WorldWideScience

Sample records for european electricity sector

  1. European Competition Law in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, P.

    2001-09-01

    The first part gives an overview on the implementation of the Electricity Directive 96/92 in the member states of the European Union and on the still missing preconditions for a single market in the electricity sector. The second part deals with the main elements of the European merger control (market definition, market domination), the decisions in the electricity sector and analyses the impact of the Electricity Directive 96/92 EG on future merger decisions in this sector. The third part examines the role of the articles 81 and 82 EGV to secure competition in the electricity market. (author)

  2. Preparation for the competitive European electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mombauer, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Energy - alongside knowledge, creativity and capital - is one of the fundamental necessities of humankind. Modern life is indeed dependent on energy, especially electricity and natural gas, the grid-connected energies, for its power, heating, cooling and traffic. To ensure security in the supply of energy, world energy hunger must be taken into account. Competition for primary energy resources will increase and the processes for their transformation from raw materials into consumable energy will have to be made more efficient, environmentally friendly and sustainable. Research into new sources of energy has to continue. After the respectable results of the industrial sector to decouple growth and energy consumption in future the transport and building sectors will have to intensify their efforts to reduce energy use intensity

  3. The single European energy market: the electricity supply sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The completion of the Internal Market in the Community by the end of 1992 has become a key objective and the focal point of the revival of the European Community. Within this overall objective, the development of the Single European Energy Market, the Internal Energy market, is a major element. The energy objectives for the Community, adopted in 1986 by the Council of Ministers and relating to targets in the energy sector to be achieved by 1995, contain what are effectively the aims of the Internal Energy Market. This is in a reference to the need for greater integration, free from barriers to trade, of the Internal Energy Market with a view to improving security of supply, reducing costs and improving economic competitiveness. In the light of these aims, the Commission drew up, in 1988, an inventory of potential obstacles to the achievement of the Internal Energy Market. This was accepted by the Council, together with a list of suggested priority areas of work, and has formed the basis of the Commission's efforts to move forward as quickly as possible in the development of the Internal Energy Market, in all branches of the energy sector. The impact on the electricity sector, in particular, is considered here. (author)

  4. Impact of carbon constraint on the European electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankeviciute, Loreta

    2010-01-01

    Two sets of factors will be decisive for the future evolution of European electricity sector: on the one hand, the necessity of new wave of investments for the renewal and the expansion of production capacities and, on the other hand, the emergency and the reinforcement of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) constraints imposed by European policies and directives. The general idea of thesis is that European Emissions Trading system (ETS) is the instrument that can facilitate the decarbonization of European electricity system. However, the necessary conditions ought to be brought together in the context of liberalisation in terms of risk management, market architecture and setting up of the complementary public policy instruments, in order for the carbon price signal to be effective. The purpose of the thesis is to provide details on these conditions and to examine the potentials scenarios for the evolution of European electricity production mix under the carbon constraint. The introduction of liberalisation in the electricity industry conditions significantly the investment choice. The analysis of theoretical market model allows demonstrating organisational inadequacy for developing an optimal technological mix and for adapting to long-term issues due to the extreme difficulty of interpreting the price signals. Indeed, the logic of a market and a concurrence disadvantages the investments in capital-intensive technologies, even though some of them less polluting like renewable energies, nuclear, hydraulic and thermal technologies integrating carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). In face of numerous uncertainties, the role of long-term risk management becomes therefore crucial. The employment of transaction cost theory allows studying the combinations of vertical arrangements that remain necessary in order to manage the risk and to facilitate the investments (e.g. vertical integration). The introduction of ETS overlaps with the market risks inherent to liberalisation

  5. Evaluation of Economic Merger Control Techniques Applied to the European Electricity Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandezande, Leen; Meeus, Leonardo; Delvaux, Bram; Van Calster, Geert; Belmans, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    With European electricity markets not yet functioning on a competitive basis and consolidation increasing, the European Commission has said it intends to more intensively apply competition law in the electricity sector. Yet economic techniques and theories used in EC merger control fail to take sufficiently into account some specific features of electricity markets. The authors offer suggestions to enhance their reliability and applicability in the electricity sector. (author)

  6. Decarbonizing the European electricity sector. Modeling and policy analysis for electricity and CO_2 infrastructure networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, Pao-Yu Charly Robin

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation uses three models to analyze different decarbonization strategies for combating global climate change: The cost minimizing mixed-integer model CCTS-Mod examines the economics of Carbon Capture, Transport, and Storage (CCTS) for the electricity and industry sector; the welfare maximizing quadratically constrained model ELMOD focuses on different trajectories for renewable energy sources (RES) and transmission grid expansions; and the equilibrium model ELCO combines the insights of the individual sectors to a combined CCTS and electricity investment and dispatch model. Modeling results show that an investment in CCTS is beneficial for the iron and steel sector once the CO_2 certificate price exceeds 50 Euros/t CO_2. The threshold is 75 Euros/t CO_2 for the cement industry and 100 Euros/t CO_2 for the electricity sector. Additional revenues from using CO_2 for enhanced oil recovery (CO_2-EOR) lead to an earlier adoption of CCTS in the North Sea region. The lack of economies of scale results in increasing CO_2 storage costs of more than 30%, while transport costs even double. Research from the last years, however, indicates that CCTS is unlikely to play an important role in decarbonizing the electricity sector. The identified reasons for this are incumbents' resistance to structural change, wrong technology choices, over-optimistic cost estimates, a premature focus on energy projects instead of industry, and the underestimation of transport and storage issues. Keeping global temperature rise below 2 C therefore implies the phase-out of fossilfueled power plants and, in particular, of CO_2-intensive coal power plants. The low CO_2 price established by the European Emissions Trading Scheme is insufficient to induce a fuel switch in the medium term. Therefore, supplementary national measures are necessary to reduce coal-based power generation; i.a. feed-in tariffs for RES, minimum CO_2 prices, or emissions performance standards. Analyses for Germany show

  7. Liberalising European electricity markets: opportunities and risks for a sustainable power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, M.

    2003-01-01

    The process of liberalising European electricity markets, encompassing a wide range of restructuring activities, has mainly been spurred by the attempt to increase the economic efficiency of the whole sector. This process might be used to trigger a development towards a sustainable power sector by increasing the use of renewable energy sources and enhancing energy efficiency on the supply and demand side. However, by taking a closer look at the current trends of the European electricity markets, it becomes obvious that the liberalisation not only implies opportunities but also risks for the creation of a sustainable power sector. Many of these risks are due to market distortions and imperfections caused by the delay in creating a fully functional single European market. Thus, in the short-term, the market liberalisation tends to constitute more risks than opportunities without government actions to prevent these risks. In the long run, though, the efficiency gains of the sector and the appearance of new market factors are likely to bring forth the opportunities of liberalisation and actively foster a transformation towards a sustainable electricity sector. (author)

  8. LIBERALISATION OF THE ELECTRICITY SECTOR IN THE EUROPEAN UNION: PRESENT STATE AND SOME OPEN QUESTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, A.

    2007-07-01

    The liberalisation of the electricity sector started approximately 10 to 15 years ago, depending on the country. Nonetheless, there is still no general agreement on the liberalisation model this sector should follow, mainly because of the discussion of whether the liberalisation is an end in itself, or a means for -basically- lower energy prices. The complexity of the sector and the resilience of the incumbents' market power have currently placed the liberalisation process at a crossroad. In the EU, entrenched national interests are another obstacle to deal with. In this article, we first give an overview of the different liberalisation processes in the electricity sector and then summarize the pending challenges from an EU perspective. Next, we argue that the EU should focus on conditions aiming at implementing an effective liberalisation process, rather than on a formal liberalisation approach. We show how asymmetries between non-sector regulations in the European states and among companies create an uneven playing field, contrary to the European vision of an internal competitive energy market. We end the article studying the compatibility of the current European regulatory framework with the upcoming challenges in the energy sector. (auth)

  9. Impact of renewables deployment on the CO2 price and the CO2 emissions in the European electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, Kenneth; Delarue, Erik; D'haeseleer, William

    2013-01-01

    As of 2005, electricity generators in Europe operate under the European Union Emission Trading System (EU ETS). At the same time, European Member States have launched support mechanisms to stimulate the deployment of renewable electricity sources (RES-E). RES-E injections displace CO 2 emissions within the sectors operating under the EU ETS and they reduce the demand for European Union Allowances (EUAs), thereby reducing the EUA price. This paper presents the results of an ex post analysis to quantify the impact of RES-E deployment on the EUA price and CO 2 emissions in the Western and Southern European electricity sector during the period from 2007 to 2010, following from an operational partial equilibrium model of the electricity sector. This study shows that the CO 2 displacement from the electricity sector to other ETS sectors due to RES-E deployment can be up to more than 10% of historical CO 2 emissions in the electricity sector. The EUA price decrease caused by RES-E deployment turns out to be likely significant. - Author-Highlights: • We assessed the impact of renewables deployment in the period 2007–2010. • Impact on CO 2 emissions in the electricity sector and the CO 2 price is considered. • CO 2 emissions decreased by up to 10% of historical emissions. • CO 2 price decrease due to renewables turns out to be likely significant

  10. The European renewable energy target for 2030 – An impact assessment of the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knopf, Brigitte; Nahmmacher, Paul; Schmid, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The European Union set binding targets for the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) and the share of renewable energy (RE) in final energy consumption by 2020. The European Council agreed to continue with this strategy through to 2030 by setting a RE target of 27% in addition to a GHG reduction target of 40%. We provide a detailed sectoral impact assessment by analyzing the implications for the electricity sector in terms of economic costs and the regional distribution of investments and shares of electricity generated from renewable energy sources (RES-E). According to the Impact Analysis by the European Commission the 27% RE target corresponds to a RES-E share of 49%. Our model-based sensitivity analysis on underlying technological and institutional assumptions shows that the cost-effective RES-E share varies between 43% and 56%. Secondly, we quantify the economic costs of these variants and those which would be incurred with higher shares. The long-term additional costs for higher RES-E shares would be less than 1% of total system costs. The third aspect relates to the regional distribution of EU-wide efforts for upscaling renewables. We point out that delivering high RES-E shares in a cost-effective manner involves considerably different efforts by the Member States. -- Highlights: •A renewable (RES) target of 27% is the cost-effective share for 40% GHG reduction. •For the electricity sector the RES-E share varies between 43% and 56%. •Long-term costs for higher RES-E shares are less than 1% of total system costs. •There are large differences in RES deployment and costs between Member States. •A lack of a governance mechanism makes the EU-wide RES target difficult to achieve

  11. Decarbonizing the European electricity sector. Modeling and policy analysis for electricity and CO{sub 2} infrastructure networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Pao-Yu Charly Robin

    2016-03-03

    This dissertation uses three models to analyze different decarbonization strategies for combating global climate change: The cost minimizing mixed-integer model CCTS-Mod examines the economics of Carbon Capture, Transport, and Storage (CCTS) for the electricity and industry sector; the welfare maximizing quadratically constrained model ELMOD focuses on different trajectories for renewable energy sources (RES) and transmission grid expansions; and the equilibrium model ELCO combines the insights of the individual sectors to a combined CCTS and electricity investment and dispatch model. Modeling results show that an investment in CCTS is beneficial for the iron and steel sector once the CO{sub 2} certificate price exceeds 50 Euros/t CO{sub 2}. The threshold is 75 Euros/t CO{sub 2} for the cement industry and 100 Euros/t CO{sub 2} for the electricity sector. Additional revenues from using CO{sub 2} for enhanced oil recovery (CO{sub 2}-EOR) lead to an earlier adoption of CCTS in the North Sea region. The lack of economies of scale results in increasing CO{sub 2} storage costs of more than 30%, while transport costs even double. Research from the last years, however, indicates that CCTS is unlikely to play an important role in decarbonizing the electricity sector. The identified reasons for this are incumbents' resistance to structural change, wrong technology choices, over-optimistic cost estimates, a premature focus on energy projects instead of industry, and the underestimation of transport and storage issues. Keeping global temperature rise below 2 C therefore implies the phase-out of fossilfueled power plants and, in particular, of CO{sub 2}-intensive coal power plants. The low CO{sub 2} price established by the European Emissions Trading Scheme is insufficient to induce a fuel switch in the medium term. Therefore, supplementary national measures are necessary to reduce coal-based power generation; i.a. feed-in tariffs for RES, minimum CO{sub 2} prices, or

  12. Mergers and acquisitions in the European electricity sector. Cases and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codognet, M.K.; Glachant, J.M.; Leveque, F.; Plagnet, M.A.

    2002-08-01

    This report surveys 96 mergers and acquisitions of electric power companies in the European Union from January 1998 to August 2002. Cases are described in part 1 and patterns in part 2. The companies in concern are: E.ON (Germany), Powergen (UK), RWE (Germany), National Power (UK), Innogy (UK), Electricite de France (EdF), Edison (Italy), EnBW (Germany), Electricidade de Portugal (EdP), Suez (France), Endesa (Spain), Enel (Italy), Vattenfall (Sweden), Bewag (Germany), Hafslund ASA (Norway), FORTUM (Finland), STATKRAFT (Norway), British Energy (UK), Scottish and Southern Energy (UK), National Grid Transco (UK), Centrica (UK), Sydvest Energi (Denmark), Essent (Netherlands) and Nuon (Netherlands). (J.S.)

  13. The European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The creation of a single European market also will have its effects on the power and electricity sector. Expectations tied to this abandonment of borders on the electricity market are different: some hope for a reduction of energy costs, others fear safeguarded supplies to be at risk. It cannot be fully judged at present what the situation will be on a strongly integrated, European power and electricity market, and the brochure in hand is intended to present a first survey of the situation from the perspective of the power industry and energy policy, concentrating on main aspects. The survey is compiled in the form of reprints of journal articles written on this topic by a number of well-known German experts in the field. (orig./HP) [de

  14. The unknown story of the European carbon market: an archaeology of the electrical sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartel, Melodie; Aggeri, Franck; Caneill, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    In economic literature, the creation of the European carbon market is presented as a major institutional innovation that can be viewed as a direct application of economic theory. In this article, we propose another version of how the European carbon market came about that emphasizes the active role played by companies. For a period of three years, these companies designed and tested a prototype carbon market, while being observed by European experts. Drawing on archive documents, we analyze this experimentation process and examine in detail its influence on the European carbon market. We then discuss the role of companies in the processes of institutional innovation, a process that generally remains invisible. Finally it is explained how such experiments, conducted in protected spaces, can facilitate the design and testing of new concepts

  15. Sectoral panorama: the electric power sector in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mons, L.

    2003-10-01

    This study takes stock on the main european markets to help the electric power companies in their decisions and investments. The first part presents the electric power sector structure in Europe. The second part is devoted to the market evolution for the different european markets (german, french, british, italian and spanish) with an analysis of the retail prices, the competition and the evolution perspectives. The third part presents the highlights in the electric power sector between 2001 and the middle of 2003. The enterprises management and strategies are presented in the fourth part. In the last part the document analyzes the financial performances of the sector and the electric power companies. (A.L.B.)

  16. Production and competition in the European electric sector. 4. report from the research project 'renewable energy in the community's internal market'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjersgaard, A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim is to elucidate the dynamic interactive pricing, competition and market mechanisms that are valid for the European electric power market. The perspective in the report is to analyse the vertical flow of substance and values of energy, the interaction of the actors, and the economic relations. The first link in the vertical chain is the energy raw materials supplies: the reserves and production of fossil and nuclear fuels and the relation to globalization of electricity production. The next link is the production of electricity: the production technologies used and their positioning, the importance of large trans-national utilities in relation to technological changes. The third link is the market and the changes of the market between production, transmission, distribution and consumption of electricity, and the consequences of these changes. Two horizontal regulating sectional views are analysed: The European Union regulations of the electric power sector and the Danish regulations of power supplies. Finally, production and competition of electric power from renewable energy sources, i.e. wind power, in a future European energy market is put into perspective. (LN) 134 refs

  17. Industrial consumers and electricity sector deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jukic, A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the electricity sector deregulation from the point of view of major industrial consumers (MIC). Possibilities and limitations of MIC's impact on the introduction and development of an open power market in some European countries, the USA and Croatia are discussed. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the impact of the liberalisation of the European electricity market on the CHP, District heating and cooling sector; 'Save CHP/DHC'. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    Improved energy efficiency will play a key role in meeting the EU Kyoto target economically. In addition to a significant positive environmental impact, improved energy efficiency will lead to a more sustainable energy policy and enhanced security of supply. The study: 1) Identifies and evaluates parameters and conditions which in relation to the liberalisation of the electricity market will have an impact on the CHP/DHC sector in EU15 and Poland. 2) Establishes an information base on CHP/DHC systems in EU15 and Poland. 3) Analyses the CHP/DHC sector and its ability to meet changing market conditions. 4) Assesses the effect of the liberalised electricity market on electricity production in relation to CHP/district heating and cooling. 5) Identifies threats for the viability of CHP/DHC in a liberalised market and evaluates means and measures to overcome such threats. The study brings forward the goals and commitments in respect of European energy and environmental policy and gives an overview of the present and expected future framework in which CHP/DHC is to operate. The study evaluates the viability of the sector at an overall level and for different groups/categories of CHP/DHC systems in different countries. The effects of existing or proposed national public measures are analysed. The analyses are essential to decision makers in the transition process towards a fully liberalised market. Recognised uncertainties in the market during the transition period may cause either a temporary or a permanent recession for the CHP/DHC sector. Improved understanding and recognition of threats and opportunities is important to all actors just now. The study can be considered a first step of a process to create a market situation, where the energy customers can make their choices under competition rules and where environmentally friendly and efficient CHP and DHC is considered an attractive business opportunity in competition with other energy supplies. (EHS)

  19. Electricity utilities: Nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1992-01-01

    The safe and economic operation of nuclear power plants requires an appropriate infrastructure on the part of the operator as well as a high level of technical quality of the plants and of qualification of the personnel. Added to this are a variety of services rendered by specialist firms. The Bayernwerk utility, with plants of its own, has played a major role in the development of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany. The importance of nuclear power to this firm is reflected in the pattern of its electricity sources and in the composition of its power plants. (orig.) [de

  20. Electricity sector reform in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadou, Ekaterini N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an outlook of the electricity market reform in Greece which started in 2001 and is still developing slowly. This is related to the persisting dominance of the incumbent company and the specificities of the electricity sector of Greece which is heavily dependent on indigenous lignite firing generation, while being located in the periphery of the EU internal electricity and gas markets. Competition through enhancing electricity trade in the region is limited to date, as the establishment of an internal market in South East Europe also progresses slowly. Development of competition through gas-firing generation by new entrants has been the priority adopted by State and Regulator's policies. However, the gas supply market in Greece and in the region still lags behind. (author)

  1. Electricity sector human resources review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facette, J. [Canadian Association of Technicians and Technologists (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    The electricity industry is expanding, with new supply and infrastructure development equivalent to 35 per cent of existing capacity over the next 20 years. This paper examines the preliminary results of a human resources sector review providing industry specific labor force data. The key objectives of the review were to develop detailed industry profiles, identify root causes of human resources issues, identify industry best practices and develop a human resources strategy for the Canadian electricity sector. Estimates of current employment were provided, with age of employees, retirement projections, regional projections and estimated supply/demand gaps. Current shortages were identified, including wind energy technicians. The paper also identified a declining Canadian born labor force and a concurrent dependence on immigrants. A project research methodology was provided with a list of participating major employers. tabs., figs.

  2. Electricity in european economies in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the electricity supply industries in the European members of the former Unified Power System/interconnected Power Systems (UPS/IPS): Belarus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia and Ukraine. It explores the transformation process in the electricity sector over the past five years, its relationship to other changes in the region and possible future trends. Subjects covered include structure and regulation, demand, primary fuel availability, generating capacity, financing, tariffs, interconnections and trade

  3. Public Sector and Europeanization Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica Matei

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasises the role of the market-type mechanisms within the activity of the organisations from the public sector. The end of the 20th century was defined by the effects of the public sector reform. The public sector is placed within the cultural and political environment of each country and the reforms have aimed to redefine the structures of the state organisations in the economy and the relationships such as market-government, government-bureaucracy, government- citizens, bureaucracy-citizens, civil servants-politicians-citizens. The public sector reform, achieved at the managerial systems, organisational structures and regulations levels is accompanied by specific and structural reforms. Accepting the market-type mechanisms instead of bureaucratic mechanisms, meaning not the simple provision of public services but the creation of some governmental “actors”, functioning completely on commercial bases, supporting the development of the partnerships between the public and private sector, introducing privatisation is achieved in view of creating “the facilitating state”. We discuss about “facilities” such as citizens and society involvement in public businesses, making public administration more citizen-friendly and the state closer to the public need. The citizens’ involvement, as customers in the flow of the public service contributes to creating an organic ensemble characterised by two fundamental dimensions: level and type of influence of the customers and the private-public dichotomy. Synthesising, the relationships and market mechanisms enable to the public sector to get closer to the public needs and to create a modern administration based on efficiency, effectiveness and openness towards change.

  4. European internal electricity market. What next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, K.; Hewicker, C.; Boisseleau, F.; Nabuurs, P.

    2007-01-01

    2006 has been a very active year in the development of electricity markets worldwide. In Europe the liberalisation process was moving forward driven by the European Directives implemented in the EU states. Together with security of supply and environmental protection, implementation of competitive energy markets has also been one of the main objectives of EU energy policy. A competitive internal market for electricity has been progressively implemented across the European Union since 1999-2000. This process aims at increasing competition in electricity generation and supply leading to enhanced efficiency, which is closely associated with lower production costs and ultimately lower electricity prices. The sector inquiry and the country reviews conducted by the European Commission (EC) during 2006 showed that progress has been achieved. However, there are still a number of issues that need to be resolved in order to achieve an adequately operating internal electricity market. The EC energy package from 10th January 2007 is a set of concrete proposals for action in the energy field and arises in reaction to the Green Paper published on 8th March 2006. The Green Paper 'A European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy', on the one hand, identified the main problems that the European energy sector faces and, on the other hand, suggested possible actions to meet key objectives, including security of supply, environmental sustainability and competitiveness towards a unified European Energy Policy. The motivation of the EC package is the need to identify new measures or a strengthening of existing measures to reach the targets and their underlying objectives. The EC package deals with the main issues on energy policy (renewable electricity, internal electricity and gas market, sector competition, sustainable power generation from fossil fuels, nuclear energy, gas and electricity infrastructures and energy technology) and an action plan for energy

  5. Public Sector and Europeanization Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica Matei

    2006-02-01

    Accepting the market-type mechanisms instead of bureaucratic mechanisms, meaning not the simple provision of public services but the creation of some governmental “actors”, functioning completely on commercial bases, supporting the development of the partnerships between the public and private sector, introducing privatisation is achieved in view of creating “the facilitating state”. We discuss about “facilities” such as citizens and society involvement in public businesses, making public administration more citizen-friendly and the state closer to the public need. The citizens’ involvement, as customers in the flow of the public service contributes to creating an organic ensemble characterised by two fundamental dimensions: level and type of influence of the customers and the private-public dichotomy. Synthesising, the relationships and market mechanisms enable to the public sector to get closer to the public needs and to create a modern administration based on efficiency, effectiveness and openness towards change.

  6. The awakening of the Chinese electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derdevet, M.

    2004-01-01

    For several years now, China has enjoyed an economic expansion the likes of which history has rarely seen. The down-side of this growth has been an explosion in the demand for energy, and particularly electricity. Indeed, the Chinese are increasingly gaining access to day-to-day capital goods and the secondary sector; which is still very important in China, is a major consumer of electricity. In order to face up to this demand, China needs to substantially increase its electricity production. Currently, three-quarters of production is achieved using traditional thermal means (particularly coal), with hydraulic production accounting or approximately a quarter of the total and the nuclear sector barely 2 %. However, both the country's leaders and the Chinese people are paying increasing attention to the problems of pollution and the environment, which explains why, in the years to come, a priority will be the development of hydroelectric projects, such as the construction of.the Three Gorge Dam. China is also keen to build new nuclear production units. This expansion policy initiated by Beijing offers a real opportunity for French and European companies. Demand is so high that the Chinese are very open to co-operation with foreign states, all the more so since the Chinese market has been extensively reorganized and is now based around a combination of central planning and market economics, resembling the situation in Europe. (author)

  7. Sectoral Innovation Watch electrical and Optical Equipment Sector. Final sector report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den; Giessen, A.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The electrical and optical equipment sector is a high-tech manufacturing sector. It is one of the most innovative sectors in Europe with investments and advances in fundamental research, applied R&D and innovation in the actual use of equipment. This sector is also one of the most global sectors

  8. National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-06-30

    The goal of the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) project was to address cyber security issues for the electric sector, particularly in the near and mid-term. The following table identifies the strategies from the DOE Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity published in September 2011 that are applicable to the NESCOR project.

  9. Liberalization of the European gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwark, B.; Finger, M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural gas is the fastest growing fossil fuel worldwide, and by 2030, natural gas will replace coal as the second largest fuel, after oil. In particular, the growing use of natural gas in electricity generation rises the demand and changes the image of gas as substitute for light oil for heating. Due to its complete supply dependency, Switzerland will be affected by the European gas market developments. A new market organization, which requires legal and entrepreneurial decisions in Switzerland, emerges from the liberalization process of the energy markets in the European Union. (author)

  10. Nuclear Electric looks to the private sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, James.

    1995-01-01

    The state-owned utility Nuclear Electric, which is responsible for nuclear power generation in England and Wales, was created in 1990 following withdrawal of nuclear from electricity privatisation. Having successfully made itself much more commercial, Nuclear Electric would like the freedom of operating in the private sector. (author)

  11. Rents in the European power sector due to carbon trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Cruciani, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) has imposed a price on the allowances for CO 2 emissions of electricity companies. Integrating this allowance price into the price of electricity earns a rent for companies who have received these allowances for free. During Phase I, 2005-2007, rents corresponding to the aggregate value of allocated allowances amounted to roughly EUR 13 billion per year. However, due to the specific price-setting mechanism in electricity markets true rents were considerably higher. This is due to the fact that companies also that have not received any allowances gain additional infra-marginal rents to the extent that their variable costs are below the new market price after inclusion of the allowance price. Producers with low carbon emissions and low marginal costs thus also benefit substantially from carbon pricing. This paper develops a methodology to determine the specific interaction of the imposition of such a CO 2 constraint and the price-setting mechanism in the electricity sector under the assumption of marginal cost pricing in a liberalized European electricity market. The article thus provides an empirical estimate of the true total rents of power producers during Phase I of the EU-ETS (2005-2007). The EU ETS generated in Phase I additional rents in excess of EUR 19 billion per year for electricity producers. These transfers are distributed very unevenly between different electricity producers. In a second step, the paper assesses the impact of switching from free allocation to an auctioning of allowances in 2013. We show that such a switch to auctioning will continue to create additional infra-marginal rents for certain producers and will leave the electricity sector as a whole better off than before the introduction of the EU ETS. (author)

  12. Seven proposals for an efficient and dynamic European electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, J.H.; Geoffon, P.; Finon, D.

    2013-01-01

    While liberalisation of the electricity generation sector is inevitably a long term process, given the complexity of the industry, European consumers expect to reap identifiable benefits in terms of price, innovation in associated services, environmental performance and security of supply. Yet rather than evidence of progress, complexity - indeed confusion - effectively characterises Europe's electricity structure at present. It's time to react. (authors)

  13. Seven proposals for an efficient and dynamic European electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Geoffron, Patrice; Finon, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    While liberalisation of the electricity generation sector is inevitably a long term process, given the complexity of the industry, European consumers expect to reap identifiable benefits in terms of price, innovation in associated services, environmental performance and security of supply. Yet rather than evidence of progress, complexity - indeed confusion - effectively characterises Europe's electricity structure at present. It is time to react

  14. Short Summary European Reports on Retail Sector, Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector, Food and Beverages Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    This document is composed of European synthesis reports on retail trade, the agro-food sector, and the motor vehicle sales and repair sector. They are based on the most important findings of the European report and the 12 national reports for each sector. Section 1, "Retail Sector," deals in part 1 with the structure of retailing in the…

  15. Electricity sector integration in West Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, Pierre-Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Regional and global integration initiatives push for more electricity sector integration everywhere in the world, including West Africa. The creation of the West African Power Pool (WAPP) in 2000 and important investments under this new structure in 2006 are concrete actions that will result in a more integrated West African electricity sector. But will this integrated sector be more functional than the previous ones? Will the identified electricity sector problems be solved with the new power pool? This paper analyzes how power sector integration is presented by international institutions (the UN Economic Commission for Africa, World Energy Council and World Bank) and identifies three problematic issues with the current integration approach: lack of African ownership, unclear and conflicting reform objectives and uncertainty of integration outcomes

  16. Pricing electricity for sustainability : climate change and Canada's electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The electricity sector is Canada's largest single source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper discussed electricity and carbon pricing approaches to reducing GHG emissions in the electricity sector. An overview of the links between electricity pricing and climate change was presented, and current and emerging trends in electricity pricing related to encouraging energy conservation were reviewed. Market prices and failures were discussed. Approaches to pricing electricity included an increase in block prices; time-of-use prices; demand-side management and energy efficiency; and carbon pricing in Canada and electricity pricing signals. The study showed that several provincial utilities in Canada are experimenting with market-based pricing approaches for electricity and carbon that may help to reduce GHG emissions over time. Concerns over electricity supply and the negative environmental impacts of electricity production may lead to the full social pricing of electricity in some regions of Canada. 46 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  17. Estimation of European Union residential sector space cooling potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubcionis, Mindaugas; Carlsson, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Data on European residential space cooling demands are scarce and often of poor quality. This can be concluded from a review of the Comprehensive Assessments on the energy efficiency potential in the heating and cooling sector performed by European Union Member States under Art. 14 of the Energy Efficiency Directive. This article estimates the potential space cooling demands in the residential sector of the EU and the resulting impact on electricity generation and supply systems using the United States as a proxy. A georeferenced approach was used to establish the potential residential space cooling demand in NUTS-3 regions of EU. The total potential space cooling demand of the EU was estimated to be 292 TW h for the residential sector in an average year. The additional electrical capacity needed was estimated to 79 GW. With proper energy system development strategies, e.g. matching capacity of solar PV with cooling demand, or introduction of district cooling, the stresses on electricity system from increasing cooling demand can be mitigated. The estimated potential of space cooling demand, identified in this paper for all EU Members States, could be used while preparing the next iteration of EU MS Comprehensive Assessments or other energy related studies. - Highlights: • An estimation of EU space cooling demand potential in residential sector is presented. • An estimate of space cooling demand potential is based on using USA data as a proxy. • Significant cooling demand increase can be expected. • Cooling demand increase would lead to increased stress in energy supply systems. • Proper policies and strategies might measurably decrease the impact on energy systems.

  18. Sectoral variation in consequences of intra-European labour migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    Intra-European labour migration has divergent labour market consequences across institutional settings and economic sectors. Some sectors experience increasing pressure on industrial relations and labour market segmentation while others do not experience such effects, and it remains unclear how...

