since then, new infrastructure and cooperation measures have being implemented in order to reinforce the European gas system to better cope with gas shortages. Joint Research Centre has developed GEMFLOW, a country-based model of the European gas network, to simulate gas disruptions of different duration and to estimate the survival time and gas non-served per country. In this paper an analysis and comparison of the improvements carried out in the European gas system between 2009 and 2014 is presented and GEMFLOW model is used to evaluate the progress being made to strengthen the security of gas supply at European level. - Highlights: • We analyse the improvements in the EU gas infrastructure between 2009 and 2014. • A model of the EU gas grid is used to study the disruption of the major importers. • We find that Europe has greatly improved its ability to cope with a gas disruption. • We find that Eastern Europe, though enhanced, remains the most vulnerable area.

  1. The US Natural Gas Exports: New Rules on the European Gas Landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    projects. Existing projects are secured by long-term contracts for periods of 20 years. However, it will be difficult for new projects to obtain financing in the current conditions. Due to the flexibility of US contracts, LNG cargoes will be exported to the most profitable markets. While the projects initially targeted the Asian market, the disappearance of the premium paid by Asian buyers and the slowdown in their demand make other import markets, including Europe, more attractive for US LNG exporters. At the current level of gas prices on the European market, which is particularly low, LNG is not however guaranteed to arrive in large quantities, as higher margins can be made in other markets (Latin America, the Middle East, and India). The European market is a 'last resort' market for LNG surpluses which are likely to increase from 2018. Traditional exporters to Europe, particularly Russia, are preparing for this new competition in a market where demand has fallen by a fifth since 2010, although it increased in 2015. The fall in Russian gas prices, which are correlated to fluctuations in the crude oil price with a six- to nine-month lag, removes on the short term the threat of this new competition. The increase in Gazprom's exports to Europe (+8 % in 2015 and +18 % in the first quarter of 2016) is limiting additional LNG import requirements in Europe. LNG imports have decreased slightly in the first quarter of 2016 after their increase in 2015. (author)

  2. Sectoral approaches establishment for climate change mitigation in Thailand upstream oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaiyapa, Warathida; Esteban, Miguel; Kameyama, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the upstream oil and gas (O&G) industry's responses to climate change and what factors can be influential to trigger their mitigation strategies is crucial for policy-makers to harness the huge resources that this industry can mobilize towards environmental protection. Considering that individual climate change efforts are unlikely to affect global mitigation paths, the study investigates the possibility that sectoral approaches can help in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, using Thailand as a case study. It conducted online questionnaire surveys and semi-structured interviews to acquire primary data from companies and key informants from the government, NGOs, NPOs and academics. The results suggested that, among three possible groups of factors that could affect company decisions on whether to promote sectoral approaches, domestic politics (particularly the Thai government) is the most important, though other factors also play important and interrelated roles. The most welcomed type of scheme that could be envisaged would appear to be a sectoral agreement between government and industry. Finally, the authors provide two main policy recommendations, namely the establishment of an industrial association of O&G companies and for it to target how to start looking at measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions amongst large companies in the sector. - Highlights: •Examining the possibility of establishing a sectoral approach Thailand's upstream O&G industry. •Analytical framework was constructed to ascertain most influential factors. •Questionnaires and interviews were employed with companies, government, NGOs and academic. •Domestic politics is the most determining factor, but other factors have strong interrelation. •Sectoral agreement between government and industry is the most likely scheme to be established.

  3. Role of natural gas in meeting an electric sector emissions reduction strategy and effects on greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenox, Carol; Kaplan, P. Ozge

    2016-01-01

    With advances in natural gas extraction technologies, there is an increase in the availability of domestic natural gas, and natural gas is gaining a larger share of use as a fuel in electricity production. At the power plant, natural gas is a cleaner burning fuel than coal, but uncertainties exist in the amount of methane leakage occurring upstream in the extraction and production of natural gas. At higher leakage levels, the additional methane emissions could offset the carbon dioxide emissions reduction benefit of switching from coal to natural gas. This analysis uses the MARKAL linear optimization model to compare the carbon emissions profiles and system-wide global warming potential of the U.S. energy system over a series of model runs in which the power sector is required to meet a specific carbon dioxide reduction target across a number of scenarios in which the availability of natural gas changes. Scenarios are run with carbon dioxide emissions and a range of upstream methane emission leakage rates from natural gas production along with upstream methane and carbon dioxide emissions associated with production of coal and oil. While the system carbon dioxide emissions are reduced in most scenarios, total carbon dioxide equivalent emissions show an increase in scenarios in which natural gas prices remain low and, simultaneously, methane emissions from natural gas production are higher. - Highlights: • MARKAL analysis of energy system GHG emissions reduction scenarios. • High methane leakage can eliminate the benefit that natural gas brings over coal. • A robust GHG reduction strategy takes into account upstream emissions for all fuels.

  4. Research document no.31. Integration of European gas markets: nascent competition in a diversity of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    2002-01-01

    The idea of building an integrated European gas market based on competitive trade, like a gas lake supplied indifferently by remote, intra-European and national sources with the help of active market places allowing arbitration and price convergence, is far from being reached. In fact it depends upon two conditions: the deregulation of each gas market at national level, and at the upper level of the market the change in contractual relations between remote gas producers and buyers, who currently make the relations rigid with long-term transactions and limit opportunities for exchange on a competitive basis. This document analyses at two levels, namely national and European, the changing shape of the European gas markets under the effects of the market reforms and their chance of integration. Firstly the former two-level European gas market, the legacy of which determines the constraints on competition development more strongly than in electricity, are characterized. Secondly, in order to characterize the potential for development of competition, the main traits of each national gas market are identified in terms of market attractiveness and market accessibility for the incumbents competitors. Thirdly, dynamics of market development towards market integration are inferred at European level from these characteristics and from the possibility for development of new forms of gas trade between foreign producers, suppliers and users at national level. (A.L.B.)

  5. Research document no.31. Integration of European gas markets: nascent competition in a diversity of models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finon, D

    2002-07-01

    The idea of building an integrated European gas market based on competitive trade, like a gas lake supplied indifferently by remote, intra-European and national sources with the help of active market places allowing arbitration and price convergence, is far from being reached. In fact it depends upon two conditions: the deregulation of each gas market at national level, and at the upper level of the market the change in contractual relations between remote gas producers and buyers, who currently make the relations rigid with long-term transactions and limit opportunities for exchange on a competitive basis. This document analyses at two levels, namely national and European, the changing shape of the European gas markets under the effects of the market reforms and their chance of integration. Firstly the former two-level European gas market, the legacy of which determines the constraints on competition development more strongly than in electricity, are characterized. Secondly, in order to characterize the potential for development of competition, the main traits of each national gas market are identified in terms of market attractiveness and market accessibility for the incumbents competitors. Thirdly, dynamics of market development towards market integration are inferred at European level from these characteristics and from the possibility for development of new forms of gas trade between foreign producers, suppliers and users at national level. (A.L.B.)

  6. International Rivalry In The Energy Sector: The Eastern European Market Of Atomic Energy In Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Borovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the post-bipolar world nuclear power has become one of the areas of competition and rivalry betweenRussiaand the West. The comprehensive analysis of theoretical publications allows us to consider international competition as an abstract, depoliticized contest of states and other international actors (including companies for some limited (mainly economic benefits. International rivalry is more a political process, necessarily involving some rival pairs of states (or groups of states that compete with each other not only to get some benefits, but to expand their territory or power. The competition and rivalry betweenRussiaand the West in the sphere of nuclear power are especially apparent in the Eastern European region where the American, European and Japanese corporations, with the support of the Western foreign ministries and EU institutions, try to achieve two main goals. The first goal is to win the contracts to build new power units, especially in tenders where Rosatom participates. The second goal is to become suppliers of nuclear fuel for multiple Russian- or Soviet-made VVER-type reactors, which are functioning or will be run in a number of countries in the region (Slovakia,CzechRepublic,Hungary,Bulgaria, andUkraine. Such activities can involve high risks. The West’s efforts to curb the dominant position of "Rosatom" inEastern Europeare formally associated with the need to create a "competitive market" of nuclear services in the region and to ensure the European energy security. It is also noteworthy that the expansion of Rosatom (and its predecessors to foreign markets, including Eastern Europe, is actively supported by the Russian state which in the second half of the 1990s – after a failed attempt of following in the footsteps of the West – joined in the rivalry, mostly imposed by the U.S. and their allies. As shown by the analysis,Russiaand the West, primarily theUnited States, are involved in the nuclear power sector to

  7. Business Case for Integrated Reporting in the Nigerian Oil and Gas Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajudeen J. AYOOLA

    2013-03-01

    were sourced from the annual reports and stand-alone sustainability reports of the six multinational companies operating in the Nigerian oil and gas sector. The results found that efforts to address environmental, social and governance reporting (ESG were adhoc, short term and unrelated to the core activities of the corporations and as such were not integrated into their business strategies and model. Information on ESG was also duplicated over many medium in a haphazard and distorted form. The study therefore concluded that the introduction of integrated reporting will streamline performance reporting that is in line with international best practice in the sector.

  8. Some economic aspects of the European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golombek, R.

    1990-01-01

    The thesis consists of five papers with following titles: Optimal utilization of natural gas. Computation of the resource rent for Norwegian natural gas; The relationship between the price of natural gas and crude oil - some aspects of efficient contracts; Bargaining and international trade - the case of Norwegian natural gas; On bilateral monopoly - a Nash-Wicksell Approach; Bertrand games and duopoly

  9. Sustainable development outlooks of the Estonian energy sector for convergence with the European Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laur, Anton; Tenno, Koidu; Soosaar, Sulev

    2002-01-01

    The article presents an overview of a research conducted in the Estonian Inst. of Economics and the Estonian Energy Research Inst. with the objectives to: analyse the dynamics of the main Estonian energy use indicators over the last 8-10 years with the background of general macroeconomics developments; compare these indicators with the respective energy indicators in the European Union Member States and Candidate Countries; evaluate Estonia's potential to catch up by the energy use efficiency (GDP energy intensity) of the average level of EU countries, modelling our possible development scenarios of GDP and TPES. The research results indicates several positive development tendencies (e.g. reduction of TPES and CO 2 emissions with the background of economic growth) in the Estonian energy sector, as well as convergence with the EU countries in terms of GDP energy intensity. Unfortunately, the model analysis results demonstrate that it takes a lot of time for Estonia to reach the current EU level - even under the most favourable GDP and TPES development conditions, 25-30 years. The primary reason is the very low level of our GDP per capita compared to the EU countries. (author)

  10. European market integration for gas? Volume flexibility and political risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asche, Frank; Tveteras, Ragnar; Osmundsen, Petter

    2002-01-01

    Long-term take-or-pay contracts regulating gas exports to the Continent are described and analyzed. We thereafter examine whether the German gas market is integrated. Time series of Norwegian, Dutch and Russian gas export prices to Germany in 1990-1998 are examined. Cointegration tests show that that the different border prices for gas to Germany move proportionally over time, indicating an integrated gas market. We find differences in mean prices, with Russian gas being sold at prices systematically lower than Dutch and Norwegian gas. Among the explanatory factors for price discrepancies are differences in volume flexibility (swing) and perceived political risk

  11. Decomposition analysis of gas consumption in the residential sector in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogan, Fionn; Cahill, Caiman J.; Ó Gallachóir, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    To-date, decomposition analysis has been widely used at the macro-economic level and for in-depth analyses of the industry and transport sectors; however, its application in the residential sector has been rare. This paper uses the Log-Mean Divisia Index I (LMDI-I) methodology to decompose gas consumption trends in the gas-connected residential sector in Ireland from 1990 to 2008, which despite an increasing number of energy efficiency policies, experienced total final consumption growth of 470%. The analysis decomposes this change in gas consumption into a number of effects, examining the impact over time of market factors such as a growing customer base, varying mix of dwelling types, changing share of vacant dwellings, changing size of new dwellings, the impact of building regulations policy and other factors such as the weather. The analysis finds the most significant effects are changing customer numbers and changing intensity; the analysis also quantifies the impact of building regulations and compares it with other effects such as changing size of new dwellings. By comparing the historical impact on gas consumption of policy factors and non-policy factors, this paper highlights the challenge for policy-makers in achieving overall energy consumption reduction. - Highlights: ► Contribution to a gap in the literature with a residential sector decomposition analysis of gas TFC. ► Activity effect had the largest impact and was cumulatively the best explainer of total TFC change. ► Intensity effect was the second biggest effect with a 19% share of total TFC change. ► In line with rising surface temperatures, the weather effect is declining over time. ► Building regulations are having a diminishing impact but are being negated by larger dwellings.

  12. The European forest sector: past and future carbon budget and fluxes under different management scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Roberto; Grassi, Giacomo; Kurz, Werner A.; Fiorese, Giulia; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    The comprehensive analysis of carbon stocks and fluxes of managed European forests is a prerequisite to quantify their role in biomass production and climate change mitigation. We applied the Carbon Budget Model (CBM) to 26 European countries, parameterized with country information on the historical forest age structure, management practices, harvest regimes and the main natural disturbances. We modeled the C stocks for the five forest pools plus harvested wood products (HWPs) and the fluxes among these pools from 2000 to 2030. The aim is to quantify, using a consistent modeling framework for all 26 countries, the main C fluxes as affected by land-use changes, natural disturbances and forest management and to assess the impact of specific harvest and afforestation scenarios after 2012 on the mitigation potential of the EU forest sector. Substitution effects and the possible impacts of climate are not included in this analysis. Results show that for the historical period from 2000 to 2012 the net primary productivity (NPP) of the forest pools at the EU level is on average equal to 639 Tg C yr-1. The losses are dominated by heterotrophic respiration (409 Tg C yr-1) and removals (110 Tg C yr-1), with direct fire emissions being only 1 Tg C yr-1, leading to a net carbon stock change (i.e., sink) of 110 Tg C yr-1. Fellings also transferred 28 Tg C yr-1 of harvest residues from biomass to dead organic matter pools. The average annual net sector exchange (NSE) of the forest system, i.e., the carbon stock changes in the forest pools including HWP, equals a sink of 122 Tg C yr-1 (i.e., about 19 % of the NPP) for the historical period, and in 2030 it reaches 126, 101 and 151 Tg C yr-1, assuming constant, increasing (+20 %) and decreasing (-20 %) scenarios, respectively, of both harvest and afforestation rates compared to the historical period. Under the constant harvest rate scenario, our findings show an incipient aging process of the forests existing in 1990: although NPP

  13. Natural gas, uncertainty, and climate policy in the US electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistline, John E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates how uncertainties related to natural gas prices and potential climate policies may influence capacity investments, utilization, and emissions in US electricity markets. Using a two-stage stochastic programming approach, model results suggest that climate policies are stronger drivers of greenhouse gas emission trajectories than new natural gas supplies. The dynamics of learning and irreversibility may give rise to an investment climate where strategic delay is optimal. Hedging strategies are shown to be sensitive to the specification of probability distributions for climate policy and natural gas prices, highlighting the important role of uncertainty quantification in future research. The paper also illustrates how this stochastic modeling framework could be used to quantify the value of limiting methane emissions from natural gas production. - Highlights: • This paper examines how uncertainty may impact natural gas in the power sector. • Uncertainties like gas prices, upstream emissions, and climate policy are modeled. • Climate policies are stronger drivers of emissions than gas supply conditions. • Lower gas prices are likely to spark greater utilization of existing capacity. • Irreversibility and uncertainty may make strategic delay optimal

  14. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-01-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

  16. Toward the integration of European natural gas markets:A time-varying approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renou-Maissant, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, European gas markets have radically changed. In order to build a single European gas market, a new regulatory framework has been established through three European Gas Directives. The purpose of this article is to investigate the impact of the reforms in the natural gas industry on consumer prices, with a specific focus on gas prices for industrial use. The strength of the relationship between the industrial gas prices of six western European countries is studied by testing the Law of One Price for the period 1991–2009. Estimations were carried out using both cointegration analysis and time-varying parameter models. Results highlight an emerging and on-going process of convergence between the industrial gas prices in western Europe since 2001 for the six EU member states. The strength and the level of convergence differ widely between countries. Strong integration of gas markets in continental Europe, except for the Belgian market, has been established. It appears that the convergence process between continental countries and the UK is not completed. Thus, the integration of European gas markets remains an open issue and the question of how far integration will proceed will still be widely discussed in the coming years. - Highlights: ► We investigate the integration of European natural gas markets. ► We use both cointegration analysis and time-varying parameter models. ► We show the failure of cointegration techniques to take account of evolving processes. ► An emerging and on-going process of convergence between the industrial gas prices is at work. ► Strong integration of gas markets in continental Europe has been established.

  17. Safety culture: a comparative study of space, nuclear and oil-gas sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, David; Assis, Altair Souza de

    2008-01-01

    Full text:We access in this paper the safety culture methodology adopted by three different industrial sectors: Nuclear, space/aeronautics and oil-gas, in Brazil. In this work, It is evaluated the planning, training, personal monitoring and the interaction between the technical personal, such as engineers and physicists, with human ones, such social workers and physiologists, key factor to understand the efficacy of the local safety culture pattern. The research is made through the analysis of the relevant manuals and interviewing the safety, human areas personal, and regulatory managers, concerned with/related to safety/working with safety culture at the specific industrial sector. It is compared the efficacies and the official regulatory vision on the issue, for the different sectors, in order to detect confluences and divergences and, so, to propose a model that better treat the safety culture as a global industrial value. (author)

  18. Energy utilization and greenhouse-gas emissions: Transportation sector, topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, K.G.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the report is to compare the emissions of greenhouse gases for alternative end-use technologies in the transportation sector. Scientists assert that global warming is occurring and will continue to occur as a result of increasing concentrations of certain gases in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the focus of this analysis because they are believed to cause three-fourths of the global warming effect and because energy production and use are a significant source of these emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions in the energy sector occur during energy production, conversion, transportation and end-use. This analysis compares alternative transportation sector fuel/technology choices in terms of their total fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases. The emphasis of this report is on the end use comparison. The fuel-cycle emissions comparison was developed in a companion report

  19. The Role of Gas in the European Energy Transition: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    Following difficult years for the European gas industry, natural gas is back to the front stage. Given its environmental credentials, its flexibility, its performance and the variety of its uses, gas has a key role to play in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the improvement of air quality, the integration of intermittent renewable energy sources in the power mix. Its role will evolve in the longer term and one must distinguish the period 2015-2030 from the period 2030-2050

  20. Shell's Role in the Future European Gas Scene - Is a Major Market Restructuring Under Way?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segundo, Karen de

    1999-01-01

    The European gas market is being restructured by a combination of major global forces. Environmental considerations like the Kyoto Agreement favour the use of gas. But in the medium-term, supplies may be limited by low energy prices. The political drive for increased competition has manifested itself as the EU Gas Directive, which came into force in 1998. Shell believes that the European industry must progressively adapt to this restructuring. Flexible mechanisms like tradable emission permits should be used to generate investment capital for new gas supply projects. Moreover, both industry and regulators should take a positive and constructive approach towards increasing competition in the marketplace

  1. Uncovering China’s greenhouse gas emission from regional and sectoral perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhu; Geng, Yong; Lindner, Soeren; Guan, Dabo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding China’s GHG (greenhouse gas) emission status is critical for achieving the national mitigation plan. While much attention has addressed China’s national level GHG emission, less is known about its regional and sectoral emission features. In this paper China’s regional and sectoral GHG emission patterns and their driving forces were explored by using upgraded energy consumption data. We constructed a detailed GHG inventory for each province in the year 2009 which covering 28 sectors and further expanded time-serious inventories during 1997–2009. We then conducted variation and index decomposition analysis to explore its sectoral/regional disparity and features. Results showed significant differences of sectoral emission intensity among different provinces, implying a huge disparity of technology level. Since less developed provinces still apply energy intensive technologies, they had contributed to most of national emission increment during 1997–2009 and made the whole country towards carbon intensive direction. Our research outcomes indicate that the inequity of technology level among regions has already become a main barrier for China’s CO 2 mitigation. Such a reality deserves more attention from both researchers and policy makers so that appropriate carbon reduction policies can be raised. -- Highlights: ► We present spacial and sectoral disparity and drivers on green house gas (GHG) emission in 30 Chinese provinces. ► We indicated a huge difference of technology level among regions. ► Different industrial structure and development stage further result in GHG intensive in China's poor regions. ► Inequity of technology level among regions has already become a main barrier for China's GHG mitigation.

  2. Which future for natural gas in the European-Mediterranean area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesbert, J.Ch.

    1997-01-01

    In the Mediterranean sea surrounding countries, energy consumption and in particular natural gas, is growing up. However, this development requires the mobilization of important capitals and the creation of multilateral partnerships. These investments must be realized when southern and eastern Mediterranean countries will change for a market economy and when the energy market in the European Union is liberalizing. This paper describes the situation of the development of natural gas uses in the Maghreb countries (power production, development of cogeneration systems, supply of LPG fuels for domestic uses, development of distribution and transportation systems) and the position of European gas companies with respect to this developing market: investments, risks assessment, European Union warranty, liberalization of gas markets in the Maghreb countries and in the European union. (J.S.)

  3. Analysis of the gas-lubricated flat-sector-pad thrust bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat sector-shaped pad geometry for a gas-lubricated thrust bearing is analyzed considering both the pitch and roll of the pad. It is shown that maximum load capacity is achieved when the pad is tilted so as to create uniform minimum film thickness along the pad trailing edge. Performance characteristics for various geometries and operating conditions of gas thrust bearings are presented in the form of design curves, and a comparison is made with the rectangular slider approximation. It is found that this approximation is unsafe for practical design, since it always overestimates load capacity.

  4. Industry sector analysis, Mexico: Oil and gas field machinery and equipment. Export Trade Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Industry Sector Analyses (I.S.A.) for oil and gas field machinery and equipment contains statistical and narrative information on projected market demand, end-users, receptivity of Mexican consumers to U.S. products, the competitive situation - Mexican production, total import market, U.S. market position, foreign competition, and competitive factors, and market access - Mexican tariffs, non-tariff barriers, standards, taxes and distribution channels. The I.S.A. provides the United States industry with meaningful information regarding the Mexican market for oil and gas field machinery and equipment

  5. Best practices for the retention of women engineers and scientists in the oil and gas sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, C.J. [Wise Newfoundland and Labrador, St. John' s, NF (Canada); Williams, F.M. [Petro-Canada Inc., (Canada); Sherk, S. [AMEC Earth and Environmental Ltd., St. John' s, NF (Canada)

    2000-07-06

    This conference paper was the result of a workshop discussion at a national conference that brought together those in industry who work in positions promoting diversity, together with women scientists and engineers from the sector. The objective was to identify effective workplace policies and practices that support and advance women's careers in the sector, and thus enhance retention. The conference paper discusses women in science, engineering and technology fields and in the oil and gas sector. It discusses best practices for the retention of women scientists and engineers in the oil and gas sector. It presents a summary of the workshop, best practices for the industry, and best practices for others. Best practices for the industry that are presented in the paper include: commitment from the top, management training, organizational policy and programs, balancing career and personal life, and career development and training. The paper concluded that companies should be recognized for thoughtful and forward-looking policies and best practice initiatives and that the strongest of the best practices is to make managers accountable for diversity progress in their areas of responsibility. 1 app., 8 refs.

  6. Tipping points for carbon dioxide and air pollution benefits: an energy systems analysis of natural gas verses electric technologies in the U.S. buildings sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our analysis examines emission trade-offs between electricity and natural gas use in the buildings sector at the system level, including upstream emissions from the electric sector and natural gas mining emissions.

  7. Implementation of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM Framework in Enhancing Business Performances in Oil and Gas Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanmugam Annamalah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study empirically investigated the ERM Implementation model and proposed framework to identify and manage risks in Oil and Gas Sector in Malaysia. The study examined the role of ERM framework implementation in improving business performance by utilizing Economic Value Added as a measurement tool. The study also provides insights to the Oil and Gas Sector to gain higher profit returns, reduce cost of capital, and improve shareholders value. Moreover, it contributes significantly in the field of Enterprise risk management in Malaysia. The identification and management of risk is significant to organizations in managing risks efficiently. Expectations of stakeholders of the organization are high from executives and board of directors in managing the risk effectively. Linear regression analysis is utilized in analyzing the data obtained from the data collection performed for this paper. Purposive sampling has been employed in order to select the firms that are operating in Malaysian oil and gas sector. Primary data has been utilized to collect data with the help of structured questions and interview techniques that involve semi structured questions. The results of the regression analysis conducted for in this study suggested that a significant and positive relationship between Enterprise Risk Management with operational risk; market risk; political risk; health, safety and environmental risk; and, also business performance.

  8. Why European Entrepreneurs in the Water and Waste Management Sector Are Willing to Go beyond Environmental Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Rabadán

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability in the water sector in Europe is a major concern, and compliance with the current legislation alone does not seem to be enough to face major challenges like climate change or population growth and concentration. The greatest potential for improvement appears when companies decide to take a step forward and go beyond environmental legislation. This study focuses on the environmental responsibility (ER of European small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in the water and waste management sector and analyzes the drivers that lead these firms to the adoption of more sustainable practices. Our results show that up to 40% of European SMEs within this industry display environmental responsibility. Market pull has a low incidence in encouraging ER, while values and the strategic decisions of entrepreneurs seem decisive. Policy makers should prioritize subsidies over fiscal incentives because they show greater potential to promote the adoption of environmental responsibility among these firms.

  9. Proposal for study of social tariffs in natural gas sector; Tarifa social para o gas canalizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegrini, Marcelo A.; Silva, Wagner M.G. da [Sinapsis Inovacao em Energia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Anuatti Neto, Francisco [Fundacao Instituto de Pesquisas Economicas (FIPE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Jordao, Rafael de Souza [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work intends to present some possible philosophies of social policy implementation targeted to low income consumers of canalized gas. In this work, the benefits and disadvantages from each philosophy are discussed and a study proposal is presented to define an implementation policy to the State of Sao Paulo. They also presented the initial results of the study, comparing the expenditures of poor families with canalized gas and LPG with statistical data. (author)

  10. Energy policy and European utilities' strategy: Lessons from the liberalisation and privatisation of the energy sector in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haar, Laura N., E-mail: laura.n.haar@mbs.ac.u [University of Manchester, Manchester Business School, Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PB (United Kingdom); Marinescu, Nicolae, E-mail: marinescu@unitbv.r [Transylvania University of Brasov, Faculty of Economic Sciences, 29 Eroilor Bd, Brasov 500 036 (Romania)

    2011-05-15

    In the context of energy sector reforms pursued by Romanian government since 1990s, we compare and contrast the market outcomes of European utilities' investment with the host government policy objectives. We begin with energy market reform in Romania and review governments' efforts to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) and to gradually withdraw from the distribution and supply segments of electricity market. Subsequently, we illustrate the scope European utilities have had, market policy and design notwithstanding, for consolidating market power through regional dominance. We examine the extent to which these utilities have sought to enhance their positions through horizontal and vertical integration, counter to the EU plans for a competitive market structure. We find that the investments of European incumbents have not been resoundingly successful: although market entrance may have been justified on long-term strategic grounds, in the immediate term, segments acquired through competitive auctions have yielded modest regulated returns. Finally, we discuss the extent to which policy makers have achieved their goals. Although the short-term benefits of a competitive market structure have reached some consumers, a renewed interest in promoting 'national champions' reflect frustration with market mechanisms as a means of ensuring long-term strategic investments in the sector. - Research highlights: {yields} We analyze the European Utilities activities in Romania after market liberalization. {yields} We find government efforts to reform energy sector attracted foreign direct investment. {yields} We find utilities consolidated market power horizontally in Central European region. {yields} The short-term benefits of competitive forces contrast the weak returns by utilities. {yields} To encourage further investment, government should not promote national champions.

  11. Energy policy and European utilities' strategy: Lessons from the liberalisation and privatisation of the energy sector in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haar, Laura N.; Marinescu, Nicolae

    2011-01-01

    In the context of energy sector reforms pursued by Romanian government since 1990s, we compare and contrast the market outcomes of European utilities' investment with the host government policy objectives. We begin with energy market reform in Romania and review governments' efforts to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) and to gradually withdraw from the distribution and supply segments of electricity market. Subsequently, we illustrate the scope European utilities have had, market policy and design notwithstanding, for consolidating market power through regional dominance. We examine the extent to which these utilities have sought to enhance their positions through horizontal and vertical integration, counter to the EU plans for a competitive market structure. We find that the investments of European incumbents have not been resoundingly successful: although market entrance may have been justified on long-term strategic grounds, in the immediate term, segments acquired through competitive auctions have yielded modest regulated returns. Finally, we discuss the extent to which policy makers have achieved their goals. Although the short-term benefits of a competitive market structure have reached some consumers, a renewed interest in promoting 'national champions' reflect frustration with market mechanisms as a means of ensuring long-term strategic investments in the sector. - Research highlights: → We analyze the European Utilities activities in Romania after market liberalization. → We find government efforts to reform energy sector attracted foreign direct investment. → We find utilities consolidated market power horizontally in Central European region. → The short-term benefits of competitive forces contrast the weak returns by utilities. → To encourage further investment, government should not promote national champions.

  12. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  13. EVEGAS Project (European validation exercise of GAS migration model)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manai, T. [Geostock S.A., Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-03-01

    The EVEGAS project aims at the verification and validation of numerical codes suitable for simulating gas flow phenomenon in low permeability porous media. Physical phenomena involved in gas generation and gas flow are numerous, often complex, and may not be very well described. The existing numerical codes cannot represent all the occurring possible phenomena, but allow a good trade-off betwen simplicity and representativity of such phenomena. Two phase flow (Gas and Water) appear to be the most consequential phenomena in gas migration and pressure sizing. The project is organised in three major steps: (1) a simple problem with analytical solutions. (2) A few problems based on laboratory or in-situ experiments. (3) A 3-D repository scenarios involving the following aspects: a repository design; a source of gas; rock characteristics; and fluid characteristics.

  14. Sectoral agreements and competitive distortions - a Swedish perspective; Effects of EU Emissions Trading System for European industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zetterberg, Lars; Holmgren, Kristina

    2009-03-15

    The objectives of this study are to: Give an overview of the current discussion concerning competition distortion in relation to climate policy; Describe results from some studies estimating the actual competition situation for selected activities; Describe what sector agreement models are suggested/ discussed by EU; Describe what sectors are most interesting to target with a sector agreement from a Swedish point of view; Analyse what parameters are important for reducing competition distortion for Swedish Industry. Two studies, for the United Kingdom and Germany, have recently assessed the potential cost impact for different industrial sectors of CO{sub 2}-prices due to the EU ETS. The sectors with high potential impact, with a maximum value at stake larger than 10%, are in the United Kingdom Lime and cement, Basic iron and steel, Starches, Refined petroleum, Fertilizers and Nitrogen compounds and Aluminium. In Germany: Cement and lime, Fertilizers and nitrogen compounds, Basic iron and steel, Aluminium, Paper and board, Other basic inorganic compounds and Coke, refined petroleum and nuclear fuels. Ex-ante studies of the impacts of competitiveness and carbon leakage due to the EU ETS fail to find actual impacts. However, that does not mean that there will be no impact in the future, which hold changes both in the EU ETS (method for allowance allocation, allowance prices etc) and possibly also other important circumstances. In this study, based on official Swedish statistics, the maximum value a stake has been calculated for 52 Swedish sectors. Seven sectors have a maximum value a stake of more than 4%: Coke and refined petroleum (21%), Pulp and paper (11%), Basic metals (10%), Non-metallic mineral (9%), Metal ore mines (6%), Air transport (5%) and Electricity, gas and heat (4%). If Air transport and Electricity, gas and heat are omitted, the five remaining sectors account for 22% of Sweden's carbon emissions. In late 2008, the EU proposed three types of

  15. European experiences as guidelines for public, private and civil sector role redefinition in spatial policy formulation process in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The period of post-socialist transition in Serbia brings more complex actors environment compared to socialistic period, while institutional arrangements are not enough developed to actively involve different groups of actors in spatial policy formulation process. In order to gather certain knowledge as guidelines for redefining institutional practices in Serbia, institutional framework of Serbia was compared in this paper with institutional framework of three developed European countries, especially in relation to the roles of public, private and civil sector in spatial policy formulation process. The European countries selected for the analysis are United Kingdom, Netherlands and Germany because of diverse national administrative traditions, so different institutional arrangements could be researched. By comparing institutional framework in Serbia with the ones in developed European countries following questions are researched: which actors are missing in Serbia, what are the ways institutional arrangements for different groups inclusion into spatial policy formulation process are formed, what are the differences between the roles of certain groups of actors in decision-making process. Current roles of actors in spatial policy formulation process in Serbia are reviewed and possible directions for public, private and civil sector role redefinition in Serbia are discussed in accordance with experiences of developed European countries.

  16. Identification studies about take measures for mitigate of gas emissions greenhouse effect in energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the Unit Nations Convention about Climatic change has get stability of greenhouse effects in atmosphere concentrations. In the framework to Uruguay Project URU/95/631 have been defined the need to identify, measures, practices, process and technologies for reduce some emissions furthermore in Energy sector. Emission impact, cost-benefit, direct or iundirect, national programs, factibility such as social, politics and Institutional agreements was considered in the present work. It was given emissions proyected for 15 years period 1999-2013 of the following atmospheric pollutants: carbon dioxide,carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides and methane.Eight stages was applied the emission evaluation: natural gas; without natural gas; transport; industrial; Montevidean bus- car demand; natural gas uses in bus-taxi; nitrogen oxides control in thermic centrals; catalytic converters in gasoline cars

  17. Domestic customers and reform of the gas sector. An organisational sociology perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, Francois-Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at the impact of gas sector reforms on domestic customers. It focuses on an aspect frequently neglected by research but one that is an essential vector of customer satisfaction, namely distribution networks. Using an organisational sociology perspective and a specific example (a study of connection to the French gas network), we will demonstrate that there are significant differences in the treatment that GrDF, the gas network operator, reserves for different categories of customer. In most cases, when the request is a straightforward, run-of-the-mill one, the problem resolution process functions quite well. However, when a more atypical problem arises, requiring more non-standard treatment, the operator struggles to provide an effective solution for its customers. This observation underpins our contention that operators are now much better equipped to deal with 'mass market' requirements than individual made-to-measure solutions.

  18. Segmentation of Natural Gas Customers in Industrial Sector Using Self-Organizing Map (SOM) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masbar Rus, A. M.; Pramudita, R.; Surjandari, I.

    2018-03-01

    The usage of the natural gas which is non-renewable energy, needs to be more efficient. Therefore, customer segmentation becomes necessary to set up a marketing strategy to be right on target or to determine an appropriate fee. This research was conducted at PT PGN using one of data mining method, i.e. Self-Organizing Map (SOM). The clustering process is based on the characteristic of its customers as a reference to create the customer segmentation of natural gas customers. The input variables of this research are variable of area, type of customer, the industrial sector, the average usage, standard deviation of the usage, and the total deviation. As a result, 37 cluster and 9 segment from 838 customer data are formed. These 9 segments then employed to illustrate the general characteristic of the natural gas customer of PT PGN.

  19. A review of national gas emergency plans in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeniewski, Peter; Bolado-Lavin, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document and review existing national gas emergency plans in the European Union, following the guidelines and requirements set out by the EU's Regulation 994/2010 concerning measures to safeguard security of gas supply. Despite the great deal of attention paid to questions of natural gas security in an increasingly import-dependent European Union, the contingency plans of most of its member states have not been widely published or scrutinized. By reviewing TSO network codes and national legal and regulatory acts, this paper teases out the key similarities and differences between member states' emergency planning frameworks, tools and methods. A gas emergency operational template is subsequently proposed that conforms to EU legislation. This is followed by a discussion of emergency planning in the context of regional cooperation and the liberalizing European gas market. The paper concludes by advocating gas emergency measures which are proportionate to the crisis level, sensitive to the gas demand profile, aware of the regional context, inconsequential to normal market operation, transparent and non-discriminatory during implementation and verifiable during emergencies as well as under normal conditions. - Highlights: ► National gas emergency plans in the EU comprehensively assessed. ► Template for gas emergencies is created to measure conformity to Regulation 994/2010. ► Gas emergency measures are related to regional cooperation and liberal markets.

  20. Dis-harmony in European natural gas market(s). Discussion of standards and definitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasz, Michael [The Energy House GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Pustisek, Andrej [Hochschule fuer Technik, Stuttgart (Germany); Drasdo, Peter

    2013-06-15

    The European Union attempts to harmonise the European natural gas market(s). In general, this is supported on national levels. Nevertheless, such harmonisation is not yet fully accomplished: neither for the rules nor for the quality specifications nor for the physical quantities and their units. Even if the current economic impact of such dis-harmony is negligible, i.e. that market participants for the time being do not have to bear additional costs caused by the lack of harmonisation, participants in the commodity market are exposed to contractual risks. Potentially, this might lead to reduced competition and reduced liquidity of each single and the European internal market for natural gas. However, as the costs for a potential harmonisation of European gas markets are estimated to be significant, the dilemma is evident and the 'political' solution of the 'harmonisation problem' will necessarily deviate from the traders' one. (orig.)

  1. CROSS COMPLIANCE AND COMPETITIVENESS OF THE EUROPEAN BEEF AND PIG SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    de Roest, Kees; Jongeneel, Roelof A.; Dillen, Koen; Winsten, Jonathan R.

    2008-01-01

    Beef and pig production are important sectors affected by the cross-compliance policy. Full compliance with SMRs and GAECs generates costs and benefits which may have an impact on the competitiveness of these sectors on the world market. Compliance with the Nitrate Directive, animal identification and registration requirements and animal welfare standards can give rise to non-negligible cost of production increases at individual farm level and at sector level. Additional costs can be relevant...

  2. Modelling long run strategic behaviour on the liberalised European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, Machiel; Zwart, Gijsbert

    2005-01-01

    In gas markets, intertemporal constraints are of particular importance due to the finiteness of gas resources. In particular in the UK and the Netherlands, gas resources are expected to dry up on the medium term, giving rise to a positive resource rent of the gas. On shorter time scales, decisions on investments in production, transmission, storage and LNG terminal capacities affect short term output decisions in following years, while within the year prices across seasons are related through storage decisions. We develop a model of strategic behaviour on the European gas markets that incorporates such intertemporal relations. We take into account interactions between strategic producers of gas, price-taking transmission companies, and traders arbitraging the markets by transporting gas across borders, storing gas across seasons, and importing LNG. As a case study, we use the model to explore the impacts on producer behaviour and infrastructure investments of a cap on production from a large gas field in the Netherlands. (Author)

  3. THE NIGERIAN GAS MASTER-PLAN, INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, ISSUES AFFECTING POWER SECTOR: AN ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. INGWE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Nigerian Gas Master-Plan, Investment Opportunities, Challenges, Issues Affecting Power Sector: an Analysis. The objective of this article is to contribute towards understanding of the Nigerian Gas Master Plan (NGMP/Plan and its bifurcations with key socio-economic development factors. I applied the method of discourse to bring to being some points that have hitherto been unknown about the Master-plan and its inter-relationships and bifurcations. Elaborated here are the spectacular gains that have accrued to the Latin American country, Trinidad and Tobago, from its recent development of natural gas resources. This was considered suitable and significant here for highlighting that if such spectacular achievements could be realized from Trinidad and Tobago’s relatively smaller gas deposit (15.3 tcf, probable reserves (8.4 tcf, possible reserves (6.2 tcf would be by far greater considering Nigeria’s larger natural gas reserves (184 tcf wealth as earlier stated. I show that the Plan is well designed relevant to addressing Nigeria’s current development needs generally. It presents potentials for stimulating Nigeria’s economic growth by harnessing the country’s abundant natural gas reserves. The Plan enumerates/ elaborates huge investment opportunities. Some challenges likely to be faced in the implementation/management of the Plan are already being surmounted as recent reports show that some of its key investments have been realized and the required infrastructure are being provided. Regarding the issues in the Master-plan that are likely to affect and are affecting Nigeria’s power sector development, I reckon that they are mostly positive factors due to the way the plan promises to stimulate electricity generation in our country.

  4. Economic potential analysis of cogeneration using natural gas in the selected sectors; Analise do potencial economico de cogeracao a gas natural nos setores selecionados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This chapter presents the results of the economic potential of the natural gas cogeneration under topping regime, in the selected sectors of beverage industry, editorial and graphic industries, shopping centers, hospitals and hotels.

  5. Norwegian gas sales and the impacts on European CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, E.; Boug, P.; Kverndokk, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper has studied the impacts on Western European CO 2 emissions of a reduction in Norwegian gas sales. Such impacts are due to changes in energy demand, energy supply, and environmental and political regulations. The gas supply model DYNOPOLY was used to analyse the effects on Russian and Algerian gas exports of a reduction in Norwegian gas supply. The effects on the demand side and the effects of committing to CO 2 targets were analysed using the energy demand model SEEM. If Western European countries commit to their announced CO 2 emissions targets, reduced Norwegian gas sales will have no impact on emissions. The consumption of oil and coal will increase slightly, while the total energy consumption will go down. Also, a reduction in Norwegian gas sales will have only minor impacts on the CO 2 emissions from Western Europe when no emissions regulations are considered

  6. STIMULATING THE ATTRACTION OF INVESTMENTS IN THE PROCESSING SECTOR – A NECESSITY IN THE CONTEXT OF EUROPEAN MILK MARKET LIBERALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana GRODEA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A main challenge for the players on the world dairy market is to efficiently respond to the changes of the local markets characteristics, in the context of an increasingly fierce competition for the raw milk obtained on the farms. From the analysis, it results that the performance of the Romanian milk sector is seriously affected by the excessive fragmentation of supply, which reveals the subsistence and semi-subsistence phenomenon that persists in the milk sector, as the main factor that constrains competitiveness growth. In reference to the volume of investments in the dairy processing sector, it results that this had a slow growth rate in the investigated period, the share in total investments in the food sector ranging from 7.8% (2000 to 16.9% (2011. The investments in agriculture in total investments accounted for 4.9% in the year 2012. In order to adapt to the competition on the European Single Market, the Romanian sector has to receive support through investments, in the conditions in which there is a favourable global conjuncture for the consumption of dairy products, in which their prices are expected to raise on the basis of the increasing demand of the development regions.

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions from Thailand’s transport sector: Trends and mitigation options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongthanaisawan, Jakapong; Sorapipatana, Chumnong

    2013-01-01

    Rapid growth of population and economy during the past two decades has resulted in continuing growth of transport’s oil demand and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The objectives of this study are to examine pattern and growth in energy demand as well as related GHG emissions from the transport sector and to analyze potential pathways of energy demand and GHG emissions reduction from this sector of the measures being set by the Thai Government. A set of econometric models has been developed to estimate the historical trend of energy demand and GHG emissions in the transport sector during 1989–2007 and to forecast future trends to 2030. Two mitigation option scenarios of fuel switching and energy efficiency options have been designed to analyze pathways of energy consumption and GHG emissions reduction potential in Thailand’s transport sector compared with the baseline business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, which assumed to do nothing influences the long-term trends of transport energy demand. It has been found that these two mitigation options can reduce the GHG emissions differently. The fuel-switching option could significantly reduce the amount of GHG emissions in a relatively short time frame, albeit it will be limited by its supply resources, whereas the energy efficiency option is more effective for GHG emissions mitigation in the long term. Therefore, both measures should be implemented simultaneously for both short and long term mitigation effects in order to more effectively achieve GHG emissions reduction target.

  8. Planning Energy Sector Development in Croatian Agricultural Sector Following Guidelines of the European Energy Policy 20-20-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirac, M.; Krajacic, G.; Duic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Energy system planning is among the most important tasks of any society. A stable energy system is a foundation for economic growth, growing living standard and general prosperity of the society. Agriculture represents an important factor in overall Croatian economy; therefore, planning of the agriculture's energy system is a major task. To foresee the trend of consumption and to ensure reasonable economic energy supply in accordance with this trend is a process which should be continuously optimised so that the planned scenario could reflect actual situation. The agriculture, thanks to natural resources, land features and climate advantages represents a major economic sector. This activity has significant impact on food industry, trade, tourism, transport, chemical industry, etc. The relevance of agriculture is also visible in the present number of employees, future potential for employment and foreign trade balance. According to numerous parameters, agricultural activities in Croatia lag behind the EU countries. Great potential can be achieved by implementation of measures for energy intensity reduction and productivity increase.(author).

  9. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szybist, James P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curran, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to

  10. Dynamics and drivers of shale gas development in three European countries: can a European policy be imagined?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmigiani, Laura

    2013-11-01

    The European Commission introduced in its Work Programme 2013 an action regarding 'Environmental climate and energy assessment framework to enable safe and secure unconventional hydrocarbon extraction'. After having assessed the existing legislative framework appropriateness regarding climate and environmental impacts of shale gas development in Europe, and having noted some improvements that could be proposed when using the hydraulic fracturing technique, the debate is now shifting to address the issue of the good governance level. To what extent a European initiative could be more effective or comprehensive than national legislation? In particular, it remains unclear whether a common EU policy that goes beyond environmental and climate measures can be built to regulate the industrial exploitation of shale gas in Europe. (author)

  11. Strategies of enterprises facing european natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The growing demand for natural gas in Europe is taking place within a gradual process of deregulation aiming to achieve a single energy market. Gas industry's traditional structure and behaviour are facing new forms of competition. Gas producers might be willing to capture a greater share of downstream profits while large users are interested in securing their supply at the cheapest cost. In addition, new comers could appear at all stages of the industry, that are becoming contestable markets. Challengers and defenders will probably induce important changes in industry's present structure. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. Derogation clauses on wages in sectoral collective agreements in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report looks at the specific case of company-level agreements deviating from (inter)sectoral wage agreements. The possibility to deviate from pay norms set under intersectoral or sectoral agreements has received growing attention in the policy debate since the present economic and financial

  13. The many shades of Public Sector Information; Organizing PSI in a European Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, H.; Veenswijk, M.B.; Poot, J.