  19. Alternative models for restructuring Ontario's electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, D.; Salaff, S.

    1996-01-01

    The future of Ontario Hydro and the provincial electrical sector was discussed. Various models proposed for restructuring Ontario's electric sector were described and views of some of the stake holders were presented, among them the views of AMPCO, MEA, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, IPPSO, Ontario Hydro Management, Energy Probe and the Power Workers' Union. In general, most stake holders were in favour of privatization to some degree except for the Power Workers' Union which was unalterably opposed to privatization, claiming that it would lead to quantum increases in electricity rates. 2 figs

  20. Research paper 2000-B-4: adjustments in the Dutch electricity producing sector in the context of the European directive 88/609/EEC: a case study on national implementation, environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lulofs, K. [Twente Univ., Center for Clean Technology and Environmental Policy, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Within the context of the IMPOL project several fields of European environmental policy are studied on aspects as national implementation and environmental and efficiency outcomes. For the IMPOL project a case study was done on the transformation of the Dutch electricity sector in the context of the European Directive 88/609/EEC. The indicators used in this report for environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs were chosen in line with a coordinating document (Eames, 1999). The European Directive 88/609/EEC regulates Large Combustion Plants on their SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. These emissions are relevant for air quality and for the acidification problem. In the empirical part of this report emphasis is laid on the power plants as a specific sub-group of the large combustion plants. The report starts in chapter 2 with a description of the Dutch policy on acidification and regulation that existed when 88/609/EEC was issued. This way it is clarified that the formal implementation of the European Directive was done in the Netherlands with very little effort. In section 2.4 some major information on the structure of the electricity production sector is given as well as some insights into developments. In section 2.5 details on a covenant to reduce emissions from power plants is given. The electricity sector and the government agreed upon this document as a binding agenda for change. In section 2.6 information on monitoring and enforcement is given. In chapter 3, the environmental outcomes are discussed. First the emissions of all large combustion plants are presented in time series. Within the IMPOL research-team the decision was taken to concentrate on the SO{sub 2} emissions of power plants. Therefore, secondly the SO{sub 2} emissions of the power plants and the individual power plants are presented. This opens the possibility for an analysis of the found decrease of SO{sub 2} emissions. In section 3.3 the

  1. Research paper 2000-B-4: adjustments in the Dutch electricity producing sector in the context of the European directive 88/609/EEC: a case study on national implementation, environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulofs, K.

    2000-01-01

    Within the context of the IMPOL project several fields of European environmental policy are studied on aspects as national implementation and environmental and efficiency outcomes. For the IMPOL project a case study was done on the transformation of the Dutch electricity sector in the context of the European Directive 88/609/EEC. The indicators used in this report for environmental effectiveness, allocative efficiency, productive efficiency and administrative costs were chosen in line with a coordinating document (Eames, 1999). The European Directive 88/609/EEC regulates Large Combustion Plants on their SO 2 and NO x emissions. These emissions are relevant for air quality and for the acidification problem. In the empirical part of this report emphasis is laid on the power plants as a specific sub-group of the large combustion plants. The report starts in chapter 2 with a description of the Dutch policy on acidification and regulation that existed when 88/609/EEC was issued. This way it is clarified that the formal implementation of the European Directive was done in the Netherlands with very little effort. In section 2.4 some major information on the structure of the electricity production sector is given as well as some insights into developments. In section 2.5 details on a covenant to reduce emissions from power plants is given. The electricity sector and the government agreed upon this document as a binding agenda for change. In section 2.6 information on monitoring and enforcement is given. In chapter 3, the environmental outcomes are discussed. First the emissions of all large combustion plants are presented in time series. Within the IMPOL research-team the decision was taken to concentrate on the SO 2 emissions of power plants. Therefore, secondly the SO 2 emissions of the power plants and the individual power plants are presented. This opens the possibility for an analysis of the found decrease of SO 2 emissions. In section 3.3 the likely causes and their

  2. Environmental consequences of electricity sector reforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, N.

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide, the electricity industry is in the process of undergoing fundamental transitions. The reform process typically involves one or more of the following changes: commercialisation, privatisation, unbundling/restructuring and introduction of competition. The environmental impacts of these changes pull in different directions. There is concern that restructured electricity markets may not always incorporate adequately the environmental impacts of electricity resource development and consumption decisions. However, the electricity sector reform process also offers an opportunity to promote positive environmental changes: because the sector is already in flux, it may be easier to address environmental issues. The paper gives an overview of power sector reform in six countries where reforms have already been implemented, and concludes that reform measures will have to be accompanied by competitively neutral regulations in order to stimulate investment in environmentally sound technologies, including renewable and energy efficient technologies. (author)

  3. Determining market boundaries in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godde, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a method of determining market boundaries in preparation of identifying all the competitive forces which a company in the electricity sector must address and deciding on this basis whether it has a dominant position in the market. The study focused in particular on current developments in the German electricity sector, this being the only way to permit a demarcation that accurately reflects the true economic situation. First the question was addressed whether a determination of market boundaries is at all necessary for performing a competitive analysis and in what specific constellations they could play a role. Giving due consideration to the special features of the electricity sector the most preferable market demarcation methods were applied to individual areas of the electricity sector that are of competitive relevance. Efforts were directed at arriving at market boundaries most conducive to the goal of identifying those competitive forces which a company in the electricity sector must address. For this purpose a critical assessment was undertaken of established market demarcation practices in Europe and Germany in order to determine whether ''classical'' market demarcation methods could be applied or whether modifications were needed on account of special features of market structure. The author also describes and discusses alternatives to the established market demarcation methods. She also elucidates methods of determining the boundaries of markets that have emerged as a result of recent developments in the electricity sector, for example through the growth of electricity production from renewable resources, or which are still in the process of formation.

  4. Electricity sector abounds with energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, P.

    2006-01-01

    This short article takes a look at Swiss energy utilities and provides a brief review of the current state of the electricity business in Switzerland. Increasing turnover has lead to increased profits. The situation in five leading utilities is looked at and commented on. The various activities of the utilities are discussed. Apart from providing normal power supply, these range from international power trading and investment through to the generation and sale of renewable forms of energy such as photovoltaics and wind power

  5. Administrative decentralization in electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this report are discussed: the new technologies impact in the electric power sector and possible scenarios and greenhouse gases containment in post-Kyoto target, the possible sinergies at urban-territorial scale, the balance of energy environmental policies, simplifications of procedures in authorization and control activities [it

  6. The challenges of the electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrientos Penalosa, Miguel

    1995-01-01

    The author refers to the challenges of the electric sector, as is the structure of prices and good efficiency level, where the measures taken in the first group are not the solution but if they have an appropriate politics, they could make profitable the business of the energy distribution

  7. Crisis of prices in electrical sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation shows the evolution of the electrical sector in Guatemala including prices, covering, market and current situation with the recent privatization of public enterprises with advantages to the consumers. Also discuss the effect of the new legislation with fiscal proposals that could produce prices distortion

  8. Electricity Sector Council : human resources challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldie, T. [Electricity Sector Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The electricity sector is currently undergoing significant human resource challenges. Several charts illustrated the aging Canadian workforce; workforce by key occupation; statistics on a 2004 sector study requirements of retirement estimations; and average annual growth rate of the domestic labour force. Several slides also depicted the dependence on immigrants for labour growth; trades intake through immigration; and a 2007 environmental scan. The presentation also provided information on the Electricity Sector Council (ESC) and its projects and occupational standards currently under development. The ESC in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada has begun the process of developing a National Occupational Standard for geoexchange professionals. It is intended to enable colleges and Ministries of Education to standardize national training and evaluate new hires. Last, several slides containing background information on the ESC board of directors were included along with slides of labour market information; connectivity; and projects under development. tabs., figs.

  9. Electricity Sector Council : human resources challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldie, T.

    2007-01-01

    The electricity sector is currently undergoing significant human resource challenges. Several charts illustrated the aging Canadian workforce; workforce by key occupation; statistics on a 2004 sector study requirements of retirement estimations; and average annual growth rate of the domestic labour force. Several slides also depicted the dependence on immigrants for labour growth; trades intake through immigration; and a 2007 environmental scan. The presentation also provided information on the Electricity Sector Council (ESC) and its projects and occupational standards currently under development. The ESC in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada has begun the process of developing a National Occupational Standard for geoexchange professionals. It is intended to enable colleges and Ministries of Education to standardize national training and evaluate new hires. Last, several slides containing background information on the ESC board of directors were included along with slides of labour market information; connectivity; and projects under development. tabs., figs.

  10. Productivity incentives in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunekreeft, G.

    2000-01-01

    July 19, 1999, the Netherlands Electricity Regulatory Service ('Dienst uitvoering en toezicht elektriciteitswet Dte) issued the consultation document 'Price-cap regulation in the electric power sector'. The document is strongly based on a modern, UK inspired method of regulation. The methods, as proposed in the document, will have an impact on the final electricity tariffs, and thus of great importance for the consumers and the businesses involved. In this article the most striking element in the consultation document is discussed: how to determine the X (i.e. the expected growth of the productivity) in the price-cap regulation

  11. Ex Post Regulation as the Method of Sectoral Regulation in Electricity Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Nagaj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim/purpose - The aim of the article is to present the essence of ex post approach to sectoral regulation, to show the advantages and disadvantages of ex post regulation and to answer the question whether it is worth using in the electricity sector. Design/methodology/approach - For this purpose, a critical analysis of expert literature was made and an empirical analysis of countries that have applied ex post regulation in the electricity sector in the European Union. Two research methods were used: a case study and a comparison of changes in price and quality of services. The research period covered the period 2000-2016. Findings - It was found that ex post regulation reduces regulatory costs, does not adversely affect the quality of service and long-term rates, gives businesses the freedom of decision-making and the ability to react quickly to changes in the economy. The main disadvantages of ex post regulation are the tendency for companies to over-estimate bills for consumers, the difficulty of pursuing claims by consumers and the need to shift regulatory risk to consumers. Research implications/limitations - In the paper there was identified a research gap, i.e. the effects of ex post regulation in the electricity sector in European Union countries where such regulation was applied. Identifying the research gap will help us understand what are the advantages and disadvantages of ex post regulation and will create a model for when it is good moment to implement this in the economy. Besides identifying the research gap, further studies will be required over ex post regulation. Originality/value/contribution - The additional value of the paper is the study of ex post regulation, its essence and types. The article analyzed the effects of ex post regulation in the electricity sector and provided valuable insights into the potential risks associated with this approach to economic regulation.

  12. Competition in the electric utility sector?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, O.J.; Fristrup, P.; Munksgaard, J.; Skytte, K.

    2000-01-01

    The book analyses some important problems for the liberaliaction of the electricity market in Denmark and its neighbouring countries. Will the competition and its potential for a more cost-effective electric supply be prevented by the electric companies' many possibilities to utilize market power? Can competition be combined with ambitious energy policy aims about reducing the environmental impacts of the electric supply? Does the Danish tradition for consumer ownership constitute an important supplement to the protection of the smaller consumers in a world of international competition? The intention with the book is not to take concrete position to the many topical problems in the Danish political discussion of restructurns of the electric sector, but to give a theoretical analysis to understand and analyse the development. On this basis the conclusion is, that the competition will work even in combination with ambitious environmental aims. (EHS)

  13. The electrical power sector in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gengyilmaz, Nese; Savruk, Nurettin

    1998-01-01

    In Turkey, highest priority is given to domestic resources, whenever economical. Imports are considered in case it is feasible. Diversification of resources is also taken into account. Efficient utilization of the resources and energy conservation are ensured ant supported. Measures for environmental and public health protection are taken into consideration during power generation and planing. In energy investments, foreign capital and domestic private sector are promoted along with the public sector. A rational structure in energy pricing is applied without any subsidies. Feasible interconnections and higher electric power exchanges with neighbouring countries are supported

  14. Electricity generation sectors under purchase obligation: support arrangement analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    This report aims at assessing the operation of the support arrangement by which currently benefit some electricity production sectors in France (renewable energies, co-generation) with respect to the evolution of the energy mix within the frame of energy transition. Other support arrangements presently adopted in Europe are also addressed as lessons to be learned. Criteria are established for any support arrangement. The report presents the French and European context regarding such support arrangement with purchasing obligation, and addresses the future evolutions of the European Commission. It highlights challenges for the electric system and for the energy market (impact on investments, optimization of market operation), describes and assesses the French purchasing obligation arrangement, and describes and assesses other existing support arrangements

  15. Electricity demand for South Korean residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa'ad, Suleiman

    2009-01-01

    This study estimates the electricity demand function for the residential sector of South Korea with the aim of examining the effects of improved energy efficiency, structural factors and household lifestyles on electricity consumption. In the study, time series data for the period from 1973 to 2007 is used in a structural time series model to estimate the long-term price and income elasticities and annual growth of underlying energy demand trend (UEDT) at the end of the estimation period. The result shows a long-term income elasticity of 1.33 and a long-term price elasticity of -0.27% with -0.93% as the percentage growth of UEDT at the end of the estimation period. This result suggests that, in order to encourage energy efficiency in the residential sector, the government should complement the market based pricing policies with non-market policies such as minimum energy efficiency standards and public enlightenment.

  16. Electricity demand for South Korean residential sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa' ad, Suleiman [Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), Department of Economics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    This study estimates the electricity demand function for the residential sector of South Korea with the aim of examining the effects of improved energy efficiency, structural factors and household lifestyles on electricity consumption. In the study, time series data for the period from 1973 to 2007 is used in a structural time series model to estimate the long-term price and income elasticities and annual growth of underlying energy demand trend (UEDT) at the end of the estimation period. The result shows a long-term income elasticity of 1.33 and a long-term price elasticity of -0.27% with -0.93% as the percentage growth of UEDT at the end of the estimation period. This result suggests that, in order to encourage energy efficiency in the residential sector, the government should complement the market based pricing policies with non-market policies such as minimum energy efficiency standards and public enlightenment. (author)

  17. Liberalization of power generation sector in the Croatian electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viskovic, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    The electricity market liberalization and the restructuring of power utilities eventually leads to the establishment of a single electricity market in Europe, which is especially important for efficiency gains in electricity generation coupled with increased security of supply, economic competitiveness and fulfillment of environmental requirements. The European electricity market Directives as well as the Energy Community Treaty for South East Europe (legislative Menu) have remarkable impact on the restructuring of the Croatian power sector and the development of electricity generation. The Croatian model of restructuring includes legal un bundling (in the ownership of one holding company - Hrvatska Elektroprivreda (HEP)). The operation of HEP Group and its subsidiaries in the conditions of partially opened electricity market in an important element that shapes the interactions of competitive activities and regulated activities in the environment influenced by exogenous factors a thirteen percent electricity are controlled by the Energy Market Operator (MO), the Transmission System Operator (TSO) and the Energy Regulatory Agency (CERA). The introduction of eligible procedures and newly created operative procedures for power system operation, are creating completely new conditions for competition in the power generation sector, where almost all power plants are owned by HEP. New generating capacities in Croatia can be built through tendering and licensing procedures carried out by the Regulator. Electricity prices are still regulated by the Government (below the cost reflective level), there is a small share of industrial consumers and the annual electricity production is 12 TWh, with relatively large share of hydro plants. All these have implications on the development of the power generation sector in Croatia as well as on electricity market operation. The subject matter of this paper is an impact of power system restructuring and electricity market opening on the

  18. Restructuring and performance in India's electricity sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Arun Kumar

    Restructuring and privatization, used as major tools in electricity sector reform, are often viewed as part of the same process and the terms used interchangeably. Although related, they represent quite different dimensions of change and reform. Privatization is the result of change in the management/ownership. Restructuring, on the other hand, refers to changes in structure such as the unbundling of vertically integrated utilities, and the introduction of competition. Most studies attempt to assess the impact of privatization of the electric utilities on their tariff structure, performance and efficiency. They have not tried to estimate the effect of restructuring on the performance of the unbundled utilities. Using panel data on the state electricity boards and the thermal power plants, and employing variance-component fixed effects and random effects models, this study examines the effects of restructuring and ownership on the performance of India's electricity sector. We also study the effects of absolute majority of political parties on performance. The study also uses a cross-country-comparison-framework to compare the electricity sector reforms of India with those of Chile, Hungary and Norway. Results show that restructuring has significantly positive effects on such performance indicators as plant availability, plant load factor, forced outage, average tariff collection, and sales revenue as a ratio of cost. With regard to labor efficiency indicators, we find mixed results. Restructuring also appears to entail reduction in the extent of cross-subsidization. However, the cost of supply seems to be unaffected by restructuring. Absolute majority of the party in government shows adverse effects on costs, sales revenue as a ratio of cost, and labor efficiency. The effects of ownership are somewhat mixed, with state ownership (as opposed to federal or private) indicating adverse effects on plant performance. Interestingly, after controlling for location

  19. Carbon dioxide emissions from Russia's electricity sector: future scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenhof, Paul A.; Hill, Malcolm R.

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates future greenhouse gas emission scenarios for Russia's electricity sector, a topic of importance since Russia's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in November 2004. Eleven scenarios are constructed to the year 2020 considering economic and technological details in both the demand and supply sides of the sector. The scenarios are based upon a thorough review of the different factors controlling carbon dioxide emissions, including potential economic growth, changes in energy efficiency and technological development, and that Russia may export large amounts of natural gas to European and Asian markets. The most likely scenario is that Russia will double industrial output over the next 10 years, increase energy efficiency in the demand sector, will remain consistent to the goals of the Energy Strategy 2020 and will implement more efficient technology in the electricity supply sector. Consequently, carbon dioxide emissions will still be 102 million tonnes below 1990 levels in 2010, representing a significant source for emission reduction credits available to be sold on international markets or transferred to the next crediting period. (Author)

  20. IMPLEMENTATION OF BASEL III IN THE EUROPEAN BANKING SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Sbarcea

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, which is part of a larger research project aimed at the expected impact of Basel III on commercial banks in Romania, I decided to analyse the implementation and transposition of the new international prudential requirements into European regulations, which are of particular interest for the Romanian banking sector. I started this analysis by highlighting the peculiarities of the European banking sector at aggregate level, but also as a cross-country survey, to later highlight the views of European regulations on prudential supervision and differences to international regulations.

  1. The art of investing in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuzenkamp, H.; De Nooij, M.; Van Geffen, S.

    2003-10-01

    After an introduction on the electricity market attention is paid to fundamental characteristics of supply and demand of electricity, and several aspects with respect to investment in the electricity sector. Next, some answers are given on questions on societal, economical and political damage of too low or too high investments in the electricity sector, focusing on public, commercial and conflicting interests [nl

  2. Economies of vertical integration in the Swiss electricity sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetz, Aurelio; Filippini, Massimo [Department of Management, Technology and Economics, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Economics, University of Lugano (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    Over the last two decades, several European nations have introduced reforms to their electricity sector. Generally, these reforms require a legal and functional unbundling of vertically integrated companies. These unbundling processes may reduce the possibilities that exist to fruitfully exploit the advantages of vertical integration. The goal of this paper is to empirically analyze the presence of economies of scale and vertical integration in the Swiss electricity sector. Economies of vertical integration between electricity production and distribution result from reduced transaction costs, better coordination of highly specific and interdependent investments and less financial risk. Different econometric specifications for panel data, including a random effects and a random-coefficients model, have been used to estimate a quadratic multi-stage cost function for a sample of electricity companies. The empirical results reflect the presence of considerable economies of vertical integration and economies of scale for most of the companies considered in the analysis. Moreover, the results suggest a variation in economies of vertical integration across companies due to unobserved heterogeneity. (author)

  3. The Harmonization of Public Sector Accounting in European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam; Alijarde, Isabel Brusca; Chow, Danny

    accounting standards in Member States. The suitability of IPSAS for the Member States” (European Commission, 2013b). This report takes into account the Public Consultation on the suitability of the IPSAS for EU Member States. The European Commission (2013b, p. 8) considers that IPSASs cannot easily......The European Commission is working on several fronts to achieve the implementation of uniform and comparable accruals-based accounting practices for the European Union Member States and for all the sectors of General Government, that is, Central Government, State Government, Local Government...... and Social Security, considering that at the same time it can help ensure high quality statistics (European Commission, 2013a). In 2012 Eurostat issued a Public Consultation on the suitability of the IPSAS for EU Member States, later publishing the report “Towards implementing harmonised public sector...

  4. Independent regulatory authorities in European electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Holm; Sorensen, Eva Moll; Olsen, Ole Jess

    2006-01-01

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has taken place in most European countries within the last decade. It is considered a precondition of successful liberalisation to establish so-called independent regulatory authorities. In this article, we compare the status and practice of them in 16 European countries, and discuss the relationship between the organisation of the regulation and the market outcome

  5. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  6. Privatisation electric power sector in Pakistan: some important issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoor, A.; Weiss, J.

    1998-01-01

    This discussion paper highlights important issues relating to the privatisation of Pakistan's electric power sector. Salient features of the electric power sector in Pakistan, factors affecting the economic performance of this sector, the partial privatisation policy adopted by Pakistan, ongoing private power projects, and current privatisation policy are examined. The arguments for competition are raised, and alternative policy reforms the are considered

  7. Th european market of the electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the CRE (commission of the Electric power Control) progress report concerning the first july 2000 to the 30 june 2001. Three main subjects are discussed, illustrated by economic data and graphs: the electric power european market, the french market control and the CRE. A special interest is given to the deregulation of the market and its consequences. (A.L.B.)

  8. Climate change and electricity - 2008. European carbon factor. Comparison of CO2 emissions of the main European electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This joint PWC/Enerpresse brochure publishes the 2007 results of a study about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the 22 main European electric power producers. The study shows an increase by 3% of the cumulated emissions of power companies with respect to 2006. These 22 companies represent 59% of the emissions of the power/heat sector in Europe (27 countries). The first 10 companies are responsible of 50% of the GHG emissions of this sector in Europe. Among those, 7 show stable emissions while the others have increased their emissions. (J.S.)

  9. Climate change and electricity - 2006. European carbon factor. Comparison of CO2 emissions of the main European electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This joint PWC/Enerpresse brochure publishes the 2005 results of a study about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the 23 main European electric power producers. The study shows an increase by 1.7% of the cumulated emissions of power companies with respect to 2001. These 23 companies represent 55% of the emissions of the power/heat sector in Europe (25 countries). The first 10 companies are responsible of 45% of the GHG emissions of this sector in Europe. Among those, 7 show stable emissions while 3 have reduced their emissions. (J.S.)

  10. Climate change and electricity - 2003. European carbon factor. Comparison of CO2 emissions of the main European electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This joint PWC/Enerpresse brochure publishes the 2002 results of a study about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the 21 main European electric power producers. The study shows an increase by 0.8% of the cumulated emissions of power companies with respect to 2001. These 21 companies represent 75% of the emissions of the power/heat sector in Europe (25 countries). The first 10 companies are responsible of 60% of the GHG emissions of this sector in Europe. Among those, 7 have increased their emissions while 3 have reduced them. (J.S.)

  11. Smart grids and the transformation of the electricity sector: ICT firms as potential catalysts for sectoral change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlinghagen, Sabine; Markard, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The sustainability challenges associated with increasing demand and generation of electricity require a far-reaching transformation of the energy system. Smart grid technologies are expected to play a major role in such sectoral transformation. While a growing body of literature is concerned with the dynamics and particularities of sectoral transformation, most contributions have focused on exogenous shocks or new technological developments as drivers of change. This paper complements the existing perspectives by exploring the role of actors as catalysts for transformation. Within the field of smart grid, we study the transformative influence of ICT firms on the energy sector in Europe. More specifically, we analyze actor participation in 450 European smart grid projects between 2000 and 2011 as well as acquisitions in the field. We find that incumbent firms from the ICT sector have gained influence and drive transformation through the creation of variety, in terms of technology, business models and value chains. As a strategic reaction, electricity sector incumbents have recently acquired many start-ups specialized in ICT technology and thus expanded their competence base. We conclude that entrants from another sector can be important catalysts for sectoral transformation and should be analyzed more systematically in transition studies. - Highlight: ► Entrants from adjacent sectors are important catalysts for sectoral transformation. ► We provide a socio-technical systems perspective on smart grid. ► We analyze actor participation in smart grid projects in Europe 2000–2011. ► ICT firms drive transformation towards a smarter grid.

  12. Europe’s climate goals and the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskeland, Gunnar S.; Rive, Nathan A.; Mideksa, Torben K.

    2012-01-01

    EU's objective of attaining 20% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 is analysed with a general equilibrium model detailing electricity generation technologies and capital vintaging. Consistent with theory and other analysts we find that the nonuniform treatment of emitting sectors in EU raises abatement costs – by a factor of two to three. Under cost effective emission reductions – a more comprehensive tradable cap—electricity generation abates more than its proportional share in emissions. The European economy abates by substitution towards natural gas, by energy efficiency improvements, and by reductions in emission intensive manufactures. Applied policies such as renewable support – and responses such as carbon leakage – hold down the prices for emission and electricity, thus also holds down incentives for energy efficiency and technological change. This leads to little preparation for the future and global mitigation. - Highlights: ► We analyse the EU's climate emissions objectives in 2020 using a computable general equilibrium model. ► We focus on its impact on electricity prices, demand, output, and technology mix in the EU regions. ► We compare alternative realistic and theoretical implementations of policies. ► We find that the electricity generation abates more than its proportional share in emissions. ► The targets are likely met at low carbon cost, and thus unlikely to promote long-term technological change.

  13. Development of the Mexican electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escofet, A.

    1981-06-01

    In 1980 Mexico had a population of 68 million, mostly concentrated in a few cities with many other areas being practically unpopulated. The country is semi-industrialized, and in order to achieve better standards of living, economic growth will have to continue at about 7.5 percent or more, particularly if the population continues to increase at 2.9 percent per year. The total installed electrical capacity at the end of 1980 was 14 600 MW; the per capita consumption of electricity was 910 KWh. The present government has as a goal an 8 percent annual growth rate in gross domestic product until 1995, resulting in forecast of a 12.5 percent growth rate in the electric sector to about 410 TWh per year. Hydroelectric power could be used to produce 80 TWh a year by 2000 if capacity were quadrupled. The use of coal for the production of electricity is beginning, and it is planned to generate 40 TWh a year from this source by 2000. Geothermal power should yield 20 TWh by then. A goal has been set of 20 000 MW of installed nuclear capacity by the end of the century; this would produce about 130 TWh, leaving some 280 TWh to be generated by oil or gas. The planned nuclear program must include the development of a strong Mexican nuclear industry, so that in 20 years 80 percent of the nuclear plant components could be locally produced. Ultimately it is hoped that Mexico will have the capability of installing, with its own resources, five or six large nuclear plants per year

  14. European scale climate information services for water use sectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van M.T.H.; Donnelly, Chantal; Strömbäck, Lena; Capell, René; Ludwig, Fulco

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a climate information service for pan-European water use sectors that are vulnerable to climate change induced hydrological changes, including risk and safety (disaster preparedness), agriculture, energy (hydropower and cooling water use for thermoelectric power) and

  15. The electric sector: alternative energetic sources and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erber, P.

    1989-01-01

    This work makes a report of the electric sector, its alternative sources and the environment. It reports also the main sources for electric power generation and analyses its impact on the environment. (A.C.A.S.)

  16. Electricity Profile Study for Domestic and Commercial Sectors

    OpenAIRE

    Asmarashid Ponniran; Nur Azura Mamat; Ariffudin Joret

    2012-01-01

    As Malaysia move towards as a developed country, it is expected that the electricity consumption in domestic and commercial sectors will increase as well as more industrials and households need. This study is to investigate the electricity profile in domestic and commercial sectors by monitoring some appropriate appliances that contribute high electricity consumption. The characteristics for every major loads are examined and the potential energy saving is compared to an efficient electrical ...

  17. French dissatisfactions on the European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glachant, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The author first notices that the French electricity professional consumers are dissatisfied with the results of the creation of the European domestic electricity market in 1997: price increase either on bills or on the wholesale markets, and even more price increases are to come. The author proposes to examine several issues: what has been done during the 6 or 7 past years, that is since the California crisis in 2000-2001, to put the European electrical reforms on a virtuous track? Have the basic market economy principles been respected to protect competitiveness of all energy consumer professionals? How and why the French government or EDF will make us pay gas, coal or CO 2 emission permits like in England or Germany whereas the French electricity production has mainly (90 or 95 per cent) a nuclear or hydraulic origin?

  18. Impact of the economic recession on the European power sector's CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Declercq, Bruno; Delarue, Erik; D'haeseleer, William

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the economic recession on CO 2 emissions in the European power sector, during the years 2008 and 2009. Three main determinants of the power sector's emissions are identified: the demand for electricity, the CO 2 price, and fuel prices. A counterfactual scenario has been set up for each of these, i.e., what these parameters would have been if not affected by the recession. A simulation model of the European power sector is then employed, comparing a historical reference simulation (taking the parameters as actually occurred) with the counterfactual scenarios. The lower electricity demand (due to the recession) is shown to have by far the largest impact, accounting for an emission reduction of about 175 Mton. The lower CO 2 price (due to the recession) resulted in an increase in emissions by about 30 Mton. The impact of fuel prices is more difficult to retrieve; an indicative reduction of about 17 Mton is obtained, mainly as a consequence of the low gas prices in 2009. The simulated combined impact of the parameters results in an emission reduction of about 150 Mton in the European power sector over the years 2008 and 2009 as a consequence of the recession. - Research highlights: → CO 2 emissions are simulated for the European power sector. → Emissions reduced drastically because of the economic recession in 2008 and 2009. → Lower electricity demand had highest impact and accounts for reduction of about 175 Mton. → Impact of different CO 2 and fuel prices on emissions is more limited.

  19. 76 FR 57723 - Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process Guideline AGENCY... public comment on DOE's intent to publish the Electricity Sector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process Guideline. The guideline describes a risk management process that is targeted to the specific needs of...

  20. The role of the European Bank in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, John

    1994-01-01

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development was established in 1991 and is owned by the western industrialized countries, including Canada, and the former communist countries of Europe and Central Asia. Its purpose is to assist the latter to make the transition from command to market economies in a democratic framework. In the energy sector, most of the EBRD's lending has been in the oil and gas sector in Russia, but it is open for business in other sectors and in all countries of operation. Unlike other development banks, the EBRD is prepared to finance nuclear power projects. The bank is also prepared to finance conventional power plants where these would permit the closure of obsolete or unsafe nuclear plants. In the oil and gas sector, most of the EBRD's lending has related to private sector, joint venture projects aimed at oil field rehabilitation and development. The private sector ventures supported by the Bank normally involve joint stock companies owned 50 per cent by western partners and 50 per cent by Russian state oil companies, which are being privatized or are operating according to private sector principles. (author)

  1. The rates and financing of electric sector expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiganer, L.; Coutinho, L.H.S.A.; Dias, L.E.N.; Silva Pegado, P.A. da; Foletto, N.S.; Guerreiro, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The current economic and political crisis of Brazilian society reach the several productive sectors that compose the national economy, and among them the electric sector. An adequate rate policy, new ways of getting resources to its financing, costs reduction, and the increase of internal generation of resources, are the objective of this work, that evaluates and evidences these questions in order to their repercussion in financing of electric sector expansion. (C.M.)