    2013-01-01

    The success of Google Maps suggests that free access to public sector information (PSI) contributes to a prosperous economy. While there has been considerable attention for legal and economical considerations concerning the implications of policies on public sector information (PSI), also labeled as

  14. Cross compliance and competitiveness of the European beef and pig sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, de K.; Jongeneel, R.; Dillen, K.; Winsten, J.

    2008-01-01

    Beef and pig production are important sectors affected by the cross-compliance policy. Full compliance with SMRs and GAECs generates costs and benefits which may have an impact on the competitiveness of these sectors on the world market. Compliance with the Nitrate Directive, animal identification

  15. A critique of the performance of EIA within the offshore oil and gas sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Adam, E-mail: adam.barker@manchester.ac.uk; Jones, Carys, E-mail: carys.jones@manchester.ac.uk

    2013-11-15

    The oil and gas sector is a key driver of the offshore economy. Yet, it is also associated with a number of unwanted environmental impacts which potentially threaten the long term economic and environmental viability of marine ecosystems. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can potentially make a significant contribution to the identification and management of adverse impacts through the promotion of evidence based decision making. However, the extent to which EIA has been embraced by key stakeholders is poorly understood. On this basis, this paper provides an initial evaluation of EIA performance within the oil and gas sector. The methodology adopted for the paper consisted of the structured review of 35 Environmental Statements (ESs) along with interviews with regulators, operators, consultants and advisory bodies. The findings reveal a mixed picture of EIA performance with a significant number of ESs falling short of satisfactory quality and a tendency for the process to be driven by compliance rather than best practice. -- Highlights: • Concerns identified relating to impacts of offshore oil and gas industry. • Research assesses performance of EIA in addressing impacts. • Findings highlight weak quality standards and procedural deficiencies. • Institutional reforms identified in order to improve practice.

  16. Natural-gas-powered thermoelectricity as a reliability factor in the Brazilian electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, E.; Oliveira, J.C.S. de; de Oliveira, P.R.; Alonso, P.S.R.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of natural-gas-powered thermoelectricity into the Brazilian generation sector can be considered as a very complex energy, economic, regulatory and institutional revision. Brazil is a country with very specific characteristics in electricity generation, as approximately 80% of the generating capacity is based on hydroelectricity, showing strong dependency on rain and management of water reservoirs. A low rate of investment in the Brazilian Electricity Industry in the period of 1995-2000, associated with periods of low rainfall, led to a dramatic lowering of the water stocks in the reservoirs. With this scenario and the growing supply of natural gas, both from within Brazil and imported, natural gas thermal electric plants became a good option to diversify the electrical supply system. In spite of the Brazilian Government's efforts to install such plants, the country was faced with severe electricity rationing in 2001. The objective of this work is to show the need to continue with the implementation of natural gas thermal electricity projects, in a manner that allows flexibility and guarantees greater working reliability for the entire Brazilian electricity sector. Taking into account the world trend towards renewable energy, the perspectives of usage of biofuels in the Brazilian Energy Matrix and in electrical energy generation are also analyzed. The very issue of electrical power efficiency in Brazil and its challenges and strategic proposals from the standpoint of Government Programs and results provided so far are presented. The technological constraints in order to put on stream the thermal electric plants are also analyzed. The article concludes with a positive perspective of the usage of natural gas as to be the third pillar in the Brazilian Energy Matrix for the years to come

  17. Review of Sector and Regional Trends in U.S. Electricity Markets. Focus on Natural Gas. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series. Number 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jeffrey; Medlock III, Kenneth B.; Boyd, William C.

    2015-10-15

    This study explores dynamics related to natural gas use at the national, sectoral, and regional levels, with an emphasis on the power sector. It relies on a data set from SNL Financial to analyze recent trends in the U.S. power sector at the regional level. The research aims to provide decision and policy makers with objective and credible information, data, and analysis that informs their discussions of a rapidly changing energy system landscape. This study also summarizes regional changes in natural gas demand within the power sector. The transition from coal to natural gas is occurring rapidly along the entire eastern portion of the country, but is relatively stagnant in the central and western regions. This uneven shift is occurring due to differences in fuel price costs, renewable energy targets, infrastructure constraints, historical approach to regulation, and other factors across states.

  18. The Mexican energy sector: integrated dynamic analysis of the natural gas/refining system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes-Regueiro, Francisco; Leach, Matthew; Ruth, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Environmental regulations in Mexico could dramatically increase demand for natural gas in the following years. This increase could lead to gas price shocks and a counter-intuitive increase in carbon emissions. The effect would be accentuated if Mexico lacks the funds required to carry on with investments in gas development and processing capacity. With the use of a dynamic computer model, this study addresses responses of the Mexican oil and gas industries to perturbations such as: changes in regulatory and environmental policies; changes in institutional arrangements such as those arising from market liberalization; and lack of availability of investment funds. The study also assesses how regulatory policies can be designed to minimize the economic inefficiencies arising from the business cycle disruptions that some perturbations may cause. In addition, this study investigates how investment responses will shape the Mexican energy sector in the future, particularly with respect to both the relative importance of different fuels for power generation and heating purposes and the nature of competition in the Mexican natural gas market. Furthermore, this study explores the direct consequences of these responses on the level of carbon emissions. (Author)

  19. Pricing Natural Gas. The Outlook for the European Market (Summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Long-term gas supply contracts contain price formulae, in which the gas price is usually linked to the price of another commodity, or to the spot price of gas in a particular market. In continental Europe the gas price in international long-term supply contracts is predominantly linked to oil products. At the same time, spot markets for gas in which gas prices are determined by supply and demand are developing in various EU markets. This paper addresses the question of to what extent the traditional form of oil-based price indexation is sustainable and/or will be sustained by the market players. It discusses the considerations the market players may have in favour of one or the other form of indexation, the external forces that may influence the choice of indexation in the short and longer terms and the consequences of change. It argues that pricing systems are a fundamental part of a market organisation, and that a shift to different pricing structures only happens if and when the main actors are convinced that they understand and accept the consequences of such change. It concludes that there is no strong evidence that the current hybrid situation, in which both forms of gas pricing co-exist, cannot continue. There are also no overriding reasons to intervene in the market practices of price formation. Both systems have their advantages and disadvantages under different market conditions, and to some extent complement each other in the current markets. Different types of risk and the appreciation thereof by the trading parties will determine particular choices of pricing rules and contracting conditions. More importantly, in today's market, in which new supplies are slow to come forward, the choice should be left to the market parties, particularly as sellers and buyers do not seem to be in strong disagreement

  20. CNG (compressed natural gas) as fuel for the transport sector in Trinidad and Tobago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So`Brien, G.C.; Persad, P.; Satcunanathan, S. [University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad)

    1996-08-01

    Several studies have established that Trinidad and Tobago is well positioned to consider the substitution of compressed natural gas (CNG) for gasoline or diesel in the transport sector. Consequently a programme of conversion of private motors was initiated. Despite considerable advertisement programs projecting CNG as an environmentally friendly and cheap fuel, there is not yet widespread acceptance of the technology. The reasons for this are analysed. It is recommended that the policy of CNG usage be reviewed and the emphasis be shifted to transport fleets. It is also recommended that tax credits be considered as an incentive to users. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the efficiency face to the NO{sub x} emissions from European gas-fired heat process equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourniguet, M.J.; Quinqueneau, A. [Gaz de France, Saint-Denis la Plaine (France); Karll, B. [Dansk Gasteknisk Center, Hoersholm (Denmark); Breithaupt, P. Gasunie [Gasunie, Groningue (Netherlands); Jonsson, O. [Svensk Gastekniskt Center AB, Malmoe (Sweden); Navarri, P. [CETIAT, Villeurbanne (France)

    1999-10-01

    In the frame of the project, tests have been performed by Gaz de France, CETIAT, DGC, GASUNIE and SGC on 35 European industrial sites in order to depict what the European industry using natural gas as an energy source actually looks like in 1997, the levels of efficiency and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions currently being achieved. These 35 industrial sites were chosen among the three following sectors: steam or water boilers, engines or turbines and industrial processes (food processing industry, metallurgy, ceramic, paper and textile industries). The partners focused on relatively new installations or newly retrofitted which were equipped with low NOx technologies. To create an open database between the Partners, a common EXCEL sheet has been defined and used to report the results for the three sectors concerned including principally the following items: General background on the site: it includes the description of the installation, technical characteristics of the furnace, the boiler or the engine, operating scenarios, gas total rating, and depending of the type of installation power density, rated electric power or production rate; Description of the equipment: it includes, if available, the control system of the heating equipment and the low NOx techniques identified; Description of the measurement techniques: In order to compensate for the lack of international standard, this part has been particularly detailed. It includes the description of flue gas analysers (CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NOx, CH{sub 4}, UHC, N{sub 2}O, VOC), metering and pressure and temperature probes in terms of measurement principle, supplier, measurement rang and accuracy and gas calibration. It precise the position of the sampling points and the type of the sampling line; Results: The operating conditions (atmospheric data, type of natural gas burnt during the test and measurement period) are given before the results themselves (complete flue gas analysis and determination of combustion

  2. Efficiency evaluation of gas fuelled and electric driven buses in the public transport sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, Tobias Alexander

    2013-07-01

    The following report evaluates the efficiency of gas fuelled and electric driven buses in the public transport sector on a theoretical basis. The results indicate that the combination of CHP power plants and electric driven buses reach an overall efficiency of about 51% throughout the production chain (Well-to-Wheel), including heat distribution losses. The overall Well-to-Wheel efficiency for conventional gas turbines without heat recovery decreases to around 28%. For gas fuelled buses the Well-to-Wheel efficiency is about 30%. The Co2-emissions are evaluated based on the example of a #Left Double Quotation Mark#Volvo B10L CNG#Right Double Quotation Mark# gas bus and the electric driven #Left Double Quotation Mark#Eurabus 600#Right Double Quotation Mark#. The low energy consumption of the electric driven bus results in Co2-emissions of only 181.4 g Co2/km (Grid-to-Wheel). Depending on the utilised power plant technology the overall Co2-emissions (Well-to-Wheel) amount to 307.5 g Co2/km for a CHP power plant and 553.5 g Co2/km for a conventional gas turbine. On the other hand, gas fuelled buses emit about 1.25 kg Co2/km (Tank-to-Wheel), which is eightfold the emissions of an electrical bus. The Well-to-Tank emissions further increase to about 1.32 kg Co2/km. The emission calculation is based on real gas consumption data from a Norwegian public transport utility. The results indicate that the combination of CHP plants and electrical buses provide a much higher efficiency while reducing Co2-emissions. (author)

  3. Towards reasonable European shale gas regulation - The European commission's 2014 recommendation and communication on shale gas extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, Ruven

    2015-01-01

    Following years of deliberation, the European Union released a Recommendation on unconventional hydrocarbons and a related Communication in 2014. Although these documents are not legally binding on member states, they are nevertheless of great significance as they indicate, for the first time, the

  4. Industrial strategies on the European gas market. Unternehmensstrategien auf dem europaeischen Gasmarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, J M [Univ. de Paris-Dauphine, Centre de Geopolitique de l' Energie et de Matieres Premieres, 75 (France)

    1992-09-01

    The European natural gas industry is faced with two main problems. On the one hand it has to satisfy strongly rising demands while on the other hand its traditional structure is being questioned especially by the European commission in Brussels. The main reasons for the rising demand is the stoppage of nuclear energy programs in all European states except France. Almost all European countries have therefore started large programmes for the building of gas power stations. As a consequence, Europe has to develop large new sources of supply in order to satisfy this demand. The deregulation demanded by Brussels is the logical consequence of the legal principles contained in the Roman Treaties: Free movement of goods, persons and capital, the right of establishment and competition. (orig./UA).

  5. 15 years of monitoring occupational exposure to respirable dust and quartz within the European industrial minerals sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilaout, Hicham; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Houba, Remko; Kromhout, Hans

    2017-07-01

    In 2000, a prospective Dust Monitoring Program (DMP) was started in which measurements of worker's exposure to respirable dust and quartz are collected in member companies from the European Industrial Minerals Association (IMA-Europe). After 15 years, the resulting IMA-DMP database allows a detailed overview of exposure levels of respirable dust and quartz over time within this industrial sector. Our aim is to describe the IMA-DMP and the current state of the corresponding database which due to continuation of the IMA-DMP is still growing. The future use of the database will also be highlighted including its utility for the industrial minerals producing sector. Exposure data are being obtained following a common protocol including a standardized sampling strategy, standardized sampling and analytical methods and a data management system. Following strict quality control procedures, exposure data are consequently added to a central database. The data comprises personal exposure measurements including auxiliary information on work and other conditions during sampling. Currently, the IMA-DMP database consists of almost 28,000 personal measurements which have been performed from 2000 until 2015 representing 29 half-yearly sampling campaigns. The exposure data have been collected from 160 different worksites owned by 35 industrial mineral companies and comes from 23 European countries and approximately 5000 workers. The IMA-DMP database provides the European minerals sector with reliable data regarding worker personal exposures to respirable dust and quartz. The database can be used as a powerful tool to address outstanding scientific issues on long-term exposure trends and exposure variability, and importantly, as a surveillance tool to evaluate exposure control measures. The database will be valuable for future epidemiological studies on respiratory health effects and will allow for estimation of quantitative exposure response relationships. Copyright © 2017 The

  6. Towards a competitive european market of the natural gas: uncertainties and tariff choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This document reveals that, by reason of external supply and contract pregnancy, the gas market deregulation will not present the same effects as for the electricity market. The first part deals with the competition in Europe in the natural gas sector (prices policy, transportation prices, administrative procedures). The second part deals with the tariffing in France and the access to the LNG networks and installations. (A.L.B.)

  7. Increased competition on the supply side of the Western European natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golombek, R.; Gjelsvik, E.; Rosendahl, K.N.

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the impact of breaking up national gas sales consortia in Western Europe. A numerical model of the Western European natural gas market is used to show that once the demand side of the market is liberalized, each producing country has an incentive to break up its national gas sales consortium. The situation is not stable, however, since each country has an incentive to increase the number of domestic producers in response to more competitors. Consequently the model suggests that there may be a large number of producers in a completely liberalized natural gas market. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. Russian Oil and Natural Gas: Strategic Culture and Security Implications of European Dependence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, William M

    2007-01-01

    .... The third section investigates the importance of revenues that Russia receives from consumption of oil and natural gas exports to Europe on their Gross National Product and economic growth for the future. By understanding Russia's strategic culture and the interdependence of European demand and Russian supply, conclusions are made that determine the threat, risk, and circumstances that Russia will deny energy resources to European countries.

  9. Natural gas market - Market opening in Switzerland and a selection of European Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, J.; Vaterlaus, S.; Worm, H.; Spielmann, Ch.; Finger, M.

    2007-02-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the situation in Switzerland and Europe as far as the liberalisation of the natural gas market is concerned. Comparisons are made between the situation for natural gas and electricity markets. The report discusses the economical and technical characteristics of the gas business such as gas sources, transport, storage and trading as well as the associated investment risks. The gas and electricity supply systems are compared from the supply and demand viewpoints and as far as trading and the increasing of efficiency are concerned. The Swiss gas market is compared with those of selected European countries. Market structures and regulatory aspects are examined and the resulting effects on the market and gas prices are reviewed. The effects of market opening are discussed from both the supplier and consumer points of view

  10. Electric sector capacity planning under uncertainty: Climate policy and natural gas in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistline, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates the dynamics of capacity planning and dispatch in the US electric power sector under a range of technological, economic, and policy-related uncertainties. Using a two-stage stochastic programming approach, model results suggest that the two most critical risks in the near-term planning process of the uncertainties considered here are natural gas prices and the stringency of climate policy. Stochastic strategies indicate that some near-term hedging from lower-cost wind and nuclear may occur but robustly demonstrate that delaying investment and waiting for more information can be optimal to avoid stranding capital-intensive assets. Hedging strategies protect against downside losses while retaining the option value of deferring irreversible commitments until more information is available about potentially lucrative market opportunities. These results are explained in terms of the optionality of investments in the electric power sector, leading to more general insights about uncertainty, learning, and irreversibility. The stochastic solution is especially valuable if decision-makers do not sufficiently account for the potential of climate constraints in future decades or if fuel price projections are outdated. - Highlights: • Explicitly incorporating uncertainty influences capacity planning decisions. • Natural gas prices and climate policy are the two most critical risks for utilities. • Strategic delay can be explained in terms of real options. • Stochastic strategies are especially valuable when outdated assumptions are used.

  11. Integration between environmental management and strategic planning in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magrini, Alessandra; Lins, Luiz dos Santos

    2007-01-01

    For activities that have a high possibility of causing environmental accidents, like in the oil and gas sector, it is reasonable to expect the environmental management to be an important variable within the company's strategic planning. However, this is not always true. In some cases, a change in the companies' attitude, abandoning a reactive position and assuming a proactive one, only happens upon the occurrence of serious environmental accidents with strong repercussion in the media. For the company that was the object of study, these accidents gave rise to deep changes in its environmental management, culminating in investments of approximately US$ 2.6 billion in environment, health and security, from 2000 to 2004. This was the highest amount to date invested on these areas by an oil company. This case study seeks to discuss the integration between environmental management and strategic planning in the oil and gas sector over a period of 10 years (from 1995 to 2004) in order to make a contextual analysis of the period before and after the environmental accidents possible

  12. Natural gas cogeneration in the residential sector; La cogeneration au gaz naturel en residentiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancelot, C.; Gaudin, S. [Gaz de France, GDF, Dir. de la Recherche, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-07-01

    The natural gas cogeneration offer is now available and operational in the industrial sector. It is based on technologies of piston engines and gas turbines. Currently, this offer is sufficiently diversified, so much from the point of view of the range of powers available (from 1 MW to more than 40 MW electric) that number of manufacturers. In order to widen the cogeneration market in France to the markets of the commercial and residential sectors, Gaz De France has undertaken a technical economic study to validate the potential of those markets. This study led to work on the assembly of a french die to cogeneration packages of low power (less than 1 MW electric). This step has emerged at the beginning of 1999 with the launching of a commercial offer of cogeneration packages. In margin to this work Gaz De France Research division also initiated a study in order to evaluate the offer of micro cogeneration, products delivering an electric output lower than 10 kW. (authors)

  13. An analysis of headquarters location in the Canadian oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, K.T.

    1993-04-01

    Headquarters location theory identifies several factors which are expected to influence the location of corporate head offices. Some of these factors directly affect the costs of operation and the basic profitability of the company, such as the cost of office space, tax levels, availability of qualified labour, cost of labour, proximity to corporate activities, and agglomeration with other services and companies. Headquarters location theory is applied to Canada's energy sector. During the previous 27 years, concentration of energy company headquarters has shifted from Toronto to Calgary. A regression model tests the extent to which those factors identified in the literature appear to be statistically significant for the headquarters relocation experience in Canada's energy sector. The results of the tests suggest that certain factors do appear to significantly influence relocation decisions. These factors are agglomeration with other oil and gas companies, and relative proximity to oil and gas operations (which unexpectedly displayed a negative coefficient). The agglomeration factor was by far the most significant. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. European energy security: An analysis of future Russian natural gas production and exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederbergh, Bengt, E-mail: bengt.soderbergh@fysast.uu.s [Global Energy Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Laegerhyddsvaegen 1, Box 535, SE-751 21, Uppsala (Sweden); Jakobsson, Kristofer; Aleklett, Kjell [Global Energy Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Laegerhyddsvaegen 1, Box 535, SE-751 21, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The widening gap between EU gas production and consumption may require an 87% increase of import volumes between 2006 and 2030, and there are great uncertainties regarding the amounts of gas that can be expected from new suppliers. The potential of increased production from Norway and Algeria is limited; hence, Russia is likely to play a crucial part of meeting the anticipated growing gas demand of the EU. A field-by-field study of 83 giant gas fields shows that the major producing Russian gas fields are in decline, and by 2013 much larger supplies from the Yamal Peninsula and the Shtokman field will be needed in order to avoid a decline in production. Gas from fields in Eastern Siberia and the Far East will mainly be directed to the Asian and Pacific Rim markets, thereby limiting its relevance to the European and CIS markets. As a result, the maximum export increase to the European and CIS markets amounts only to about 45% for the period 2015-2030. The discourse surrounding the EU's dependence on Russian gas should thus not only be concerned with geopolitics, but also with the issue of resource limitations. - Research highlights: {yields}Natural gas production in the Nadym Pur Taz region (Western Siberia) will start to decline within a few years. {yields}New production from the Yamal peninsula is critical to ensure gas exports to Europe. {yields}Additional production in East Siberia and the Far East will not be available for the European market. {yields}Rapid gas demand growth in China might also lead to competition for gas from Western Siberia.

  15. The unknown story of the European carbon market: an archaeology of the electrical sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartel, Melodie; Aggeri, Franck; Caneill, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    In economic literature, the creation of the European carbon market is presented as a major institutional innovation that can be viewed as a direct application of economic theory. In this article, we propose another version of how the European carbon market came about that emphasizes the active role played by companies. For a period of three years, these companies designed and tested a prototype carbon market, while being observed by European experts. Drawing on archive documents, we analyze this experimentation process and examine in detail its influence on the European carbon market. We then discuss the role of companies in the processes of institutional innovation, a process that generally remains invisible. Finally it is explained how such experiments, conducted in protected spaces, can facilitate the design and testing of new concepts

  16. Conflict and cooperation with respect to European natural-gas regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austvik, O.G.

    2003-01-01

    Significant economies of scale and scope in the European gas industry make many transmission and local distribution companies natural monopolies in the markets in which they operate. Often, this gives them a strong market power and they experience little competitive pressure. Hence public interventions into the functioning of the market, as seen under the initiatives taken by the European Commission, such as the 'Gas Directive' occur. This paper discusses a game between the public authority and the transporters, where various levels of conflict and cooperation will influence how far regulations will go and how they will be designed. (author)

  17. Development of the auto gas and LPG-powered vehicle sector in Turkey: A statistical case study of the sector for Bursa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamangil, M. Ihsan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the development of LPG-powered vehicle sector in Turkey and the policies applied by the Turkish Government as well as the total fleet of LPG-powered vehicles in Bursa province, which is assumed as typical district to represent whole Turkey, are analyzed. We also tried to point out economical losses and applicational problems caused by wrong energy and environmental policies in Turkey. We aimed to focus a guiding light on the newly developing auto gas markets in different countries through the problems resulting from the fast growth of the sector and the experiences in Turkish application

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE OF THE EASTERN-EUROPEAN AUTO SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian-Ovidiu CINADE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Car-building industry territorial reconfiguration in Europe is the result of several rounds of company delocations from origin countries to emergent countries. Such rounds have been limited by the gradual opening of the national countries, as well as by changes in East European ideology and politics. Hence, about the end of the 90’s, European car-building industry shows considerable disparity, East to West. In the car-building companies’ vision, East-European car-building development potential is basically sustained by both the car low penetration rate, and the low labor cost. On the long term run, gradual valorizing of the East-european trading, with increasing labor costs, may read as a wearing thin of the competitive advantage in car-building industries, as well as problem issues of novel territory attractiveness needing permanent boosting. Country-to-country comparative analysis indicates that competitive advantage of car-building has not gone down in all of the West-European States. Competitive advantage of the West-European car-building industry increases, which can be explained, in part, by adequate strategies, as both labor costs, and cars penetration rate, go up.

  19. LNG REGASIFICATION TERMINALS ACCESS CAPACITY ANALYSIS FOR SECURITY OF EUROPEAN NATURAL GAS SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Veselić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing natural gas consumption, declining North Sea gas reserves, increased production costs and the deregulation of European gas and electricity markets have all combined to create new opportunities for LNG in Europe. In these circumstances, LNG represents an opportunity for many European countries to diversify their natural gas supply, while decreasing their dependence on Russian natural gas import at the same time. The largest exporters of LNG to Europe are Qatar, Algeria, Nigeria, Trinidad & Tobago, Egypt and Oman. Spain, Great Britain and France are the largest European importers of LNG. Spain has six LNG regasification terminals, followed by four in Great Britain, three in France, two in Italy and Turkey and finally Greece and Portugal with one terminal each. New LNG regasification terminals are currently under construction in Italy, Spain, Sweden and Netherlands. In addition, more than 30 new LNG terminal projects have been proposed around Europe. Italy plans to construct as many as 10 new regasification terminals, due to the strong orientation of its national energy policy towards LNG. Many European countries are strongly considering participating in the LNG chain for the first time, namely Albania, Cyprus, Ireland, Lithuania, Germany, Poland, Romania, Ukraine and Croatia. This paper focuses on a specific aspect of the LNG supply chain: the import facility (the paper is published in Croatian.

  20. The strategies of European energy operators. Which strategic and capitalistic evolutions for the sector on a medium term?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-11-01

    This article presents the content of a market study which aimed at describing the current regulatory context of energy markets in Europe and the degree of openness to competition, at analysing all figures concerning electricity and natural gas in different countries (production, consumption, balance of trade), at analysing development strategies of electricity providers and gas operators and at assessing their strengths and weaknesses, at comparing financial performance of leader groups and at assessing their financial flexibility, and at anticipating the reconfiguration of the sector on a medium term. Fifteen energy companies or operators have been analysed: Centrica, CEZ, E.ON, EDF, EDP, Enel, ENI, Fortum, Gas Natural, GDF Suez, Iberdrola, RWE, SSE, Vattenfall, Verbund

  1. Simulating security of supply effects of the Nabucco and South Stream projects for the European natural gas market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckhoener, Caroline

    2010-12-15

    Due to the increasing European import dependency, significant additional natural gas volumes will be required. In addition to the Nord Stream pipeline, the Nabucco and South Stream pipeline are projects planned for the next decade to provide further gas supplies to the European market. As one of the European Union's energy policies' foci is security of supply, the question can be raised if and how these projects contribute to this objective not only in terms of diversification but also in case of supply disruptions such as occurred in 2009 during the Russia-Ukraine gas crisis. This paper discusses the impact of these two major gas import pipeline projects on the South-Eastern Europe gas supply and analyzes their effects on gas flows and marginal cost prices in general and in case of gas supply disruptions via Ukraine in a model-based analysis with the European natural gas infrastructure and dispatch model TIGER. (orig.)

  2. Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU funds. Electricity sector analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    The present report is the final electricity sector analysis report in the project 'Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU funds'. As part of the project a number of quantitative analyses have been carried out for the electricity sector. The report presents the results of those electricity sector analyses. The present project aims at: 1. Identifying major issues relating to the restructuring and liberalization process in the Polish electricity and the gas sector, 2. Setting up an overview of the Polish electricity and natural gas sector, 3. Setting up scenarios for development of electricity and gas markets in the period to 2020, 4. Updating the Balmorel model with recent data for the Polish electricity system, 5. Analyzing future consequences of liberalization of energy markets for the producers, consumers and the Polish economy and society as a whole, 6. Presenting the possibilities and preparing a practical guide for using EU funds and community programmes for large infrastructure projects in the energy sector. (BA)

  3. Gas-to-power market and investment incentive for enhancing generation capacity: An analysis of Ghana's electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, Jorik; Poudineh, Rahmatallah

    2016-01-01

    Ghana's electricity generation capacity is currently insufficient to meet demand, making power outages and load shedding common. The resulting impact is potentially devastating for the country's growth prospects. Traditionally, lack of an affordable and reliable fuel supply for power generation, coupled with ineffective institutions and an unfavourable investment climate, have resulted in Ghana's electricity sector performing poorly. In light of the 2007 discovery of natural gas reserves in Ghanaian waters, this paper examines whether domestic gas could advance the performance of the electricity sector, and if so, how. The results of our analysis show that utilization of gas reserves in Ghana's gas-to-power market is an economically superior strategy compared to an export-oriented utilization scheme. The lack of an effective regulatory framework for investment, skill shortages, and an inefficient electricity pricing structure continue to be the main constraining factors. Our analysis also considers possible approaches to modification of the electricity tariff in order to send the right signal to potential investors in generation capacity, without compromising the affordability of power supply. - Highlights: •We examine if domestic gas can improve the Ghanaian electricity sector performance. •We compare domestic gas-to-power market utilisation versus gas export. •It shows that gas-to-power market is more economical compared to gas export. •Ineffective investment regime, skill shortage and inefficient tariffs are barriers.

  4. Energy - dichotomies within the European Union? Outlook of the Turkish energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilli, B.

    2001-01-01

    Turkey, an alley of the West, and being in the process of rapid integration with the world economy, has started a comprehensive restructuring endeavor in the energy sector. In today's power markets where globalisation and competition plays an increasing role, supply security, economic growth and social targets must be harmonized effectively. Following topics can be considered as basic instruments in this context; restructuring of the power sector (privatization, demonopolization); removal of governmental intervention in the markets; creating a better regional/global cooperation for the deployment of new technologies; enhancing energy efficiency. (author)

  5. Regulatory intervention on the dynamic European gas market. Neoclassical economics or transaction cost economics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanjer, Aldo R.

    2009-01-01

    Shifts at the international gas market indicate that the transaction cost perspective provides better underpinnings for European gas regulation than the current neoclassical perspective. Three implications are that policymakers should: (1) allow alternative coordination measures to complement market exchange; (2) recognize that less than perfect competition outcomes may be optimal and (3) be more reticent in prescribing interventionist measures. Finally, the analysis provides the foundations for the empirical research required to complement this paper's theoretical approach. (author)

  6. Panorama 2014 - The importance of underground storage in the security of European gas supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2013-12-01

    While European capacity for underground gas storage has increased by 16% over the last three years, levels of stock at the beginning of the 2013/2014 winter, in relation to capacity, are the lowest that have been seen since 2010; they represent only 84% of storage capacity. The suppliers of gas have no incentive to reserve storage capacity, for which the cost is considered too high in relation to the spread, currently very low, between the price of gas in winter and in summer. They also rely on sufficient gas supply thanks to other sources of flexibility available on the market: flexibility of production or imports, spot LNG purchases, purchases in the spot market... or even use of the storage capacities of neighbouring countries via European network interconnections. Yet, the 2013/2014 winter is beginning in a gas supply context in Europe that is more difficult: imports of LNG, which had already dropped sharply in 2012, have continued to contract, faced with increased competition from Asian buyers on the international LNG market. Gas imports from Norway are also declining following production limits in that country. Only Russia has strongly increased its exports to Europe in 2013. However, the dispute between Ukraine and Russia about the price of Russian gas delivered to Ukraine still raises the spectre of a threat to the European supply of Russian gas, nearly 60% of which transits via Ukraine. Under these circumstances, as demonstrated by the gas crises of 2006 and 2009 and the cold conditions of February 2012 and March/April 2013, storage is the most efficient means of securing the supply of gas providing, of course, that the storage sites are filled at the beginning of winter. (author)

  7. Natural gas utilization in the electricity sector in a framework of supporting an energy diversification policy: the case of Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudiyanto Wahyuputro, B.

    1992-01-01

    Although the Government of Indonesia (GOI) has been trying to balance its economy, oil and gas (MIGAS) sector still has an important role. The revenue from exporting oil has been needed to sustain national economic development. For that reason, the GOI has determined to diversify and to develop alternative energy resources for domestic consumption. The alternative energy resources available are classified into non-renewable energy resources such as natural gas and coal; and renewable energy resources such as geothermal, biomass, solar energy, wind energy, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), etc. Natural gas is one of the potential non-renewable energy resources available in Indonesia abundantly. The total potential reserves in Indonesia is estimated about 109.1 TSCF, which is including proven reserve of 80.2 TSCF. By the estimated production level of 2.0 TSCF per year for the fiscal year 1993/1994, these proven reserves can be still produced for 30 years more. Besides the reserves is available abundantly, the other advantage in developing natural gas for domestic consumption is a 'clean energy' rather than other fossil fuels. So that, it should be promoted to support the energy diversification and the clean environment policies. In the other side, electricity sector has a bigger opportunity than other sectors in supporting the energy diversification policy. There are several kinds of power generating plant which utilize various types of primary energy such as oil, gas, coal, geothermal, and hydro. Nevertheless, until this moment the utilization of natural gas in the electricity sector is still low of 15 percent. Recently, the growth of electricity demand in Indonesia is very high, especially in the Java-Bali grid system. There is a wide chance for natural gas to improve its role in electricity sector, and there is an economic variable which will determine the development of natural gas reserve, that is natural gas price itself. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  8. The Nabucco project's economic failure - Lessons for the European Union's foreign gas policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    2010-01-01

    This article criticises the new strategy of the European Union's foreign gas policy. The new policy translates in the setting up of gas corridors to diversify importations in a context of increased political competition with Russia. The inherent limitations of the EU's plan to promote the Nabucco gas pipeline as merchant line without seeking exporter involvement in the project are analysed. Such limitations are analysed through various economic prospects. A micro-economic calculation shows the significance of the use rate of a gas pipeline for profitability. The competition theory shows the possibility for an existing dominating firm to compete with a newcomer's investment by building equipment likely to pre-empt access to the resources. The transaction cost saving shows how long term undertakings between producers and suppliers are necessary for the development of transit infrastructures and distant gas fields. The article ends with the need for economic relevance in the EU's gas policy actions. (author)

  9. Electricity and gas market design to supply the German transport sector with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The German government has set targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2020, 55% by 2030, 70% by 2040 and 80-95% by 2050 compared to 1990 as reference year. As well as meeting other requirements, these targets can be achieved by raising the contribution of renewably-generated power to Germany's gross electricity consumption to 80% by 2050. Based on Germany's potential, intermittent energy sources (IES) such as on- and offshore wind, as well as photovoltaics, are necessary sources that must be utilized in order to achieve these ambitious targets. Because of the intermittency of these sources, there will be times in which surplus power generated could be used for example for the transport sector. During these periods of surplus power, the storage capacity of hydrogen allows for a socalled ''power-to-gas'' concept whereby the surplus power can be used to produce hydrogen and oxygen by means of electrolyzers. The aim of this thesis is to identify and develop a market design that is characterized by high penetration levels of IES, supplemented by the use of hydrogen in the transport sector. Furthermore, the aim was to develop a model in which the electricity and gas sector, including a hydrogen pipeline grid, is represented so as to analyze and validate selected market designs. Therefore, potential electricity and gas markets, as well as the most important potential share and stakeholders of a hydrogen infrastructure, are analyzed. With the model developed in this thesis, an existing energy concept has been developed, analyzed and evaluated. In addition, the distribution of the hydrogen production costs was calculated by employing a Monte Carlo Simulation analysis. The developed energy concept relies on 170 GW onshore and 60 GW offshore wind capacity and these dominate the model. This leads to surplus power, especially in the federal states of Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. To supply the

  10. Russia's and the European union's gas interdependence. What balance between the market and geopolitics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the interdependence relation-ship between Russia and the European Union in the area of gas, by distinguishing the Russian seller's power risk from the issue of short term security, which are often mistaken one for the other The goal is to measure the economic risk associated with the seller's dominant position in the European market to appreciate the relevance of responses that can be made by European countries or the European Union. Firstly, the basically different nature of Russia and of the European Union is described, as well as the role played by its energy resources in the assertion of Russia's political power Secondly there is an analysis of the Russian seller's elements of dependence on the European market, before reviewing, thirdly, the risk of exercising Gazprom's market power in Europe. In closing is a review of the relevance of possible actions by the European Union and member countries to reduce that risk by facilitating the densification of the Pan-european Network, the establishment of entry points and market integration. (author)

  11. The Integration Aspects of Activities of the Companies in the Oil and Gas Industry Sector in the Context of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panevnyk Tetiana M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article considers both the dynamics and the structure of oil and gas production in Ukraine, situation of the oil and gas companies at the current stage of globalization of the world economy have been covered. The main problems impacting the functioning of the domestic industry sector have been identified, including the lack of effectiveness of the existing integration processes. The world trends and patterns of integration processes have been considered. It has been determined that the oil and gas industry sector leaders are the multinational companies that actively use integration in their practices. The current trends in creating integration linkages in different parts of the process chain in the oil and gas industry have been identified. Influence by large corporations of the innovative type on the creation of a favorable investment climate has been confirmed, as well as conducting their own policies of expansion in the overseas markets. On the basis of studying the foreign experience, expediency of development of the oil and gas sector enterprises by activating integration processes has been substantiated. Priorities and possibilities for further functioning of enterprises in the the oil and gas industry sector have been identified

  12. Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen C. Yborra

    2007-04-30

    infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for

  13. Employment in the research and development sector in selected countries of the European Union and the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Turczak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to determine how particular factors affect the diversity of countries in terms of the number of employees in the research and development (R&D sector compared with the number of their overall populations. Two factors are analysed in the study: the proportion of employment in the R&D sector to the total number of people employed (i.e. the factor showing the importance given to R&D in the country concerned and the proportion of the total number of people employed to the number of inhabitants aged 15 and more (i.e. the employment rate. The logarithmic method has been used to assess the impact of deviations of these factors on the deviation of employment in the R&D sector in relation to the number of inhabitants. The causal analysis has allowed for answering the question of how each factor affects the variable in the selected twenty-six countries of the European Union and the world, i.e. what are the direction and strength of the influence. The results obtained for Poland are compared with those received for other countries covered by the analysis and the final conclusions are drawn on this basis.

  14. Strategies of an incumbent constrained to supply entrants: the case of European gas release programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clastres, Cedric; David, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    To accelerate the development of competition in gas markets, some European regulators (in United Kingdom or in France) have decided to implement gas release programs. These programs compel the incumbent to sell gas that is no longer sold to its customers to its competitors. A first intuition would suggest that such a measure could give the incumbent an incentive to let its own costs rise in order to raise its rival's ones. With a duo-poly model, we found some cases where incentives to raise costs do exist but, in most of the cases there is no such incentives. (authors)

  15. Designing Dreams or Constructing Contradictions? European Union Multifunctional Policies and the Polish Organic Farm Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Master, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Analysts have heralded the principle of "multifunctionality" undergirding the European Union's Common Agricultural Policy "Second Pillar" support mechanisms as a "new...and strong paradigm" for agriculture (van der Ploeg and Roep 2003), with the potential to re-embed social, environmental, and ethical concerns into…

  16. Millefeuille. The emergence of a multi-layered controls system in the European food sector.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der B.M.J.; Freriks, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    More and more substances used in (the processing of) food as well as food products travel world wide and as a result the food production chain is becoming increasingly complex. It goes without saying that within a free European market, the safety of food products that reach the consumer at the end

  17. Millefeuille The emergence of a multi-layered controls system in the European food sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, Bernd M.J. van der; Freriks, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    More and more substances used in (the processing of) food as well as food products travel world wide and as a result the food production chain is becoming increasingly complex. It goes without saying that within a free European market, the safety of food products that reach the consumer at the end

  18. Making offshore industries greener: negotiating environmental policy in the Dutch oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinssen, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the negotiations between the Dutch Government and the oil and gas sector regarding environmental measures for the offshore industry are analysed. Dutch environmental policy is presently being developed via 'Target Group Management'. The instrument used in this approach is policy negotiations, resulting in covenants. By signing a covenant, both government and industry take responsibility for the development and implementation of a realistic environmental policy. Negotiating environmental policies, however, can be problematic. This relates to the delay in obtaining an integrated approach to environmental problems. It is not unlikely that, in the four years required for the negotiation process, a legally binding environmental law might also have been developed. It is concluded that the value of the covenant mainly depends on the goodwill of the parties involved. (Author)

  19. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions of the agriculture sector in France. Collection of territorial experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, Fabien; Martin, Sarah; Bajeat, Philippe; Larbodiere, Ludovic; Vergez, Antonin

    2013-06-01

    After having briefly indicated the different origins of direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by the agriculture sector, presented the technical and political context, and outlined the need for new practices to struggle against climate change and to adapt to changes to come, this publication reports some experiments undertaken in different French regions: a farm network as an animation tool to support farmers, a local partnership to conciliate town and agriculture, the development of actions on energy and greenhouse gases in agriculture, the implementation of climate and agriculture plan, a network of agricultural actors for a sustainable support of change, an agriculture with and for its territory and inhabitants, a debate on agriculture and climate

  20. Conflict Approaches of Effective Project Manager in the Upstream Sector of Indonesian Oil & Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Cahyono

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Conflict can be functional or dysfunctional to the organization’s performance. This study focused on the relationship between conflict approaches implemented by the project manager based on project team member’s perception on the effectiveness of the project manager in managing project’s conflict. Questionnaires were modified from Barker et al. (1988 to measure conflict management approaches and outcomes of managing project conflict. Data were gathered from 57 respondents who worked in the Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC contractors serving the upstream sector of the Oil and Gas industry in Indonesia. By using Pearson correlation, result of this study indicated that project managers were perceived to be effective in managing project conflict when implementing cooperative and confi rmative approaches, but ineffective when combining competitive and avoidance approaches. Further research should investigate correlation between cultural dimensions with conflict approaches and outcomes of managing conflict.

  1. FINANCIAL REPORTING: PERFORMANCE AND FAIR VALUE THE CASE OF THE EUROPEAN BANKING SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Combes-Thuelin; Lionel Escaffre

    2003-01-01

    International audience; Regarding financial reporting, information about performances is one of the preferred items banking institutions are referring to. Therefore, quantitative and qualitative performance indicators are a significant part of annual reports. Reporting about performances raises some other issues: valuation at cost or at fair value, registration versus disclosure. In the case of the banking industry, the accounting information disclosed is all the more important as this sector...

  2. European energy security. An analysis of future Russian natural gas production and exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederbergh, Bengt; Jakobsson, Kristofer; Aleklett, Kjell [Global Energy Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Laegerhyddsvaegen 1, Box 535, SE-751 21, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    The widening gap between EU gas production and consumption may require an 87% increase of import volumes between 2006 and 2030, and there are great uncertainties regarding the amounts of gas that can be expected from new suppliers. The potential of increased production from Norway and Algeria is limited; hence, Russia is likely to play a crucial part of meeting the anticipated growing gas demand of the EU. A field-by-field study of 83 giant gas fields shows that the major producing Russian gas fields are in decline, and by 2013 much larger supplies from the Yamal Peninsula and the Shtokman field will be needed in order to avoid a decline in production. Gas from fields in Eastern Siberia and the Far East will mainly be directed to the Asian and Pacific Rim markets, thereby limiting its relevance to the European and CIS markets. As a result, the maximum export increase to the European and CIS markets amounts only to about 45% for the period 2015-2030. The discourse surrounding the EU's dependence on Russian gas should thus not only be concerned with geopolitics, but also with the issue of resource limitations. (author)

  3. Bypassing Russia: Nabucco project and its implications for the European gas security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogdu, Erkan

    2010-01-01

    Restrictions on CO 2 emissions, the nuclear phase-out announced by some member states, high emissions from coal-fired power plants, and barriers to rapid development of renewable generation are factors that make the European Union (EU) highly dependent on natural gas. With three non-EU countries (Russia, Algeria and Norway) currently supplying more than half the gas consumed within the EU and with projections pointing out that by 2030 internal sources will only be able to meet 25% of demand, the EU desperately looks for means to secure new sources of gas supply. In this context, the Nabucco pipeline is planned to deliver gas from Caspian and Middle East regions to the EU market. It runs across Turkey and then through Bulgaria, Romania and Hungary before connecting with a major gas hub in Austria. On paper, Nabucco project makes perfect sense, offering a new export route to the EU markets for Caspian gas producers (Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan) as well as Iran and, in time, Iraq. The project is backed by the EU and strongly supported by the United States. Perhaps most importantly, Nabucco would completely bypass Russia. This paper addresses issues surrounding Nabucco project and their implications for the European gas security. (author)

  4. Greenhouse Gas Emission Intensities for the Livestock Sector in Indonesia, Based on the National Specific Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eska Nugrahaeningtyas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to calculate greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and to identify the trends of GHG emission intensity, based on meat production from the livestock sector in Indonesia, which had not been done before. The total emissions from the livestock sector from 2000 to 2015 in Indonesia were calculated using the 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Guideline (2006 IPCC GL using Tier 1 and Tier 2, with its default values and some of the country specific data that were found in the grey literature. During 2000 to 2015, the change from the Tier 1 to Tier 2 methods resulted in an approximately 7.39% emission decrease from enteric fermentation and a 4.24% increase from manure management, which resulted in a 4.98% decrease in the total emissions. The shared emission from manure management increased by about 9% and 6% using Tier 1 and Tier 2, respectively. In contrast with the total emissions, the overall emission intensity in Indonesia decreased (up to 60.77% for swine, showing that the livestock productivity in Indonesia has become more efficient. In order to meet the meat demand with less GHG emissions, chicken farming is one option to be developed. The increased emission and share from manure management indicated that manure management system needs to be of concern, especially for beef cattle and swine.