  2. Multi-sectoral action for child safety-a European study exploring implicated sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Beatrice; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Förster, Katharina; MacKay, Morag; Vincenten, Joanne; Brand, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    Injury to children in Europe, resulting in both death and disability, constitutes a significant burden on individuals, families and society. Inequalities between high and low-income countries are growing. The World Health Organisation Health 2020 strategy calls for inter-sectoral collaboration to address injury in Europe and advocates the whole of government and whole of society approaches to wicked problems. In this study we explore which sectors (e.g. health, transport, education) are relevant for four domains of child safety (intentional injury, water, road and home safety). We used the organigraph methodology, originally developed to demonstrate how organizations work, to describe the governance of child safety interventions. Members of the European Child Safety Alliance, working in the field of child safety in 24 European countries, drew organigraphs of evidence-based interventions. They included the different actors involved and the processes between them. We analyzed the organigraphs by counting the actors presented and categorizing them into sectors using a pre-defined analysis framework. We received 44 organigraphs from participants in 24 countries. Twenty-seven sectors were identified across the four domains. Nine of the 27 identified sectors were classified as 'core sectors' (education, health, home affairs, justice, media, recreation, research, social/welfare services and consumers). This study reveals the multi-sectoral nature of child safety in practice. It provides information for stakeholders working in child safety to help them implement inter-sectoral child safety interventions taking a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach to health governance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  3. Independent regulatory authorities in European electricity market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Larsen, Anders; Sørensen, Eva Moll

    2006-01-01

    Liberalisation of the electricity market has taken place in most European countries within the last decade. It is considered a precondition of successful liberalisation to establish so-called independent regulatory authorities. In this article, we compare the status and practice of them in 16...

  4. Sectoral Innovation Foresight. Electrical and Optical Equipment Sector. Final report. Task 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den; Giessen, A.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to highlight possible future developments of importance to the electrical and optical (E&O) equipment sector, paying particular importance to ‘radical’ changes and discussing policy options and future scenarios. The electrical & optical equipment sector plays a vital role

  5. Decomposition of electricity demand in China's industrial sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenhof, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    In the past five years, China's demand for electricity has accelerated far beyond what central planners had forecasted, leading to supply constraints and costly brownouts throughout the country. This paper presents analysis of the effect of changes in the industrial sector on electricity demand, an important economic sector contributing to these above patterns as it consumes nearly 70% of the electricity generated in China. Using decomposition analysis, it is found that both increased industrial activity and fuel shifts helped increase industrial sector electricity demand between 1998 and 2002, the period of focus in this study, but significant increases in energy efficiency countered this

  6. Actual questions in Slovak and European nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2010-01-01

    The close cohesion of research and education underlines the development of all research areas and contributes to their sustainability. In the paper, new approaches of European Commission (DG RTD Energy) to nuclear power engineering development (focused on area fission and reactor systems) and applications also for Slovak conditions are discussed in details. Research, education and training increase not only economical factor and technical development, but imply the higher level of safety culture by design or operation of nuclear installations. The paper will be focused on the actual questions in frame of Slovak as well as European nuclear sector.

  7. Regulation and competition issues in Thai electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisuttisak, Pornchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the issues related to regulatory reform and liberalisation leading toward competition in the Thai electricity sector, which is still under the monopoly control of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Following an overview of the current market structure of the Thai electricity sector, the process of liberalisation and deregulation that contributes to the uncompetitive market structure under SOEs’ control is examined. The author asserts that there are problems within the Energy Commission and the Energy Industry Act BE 2550 (2007) that contribute to the continuance of an uncompetitive electricity supply. Possible reforms to the Thai electricity regulation are proposed with the aim of creating market competition and efficiency in the Thai electricity sector. - Highlights: ► Author studies on the regulatory reform and a development of liberalisation plans on Thai electricity sector. ► The paper presents that the liberalisation plan was affected by the government implementation on electricity corporatisation. ► The paper asserts that the current energy regulation will not lead to market reform and competition in electricity. ► The paper also discusses on the current monopoly structure of Thai electricity sector under state owned enterprises. ► The paper concludes that Thailand needs an appropriate regulatory reform for building competition in electricity sector.

  8. New modes of governance in the Spanish electricity and gas sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Leonor Moral [Public and Constitutional Law Universidad de Granada Department of Administrative Law, Law Faculty Plaza de la Universidad s/n 18071 Granada, (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    This paper analyses the institutional framework of the Spanish electricity and gas markets from their emergence at the beginning of the twentieth century until the liberalisation process encouraged by the European Union. European processes of liberalisation involving the introduction of regulation and competition and the application of non-hierarchical modes have raised the number of both public and private actors taking part in sectoral governance. However, none of these modes is new for the sector. A historical perspective shows the conditions under which the threat of governmental intervention and the discretion granted to sectoral governance differed significantly between sectors. While the threat to nationalise and monopolise the electricity sector contributed to the creation of a private agent and a model of self-regulation with a large measure of discretion, in the gas sector the public presence was strong and control tight. Thus, the paper concludes that one should not presuppose that old modes of governance are strongly governmental and hierarchical. The opposite proves to be the case in the Spanish electricity sector, where new modes of governance are now more linked to hierarchy. (Author).

  9. New electricity act brings in private sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Opening up the State's electricity industry, previously the domain of the former Queensland Electricity Commission (QEC), is part of an overall restructuring of the industry under the new Queensland Electricity Act. Under this Act, the QEC was split into generating and transmission and supply corporations. The Act provides for the regulation of the electricity industry and the regulation of the use of electricity and safety in relation to the supply and use of electricity.(Author). 6 photos

  10. European Short-term Electricity Market Designs under High Penetration of Wind Power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaves Avila, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The EU has ambitious policies for decarbonization of the electricity sector. Due to recent technological developments, wind power already represents a significant share of the generation mix in some European countries. As a result, short-term electricity markets and balancing arrangements must be

  11. Three Target Sectors for a European Investment Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, Lionel; Douillard, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    While the president of the European Commission is getting ready to present the 'Juncker package' announced in July 2014, to revive activity in Europe through investment, what are the sectors in which these investments may be concentrated? The overall analysis of investment gaps in the euro zone has confirmed the requirement for a European macro-economic revival effort that involves investment, public or private, undertaken very quickly, even though this diagnosis varies depending on the country. The drivers of a European investment strategy are fiscal, regulatory and financial and are based on the selection of projects for the future. This third 'Note d'analyse' addresses the topic of investment potential in three key sectors: transport, energy and the digital sector, for which the amount of additional investment could reach euro 120 billion per year and thus, over three years, be higher than the forecasts in the Juncker plan. This maximalist amount mainly corresponds to the implementation of an ambitious energy-climate policy. Given current budgetary constraints, carefully selecting the desired investments, for which their social utility must be validated, is imperative: socioeconomic evaluation is the appropriate approach, particularly for taking into account the environmental externalities that now justify significant investments in the ecological transition. (authors)

  12. The role of the European Bank in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.

    1993-01-01

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development was established in 1991 to assist central and eastern European countries in making the transition from command economies to market economies. The Bank provides loans, equity investments, guarantees, advice, and technical cooperation to qualified applicants through its merchant banking and development banking operations. In the energy sector, the Bank recognizes that the energy resources of eastern Europe are enormous but so are the problems associated with their development. Since its foundation, most of the Bank's energy-related lending has been in the oil and gas sector in Russia and the Baltic countries. The Bank has approved eight projects in that sector with total capital costs of ca US$1.7 billion. Major problem areas to be overcome include uneconomic domestic pricing, high energy intensity and pollution, inadequate legal frameworks, inappropriate tax structures, and institutional complexity. Canadian firms have been actively involed in Bank-financed projects in the Russian oil and gas sector, and two such projects are briefly described. They comprise joint ventures with Russian enterprises or associations and include rehabilitation of Siberian oil fields and drilling new wells in the Komi (Arctic) region. A common feature of these projects is that they were well under way before the Bank got involved, but the Bank brings the benefits of additional financing and providing moral support and expertise which can be useful in overcoming administrative and regulatory difficulties

  13. South Africa's electricity consumption: A sectoral decomposition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inglesi-Lotz, Roula; Blignaut, James N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We conduct a decomposition exercise of the South African electricity consumption. → The increase in electricity consumption was due to output and structural changes. → The increasing at a low rate electricity intensity was a decreasing factor to consumption. → Increases in production were proven to be part of the rising trend for all sectors. → Only 5 sectors' consumption were negatively affected by efficiency improvements. -- Abstract: South Africa's electricity consumption has shown a sharp increase since the early 1990s. Here we conduct a sectoral decomposition analysis of the electricity consumption for the period 1993-2006 to determine the main drivers responsible for this increase. The results show that the increase was mainly due to output or production related factors, with structural changes playing a secondary role. While there is some evidence of efficiency improvements, indicated here as a slowdown in the rate of increase of electricity intensity, it was not nearly sufficient to offset the combined production and structural effects that propelled electricity consumption forward. This general economy-wide statement, however, can be misleading since the results, in essence, are very sector specific and the inter-sectoral differences are substantial. Increases in production were proven to be part of the rising trend for all sectors. However, only five out of fourteen sectors were affected by efficiency improvements, while the structural changes affected the sectors' electricity consumption in different ways. These differences concerning the production, structural and efficiency effects on the sectors indicate the need for a sectoral approach in the energy policy-making of the country rather than a blanket or unilateral economy-wide approach.

  14. The Europeanization of regulation of the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrijsen, S.A.C.M.; Nauta, T.

    2010-01-01

    The main question of this article is how the ongoing Europeanization of regulation relates to the restrictive manner in which the Dutch legislator interprets the principle of legality with respect to the qualification of the independent regulating authorities. To answer this question, research focuses first of all on which demands are imposed by European law on the constitutional position and qualification of the national regulating authorities that implement the energy directives. Anticipating the consequences of the third generation of energy directives for the position of the national authorities, attention is subsequently paid to the question whether any tension exists between European requirements for the regulation of the energy sector and the manner in which the national legislator interprets the principle of legality. [nl

  15. Toward a More Efficient and Innovative Electricity Sector in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Russia is in the process of one of the most ambitious electricity sector reforms ever undertaken, reflecting the importance of an efficient and reliable electricity sector for promoting economic activity, growth and community prosperity. The outcome of this process will have a substantial impact on Russia’s energy sector and longer-term economic performance. It will help to determine the nature and pace of investment and modernisation of the sector and will help to shape incentives for efficient, flexible and innovative operation and end-use.

  16. Does Electricity Drive the Development of Manufacturing Sector in Malaysia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husaini, Dzul Hadzwan [Faculty of Economics and Business, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Sarawak (Malaysia); Lean, Hooi Hooi, E-mail: hooilean@usm.my [Economics Program, School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-22

    This paper investigates the relationship between electricity consumption, output, and price in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia. We find that electricity consumption, output, and price are cointegrated in the long run. In addition, it has been found that the relationship between electricity consumption and output is positive. In the long run, we find a unidirectional causality from manufacturing output to electricity consumption. This result indicates that the development of manufacturing sector stimulates greater demand for electricity. Government needs to make sure that the planning of electricity supply in the future is in line with the economic development planning to avoid shortage in electricity supply. In the short run, a unidirectional relationship runs from electricity consumption to output is found. A decrease of energy usage in production might reduce the output growth in short run. Hence, we suggest improving the efficiency of electricity usage and some cost-effective sources of energy.

  17. Does Electricity Drive the Development of Manufacturing Sector in Malaysia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, Dzul Hadzwan; Lean, Hooi Hooi

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between electricity consumption, output, and price in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia. We find that electricity consumption, output, and price are cointegrated in the long run. In addition, it has been found that the relationship between electricity consumption and output is positive. In the long run, we find a unidirectional causality from manufacturing output to electricity consumption. This result indicates that the development of manufacturing sector stimulates greater demand for electricity. Government needs to make sure that the planning of electricity supply in the future is in line with the economic development planning to avoid shortage in electricity supply. In the short run, a unidirectional relationship runs from electricity consumption to output is found. A decrease of energy usage in production might reduce the output growth in short run. Hence, we suggest improving the efficiency of electricity usage and some cost-effective sources of energy.

  18. The European Union prepares an electrical crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article discusses the fact that a lack of electricity production within the EU could not be balanced by imports and would lead to an economic and social catastrophe. He comments the current situation in which European countries tend to close an important number of coal and oil power stations in order to meet commitments regarding emissions and the targeted share of renewable energies. He outlines the consequences of theses trends, and states that these decisions based on ecological objectives do not take economic and market realities into account, and lead to a destruction of the French electricity system

  19. Energetic transition in the electric sector: Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannuzzi, Gilberto de Martino

    1999-01-01

    The Brazilian electric sector is essentially based on a source of renewable energy -hydroelectricity, and the national economy has increased its dependence of the electricity. The use of the electricity for unit of GDP increased in continuous form from 1970 and the country has serious difficulties in the financing of the expansion of the electric production. Energetic politics, in what concerns to the sustainable development in the Brazilian case, should direct its efforts toward a bigger investment in efficiency and energy conservation. a bigger use of supply options that they are renewable and decentralized will depend on high degree of the regulation of the electric sector during the privatization. The transition stage of the Brazilian electric sector will imply more efforts toward a handling based on the demand and a bigger efficiency

  20. The greening of European electricity industry: A battle of modernities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, Atle

    2012-01-01

    Europe has played the role of a green hegemon on the global arena for several decades. By exploring its green transition in the electricity industry, the article discusses whether Europe is on track with regard to delivering sustainable development in a core sector at home. The article finds that the greening of European electricity industry has been highly dynamic and can best be represented in terms of competing modernities; where carbon, nuclear, renewables and demand side management challenge each other in the race for sustainable energy solutions. The article describes Greening European electricity industry as a complex institutional game which resembles a relay race where various factors have driven innovation at different stages. Change may be initially have been politically driven, while the baton is later taken by markets, technology or civic mobilization. The article shows how strong greening policies may lead to blockage, whereas softer and less confrontational policies with triggering effects may have a better chance of success. The article also argues that a central factor in the apparent European success in greening electricity has been an advantageous blend of technology push and market pull approaches, which has merged out of national rivalry rather than coordinated planning. - Highlights: ► European el-industry has met the climate challenge with four rivaling modernities. ► They are carbon modernity, nuclear modernity, supply and demand side ecomodernity. ► Europe has successfully facilitated green transition through three channels. ► They are green radicalism, institutional pluralism and multiple policy instruments. ► Europe has been a front-runner, but faces challenges mainstreaming sustainability.

  1. Smart Grid Communication Technologies in the Brazilian Electrical Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Kühne, Philipp; Hauer, Ines; Styczynski, Zbigniew A.; Fernandes, Rubipiara; Vale, Zita

    2013-01-01

    Intelligent electrical grids can be considered as the next generation of electrical energy transportation. The enormous potential leads to worldwide focus of research on the technology of smart grids. This paper aims to present a review of the Brazilian electricity sector in context with the integration of communication technologies for smart grids. The work gives an overview of the generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy in the Brazil and a brief summary ...

  2. The French electricity policy facing European integration and environmental law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begue, M.C.

    2004-02-01

    The french electricity policy is traditionally defined by public authorities. The preference for nuclear power implies great risk and severe damage to the environment. These features of french electricity policy are however questioned by the increasing influence of european law and the (relatively) recent recognition of the environmental issues of such policy. This thesis intends to study the consequences of two 'new' tendencies that seem to be inevitable in the field of electricity policy: the decreasing role of national public authorities and the diffusion of the concept of sustainable development. The theoretical model which underlies the organization of commercial exchanges is replacing the traditional intervention of the State. regarding of this basic good. The adoption of legal rules to organize the electricity market has involved the development of many economic instruments. Those instruments aim at modifying the electricity policy in accordance with the principle of integration of environmental dimension in sectoral policies. The main object of our work is to analyse the consequences of these changes in the concept of public utility as well as in the importance given to environmental protection in the new forms of electricity policies. (author)

  3. The European Community programmes in the sector of wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamantaras, K.; Ferrero, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    The wind technology market has known a considerable evolution over the last decade. From the early eighties - when there were only a few kilowatts of the research prototype wind turbines installed - the total installed capacity within the European Community has reached nowadays more than 765 MW in commercial machines. This expansion has been brought about with the aid of important R and D energy technology programmes run by national governments, and by the Commission of European Communities with its research, development, demonstration and market development programmes, such as the JOULE, demonstration and THERMIE programmes. This paper presents the activities of the Community demonstration and THERMIE programmes in the wind energy sector from 1983 to 1992. Reference is also made to the Community programmes JOULE II and ALTENER. (au)

  4. Decision making in the electricity sector using performance indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingues, Nuno [ISEL-ADESPA, Lisbon (Portugal); FCT-UNL, Caparica (Portugal); Neves-Silva, Rui; Melo, Joao Joanaz de [FCT-UNL, Caparica (Portugal)

    2017-02-15

    The studies on the electricity sector are usually focused on the supply side, considering consumers as price-takers, i.e. assuming no demand elasticity. The present paper highlights the role of consumers on the electricity sector, assuming that consumers react to electricity prices and make decisions. Many studies focused on the demand side disaggregate consumers by activities, leading to a highly complex analyse. In the present paper, consumers are divided by three main types. In the present paper, the Government makes decisions on the measures to implement to influence the production and the consumption. To study the impact of the Government decisions, the present paper studies and implements a tool: a decision support system. This tool is based on a conceptual model and assists the task of test and analyse the electricity sector using scenarios to obtain a set of performance indicators that would allow to make quantitative balance and to eliminate unfeasible measures. The performance indicators quantify the technical, environmental, social and economical aspects of the electricity sector and help to understand the effect of consumer practices, production technology and Government measures on the electricity sector. Based on the scenarios produced, it is possible to conclude that the price signal is important for consumers and it is a way to guide their behaviour. It is also possible to conclude that is preferable to apply incentives on supporting energy-efficiency measures implementation than on reduce the price of electricity sold to consumers. (orig.)

  5. Decision making in the electricity sector using performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingues, Nuno; Neves-Silva, Rui; Melo, Joao Joanaz de

    2017-01-01

    The studies on the electricity sector are usually focused on the supply side, considering consumers as price-takers, i.e. assuming no demand elasticity. The present paper highlights the role of consumers on the electricity sector, assuming that consumers react to electricity prices and make decisions. Many studies focused on the demand side disaggregate consumers by activities, leading to a highly complex analyse. In the present paper, consumers are divided by three main types. In the present paper, the Government makes decisions on the measures to implement to influence the production and the consumption. To study the impact of the Government decisions, the present paper studies and implements a tool: a decision support system. This tool is based on a conceptual model and assists the task of test and analyse the electricity sector using scenarios to obtain a set of performance indicators that would allow to make quantitative balance and to eliminate unfeasible measures. The performance indicators quantify the technical, environmental, social and economical aspects of the electricity sector and help to understand the effect of consumer practices, production technology and Government measures on the electricity sector. Based on the scenarios produced, it is possible to conclude that the price signal is important for consumers and it is a way to guide their behaviour. It is also possible to conclude that is preferable to apply incentives on supporting energy-efficiency measures implementation than on reduce the price of electricity sold to consumers. (orig.)

  6. A European nuclear sector to face future energy challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legee, F.; Thais, F.

    2010-01-01

    Very early Europe chose the way of nuclear energy to produce electricity but progressively different countries followed different policies and now the nuclear landscape of the European Union is various: some countries are full-fledged, some stopped their program a long ago and others are in a phase-out period. The stakes of the climatic change and a framed strategy of the European Union have led to a renewal of the nuclear option. Great-Britain has already launched a program of new power plants. Poland, Bulgaria, Slovenia and Hungary want to develop nuclear energy to be less dependant on Russian oil and gas exports. In other countries like Germany, Austria, Sweden we can notice a positive change in favour of nuclear power of their public opinion. A recent OECD study shows that nuclear power stays largely competitive in Europe despite rising construction costs. The harmonization of the nuclear safety regulations throughout Europe appears clearly as an objective of the European Union. As for the management of radioactive wastes the European Union favors the disposal in deep geological layers, but as for the options: direct storage or reprocessing, a common European policy is out of reach at the moment. (A.C.)

  7. Do Decision 2003/54/EC and Decision no. 1229/2003/EC result in a European market for electricity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenting, F.

    2004-01-01

    In the summer of 2003 the European Parliament and the European Council issued a new Directive with respect to the internal market for electricity (Directive 2003/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity) and Guidelines for trans-European networks in the energy sector (Decision no. 1229/2003/EC). The question is whether these decisions will lead to a European and free market for electricity. It is concluded that this is not yet the case [nl

  8. The electric power sector in Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingimarsson, J.

    1992-01-01

    In Iceland the government must give permission for the building of a power station etc. but in practise the power plant administrators determine the tariffs. The structure of electric power supply mirrors a strong engagement on the part of the state and the local authorities. Almost all the power plants and distribution systems are state owned or owned by both the state and the local authorities, and so constitute a monopoly, producing 93% of the total amount of electricity supply. Government policy in this field, the Icelandic electric power distribution system and the setting of electricity prices are briefly described. It is claimed that there would be economical advantages in restructuring the distribution network and that the government favours an increase in possibilities for competition and making legislative changes. This will mean that in the future the market will play a more important role and that power plant administrators must review their duties regarding consumer satisfaction, tariffs etc. (AB)

  9. New institutional analysis of European electric power reforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Yannick

    2002-01-01

    This research thesis reports a comparative analysis of reforms of the electric power sector implemented in European countries. In the first part, the authors proposes a presentation of the theoretical framework adopted for this analysis which is notably based on the New Institutional Economy approach. He also proposes an approach to the electric power industry based on the Transaction Cost Theory, and presents an overview of the various European reforms in the field of electricity, and of still unresolved problems which emerged after the creation of different power markets. The next part addresses an assessment of the attractive and desirable characters of reforms which have been implemented in the United Kingdom, in Germany and in Spain, with an attempt to identify winners and losers, and to classify these reforms. In the third part, the author defines a framework for the analysis of the feasibility of reforms which combine institutional and industrial dimensions, notably by reference to Noll and Williamson works. In the last part, the author sheds a new light on the concept of credibility. He introduces the conventional arbitrage of the Transaction Cost Theory between commitment stability and flexibility to generate uncertainty. He notably shows that the main problem in centralised institutional environments, is to guarantee the stability of commitments in front of opportunism, whereas in decentralised institutional environments, the main problem is to produce flexibility to manage uncertainty [fr

  10. Nuclear energy and opportunity to strengthen the sustainable electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles N, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    The beginning of electricity in Mexico was through the use and exploitation of natural resources; as the demand grew, more generation power plants were required with great capacity and at the same time the fuels used varied, although, oil continued to be the main fuel. At present, due to the effects of climate change, the Conference of the Parties has proposed to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels to give way to clean energy (wind, solar, geothermal, nuclear, etc.), which entails gradually modifying the energy matrix of the electricity sector. The National Development Plan and the National Electricity Sector Development Program, this coordinated by the Energy Secretariat in Mexico, establish policies to promote sustainable development, increasing electricity generation through clean energy sources, including nuclear energy. However, such plans are not accurate in the strategy to be followed to ensure compliance with the increased participation of nuclear energy. This article proposes a nuclear program for the Mexican electricity sector, under the terms of a State policy, aimed at crystallizing a sustainable electricity development 2015-2036; considering that the application to the electricity sector constitutes a representative and justified example of the incorporation of environmental aspects in decision processes for the preservation of the environment. In order to determine the quantity and type of reactors, as well as the number of nuclear power plants and increase of the installed capacity, the general planning scheme of the electric sector was used, taking as reference the modeling criteria of the WASP planning system. Finally, is concluded that the electricity generated by fission of radioactive elements is an opportunity to fulfill the commitments made by Mexico at COP 21 and to meet in an environmentally friendly way the energy requirement that our country needs. (Author)

  11. Management of electricity markets in European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfir, A.; Florescu, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The challenges facing energy markets in Europe were discussed with particular reference to the need to integrate and interconnect national energy markets. The Romanian power market evolution since 2000 was also analyzed, taking into account the fact that the strategic objective of the Romanian Government is to assume the role of Regional Exchange in the South-East European region. A common approach to energy is needed to enable the European Union (EU) to compete in global markets, to improve sustainability in the EU and to secure energy supply. An overall framework is needed in order to achieve these objectives. This paper presented the general measures needed to complete the internal gas and electricity markets in Europe. It also proposed measures to ensure that the EU's internal energy market guarantees security of supply and solidarity between Member States. The guiding principles that an approach to information management and market transparency should be based on were described. The authors suggested that an integrated and competitive electricity and gas markets should be established to promote efficient energy services and diversify the energy mix. The measures needed in order to achieve the goal of a genuine single market at EU level were described along with the actions needed to stimulate investments in infrastructure and generation capacity. Measures to prevent or manage energy supply crises were also proposed. 4 refs., 1 tab

  12. Natural gas demand in the European household sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Asche, Frank; Tveteras, Ragnar

    2005-08-01

    This paper analyzes the residential natural gas demand per capita in 12 European countries using a dynamic log linear demand model, which allows for country-specific elasticity estimates in the short- and long-run. The explanatory variables included lagged demand per capita, heating degree days index, real prices of natural gas, light fuel oil, electricity, and real private income per capita. The short-run own-price and income elasticity tend to be very inelastic, but with greater long-run responsiveness. By splitting the data set in two time periods, an increase in the own-price elasticities were detected for the European residential natural gas demand market as a whole. We have provided support for employing a heterogeneous estimator such as the shrinkage estimator. But the empirical results also motivate a further scrutiny of its properties. (Author)

  13. Restructuring in Ontario : electricity sector reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, S.

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's electricity reform strategy was outlined along with challenge facing Ontario's electricity supply and demand with particular focus on the issue of replacing coal-fired generation. According to reports by the Independent Electricity Market Operator, short-term reserve margins were higher in 2004 than they were in 2003 due to the return to service of some nuclear generating units and planned capacity additions. Ontario's long-term supply and demand situation was also examined. It was noted that lenders hesitate to finance the expansion of generation companies selling into the spot market. Many lenders are requiring that half of the project's output be sold in advance on contract. Other challenges include Ontario's aging generation infrastructure and rising energy prices. The presentation included graphs that compared electricity costs for residential and small business customers across various provinces and states. The main supply and conservation challenges revolve around the large investments required by 2020 to replace coal plants, retire nuclear plants and projected load growth. Ontario's current generation capacity is 154 TWh and the mix is represented by 40 per cent nuclear, 25 per cent coal, 25 per cent hydro, 8 per cent natural gas, 1 per cent oil, and 1 per cent biomass and other renewable energy sources. This paper also addressed the issue of coal generation and air pollution and emphasized the importance of looking at the broad externalities associated with air emissions. tabs., figs

  14. Prospective of the Electrical Mexican Sector 2005-2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    Mexico is an OECD member but is an emergent economy as can be seen from its electrical sector. Its electrical installed capacity has been growing during the last 10 years with a 4.5 % annual pace and it is planed to grow for the next 10 years with a 5.2 % annual pace. In 2004 the annual electrical consumption per inhabitant was of 2237 kWh, which is around the world average but almost one quarter of the industrial countries average consumption. The current document shows the prospective for the Mexican Electricity sector for the 2005-2014 time frames. It also shows the technologies that will be used to cover the requirements of electricity by region. (author)

  15. Water constraints on European power supply under climate change: impacts on electricity prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van M.T.H.; Vögele, S.; Rübbelke, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent warm, dry summers showed the vulnerability of the European power sector to low water availability and high river temperatures. Climate change is likely to impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power

  16. Electricity sector restructuring in India: an environmentally beneficial policy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Richard

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that reforms to the electricity sector in developing countries encouraging the entry of independent power producers (IPPs) are likely to result in environmental improvements similar to those recently made in a number of developed economies. The present paper evaluates this claim by examining the experience of the Indian power sector. It finds that recent investments by IPPs have reduced the pollution-intensity of electricity generation in the country. Yet they have not brought the significant gains seen in countries such as the UK, nor are they likely to in the foreseeable future. This is largely a product of the nature and context of electricity sector reform in India which is less favourable to environmentally beneficial outcomes. Accordingly, the paper concludes by suggesting that the environmental benefits of restructuring are not automatic, but depend on the existence of an enabling structural, institutional and regulatory framework

  17. Efficiency in the European agricultural sector: environment and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Victor; Madaleno, Mara; Macedo, Pedro; Robaina, Margarita; Marques, Carlos

    2018-04-22

    This article intends to compute agriculture technical efficiency scores of 27 European countries during the period 2005-2012, using both data envelopment analysis (DEA) and stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) with a generalized cross-entropy (GCE) approach, for comparison purposes. Afterwards, by using the scores as dependent variable, we apply quantile regressions using a set of possible influencing variables within the agricultural sector able to explain technical efficiency scores. Results allow us to conclude that although DEA and SFA are quite distinguishable methodologies, and despite attained results are different in terms of technical efficiency scores, both are able to identify analogously the worst and better countries. They also suggest that it is important to include resources productivity and subsidies in determining technical efficiency due to its positive and significant exerted influence.

  18. European electricity grid. Status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    There is no doubt about the need to expand and modernize the European electricity grid, especially in order to allow renewable energies to be fed stochastically into existing systems. As it is hardly possible at the present time and also in the near future to store electricity on a major scale and at adequate prices, electricity must be transmitted from the point of generation to the point of consumption directly and in real time. The development of grid systems, including cross-border transmission systems, is still behind expectations. This is not due to a shortage of projects or a lack of interest on the part of grid operators; the necessary political support is available as well, and investments at present are covered by the feed tariffs. The problem is the lack of acceptance. It is difficult to obtain new permits or commission new grids. This problem of the licensing authorities often results in considerable delays. Consequently, it is up to the grid operators to handle this situation and promote new, intelligent grid systems in an effort to achieve acceptance of a technical-scale infrastructure. This includes transparency in grid expansion, exchange with the public in order to reach mutual understanding and trust and also find compromises as well as the willingness to discuss various approaches to solutions (underground routing, upgrading of existing grid systems, smart systems, and intelligent designs) so as to optimize the use of the existing infrastructure. (orig.)

  19. The electricity sector : a top choice for employment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacNaughton, L. [Canadian Electricity Association, Montreal, PQ (Canada)]|[FortisAlberta, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation outlined the reasons why the electricity sector should be considered as an excellent employment opportunity. A set of statistics was presented in which employees of the electricity sector cited factors that attracted them to the sector. Factors included benefits; job security; work/life balance; career development and advancement; compensation; work hours; safety on the job; and the fact that a friend or family member was in the industry. Data on personnel turnover per region was presented, along with data on employee satisfaction. Statistics on student and apprentice hiring and available graduates were listed. An estimated supply and demand gap was provided along with a list of current jobs where there are manpower shortages. Youth perceptions of the sector were examined and suggestions were made to promote the sector to young job seekers. Various plans were reviewed to rectify shortages. Study components included a survey of electricity employers; a survey of electricity employees; literature review; training organization survey; focus groups; interviews with human resources staff; and interviews with key industry stakeholders. A project research methodology was presented. It was noted that one in 5 non-support staff members will be eligible to retire over the next 5 years. Low and high growth scenarios were presented. In addition, a list of participating major employers was provided. tabs., figs.