  5. LMDI decomposition analysis of greenhouse gas emissions in the Korean manufacturing sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyonghwa; Kim, Suyi

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we decomposed Korean industrial manufacturing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions using the log mean Divisia index (LMDI) method, both multiplicatively and additively. Changes in industrial CO 2 emissions from 1991 to 2009 may be studied by quantifying the contributions from changes in five different factors: overall industrial activity (activity effect), industrial activity mix (structure effect), sectoral energy intensity (intensity effect), sectoral energy mix (energy-mix effect) and CO 2 emission factors (emission-factor effect). The results indicate that the structure effect and intensity effect played roles in reducing GHG emissions, and the structure effect played a bigger role than the intensity effect. The energy-mix effect increased GHG emissions, and the emission-factor effect decreased GHG emissions. The time series analysis indicates that the GHG emission pattern was changed before and after the International Monetary Fund (IMF) regime in Korea. The structure effect and the intensity effect had contributed more in emission reductions after rather than before the IMF regime in Korea. The structure effect and intensity effect have been stimulated since the high oil price period after 2001. - Highlights: • We decomposed greenhouse gas emissions of Korea's manufacturing industry using LMDI. • The structure effect and intensity effect play a role in reducing GHG emissions. • The role of structure effect was bigger than intensity effect. • The energy-mix effect increased and the emission-factor effect decreased GHG emissions. • The GHG emission pattern has been changed before and after IMF regime in Korea

  6. New energy efficiency technologies associated with increased natural gas demand in delivery and consumption sectors of Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alghalandis, Saeid Mansouri

    2010-09-15

    Increasing population and economic growth in developing countries has changed their energy consumption patterns. So, the conventional systems of energy supply have become inadequate to deal with rising energy demand. Iran has great reservoirs of natural gas and its natural gas usage is far more than average international standard. Dominance of natural gas share in energy basket in Iran, make it necessary to consider energy efficient technologies and solutions for this domain. In this study new technologies for increasing energy efficiency (EE) in natural gas delivery and consumption sub sectors are discussed and evaluated according to available infrastructures in Iran.

  7. Market liberalization in the European Natural Gas Market. The importance of capacity constraints and efficiency differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakman, S. [University of Groningen, Faculty of Economics, Department of International Economics and Business, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Van Marrewijk, C.; Van Witteloostuijn, A. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    In the European Union, energy markets are increasingly being liberalized. A case in point is the European natural gas industry. The general expectation is that more competition will lead to lower prices and higher volumes, and hence higher welfare. This paper indicates that this might not happen for at least two reasons. First, energy markets, including the market for natural gas, are characterized by imperfect competition and increasing costs to develop new energy sources. As a result, new entrants in the market are less efficient than incumbent firms. Second, energy markets, again including the market for natural gas, are associated with capacity constraints. Prices are determined in residual markets where the least efficient firms are active. This is likely to lead to price increases, rather than decreases.

  8. Considering the Role of Natural Gas in the Deep Decarbonization of the U.S. Electricity Sector. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series: Number 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beppler, Ross [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zinaman, Owen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-12

    Natural gas generation in the U.S. electricity sector has grown substantially in recent years, while the sector's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have generally declined. This relationship highlights the concept of natural gas as a potential enabler of a transition to a lower-carbon future. This work considers that concept by using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Renewable Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. ReEDS is a long-term capacity expansion model of the U.S. electricity sector. We examine the role of natural gas within the ReEDS modeling framework as increasingly strict carbon emission targets are imposed on the electricity sector. In addition to various natural gas price futures, we also consider scenarios that emphasize a low-carbon technology in order to better understand the role of natural gas if that low-carbon technology shows particular promise. Specifically, we consider scenarios with high amounts of energy efficiency (EE), low nuclear power costs, low renewable energy (RE) costs, and low carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs. Within these scenarios we find that requiring the electricity sector to lower CO2 emissions over time increases near-to-mid-term (through 2030) natural gas generation (see Figure 1 - left). The long-term (2050) role of natural gas generation in the electricity sector is dependent on the level of CO2 emission reduction required. Moderate reductions in long-term CO2 emissions have relatively little impact on long-term natural gas generation, while more stringent CO2 emission limits lower long-term natural gas generation (see Figure 1 - right). More stringent carbon targets also impact other generating technologies, with the scenarios considered here seeing significant decreases in coal generation, and new capacity of nuclear and renewable energy technologies over time. Figure 1 also demonstrates the role of natural gas in the context of scenarios where a specific low-carbon technology is advantaged. In

  9. Security of supply and retail competition in the European gas market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abada, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.abada@polytechnique.edu [IFP Energies nouvelles, 1 et 4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison (France); EDF Research and Development, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France); EconomiX-CNRS, University of Paris Ouest (France); Massol, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.massol@ifpen.fr [Center for Economics and Management, IFP School, 228-232 av. Napoleon Bonaparte, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Department of Economics, City University London, Northampton Square, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, we analyze the impact of uncertain disruptions in gas supply upon gas retailer contracting behavior and consequent price and welfare implications in a gas market characterized by long-term gas contracts using a static Cournot model. In order to most realistically describe the economical situation, our representation divides the market into two stages: the upstream market that links, by means of long-term contracts, producers in exporting countries (Russia, Algeria, etc.) to local retailers who bring gas to the consuming countries to satisfy local demands in the downstream market. Disruption costs are modeled using short-run demand functions. First we mathematically develop a general model and write the associated KKT conditions, then we propose some case studies, under iso-elasticity assumptions, for the long-short-run inverse-demand curves in order to predict qualitatively and quantitatively the impacts of supply disruptions on Western European gas trade. In the second part, we study in detail the German gas market of the 1980s to explain the supply choices of the German retailer, and we derive interesting conclusions and insights concerning the amounts and prices of natural gas brought to the market. The last part of the paper is dedicated to a study of the Bulgarian gas market, which is greatly dependent on the Russian gas supplies and hence very sensitive to interruption risks. Some interesting conclusions are derived concerning the necessity to economically regulate the market, by means of gas amounts control, if the disruption probability is high enough. - Highlights: > We model retail competition using a Nash-Cournot framework. > Risk-neutral retailers decide their import policy among a set of risky producers. > Case 1: the German gas trade of the 1980s to understand the gas sources' choices. > Case 2: the current Bulgarian gas trade to study the market properties. > Conclusions about the market regulation for welfare optimization reasons.

  10. Security of supply and retail competition in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abada, Ibrahim; Massol, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the impact of uncertain disruptions in gas supply upon gas retailer contracting behavior and consequent price and welfare implications in a gas market characterized by long-term gas contracts using a static Cournot model. In order to most realistically describe the economical situation, our representation divides the market into two stages: the upstream market that links, by means of long-term contracts, producers in exporting countries (Russia, Algeria, etc.) to local retailers who bring gas to the consuming countries to satisfy local demands in the downstream market. Disruption costs are modeled using short-run demand functions. First we mathematically develop a general model and write the associated KKT conditions, then we propose some case studies, under iso-elasticity assumptions, for the long-short-run inverse-demand curves in order to predict qualitatively and quantitatively the impacts of supply disruptions on Western European gas trade. In the second part, we study in detail the German gas market of the 1980s to explain the supply choices of the German retailer, and we derive interesting conclusions and insights concerning the amounts and prices of natural gas brought to the market. The last part of the paper is dedicated to a study of the Bulgarian gas market, which is greatly dependent on the Russian gas supplies and hence very sensitive to interruption risks. Some interesting conclusions are derived concerning the necessity to economically regulate the market, by means of gas amounts control, if the disruption probability is high enough. - Highlights: → We model retail competition using a Nash-Cournot framework. → Risk-neutral retailers decide their import policy among a set of risky producers. → Case 1: the German gas trade of the 1980s to understand the gas sources' choices. → Case 2: the current Bulgarian gas trade to study the market properties. → Conclusions about the market regulation for welfare optimization

  11. What are the health and greenhouse gas implications of travel patterns in different European settings?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, J.; Götschi, T.; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick

    Modelling studies have indicated the potential for substitution of car use with walking and cycling to achieve both large health benefits and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. There is considerable variation in walking, cycling, car and public transport use between different European settings....... However, there has been limited rigorous investigation of the impact of these differences on health and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper we present modelled results on what would be the health and greenhouse gas implications if a setting with high levels of car use and low levels of cycling (urban......) and greenhouse gas modelling were conducted using ITHIM (Integrated Transport and Health Impact Modelling tool). The analysis suggests that differences in travel patterns are making an important contribution to population health but that lower transport related greenhouse gas emissions do not always coincide...

  12. Future evolution of the liberalised European gas market: Simulation results with a dynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lise, Wietze; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    Strategic behaviour by gas producers is likely to affect future gas prices and investments in the European Union (EU). To analyse this issue, a computational game theoretic model is presented that is based on a recursive-dynamic formulation. This model addresses interactions among demand, supply, pipeline and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport, storage and investments in the natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. Three market scenarios are formulated to study the impact of producer market power. In addition, tradeoffs among investments in pipelines, LNG liquefaction and regasification facilities, and storage are explored. The model runs indicate that LNG can effectively compete with pipelines in the near future. Further, significant decreases in Cournot prices between 2005 and 2010 indicate that near-term investments in EU gas transport capacity are likely to diminish market power by making markets more accessible. (author)

  13. Future evolution of the liberalised European gas market: Simulation results with a dynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lise, Wietze [IBS Research and Consultancy, Aga Han, Agahamami Cadessi 1/6, Cihangir, 34433 Beyoglu, Istanbul (Turkey); Energy Markets and International Environmental Policy group, ECN Policy Studies, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hobbs, Benjamin F. [Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Ames Hall 313, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Strategic behaviour by gas producers is likely to affect future gas prices and investments in the European Union (EU). To analyse this issue, a computational game theoretic model is presented that is based on a recursive-dynamic formulation. This model addresses interactions among demand, supply, pipeline and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport, storage and investments in the natural gas market over the period 2005-2030. Three market scenarios are formulated to study the impact of producer market power. In addition, tradeoffs among investments in pipelines, LNG liquefaction and regasification facilities, and storage are explored. The model runs indicate that LNG can effectively compete with pipelines in the near future. Further, significant decreases in Cournot prices between 2005 and 2010 indicate that near-term investments in EU gas transport capacity are likely to diminish market power by making markets more accessible. (author)

  14. Production from Giant Gas Fields in Norway and Russia and Subsequent Implications for European Energy Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederbergh, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    70 bcm In addition, there are a number of potential downside factors for future Russian gas supplies to the European markets. Consequently, a 90% increase of import volumes to the EU by 2030 will be impossible to achieve. From a European energy security perspective the dependence of pipeline gas imports is not the only energy security problem to be in the limelight, the question of physical availability of overall gas supplies deserves serious attention as well. There is a lively discussion regarding the geopolitical implications of European dependence on imported gas from Russia. However, the results of this thesis suggest that when assessing the future gas demand of the EU it would be of equal importance to be concerned about diminishing availability of global gas supplies

  15. Legal analysis of systemic investment protection regulation in the European Union’s financial sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bocs L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available After the Treaty of Lisbon the European Union has an exclusive and uniform competence regarding investment agreements within its common commercial policy. Yet the political events in 2016 showed that there are still many regional differences politically and economically, especially after the so-called Brexit and negotiations with the United States of America in relation to transatlantic trade and investment. Therefore, the aim of the research is to determine the legal framework and related problems for unified investment protection within the European Union. Using descriptive, logical and deductive methodology the paper establishes a juristic base consensus for trade and investment policies, concludes that so far those policies have been systemically neglected due to regional differences in economic development and accordingly suggests to unify and protect the common investment policies by using already existing regional judicial mechanisms of member states within a unified code of conduct.

  16. The potential of natural gas use including cogeneration in large-sized industry and commercial sector in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales Palomino, Raul; Nebra, Silvia A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there have been several discussions on a greater use of natural gas nationwide. Moreover, there have been several announcements by the private and public sectors regarding the construction of new pipelines to supply natural gas to the Peruvian southern and central-north markets. This paper presents future scenarios for the use of natural gas in the large-sized industrial and commercial sectors of the country based on different hypotheses on developments in the natural gas industry, national economic growth, energy prices, technological changes and investment decisions. First, the paper estimates the market potential and characterizes the energy consumption. Then it makes a selection of technological alternatives for the use of natural gas, and it makes an energetic and economic analysis and economic feasibility. Finally, the potential use of natural gas is calculated through nine different scenarios. The natural gas use in cogeneration systems is presented as an alternative to contribute to the installed power capacity of the country. Considering the introduction of the cogeneration in the optimistic–advanced scenario and assuming that all of their conditions would be put into practice, in 2020, the share of the cogeneration in electricity production in Peru would be 9.9%. - Highlights: ► This paper presents future scenarios for the use of natural gas in the large-sized industrial and commercial sectors of Peru. ► The potential use of natural gas is calculated through nine different scenarios.► The scenarios were based on different hypotheses on developments in the natural gas industry, national economic growth, energy prices, technological changes and investment decisions. ► We estimated the market potential and characterized the energy consumption, and made a selection of technological alternatives for the use of natural gas.

  17. INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO EFFICIENT POLICY INTERVENTION IN THE EUROPEAN PORT SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry UBBELS

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing role of private involvement in recent port developments, most maritime trade is still largely handled in ports where investments, pricing and other managerial decisions are, to a varying extent, dependent, or at least influenced by public bodies. This paper shows that the extent and type of public intervention differs considerably between ports in the Hamburg-Le Havre range. The wide variety in ownership, financing and management of ports throughout Europe indicates that there is no level playing field at present. Because ports operate in an increasingly competitive environment (intensified by globalisation trends and the completion of the internal market, this may lead to situations of unfair competition. The European Union emphasises the importance of a more harmonised approach of port regulation by national governments (in terms of financing and pricing of infrastructure. Given the differences in (national port management styles and the low levels of transparency, the creation of a level playing field in the European port industry seems far away. This suggests the presence of a major institutional difference in European transport policy that hampers efficient policy intervention.

  18. The link between eddy-driven jet variability and weather regimes in the North Atlantic-European sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, E.; Li, C.; Grams, C. M.; Woollings, T.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the variability of the North Atlantic eddy-driven jet is key to unravelling the dynamics, predictability and climate change response of extratropical weather in the region. This study aims to 1) reconcile two perspectives on wintertime variability in the North Atlantic-European sector and 2) clarify their link to atmospheric blocking. Two common views of wintertime variability in the North Atlantic are the zonal-mean framework comprising three preferred locations of the eddy-driven jet (southern, central, northern), and the weather regime framework comprising four classical North Atlantic-European regimes (Atlantic ridge AR, zonal ZO, European/Scandinavian blocking BL, Greenland anticyclone GA). We use a k-means clustering algorithm to characterize the two-dimensional variability of the eddy-driven jet stream, defined by the lower tropospheric zonal wind in the ERA-Interim reanalysis. The first three clusters capture the central jet and northern jet, along with a new mixed jet configuration; a fourth cluster is needed to recover the southern jet. The mixed cluster represents a split or strongly tilted jet, neither of which is well described in the zonal-mean framework, and has a persistence of about one week, similar to the other clusters. Connections between the preferred jet locations and weather regimes are corroborated - southern to GA, central to ZO, and northern to AR. In addition, the new mixed cluster is found to be linked to European/Scandinavian blocking, whose relation to the eddy-driven jet was previously unclear. The results highlight the necessity of bridging from weather to climate scales for a deeper understanding of atmospheric circulation variability.

  19. Controlling greenhouse gas emissions in Spain: what are the costs for agricultural sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, M.; Childs, J.; Philippidis, G.; Feijoo, M.

    2012-11-01

    Employing a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the Spanish economy, this study explicitly aims to characterise the potential impact of Kyoto and European Union environmental policy targets on specific agricultural activities up to 2020. The model code is modified to characterise the emissions trading scheme (ETS), emissions quotas and carbon taxes, whilst emissions reductions are applied to all six registered greenhouse gases (GHGs). Compared to a business-as-usual baseline scenario, by 2020, GDP and employment fall 2.1% and 2.4%, respectively, whilst the retail price index rises 3.4%. In agriculture, the indices of output (4.3% fall), and supply price (7.7% rise) perform relatively worse, whilst there is a concomitant cumulative fall in aggregate farm incomes of1,510 million by 2020. The more notable impact in agriculture is attributed to its relatively higher emissions intensity. Consequently, we record an agricultural marginal abatement cost estimate of 86 ton -1 of CO{sub 2} equivalent by 2020, which is consistent with other estimates in the literature. In addition, we find that the optimal mix of emissions reductions across specific agricultural sectors is a function of the degree of substitutability of their emitting activities. In light of estimated income losses within the strategically important farm sector, a final simulation contemplates an agricultural cost-neutral emissions reduction policy akin to a cross compliance payment between 2013 and 2020. This is found to reduce food price rises, whilst altering the optimum mix of agricultural emissions reductions across specific agricultural activities. (Author) 52 refs.

  20. The Kashagan Field: A Test Case for Kazakhstan's Governance of Its Oil and Gas Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campaner, N.; Yenikeyeff, S.

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the factors behind Kazakhstan's decision to renegotiate the terms of the existing Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs) with International Oil Companies (IOCs), in the context of the development of the huge Kashagan oil field. The development of Kashagan, one of the largest and most recently discovered oil fields in Kazakhstan, is crucial for Kazakhstan's ambitions of becoming a global oil producer. Kazakhstan, which has the largest oil reserves in the Caspian Sea region, is the second largest regional producer after Russia in the former Soviet Union. The country's potential for oil exports is also strategically significant as a future source of non- OPEC supplies. Amongst the CIS states, Kazakhstan is considered one of the most open countries for foreign investments. International projects in the form of Joint Ventures, Production Sharing Agreements (PSAs) or exploration/field concessions have brought foreign investments into the country's natural resources sector, particularly in the oil and gas industry. However, new developments have recently taken place, which have marked a shift in the Kazakh government's approach towards foreign investment in its energy sector. This study will therefore examine the following issues: - Kazakhstan's plans to abandon the practice of attracting foreign investments in its energy sector through new PSAs. - The recent entry of state-controlled KazMunaiGaz into the consortium operating over the Kashagan field and its impact on IOCs. - The impact of high oil prices on the negotiating power of producer states in the context of Kazakhstan's new stance on PSAs. Specifically, this study will focus on the following key factors, which will seek to further explain the changes in Kazakhstan's attitude toward the Kashagan PSA2: - Operational factors - management of the project, development strategy, cost estimates, levels of production and export markets. - Consortium factors - the relative strength of the investment

  1. Greenhouse gas mitigation options in the forestry sector of The Gambia: Analysis based on COMAP model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jallow, B.P.

    1996-12-31

    Results of the 1993 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory of The Gambia showed net CO{sub 2} emissions of over (1.66 x 10{sup 6} tons) and 1% was due to uptake by plantations (0.01 x 10{sup 6} tons). This is a clear indication that there is need to identify changes in the land-use policy, law and tenure that discourages forest clearing at the same time significantly influencing the sustainable distribution of land among forestry, rangeland and livestock, and agriculture. About 11% of the total area of The Gambia is either fallow or barren flats that once supported vegetation and hence is still capable of supporting vegetation. The US Country Study Programme has provided the Government of The Gambia through the National Climate Committee funds to conduct Assessment of Mitigation Options to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The Forestry Sector is one area for which assessment is being conducted. The assessment is expected to end in September 1996. The Comprehensive Mitigation Analysis Process (COMAP) is one of the Models supplied to the National Climate Committee by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, on behalf of the US Country Study Programme, and is being used to conduct the analysis in The Gambia.

  2. Investigation of greenhouse gas reduction potential and change in technological selection in Indian power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bansal, Narendra Kumar; Wagner, H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Due to the growing energy needs along with increasing concerns towards control of greenhouse gas emissions, most developing countries are under pressure to find alternative methods for energy conversion and policies to make these technologies economically viable. One of the instruments that have been adopted by many industrial countries is that of the carbon tax. The rate of introducing carbon taxes however, depends upon the local economic conditions and market forces. The case of Indian power sector has been examined by using MARKAL model for introduction of carbon taxes at four different trajectories. Their implications on the power generation choices have been investigated for a time span of 25 years from the year 2000. In general large hydropower plants have emerged as the first choice followed by wind energy systems. However, cheaper availability of coal in India keeps scope of use of coal based technologies for which pressurised fluidised bed combustion technology has been found to be the balanced choice among fossil technologies. There exists a potential of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by about 25% as compared to the 'business-as-usual' case in presence of high carbon tax rates

  3. Economic analysis of the vertical structure of the European gas network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranes, E.; Mirabel, F.; Poudou, J-C.

    2003-01-01

    The report prepared for the European Commission on the initial results of the competitive natural gas market, which opened in August 2000, identified various technical and organizational problems. The report highlighted the preponderant place occupied by historical natural gas suppliers in the market place and the barriers they have constructed in their former exclusively held territories, with the obvious intention of limiting the entry of new suppliers into the market. The authors conclude that to avoid such competition-limiting behaviour, it will be necessary to limit the power of the existing supply firms. To lay the foundation for a series of recommendations the authors first examine the positions occupied by the various actors in the gas supply chain, followed by a review of the principal factors affecting the European natural gas market, paying special attention to existing regulations. Based on the literature on vertical integration of markets, the final section makes certain proposals concerning the separation of the gas production and distribution functions and the resulting behaviour of the various actors in terms of their respective positions along the natural gas supply chain. Recommendations are also made regarding possible future directions in market regulations. 25 refs., 1 tab. figs

  4. Gas and electricity prices in France and in the European Union in 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    This publication presents and comments tables and graphs of data related to natural gas prices for enterprises and for households and to their evolution between 2013 and 2014, to the electricity price for enterprises and for households and to their evolution between 2013 and 2014 in European countries (Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Croatia, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia, United Kingdom), in the euro Zone (19 countries), and in the European Union as a whole

  5. Vulnerability to terrorist attacks in European electricity decarbonisation scenarios: Comparing renewable electricity imports to gas imports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilliestam, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The decarbonised future European electricity system must remain secure: reliable electricity supply is a prerequisite for the functioning of modern society. Scenarios like Desertec, which partially rely on solar power imports from the Middle East and North Africa, may be attractive for decarbonisation, but raise concerns about terrorists interrupting supply by attacking the long, unprotected transmission lines in the Sahara. In this paper, I develop new methods and assess the European vulnerability to terrorist attacks in the Desertec scenario. I compare this to the vulnerability of today's system and a decarbonisation scenario in which Europe relies on gas imports for electricity generation. I show that the vulnerability of both gas and electricity imports is low, but electricity imports are more vulnerable than gas imports, due to their technical characteristics. Gas outages (and, potentially, resulting blackouts) are the very unlikely consequence even of very high-number attacks against the gas import system, whereas short blackouts are the potential consequence of a few attacks against the import electricity lines. As the impacts of all except extreme attacks are limited, terrorists cannot attack energy infrastructure and cause spectacular, fear-creating outages. Both gas and electricity import infrastructure are thus unattractive and unlikely terrorist targets. - Highlights: • A comparison of terrorism risks of importing solar power and gas for power generation. • Both scenarios show low vulnerability to terrorist attacks. • Within low vulnerabilities, gas imports are less vulnerable than electricity imports. • Causing spectacular, large and long outages is very difficult for attacker. • The attractiveness of gas and power import infrastructure as terrorist target is low

  6. Case study; Paper on the energy efficiency evolution in the European road freight transport sector

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardo Basosi; Franco Ruzzenenti

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of WP7 is that of analyzing the energy crisis within the global economic crisis and assess to what extent fuel prices can promote the transition towards a more sustainable and efficient energy regime. This paper addresses the European freight transport system, national and cross-boarder, and assesses the evolution of its efficiency and intensity during the period 1998-2011, when oil prices globally increased, up the hike of the 2008. It will also be investigated the rebound e...