  20. Direct external investment in the Brazilian electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Junior, Helder Queiroz; Silveira, Joyce Perin; Losekann, Luciano Dias

    1999-01-01

    The central issue of debate was the need to align the energy sector's options and organization with changing global patterns of economic and social development, characterized by the increasing role played by the private sector, greater integration in the world economy, and new economic and social priorities such as efficiency, decentralization, deregulation, and a closer attention to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to identify the foreign investors participants of Brazilian privatization in the electric power sector and to analyze their strategies

  1. Welfare impacts of electricity generation sector reform in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toba, Natsuko

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports an empirical investigation into the welfare impacts of the introduction of private sector participation into the Philippines electricity generation sector, by liberalizing the market for independent power producers (IPPs) during the power crisis of 1990-1993. This study uses a social cost and benefit analysis. The main benefits came from IPPs, who contributed to resolving the crisis, and promoted economic and social development. Consumers and investors were net gainers, while the government lost and there was an air pollution cost. The paper concludes that the reform with private sector participation increased social welfare

  2. Demand Response in Europe's Electricity Sector: Market barriers and outstanding issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, Cherrelle

    2015-01-01

    In October 2014, Europe's drive for sustainability has been further continued with the set objectives for 2030, aiming for 40% emission reduction compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy sources. For the longer term, the European Commission (EC) targets a zero CO_2 emitting electricity sector in 2050. Those objectives for the electricity sector have a large impact on the expected development of electricity generation, but also on the evolution of demand. To meet those objectives, a larger share of electricity supply will come from intermittent sources like wind turbines and solar panels. In an electric system that is largely based on renewable electricity sources, it is desired to have higher electricity consumption in moments when more renewable electricity is being produced, and a lower consumption in times of lower renewable production. Demand response is related to the adaptability of the electricity demand to the availability of supply. The development of demand response is rooted in the need for carbon emission reductions and for efficient use of installed generation capacities with the growth of power consumption. In addition to providing flexibility to the electric system, demand response could be a direct source of revenue to households and businesses. In 2013, in the United States, businesses and homeowners earned over $2.2 billion in revenues from demand response together with other avoided investment in grid infrastructure and power plants. This source of direct revenue could also be made available in Europe and would release financial benefits to local economies (SEDC, 2014). The reliability improvements as well as the economic and sustainability potential coming from a more responsive electricity demand are fully acknowledged. However, demand response is still immaturely developed in Europe. If Europe wants to make a step forward to a more sustainable electricity sector, the development of demand response is an inevitable

  3. Manufacturing preparations for the European Vacuum Vessel Sector for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Lawrence; Arbogast, Jean François; Bayon, Angel; Bianchi, Aldo; Caixas, Joan; Facca, Aldo; Fachin, Gianbattista; Fernández, José; Giraud, Benoit; Losasso, Marcello; Löwer, Thorsten; Micó, Gonzalo; Pacheco, Jose Miguel; Paoletti, Roberto; Sanguinetti, Gian Paolo; Stamos, Vassilis; Tacconelli, Massimiliano; Trentea, Alexandru; Utin, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    The contract for the seven European Sectors of the ITER Vacuum Vessel, which has very tight tolerances and high density of welding, was placed at the end of 2010 with AMW, a consortium of three companies. The start-up of the engineering, including R and D, design and analysis activities of this large and complex contract, one of the largest placed by F4E, the European Domestic Agency for ITER, is described. The statutory and regulatory requirements of ITER Organization and the French Nuclear Safety regulations have made the design development subject to rigorous controls. AMW was able to make use of the previous extensive R and D and prototype work carried out during the past 9 years, especially in relation to advanced welding and inspection techniques. The paper describes the manufacturing methodology with the focus on controlling distortion with predictions by analysis, avoiding use of welded-on jigs, and making use of low heat input narrow-gap welding with electron beam welding as far as possible and narrow-gap TIG when not. Further R and D and more than ten significant mock-ups are described. All these preparations will help to assure the successful manufacture of this critical path item of ITER.

  4. The electric tariff in the residential sector; Tarificacion electrica en el sector residencial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheinbaum Pardo, Claudia [Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    The main objective of this paper is to make an historical revision and analyze the current condition of the electric tariffs in the Mexican residential sector and ask ourselves if the equalization of tariffs generates the possibility that the entire population has access to the electricity service. The document is divided into three parts. The first one presents the history and the tendencies of the tariffs in the domestic sector in Mexico since 1973 until 1996 and the current tariff structure. The second one describes the characteristics of the residential users and mention is made of how the increment of the electric tariffs would affect the various population sectors. The last part of this paper presents some tariff criteria, that take into account energy conservation measures [Espanol] El objetivo principal de este trabajo es hacer una revision historica y analizar la situacion actual de las tarifas electricas en el sector residencial mexicano y preguntarnos si la igualdad de tarifas genera la posibilidad de que toda la poblacion tenga acceso al servicio electrico. El documento se divide en tres partes. La primera presenta la historia y tendencias de las tarifas del sector domestico en Mexico desde 1973 hasta 1996 y la estructura tarifaria actual. La segunda describe las caracteristicas de los usuarios residenciales y se menciona como afectaria el incremento de las tarifas electricas a los distintos sectores de la poblacion. La ultima parte de este trabajo presenta algunos criterios de tarificacion, que toman en cuenta medidas de ahorro de energia

  5. European wood pellet market integration - A study of the residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Olle; Hillring, Bengt; Vinterbaeck, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The integration of European energy markets is a key goal of EU energy policy, and has also been the focal point of many scientific studies in recent years. International markets for coal, oil, natural gas and electricity have previously been investigated in order to determine the extent of the respective markets. This study enhances this field of research to bioenergy markets. Price series data and time series econometrics are used to determine whether residential sector wood pellet markets of Austria, Germany and Sweden are integrated. The results of the econometric tests show that the German and Austrian markets can be considered to be integrated, whereas the Swedish market is separate from the other two countries. Although increased internationalization of wood pellet markets is likely to contribute to European price convergence and market integration, this process is far from completed. (author)

  6. Effect of demand management on regulated and deregulated electricity sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrioglu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Our society derives a quantifiable benefit from electric power. In particular, forced outages or blackouts have enormous consequences on society, one of which is loss of economic surplus. The society relies on having a continuous supply of electrical energy. Some customers may willingly risk this continuous supply and participate in demand management programs for electrical power. If the power system grid is in trouble, electric utilities need to have demand relief. Customers willing to reduce their demand to help the system can receive an incentive fee for helping the utilities. Demand relief can be system wide or location specific. Sometimes it can be more effective to fix the electrical demand vs. supply imbalance from the demand side. The value of demand management contracts is greatly affected by customer location. Inclusion of locational attributes into the contract design procedure increases the effectiveness of the contracts by helping a utility get more value from its demand management programs. Independent System Operators and regulators, among others, can also benefit from effective demand management. This paper will investigate how this type of demand management contracts can help the electricity sector both in regulated and deregulated environments. - Highlights: • Demand management can help prevent forced electricity outages. • Both electric utilities and ISOs can use demand management. • Regulated and deregulated electricity sectors can benefit from demand management. • Demand management contracts can be effectively used in power system grids.

  7. Private sector participation in the electricity sector : potential and critical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsky, I.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation discussed the development of infrastructure in the electricity sector with particular reference to public-private partnerships and project finance. Emerging markets that encourage private-sector investment were presented along with recommendations to negotiate power purchase agreements involving small-scale hydroelectric power; a thermal power plant at Suroit, Quebec; and, wind energy in Quebec's Gaspe Peninsula. Interconnection to the provincial power grid was also reviewed with reference to the risk faced by the promoters of a project in terms of project design, construction, financing, production and maintenance. The risks faced by Hydro-Quebec were also discussed along with risk allocations between the private and public sectors. tabs., figs

  8. With electricity, a new ambition for France. Recommendation by the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication first outlines the role and importance of electric power and of the electricity sector for the French economy, society and population, for the environment, and for innovation. It also outlines the role and perspectives of this sector for consumers, territories, jobs, and rural growth, and for a stronger France in Europe and a stronger Europe in the world. It proposes graphs and data illustrating electricity trade balance, production and consumption, and then formulates a set of diagnoses and recommendations made by the UFE (a French professional body of the electricity sector) regarding the struggle against climate change, the evolution of the electricity system towards a greater flexibility to meet consumer and territory expectations, a controlled price evolution with a perspective of new services, a higher competitiveness and a guaranteed supply safety for France, and a social and economic transformation of the sector

  9. Taxing Electricity Sector Carbon Emissions at Social Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Anthony; Beasley, Blair; Palmer, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about budget deficits, tax reform, and climate change are fueling discussions about taxing carbon emissions to generate revenue and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Imposing a carbon tax on electricity production based on the social cost of carbon (SCC) could generate between $21 and $82 billion in revenues in 2020 and would have important effects on electricity markets. The sources of emissions reductions in the sector depend on the level of the tax. A carbon tax based on lower SCC ...

  10. Exploiting synergies in European wind and hydrogen sectors: A cost-benefit assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Suzanne; Peteves, Estathios

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a 'wind-hydrogen strategy', is analysed using a cost-benefit approach to evaluate the final impact at the level of the end-consumer when this strategy is implemented. The analysis is conducted for four scenarios, based on different levels of: wind energy penetration in the electricity network area, hydrogen energy price, and environmental taxation on fuels. The effect of technological learning on the outcome is also analysed for the period up to 2050. The results of the analysis indicate that the relative value of the wind energy in the electricity market compared to the hydrogen market is a deciding factor in the attractiveness of the strategy; here the wind energy penetration in the network is a key consideration. Finally, in order to exploit learning effects from linking European wind and hydrogen sectors, action would need to be taken in the short term. (author)

  11. Climate change and energy - 2004. European carbon factor. Comparison of CO2 emissions of the main European electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This joint PWC/Enerpresse brochure publishes the 2003 results of a study about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the 23 main European electric power producers. The study shows an increase by 5% of the cumulated emissions of power companies with respect to 2002. These 23 companies represent 55% of the emissions of the power/heat sector in Europe (25 countries). The first 10 companies are responsible of 43% of the GHG emissions of this sector in Europe. Among those, 2 show stable emissions while 3 have reduced their emissions. (J.S.)

  12. Organisation and reforms of the electricity sector in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovatin, Nevenka; Zoric, Jelena; Pittman, Russell

    2009-01-01

    As a new member state of the EU, Slovenia has been required to adopt EU legislation in full. The Slovenian electricity market has been partially opened since 2001. From 1 July 2007, when households became eligible customers, the electricity market opened fully. The electricity reforms carried out so far comprise of market liberalization, unbundling of activities, allowing regulated TPA, formation of an organized power market, adoption of incentive-based price cap regulation and the establishment of an independent regulatory body. The challenge that remains to be addressed is how to enhance competition in an electricity market that has a net importer position with limited cross-border capacity. Envisaged investments in generating and cross-border capacities will partially close the gap between domestic generation and consumption. Furthermore, since Slovenia has one of the largest levels of state ownership in the electricity sector among EU member states, privatization of electricity companies is envisaged in the near future. (author)

  13. The benefits of integrating European electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbery, David; Strbac, Goran; Viehoff, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The European Commission's Target Electricity Model (TEM) aims to integrate EU electricity markets. This paper estimates the potential benefit of coupling interconnectors to increase the efficiency of trading day-ahead, intra-day and balancing services across borders. Further gains are possible by eliminating unscheduled flows and avoiding the curtailment of renewables with better market design. In the short run the gains could be as high as €3.9 billion/yr, more than 100% of the current gains from trade. About one-quarter of this total comes from day-ahead coupling and another third from shared balancing. If shared balancing is so valuable, completing the TEM becomes more urgent, and regulators should ensure these gains are paid to interconnectors to make the needed investment in the cross-border links more commercially profitable. - Highlights: •The benefits from day-ahead market coupling are €1 bn/yr. •Intra-day and balancing benefits add a further €1.3 bn/yr. •Total benefits including removing unscheduled flows could be €3.4 bn/yr. •Sharing balancing and reserves is high priority. •Rewarding interconnectors for all services reduces barriers to expansion.

  14. The stochastic effects on the Brazilian Electrical Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Pedro Guilherme Costa; Oliveira, Fernando Luiz Cyrino; Souza, Reinaldo Castro

    2015-01-01

    The size and characteristics of the Brazilian Electrical Sector (BES) are unique. The system includes a large-scale hydrothermal power system with many hydroelectric plants and multiple owners. Due to the historical harnessing of natural resources, the National Interconnected System (NIS) was developed outside of the economic scale of the BES. The central components of the NIS enable energy generated in any part of Brazil to be consumed in distant regions, considering certain technical configurations. This interconnection results in a large-scale complex system and is controlled by robust computational models, used to support the planning and operation of the NIS. This study presents a different vision of the SEB, demonstrating the intrinsic relationship between hydrological stochasticity and the activities executed by the system, which is an important sector of the infrastructure in Brazil. The simulation of energy scenarios is crucial to the optimal manner to operate the sector and to supporting decisions about whether expansion is necessary, thus, avoiding unnecessary costs and/or losses. These scenarios are an imposing factor in the determination of the spot cost of electrical energy, given that the simulated quantities of water in the reservoirs are one of the determinants for the short-term energy price. - Highlights: • The relationship between the hydrological regimes and the energy policy and planning in Brazil; • An overview about the stochastic effects on the Brazilian Electrical Sector; • The stochasticity associated with the Brazilian electrical planning; • The importance of hydro resources management for energy generation in Brazil;

  15. R+D management in the electrical sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuara, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Research and development activities have a lot to say in the energy technology debate. In view of the strategic dimension of energy in development societies, the author defends the need to strengthen research in the electrical sector to make it possible for current technologies to evolve and generation processes to be studied as from innovating materials and systems. (Author)

  16. Nuclear regulation on the electrical sector's deregulation horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindelan, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical sector is generally tending towards a deregulated system which will exert greater pressure on production costs. The author uses this article to reflect on the consequences this new conception will bring for nuclear energy and, particularly, for the activity of regulatory agencies and safety requirements. (Author)

  17. Legal aspects of new electrical sector law; Aspectos juridicos de la nueva ley del sector electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra Peris, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    The Electricity Industry Act dated on November 27th 1997 is a milestone of the liberalization process in the basic sectors of the Spanish economy. Concealing the principles of free competition, freedom of establishment and deregulation with the public interest, inherent to this essential service, is the great challenge of rule. The article also analyzes the legal evolution of the electricity industry in either our country or other around it. (Author)

  18. Decarbonising the Finnish Transport Sector by 2050: Electricity or Biofuels?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Klaus; Bramstoft Pedersen, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    for the transport sector by 2050—one with a high percentage of electric vehicles (EV) and another with a high percentage of biofuels (BIO), and compares the scenario results with a known Carbon-Neutral Scenario (CNS) which is adopted from the Nordic Energy Technology Perspective (IEA in Nordic energy technology...... perspective—pathways to a carbon-neutral energy future, 2013a). The socio-economic value of the total system cost is computed and the system integration of the transport sector with the electricity and heating sectors is simulated with an hourly time resolution. This study finds that a Finnish transport...... of the results is tested through a sensitivity analysis which shows that the costs (investment and maintenance) of biodiesel cars and EV are the most sensitive parameters in the comparative analysis of the scenarios....

  19. Decarbonising the Swedish transport sector with electricity or biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Bo Bramstoft; Skytte, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Sweden has set long-term energy policy targets which aim at eliminating net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050 [1]. Since the production of power and district heating in Sweden is already close to be carbon neutral, a further reduction of GHG emissions have to be seeked in other sectors......, if the ambitious targets of a carbon neutral transport system by 2050 and of being independent from fossil fuels in the vehicle fleet by 2030 have to be achieved [1]. To meet the energy policy targets, radical restructuring of the fuel use and vehicle stock in the transport sector is required. In this context......, this paper develops two alternative scenarios for the transport sector by 2050 – an Electric Vehicles Scenario (EVS) which include a high percentage of electric vehicles and a BIOfuel Scenario (BIOS) with a high percentage of biofuels. The scenario results are compared to the Carbon Neutral Scenario (CNS...

  20. FDI spillovers at different levels of industrial and spatial aggregation: Evidence from the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bo, Chiara F.

    2013-01-01

    The European electricity sector has undergone significant reforms in recent years, in the direction of market opening, integration and privatization. National and regional markets are now characterized by the presence of domestic and foreign firms, both privately and publicly owned. Did foreign entry induce positive productivity spillovers to domestic firms in the electricity sector, both at the aggregate and disaggregated level, while also controlling for domestic firms' ownership? This paper examines this issue by focusing on regional foreign direct investment (FDI) spillovers in the aggregated electricity sector and in the disaggregated sub-sectors of generation and distribution. The results show the importance of industry aggregation in determining the existence and sign of regional FDI spillovers for domestic firms. FDI spillovers are then calculated based on a purely geographic scale, by considering the distance between each firm's city of location and firms in neighboring cities. The importance and sign of FDI spillovers is different with respect to the analysis based on regional administrative boundaries, suggesting that spatial aggregation, along with industrial aggregation, is relevant in accounting for productivity spillover effects of foreign presence in the EU electricity sector. - Highlights: • Has the post-reform entry of foreign firms in the EU electricity sector induced spillover effects? • Spatial and industrial disaggregation are important when evaluating foreign direct investment (FDI) spillovers. • Positive horizontal spillovers are found only in the distribution segment of the industry. • Vertical spillovers in generation are negative; positive in distribution. • Spillover intensity in distribution decreasing with distance; regional dimension relevant in generation

  1. European electricity: meeting the challenge of the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    At a two day Conference on 'European Electricity', thirteen papers were presented concerning the likely growth in electricity demand, the structure and regulation of the industry, the effect of the growing environmental lobby and the changing fuel mix in electricity generation. One paper on nuclear power in electricity production in the 1990s is selected and indexed separately. (UK)

  2. Water Use in the US Electric Power Sector: Energy Systems ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation reviews the water demands of long-range electricity scenarios. It addresses questions such as: What are the aggregate water requirements of the U.S. electric power sector? How could water requirements evolve under different long-range regional generation mixes? It also looks at research addressing the electricity generation water demand from a life cycle perspective, such as water use for the fuel cycle (natural gas, coal, uranium, etc.) and water use for the materials/equipment/manufacturing of new power plants. The presentation is part of panel session on the Water-Energy Nexus at the World Energy Engineering Congress

  3. Carbon price signal. Impact Analysis on the European Electricity System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    The Paris Agreement signed by 195 countries late in December 2015, after COP 21, created a new basis for efficient cooperation between countries in the fight against climate change. The technologies being rolled out by the electricity sector will have very different impacts on climate change and, for the time being, investments other than public aid for renewable energies are being guided primarily by prices. To shed more slight on the issue of greenhouse gas emissions, which is closely related to the challenges addressed at COP21, RTE initiated a study in 2015 based on the models used in its Generation Adequacy Report. ADEME wanted to contribute to this effort and offer its support. The present document outlines the approach taken to assessing the impact of the carbon price signal on emissions from the European electric power system, its production costs and its structural evolution over the medium term. This approach was discussed with members of the 'Network Outlook Committee' of the Transmission System Users' Committee which includes environmental NGOs as well as the main economic actors from the power sector. Key findings resulting from the analysis developed in this report include: Simulations conducted with the current generation fleet show that the carbon price would have to be close to euro 30/tonne at the European level to drive a significant reduction in emissions (about 100 million tonnes a year, or 15 %) from the European power sector. A higher price of about euro 100/tonne would help drive an emissions reduction of close to 30%. Over the medium and long terms, beyond an impact on the number of hours fossil fuel power plants would be run, having a high carbon price would send a signal encouraging investment in renewable energies and could incentivise the development of flexible and storage capacity. It would notably guarantee the profitability of gas-fired plants and renewable power development. The following assumptions are factored into the study

  4. The restructuring of Africa's electricity sector : lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, A.

    2008-01-01

    The challenges facing the electricity sector in Africa was discussed with particular reference to financial constraints and the inefficient management of public utilities. The 2 types of reform in the electricity sector include the disengagement of the State for the benefit of the private sector, and the restructuring of the electrical industry to include competition for greater efficiency in the sector. The first reform in Africa involved the opening of the sector to private enterprises without the restructuring of the industry. With the exception of Uganda, the evolution of the restructuring did not include a complete de-integration in the transitional stage. Restructuring involved systematic independent production; a single buyer model with a limited period of monopoly on bulk purchase; access to third party on the networks; empowerment of regulation by the creation of an independent body responsible for regulation; and, establishment of a rural electrification agency. In more advanced countries such as Egypt, Algeria and Nigeria, the creation of a holding company with legally separated subsidiaries was retained. One of the major problems was financial investment, technical performances and the extension of electrical access. Low competition, or low negotiation capabilities led to unbalanced contracts in favour of private promoters. In general, rates for electrical energy increased due to the reform, with the lowering of public resources at the profit of private funding, notably in the independent production of thermal energy versus hydroelectric energy. The results have been mixed due to the breakdown of public versus private partnerships in many countries, with the disengagement of the State. Independent power production has raised problems of sustainability and environmental issues, as well as social problems, price control, as well as accessibility in rural settings. 7 refs., 1 fig

  5. Strategy for development of the Polish electricity sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dybowski, J. [Polish Power Grid Co., Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-01

    This paper represents the strategy for development of the Polish Electricity Sector dealing with specific problems which are common for all of East Central Europe. In 1990 Poland adopted a restructuring program for the entire energy sector. Very ambitious plans were changed several times but still the main direction of change was preserved. The most difficult period of transformation is featured by several contradictions which have to be balanced. Electricity prices should increase in order to cover the modernization and development program but the society is not able to take this burden in such a short time. Furthermore the new environment protection standards force the growth of capital investment program which sooner or later has to be transferred through the electricity prices. New economic mechanisms have to be introduced to the electricity sector to replace the old ones noneffective, centrally planned. This process has to follow slow management changes. Also, introduction of new electricity market is limited by those constraints. However, this process of change would not be possible without parallel governmental initiation like preparation of new energy law and regulatory frames.

  6. Assessing the influence of manufacturing sectors on electricity demand. A cross-country input-output approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, Miguel Angel; Callejas Albinana, Fernando [Faculty of Law and Social Sciences, Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha, Ronda de Toledo s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Del Rio, Pablo [Institute for Public Policies and Goods (IPP), Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C/Albasanz 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    The production and consumption of electricity is a major source of CO{sub 2} emissions in Europe and elsewhere. In turn, the manufacturing sectors are significant end-users of electricity. In contrast to most papers in the literature, which focus on the supply-side, this study tackles the demand-side of electricity. An input-output approach combined with a sensitivity analysis has been developed to analyse the direct and indirect consumptions of electricity by eighteen manufacturing sectors in fifteen European countries, with indirect electricity demand related to the purchase of industrial products from other sectors which, in turn, require the consumption of electricity in their manufacturing processes. We identify the industrial transactions and sectors, which account for a greater share of electricity demand. In addition, the impact of an electricity price increase on the costs and prices of manufacturing products is simulated through a price model, allowing us to identify those sectors whose manufacturing costs are most sensitive to an increase in the electricity price. (author)

  7. Assessing the influence of manufacturing sectors on electricity demand. A cross-country input-output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarancon, Miguel Angel; Callejas Albinana, Fernando; Del Rio, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The production and consumption of electricity is a major source of CO 2 emissions in Europe and elsewhere. In turn, the manufacturing sectors are significant end-users of electricity. In contrast to most papers in the literature, which focus on the supply-side, this study tackles the demand-side of electricity. An input-output approach combined with a sensitivity analysis has been developed to analyse the direct and indirect consumptions of electricity by eighteen manufacturing sectors in fifteen European countries, with indirect electricity demand related to the purchase of industrial products from other sectors which, in turn, require the consumption of electricity in their manufacturing processes. We identify the industrial transactions and sectors, which account for a greater share of electricity demand. In addition, the impact of an electricity price increase on the costs and prices of manufacturing products is simulated through a price model, allowing us to identify those sectors whose manufacturing costs are most sensitive to an increase in the electricity price. (author)

  8. Review of events in the electricity distribution sector in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasley, Henry

    1993-01-01

    The Chief Executive of Southern Electric plc, one of the thirteen recently privatised Regional Electricity Companies, reviews the performance of the United Kingdom electricity distribution sector for 1992, and considers the effects of competition in the Electricity Supply Industry. Three areas of progress are discussed. These include benefits to shareholders (in terms of profits) and to customers, who enjoyed lower prices, better service and more choice. A review of transmission prices was undertaken by the Director General and led to regulations on the effective operation of the pool, improved service standards and power generation competition. Finally, the Coal Review had ramifications for the industry by broadening the debate on competitively priced energy generation and the electricity market since privatization. (UK)

  9. Decomposition for emission baseline setting in China's electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenhof, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition analysis is used to generate carbon dioxide emission baselines in China's electricity sector to the year 2020. This is undertaken from the vantage point of the final consumer of electricity, and therefore considers factors influencing electricity demand, efficiency of generation, sources of energy used for generation purposes, and the effectiveness of transmission and distribution. It is found that since 1980, gains in efficiency of generation have been the most important factor affecting change in the emission intensity of electricity generated. Based upon known energy and economic policy, efficiency gains will continue to contribute to reductions in the emission intensity of electricity generated, however, fuel shifts to natural gas and increases in nuclear generation will further these trends into the future. The analysis confirms other sources in the literature that decomposition is an appropriate technique available for baseline construction, thereby suitable for the emerging carbon market and its related mechanisms

  10. Trading in the rain. Rainfall and European power sector emissions. Research note no. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Analysts often say that temperature and rainfall have an impact on the price of CO 2 , as they influence the conditions of electric power supply and demand. Rainfall mainly affects the capacity of hydropower production, the third largest source of electricity in Europe and by far the leading source of renewable energy. The variability of hydroelectric volumes is indeed usually offset by other, higher-emitting sources of electricity, which has repercussions on the European allowances trading market. In 2005, rainfall was unusually low in several European countries: in the Iberian peninsula and in France, drought is believed to have brought about a rise of approximately 15 Mt CO 2 in power sector emissions. In contrast, hydrological conditions were particularly good in the Nordic countries, allowing them to reduce CO 2 emissions in the region as a whole through hydropower-based exports. The additional allowances demand would therefore have been 'only' about 9 Mt CO 2 . To make the interaction with the CO 2 market easier to understand, an indicator of rainfall in Europe must include this compensating phenomenon resulting from the heterogeneity of the climatic conditions and volumes produced in Europe

  11. Environmental challenges and opportunities of the evolving North American electricity market : European electricity generating facilities: an overview of European regulatory requirements and standardization efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, L.

    2002-06-01

    Several factors are affecting power generating facilities, such as the opening of both electricity and gas markets, and the pressure applied on generators and governments to ensure a steady energy supply for consumers. An additional factor is the pressure for the closing of nuclear power facilities. European siting and emissions requirements for coal-fired and natural gas generating facilities were presented in this background paper. In addition, the author provided an overview of the standardization process in place in Europe. The European Union and its functioning were briefly described, as well as a listing of relevant organizations. The current trends were examined. The document first introduced the European Union, and the next section dealt with Regulatory regime: the internal energy market. The third section examined the issue of Regulatory regime: generation and environmental regulations. Section four presented environmental management systems, followed by a section on standardization. Section six discussed European organizations involved in electricity issues, while the following section dealt with European commission programs. The last section briefly looked at the trends in the electricity sector, broaching topics such as compliance, electricity generation, and emissions trading. 52 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Energy in Europe: the case of electricity or 'how to be european?'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescoeur, B.; Verger, E.

    2007-01-01

    After a long period of benign neglect, concern has been re-aroused for questions related to energy. European Union has succeeded in opening its gas and electricity markets to free competition. This deregulation process began between 10 and 20 years ago. It was at a time of low electricity prices because Europe was facing a power overproduction due to the important investment made in this sector. Low price policy has made companies to re-organize themselves and the sector in order to stay profitable. Now we are entering a new period in which energy prices keep increasing following the strong energy demand. Europe needs to augment its production of electricity, and firms are now drafting strategies on a continental scale. A major piece of the energy puzzle is still missing: the yet to be designed European energy policy

  13. Institutionalizing cross-border cooperatives on European level in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulusma, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    The third energy package proposes the establishment of an Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) and the establishment of a European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity (ENTSOE) and a European Network of Transmission System Operators for Gas (ENTSOG). This legislative initiative is a response to the need to further liberalise the energy sector and to create one single energy market. The proposals wish to remedy the lack of regulatory oversight for cross border issues and the existence of a regulatory gap on cross-border issues. This article addresses these proposals and places them in a historical context. The proposals indicate that the European legislator to some degree intends to institutionalize cross border cooperation of regulators and of transmission system operators. So far cross-border cooperation mostly has been brought about on a voluntary basis and not on the basis of European law. Also this cooperation takes place on a voluntary basis and largely outside the scope of the European Commission. If the proposals are excepted they will result in new forms of cooperation in the energy sector. The Agency will be a community body with legal personality that, besides having an advisory role, will in some circumstances be able to take binding decisions. Therefore it will entail more than voluntary cooperation and be a step closer to the establishment of a European regulator. With the creation of ENTSOG and ENTSOE cooperation between transmission system operators will for the first time be obligatory and take place on the basis of European legislation. It will therefore be a new phenomenon. Nevertheless, it is not always clear from the proposals what the result in practice will be nor how the new organizations will relate to each other, to the Commission and to the national regulators and transmission system operators. Currently, the main question is whether the proposals will be adopted by the Council and the European

  14. The Continuing Role For Antitrust Enforcement In the Electricity Sector

    OpenAIRE

    William Stallings

    2013-01-01

    William Stallings discusses some of the recent enforcement actions in the electricity sector, a highly regulated sector, where government has played an important role in enforcing competition policy. The recent “New York Capacity†cases involving a power generator and its financial services firm, includes the use of a derivative agreement to bypass merger regulation and restrain trade. As Stalling notes, this is an example of a novel liability theory used by the Antitrust Division of...

  15. A robust multivariate long run analysis of European electricity prices

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Bosco; Lucia Parisio; Matteo Pelagatti; Fabio Baldi

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the interdependencies existing in wholesale electricity prices in six major European countries. The results of our robust multivariate long run dynamic analysis reveal the presence of four highly integrated central European markets (France, Germany, the Netherlands and Austria). The trend shared by these four electricity markets appears to be common also to gas prices, but not to oil prices. The existence of long term dynamics among electricity prices and between electrici...