  7. Mergers and acquisitions in the European electricity sector. Cases and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codognet, M.K.; Glachant, J.M.; Leveque, F.; Plagnet, M.A.

    2002-08-01

    This report surveys 96 mergers and acquisitions of electric power companies in the European Union from January 1998 to August 2002. Cases are described in part 1 and patterns in part 2. The companies in concern are: E.ON (Germany), Powergen (UK), RWE (Germany), National Power (UK), Innogy (UK), Electricite de France (EdF), Edison (Italy), EnBW (Germany), Electricidade de Portugal (EdP), Suez (France), Endesa (Spain), Enel (Italy), Vattenfall (Sweden), Bewag (Germany), Hafslund ASA (Norway), FORTUM (Finland), STATKRAFT (Norway), British Energy (UK), Scottish and Southern Energy (UK), National Grid Transco (UK), Centrica (UK), Sydvest Energi (Denmark), Essent (Netherlands) and Nuon (Netherlands). (J.S.)

  8. Decarbonizing the European electricity sector. Modeling and policy analysis for electricity and CO{sub 2} infrastructure networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Pao-Yu Charly Robin

    2016-03-03

    This dissertation uses three models to analyze different decarbonization strategies for combating global climate change: The cost minimizing mixed-integer model CCTS-Mod examines the economics of Carbon Capture, Transport, and Storage (CCTS) for the electricity and industry sector; the welfare maximizing quadratically constrained model ELMOD focuses on different trajectories for renewable energy sources (RES) and transmission grid expansions; and the equilibrium model ELCO combines the insights of the individual sectors to a combined CCTS and electricity investment and dispatch model. Modeling results show that an investment in CCTS is beneficial for the iron and steel sector once the CO{sub 2} certificate price exceeds 50 Euros/t CO{sub 2}. The threshold is 75 Euros/t CO{sub 2} for the cement industry and 100 Euros/t CO{sub 2} for the electricity sector. Additional revenues from using CO{sub 2} for enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) lead to an earlier adoption of CCTS in the North Sea region. The lack of economies of scale results in increasing CO{sub 2} storage costs of more than 30%, while transport costs even double. Research from the last years, however, indicates that CCTS is unlikely to play an important role in decarbonizing the electricity sector. The identified reasons for this are incumbents' resistance to structural change, wrong technology choices, over-optimistic cost estimates, a premature focus on energy projects instead of industry, and the underestimation of transport and storage issues. Keeping global temperature rise below 2 C therefore implies the phase-out of fossilfueled power plants and, in particular, of CO{sub 2}-intensive coal power plants. The low CO{sub 2} price established by the European Emissions Trading Scheme is insufficient to induce a fuel switch in the medium term. Therefore, supplementary national measures are necessary to reduce coal-based power generation; i.a. feed-in tariffs for RES, minimum CO{sub 2} prices, or

  9. Forecast for potential evaluation of natural gas consumption in the selected sectors; Estimativa de potencial economico de consumo de gas natural nos setores selecionados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This chapter estimates the economical potentials of the natural gas market in the mentioned project sectors. This estimation is based on the concept or story lines prior applied by the IPCC (2001) for the elaboration of the technical-economical scenery on the Global Climate Changes, and the procedure for the viability economic analysis of cogeneration systems.

  10. Performance Audit in Public Sector Entities - A New Challenge for Eastern European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana TIRON TUDOR

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Performance measurement provides an objective basis for evaluating how efficiently public resources are being used and how effectively public service outcomes are being achieved. It is a process used to support government selfanalysis and provide a basis for more informed and publicly defensible decision-making. In this context an important role is reserved to performance external audit performed by external audit institutions. The performance audit analyses the quality of financial administration from the point of view of the three elements of performance: economy, efficiency and effectiveness. We intend to realize a comparative study for some Eastern European countries regarding the performance audit, knowing the fact that since countries differ at the level of individual reforms, there is no single model of reform. Nonetheless, reform strategies have many points in common emphasizing the international character of public management reform. By cross-national comparisons we intend to analyze the impact of implementing the new performance audit in certain Eastern European Countries, and in Romania, focused on the external audit institutions.

  11. In-depth assessment of the situation of the textile and clothing sector in the EU and prospects : Task 7: synthesis report for the European textile and clothing sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.R. (Michiel)

    2012-01-01

    The in-depth assessment of the situation of the European textile and clothing sector is composed by six independent reports with a close focus on key aspects useful to understand the dynamics and the development of the textile and clothing industry, drivers of change – most notably the impact

  12. In-depth assessment of the situation of the textile and clothing sector in the EU and prospects : Task 1: survey on the situation of the European textile and clothing sector and prospects for its future development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.R. (Michiel)

    2011-01-01

    The in-depth assessment of the situation of the European textile and clothing sector is composed by six independent reports with a close focus on key aspects useful to understand the dynamics and the development of the textile and clothing industry, drivers of change – most notably the impact

  13. Self-exclusion as a harm minimization strategy: evidence for the casino sector from selected European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Tobias; Meyer, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    As the international gambling market continues to expand, determining effective approaches to prevent gambling-related problems becomes increasingly important. Despite a lack of in-depth research into its benefits, self-exclusion is one such measure already in use around the world in various sectors of the gambling industry. The present study is the first of its kind to examine the effectiveness of self-exclusion schemes in the casino sector in selected European countries. A written survey yielded a sample of N = 152 (self)-excluded gamblers. In addition to this cross-section analysis, a small sub-group (n = 31) was monitored over time by means of follow-up surveys carried out 1, 6, and 12 month(s) after the exclusion agreement came into force. The results reveal that the self-excluded individuals are typically under a great deal of strain and show a relatively pronounced willingness to change. However, this largely reaches its peak at the time the decision to self-exclude is made. From a longitudinal perspective, various parameters indicate a clear improvement in psychosocial functioning; a favorable effect that also starts directly after the exclusion agreement was signed. Finally, considering theoretical and empirical findings, possibilities for optimizing (self-)exclusion schemes will be discussed.

  14. Iran, a gas exporter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therme, C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the gas sector has not allowed, up to now, Iran to become one of the main gas actors, whether it is on the regional or international market. This under-development of the gas sector finds expression, each winter, through the Iranian incapability to satisfy its domestic demand as well as its exportation commitments to Turkey or Armenia. In this study, the author tries to examine the origins of Iranian difficulties to increase its gas production and to abide by its commitments to export gas to other countries. The possibility of gas exportation from Iran to the European Union is also discussed

  15. Producer responsibility, waste minimisation and the WEEE Directive: case studies in eco-design from the European lighting sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottberg, Annika; Morris, Joe; Pollard, Simon; Mark-Herbert, Cecilia; Cook, Matthew

    2006-04-15

    The EU Directive on Waste Electrical and Electrical Equipment (WEEE) (2002/96/EC), to be implemented in stages from August 2004, attempts to tackle the growing quantity WEEE by making producers responsible for the costs of the collection and recycling of their products at the end of usable life. This is considered to give producers a financial incentive to reduce waste at source through eco-design. This link is, however, under-researched and little is known generally about the effectiveness of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and policies to promote it. This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study to address these important gaps in knowledge. Literature review was used to develop an analytical framework to explain the relationships between the drivers for eco-design and the role of policies to promote EPR. This was applied to eight case studies of firms from the European lighting sector. While quantitative data to confirm the link between EPR and eco-design were difficult to obtain, the case studies showed that EPR has had little effect on product development so far. Within the sector studied, most producers have been able to pass on incremental costs associated with EPR to customers with negligible effects on sales. This reflects perceptions in the lighting sector that, because demand for products is relatively price inelastic and the regulation affects all producers equally, EPR is unlikely to drive eco-design at least in the short run. The cases also showed that choice between individual and centrally provided waste recovery schemes rested on perceptions of relative costs and practicability. It was evident that other drivers, such as bans on hazardous substances, product declarations and supply chain pressures, were often more effective promoters of eco-design. Thus it seems a mix of policy measures is required rather than reliance on economic instruments alone.

  16. Gas pricing in a liberalized European market; will the rent be taxed away?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austvik, O.G.

    1997-01-01

    The European gas market will become 'more liberal'. Depending on in which segments competition is intensified and public interference takes place, prices in the gas chain will be affected. Rent may be redistributed among firms and prices will become more volatile. If supply overshoots demand for a long period, average consumer prices may also be pushed down. Rent may also end up as tax revenues for public authorities. This article argues that an active use of gas taxes as an instrument to derive public revenues increases the probability of a politically led liberalization process. The effect of these economic and political forces and actions may, however, be less new gas to the market. (author)

  17. PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS OF SYSTEM MODERNIZATION OF THE ARCTIC NATURAL GAS EXPORT ON THE EUROPEAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Selin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A research purpose is the analysis of the European natural gas market environment and the modernization opportunities of the delivery system from Russia in connection with the current geo-economic changes. The main methods are the factorial approaches and the content analysis, which allows allocate and structure this sector’s driving forces.Export of the Russian natural gas on the European market still remains the dominating activity, in terms of the total amounts of deliveries, though over the last ten years its specific weight has been considerably reduced. The situation has sharply become aggravated both in connection with the "Ukrainian" crisis, and that of the European Union policy, which is taking the active measures for the gas supply system diversification. As a result of the conducted research it is proved that the Russian gas transportation system in the Arctic regions requires the strategic upgrade which shall go in two main directions.The first direction is the forming of the new pipeline schemes replacing the unreliable transit routes. The second direction is a rather innovative development of exploration and transportation of the liquefied natural gas which amount exceeds thirty percent in world export and in Russian has not yet reached ten percent.Scientific novelty of the received results consists in system approval of the opportunities of adaptation of Russian export deliveries to the market demand changes. The proposals of increase of the liquefied natural gas exploration in the Arctic regions and formation of the basic centers (special zones have also a practical importance.

  18. Company maturity models: Application to supplier development program in oil&gas sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabier Retegi Albisua

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to achieve excellence, outsourced maintenance contractors in Oil&Gas sector play a key role due to the important impact of their task on security, availability and energy consumption. This paper presents the process followed in order to implement a Supplier Development Program in a refinery using Company Maturity Model (CoMM and the results obtained in three cases validating the method to obtain a strategic improvement project medium term grid. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology followed consists of constructing a CoMM capturing the knowledge existing in the refinery and applying it with three supplier improvement teams. Findings and conclusions have arised through an observation of the three processes and extracting common conclusions. Findings: The resulting CoMM has been used for self-assessment by three suppliers and has demonstrated its potential to define a medium-term improvement project road map validated by the customer. Furthermore, during the design and application processes, the contribution of CoMMs to the SECI process of knowledge management has been observed. Practical implications: The use of CoMMs in a service contractor context can be applied in other sectors. It contributes to alignment of targets between the supplier and customer companies and to knowledge sharing inside both firms. Originality/value: Maturity models in many transversal fields (CMMI, EFQM, BPMM, PEMM, etc. have been thoroughly studied in the literature. Less effort has been made analysing the case of using maturity models constructed and implemented by a company for its specific purposes. In this paper, the process followed by a company to establish a Supplier Development Process using CoMMs is described.

  19. Unemployment, public-sector health-care spending and breast cancer mortality in the European Union: 1990-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Watkins, Johnathan A; Waqar, Mueez; Williams, Callum; Ali, Raghib; Atun, Rifat; Faiz, Omar; Zeltner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The global economic crisis has been associated with increased unemployment, reduced health-care spending and adverse health outcomes. Insights into the impact of economic variations on cancer mortality, however, remain limited. We used multivariate regression analysis to assess how changes in unemployment and public-sector expenditure on health care (PSEH) varied with female breast cancer mortality in the 27 European Union member states from 1990 to 2009. We then determined how the association with unemployment was modified by PSEH. Country-specific differences in infrastructure and demographic structure were controlled for, and 1-, 3-, 5- and 10-year lag analyses were conducted. Several robustness checks were also implemented. Unemployment was associated with an increase in breast cancer mortality [P unemployment rises (P unemployment and breast cancer mortality remained in all robustness checks. Rises in unemployment are associated with significant short- and long-term increases in breast cancer mortality, while increases in PSEH are associated with reductions in breast cancer mortality. Initiatives that bolster employment and maintain total health-care expenditure may help minimize increases in breast cancer mortality during economic crises. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  20. The Spanish gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The spanish gas industry has become one of the major actors in the gas sector of the European Economic Community. This paper pictures the spanish gas industry on the basis of a study by Sedigas, the spanish member of the International Gas Union (IGU). The main subjects described are structure of gas companies, natural gas supply, transport and storage, natural gas distribution networks, statistical data on natural gas consumption, manufactured gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) production-consumption in Spain. 7 figs., 10 tabs

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption and economic growth: A panel cointegration analysis from Canadian industrial sector perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamit-Haggar, Mahamat

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the long-run and the causal relationship between greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption and economic growth for Canadian industrial sectors over the period 1990–2007. The empirical findings suggest that in the long-run equilibrium, energy consumption has a positive and statistically significant impact on greenhouse gas emissions whereas a non-linear relationship is found between greenhouse gas emissions and economic growth, consistent with the environmental Kuznets curve. The short-run dynamics conveys that there is a unidirectional Granger causality running from energy consumption to greenhouse gas emissions; from economic growth to greenhouse gas emissions and a weak unidirectional causality running from greenhouse gas emissions to energy consumption; from economic growth to energy consumption. In the long-run however, there seems to be a weak one way causality flowing from energy consumption and economic growth to greenhouse gas emissions. - Highlights: ► A long-run and a causal relationship between greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption and economic growth is investigated. ► Energy consumption has a positive impact on greenhouse gas emissions in the long run. ► Unidirectional causality runs from energy consumption and economic growth to greenhouse gas emissions. ► A weak unidirectional causality runs from greenhouse gas emissions and economic growth to energy consumption.

  2. Near real-time geomagnetic data for space weather applications in the European sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, M. G.; Hansen, T. L.

    2012-12-01

    Tromsø Geophysical Observatory (TGO) is responsible for making and maintaining long time-series of geomagnetic measurements in Norway. TGO is currently operating 3 geomagnetic observatories and 11 variometer stations from southern Norway to Svalbard . Data from these 14 locations are acquired, processed and made available for the user community in near real-time. TGO is participating in several European Union (EU) and European Space Agency (ESA) space weather related projects where both near real-time data and derived products are provided. In addition the petroleum industry is benefiting from our real-time data services for directional drilling. Near real-time data from TGO is freely available for non-commercial purposes. TGO is exchanging data in near real-time with several institutions, enabling the presentation of near real-time geomagnetic data from more than 40 different locations in Fennoscandia and Greenland. The open exchange of non real-time geomagnetic data has been successfully going on for many years through services such as the world data center in Kyoto, SuperMAG, IMAGE and SPIDR. TGO's vision is to take this one step further and make the exchange of near real-time geomagnetic data equally available for the whole community. This presentation contains an overview of TGO, our activities and future aims. We will show how our near real-time data are presented. Our contribution to the space weather forecasting and nowcasting effort in the EU and ESA will be presented with emphasis on our real-time auroral activity index and brand new auroral activity monitor and electrojet tracker.

  3. Critic to the science and technology activities in the CTPETRO, Brazil, natural gas sector (National Plan of Science end Technology of the Petroleum and Natural Gas Sector); Critica as atividades de C and T na area de gas natural do CTPETRO (Plano Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Setor de Petroleo e Gas Natural)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Edmilson Moutinho dos; Faga, Murilo Tadeu Wenerck [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia. Grupo de Energia]. E-mails: edsantos@iee.usp.br; Poulallion, Paul; Correa Neto, Vicente [SINDE - Sinergia e Desenvolvimento S/C Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    This paper performs an evaluation of the science and technology activities for the natural gas area at the CTPETRO - National Plan of Science and Technology for the Petroleum and Natural Gas Sector. The paper discuss the insufficiency of the present technological efforts in Brazil, aiming the increasing of the natural gas participation in the brazilian energy matrix. The work shows the great distance among those efforts and the national policy for the natural gas. Last, the paper discusses the necessity of a review in the science and technology activities in the gas sector, and makes some considerations on the great potential in the gas industry for employment generation, for new business and the increasing in the national competitiveness.

  4. Security of supply and retail competition in the European gas market. Some model-based insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abada, Ibrahim; Massol, Olivier

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the impact of uncertain disruptions in gas supply upon gas retailer contracting behavior and consequent price and welfare implications in a gas market characterized by long-term gas contracts using a static Cournot model. In order to most realistically describe the economical situation, our representation divides the market into two stages: the upstream market that links, by means of long-term contracts, producers in exporting countries (Russia, Algeria, etc.) to local retailers who bring gas to the consuming countries to satisfy local demands in the downstream market. Disruption costs are modeled using short-run demand functions. First we mathematically develop a general model and write the associated KKT conditions, then we propose some case studies, under iso-elasticity assumptions, for the long-short-run inverse-demand curves in order to predict qualitatively and quantitatively the impacts of supply disruptions on Western European gas trade. In the second part, we study in detail the German gas market of the 1980's to explain the supply choices of the German retailer, and we derive interesting conclusions and insights concerning the amounts and prices of natural gas brought to the market. The last part of the paper is dedicated to a study of the Bulgarian gas market, which is greatly dependent on the Russian gas supplies and hence very sensitive to interruption risks. Some interesting conclusions are derived concerning the necessity to economically regulate the market, by means of gas amounts control, if the disruption probability is high enough. (authors)

  5. Conflict Approaches of Effective Project Manager in the Upstream Sector of Indonesian Oil & Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Cahyono

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Conflict can be functional or dysfunctional to the organization’s performance. This study focused on the relationship between conflict approaches implemented by the project manager based on project team member’s perception on the effectiveness of the project manager in managing project’s conflict. Questionnaires were modified from Barker et al. (1988 to measure conflict management approaches and outcomes of managing project conflict. Data were gathered from 57 respondents who worked in the Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC contractors serving the upstream sector of the Oil and Gas industry in Indonesia. By using Pearson correlation, result of this study indicated that project managers were perceived to be effective in managing project conflict when implementing cooperative and confi rmative approaches, but ineffective when combining competitive and avoidance approaches. Further research should investigate correlation between cultural dimensions with conflict approaches and outcomes of managing conflict. Keywords: Conflict approaches, effective project manager, EPC contractors, upstream sector of oil and gas industry /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  6. Regional ozone impacts of increased natural gas use in the Texas power sector and development in the Eagle Ford shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacsi, Adam P; Kimura, Yosuke; McGaughey, Gary; McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Allen, David T

    2015-03-17

    The combined emissions and air quality impacts of electricity generation in the Texas grid and natural gas production in the Eagle Ford shale were estimated at various natural gas price points for the power sector. The increased use of natural gas in the power sector, in place of coal-fired power generation, drove reductions in average daily maximum 8 h ozone concentration of 0.6-1.3 ppb in northeastern Texas for a high ozone episode used in air quality planning. The associated increase in Eagle Ford upstream oil and gas production nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions caused an estimated local increase, in south Texas, of 0.3-0.7 ppb in the same ozone metric. In addition, the potential ozone impacts of Eagle Ford emissions on nearby urban areas were estimated. On the basis of evidence from this work and a previous study on the Barnett shale, the combined ozone impact of increased natural gas development and use in the power sector is likely to vary regionally and must be analyzed on a case by case basis.

  7. The changing structure of the Russian oil and gas sector: the response of Western investors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavers, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the Russian oil and gas sector has changed dramatically in the last two years. The first step was the consolidation of the majority of Russia's upstream and downstream companies and associations into vertically integrated companies (VICs). The second step was the acquisition, initially through loans for shares schemes, of controlling interests in some of the larger VICs by major banks. This has resulted in the creation of extremely powerful industrial groupings and radically altered the strategy and management philosophy of the component production and refining associations. The VICs are gradually taking over the trading functions previously carried out by independent registered exporters and relationships are changing with the transportation monopoly, Transneft, which has itself devolved some of its powers to the Federal Energy Service. Gazprom is also changing and has recently been obliged to open its gas pipeline network to third party users. As the production sharing legislation slowly works its way through parliament, the industries' goals have undergone a subtle change; whereas, at inception, the primary objective was to create a legal and fiscal framework to encourage inward investment from western oil companies, latterly the main emphasis has been on encouraging domestic investment by improving the tax regime for selected components within the VICs. The growing strength of the VICs is steadily improving their prospects of raising direct equity and debt finance in the West. This, in turn, reduces the need and hence opportunities for major western operated new projects, except in fields with extreme technological and environmental challenges, where they may still be welcome. (Author)

  8. Long-term contracts vs. short-term trade of natural gas - a European perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhoff, Karsten; Hirschhausen, Christian von

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses the economics of long-term gas contracts under changing institutional conditions, mainly gas sector liberalisation. The paper is motivated by the increasingly tense debate in continental Europe, UK and the US on the security of long-term gas supply. We discuss the main issues regarding long-term contracts, i.e. the changing role of the flexibility clause, the effect of abandoning the destination clause, and the strategic behaviour of producers between long-term sales and spot-sales. The literature suggests consumers and producers benefit from risk hedging through long-term contracts. Furthermore long-term contracts may reduce exercise of market power. Our analysis adds an additional benefit if the long-run demand elasticity is significantly lower than the short-run elasticity, both strategic producers and consumers benefit from lower prices and larger market volume. Some policy implications of the findings are also discussed. (Author)

  9. Study on Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential in Residential, Commercial and Transportation Sectors of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. G.; Jeong, Y. J.

    2011-11-01

    The establishment of the sectoral model was made. The sectors cover residential, commercial and transportation sectors. The establishment of the model includes designing Reference Energy System, Development of the reference scenario, setting up various scenarios in which GHG reductions were taken into account by evaluating the reduction potential in the cost effective way

  10. The causes of the municipal solid waste and the greenhouse gas emissions from the waste sector in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungtaek; Kim, Jonghoon; Chong, Wai K O

    2016-10-01

    The United States generated approximately 730kg of waste per capita in 2013, which is the highest amount of waste among OECD countries. The waste has adverse effects to human health and the environment. One of the most serious adverse effects is greenhouse gas emissions, especially methane (CH4), which causes global warming. However, the United States' amount of waste generation is not decreasing, and the recycling rate is only 26%, which is lower than other OECD countries. In order to decrease waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying the causality of the waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions from waste sector should be made a priority. The research objective is to verify whether the Environmental Kuznets Curve relationship is supported for waste generation and GDP across the U.S. Moreover, it also confirmed that total waste generation and recycling of waste influences carbon dioxide emissions from the waste sector. Based on the results, critical insight and suggestions were offered to policymakers, which is the potential way to lower the solid waste and greenhouse gas emissions from the waste sector. This research used annually based U.S. data from 1990 to 2012, and these data were collected from various data sources. To verify the causal relationship, the Granger causality test was applied. The results showed that there is no causality between GDP and waste generation, but total waste and recycling generate significantly increasing and decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from the waste sector, respectively. This implies that waste generation will not decrease even if GDP increases. And, if waste generation decreases or the recycling rate increases, greenhouse gas emission will decrease. Based on these results, increasing the recycling rate is first suggested. The second suggestion is to break the causal relationship between MSW and greenhouse gas emission from the waste sector. The third is that the U.S. government should benchmark a

  11. EUROGAS long-term outlook on natural gas demand and supply up to 2020. The approach of the West European gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roze, J.

    1997-01-01

    Eurogas is the European Union of the Natural Gas Industry. Since 1994, it has been publishing a booklet presenting the main figures describing natural gas industry in Europe with a view to supporting its positions in the debates taking place with European and international institutions. This paper is presenting the results of the Eurogas outlook updated in 1996, it is based on input from the national members of Eurogas. (au)

  12. The development of the gas sector in Tanzania and Mozambique. The early stages of two asymmetric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auge, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    As huge gas deposits have been discovered in 2010 in Mozambique and in Tanzania, and as the oil barrel price has dramatically decreased since mid-2014, this report, based on interview with local economic, industrial and political actors, describes the very different situations faced by these two countries regarding the development of their gas sector. First, Mozambique possesses four times more gas than Tanzania. Secondly, they display very different relationships between political power and private investors. Therefore the Mozambican project grows at a much higher rate than the Tanzanian one. The author thus proposes presentations of the status and projects of gas exploitation in these both countries, by mentioning involved actors (notably large oil companies), economic and political relationships between them, assessments and perspectives in terms of gas production

  13. The Natural Gas Dilemma in New England's Electricity Sector: Experts' Perspectives on Long Term Climate Issues and Policy Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Steven

    This thesis is an interpretive analysis of experts' perspectives on the climate implications of New England's reliance on natural gas for electricity generation. Specifically, this research, conducted through interviews and literature review, examines experts' opinions on the desired role of natural gas within the regional electricity sector, alternative energy resources, and state and regional policy opportunities toward the achievement of New England's ambitious long-term greenhouse gas reduction goals. Experts expressed concern about the climate dilemma posed by a dependence on natural gas. However, interviews revealed that short-term reliability and cost considerations are paramount for many experts, and therefore a reliance on natural gas is the existing reality. To incentivize renewable generation technologies for the purposes of long-term climate stabilization, experts advocated for the expanded implementation of renewable portfolio standard, net metering, and feed-in tariff policies. More broadly, interviewees expressed the need for an array of complementary state and regional policies.

  14. CDM (Clean Development Mechanism) opportunities for the oil and gas sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Joana Chiavari [FEEM - Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Milan (Italy). Eni/Agip Group

    2004-07-01

    Due to the broad impact of legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions and the increasing public awareness concerning the environment, the oil industry has been currently incorporating climate change considerations in its corporate strategy. However, compliance in the carbon constrained economy does not merely represent a cost issue; it also represents an opportunity. Projects developed under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) in particular represent an incentive both for companies and governments to invest in emission reduction projects in developing countries and earn carbon credits, while promoting sustainable development. The oil industry is characterized by a high emission reduction potential and is able to deliver to the market an amount of credits which is by far higher than the amount that most projects developers are able to offer. However some critical issues, such as the current interpretation of the additionally concept, may represent a barrier for the full utilization of such mechanism, particularly regarding petroleum-sector projects, thus reducing the benefits the CDM can actually produce. Considering that a very large number of CDM projects may be needed for the implementation of a successful climate policy, the engagement of the oil industry on the Kyoto mechanisms is very important and auspicial. (author)

  15. Role of natural gas in meeting an electric sector emissions reduction strategy and effects on greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    With advances in natural gas extraction technologies, there is an increase in availability of domestic natural gas, and natural gas is gaining a larger share of use as a fuel in electricity production. At the power plant, natural gas is a cleaner burning fuel than coal, but unce...

  16. Dense Molecular Gas Around Protostars and in Galactic Nuclei European Workshop on Astronomical Molecules 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Baan, W A; Langevelde, H J

    2004-01-01

    The phenomena observed in young stellar objects (YSO), circumstellar regions and extra-galactic nuclei show some similarity in their morphology, dynamical and physical processes, though they may differ in scale and energy. The European Workshop on Astronomical Molecules 2004 gave astronomers a unique opportunity to discuss the links among the observational results and to generate common interpretations of the phenomena in stars and galaxies, using the available diagnostic tools such as masers and dense molecular gas. Their theoretical understanding involves physics, numerical simulations and chemistry. Including a dozen introductory reviews, topics of papers in this book also cover: maser and dense gas diagnostics and related phenomena, evolution of circumstellar regions around protostars, evolution of circumnuclear regions of active galaxies, diagnostics of the circumnuclear gas in stars and galactic nuclei. This book summarizes our present knowledge in these topics, highlights major problems to be addressed...

  17. Electricity and gas interconnections in France. A tool for the construction of an integrated European market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    The French Energy Regulator (CRE) is publishing its report on French electricity and gas interconnections. The report makes two main conclusions: French electricity and natural gas networks are well interconnected with their counterparts in neighbouring countries and the use of interconnections has been significantly improved over the last 10 years. In terms of electricity, France's average export capacity is 13.5 GW, i.e. more than 10% of its production capacity. France is very well integrated in the European gas market and is a transit country to Spain and Italy. It has boosted its interconnection capacity in gas by 40% in 10 years. Interconnections are vital to the internal energy market and help trade between Member States. They enable European consumers to benefit from cost-effective energy by diversifying sources of supply. Since it was created, the CRE has played a leading role in this area, by fostering the development of interconnections at the French borders and by making them more efficiently used. After major efforts, the question of creating new interconnections (which constitute complex and costly projects) is now being raised. In terms of gas, the Midcat Project (a new gas interconnection between France and Spain) provides a good illustration of this question. The project will cost almost 3 billion Euros, two billion of which is being funded by France, and the decision to launch it should not be taken lightly without robust cost-benefit analyses. These studies must, in particular, identify and quantify the benefits for each country concerned as well as for the European Union, and organise the project funding in relation to these benefits. As concerns the interconnection project in the Bay of Biscay between France and Spain, overcoming technical uncertainties is an essential prerequisite before commenting on the opportunities it offers in terms of the costs and benefits that it might generate. In compliance with the law, the CRE acts on behalf of

  18. Shell's Role in the Future European Gas Scene - Is a Major Market Restructuring Under Way?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segundo, Karen de

    1999-07-01

    The European gas market is being restructured by a combination of major global forces. Environmental considerations like the Kyoto Agreement favour the use of gas. But in the medium-term, supplies may be limited by low energy prices. The political drive for increased competition has manifested itself as the EU Gas Directive, which came into force in 1998. Shell believes that the European industry must progressively adapt to this restructuring. Flexible mechanisms like tradable emission permits should be used to generate investment capital for new gas supply projects. Moreover, both industry and regulators should take a positive and constructive approach towards increasing competition in the marketplace.

  19. World Energy Scenarios 2050: Impact of the Energy Governance Models to the Future of the European Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisel, E.

    2014-01-01

    World Energy Council has explored the impact of two extreme governance models of energy sector to the global economic and climate developments. Scenario 'Jazz' describes the world, where investments in the energy markets are made by the companies on the purely economic basis. Scenario 'Symphony' describes the world, where decisions about the energy investments are made by the governments. It appears that in case of Scenario 'Jazz' we would reach lower energy prices, but it would also bring along higher and wider consumption of energy, and much higher environmental impact. In case of Scenario 'Symphony' energy prices would be somewhat higher, but environmental and energy efficiency would deliver better results, and there will be more energy-poor people around the world. It can also be observed, that resulting energy mixes of these two scenarios are very different. When Scenario 'Jazz' would leave the share of fossil fuels nearly to the current levels, then Scenario 'Symphony' supports strongly development of Solar and Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Sequestration Technologies. The modelling was also made separately for different regions of the world, the results for Europe can be observed from the report as well. This provides a fruit for thought about the role of the governments in the implementation of the EU 2030 Energy and Climate Strategy. The presentation would describe shortly the methodology of the study, clarifies the assumptions of the scenarios and highlights the main outcomes of the study in for the world and for European energy sector. (author).

  20. A multi-sectoral decomposition analysis of city-level greenhouse gas emissions: Case study of Tianjin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jidong; Zhao, Tao; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Xianshuo; Lin, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how city-level greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have evolved, we performed a multi-sectoral decomposition analysis to disentangle the GHG emissions in Tianjin from 2001 to 2009. Five sectors were considered, including the agricultural, industrial, transportation, commercial and other sectors. An industrial sub-sector decomposition analysis was further performed in the six high-emission industrial branches. The results show that, for all five sectors in Tianjin, economic growth was the most important factor driving the increase in emissions, while energy efficiency improvements were primarily responsible for the decrease in emissions. In comparison, the influences from energy mix shift and emission coefficient changes were relatively marginal. The disaggregated decomposition in the industry further revealed that energy efficiency improvement has been widely achieved in the industrial branches, which was especially true for the Smelting and Pressing of Ferrous Metals and Chemical Raw Materials and Chemical Products sub-sectors. However, the energy efficiency declined in a few branches, e.g., Petroleum Processing and Coking Products. Moreover, the increased emissions related to industrial structure shift were primarily due to the expansion of Smelting and Pressing of Ferrous Metals; its share in the total industry output increased from 5.62% to 16.1% during the examined period. - Highlights: • We perform the LMDI analysis on the emissions in five sectors of Tianjin. • Economic growth was the most important factor for the emissions increase. • Energy efficiency improvements mainly contributed to the emission decrease. • Negative energy intensity effect was observed in most of the industrial sub-sectors. • Industrial structure change largely resulted in emission increase

  1. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  2. Prof's passion for the oil and gas sector spans four decades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2009-04-15

    This article described some of the inventions by a geological engineer and engineering professor at the University of Waterloo during his career in the oil and gas sector over the past 40 years. He began his career at the University of Alberta where his research was funded by the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority (AOSTRA). The veteran oilfield researcher is a proponent of deep geological disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and has applied for some related patents. While oily sand is not hazardous, it it not suitable for landfill disposal. An important contribution to technology by the inventor and teacher is deep-well disposal of wastes. His injection disposal technique which replaces surface disposal pits has been operating at a facility in the Duri heavy oil field in Indonesia for more than 6 years. This deep-well waste injection method disposes of tonnes of sand produced by cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS). However, it has not been widely adopted in western Canada due to relaxed restrictions regarding landfill disposal. Eighteen years ago, the researcher came up with the idea of deep geological conversion of biosolids into methane. Methane generation, driven by high temperatures and anaerobic bacteria, is completed a year or two after the biowaste is injected. About 40 to 50 per cent of the mass of the biosolids are left behind as elemental carbon. For every dry tonne of biosolids injected, 400 to 500 kg of carbon are sequestered. While deep well disposal is touted as being most useful in emerging nations that lack elaborate sewage treatment systems, the first pilot project of the technology took place in August 2008 in Los Angeles, California. The inventor was also involved in the startup of Edmonton-based Wavefront Energy and Environmental Services Inc. whose downhole enhanced oil recovery tool sends low-frequency pulses through the formation generating waves that dislodge more oil from the rock matrix. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  3. Asia least-cost greenhouse gas abatement strategy identification and assessment of mitigation options for the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sujata; Bhandari, Preety

    1998-01-01

    The focus of the presentation was on greenhouse gas mitigation options for the energy sector for India. Results from the Asia Least-cost Greenhouse gas Abatement Strategies (ALGAS) project were presented. The presentation comprised of a review of the sources of greenhouse gases, the optimisation model, ie the Markal model, used for determining the least-cost options, discussion of the results from the baseline and the abatement scenarios. The second half of the presentation focussed on a multi-criteria assessment of the abatement options using the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) model. The emissions of all greenhouse gases, for India, are estimated to be 986.3 Tg of carbon dioxide equivalent for 1990. The energy sector accounted for 58 percent of the total emissions and over 90 percent of the CO2 emissions. Net emissions form land use change and forestry were zero. (au)

  4. Tough sell : forgetting and forgiving are not on the financial service sector's oil and gas investment agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, A.

    1999-01-01

    A review of the recovery from the year-long low on the oil-price cycle was presented, with special emphasis on the growth potential within the petroleum sector. Although the mood was optimistic at this year's Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers' annual Oil and Gas Investment Symposium, scrutiny from analysts and investors was severe. In today's dynamic market investors are less loyal and companies can no longer ride out the lows. When companies fell short of high investor expectations, they were faced with plunging stocks when investors left. This forced firms to sell assets or to merge with other, more solvent companies. It was noted that the oil and gas industry is among the best of any industrial sector in quality and standardization of disclosure. The advantage of this is that a high degree of disclosure reduces uncertainty which could benefit stock prices. 2 figs

  5. The life cycle greenhouse gas implications of a UK gas supply transformation on a future low carbon electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Geoffrey P.; O'Grady, Áine

    2017-01-01

    Natural gas used for power generation will be increasingly sourced from more geographically diverse sites, and unconventional sources such as shale and biomethane, as natural gas reserves diminish. A consequential life cycle approach was employed to examine the implications of an evolving gas supply on the greenhouse gas (GHG) performance of a future United Kingdom (UK) electricity system. Three gas supply mixes were developed based on supply trends, from present day to the year 2050. The contribution of upstream gas emissions - such as extraction, processing/refining, - is not fully reported or covered by UK government legislation. However, upstream gas emissions were seen to be very influential on the future electricity systems analysed; with upstream gas emissions per MJ rising between 2.7 and 3.4 times those of the current supply. Increased biomethane in the gas supply led to a substantial reduction in direct fossil emissions, which was found to be critical in offsetting rising upstream emissions. Accordingly, the modelled high shale gas scenario, with the lowest biomethane adoption; resulted in the highest GHG emissions on a life cycle basis. The long-term dynamics of upstream processes are explored in this work to help guide future decarbonisation policies. - Highlights: • United Kingdom is set to undergo a large gas supply transformation. • Three potential gas mix scenarios were developed based on supply trends. • A consequential life cycle approach was taken to examine the evolving gas supply. • Upstream emissions were seen to rise substantially for all gas supply scenarios. • High shale gas mix resulted in greatest emissions due to low influx of biomethane.

  6. Determinants of Capital Integration among Strategic Alliance Members in the Retail Sector: Evidence from Central and Southeast European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Butigan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Survival of firms requires continuous search for new and a restructuring of the existing competitive advantages. These can come either from firms’ internal factors or from cooperation with the environment. Cooperation among firms commonly takes place through the formation of strategic alliances. However, such form of cooperation presents only one stage in the integration of business entities. In the long run, strategic alliances can cease to exist or transform into a higher form of association based on capital integration. The objective of this paper is to explore the determinants of capital integration among strategic alliance member firms in retail sectors of several Central and Southeast European countries. Overall, the obtained findings suggest that business entities engage in integration with the aim of reaching hidden knowledge and skills, accessing distribution and supply channels, and developing new products and services. Integration is also driven with the aim of risk diversification and possible better market positioning, achieving the economies of scale, and improving organization and marketing. The opportunistic behavior of partners and limited managerial control represent its strongest barriers.

  7. Development and trade competitiveness of the European wine sector: A gravity analysis of intra-EU flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Lombardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the intra-EU trade of the world׳s chief wine exporters, namely Italy, France and Spain. Using an augmented version of the gravity model we empirically assess which of the three countries have experienced growth in intra-EU market trade. Effects of transportation costs, as well as demand and supply gaps between origin and destination countries, on the size of bilateral trade flows were specifically taken into account. Estimation results highlight the differences between bulk and bottled wine, providing useful information for European producers and policy-makers involved on regulation of wine sector. As concern bulk wine, Italy and Spain show no element of growth in competitiveness, while France shows a statistically significant annual decrease. In contrast, estimates for bottled wine all show a growth tendency, albeit with a different magnitude of coefficients. Italy is the country with the highest trend, followed by Spain and France which instead has a decidedly modest growth in export values. However, analysis of pricing policies shows that France does not appear to target an increase in export volumes so much as an increase in average unit price, while Italy, and especially Spain, have a tendency to increase export volumes, also to the detriment of prices.

  8. Environmental Accounting and Reporting in Fossil Fuel Sector : A Study on Bangladesh Oil, Gas and Mineral Corporation (Petrobangla)

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Sudipta

    2006-01-01

    Petrobangla is the sole responsible organization to maintain the fossil fuel sector in Bangladesh. It is accountable to next generations for oil, gas and other natural resources. It is necessary to ensure optimum use of these resources. Development activities cannot be sustained if these resources are depleted through wasteful use. This study indicates that Petrobangla takes many initiatives to provide environment-friendly energy in the economy. Environmental Accounting and reporting is th...

  9. Shale gas in Poland, in the United Kingdom and in Denmark: towards a European model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Based on a research on the development of shale gas in Denmark, Poland and the UK, this report first describes and discusses the heterogeneous situations of these countries regarding energy and gases while outlining a more global European trend with an increasing dependence on foreign gas supply sources. It outlines that, while being still not well known, shale gas resources are differing from one country to the other. The exploration of shale gas in the three studied countries is presented. The next part of the report addresses other related issues like: adaptation of the legal, regulatory and taxing framework, social acceptance (importance of two key factors: involvement of local population and information transparency). The conclusion outlines the differences between the studied cases. Appendices propose: a table of data describing the energy and shale gas markets in the three studied countries, a map indicating concession locations in Poland, a map indicating areas of search for oil gases in the UK, a map indicating locations to Total's concessions in Denmark, and a diagram describing the British procedure aimed at determining whether an environmental impact study is necessary

  10. Current status of the debate about the European single market for gas and electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluge, W.

    1993-01-01

    The current status of the debate is characterised by heterogeneity, which can be perceived reading the body of opinions given by the EC Commission, the European Parliament, the EC Council of Ministers, or the national governments, and in the opinions of the European Parliament or the respective national parliaments, the scope of diverging attitudes ranging from anticipating obedience in single cases to anticipating refusal. There is a growing awareness of the distinctions between the gas and the power industry and their respective requirements, leading to increasing discussions about suitable policies. The EC Commission has put down some basic principles, but their proposal of establishing a scheme of Third Party Access on a voluntary basis is a wolf in sheep's clothing, because in case this voluntary scheme will not work, more stringent instruments are on the list. There is general confusion to be stated, which might indicate that the existing systems are not so bad after all. (orig.) [de

  11. Assessment of private sector anticipatory response to greenhouse gas market development : Final analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrister, D.; Marsh, D.; Varilek, M.

    2002-01-01

    Some active markets in greenhouse gases are beginning to emerge, which will lead to actual data concerning market performance becoming available and rendering the prediction of future prices for global greenhouse gas reductions more accurate. Market participants use studies as a starting point for the calibration of their understanding then seize opportunities in the external market and therefore refine their price expectations. In addition, they attempt to outperform their competitors. In this study, the authors reviewed the results of some of the most recent economic modeling results, synthesized pricing data, assessed the price and risk expectations of a broad range of corporate market players and examined their response strategies. The authors also took advantage of their expertise as market brokers to offer their views. The representatives of 35 companies operating in Canada, the United States, Japan, the European Union and Russia were interviewed for this study. Their price expectations were just over 5 dollars per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2005 before the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol, and raised to an average of 11 dollars per tonne of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2010. The major assumption was that the Kyoto Protocol would begin to take effect in 2002, and also that the United States would fail to ratify the Protocol. The respondents believed that some demand would force state and/or local programs to be implemented for a carbon reduction program. Poorly harmonized or delayed national policies, the potential costs of the Clean Development Mechanism projects and national pressure to take action at home are some of the concerns expressed which could prevent prices from becoming fully efficient. 41 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Evolution of the European gas market on the long term. Organisation and price

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouvry, V.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work is to shed light upon the future organization of the European gas market with an emphasis on price matters. There are nowadays few producers of gas on the market, most of whom hold long-term contracts with gas companies. Gas pricing is based on the net-back principle. The actual debate on liberalization of the gas market and the growing pressure from industrial customers to obtain lower prices addresses the problem of the future organisation of the market and the potential impact of the introduction of third party access. We first analyse the main actors of the gas market, their strategy and the actual market organization market. Two different logics are considered hereunder: a market approach: the competition theory provides efficient tools to analyse the evolution of competition depending on numerous factors. It appears that the strategy of all actors and particularly of producers will be the main determinant of the future competition. The oligopoly theory includes oligopolistic behaviours modelizations. The application of the Cournot's model leads to prices ranging from 1,6 to 3,7 $/MBtu; a contractual approach: today, gas is essentially exchanged through long term contracts, which allow for long-term management of investments and supply security. Two operators negotiate the price, which ultimately mirrors their respective leverage. The transaction cost theory clearly shows the necessity of including transaction costs, especially when optimizing the duration of the contract. The gas prices escalation is nowadays partially obsolete and unadapted to customer needs. Escalation on coal, electricity price or inflation should soon be considered. The theories of negotiation highlight the importance of the operators' marketing power during gas price fixation Applying Nash and Harsanyi-Selten's negotiation models results in a scale of 2,4 to 3,5 $/MBtu of the gas price at the actual supply and demand conditions. Both approaches lead to similar

  13. Sectoral shift in industrial natural gas demand: A comparison with other energy types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, G.; Fisher, R.; Hanson, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-01-01

    It has been recognized in a variety of studies that energy demand by industry has been effected not only by the changing energy intensity of the various sectors of industry, but also by the composition of industrial sector. A previous study group of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF-8) found that sectoral shift, i.e., the relative decline in the energy intensive sectors of industry, has contributed at least one third of the decline in aggregate manufacturing energy intensity since the early 1970s. The specific types of energy use may also be important, however. For example, the effect of shifts in production by electricity intensive sectors has been shown to be somewhat different than that for fossil fuel

  14. The European supply security of petroleum and natural gas in the coming years. Economical and geopolitical risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Linde, C.

    2001-01-01

    An overview is given of the geopolitical risks for oil and gas and (inter)national strategies to limit those risks. The risk assessment is motivated by the increasing dependency for European countries on imports of oil and gas from the Russian Federation, Caspian Sea region and the countries around the Persian Gulf in the next decades [nl

  15. Evaluating the influence of increasing block tariffs in residential gas sector using agent-based computational economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chengzhu; Yu, Shiwei; Zhu, Kejun; Hailu, Atakelty

    2016-01-01

    Designing a desirable increasing block tariff for the residential gas retail market has been a challenging task for regulated utilities, especially in China. To deal with such problems, in this paper, we establish an agent-based, computational economics system to provide a formal evaluation of the direct and indirect influences of several issued increasing block tariffs in the residential gas market. Moreover, a comprehensive demand response behaviour model has been improved in term of price elasticity, while still coping with income levels and complex social environment. We also compute and compare the outcomes of several increasing block tariffs with the initial flat tariff by running the system on a test-case using real-world data from a middle-scale gas retail market in Wuhan. The results indicate that there is an appropriate increasing block gas tariff scheme that has greater ability to improve social equity while still ensuring operator revenue and promoting gas conservation. In order to offset the limitations of the proposed increasing block tariffs, the regulator should adopt some complementary measures, such as applying appropriate policies targeting the intended consumers, and allowing large families to obtain extra allowance of volume. - Highlights: •Analyse the influence of increasing block tariffs in residential gas sector. •An agent-based computational economics system is utilised for policy analysis. •Increasing block tariff can generate revenue while still promote gas conservation. •The increasing subsidy for low income household can improve the social equity.