  16. Reforming European electricity industries: to each, his own ''single market''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glachant, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    National transpositions of the European directive on domestic electricity markets have maintained a degree of diversity; and this also characterizes the other conditions for accessing national electricity markets (physical, commercial, industrial and capital access). As a look at the prices of electricity shows, these national markets do not operate in a single way Europe-wide. Furthermore, electricity companies - key actors in this competition - differ widely from each other in size, electrical potential, investment portfolios and strategies for growth. (authors)

  17. Discount factor in planning decision of electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.L.; Maurer, L.T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers and technicians have been giving a lot of attention to the issue of discount factor in planning in the electric sector. In this paper we review the most important points under consideration, attempting to broaden the discussion and stimulate the creativity of the technicians involved with the sector. There appears to be an emerging consensus that the discount factor to be used must consider the capital costs associated with the main financial sources utilized. The traditional factor of 10% per year must be re-evaluated and augmented, in order to best reflect long range economical and financial conditions. The paper emphasizes the importance of the discount factor to several decisions made within the sector, including energy conservation. Because of the relevance of the topic to Brazil future, we strongly suggest the utilization of sensitivity analysis techniques. (author)

  18. Evolution of industrial sector electricity demand in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Steven C.

    2005-01-01

    This note is a preliminary investigation into the relationship between the efficiency of electricity utilization in the Costa Rican industrial sector and the competitive pressures generated by the implementation of economic reforms, in particular, the progressive liberalization of international trade, in the years since the debt and economic crisis of the early 1980s. The steady, year-by-year, reduction in the rate of import tariff protection, with only temporary interruptions and reverses, has been the most consistently implemented component of the macroeconomic, trade, and financial sector reforms upon which this country has embarked over the past two decades. The note sheds some light on the nature of the general policy environment that is conductive to an efficient utilization of energy in the productive sectors and to the success of national energy efficiency promotion programs in this and other parts of the world. (Author)

  19. Electricity consumption and ICT in the French service sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, Fabrice [Toulouse Univ., (GREMAQ-CNRS, IDEI), Toulouse (France); Feve, Patrick [GREMAQ-Univ. de Toulouse 1, Toulouse, 31 (France); Portier, Franck [Toulouse Univ., (GREMAQ, LEERNA, IDEI, IUF, CEPR), Toulouse (France)

    2005-05-01

    The paper documents the evolution of electricity use and the development of information and communication (IC) technologies in the French service sector. To that purpose, we put together two data sets documenting electricity consumption and the diffusion of IC capital goods. Using a simple factor demand model, we estimate the structural parameters of the model using both the time series and the cross-sectional dimension of the data, and allow for a specific effect of IC capital goods on the efficiency of electricity in production. We obtain robust results showing that, once controlled for technical progress, prices, and heated areas, electricity intensity of production increases with computers and software, while it decreases with the diffusion of communication device. (Author)

  20. ASEAN coal development and its impact on electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidin, H.Z.

    1991-01-01

    The Association of southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) comprising the States of Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand is presently experiencing rapid growth in electricity demand attributed mainly to the continued high growth in the economy. This rapid pace of industrialization is exerting pressure on resources available to meet electricity demand. Over the last few years coal has emerged as a significant energy resource in the region and is poised to play an even bigger role in the electricity sector. The paper outlines the electricity supply and coal development in each of the ASEAN countries. The impact of coal in the future generation mix is analyzed. The major issues relating to these developments are also discussed

  1. Prospective of the Electrical Sector 2002-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with the 66 Th Article of the regulation of the Law of the Public Service of Electric Energy, the Comision Federal de Electricidad presented for approval of the Secretaria de Energia this prospective that contains the trend analysis of the electric sector, the program of the expansion system and the perspectives of the market for the next 10 years. The first chapter treats about the position of the generation infrastructure of Mexico in the World and continental environment. In chapter two, the regulatory framework of the electric industry is presented, the present and future evolution of the supply and demand of electric energy as contributions of the Comision Federal de Electricidad and the Compania de Luz y Fuerza del Centro is presented in chapter three. Finally, the main programs of savings and efficient use of energy are shown. This document is perfectible therefore the Secretaria de Energia invites to all those interested on the Mexican electric sector for sending their comments to the addresses which appearing in the Annexe five to establish a continuous improvement system of this publication. (Author)

  2. Qualification Needs, Approaches and Strategies in the Second-Hand Sector A European Good Practice Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arold, Heike

    2008-01-01

    Against the background of changing consumer behaviour and environmental policies, a growing second-hand sector is expected. In order to ensure quality and professionalism within companies operating in this sector, it is necessary to develop a unified Europe-wide and sector-specific qualification which is geared to real working processes and requirements. This good practice report describes the training and qualification structures in the European second-hand sector. In addition, occupational ...

  3. Rational use of electricity in the sideromechanical sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perellada Gamio, Maria Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The present work summarizes the current actions in the sideromecanic sector in Cuba in order to achieve a rational use of the energy carriers and in particular of the Electric Energy, since this constitutes about 85% of the energy structure Of the Organization. It relates the concrete results obtained with the application of Total and Efficient Energy Management Technology in the entities and the projections that have to achieve a better end use of this carrier. (author)

  4. Renewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions from the waste sectors of European Union member states: a panel data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Hélde Araujo; De Melo Faria, Alexandre Magno; Fuinhas, José Alberto; Marques, António Cardoso

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a rich debate about the environmental degradation that results from exposure to solid urban waste. Growing public concern with environmental issues has led to the implementation of various strategic plans for waste management in several developed countries, especially in the European Union. In this paper, the relationships were assessed between economic growth, renewable energy extraction and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the waste sector. The Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis was analysed for the member states of the European Union, in the presence of electricity generation, landfill and GHG emissions for the period 1995 to 2012. The results revealed that there is no inverted-U-shaped relationship between income and GHG emissions in European Union countries. The renewable fuel extracted from waste contributes to a reduction in GHG, and although the electricity produced also increases emissions somewhat, they would be far greater if the waste-based generation of renewable energy did not take place. The waste sector needs to strengthen its political, economic, institutional and social communication instruments to meet its aims for mitigating the levels of pollutants generated by European economies. To achieve the objectives of the Horizon 2020 programme, currently in force in the countries of the European Union, it will be necessary to increase the share of renewable energy in the energy mix.

  5. Contagion effects of the global financial crisis in us and European real economy sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenourgios Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically investigates the contagion effects of the Global Financial Crisis (2007-2009 from the financial sector to the real economy by examining nine sectors of US and developed European region. We provide a regional analysis by testing stock market contagion on the aggregate level and the sector level, on the global level and the domestic/regional level. Results show evidence of global contagion in US and developed European aggregate stock market indices and all US sector indices, implying the limited benefits of portfolio diversification. On the other hand, most of the European regional sectors seem to be immune to the adverse effects of the crisis. Finally, all non-financial sectors of both geographical areas seem to be unaffected by their domestic financial systems. These findings have important implications for policy makers, investors and international organizations.

  6. Optimal policy for mitigating emissions in the European transport sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Piera, Patrizio; Sennai, Mesfun; Igor, Staritsky; Berien, Elbersen; Tijs, Lammens; Florian, Kraxner

    2017-04-01

    A geographic explicit techno-economic model, BeWhere (www.iiasa.ac.at/bewhere), has been developed at the European scale (Europe 28, the Balkans countries, Turkey, Moldavia and Ukraine) at a 40km grid size, to assess the potential of bioenergy from non-food feedstock. Based on the minimization of the supply chain from feedstock collection to the final energy product distribution, the model identifies the optimal bioenergy production plants in terms of spatial location, technology and capacity. The feedstock of interests are woody biomass (divided into eight types from conifers and non-conifers) and five different crop residuals. For each type of feedstock, one or multiple technologies can be applied for either heat, electricity or biofuel production. The model is run for different policy tools such as carbon cost, biofuel support, or subsidies, and the optimal mix of technologies and biomass needed is optimized to reach a production cost competitive against the actual reference system which is fossil fuel based. From this approach, the optimal mix of policy tools that can be applied country wide in Europe will be identified. The preliminary results show that high carbon tax and biofuel support contribute to the development of large scale biofuel production based on woody biomass plants mainly located in the northern part of Europe. Finally the highest emission reduction is reached with low biofuel support and high carbon tax evenly distributed in Europe.

  7. The contribution of the industry sector to the construction of a European area of safety and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiss, W.; Parker, G.; Glibert, M.

    2010-01-01

    The European Atomic Forum (FORATOM) is a trade association representing the European nuclear industry. Its main purpose is to promote the use of nuclear energy in Europe by representing the interests of this important and multi-faceted industrial sector. The European nuclear industry recognized that with the deregulation of the electricity market, diversity of national regulations could seriously distort competition. Therefore harmonizing regulatory practices is the best way of ensuring that the industry can evolve within a stable legal framework. In order to pool resources, the licensees launched mid 2005 ENISS (European Nuclear Installation Safety Standard Initiative) under the umbrella of FORATOM. The EU institutions have in recent years acknowledged nuclear energy as a key component of Europe's energy mix. Major European survey shows public acceptance of nuclear energy is on the increase. Support for discussion and debate on nuclear energy has been supported over the past few years by the European Union through the establishment of the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG) and the European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF). FORATOM and ENISS have been a keen supporter and participant of the ENEF process. The European Nuclear Industry considers that the existing arrangements for ensuring nuclear safety in the EU under the guidance of international nuclear organisations, conventions and under the control of the national safety authorities have delivered excellent safety records. However, the industry has a role to play in the further harmonization processes and is therefore willing to contribute to the dialogue with all possible stakeholders. (author)

  8. Electricity sector prospective 2009-2024; Prospectiva del sector electrico 2009-2024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irastorza Trejo, Veronica; Doniz Gonzalez; Virginia; Cue Aguilar; Gumersindo [Secretaria de Energia, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    This prospective planning of the electricity sector is comprised of four chapters and covers the 2009-2024 planning horizon. The first chapter describes recent developments in the international market of electric energy, which analyzes trends in global consumption of electrical energy, global installed capacity by technology type and country, sources of primary and secondary energy used to generate electricity in several countries and regions, the projections of fuel consumption and the dynamic construction of new plants and infrastructure using technology that, in both advanced economies and in the emerging strategic trends represent in the context the global fight against climate change, among which the new technology and advanced nuclear reactor technologies applicable to the use of renewable sources like wind, solar, geothermal, mini hydro, and bioenergy, among others. The second chapter presents the structure of the legal and regulatory framework in the electricity sector and regulatory policy instruments applicable in Mexico and saved the state permits issued in the methods considered in the Public Service Law of Electricity. The third chapter analyzes the evolution of the national electricity market in recent years, considering the behavior of domestic electricity consumption, sales to the public service sector, the seasonal behavior of demand and pricing structure. In the fourth chapter presents the path planning of consumption and electricity demand at the national, sectoral and regional levels in order to identify the requirements of capacity and energy for the period 2009-2024. [Spanish] Esta prospectiva de planeacion del sector electrico se integra por cuatro capitulos y abarca el horizonte de planeacion 2009-2024. El primer capitulo describe la evolucion reciente del mercado internacional de la energia electrica, en el cual se analizan las tendencias en el consumo mundial de energia electrica, capacidad mundial instalada por tipo de tecnologia y paises

  9. The First Steps Towards Harmonizing Public Sector Accounting for European Union Member States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam; Alijarde, Isabel Brusca

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the process that led the European Commission to the decision to develop European Public Sector Accounting Standards (EPSAS) for harmonizing public sector accounting practices within the European Union. The paper finds that there was limited scope in terms of stakeholder...... participation in the public consultation that served as a basis for the decision. In addition, the decision to adopt EPSAS for EU member states raises questions on the relationship between regional and global governance in the area of public sector accounting....

  10. A post-Kyoto analysis of the Greek electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagoumas, A.S.; Kalaitzakis, E.; Papagiannis, G.K.; Dokopoulos, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    The obligations resulting from the Kyoto Protocol (KP) are implemented by many participants, e.g. Greece, by a combination of two methods: (a) application of regional measures which restrict CO 2 emissions and (b) procurement of green certificates e.g. in a Climate Exchange Market (CEX). Therefore, the cost for compliance with the KP depends on the extent each method is used and also on the traded values in the CEX. The energy policy and planning to be considered are long-term items and now extension of the KP to a post-KP is discussed which reaches year 2020. In Greece, the electricity sector is with a weighted CO 2 contribution of 73%, the dominantly emission sector. The paper analyzes the cost and other merits of different scenarios for the expansion of electrical power system in Greece. For different scenarios, the total cost of the electrical power system expansion is calculated as a function of the price of emission certificates. It has been shown that there is a price of 27.5 Euro /tCO 2 , above which specific mitigation measures may lead to cost optimum solutions. A sensitivity analysis is also presented concerning the variation of key parameters like the participation in the system expansion of new supercritical coal units, the price evolution of natural gas, the RES usage rate and the discount rates of the expansion investments. Results may be of interest for a decision on the cost optimum electrical power system expansion

  11. Socio-environmental policy of Brazilian electric sector. Effects of environmental legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, A.C.; Menezes, C.F.S.

    1993-01-01

    The great socio-environmental policies of Brazilian electric sector are presented, including the aspects of environmental legislation that affects the electric sector and the difficulties faced in order to adapting to this situation. The main problems that the electric sector has found to establishing its socio-environmental policies are also described. (C.M.)

  12. Decarbonization scenarios in the electricity sector in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Van Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of CO_2 emissions issue is clearly a world challenge today and COP21 highlighted the international requirements for countries to address related issues in the short and long term. The fundamental objective of the thesis is to contribute to the identification of possible climate policy solutions related to growing electricity production in a developing country, namely Vietnam, taking into account the need to reduce carbon energy sources. For this purpose several scenarios for electricity sector development are constructed in order to measure effects of choices related to the electricity production on CO_2 emissions. The thesis presents an overview of the energy situation in Vietnam and highlights the rapid increase in electricity consumption due to population pressure and new needs. It also considers major issues of coal and gas imports, new energy sources, in light of economic constraints but also environmental challenges. The theoretical and analytical chapter reviews the analyses of electricity master plans construction, major available economic tools for energy demand forecast models. This forms the framework to understanding the complexity of the 'electric bet' which Vietnam faces. After a presentation of potential quantitative simulation instruments, ELECsim was chosen for modeling the electricity sector in Vietnam. This leads to a comprehensive scenario approach; Scenarios are based on several assumptions about the evolution of economic growth and demographics, energy prices, the power generation technology development, the declared carbon value, discount rates and change rate. As a first step in energy and climate policy Vietnam can control the demand growth by strong action on energy efficiency, while reducing parallel to both the electricity production costs and CO_2 emissions. Several scenarios are then proposed, highlighting both the need to search for higher energy efficiency and the promotion of low-carbon energies. Research envisages a rapid

  13. Restructuring the Russian electricity sector: Re-creating California?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittman, Russell

    2007-01-01

    The Russian Federation has begun restructuring its electricity sector, following the standard restructuring model of complete vertical separation of generation from transmission, with the aim of creating competition in regional generation markets. This paper examines the structure of the six principal regional generation markets that are in their early stages of development and argues that they are likely to be characterized by high levels of market power on the part of individual privatized generation companies, especially during the peak winter demand season. These levels-considerably higher than those that caused competitive problems in California-seem to create a serious risk of price spikes in deregulated wholesale electricity markets, and thus of significant price increases to consumers of electricity

  14. Efficient emission fees in the US electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer Banzhaf, H.; Burtraw, Dallas; Palmer, Karen

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides new estimates of efficient emission fees for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions in the US electricity sector. The estimates are obtained by coupling a detailed simulation model of the US electricity markets with an integrated assessment model that links changes in emissions with atmospheric transport, environmental endpoints, and valuation of impacts. Efficient fees are found by comparing incremental benefits with emission fee levels. National quantity caps that are equivalent to these fees also are computed, and found to approximate caps under consideration in the current multi-pollutant debate in the US Congress and the recent proposals from the Bush administration for the electricity industry. We also explore whether regional differentiation of caps on different pollutants is likely to enhance efficiency

  15. Towards future organization of French electricity sector; Vers la future organisation electrique francaise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss-Kahn, Dominique; Pierret, Christian [Ministere de l' Economie, des Finances et de l' Industrie, Paris (France)

    2000-02-07

    This document displays information and questions concerning the future organization of the French electric sector. The directive on the domestic electricity market was adopted in 1996 by the Council of the Ministers of European Union and Parliament. The member states were due to transpose the directive within their national legislation up to 19 February 1999. The directive establishes principles but provides large reaches of maneuver to the member states which can choose the organizational means according to their own expectations. These task is considered as feasible by the authors. It must reinforce the public service by giving added strength to the security of supply and ensuring everybody's access to a well marketed and high quality electric supply. By introduction of certain well controlled elements of competition this evolution should also contribute to cost lowering, boost of the national competitiveness and support of employment. The document contains seven chapters which expose the following items: 1. The objectives of reorganization; 2. The directive and its reach; 3. Strengthening the public service; 4. Revamping the electric service to promote the growth; 5. Preserving the grids for the general benefit; 6. Defining the place of EDF within the new organizational scheme; 7. Developing an efficient regulation. Finally, an appendix is given containing the Directive 96/92/CE of the European Parliament and Council of 19 October 1996, concerning the common rules for domestic electricity market.

  16. A carbon floor price for the electric power sector: which consequences? Policy Brief nr 2015-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotignon, Raphael; Solier, Boris; Perthuis, Christian de

    2015-11-01

    As France envisages to introduce a carbon floor price (raised from 8 to 30 euros) for the electricity sector like it has been the case in the UK since 2013, such a measure would not result in CO_2 emission reductions, but in emission transfers between actors. The authors comments and analyse the possible consequences of such a measure. By using the ZEPHYR model, they discuss the consequences on the European ETS and on the western European electric power market. They notably briefly comment the impact of a price of 30 euros per CO_2 ton on the emissions by the electricity sector in France, Germany, the UK and Poland, and more particularly of French emissions in 2013 and 2014

  17. Open innovation in the European space sector : existing practices, constraints and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Burg, E.; Giannopapa, C.G.; Reymen, I.M.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    To enhance innovative output and societal spillover of the European space sector, the open innovation approach is becoming popular. Yet, open innovation, referring to innovation practices that cross borders of individual firms, faces constraints. To explore these constraints and identify

  18. The Liberalisation Process of the Spanish Electricity Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    At the beginning of 1998, the 54/1997 Electricity Law entered into force, introducing a new configuration for the Spanish electricity system. Before this, the electric utilities and the Spanish Ministry of Industry and Energy signed a Protocol outlining the general structure of the future changes which would lead to the transformation of the Spanish electricity system from one based on a central purchasing agent model to one based on wholesale and retail competition. The structure of the power industry prior to the 54/1997 Electricity Law consisted of a number of vertically integrated electricity companies, most of them privately owned. One company (REE, Red Electrica de Espana) controlled by the State, was the System Operator, with the property of most of the Transmission Network. This company was created in 1984, as an attempt to improve overall efficiency in the sector by central co-ordination of all available resources and by central planning of new investments. Later, in 1987 a New Legal Framework (Marco Legal Estable) was established in order to assure financial stabilisation to the electric utilities, fixing revenues based on standard costs and setting a National tariff system. The start for the liberalisation process began with the 1994 Electricity Act (LOSEN) with the creation of the Regulatory Commission and the allowance to open access to new entrants. The Spanish electricity model finally set in 1998 seeks the introduction of competitiveness in the power sector through a few basic principles: Shorter state intervention by rationalisation of the energy policy constraints and by leaving to the market forces the system operation and planning (except for transmission planning); Separation of activities: Regulated activities (transmission and distribution) are separated form non-regulated activities (generation, trading); The design of a bulk power competitive market, including competition in generation, freedom of entry, a power pool managed by a market

  19. Bottleneck management in the German and European electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    This publication describes how bottlenecks in the German and European electricity supply pose a danger to the realization of the European internal market in electricity, the transition to electricity production from renewable resources and to the safeguarding of grid availability and security of supply. Bottlenecks at cross-border interconnectors between member states of the European Union are hampering cross-border trade in electricity, posing an impediment to EU-wide competition among electricity production and electricity trading companies. Grid bottlenecks at cross-border interconnectors isolate national markets from one another, with the result that it is not always possible in the European Union to have the most competitive power plant produce electricity. This amounts to a loss of welfare compared with what it would be in the case of an electricity supply without bottlenecks. Furthermore, bottlenecks make it impossible for green electricity that would be eligible for promotion for reasons of climate and environmental protection to be transmitted unimpeded from the most suitable site to the consumer regions. Thus the transmission of electricity produced from wind power in Northern Germany to the industrial centres in Southern Germany is impeded by bottlenecks along the north-south lines of the national transmission network. Today some of the German electricity supply networks already have to be operated near the limits of their capacity, especially during high wind episodes. This poses a growing danger to network availability and security of supply. Since the installation, expansion and conversion of electricity supply networks in Germany and other member states of the European Union is no longer progressing at the required speed, growing importance attaches to the management of bottlenecks. The goal of bottleneck management is to resolve conflicts over network use such as can occur in overload situations with as little discrimination and as little

  20. R,D&I in Electric Sector: a Management Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmilson Alves de Moraes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with the support of the companies of Eletrobras (Chesf, Furnas, Eletronorte and Eletrosul and seeks to develop an integrated management model that incorporates technology and innovation. The model should be concerned with the performance of companies, aligning R, D&I [Research, Development and Innovation] projects with business strategies. The project was undertaken by an in-depth bibliographical review of the subject and a series of guided interviews. These interviews were conducted in both national and international companies that were regarded as innovative in several different sectors, in an attempt to identify practices that could be employed by companies in the electric sector. The findings of this research allowed the development of an integrated R,D&I Management model which is formally set out here as the results of this study.

  1. European Electricity Markets in Crisis: Diagnostic and Way Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roques, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The European electricity industry is going through a profound crisis as several factors combine to create a challenging operating environment for thermal plants. The key issue is that the regulatory and market framework create a climate of deep policy and regulatory uncertainty which will hamper investments and will not deliver on the long term objectives of decarbonization and competitiveness of the European economy. This report analyses both the short and long term challenges for the European electricity markets, and highlights some directions for reform. The report has three main parts. The first part describes the current status quo and challenges associated with the long term decarbonization of the European economy: Section 1 sets the scene by describing the current challenges for the European electricity industry and the challenges associated with the long term decarbonization of the European economy; Section 2 quantifies the investment challenge for the electricity industry and shows how the current regulatory uncertainty undermines investments and will likely not deliver on the stated policy objectives; The second part of the report focusses on the 'extrinsic' issues which affect electricity markets: Section 3 reviews the wider context for electricity market liberalization, which calls for a rethink of the European energy policy framework, including the recent developments in global energy markets, as well as the impact of rising energy prices on economic competitiveness; Section 4 presents the distortive effects of support policies for low carbon technologies and the issues with the European carbon Trading Scheme; The third and last part of the report concentrates on the 'intrinsic issues' with electricity markets: Section 5 details the experience to date with European electricity markets liberalization, and highlights the achievements as well as the shortcomings of the liberalization and integration process; Section 6 dwells into the 'intrinsic issues

  2. Financial Integration Through Benchmarks: The European Banking Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Moerman (Gerard); R.J. Mahieu (Ronald); C.G. Koedijk (Kees)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractEuropean banking regulation has been harmonized to a high degree over the last few decades. Nevertheless, the European banking industry remains fragmented as shown by the relatively high market shares of banks in their home countries. In this paper we concentrate on the integration

  3. Training in the Motor Vehicle Repair and Sales Sector. Report for the FORCE Programme. European Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, Felix; And Others

    Trends in training for employment in the motor vehicle repair and sales sectors in the 12 European Community (EC) countries were identified through a review of 12 national reports that were prepared by 16 research teams involved in an EC study on continuing training in the motor vehicle sales and repair sector. Special attention was paid to the…

  4. Interest organizations across economic sectors : explaining interest group density in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Joost; Carroll, Brendan J.; Braun, Caelesta; Chalmers, Adam W.; Destrooper, Tine; Lowery, David; Otjes, Simon; Rasmussen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The number of interest organizations (density) varies across policy domains, political issues and economic sectors. This shapes the nature and outcomes of interest representation. In this contribution, we explain the density of interest organizations per economic sector in the European Union on the

  5. Interest organizations across economic sectors: explaining interest group density in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Joost; Carroll, Brendan; Braun, Caelesta; Chalmers, Adam; De Strooper, Tine; Lowery, David; Otjes, Simon; Rasmussen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The number of interest organizations (density) varies across policy domains, political issues and economic sectors. This shapes the nature and outcomes of interest representation. In this contribution, we explain the density of interest organizations per economic sector in the European Union on the

  6. Innovation in the European energy sector and regulatory responses to it : Guest editorial note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, T.; Butenko, Anna; Heldeweg, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    The European energy sector is an important economic sector that is also traditionally highly regulated. With the increasing tempo in which innovations in technology and markets occur, catalysed inter alia by the energy transition and accompanied by new formats of innovation (disruptive and

  7. Innovation in the European energy sector and regulatory responses to it : Guest editorial note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, Thomas; Butenko, Anna; Heldeweg, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    The European energy sector is an important economic sector that is also traditionally highly regulated. With the increasing tempo in which innovations in technology and markets occur, catalysed inter alia by the energy transition and accompanied by new formats of innovation (disruptive and

  8. African Financial Sectors and the European Debt Crisis : Will Trouble Blow across the Sahara?

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    The exposure of African financial sectors to global risks, including the likely fall-out of the on-going European debt crisis, continues to be limited. African financial sectors have received much recognition for their steady growth performance and resilience during and after the 2008 global financial crisis. Many of the transmission channels for global risks and financial contagion to fin...

  9. Saving, efficiency and management of electric sector demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez de Tembleque, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Spanish economic model of development is based on energy consumption, and its main source is imported fossil fuels, which have some environmental and scarcity consequences in the mid term, among others. These problems could be reduced in two ways: economic activity reduction or energy efficiency improvement. In the presence of these possibilities, It may be desirable to bet for saving and energy efficiency, to maintain the economic development. This assignment analyzes the main available regulatory and social mechanisms to promote saving and energy efficiency in the power sector, like systems to internalize social costs in the electricity price, efficiency standards, and encourage the new saving culture. (Author) 15 refs

  10. Photovoltaic electricity generation: Value for residential and commercial sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjwal

    The photovoltaic (PV) industry in the US has seen an upsurge in recent years, and PV holds great promise as a renewable technology with no greenhouse gas emissions with its use. We aim to assess the value of PV based electricity for users in the residential and commercial sectors focusing on the financial impacts it has, which may not be greatly recognized. Specifically, we pursue two goals. First, the emerging 'renewable portfolio standard (RPS)' adopted in several states in the country has been a driving force for large scale PV deployment, but financial incentives offered to PV in different RPS states differ considerably. We use life cycle cost model to estimate the cost of PV based electricity for thirty-two RPS states in the country. Results indicate that the levelized cost of PV electricity is high (40 to 60 Cents/kWh). When the contribution of the financial incentives (along with the cost of energy saved) is taken into account, the cost of PV based electricity is negative in some RPS states such as California, New Jersey, New York, while for most of the RPS states the cost of PV electricity continues to remain high. In addition, the states with negative or low cost of PV electricity have been driving the PV diffusion in the residential sector. Therefore, a need to adjust the financial incentive structure in different RPS states is recommended for homogenous development of the residential PV market in the country. Second, we assess the value of the PV in reducing the highest peak load demand in commercial buildings and hence the high value demand charge. The Time-of-Use (TOU) based electricity tariff is widely used by electric utilities in the commercial sector. Energy and peak load are two important facets of the TOU tariff regime. Tools are well established to estimate the energy contribution from a PV system (installed in a commercial building), but not power output on a short time interval. A joint conditional probability model has been developed that

  11. Overview regarding the Romanian electricity sector regulatory framework development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, H.; Caracasian, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Romanian Electricity and Heat Regulatory Authority (ANRE) became operational in March 1999 and sector regulations came to render complete the specific primary legislation already adopted. The alignment to the international practice in the field, attracting investors while complying with the country's legitimate interests for a sustainable economic development and a sound social partnership among sector players were aimed at by ANRE in drawing out its regulations. The paper describes the progress Romania made in the last years in the transition towards a liberalised electricity sector. The key elements leading to such evolution are: 1. the development of the national legislation in accordance with the applicable EU legislation; 2. the establishment of an independent regulator to regulate monopolies where they remain, and to foster competition; 3. the splitting of the vertical integrated utility CONEL/RENEL in several independent companies, the establishment of the Transmission System Operator and the Market Operator within the National Grid Company T ranselectrica ; 4. the Romanian regulating system of authorizations and licenses; 5. the regulated access to the transmission and distribution networks; 6. the design of the wholesale market with two components: bilateral contracts between generators and suppliers and a day-ahead market to ensure the balance between demand and supply; 7. the gradual opening of the electricity market for eligible customers with minimum negative impact upon captive customers; 8. the improvements of the tariff methodologies in order to facilitate long-term decision making and to encourage the entering of potential investors on the market; 9. the introduction of performance standards for the supply activities. Financing resources were also ensured for investments in the modernisation of the national electricity transmission grid with a view to interconnection to the EU networks. Transparency of the process for the access to electricity

  12. Independent regulatory agencies and rules harmonization for the electricity sector and renewables in the Mediterranean region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambini, Carlo; Franzi, Donata

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses the existing regulatory framework for the electricity and renewables sectors, and the role of regulatory agencies in Northern Africa and Middle East countries, under the promotion by the European Union. Using data collected through an original survey directed at regulators, ministry departments and energy companies of the southern Mediterranean, the study is aimed at assessing the extent of agencies' independence looking at three main dimensions of independence: regulatory instruments available to regulators and decision making autonomy; regulators' organizational autonomy; and regulators accountability. Results show that those countries having established an independent regulator have a more credible regulatory framework than those countries in which such a body does not exist. In particular, the analysis shows that Turkey, Croatia and Jordan have defined a regulatory framework that limits administrative expropriation and, consequently, creates an environment more suitable for attracting investments in the electricity and renewables sector. On the institutional ground, this is probably related with the harmonization of regulatory standards promoted by the European Union through the neighboring policy, for the Jordan case, and the membership perspective, in the Turkish and Croatian cases. - Highlights: • We analyze the existing regulatory framework in Northern Africa and Middle East countries. • We construct an original dataset through a survey directed to national regulators. • The extent of agencies' independence has been assessed in different dimensions. • These dimensions are decision making autonomy; organizational autonomy; and accountability. • Few countries have defined a regulatory framework limiting administrative expropriation

  13. Application of additive tariffs in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apolinario, I.; Felizardo, N.; Leite Garcia, A.; Oliveira, P.; Trindade, A.; Vasconcelos, J.; Verdelho, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses a methodology for the calculation and application of tariffs in the electricity sector based on the principle of tariff additivity. It shows how such tariffs can reflect costs and assure the absence of cross subsidies between clients. The methodology presented was adopted in the Portuguese Tariff Code for electricity by the Portuguese Energy Regulator (ERSE). The work presented in this article reflects the experience acquired by ERSE during the preparation, discussion and implementation of that Code. Allowed revenues are determined separately for every regulated activity, assuring that there are no cross subsidies between activities. Additionally, the application of the tariff additivity principle assures the nonexistence of cross subsidies between consumers. Regulated tariffs applicable to end users of electricity are determined by summation, variable by variable, of the different activity tariffs in accordance with the services the costumer uses and in the proportion of that use. The corollary is that if the different activity tariffs are cost reflective and promote efficiency in resource allocation, the tariffs applicable to consumers (access tariffs or integral tariffs) will also reflect costs in the same manner. Therefore, besides economic efficiency, equity between non binding system consumers and binding system consumers is promoted. The examples presented in the article intend to show how additive tariffs reflect costs giving adequate economic price signals for the rational use of the networks and electric energy consumption

  14. Twenty years of environmental opposition in the electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molocchi, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    This article aims to provide a framework for analysing social opposition In Italy against the construction and management of electric power plants (nuclear and thermoelectric) and big electricity power lines in the past twenty years. First The author provide a history of social environmental opposition in the electric sector. This is followed by a typology of reason for opposition in terms of risk perception, which has been applied to about forty cases of social opposition against electric plants. This study an original experimental methodology which could also yield useful results when applied to other complex social phenomena. In the third phase of the study the author analyse the various roles of the social and institutional actors involved in the opposition, and the obstacles to future consensus building. The most interesting result of the study is the not only social but political nature opposition. This factor necessitates integration of the traditional individual risk perception approach with an approach which analyses political and social action of NGO's

  15. Sectoral analysis of the causal relationship between electricity consumption and real output in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chor Foon; Shahbaz, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    This study uses the annual data from 1972 to 2010 to assess the causal relationship between electricity consumption and real output at the aggregate and sectoral levels in Pakistan. This study covers three main economic sectors in Pakistan namely agricultural, manufacturing and services sectors. Our cointegration results reveal that the variables are cointegrated at the aggregate and sectoral levels. At the aggregate level, we find that there is uni-directional Granger causality running from electricity consumption to real output in Pakistan. At the sectoral level, we find that electricity consumption Granger-causes real output in the manufacturing and services sectors. However, there is no causal relationship between electricity consumption and real output in the agricultural sector. The policy implication of these results is that electricity conservation policies in general would deteriorate the process of economic growth as well as the real output in the manufacturing and services sectors in Pakistan. Nevertheless, we suggest the Pakistani government to implement the electricity conservation policies merely to the agricultural sector because such policies may have less or no adverse impact on its real output. - Highlights: • We assess the electricity-growth nexus in Pakistan at the aggregate and sectoral levels. • The variables are cointegrated at both levels. • We find causality from electricity to output at the aggregate level and services. • We find neutral causality in the agricultural sector. • We find bi-directional causality in the manufacturing sector

  16. ROMANIA’S NEGOTIATIONS WITH EUROPEAN UNION REGARDING AGRICULTURAL SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard IONESCU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of negotiations considering the agricultural and alimentary sectors results, from the one hand from their importance in Romanian economy, from the fact that, on the results of negotiations held with EU officials depends the re-launching capacity of these sectors, of Romanian agro-alimentary market,the amendment of their contribution to general economic increase, durable rural development and population life standard improvement generally and specially to the one in rural medium. But, on the other hand, these negotiations importance is also generated by the fact that the Romania’s agriculture structural problems are hard to solve, the disequilibrium from agricultural sector are bigger compare to the ones of other states and their rectifying is more difficult.

  17. 'Nuclearelectrica' and restructuring the electric power sector in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metes, Mircea

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the first steps of the energy market development in Romania and the impact of this process on 'Nuclearelectrica' company which operates the Cernavoda NPP. The main directions of the power sector liberalization in the European Union are being implemented in Romania. 'Nuclearelectrica' attempts to comply with both economic and safety requirements for nuclear plant operation. So far, the evolution of power market proved the competitiveness of Cernavoda Unit 1 with the existing power producers in Romania. It is stressed that although the 'Hydroelectrica' company sells the MWh at a lower price it cannot cope with top demands higher than 2400 MW. Economical aspects are analyzed and the conclusion is drawn that the situation of 'Nuclearelectrica' company will be significantly changed after the commissioning of Cernavoda Unit 2. (author)

  18. Effects of national energy policies on carbon dioxide emissions in a European internal electricity market: Results from a simulation model of the European power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hoster, Frank

    1997-01-01

    This article considers the economic and environmental (in terms of CO2) effects of national energy policies in a European Single Market for electricity. It was found that the combined CO2/Energy-tax proposed by the European Commission would be able to stabilise the current volume of CO2-emissions in the electricity sector. A national single handed effort in introducing a CO2-tax to reduce the emissions was found to be ineffective in the long term and would be in addition allocative inefficien...

  19. The European green electricity markets in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meibom, Peter; Skytte, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    The market shares of different electricity producing renewable energy technologies in the green electricity markets in EU, and the size and prices obtained on these markets depends strongly on the market designs and support policies governing the development of these markets. These issues have been analysed with the use of the ADMIRE REBUS model. Costs data for all significant electricity producing renewable energy technologies and data on the sizes of the renewable energy resources in the EU are combined with different national development of the support policies for green electricity in the different EU countries towards a common EU market in 2010. The model simulates the operation of each green electricity market in EU and the interaction between the markets. Model results show that in a harmonized EU wide tradable green certificate system starting from 2010, i.e. in a system without technology-specific support, wind power will be the most competitive technology, but power plants using different types of biomass will also gain a large share of the market. To reach the indicative EU targets for RES-E production in 2010 a TGC price of 5.6 eurocents is necessary in addition to a physical power price of 2.2 eurocents. (au)

  20. Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Catering sector - Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the respective national and supranational actors (i.e. trade unions and employer organisations) in the field of industrial relations in the contract catering sector in the Netherlands. In order to determine their relative importance in the

  1. Growing like mushrooms? Sectoral evidence from four large European economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldi, C.; Sapio, S.

    This paper follows a stream of literature on the empirics of sectoral growth rates, originated by Castaldi and Dosi (Income levels and income growth. Some new cross-country evidence and some interpretative puzzles. LEM Working Paper 2004-18, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, 2004)

  2. Growing like mushrooms? Sectoral evidence from four large European economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldi, C.; Sapio, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper follows a stream of literature on the empirics of sectoral growth rates, originated by Castaldi and Dosi (Income levels and income growth. Some new cross-country evidence and some interpretative puzzles. LEM Working Paper 2004-18, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, 2004)

  3. Contribution to electrical energy sector reform: Maghreb's case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmouni, A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an electrical energy sector reform 'initiative' adapted to developing countries, in particular those of Maghreb, in order to promote competitive electricity business outside of market structures. It is a matter 1) of authorizing access to networks and international interconnections for all high or low voltage consumers, in particular those very sensitive to electricity prices and to competition, in order to get electricity supply on foreign markets and/or from private producers and/or develop their own productions directly or via consortium; 2) of authorizing access to networks and international interconnections for every independent production destined for internal and/or foreign markets, resulting especially in the development of competitive supplies which are renewable or reduce network constraints; 3) of initiating (or promoting) the integrated management of supply, demand and network systems, around the fundamental principles of technical and economical optimizations, bearing in mind the sector's unique character in order to develop the trans-border electricity business. Much appreciated by internal and external economic operators, the outcome of this initiative applied to the development of self generation and launched for the first time in Morocco, is impressive, since less than one year following its launch, several national and foreign company associations committed, by way of signed agreements, to equip around a dozen wind energy sites spread across the whole of the land and totaling a power of more than 1000 MW so 20% to 25% of the country's current peak demand. Some of the region's countries have shown their keen interest in this solution. In addition, analysis and simulation studies carried out on the integrated systems of Maghreb and the Iberian Peninsula show that access to international networks and interconnections in order to choose one's own suppliers, means among other things that significant gains on production costs of

  4. Multi-period emissions trading in the electricity sector-winners and losers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, Sven

    2006-01-01

    In the context of controlling greenhouse gas emissions, the directive on a Europe-wide trading scheme may be perceived as one of the most important milestones in recent years. Prior to its start, however, a number of very specific design features have to be agreed upon. Regarding the allocation of allowances, a distribution (almost) free of charge seems to be the most likely choice. An aspect that has interestingly attracted little attention in the past is the question of how to allocate emission rights over time. The following paper analyses different allocation options in multi-period emissions trading that are currently discussed in the European context. The options are applied for the electricity sector which is simulated over two periods. The paper distinguishes between a market effect of emissions trading and compliance costs for meeting the emission reduction obligation. The market effect results from a price increase which is due to the fact that opportunity costs for using allowances must be considered. It turns out that the electricity sector as a whole gains from the introduction of the instrument due to the increase of the electricity price. With regard to the different allocation options, it is found that utilities have different preferences depending on the fuel used

  5. Lobbying in the European union – regulation and public sector economics perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Dvořáková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lobbying has become an inseparable companion of the decision-making process and firms but also other social actors (non-governmental organizations, individuals, private and civil sector are forced to reflect this fact, if they want to promote their interests effectively and if they want to avoid regulation that would harm their interests. The paper analyses the regulation of lobbying in European institutions and focuses on two major institutions which are under pressure of the lobbyists, the European Commission and the European Parliament. The paper discusses and presents the both ways of regulation which occur in the European institutions- the concept of self-regulation and the binding Code of Conduct under the Rules of Procedure in the European Parliament.The paper contains also possible economic consequences of lobbying based on the Public Sector Economics perspective and the methodology of the principal-agent relationship.

  6. Water Constraints in an Electric Sector Capacity Expansion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cohen, Stuart [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newmark, Robin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Martinez, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sullivan, Patrick [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tidwell, Vince [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-17

    This analysis provides a description of the first U.S. national electricity capacity expansion model to incorporate water resource availability and costs as a constraint for the future development of the electricity sector. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model was modified to incorporate water resource availability constraints and costs in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions along with differences in costs and efficiencies of cooling systems. Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013b). Scenarios analyzed include a business-as-usual 3 This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. scenario without water constraints as well as four scenarios that include water constraints and allow for different cooling systems and types of water resources to be utilized. This analysis provides insight into where water resource constraints could affect the choice, configuration, or location of new electricity technologies.

  7. 2015 Plan. Project 2: the electric power sector and the Brazilian economy: insertion and forecasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This project shows the economic and the energetic view of the Brazilian electric power sector, mentioning the actual conjuncture; the economy evolution; some sector forecasts; demographical aspects; international price of petroleum and National Energetic Matrix. (C.G.C.)

  8. European Human Resources Observatory for the Nuclear Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flore, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Institute for Energy and Transport provides support to European Union policies and technology innovation to ensure sustainable, safe, secure and efficient energy production, distribution and use and to foster sustainable and efficient transport in Europe. Briefly outlined are the organization, bottom-up approach and top-down approach

  9. Employability and the psychological contract in European ICT sector SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholarios, D.; van der Heijden, B.I.J.M.; van der Schoot, E.; Bozionelos, N.; Epitropaki, O.; Knauth, P.; Marzec, I.; Mikkelsen, A.; van der Heijde, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the employability of information and communication technology (ICT) professionals from the perspective of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The first stage of analysis, based on over 100 interviews with managers of ICT supplier companies in seven European countries

  10. Renewable energy and CCS in German and European power sector decarbonization scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludig, Sylvie

    2013-11-06

    system costs are lower when transmission and storage are available. Restrictions on transmission expansion induce high amounts of storage since high local shares of solar PV lead to large output variations. In contrast, a highly interconnected European power grid allows for optimized renewable power generation siting in regions with highest potentials, which requires large-scale transmission expansions but limits total power system costs. Results from a detailed study for Germany show that the level of power demand is strongly relevant for the realization of high renewable shares and ambitious decarbonization targets. A broad technology portfolio allows to hedge against the failure to meet efficiency goals for electricity demand. CCS is necessary to reach ambitious government targets if power demand is not sufficiently decreased by efficiency measures, as is offshore wind energy. Even in case of decreasing demand, at least one of both technologies needs to be available. The choice of transmission expansion corridors is strongly influenced by technology availability: in scenarios without offshore wind energy, north-south interconnections, which are crucial in all other scenarios, only play a minor role. The studies in this thesis show that a large-scale decarbonization of the German and European power sectors is achievable through large shares of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation. CCS is not a prerequisite for successful CO{sub 2} emission strategies, but allows reaching mitigation targets at a lower cost. A portfolio of renewable energy integration options is essential to manage temporal and spatial fluctuations; the optimal technology mix is determined by the underlying power system.

  11. Pathways for the North European electricity supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odenberger, M.; Unger, T.; Johnsson, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the development of the electricity-supply systems in Northern Europe (Germany, UK, Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway) until the year 2050. The focus is on the response to an assumed common stringent CO 2 -reduction target and on the role of carbon capture and storage technologies (CCS). Special emphasis is put on turn-over in capital stock, timing of investments and the infrastructural implications of large-scale introduction of CCS. The analysis is carried out through scenario analysis with the aid of a techno-economic model, in which a case including CCS is compared to a case excluding this option. The phase out of the present capital stock (power plants) is included from the Chalmers energy infrastructure databases, which gives information on present and planned power plants down to block level for plants exceeding 10 MW net electric power. Assuming technical lifetimes for these plants yield residual capacities in each year, here referred to as the phase-out pattern. CCS technologies are assumed to become commercially available in 2020. The age structure of the power plants indicate that full turn-over in capital stock will take several decades with the present generation capacities accounting for around 50% of generated electricity in 2020. The results show that CO 2 emission reductions of 20% and 60% by the years 2020 and 2050, respectively, relative to 1990, can be met at a marginal cost of abatement of about 25-40 Euro /ton CO 2 over the period studied if CCS is included as an option from 2020. At the same time the marginal cost of generating electricity lies in the range 45-60 Euro /MWh. Excluding CCS raises the marginal cost of abatement with about 10 Euro /ton CO 2 , whereas the marginal cost of electricity generation increases with roughly 5-10 Euro /MWh. The CO 2 target by the year 2020 is met by implementation of renewable electricity and fuel shifting from coal to gas. After 2020 CCS technologies constitute an attractive way

  12. Energy policy and European utilities' strategy: Lessons from the liberalisation and privatisation of the energy sector in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haar, Laura N., E-mail: laura.n.haar@mbs.ac.u [University of Manchester, Manchester Business School, Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PB (United Kingdom); Marinescu, Nicolae, E-mail: marinescu@unitbv.r [Transylvania University of Brasov, Faculty of Economic Sciences, 29 Eroilor Bd, Brasov 500 036 (Romania)

    2011-05-15

    In the context of energy sector reforms pursued by Romanian government since 1990s, we compare and contrast the market outcomes of European utilities' investment with the host government policy objectives. We begin with energy market reform in Romania and review governments' efforts to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) and to gradually withdraw from the distribution and supply segments of electricity market. Subsequently, we illustrate the scope European utilities have had, market policy and design notwithstanding, for consolidating market power through regional dominance. We examine the extent to which these utilities have sought to enhance their positions through horizontal and vertical integration, counter to the EU plans for a competitive market structure. We find that the investments of European incumbents have not been resoundingly successful: although market entrance may have been justified on long-term strategic grounds, in the immediate term, segments acquired through competitive auctions have yielded modest regulated returns. Finally, we discuss the extent to which policy makers have achieved their goals. Although the short-term benefits of a competitive market structure have reached some consumers, a renewed interest in promoting 'national champions' reflect frustration with market mechanisms as a means of ensuring long-term strategic investments in the sector. - Research highlights: {yields} We analyze the European Utilities activities in Romania after market liberalization. {yields} We find government efforts to reform energy sector attracted foreign direct investment. {yields} We find utilities consolidated market power horizontally in Central European region. {yields} The short-term benefits of competitive forces contrast the weak returns by utilities. {yields} To encourage further investment, government should not promote national champions.

  13. Energy policy and European utilities' strategy: Lessons from the liberalisation and privatisation of the energy sector in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haar, Laura N.; Marinescu, Nicolae

    2011-01-01

    In the context of energy sector reforms pursued by Romanian government since 1990s, we compare and contrast the market outcomes of European utilities' investment with the host government policy objectives. We begin with energy market reform in Romania and review governments' efforts to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) and to gradually withdraw from the distribution and supply segments of electricity market. Subsequently, we illustrate the scope European utilities have had, market policy and design notwithstanding, for consolidating market power through regional dominance. We examine the extent to which these utilities have sought to enhance their positions through horizontal and vertical integration, counter to the EU plans for a competitive market structure. We find that the investments of European incumbents have not been resoundingly successful: although market entrance may have been justified on long-term strategic grounds, in the immediate term, segments acquired through competitive auctions have yielded modest regulated returns. Finally, we discuss the extent to which policy makers have achieved their goals. Although the short-term benefits of a competitive market structure have reached some consumers, a renewed interest in promoting 'national champions' reflect frustration with market mechanisms as a means of ensuring long-term strategic investments in the sector. - Research highlights: → We analyze the European Utilities activities in Romania after market liberalization. → We find government efforts to reform energy sector attracted foreign direct investment. → We find utilities consolidated market power horizontally in Central European region. → The short-term benefits of competitive forces contrast the weak returns by utilities. → To encourage further investment, government should not promote national champions.

  14. Role of natural gas in meeting an electric sector emissions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    With advances in natural gas extraction technologies, there is an increase in availability of domestic natural gas, and natural gas is gaining a larger share of use as a fuel in electricity production. At the power plant, natural gas is a cleaner burning fuel than coal, but uncertainties exist in the amount of methane leakage occurring upstream in the extraction and production of natural gas. At high leakage levels, these methane emissions could outweigh the benefits of switching from coal to natural gas. This analysis uses the MARKAL linear optimization model to compare the carbon emissions profiles and system-wide global warming potential of the U.S. energy system over a series of model runs in which the power sector is asked to meet a specific CO2 reduction target and the availability of natural gas changes. Scenarios are run with a range of upstream methane emission leakage rates from natural gas production. While the total CO2 emissions are reduced in most scenarios, total greenhouse gas emissions show an increase or no change when both natural gas availability and methane emissions from natural gas production are high. Article presents summary of results from an analyses of natural gas resource availability and power sector emissions reduction strategies under different estimates of methane leakage rates during natural gas extraction and production. This was study was undertaken as part of the Energy Modeling Forum Study #31:

  15. Investments in the Brazilian electric sector and the financial crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela, Jorge Alberto Alcala; Oliveira, Andre Luis Cantuaria Cardoso

    2010-01-01

    The electricity sector in addition to being a public utility, requires a substantial investment, explore natural resources and the basis of all production chains and consumption of our society. The dynamics of this sector goes beyond the individual performance of energy companies and will also interfere in matters of political, economic, social and environmental development of nations. The lack of sophistication and low level of development in credit derivatives financial systems in Brazil, both as a healthy situation of the accounts and balance sheets, the fruit of bitter experience in past crises are allowing a better resistance to weather the current crisis. But it is an important trading partner of Brazil, through various business financial economic crises that is affecting the U.S. economy and the world has also affected the economy of our country, but with less intensity. The econometric model used to study the investment to be initiated in 2010 by ELETROBRAS meets a correlation acceptable; this demonstrates that a well dependence exists between power and investment to the projects to be implemented. (author)

  16. Liberalisation of the European Electricity Industry: Internal Market or National Champions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domanico, F.

    2007-07-01

    This article offers an analysis of the present competitive and regulatory framework of the European electricity sector. Considering the complexity of this industry, the focus in this work is mainly on the problem of market concentration of incumbents in the sector as a result of the liberalisation process. The new trend toward the creation of ''national champions'' as well as recent mergers between gas suppliers and electricity producers raised serious concerns about abuses of market power and risks of future collusion. Taking account of investment in interconnection as well as other international and regional experiences, the internal market issue is investigated as the solution to the''risks'' from liberalisation. (auth)

  17. Concentration in the European electricity industry: The internal market as solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanico, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of the present competitive and regulatory framework of the European electricity sector and the results achieved with the liberalisation process. Considering the reactions of incumbents to the liberalisation, the focus in this work is mainly on the problem of market concentration in the sector. The new trends toward the creation of 'national champions' as well as recent mergers between gas suppliers and electricity producers raise serious concerns about abuses of market power and risk of future collusion. In particular, the strategic linkage of existing markets and the expansion into new ones are analyzed in the light of the multimarket contact theory. Considering investment in interconnection among Member States, the internal market issue is investigated as a solution to the 'risks' coming from liberalisation

  18. Concentration in the European electricity industry: The internal market as solution?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domanico, Fabio [Department of Economics, Luiss Guido Carli University, 1, Via O. Tommasini, 00162 Roma (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    This article offers an analysis of the present competitive and regulatory framework of the European electricity sector and the results achieved with the liberalisation process. Considering the reactions of incumbents to the liberalisation, the focus in this work is mainly on the problem of market concentration in the sector. The new trends toward the creation of 'national champions' as well as recent mergers between gas suppliers and electricity producers raise serious concerns about abuses of market power and risk of future collusion. In particular, the strategic linkage of existing markets and the expansion into new ones are analyzed in the light of the multimarket contact theory. Considering investment in interconnection among Member States, the internal market issue is investigated as a solution to the 'risks' coming from liberalisation. (author)

  19. The European directive on renewable electricity: conflicts and compromises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.H.

    2005-01-01

    As part of its efforts to increase the use of renewable energy in Europe, a Directive regarding renewable electricity was agreed by the European Union in 2001. The purpose of this article is to examine this Directive, examining how the discussions surrounding its content unfolded. The investigation focuses upon three contentious issues that were debated during the Directive's development: the definition of 'renewable', the national targets for renewable electricity (their levels, as well as whether they should be 'binding' or 'indicative') and the questions associated with harmonisation (whether one Union-wide 'support scheme' for renewable electricity should be in place, and, if so, what it should be). During the 5 years that the Directive was negotiated, many intra-Union conflicts were eventually resolved, at least temporarily, by compromises. Nevertheless, some difficult decisions regarding the promotion of renewable electricity in the European Union still have to be taken

  20. A Sectoral Approach to Training in the Printing Industry and the Hospital Sector. Synthesis Report of a Study in Five European Countries. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmerdam, John

    The development of sectoral training systems in two economic sectors--the printing industry and the sector of health care in hospitals--was examined in a study that entailed parallel research projects in five European countries: Belgium, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom. The study was based on the assumption that the…

  1. European preparations for the ITER VV sectors manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Lawrence; Arbogast, Jean-Francois; Bayon, Angel; Galvan, Stefano; Giraud, Benoit; Ioki, Kimihiro; Losasso, Marcello; Mico, Gonzalo; Stamos, Vassilis; Trentea, Alexandru; Utin, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    For the benefit of the bidders for the Call-for-Tender for the 7 sectors of the ITER Vacuum Vessel, launched in early 2010, a large amount of relevant technical information was included to ensure a rapid start to successful manufacture programme, without the need for a full-scale prototype, which would cause an unacceptable delay to the ITER schedule. The methodology of the logical structures of the specification and the additional planned mock-ups are described and the results from nearly a decade of R and D and manufacturing studies carried out inside the EU under the auspices of EFDA and F4E are also summarised. The work covers the evolution of novel manufacturing schemes and technologies, including a modular special local machining centre for making holes in the shell of the vessel with weld preparation included. New results from the combined studies by three parties, and using a round-robin trial system on the UT inspection of single-sided welds, including the successful control of the root side are described. A full-scale, partial prototype has demonstrated the successful construction segments using jigs to control the distortion from conventional welding, from the inner shell to the outer shell, and then the joining of the segments to form a part sector. The paper also summarises the results from the prototype segment, manufactured without jigs and using only EB welds. In order to be able to achieve the required as-welded tight tolerances, two specialised computational techniques have been developed, using SYSWELD and ANSYS codes and calibrated with the mock-ups in order to efficiently predict welding distortions. Based on this successful practical and theoretical work, computer models of the complete poloidal segments or sectors, including jigs, were can now generated and used to investigate many welding sequences in order to optimise the construction and achieve all the tolerances.

  2. Exploring the public-private sector wage gap in European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Christofides, Louis N.; Michael, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We estimate the public-private sector pay gap for 27 European countries, using the 2008 EU SILC. The coefficients of conditional (on personal and job characteristics) public sector controls give a first impression on wage differences, while decompositions into explained and unexplained components (also accounting for selectivity) allow for a more complete analysis, which helps to identify possible causes of the gap. Regional patterns exist. Separate subsample decompositions based on age, educ...

  3. The Saudi electricity sector: pressing issues and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachet, Said; Aoun, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    % of the global GDP and two thirds of world population. - Saudi Arabia is the host of the Muslim holy places Mecca and Medina, attracting some two million pilgrims annually from all over the world, putting the Kingdom as one of the most prominent countries in the Islamic world. However, the Kingdom's role on the global energy scene is endangered by several domestic aspects, mainly linked to its fast-growing population, creating significant economic challenges in providing sufficient employment for its young population. Furthermore, the domestic energy demand is growing at an unsustainable high rate. Some observers see the country becoming a net energy importer if the present path of domestic energy consumption (mainly oil and natural gas) continues in the future. Relying heavily on hydrocarbons as feedstock for the electricity sector, Saudi Arabia is by far the largest user of crude oil for power generation in the world. Oil accounts for two thirds of the input into electricity generation, with natural gas providing most of the remaining portion. The Saudi authorities have realized that there is an urgent need to review the domestic energy policy. With a particular focus on the electricity sector, the policy is based on an ambitious diversification program of the energy mix towards renewable and nuclear energy. However, should the recent slip of oil prices reflect a new level for a long period of time, Saudi authorities, like other oil producing countries, may revise their global energy investment policy. The passing of King Abdallah on January 23 also raises questions about the energy policy path, which could be either confirmed or amended by the new Saudi leadership. This paper reviews the electricity demand patterns and structure in Saudi Arabia. It examines the recent Saudi power sector developments and draws possible avenues to address the numerous related challenges ahead

  4. Power sector development in a common Baltic electricity market. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    In the years to come the Baltic electricity sector is expected to go through major changes. up till recently the sector has been characterised by vertically integrated monopolies, but at present the electricity sectors in the Baltic States are undergoing reform processes to meet the requirements of the EU directives regarding liberalisation of electricity sectors. This implies a different organisation of the sector, with new roles and responsibilities, and focus on new issues such as a well-functioning electricity market, security of supply and market power. In this project long-term scenario analyses are used to clarify the challenges facing the future Baltic electricity market and to analyse the robustness of the power sector. The project examines how existing power plants will manage in a competitive market, how power prices will develop and which investments are likely to be preferred by investors, among other issues. (BA)

  5. TAXATION OF FINANCIAL SECTOR AFTER THE CRISIS IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Eugenia-Ramona

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Taxation of financial sector is an important issue of the actual fiscal policy, especially after the economic crisis impact. By taxing the financial sector, it is intended taxation of financial transactions, and financial activities. European Union supports the taxation of the financial system and makes proposals in this regard. This paper tries to reveal the major aspects concerning the taxation of financial sector, both theoretical and empirical aspects. It will analyze the reasons which justify the application of such taxes, but also difficulties involved in practice. Another major objective of this paper is to examine the role of taxation in the financial sector as important regulatory instrument. This subject is debated in European Commission papers and by many economists. There are underlined the necessity of such tax, the impact and the economic efficiency. Our purpose is to identify if this kind of tax is good for our economy and what can be the impact from budgetary point of view. For finding this answers the paper realize a complex analysis of the types of taxes applied on financial sector in countries which already adopted this kind of taxes, like United Kingdom, Austria, Hungary, Cyprus. We believe that the financial sector should be charged, because was responsible in great measure the economic crisis impact. A potential tax applied to financial sector is considered as an important source of budget revenues. This article tries to explore the possible tax measures for financial sector according to the major principle of public finance –equity and efficiency. Special attention will be given to the need to implement financial sector taxation in Romania. In the years before the crisis banks and entire financial sector in Romania recorded significant profits. For this reason such tax is justified given that this sector is exempt from VAT. Applying such a tax would reduce the budget deficit and on the long term will

  6. The development strategies of the european electric power companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heddebaud, D.

    2005-01-01

    This study takes stock on the european market of the electric power and of its development perspectives. It details the strategy and the place of the main operators and shows their forces and weaknesses. It provides a comparison of the financial performances of 28 companies (growth, margins, profitability, debt and war chest). (A.L.B.)

  7. Storing electricity, the technological challenge of the automotive sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The search for alternatives to the internal combustion engine for motor vehicles may be nothing new, but the present focus on environmental issues (dwindling fossil fuel reserves, growing awareness of the environmental impact of the internal combustion engine, etc.) makes it more topical than ever. It is no coincidence that most manufacturers and OEMs on the automotive market, and many research centers, are studying the use of batteries and fuel cells as a means of developing greener, sustainable transport solutions for the future. The European Union is considering ways of compelling manufacturers to market vehicles that are more fuel-efficient at a time when the members of the European Automobile Manufacturers Association, unlike their counterparts in Japan, are failing to meet the targets defined in voluntary agreements. Through their sales of hybrid vehicles, Japanese manufacturers have lent credibility to the notion of a market for electrified vehicles. In this way, market constraints (environmental impact of the internal combustion engine, the cost of fossil fuel, consumers, and national or European lawmakers) will push the automotive industry into marketing 'low-carbon' vehicles in the very short term. Manufacturers' product plans reveal that a wave of electrified products can be expected on the market in 2015. That implies a significant R and D effort between now and 2012, with demonstrator vehicles up and running by 2013-2014 at the latest. So now is a crucial time for research organisations to position themselves in preparation for this emerging market. Industry is hoping for technological progress in areas that cut across these varying degrees of hybridisation and electrification, namely the storage and management of electrical energy and power electronics. It is these areas that will be at the heart of research programs. In these highly competitive times, efforts should focus on: - Lowering costs (by a factor of 5 to 10 for fuel cells and 2 to 4 for

  8. A model for predicting Inactivity in the European Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Themistokles Lazarides

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The paper will addresses the issue of inactivity and will try to detect its causes using econometric models. The Banking sector of Europe has been under transformation or restructuring for almost half a century. Design/methodology/approach – Probit models and descriptive statistics have been used to create a system that predicts inactivity. The data was collected from Bankscope. Findings – The results of the econometric models show that from the six groups of indicators, four have been found to be statistically important (performance, size, ownership, corporate governance. These findings are consistent with the theory. Research limitations/implications – The limitation is that Bankscope does not provide any longitudinal data regarding ownership, management structure and there are some many missing values before 2007 for some of the financial ratios and data. Originality/value – The paper's value and innovation is that it has given a systemic approach to find indicators of inactivity.