  16. Implications of the recent reductions in natural gas prices for emissions of CO2 from the US power sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; Salovaara, Jackson; McElroy, Michael B

    2012-03-06

    CO(2) emissions from the US power sector decreased by 8.76% in 2009 relative to 2008 contributing to a decrease over this period of 6.59% in overall US emissions of greenhouse gases. An econometric model, tuned to data reported for regional generation of US electricity, is used to diagnose factors responsible for the 2009 decrease. More than half of the reduction is attributed to a shift from generation of power using coal to gas driven by a recent decrease in gas prices in response to the increase in production from shale. An important result of the model is that, when the cost differential for generation using gas rather than coal falls below 2-3 cents/kWh, less efficient coal fired plants are displaced by more efficient natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) generation alternatives. Costs for generation using NGCC decreased by close to 4 cents/kWh in 2009 relative to 2008 ensuring that generation of electricity using gas was competitive with coal in 2009 in contrast to the situation in 2008 when gas prices were much higher. A modest price on carbon could contribute to additional switching from coal to gas with further savings in CO(2) emissions.

  17. Gas to Coal Competition in the U.S. Power Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    With the newfound availability of natural gas due to the shale gas revolution in the United States, cheap gas now threatens coal’s longstanding position as the least costly fuel for generating electricity. But other factors besides cost come into play when deciding to switch from coal to gas. Electricity and gas transmission grid constraints, regulatory and contractual issues, as well as other factors determine the relative share of coal and gas in power generation. This paper analyzes competition between coal and gas for generating power in the United States and the factors explaining this dynamic. It also projects coal-to-gas switching in power generation for 18 states representing 75% of the surplus gas potential in the United States up to 2017, taking into consideration the impact of environmental legislation on retirement of coal-fired power plants.

  18. Iran in the European gas market: a Russian point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomberg, I.

    2009-01-01

    Behind Iranian diplomacy lies the continuing hope for an easing of tensions between America and Iran, with its consequences, which have not yet been worked out satisfactorily, both for Russian interests in the sphere of energy and from the point of view of preserving the fully-formed configuration of Eurasia's gas market. After this introduction of the political context, the document discusses the energy constituent of the 'Iranian question', the difficult choice between pipelines and LNG, the expansion of contacts of European companies with Iran, the issue of Nabucco pipeline that could be a bone of contention in the anti-Iranian coalition and the fact that Azerbaijan alone cannot save Nabucco, the complex situation in Central Asia (with the gas troika - Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan), the increased war risks of gas transportation, the necessary participation of Iran in the Nabucco project, the appealing prospects for Gazprom in the area, the possible market sharing with the supply of gas from Iran towards the East (China, Pakistan and India)

  19. Modelling the role of transmission companies in the downstream European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boots, M.A.; Rijkers, F.A.M.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the empirical model GASTALE and shows several analyses of the European gas market using this model. These analyses are mainly focused on the role of the downstream transmission companies. Producers of natural gas are assumed to form an oligopoly throughout the paper. Considering an oligopolistic transmission structure our model results show that the level of transmitters' profits strongly depends on the possibilities of discrimination on the border prices. If price discrimination by producers is allowed, these producers collect the main part of the margins on end-use prices. Without price discrimination the transmission companies collect most of the margins. Assuming an oligopolistic downstream structure, end-use prices converge to prices corresponding to perfect competition when the number of transmitters increases. Given the oligopolistic structure of the upstream industry, it is of importance to prevent (or abolish) monopolistic structures in the downstream gas market. In the case where oligopolistic competition between downstream gas companies cannot be prevented, vertical integration should be supported (or at least not be discouraged). 14 refs

  20. Estimation of Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions considering Aging and Climate Change in Residential Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Park, C.; Park, J. H.; Jung, T. Y.; Lee, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of climate change, particularly that of rising temperatures, are being observed across the globe and are expected to further increase. To counter this phenomenon, numerous nations are focusing on the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Because energy demand management is considered as a key factor in emissions reduction, it is necessary to estimate energy consumption and GHG emissions in relation to climate change. Further, because South Korea is the world's fastest nation to become aged, demographics have also become instrumental in the accurate estimation of energy demands and emissions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to estimate energy consumption and GHG emissions in the residential sectors of South Korea with regard to climate change and aging to build more accurate strategies for energy demand management and emissions reduction goals. This study, which was stablished with 2010 and 2050 as the base and target years, respectively, was divided into a two-step process. The first step evaluated the effects of aging and climate change on energy demand, and the second estimated future energy use and GHG emissions through projected scenarios. First, aging characteristics and climate change factors were analyzed by using the logarithmic mean divisia index (LMDI) decomposition analysis and the application of historical data. In the analysis of changes in energy use, the effects of activity, structure, and intensity were considered; the degrees of contribution were derived from each effect in addition to their relations to energy demand. Second, two types of scenarios were stablished based on this analysis. The aging scenarios are business as usual and future characteristics scenarios, and were used in combination with Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and 8.5. Finally, energy consumption and GHG emissions were estimated by using a combination of scenarios. The results of these scenarios show an increase in energy consumption

  1. GASTALE. An oligopolistic model of production and trade in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boots, M.G.; Rijkers, F.A.M.; Hobbs, B.F.

    2003-08-01

    The empirical model GASTALE is described and used to analyse the European natural gas market. These analyses focus primarily on the role of the downstream trading companies and their interaction with gas producers. By default, producers of natural gas are assumed to form an oligopoly in the paper. Meanwhile, downstream within-country traders of gas are represented in different versions of the model as local oligopolists or perfect competitors. The model therefore has a two-level structure, in which producers engage in competition a la Cournot, and each producer is a Stackelberg leader with respect to traders, who may be Cournot oligopolists or perfect competitors. The case of Cournot traders results in a new form of energy model, that of successive oligopoly. The model is formulated as a complementarity problem, and is solved by nonlinear programming. Considering this oligopolistic market structure, several tentative conclusions emerge. First, our model results show that successive oligopoly (so-called 'double marginalisation') yields significantly higher prices and lower consumer welfare than if oligopoly exists only on one level. Second, oligopoly in the trading market (because of the high concentration of traders) results in more distortion than oligopoly in production. Third, the level of traders' profits depends on the possibilities of discrimination on the border prices. If price discrimination by producers is allowed, these producers collect a greater share of the margins on end-use prices. Fourth, when the number of traders increases and assuming an oligopolistic downstream structure, end-use prices converge to prices corresponding with perfect competition. Thus, it is important to prevent (or abolish) monopolistic structures in the downstream gas market. In the case where oligopolistic competition among downstream gas companies cannot be prevented, vertical integration should be supported (or at least not be discouraged), especially if it would result in a

  2. Sectoral roles in greenhouse gas emissions and policy implications for energy utilization and carbon emissions trading: a case study of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jianping; Lei, Yalin; Xu, Qun; Wang, Xibo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a decomposition and emissions matrix is developed to identify the roles (giver or taker) played by the sectors in the greenhouse gas emissions for the economy of Beijing in China. Our results indicate that services were the most important emitter if we consider the total (direct and indirect) emissions. In addition to Construction, Scientific studies and technical services and Finance sectors of services were the largest takers. They have a large role in boosting greenhouse gas emissions throughout the economy of Beijing. As the basis and supporter of production activities, the electricity production and the transportation sectors were the greatest givers. More emphasis should be placed on using clean energy and carbon capture and storage technologies to reduce emissions within these sectors. Based on the roles played by these sectors in greenhouse gas emissions, some policy implications were proposed for energy utilization and carbon emissions trading.

  3. Energy efficiency, carbon emissions, and measures towards their improvement in the food and beverage sector for six European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Steven; Schmitt, Bastian; Chester-Jones, Mae; Sturm, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Basic and detailed audits of small and medium sized food and beverage enterprises were conducted in six European Union countries to determine product specific energy consumption and measures to reduce energy use and carbon emissions. Collected results showed that the companies’ products had similar specific energy consumption as prior studies, but due to no standard metrics, the range was rather large. Auditors primarily recommended energy savings measures (process optimization and heat recovery), due to their low payback periods. Lower carbon energy sources were also recommended (solar thermal and combined heat/power), but often at higher costs, supported through government incentive programs. Through these measures, energy savings of up to 45% and carbon to 30% (∼30,000 t CO_2 equivalent in the audited companies) were possible, dependent on the type, size of company, and fuel choice. Typically, very small companies and those using coal showed the greatest margin for improvement, though it varied greatly depending on the type of product produced and the installed heating and cooling equipment. Auditors noted significant barriers toward the implementation of measures, e.g. companies found the costs too high, did not know of efficient technologies and their performance, or did not have managerial support to implement efficiency measures. - Highlights: • The Food and Beverage sector in Europe was assessed for carbon reduction potential. • Significant emission reductions can be achieved by energy efficiency and renewables. • The Bakery and Meat branches can reduce energy consumption by 30–40%. • Small and coal burning companies have the greatest potential for emission reduction. • Financial barriers remain the hardest obstacle to realize reduction potential.

  4. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  5. European Union; Publication of Financial Sector Assessment Program Documentation—Technical Note on Progress with Bank Restructuring and Resolution in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This article is an analysis on the restructuring banking system of the European Union. The global financial crisis created the need to restructure by immensely reflecting weaknesses in the public, households, corporate, and other financial sectors. The restructuring includes the strengthening of bank resolution tools, the activation of nonperforming loans, the maintenance of macrofinancial framework, recovery of market access, and so on. The Executive Board recommends this transition of the E...

  6. Health and wellness trends in the oil and gas sector : insights from the Shepell-fgi Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This report discussed health and wellness trends in the oil and gas sector in relation to employee assistance program (EAP) data. The data were derived from oil and gas client organizations across Canada for 2008, and represented a population base of 14,685 employees. The data demonstrated that EAP utilization in the petroleum industry increased by approximately 5 per cent from 2006 to 2008. The sector's utilization was 34 per cent higher than the Canadian norm in 2006, and 40 per cent higher than in 2007 and 2008. Females used the EAP to a greater extent than males. A higher proportion of the spouses of workers accessed EAP than the national norm. Employees accessed EAP for assistance with work-life issues; family support services; and substance abuse interventions. Weight management and dietary consultations in relation to disease control were also of concern within the sector. A 66 per cent increase in childcare issues was noted, as well as a 148 per cent increase in eldercare issues, and a 112 per cent increase in addiction issues. The findings indicated that the EAP is being effectively communicated as a relevant and accessible tool. As the industry continues to develop in remote regions, new services and resources will be required to retain existing workforces and attract new employees. Prevention-focused training and services and program for at-risk groups are needed to ensure that employee health and productivity is maintained. 1 tab., 4 figs.

  7. Modelling of energy / technology actions and measures for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the industrial sector (the industry challenge)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyboer, J.; Bailie, A.J.; Sadownik, B.

    2001-01-01

    The potential in Canadian industry for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is assessed in this report. The analysis is aimed at providing a comprehensive and integrated evaluation of a wide spectrum of technology and energy actions available to the industrial sector in Canada, providing estimates of greenhouse gas emissions reductions, costs and cost effectiveness for different actions by 2010, and simulating industry response to defined measures approved by representatives of the industry sector sub-table. The impacts of a set of measures was determined using in-house models. Four measures were tested against several actions including primary fossil and electricity consumption, using regionally specific energy prices, a discount rate approximating 40 per cent and growth rates derived from the Analysis and Modelling Group. Enhancement of voluntary initiatives, enhanced cogeneration, financial incentives for capital investment to improve efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction, and a set of cost-of-carbon-dioxide simulations were the measures tested. Total energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions by sector and in aggregate are provided as well as the costs. An indication of the total cost of reduction per tonne, some sense of the cost of the permit and the quantity of a subsidy required to induce decision-makers to purchase the more efficient technology are also provided. 9 refs., tabs

  8. Fundamentals for the structuralization of fuel gas commercialization sector in Bahia State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes Filho, F.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of the Gas National Politics made possible for the Energy Companies to initiate the commercialization of canalized combustible gas. In this context, besides all the technical economic aspects that refer to the gas distribution, it is very important to emphasize the politic-institutional aspect related to the introduction of a gas company in the scene of the state energy management. As a result, remainder obstacles for the consolidation of the combustible gas area in the national plan are described in the following work. (author)

  9. Natural gas position in the energy sector of the 21. century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, Th.

    2000-01-01

    Natural gas with its abundant reserves, largely distributed all around the world, and with its low environmental impacts, should assert its position since the beginning of the 21. century. However, the fundamentals of our world are changing more and more rapidly and some short term events can modify this long term optimistic vision of natural gas development. This was the topic debated during a round table of the WOC 9 working committee of the CMG 2000 worldwide gas congress: the long term future of natural gas industry, the population need for a sustainable development, the potentialities of gas resources, the need for large scale interconnected energy networks, the new technologies favourable to the development of natural gas uses, the progressive 'decarbonization' of energy sources, the global warming and the role of R and D, the risks that could threat natural gas development. (J.S.)

  10. The energy sector abroad. Part 17. Italy. ENI dominates the Italian natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    For more than 25 years the Netherlands and Russia have supplied Italy with natural gas. Consequently, Italy was the first importer that did not receive natural gas from a neighbouring country, but from sources located more than a thousand kilometers away. These gas import pipelines, among other things, made it possible for Italy to grow into one of the largest gas countries in Europe. Today, natural gas accounts for well over a quarter of primary energy consumption and it is expected to reach a 37% peak by the year 2010. Since the 1950s, almost the entire oil and gas industry is owned by the state-owned holding company ENI ('Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi'). Although privatisation has gained momentum, it seems as if this holding will continue to dominate the gas market in the short term, because, in addition to large-scale import, ENI also controls the logistical elements, transmission and storage

  11. New IR-UV gas sensor to energy and transport sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    In situ simultaneous measurements of gas temperature and gas composition are of great interest in combustion research and give useful information about conditions, chemical reactions and gas mixing in many industrial processes. An optically based technique is beneficial because it is non......-intrusive, accurate, fast and can be performed in situ for various extremely hard conditions. In humid and hot gas flows UV technique is more sensitive than FTIR one for fast gas concentration measurements of NO and SO2 and gives a great opportunity for simultaneous measurements of O2 concentration. Analysis...... of the fine structure of the UV absorption bands of, for example, NO, SO2 or O2 allows also to determine a value of the gas temperature. Absorption cross sections of CO2, H2O and SO2 measured using Risø DTU’s hot gas cell facility at elevated temperatures up to 1500°C are reported. Design of a new developed 9...

  12. How important are national companies for oil and gas sector performance? Lessons from the Bolivia and Brazil case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz Antolín, María José; Ramírez Cendrero, Juan Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Control of natural resources, especially oil and gas, has been a major issue in the consideration of underdevelopment. In the present commodity boom, some Latin American economies are reforming their resource exploitation regimes, especially those issues linked with foreign capital share. The purpose of this report is to analyze these changes in the Bolivian and Brazilian oil and gas sectors in order to answer such questions as: Which property system combining public and private capital is the most suitable? Which regulating framework can guarantee a sustainable increase in output and investment? Our analyses lead to the conclusion that the regulatory framework can establish a particular ownership structure that is considered favorable for improving the performance of oil and gas sector, but the internal dynamics and the historical trajectories of enterprises will also be determining factors that interact with the given regulatory framework, generating mixed results. - highlights: • We analyze the influence of the regulatory framework in the growth of production. • We analyze the influence of the regulatory framework in investment dynamics. • We compare the regulatory frameworks for Brazil and Bolivia. • We compare the importance of public and private companies in hydrocarbons in Brazil and Bolivia

  13. Data as an asset: What the oil and gas sector can learn from other industries about “Big Data”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrons, Robert K.; Jensen, Jesse W.

    2015-01-01

    The upstream oil and gas industry has been contending with massive data sets and monolithic files for many years, but “Big Data” is a relatively new concept that has the potential to significantly re-shape the industry. Despite the impressive amount of value that is being realized by Big Data technologies in other parts of the marketplace, however, much of the data collected within the oil and gas sector tends to be discarded, ignored, or analyzed in a very cursory way. This viewpoint examines existing data management practices in the upstream oil and gas industry, and compares them to practices and philosophies that have emerged in organizations that are leading the way in Big Data. The comparison shows that, in companies that are widely considered to be leaders in Big Data analytics, data is regarded as a valuable asset—but this is usually not true within the oil and gas industry insofar as data is frequently regarded there as descriptive information about a physical asset rather than something that is valuable in and of itself. The paper then discusses how the industry could potentially extract more value from data, and concludes with a series of policy-related questions to this end. -- Highlights: •Upstream oil and gas industry frequently discards or ignores the data it collects •The sector tends to view data as descriptive information about the state of assets •Leaders in Big Data, by stark contrast, regard data as an asset in and of itself •Industry should use Big Data tools to extract more value from digital information

  14. Future European gas supply in the resource triangle of the Former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Northern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remme, Uwe; Blesl, Markus; Fahl, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    A steady increase of natural gas demand can be observed in Europe over the last decades. Due to the European obligation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the framework of the Kyoto Protocol, the trend toward natural gas is expected to continue in the future. The increased consumption is faced by comparably low indigenous gas resources within Europe, so that the dependency of Europe on gas imports from abroad will rise in the future. In addition to the existing supply sources Russia and Algeria, gas resources from the Middle East and the Caspian and the Central Asian regions may be supply options to cover Europe's gas demand in the future. Against this background, possible natural gas supply options as well as the transport infrastructure to and within Europe are discussed regarding their technical capacity and their costs. With the help of a cost-minimization model of the European gas supply system, the gas flows and the infrastructure capacity development up to the year 2030 are analyzed. In a sensitivity analysis, the impacts of demand variations on the choice of supply sources are studied. (author)

  15. European Gas in the Next Century. Fundamental Changes or Business as Usual?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norvik, Harald [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    The oil price development is surprising. As soon as a consensus has been formed, it moves in some direction opposite of what was expected. Producers should be prepared to meet a future with declining rather than increasing prices in real terms. In this presentation, the President and Chief Executive Officer of Statoil focuses on some aspects he believes to be important for the evolution of current and future natural gas trade: Demand, supply and prices, Innovation, Geopolitical environment. The European gas industry is moving into the next century after a remarkable development with extensive infrastructure and solid trade patterns established. The future will bring new challenges. The market will be more transparent and more competitive. Cost efficiency and capacity utilization of existing infrastructure will be key factors in order to exploit production at competitive costs. Big reserves are available, although at more remote locations which call for strong commercial players and strong relations between the producers and the distributors if new big supply projects shall be lifted. Norway has gained a competitive position, but new measures will be needed in order to ensure a competitive position for the commercial companies also in the future. The shape of the gas business has developed continuously and market changes will keep it doing so. Therefore, Business as usual will never be a winning strategy in a world of change.

  16. European Gas in the Next Century. Fundamental Changes or Business as Usual?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norvik, Harald

    1999-01-01

    The oil price development is surprising. As soon as a consensus has been formed, it moves in some direction opposite of what was expected. Producers should be prepared to meet a future with declining rather than increasing prices in real terms. In this presentation, the President and Chief Executive Officer of Statoil focuses on some aspects he believes to be important for the evolution of current and future natural gas trade: Demand, supply and prices, Innovation, Geopolitical environment. The European gas industry is moving into the next century after a remarkable development with extensive infrastructure and solid trade patterns established. The future will bring new challenges. The market will be more transparent and more competitive. Cost efficiency and capacity utilization of existing infrastructure will be key factors in order to exploit production at competitive costs. Big reserves are available, although at more remote locations which call for strong commercial players and strong relations between the producers and the distributors if new big supply projects shall be lifted. Norway has gained a competitive position, but new measures will be needed in order to ensure a competitive position for the commercial companies also in the future. The shape of the gas business has developed continuously and market changes will keep it doing so. Therefore, Business as usual will never be a winning strategy in a world of change

  17. Sector of the natural gas in Colombia: Toward a bigger backing and dependability of the service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    A sketch of the infrastructure requirements and laws is made of the natural gas industry in Colombia, according to the plan of massive use of the gas, settled down by the government in 1991 and the maturity of the market, that which forces to the development of a backing infrastructure to assure the highest levels of quality and continuity of the service of the natural gas for the users

  18. Pluri annual indicative plan of the investments in the gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    This indicative plan constitutes the first report to the Parliament. It is a prospective document for the period 2006-2015 containing: a forecast of the gas demand increase, a description of main investments decided in matter of gas infrastructures, a diagnostic concerning the adequation between the supplying capacities in natural gas and the national needs, a series of recommendations on the State tools to guarantee the national supplying security and on the investment. The four parts deal with the stakes and perspectives of the national natural gas supplying, the demand evolution, the offer evolution and the equilibrium offer. (A.L.B.)

  19. Climate change, future Arctic Sea ice, and the competitiveness of European Arctic offshore oil and gas production on world markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Sebastian; Riemann-Campe, Kathrin; Hoog, Sven; Growitsch, Christian; Schwind, Hannah; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Rehdanz, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    A significant share of the world's undiscovered oil and natural gas resources are assumed to lie under the seabed of the Arctic Ocean. Up until now, the exploitation of the resources especially under the European Arctic has largely been prevented by the challenges posed by sea ice coverage, harsh weather conditions, darkness, remoteness of the fields, and lack of infrastructure. Gradual warming has, however, improved the accessibility of the Arctic Ocean. We show for the most resource-abundant European Arctic Seas whether and how a climate induced reduction in sea ice might impact future accessibility of offshore natural gas and crude oil resources. Based on this analysis we show for a number of illustrative but representative locations which technology options exist based on a cost-minimization assessment. We find that under current hydrocarbon prices, oil and gas from the European offshore Arctic is not competitive on world markets.

  20. Accelerated Reduction in \\(SO_2\\) Emissions from the U.S. Power Sector Triggered by Changing Prices of Natural Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Gang; McElroy, Michael Brendon; Lu, Xi; Nielsen, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of sulfur dioxide (\\(SO_2\\)) from the U.S. power sector decreased by 24% in 2009 relative to 2008. The Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) approach was applied to isolate the factors responsible for this decrease. It is concluded that 15% of the decrease can be attributed to the drop in demand for electricity triggered by the economic recession, and 28% can be attributed to switching of fuel from coal to gas responding to the decrease in prices for the latter. The largest factor i...