  9. Gas and electricity price in the European Union in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jean-Philippe

    2012-11-01

    This document indicates and comments the evolution of gas and electricity prices in the different countries of the European Union. As far as natural gas is concerned, it outlines that taxes on gas are higher in Nordic countries, and that prices are increasing everywhere (for industry as well as for households). As far as electricity is concerned, price is rather cheap in France compared to the other countries. Graphs indicate the evolution of electricity prices between 2010 and 2011 in the different countries for industry and households. Even if a decrease has been noticed in some countries, the general trend is to an increase (between 5 and 10% in average)

  10. The European Roadmap to Fussion Electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    With the reduction of CO 2 emissions driving future energy policy, fusion can start market penetration around 2050 with up to 30% of electricity production by 2100. This requires an ambitious, yet realistic roadmap towards the demonstration of electricity production by 2050. This talk describes the main technical challenges on the path to fusion energy. For all of the challenges candidate solutions have been developed and the goal of the programme is now to demonstrate that they will also work at the scale of a reactor. The roadmap has been developed within a goal-oriented approach articulated in eight different Missions. For each Mission the critical aspects for reactor application, the risks and risk mitigation stretegies, the level of readiness now and after ITER and the gaps in the programme have been examined with involvement of experts from ITER International Organization, Fusion for Energy, EFDA Close Support Unites and EFDA Associates. High-level work packages for the roadmap implementation have been prepared and the resources evaluated. ITER is the key facility in the roadmap and its success represents the most important overarching objectives of the EU programme. A demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO), producing net electricitiy for the grid at the level of a few hundreds MW is foreseen to start operation in the early 2040s. Following ITER, it will be the single step to a commercial fusion power plant. Industry must be involved early in the DEMO definition and design. The evolution of the programme requires that industry progressively shifts its role from that of provider of high-tech components to that of driver of the fusion development. Industry must be able to take full responsibility for the commercial fusion power plan after successful DEMO operation. For this reason, DEMO cannot be defined and designed by research laboratories alone, but requires the full involvement of industry in all technological and systems aspects of the design. Europe

  11. Generating solutions : summary of the Electricity Sector Council's review of foreign credential recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The Electricity Sector Council has recognized the increasing requirement to recruit and retain internationally trained workers to offset the anticipated retirement of up to 40 per cent of skilled workers in this sector by 2014. This document provided a brief summary of the review of foreign credential recognition in Canada's Electricity Council which was prepared in February 2008. The purpose of the study was to capture a perceptive picture of Canada's electricity labour force and to assist the Electricity Sector Council in the potential development and implementation of strategies to facilitate the integration of internationally trained workers into Canada's electricity sector. This synopsis report presented the analysis of the study including a discussion of immigration trends; foreign credential recognition in Canada's electricity sector; immigration profiles by region; case study profiles; and recommendations. It was recommended that resources be researched, developed and provided in order to help stakeholders attract, recruit, retain and integrate internationally trained workers. 2 refs

  12. Impact of the liberalization of the electricity market on the waste processing sector in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomme, S.; Buist, G.

    2001-01-01

    The consequences of the deregulation of the electricity sector for the waste incinerating market in the Netherlands are discussed. Attention is paid to technical and organizational characteristics of the market for electricity, the mechanism that determines the hierarchy of power plants in the total electric power production sector, the dilemma of flexibility versus throughput, and the importance of sustainable and green electricity. The appendix holds a scheme for the sale of energy in a free market and a list of contract variables [nl

  13. How to benefit from a common European electricity market design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringler, Philipp; Keles, Dogan; Fichtner, Wolf

    2017-01-01

    The realization of an Internal Electricity Market in Europe is currently, on the one hand, progressing, in particular thanks to the wide-spread implementation of market coupling solutions for cross-border congestion management. On the other hand, diverging national market designs pose a threat to the continuation of this process. Given the challenges to electricity market design in a multi-regional context, we analyze how different design aspects, namely cross-border congestion management and capacity mechanisms, affect welfare and generation adequacy in Europe. In doing so, we rely on an agent-based simulation model for electricity wholesale markets which we apply within several numerical, computational case studies for the region of Central Western Europe (2012–2030). Our results confirm the benefits of market coupling in terms of welfare as well as generation adequacy. Furthermore, we find indications that coordinating market designs across regions supports these targets. Therefore, we recommend that European energy policy forms a stable, transparent regulatory framework with cross-border market coupling as an integral component. In this context, energy policy targets should be clearly defined and operationalized, which also needs to consider potential conflicts between them. Finally, electricity market designs need to be coordinated among states to benefit most from a common European market. - Highlights: • European electricity markets at crossroads given diverging market designs • Simulation of CWE Market Coupling using an agent-based model. • Welfare and adequacy gains from European market coupling and new interconnections. • Conflicts between energy policy targets to be considered in market design. • Coordination key to further strengthen integration of electricity markets in Europe.

  14. Nuclear energy and opportunity to strengthen the sustainable electricity sector; Energia nuclear una oportunidad para fortalecer el sector electrico sustentable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles N, A. G. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Direccion de Proyectos de Inversion Financiada, Gerencia de Proteccion Ambiental, Paseo de la Reforma No. 164, Col. Juarez, 06600 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The beginning of electricity in Mexico was through the use and exploitation of natural resources; as the demand grew, more generation power plants were required with great capacity and at the same time the fuels used varied, although, oil continued to be the main fuel. At present, due to the effects of climate change, the Conference of the Parties has proposed to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels to give way to clean energy (wind, solar, geothermal, nuclear, etc.), which entails gradually modifying the energy matrix of the electricity sector. The National Development Plan and the National Electricity Sector Development Program, this coordinated by the Energy Secretariat in Mexico, establish policies to promote sustainable development, increasing electricity generation through clean energy sources, including nuclear energy. However, such plans are not accurate in the strategy to be followed to ensure compliance with the increased participation of nuclear energy. This article proposes a nuclear program for the Mexican electricity sector, under the terms of a State policy, aimed at crystallizing a sustainable electricity development 2015-2036; considering that the application to the electricity sector constitutes a representative and justified example of the incorporation of environmental aspects in decision processes for the preservation of the environment. In order to determine the quantity and type of reactors, as well as the number of nuclear power plants and increase of the installed capacity, the general planning scheme of the electric sector was used, taking as reference the modeling criteria of the WASP planning system. Finally, is concluded that the electricity generated by fission of radioactive elements is an opportunity to fulfill the commitments made by Mexico at COP 21 and to meet in an environmentally friendly way the energy requirement that our country needs. (Author)

  15. Asymmetric regulation measures in the European gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clastres, C.

    2003-01-01

    Like most of the privatized utilities, the gas market needs to be regulated in order for the positive benefits of competition to fully develop. In addition to the issues of eligibility and access, the regulators have had to deal with several other obstacles, and among other things have raised questions concerning the supply of gas. Asymmetric regulation (release gas and market share reduction measures) is one of the possible responses, making it possible to facilitate access to both resources and consumers. The British regulator was the first to introduce this type of regulation during the 1990's. More recently, Spain and Italy have also adopted it. Although we can find a number of similarities in the causes justifying the use of such regulation, the results obtained vary from one country to another. It appears that they are dependent upon a number of variables including: the existence of national production, the structure of the gas market and finally the level of penetration and growth of gas in various business sectors. (authors)

  16. Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Electricity Sector Using Smart Electric Grid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiaa Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of global CO2 emissions are emitted from electricity generation through the combustion of fossil fuels to generate heat needed to power steam turbines. Burning these fuels results in the production of carbon dioxide (CO2—the primary heat-trapping, “greenhouse gas” responsible for global warming. Applying smart electric grid technologies can potentially reduce CO2 emissions. Electric grid comprises three major sectors: generation, transmission and distribution grid, and consumption. Smart generation includes the use of renewable energy sources (wind, solar, or hydropower. Smart transmission and distribution relies on optimizing the existing assets of overhead transmission lines, underground cables, transformers, and substations such that minimum generating capacities are required in the future. Smart consumption will depend on the use of more efficient equipment like energy-saving lighting lamps, enabling smart homes and hybrid plug-in electric vehicles technologies. A special interest is given to the Egyptian case study. Main opportunities for Egypt include generating electricity from wind and solar energy sources and its geographical location that makes it a perfect center for interconnecting electrical systems from the Nile basin, North Africa, Gulf, and Europe. Challenges include shortage of investments, absence of political will, aging of transmission and distribution infrastructure, and lack of consumer awareness for power utilization.

  17. The impact of CO{sub 2} emissions trading on the European transport sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaageson, Per

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report is to analyse how a common European scheme for CO{sub 2} emissions trading covering all sectors of society would affect the transport sector. Transport externalities other than CO{sub 2} are assumed to be internalised by kilometer charging. This means road fuels will no longer be subject to taxation. The European Union's commitment under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol can be reached at a marginal abatement cost around 65 Euro per tonne of CO{sub 2} in a case where emissions trading replaces all current taxes on fossil fuels. In a case where emissions trading is supplementary to today's energy and carbon taxes, the current average taxation (45-50 Euro per tonne CO{sub 2}) and the shadow price of the emission permits (33 Euro per tonne) would together give a total marginal abatement cost around 80 Euro per tonne Of CO{sub 2}. Having to buy emission permits would significantly raise the cost of fuel and electricity used in rail, aviation and short sea shipping, as these modes are currently not taxed at all. The resulting long-term (2025) improvement in specific energy efficiency is estimated at around 25 per cent compared to trend for rail and 20 and 40 per cent respectively for aviation and sea transport. A combination of CO{sub 2} emissions trading and km charging would moderately raise the variable cost of driving a gasoline car. The cost of using diesel vehicles would rise considerably in most Member States. Annual mileage per car would therefore decline somewhat. The fuel, however, would become cheaper than today (especially gasoline) and this would reduce the incentive to buy fuel-efficient vehicles. The reform would thus hamper the introduction of new, more efficient, technologies that might be needed for meeting more long-term commitments. Emissions trading would not encourage the introduction of biofuels in road transport. The incremental cost of producing ethanol or RME is much too high and cannot be expected to fall to the

  18. 2017 Standard Scenarios Report: A U.S. Electricity Sector Outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Richards, James [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Das, Paritosh [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Donohoo-Vallett, Paul [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2017-10-03

    The 2017 Standard Scenarios includes a suite of U.S. electricity sector scenarios. The report explores four power sector storylines, including the growth in natural gas and renewable energy, the relative competitiveness of wind and solar PV, the potential impact of low-cost battery storage, and the impact of nuclear lifetimes on the capacity expansion of the power sector.

  19. The challenge of a greener European construction sector: Views on technology-driven (eco)innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jofre, Sergio

    , particular emphasis is given to the description and discussion of technology-driven eco-innovation initiatives such us nanotechnologies for a greener construction. Although the scope of this report covers the European construction sector, most data presented is at an EU scale. In this context, particular...

  20. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector: a perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, I.; Dias, S.F.; Degomme, O.; Devillé, W.; Kennedy, P.; Kovats, A.; Meyer, S. de; Vettenburg, N.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  1. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector: a perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, I.; Dias, S.F.; Degomme, O.; Devillé, W.; Kennedy, P.; Kováts, A.; De Meyer, S.; Vettenburg, N.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  2. Sexual and gender-based violence in the European asylum and reception sector : A perpetuum mobile?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keygnaert, Ines; Dias, Sonia F.; Degomme, Olivier; Devillé, Walter; Kennedy, Patricia; Kováts, András; De Meyer, Sara; Vettenburg, Nicole; Roelens, Kristien; Temmerman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Refugees, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants are at risk of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and subsequent ill-health in Europe; yet, European minimum reception standards do not address SGBV. Hence, this paper explores the nature of SGBV occurring in this sector and

  3. Incorporating the catering sector in nutrition policies of WHO European Region: is there a good recipe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, Carl; Roberfroid, Dominique; Huybregts, Lieven; Van Camp, John; Kolsteren, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    To review how countries of the WHO European Region address issues related to the catering sector in their nutrition policy plans. Documentary analysis of national nutrition policy documents from the policy database of the WHO Regional Office for Europe by a multidisciplinary research team. Recurring themes were identified and related information extracted in an analysis matrix. Case studies were performed for realistic evaluation. Fifty-three member states of the WHO European Region in September 2007. The catering sector is a formally acknowledged stakeholder in national nutrition policies in about two-thirds of countries of the European region. Strategies developed for the catering sector are directed mainly towards labelling of foods and prepared meals, training of health and catering staff, and advertising. Half of the countries reviewed propose dialogue structures with the catering sector for the implementation of the policy. However, important policy fields remain poorly developed, such as strategies for stimulating and monitoring actual implementation of policies. Others are simply lacking, such as strategies to ensure affordability of healthy out-of-home eating or to enhance accountability of stakeholders. It is also striking that strategies for the private sector are rarely developed. Important policy issues are still embryonic. As evidence is accumulating on the impact of out-of-home eating on the increase of overweight, member states are advised to urgently develop operational frameworks and instruments for participatory planning and evaluation of stakeholders in public health nutrition policy.

  4. AN ANALYSIS OF THE ROMANIAN FISHERY SECTOR IN THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius STANCIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of the fishery sector represents one of the European Union’s priorities due to the positive impact it has on food security and to its potential to ensure nutritious and quality food at an affordable price as compared to other animal-origin resources. The Community policy in the fishery sector focuses on reducing the Community market dependence on imports and on the sustainable development of business in this domain. Romania aligned with the Community policies and, therefore, important funds were allocated to the national fishery sector. The diversified natural resources, the possibility to use friendly technologies, the qualified staff, the tradition in the domain, and the existence of a number of niche markets all represent motivations for the development of the Romanian fishery sector. The present paper proposes an analysis of the Romanian fishery production and of the European financing effects on the specialized companies. Despite the fact that there have been important resources allocated to the sector and there is a slight positive evolution, the absorption of funds was difficult. The results of the investment may be observed after a long period of time, this is why Romania is still dependent on fishery product imports. Aquaculture represents the main segment towards which the European funds were directed, including in our country, thus providing the greatest part of the income and employment in the domain.

  5. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Urban Planning and Construction. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European Climate Change Policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to climate change impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national, regional and local level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on urban planning and infrastructure in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the urban planning sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting. Some of the other stakeholder meetings, such as the meeting on human health, have a strong connection with the urban planning agenda. Therefore, some actions in the sector report on adaptation and human health relate to urban planning and infrastructure considerations

  6. Impacts of market liberalization on the electricity supply sector: a comparison of the experience in Austria and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madlener, R.; Jochem, E.

    2001-01-01

    The impacts of market liberalization on the electricity supply sector depend on many different factors and boundary conditions. Comparing these impacts in Austria and Germany, two countries which both participate in the European internal market and have a central geographical location in Western Europe, and which both have borders and important trade relationships with Central and Eastern European countries, provides some important insights with regard to the following aspects: (a) the differences in the primary energy supply mix for electricity generation; (b) the substantial excess capacity, not only in the two countries analyzed but also in the EU as a whole, and its uneven reduction due to different market opening speeds within the Community and differences in the plant stock composition; (c) the utility company structure, including ownership and traditional energy supply and customer relations; (d) the changing situation faced by co-generation and small power producers; and (e) the relevant regulation of third-party access to the grid, electricity transmission, and prices for small/captive consumers. Last but not least, the paper also covers the influence of the expected increase in the volumes of electricity traded in the two countries, also with their Central and Eastern European neighbors (where the level of the playing field may not yet be equalized in the near future), and the concerns that this may lead to conflicts in the achievement of the energy policies, environmental policies, and climate change policies aimed for at the national and European level. (author)

  7. Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU funds. Electricity sector analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    The present report is the final electricity sector analysis report in the project 'Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU funds'. As part of the project a number of quantitative analyses have been carried out for the electricity sector. The report presents the results of those electricity sector analyses. The present project aims at: 1. Identifying major issues relating to the restructuring and liberalization process in the Polish electricity and the gas sector, 2. Setting up an overview of the Polish electricity and natural gas sector, 3. Setting up scenarios for development of electricity and gas markets in the period to 2020, 4. Updating the Balmorel model with recent data for the Polish electricity system, 5. Analyzing future consequences of liberalization of energy markets for the producers, consumers and the Polish economy and society as a whole, 6. Presenting the possibilities and preparing a practical guide for using EU funds and community programmes for large infrastructure projects in the energy sector. (BA)

  8. Grid requirements applicable to future NPPs in the new European Electricity Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beato Castro, D.; Padill, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    With a view to keeping nuclear energy as an option for future power generation in a competitive market and taking advantage of the current operating experience, a group of European electric utilities have come together to define common requirements for the design and supply of future Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants connected to the electrical system. These requirements, defined with the aim of standardizing and adapting design to the conditions of the new electricity framework, are being included in the European Utility Requirements (EUR) document. Although there are different types of power plants operating appropriately in large electrical systems, the idea is to find the minimum requirements that will allow growth of this type of energy in the European electricity industry without reducing quality, safety and reliability of interconnected electrical systems. It is therefore necessary to take into account the features of the existing power systems and the operating characteristics and design of nuclear power plants so as to harmonize their respective technical peculiarities in the framework of the deregulated electricity sector. The definition of these grid requirements is based primarily on the operating conditions of the Union pour la Coordination de la Production et le Transport de L'Electricite (UCPTE) grid and takes into account the current Grid Code of the main European countries, for the forthcoming Issue C. This paper sets outs the most relevant aspects of the grid requirements, included in Chapter 2.3 of the EUR document Grid Requirements, Issue B, for the connection of future nuclear power plants in the European electricity system, and others that are being considered in the preparation of the new issue of the document that will take into account the deregulated electricity market situation and deal with the following aspects: General characteristics. Operation of a plant under normal grid conditions. Operation of a plant under disturbed grid

  9. Economic prospective study of the nuclear electricity generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, R.; Charpin, J.M.; Dessus, B.

    2000-01-01

    In his letter dated May 7. 1999, the French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin asked Jean-Michel Charpin, Benjamin Dessus and Rene Pellat to carry out a 'study of the economic data for the whole of the nuclear sector, in particular downstream of the nuclear combustion cycle, including reprocessing'. This report had to include comparisons with other production methods for electricity and take account of environmental costs. The Prime Minister stressed in this same letter his wish to see the inquiry 'examine all of the factors forming the basis for a public decision, including intrinsic competitiveness, external factors and long-term effects, as well as the impact of different production methods upon our CO 2 gas emissions and control over the downstream part of the nuclear cycle'. Two series of questions are central to this study. The first concerns the existing nuclear facilities. In view of the inertia of a French electrical production system which is largely based upon nuclear energy and in which major investments have already been made, what room for manoeuvre remains for the public authorities and operators concerning the future of these stations? In particular: What are the economic conditions and consequences of possibly prolonging the average active life of the existing stations? What are the economic and environmental consequences of decisions concerning the continuation or stoppage of the reprocessing of irradiated fuel produced by the existing stations? The second concerns new investments likely to meet electrical demand under various scenarios. In particular: what are the technologies that may be envisaged (nuclear and non-nuclear) and in what timescale? What are the changes underway in the world that are likely to have an influence on the choices made in France? What will be the environmental consequences of these choices by the year 2050, in particular regarding greenhouse gas emissions and the quantities of transuranic elements to be stored? What will be

  10. Close to the wind. A European strategy for the (top)sectors in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    The formation of a new government in the Netherlands in 2010 caused a change of wind. The government opted for topsectors to boost the competitiveness of the Dutch economy, by designing a comprehensive policy agenda for the top nine sectors, which were identified as Water, Food, Horticulture, High Tech, Life Sciences, Chemistry, Energy, Logistics and the Creative Industry. The two main questions in this request for advice are: (1) What are the visible trends and developments in European research and innovation policy and what impact will they have on the Netherlands?; (2) How can the Netherlands best respond to changing policy context at European level to ensure that European research priorities and Dutch priorities keep matching? The advice of the Council starts with an overview of key developments and trends that are relevant to Dutch and European research and innovation policy. It does so against the background of a number of important challenges such as the economic crisis, globalisation and a paucity of private investment. The new European 'Innovation Union' policy aims to tackle these challenges and to enhance the competitiveness of Europe in relation to emerging economies as those of the BRIC countries. In this context, the EU believes that research and innovation can be used not only as a means of tackling major social challenges but also as a way out of the downward spiral of the economic crisis. New to this European policy is the added emphasis on knowledge utilisation and innovation. This shift may alter the desirable approach of the Netherlands to European policy. The Council then analyses the basic principles for the Dutch position in Europe and sets out the opportunities and threats of various policies under the Innovation Union for the top (and other) sectors. From this analysis, the Council draws conclusions about the relationship between the use of Dutch and European policy to strengthen Dutch and European sectors. Recommendations are (1

  11. Sectoral electricity elasticities in South Africa: Before and after the supply crisis of 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Blignaut

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we estimate the price elasticity of electricity for various industrial sectors of the South African economy from 2002 to 2011. The data used include sectoral electricity consumption data and electricity tariff data, both courtesy of Eskom as well as output data based on national statistics. The most important contribution this paper makes is that it includes the period after the sharp rises in electricity tariffs in 2007/2008 following a period of load-shedding and insecurity in electricity supply. Previous studies have included data only until 2007 and, for the most part, have found statistically insignificant, positive elasticities. However, for the period post-2007, we found statistically significant and negative elasticities for 9 of the 11 sectors considered. Our results show that the majority of industrial sectors have become much more sensitive to changes in the price of electricity following 2007/2008, indicating to policymakers that tariff restructuring might influence consumer behaviour significantly.

  12. A decomposition analysis of the driving factors of CO_2 (Carbon dioxide) emissions from the power sector in the European Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmellos, M.; Kopidou, D.; Diakoulaki, D.

    2016-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate the driving factors of CO_2 emissions from electricity generation in all European Union countries (EU-28) during the period 2000–2012. Particular emphasis is placed on the assessment of any potential association between the examined driving factors and major climate and energy policies implemented during the examined period. In addition, the analysis distinguishes two subperiods, namely 2000–2007 and 2007–2012 in order to detect the impact of the economic crisis on each distinct driving factor and, consequently, on the total level of CO_2 emissions from the power sector. The model developed to analyse the changes in CO_2 emissions from the power sector across EU-28, is based on LMDI-I method and takes into account five driving factors: level of activity, electricity intensity, electricity trade, efficiency of electricity generation and fuel mix. The obtained results show that in times of economic growth the main factor counterbalancing the activity effect was in most countries the decreasing electricity intensity, while the contribution of all other factors becomes apparent later, despite the economic crisis and in view of the Kyoto targets. - Highlights: • LMDI is used to identify driving forces of CO_2 emissions from EU's power sector. • Declining electricity intensity was the main restrictive factor before 2007. • Fuel shifts contributed to emissions fall mostly after 2007, despite the crisis. • Trade effect is notable and indicates growing carbon leakage in the power sector.

  13. Renewable energy and energy efficiency in liberalized European electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, Norbert

    2000-01-01

    Given the projected growth in global energy demand, renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) play a crucial role in the attainment of the environmental dimension of sustainable development. Policy mechanisms to promote RE and EE have been justified on the rationale of market failure, which prevents price signals alone from being sufficient to induce consumers to implement the socially optimal level. The paper shows driving forces for increasing competition in the electricity supply industry and discusses the implication of electricity industry liberalisation on RE/EE activities. Policies of the European Commission to promote RE/EE are presented, including a more detailed description of the experience made in the United Kingdom. Conclusions are that the new market structure may be too short sighted to stimulate RE and EE activities and that the design of policies should be compatible with the new market-orientated structure of the electricity industry. If implemented properly, and compatible with the competitive market organisation, electricity supply liberalisation could pave the way for 'sustainable electricity' in the European Union. (Author)

  14. The new electric price. Principal changer by the electrical sector law; La nueva tarifa electrica. Principales cambios. Introducidos en la ley del sector electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomis Saez, A.

    1998-12-01

    The article analyzes the changes introduced by the Electricity law, which imply a new economic regulation substantially different to the previous one, and therefore also different to the electricity tariff calculation system, whose elements are the sector various activities costs, the sharing of such costs among the activities and the final assignment to consumers through the tariffs. The article analyses the substantial changes of the new electricity tariff. (Author)

  15. Electricity demand of manufacturing sector in Turkey. A translog cost approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeluek, Guelden; Koc, A. Ali

    2010-01-01

    This paper models factor demand for manufacturing sector in Turkey. We estimated a translog cost function with four factor consist of capital, labor, intermediate input and electricity over the 1980-2001. Our objective, taking in the consideration electricity as production input, was twofold: on the one hand, to estimate the price elasticity of electricity demand in manufacturing sector, and on the other hand to use cross-price and Morishima Elasticities of Substitution results for structural analysis regarding effects of electricity liberalization which initiated in 2001. Empirical result shows that electricity demand is relatively price sensitive (- 0.85). Our result in terms of electricity price is consistent with the previous studies. While electricity-labor and electricity-capital inputs are complementary, results indicate the existence of substitution possibilities between electricity and intermediate input. This means that changes in electricity prices have impact on labor demand and investment demand. These results have important implications for public policy. (author)

  16. Electricity demand of manufacturing sector in Turkey. A translog cost approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeluek, Guelden; Koc, A. Ali [Akdeniz University, Department of Economics, Antalya, 07058 (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    This paper models factor demand for manufacturing sector in Turkey. We estimated a translog cost function with four factor consist of capital, labor, intermediate input and electricity over the 1980-2001. Our objective, taking in the consideration electricity as production input, was twofold: on the one hand, to estimate the price elasticity of electricity demand in manufacturing sector, and on the other hand to use cross-price and Morishima Elasticities of Substitution results for structural analysis regarding effects of electricity liberalization which initiated in 2001. Empirical result shows that electricity demand is relatively price sensitive (- 0.85). Our result in terms of electricity price is consistent with the previous studies. While electricity-labor and electricity-capital inputs are complementary, results indicate the existence of substitution possibilities between electricity and intermediate input. This means that changes in electricity prices have impact on labor demand and investment demand. These results have important implications for public policy. (author)

  17. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Water Management. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European climate change policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to Climate Change Impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national and regional level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on the water cycle and water resources management and prediction of extreme events in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the Water Resources sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting on 11 April, 2006

  18. The restructuring of the Brazilian electric power sector and the universal access to the electric power service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rosana Rodrigues dos; Mercedes, Sonia Seger P.; Sauer, Ildo Luis

    1999-01-01

    The central issue of debate was the need to align the energy sector's options and organization with changing global patterns of economic and social development, characterized by the increasing role played by the private sector, greater integration in the world economy, and new economic and social priorities such as efficiency, decentralization, deregulation, and a closer attention to environmental issues. The aim of the work was to overview the restructuring of the Brazilian electric power sector. Tariffs are also commented

  19. Politics design of cleaner production in the electric sector for the energy scenarios of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa P, Woody; Smith Q, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    Cleaner production (PML) in Colombia has been implemented as an agreement of wills between the companies of different productive sectors and the Colombian environment ministry. In the electric sector, the agreement of PML has been implemented with successes and difficulties. A concern that exists today among the companies of the electric sector involved in the agreement is about its long-term viability. Supported in the planning tool of scenarios, an analysis of the possible futures of PML in the Colombian electric sector, using the energy scenarios for Colombia (UPME, 2000), is made. PML policies are designed that will allow to analyze its long-term implementation. This work seeks to contribute in the long-term analysis about the evolution and tendencies of PML in the Colombian electric sector, according with the markets dynamics, trends and competitiveness that are gaining space in the international community

  20. Liberalisation of the German electricity sector and the role of energy policy

    OpenAIRE

    Schleich, J.; Betz, R.; Gagelmann, F.; Jochem, E.; Köwener, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives an account if the impacts of the liberalisation of the German electricity marktet and describes the existing energy policy and recent responses to the liberalisation with respect to the electricity sector. In the first section, supply, electricity consumption and the structure of the electricity market are describes. In the second section, the legal framework for the liberalisation of the electricity market in Germany and the consequences for prices, market structure, legal f...

  1. Income and price elasticities of electricity demand: Aggregate and sector-wise analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, Faisal; Ahmad, Eatzaz

    2011-01-01

    Cointegration and vector error correction modeling approaches are widely used in electricity demand analysis. The study rigorously examines the determinants of electricity demand at aggregate and sectoral levels in Pakistan. In the backdrop of severe electricity shortages, our empirical findings give support to the existence of a stable long-run relationship among the variables and indicate that electricity demand is elastic in the long run to both income and price at aggregate level. At sectoral level, long-run income and price elasticity estimates follow this pattern except in agricultural sector, where electricity demand is found elastic to output but inelastic to electricity price. On the contrary, the coefficients for income and price are rather small and mostly insignificant in the short run. We employed temperature index, price of diesel oil and capital stock at aggregate and sectoral levels as exogenous variables. These variables account for most of the variations in electricity demand in the short run. It shows that mechanization of the economy significantly affect the electricity demand at macro level. Moreover, elastic electricity demand with respect to electricity price in most of the sectors implies that electricity price as a policy tool can be used for efficient use and conservation. - Highlights: → The study conducts analysis for aggregate and four sectors. → Sectoral analyses are for residential, commercial, manufacturing and agricultural sectors. → We obtained higher positive income and negative price elasticity in the long run. → The higher price elasticity implies that price can be used as a policy tool. → Capital stock and temperature variables explain most of the short-run demand fluctuations.

  2. Income and price elasticities of electricity demand: Aggregate and sector-wise analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Faisal, E-mail: fsljml@hotmail.com [School of Economics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Eatzaz, E-mail: eatzaz@qau.edu.pk [School of Economics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15

    Cointegration and vector error correction modeling approaches are widely used in electricity demand analysis. The study rigorously examines the determinants of electricity demand at aggregate and sectoral levels in Pakistan. In the backdrop of severe electricity shortages, our empirical findings give support to the existence of a stable long-run relationship among the variables and indicate that electricity demand is elastic in the long run to both income and price at aggregate level. At sectoral level, long-run income and price elasticity estimates follow this pattern except in agricultural sector, where electricity demand is found elastic to output but inelastic to electricity price. On the contrary, the coefficients for income and price are rather small and mostly insignificant in the short run. We employed temperature index, price of diesel oil and capital stock at aggregate and sectoral levels as exogenous variables. These variables account for most of the variations in electricity demand in the short run. It shows that mechanization of the economy significantly affect the electricity demand at macro level. Moreover, elastic electricity demand with respect to electricity price in most of the sectors implies that electricity price as a policy tool can be used for efficient use and conservation. - Highlights: > The study conducts analysis for aggregate and four sectors. > Sectoral analyses are for residential, commercial, manufacturing and agricultural sectors. > We obtained higher positive income and negative price elasticity in the long run. > The higher price elasticity implies that price can be used as a policy tool. > Capital stock and temperature variables explain most of the short-run demand fluctuations.

  3. Introducing of Green Pricing in the Korean Electricity Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boo, K.J. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    2001-11-01

    In recent years, the Korean electricity sector has been undergoing restructuring, represented by de-regulation and promotion of competition. Competition will, eventually, force electricity power producers to overly rely on cheap fuels such as coal and nuclear in order to reduce the cost of power generation, which is against the international Green Round, including the UNFCCC. Accordingly, some measures are needed not to let such an market failure discourage the efforts to protect the environment. Up to date, a number of policy measures have been worked out by the Korean government to promote the use of renewable energy in power generation. Such efforts, however, have not been quite successful. Innovative policy tools are called for to promote renewable energy-base power generation in the emerging competitive electricity market. Among various approaches that have been tried and worked out in the developed countries to adequately address this problem, a most popular approach is green pricing. Green pricing is to let the customers pay for the additional cost incurred from installing renewable energy-based generating facilities, consequently making it viable and promoting an increased use of renewables in the power generation. Accordingly, a market research to investigate the willingness to pay for this premium was conducted as a prerequisite to design a green pricing. The major findings of this market research are: First, while limited to the industrial and buildings sectors, awareness of environmental and green pricing is not so disappointing as compared with those in the develop countries(41.3%). Second, companies have not yet fully developed the concept of green pricing and are mainly motivated to purchase green power in the perspective of a great cause rather than in pursuit of direct and indirect economic benefits. Third, regarding fuel choice for power generation, respondents express a strong opposition to nuclear, coal, and oil, while they are more favorable to

  4. Structural analysis of electricity consumption by productive sectors. The Spanish case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara, Vicent [Departamento de Economia Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edificio B 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); del Rio, Pablo; Hernandez, Felix [Institute for Public Goods and Policies (IPP), Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/Albasanz 26-28, Madrid 28037 (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to identify those sectors that contribute most to electricity consumption in Spain, using a methodology based on input-output tables, and to derive some recommendations aimed at increasing energy efficiency in those sectors. This input-output approach is complemented with a sector-focused study in which the availability of electricity-efficient technologies per sector and the barriers to their uptake are identified. This hybrid approach is deemed useful to derive policy implications. We thus propose several instruments to remove those barriers. (author)

  5. Structural analysis of electricity consumption by productive sectors. The Spanish case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, Vicent; Rio, Pablo del; Hernandez, Felix

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify those sectors that contribute most to electricity consumption in Spain, using a methodology based on input-output tables, and to derive some recommendations aimed at increasing energy efficiency in those sectors. This input-output approach is complemented with a sector-focused study in which the availability of electricity-efficient technologies per sector and the barriers to their uptake are identified. This hybrid approach is deemed useful to derive policy implications. We thus propose several instruments to remove those barriers.

  6. Development and Performance of Alternative Electricity Sector Pathways Subject to Multiple Climate and Water Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmark, R. L.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Miara, A.; Cohen, S.; Macknick, J.; Sun, Y.; Corsi, F.; Fekete, B. M.; Tidwell, V. C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change impacts on air temperatures and water availability have the potential to alter future electricity sector investment decisions as well as the reliability and performance of the power sector. Different electricity sector configurations are more or less vulnerable to climate-induced changes. For example, once-through cooled thermal facilities are the most cost-effective and efficient technologies under cooler and wetter conditions, but can be substantially affected by and vulnerable to warmer and drier conditions. Non-thermal renewable technologies, such as PV and wind, are essentially "drought-proof" but have other integration and reliability challenges. Prior efforts have explored the impacts of climate change on electric sector development for a limited set of climate and electricity scenarios. Here, we provide a comprehensive suite of scenarios that evaluate how different electricity sector pathways could be affected by a range of climate and water resource conditions. We use four representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios under five global circulation models (GCM) as climate drivers to a Water Balance Model (WBM), to provide twenty separate future climate-water conditions. These climate-water conditions influence electricity sector development from present day to 2050 as determined using the Regional Energy Deployment Systems (ReEDS) model. Four unique electricity sector pathways will be considered, including business-as-usual, carbon cap, high renewable energy technology costs, and coal reliance scenarios. The combination of climate-water and electricity sector pathway scenarios leads to 80 potential future cases resulting in different national and regional electricity infrastructure configurations. The vulnerability of these configurations in relation to climate change (including in-stream thermal pollution impacts and environmental regulations) is evaluated using the Thermoelectric Power and Thermal Pollution (TP2M) model, providing

  7. Assessment of demand for natural gas from the electricity sector in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.R.; Dhar, Subash; Victor, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Electricity sector is among the key users of natural gas. The sustained electricity deficit and environment policies have added to an already rising demand for gas. This paper tries to understand gas demand in future from electricity sector. This paper models the future demand for gas in India from...... the electricity sector under alternative scenarios for the period 2005–2025, using bottom-up ANSWER MARKAL model. The scenarios are differentiated by alternate economic growth projections and policies related to coal reforms, infrastructure choices and local environment. The results across scenarios show that gas...... competes with coal as a base-load option if price difference is below US $ 4 per MBtu. At higher price difference gas penetrates only the peak power market. Gas demand is lower in the high economic growth scenario, since electricity sector is more flexible in substitution of primary energy. Gas demand...

  8. The discussion about the privatization of the brazilian electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, G.A.P. do; Pinto Junior, H.Q.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the complexities of the privatisation of the brazilian power sector. We try to explain the differences between privatisation.It is shown, based on a formulation proposes by Aylen, that the solutions of the sector problems has to do with the management reform of the public utilities and also the holding ELETROBRAS. (author)

  9. Energy efficiency and performance indicators of European electricity market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin DUGULEANĂ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The electric power system plays a vital role in the development of every country, ensuring the “fuel” which feeds its economic motor. The efficient functioning of this motor is essential for economy. The efficiency and the performances of electric power systems are reflected on the living level of population, through the money spent and the satisfaction level of their needs. The continuity of power distribution process, the good communication between the suppliers and consumers, the promptitude of interventions, the environment protection - all these are aspects characterizing the performance level of power distribution systems. The paper analyzes the evolution of quality indicators of power distribution systems both for countries’ level and for population on European market of electricity.

  10. Wind power and a liberalised North European electricity exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, L H; Morthorst, P E; Skytte, K [and others

    1999-03-01

    Conditions for wind power on a liberalised North European electrical power market are addressed in the paper. Results are presented from a recently completed study carried out by Risoe National Laboratory in collaboration with the Danish electric utilities Eltra, Elsam and Elkraft. A main result from the study is, that the market will be able to provide the necessary power regulation, that will be required year 2005 as consequence of the expected wind power capacity extension, according to the Danish energy plan, Energy21. The averege sales price on the market for the wind-generated electricity is less than the average spot market price, due to provision of power regulation to balance the unpredictability of the wind power. This reduction in the market value of wind power has been calculated to 10-20 DKK/MWh of 1.3-2.7 EUR/MWh. (au)

  11. Acquits communautaire in quality management in the energy sector -Central and Eastern European Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristikj, Julija

    1997-01-01

    Energy is considered as one of the main infrastructure components, and efficient energy sectors are corner stones for the economic growth of the Central and Eastern European Countries on their way towards gaining EU membership. Therefore, energy is considered as one of the main directions of action within the PHARE Programme with trans-European dimensions. Five years ago started the implementation of the PHARE Multi-country Energy Programme, the efforts of which have been oriented to three main strategic axes: energy policy, energy supply, as well as energy efficiency and environment. (author)

  12. Qualification Needs, Approaches and Strategies in the Second-Hand Sector. A European Good-Practice Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arold, Heike; Koring, Claudia; Windelband, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Against the background of changing consumer behaviour and environmental policies, a growing second-hand sector is expected. In order to ensure quality and professionalism within companies operating in this sector, it is necessary to develop a unified Europewide and sector-specific qualification which is geared to real working processes and requirements. This good practice report describes the training and qualification structures in the European second-hand sector. In addition, occupational a...

  13. The electricity market. Situation and predictions 2018 - Sectoral and competitive analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This document comprises two reports. A first one, published and updated three times a year, and a second one which is a yearly publication. The first one, based on an analysis of market perspectives and of actor strategies, proposes a synthesis on the consequences of the evolution of the economic environment, on major trends noticed for the electric power sector, and on predictable evolutions. It proposes the most recent data regarding the activities of about 200 firms belonging to the power sector (notably in terms of turnover and of electric power consumption). It highlights recent events for companies of the sector: takeovers, investments, restructuring, introduction of new products, and so on. It proposes a sector-based dashboard which contains all the critical figures useful to analyse the sector situation (activity determining factors, key figures for the sector and its environment). The annual report proposes a presentation of the sector and of the determining factors of its activity, an analysis of the activity evolution (trends, indicators like turnover, electric power consumption and production, prices and regulated tariffs, power imports and exports), a presentation of financial performance of electricity producers, a description of the sector economic structure (evolution of the economic tissue, analysis of structural characteristics), and a presentation of actors and of the competitive landscape (ranking and positioning of electric power providers and producers, market shares, identity sheets of the main actors, highlights, and ranking of the main companies in terms of turnover and of financial performance)

  14. Exploiting Synergies in European Wind and Hydrogen Sectors: A Cost-benefit Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    SHAW SUZANNE; PETEVES ESTATHIOS

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a ¿¿wind-hydrogen strategy¿¿, is analysed using a costbenefit approach to evaluate the final impact...

  15. Factors affecting labour productivity in the SME sector of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Gołaś

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of labour productivity analysis in micro, small and medium enterprises of EU countries. The analysis was conducted on the basis of European Commission for Enterprise and Industry data from 2008. The results of regression analysis point that the technical equipment of work, the share of value added and value of production in revenues are the most important factors influencing the labour productivity in the SME sector.

  16. Deregulation and restructuring of the electricity sector in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francia, L.

    2000-01-01

    This economic analysis of the Electric Power industry and market in Spain shows how the electricity deregulation and liberalization in Spain have given rise to an electricity industry which not only complies in spirit and letter with the E.U. Directive on the internal energy market, but which in fact goes much further. (A.L.B.)

  17. Challenging issues in the design and manufacturing of the European sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dans, Andres; Jucker, P.; Bayon, A.; Arbogast, J.-F.; Caixas, J.; Fernández, J.; Micó, G.; Pacheco, J.; Trentea, A.; Stamos, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ITER Vacuum Vessel was described with its features and particularities. • Engineering and CAD design of Sector 5 is finish; the work of sectors 3 and 4 is ongoing. • Fabrication Mock Ups almost finished with an important know-how acquired. • Procurement of raw material (plates and forgings) started. • Qualification of welding, NDT and forming close to be finished. - Abstract: Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency for the ITER project, has to supply seven sectors as part of the European contribution to the project. F4E signed the Procurement Agreement with ITER Organization (IO) in 2009. After a call for tender in 2010, the contract for the manufacturing of seven sectors was placed in October 2010 to a consortium of three Italian companies, Ansaldo, Mangiarotti and Walter Tosto (AMW). The first sector in the manufacturing route is Sector 5 (later will come 4, 3, 2, 9, 8, 7). This paper will cover: the status of the engineering activities, design, procurement and preparation to begin the manufacturing in 2013. Also will be presented the statutory and regulatory requirements of the French Nuclear Safety regulator and the status of the relevant R and D mock-ups to demonstrate manufacturing feasibility control of distortions (using predictions with analysis and algorithms to change in real time the manufacturing route in order to correct such distortions, inspectability and metrology). Another important aspect at this stage of the manufacturing is qualification of activities like welding, Non-destructive Examination and Hot Forming. This paper describes the status of the activities currently in process in order to meet with the challenging design, schedule and high quality requirements of the project

  18. Challenging issues in the design and manufacturing of the European sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dans, Andres, E-mail: andresdans@gmail.com; Jucker, P.; Bayon, A.; Arbogast, J.-F.; Caixas, J.; Fernández, J.; Micó, G.; Pacheco, J.; Trentea, A.; Stamos, V.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER Vacuum Vessel was described with its features and particularities. • Engineering and CAD design of Sector 5 is finish; the work of sectors 3 and 4 is ongoing. • Fabrication Mock Ups almost finished with an important know-how acquired. • Procurement of raw material (plates and forgings) started. • Qualification of welding, NDT and forming close to be finished. - Abstract: Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency for the ITER project, has to supply seven sectors as part of the European contribution to the project. F4E signed the Procurement Agreement with ITER Organization (IO) in 2009. After a call for tender in 2010, the contract for the manufacturing of seven sectors was placed in October 2010 to a consortium of three Italian companies, Ansaldo, Mangiarotti and Walter Tosto (AMW). The first sector in the manufacturing route is Sector 5 (later will come 4, 3, 2, 9, 8, 7). This paper will cover: the status of the engineering activities, design, procurement and preparation to begin the manufacturing in 2013. Also will be presented the statutory and regulatory requirements of the French Nuclear Safety regulator and the status of the relevant R and D mock-ups to demonstrate manufacturing feasibility control of distortions (using predictions with analysis and algorithms to change in real time the manufacturing route in order to correct such distortions, inspectability and metrology). Another important aspect at this stage of the manufacturing is qualification of activities like welding, Non-destructive Examination and Hot Forming. This paper describes the status of the activities currently in process in order to meet with the challenging design, schedule and high quality requirements of the project.

  19. Geothermal energy in the new competitive electric sector of Latin America and the Caribbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrientos, Maria Elena; Coviello, Manlio

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the problem of the allocation of risks in private or mixed geothermal projects, within the framework of the new competitive electric sector being structured in Latin America. (The author)

  20. Water-Constrained Electric Sector Capacity Expansion Modeling Under Climate Change Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Miara, A.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.; Corsi, F.; Prousevitch, A.; Rangwala, I.

    2015-12-01

    Over 80% of U.S. electricity generation uses a thermoelectric process, which requires significant quantities of water for power plant cooling. This water requirement exposes the electric sector to vulnerabilities related to shifts in water availability driven by climate change as well as reductions in power plant efficiencies. Electricity demand is also sensitive to climate change, which in most of the United States leads to warming temperatures that increase total cooling-degree days. The resulting demand increase is typically greater for peak demand periods. This work examines the sensitivity of the development and operations of the U.S. electric sector to the impacts of climate change using an electric sector capacity expansion model that endogenously represents seasonal and local water resource availability as well as climate impacts on water availability, electricity demand, and electricity system performance. Capacity expansion portfolios and water resource implications from 2010 to 2050 are shown at high spatial resolution under a series of climate scenarios. Results demonstrate the importance of water availability for future electric sector capacity planning and operations, especially under more extreme hotter and drier climate scenarios. In addition, region-specific changes in electricity demand and water resources require region-specific responses that depend on local renewable resource availability and electricity market conditions. Climate change and the associated impacts on water availability and temperature can affect the types of power plants that are built, their location, and their impact on regional water resources.

  1. North–south polarization of European electricity consumption under future warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Leonie; Levermann, Anders; Auffhammer, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    There is growing empirical evidence that anthropogenic climate change will substantially affect the electric sector. Impacts will stem both from the supply side—through the mitigation of greenhouse gases—and from the demand side—through adaptive responses to a changing environment. Here we provide evidence of a polarization of both peak load and overall electricity consumption under future warming for the world’s third-largest electricity market—the 35 countries of Europe. We statistically estimate country-level dose–response functions between daily peak/total electricity load and ambient temperature for the period 2006–2012. After removing the impact of nontemperature confounders and normalizing the residual load data for each country, we estimate a common dose–response function, which we use to compute national electricity loads for temperatures that lie outside each country’s currently observed temperature range. To this end, we impose end-of-century climate on today’s European economies following three different greenhouse-gas concentration trajectories, ranging from ambitious climate-change mitigation—in line with the Paris agreement—to unabated climate change. We find significant increases in average daily peak load and overall electricity consumption in southern and western Europe (∼3 to ∼7% for Portugal and Spain) and significant decreases in northern Europe (∼−6 to ∼−2% for Sweden and Norway). While the projected effect on European total consumption is nearly zero, the significant polarization and seasonal shifts in peak demand and consumption have important ramifications for the location of costly peak-generating capacity, transmission infrastructure, and the design of energy-efficiency policy and storage capacity. PMID:28847939

  2. North-south polarization of European electricity consumption under future warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Leonie; Levermann, Anders; Auffhammer, Maximilian

    2017-09-19

    There is growing empirical evidence that anthropogenic climate change will substantially affect the electric sector. Impacts will stem both from the supply side-through the mitigation of greenhouse gases-and from the demand side-through adaptive responses to a changing environment. Here we provide evidence of a polarization of both peak load and overall electricity consumption under future warming for the world's third-largest electricity market-the 35 countries of Europe. We statistically estimate country-level dose-response functions between daily peak/total electricity load and ambient temperature for the period 2006-2012. After removing the impact of nontemperature confounders and normalizing the residual load data for each country, we estimate a common dose-response function, which we use to compute national electricity loads for temperatures that lie outside each country's currently observed temperature range. To this end, we impose end-of-century climate on today's European economies following three different greenhouse-gas concentration trajectories, ranging from ambitious climate-change mitigation-in line with the Paris agreement-to unabated climate change. We find significant increases in average daily peak load and overall electricity consumption in southern and western Europe (∼3 to ∼7% for Portugal and Spain) and significant decreases in northern Europe (∼-6 to ∼-2% for Sweden and Norway). While the projected effect on European total consumption is nearly zero, the significant polarization and seasonal shifts in peak demand and consumption have important ramifications for the location of costly peak-generating capacity, transmission infrastructure, and the design of energy-efficiency policy and storage capacity.

  3. Biannual bulletin of SIESE (Enterprise Information System of the Electric Energy Sector). Jan-Sep 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The statistical results of Brazilian electric power sector, referring to the first semester of 1996 are shown, presenting the nominal capacity, energy supplying, hydraulic and thermal generation, consumption of oil, charcoal, natural gas, uranium dioxide and coal fuels, and also the electric power consumption in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The extension of transmission lines, power installed, operational data, nominal capacity, gross generation and tariffs are also presented

  4. Biannual bulletin of SIESE (Enterprise Information System of the Electric Energy Sector). Jan-Sep 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The statistical results of Brazilian electric power sector, referring to the first semester of 1996 are shown, presenting the nominal capacity, energy supplying, hydraulic and thermal generation, consumption of oil, charcoal, natural gas, uranium dioxide and coal fuels, and also the electric power consumption in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The extension of transmission lines, power installed, operational data, nominal capacity, gross generation and tariffs are also presented

  5. Impacts of High Variable Renewable Energy Futures on Wholesale Electricity Prices, and on Electric-Sector Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Seel, J; Mills, AD; Wiser, RH

    2018-01-01

    Increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy (VRE) can affect wholesale electricity price patterns and make them meaningfully different from past, traditional price patterns. Many long-lasting decisions for supply- and demand-side electricity infrastructure and programs are based on historical observations or assume a business-as-usual future with low shares of VRE. Our motivating question is whether certain electric-sector decisions that are made based on assumptions reflecting low V...

  6. Material constraints related to storage of future European renewable electricity surpluses with CO_2 methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meylan, Frédéric D.; Moreau, Vincent; Erkman, Suren

    2016-01-01

    The main challenges associated with a growing production of renewable electricity are intermittency and dispersion. Intermittency generates spikes in production, which need to be curtailed when exceeding consumption. Dispersion means electricity has to be transported over long distances between production and consumption sites. In the Directive 2009/28/EC, the European Commission recommends sustainable and effective measures to prevent curtailments and facilitate transportation of renewable electricity. This article explores the material constraints of storing and transporting surplus renewable electricity by conversion into synthetic methane. Europe is considered for its mix of energy technologies, data availability and multiple energy pathways to 2050. Results show that the requirements for key materials and land remain relatively low, respecting the recommendations of the EU Commission. By 2050, more than 6 million tons of carbon dioxide might be transformed into methane annually within the EU. The efficiency of renewable power methane production is also compared to the natural process of converting solar into chemical energy (i.e. photosynthesis), both capturing and reenergizing carbon dioxide. Overall, the production of renewable methane (including carbon dioxide capture) is more efficient and less material intensive than the production of biofuels derived from photosynthesis and biomass conversion. - Highlights: •The potential of methanation to store renewable electricity surpluses is assessed. •Material constraints are relatively low. •Biogenic CO_2 will probably be insufficient. •Production of renewable power methane is more efficient than conventional biofuels. •Renewable power methane can help decarbonizing the global energy sector.

  7. Green electricity externalities: Forest biomass in an Atlantic European Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solino, M.; Prada, A.; Vazquez, M.X.

    2009-01-01

    Renewable energy sources are expected to represent a growing proportion of the primary energy sources for the production of electricity. Environmental and social reasons support this tendency. European and Spanish energy plans assign a role of primary importance to biomass in general and, especially, to forest biomass for the period up to 2010. This paper reviews, organises and quantifies the potentials and values of this renewable resource in the foremost Spanish Region in terms of silviculture. The non-market externalities (environmental, economic and social) are classified, and some of them are quantified to present a synthesis of the benefits of a partial substitution of fossil fuels by forest biomass for electricity generation. (author)

  8. Human networks in the European electric power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjot, Dominique; Kurgan-van Hentenryk, Ginette

    2004-01-01

    Behind electrical systems, we should not forget the human networks. The European case is interesting for that matter. There were major players involved, from the pioneers up to the conceivers of national and international systems. More particularly, the engineers should be considered for their technical as well as organizational performance. Attitudes must also be stressed: in Europe, electricity has constantly been developed with both nationalist and internationalist considerations, as shown by the passage from Unternehmergeschaeft to Bankgeschaeft after 1918. Neither should we forget the role played by institutions in the formation of networks: schools, holdings, cartels, and also those frontier zones formed by small countries like Belgium and Switzerland. The human networks, finally, left long term results such as: interconnection, inter-firm cooperation, technocracy, and the growing intervention of the State

  9. The liberalisation of the continental European electricity market : lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, R.; Auer, H.; Keseric, N.; Glachant, J.M.; Perez, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Before 1990, nearly all electricity supply companies in continental Europe (CE) were vertically integrated in a franchise market, either state-owned or under price-regulated mixed private-public ownership. In 1996, the European Commission (EC) issued a directive for a common electricity market, which launched the liberalisation of the electricity market in continental Europe (CE). The ultimate objective was to lower electricity prices throughout Europe by promoting competition in generation and supply through price deregulation and privatization. The intention of the EC was to create one common European electricity market. This paper analyzed the evolution of this market along with conditions needed to enhance competition in the long term. It also presented background information with major data on electricity supply and demand in the CE markets and outlined EC and national governments' market liberalisation initiatives and the major changes that countries have made. Currently, there are at least 7 distinct sub-markets separated by partly insufficient transmission capacity and differences in access conditions to the grid. In 2004, the total demand in the CE area was 2300 TWh. This paper also summarized generation capacity and load in CE; imports and exports between CE countries; past and current transmission issues; political issues for restructuring; providing non-discriminatory access to the market and to the grid; the new institutional and regulatory environment and the promotion of renewables. The performance of the market was also reviewed with particular reference to market access, mergers, acquisitions, market concentration, and the evolution of both wholesale and retail electricity prices. It was concluded that in order to bring about effective competition in the long run, the following conditions would be required: complete ownership separation of the transmission grid from generation and supply in all countries and sub-markets; adequate capacity margin in

  10. The liberalisation of the continental European electricity market : lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, R.; Auer, H.; Keseric, N. [Vienna Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria). Energy Economics Group; Glachant, J.M.; Perez, Y. [Paris-Sud Univ., Paris (France). ADIS-Group Reseaux Jean-Monnet

    2006-10-01

    Before 1990, nearly all electricity supply companies in continental Europe (CE) were vertically integrated in a franchise market, either state-owned or under price-regulated mixed private-public ownership. In 1996, the European Commission (EC) issued a directive for a common electricity market, which launched the liberalisation of the electricity market in continental Europe (CE). The ultimate objective was to lower electricity prices throughout Europe by promoting competition in generation and supply through price deregulation and privatization. The intention of the EC was to create one common European electricity market. This paper analyzed the evolution of this market along with conditions needed to enhance competition in the long term. It also presented background information with major data on electricity supply and demand in the CE markets and outlined EC and national governments' market liberalisation initiatives and the major changes that countries have made. Currently, there are at least 7 distinct sub-markets separated by partly insufficient transmission capacity and differences in access conditions to the grid. In 2004, the total demand in the CE area was 2300 TWh. This paper also summarized generation capacity and load in CE; imports and exports between CE countries; past and current transmission issues; political issues for restructuring; providing non-discriminatory access to the market and to the grid; the new institutional and regulatory environment and the promotion of renewables. The performance of the market was also reviewed with particular reference to market access, mergers, acquisitions, market concentration, and the evolution of both wholesale and retail electricity prices. It was concluded that in order to bring about effective competition in the long run, the following conditions would be required: complete ownership separation of the transmission grid from generation and supply in all countries and sub-markets; adequate capacity

  11. Electricity demand by the commercial sector in Kuwait: an econometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltony, M.N.; Hajeeh, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper models and estimates electricity demand by the Kuwaiti commercial sector, using an error correction model. It also simulates the estimated model under three scenarios and presents an analysis of the results. The empirical results indicate that short- and long-run electricity consumption and the level of economic activity are interrelated. The forecasts show that electricity consumption varies directly with economic growth. They also suggest that an increase of 100 per cent in nominal electricity prices will lead to a reduction in commercial sector electricity demand of 45 per cent by the year 2010. The simulation of the model under the different scenarios demonstrates that the potential for energy conservation exists in the commercial sector

  12. Producer responsibility, waste minimisation and the WEEE Directive: case studies in eco-design from the European lighting sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottberg, Annika; Morris, Joe; Pollard, Simon; Mark-Herbert, Cecilia; Cook, Matthew

    2006-04-15

    The EU Directive on Waste Electrical and Electrical Equipment (WEEE) (2002/96/EC), to be implemented in stages from August 2004, attempts to tackle the growing quantity WEEE by making producers responsible for the costs of the collection and recycling of their products at the end of usable life. This is considered to give producers a financial incentive to reduce waste at source through eco-design. This link is, however, under-researched and little is known generally about the effectiveness of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and policies to promote it. This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study to address these important gaps in knowledge. Literature review was used to develop an analytical framework to explain the relationships between the drivers for eco-design and the role of policies to promote EPR. This was applied to eight case studies of firms from the European lighting sector. While quantitative data to confirm the link between EPR and eco-design were difficult to obtain, the case studies showed that EPR has had little effect on product development so far. Within the sector studied, most producers have been able to pass on incremental costs associated with EPR to customers with negligible effects on sales. This reflects perceptions in the lighting sector that, because demand for products is relatively price inelastic and the regulation affects all producers equally, EPR is unlikely to drive eco-design at least in the short run. The cases also showed that choice between individual and centrally provided waste recovery schemes rested on perceptions of relative costs and practicability. It was evident that other drivers, such as bans on hazardous substances, product declarations and supply chain pressures, were often more effective promoters of eco-design. Thus it seems a mix of policy measures is required rather than reliance on economic instruments alone.

  13. Carbon mitigation in the electric power sector under cap-and-trade and renewables policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delarue, Erik; Van den Bergh, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, CO_2 emissions from the electric power sector and energy intensive industries are capped under a cap-and-trade system (i.e., the EU ETS). When other indirect measures are taken to impact emissions in a specific sector under the cap (such as a push for renewables in the electric power sector), this has implications on the overall allowance price, and on CO_2 emissions both from this specific sector and the other sectors under the cap. The central contribution of this paper is the derivation of impact curves, which describe these interactions, i.e., the impact on allowance price and the shift of emissions across sectors. From a set of detailed simulations of the electric power system operation, a so-called “emission plane” is obtained, from which impact curves can be derived. Focus is on interactions between CO_2 abatement through fuel switching and measures affecting the residual electricity demand (such as deployment of renewables) in the electric power sector, as well as on interactions with other sectors, both in a short-term framework. A case study for Central-Western Europe is presented. The analysis reveals a substantial impact of renewables on CO_2 emissions, and hence on emissions shifts across sectors and/or on the CO_2 price. - Highlights: •CO_2 cap-and-trade interacts with policies targeting one specific sector under cap. •Interaction creates emission displacement and/or impacts CO_2 price. •The central contribution is the derivation of impact curves from the emission plane. •The method is applied to a case study of Central-Western Europe. •The analysis reveals a large impact of renewables on CO_2 displacement and/or price.

  14. Competition in European electricity markets: a cross-country comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glachant, J.-M.; Finon, D.

    2003-01-01

    In 1988, the European Commission floated the idea of liberalising the power sector as the key to improving competition and creating jobs in Western Europe, and many reforms have taken place since then. This book examines and evaluates those changes drawing on 12 specific countries. An introductory chapter presents an overview of the typology of institutional structure, approaches to reform, industrial response and progress. The heart of the book looks at three separate areas, viz. the northerners, western-central, and southern and Latin Europe. A dozen chapters by 21 writers present an analysis of the issues faced in dealing with the reforms. The book discusses price convergence and why this cannot be forced. Both practical and academic perspectives are dealt with

  15. Tariffs, investments and financing of the electric power sector in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, M.I.

    1991-05-01

    An approach to the study of electricity prices in Uruguay, emphasizing the relation linking prices, investment funds and loan requirements for the electric utility is presented. The main part of the work is a survey of the evolution of electricity prices, amounts of investment, an external debt of the Uruguayan electric power sector from 1973 to 1988. There is also a prospective analysis, to determine whether the current electricity price level would be able to ensure the electric system expansion, if current trends are maintained. (author)

  16. Competition in the European electricity markets – outcomes of a Delphi study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkonen, Mari; Pätäri, Satu; Jantunen, Ari; Viljainen, Satu

    2012-01-01

    Internal European electricity markets are a target set by the European Union (EU) and under development at present. This article presents the findings of a Delphi study focusing on the prospects of European electricity markets. The main aim is to report the obstacles that participants in the survey felt were the most critical ones affecting competition in the European electricity markets of the future. The respondents were European electricity market specialists, and the themes of the survey ranged from transmission networks and electricity trade to demand flexibility. One of the key findings was shared concern over the adequacy of transmission network capacity in Europe. It was considered that technical issues, such as existing transmission network bottlenecks, are most likely to form obstacles to creating common European electricity markets if new capacity is not built quickly enough. It was seen by the panellists that electricity trading arrangements, whilst important, are unlikely to form a barrier to the development of an internal electricity market. It was noted that electricity trading issues have recently been the subject of development work in the EU. - Highlights: ► The internal electricity market is a priority of the European Union. ► The Delphi method was used to study competition in the European electricity markets. ► The congested grid hampers the development of internal electricity markets in Europe. ► The significance of a transmission network will be emphasised in the future. ► Electricity trading arrangements are likely to be solved.

  17. National green house gas inventory for electric sector for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, D.; Lopez Lopez, I.

    1998-01-01

    In the paper background characterization of existing in 1990 National Electric System is made including isolate plants. The structure of primary energy sources used for electricity generation, including the start up consumption is presented. The Green House Gas calculation constitutes the objective of the work. Used methodology is described. Results and sensitivity analysis is presented

  18. Tariff regulation models of the electric sector; Modelos de regulacao tarifaria do setor eletrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Jose Claudio Linhares; Piccinini, Mauricio Serrao

    2003-07-01

    This article discusses the tariff regulation models adopted in the electricity utility sector, with a focus on the innovations introduced as a result of the liberalization of the sector that began in the 1980s. The principal tariff criteria are discussed: tariffs determined by the both the rate of return regulation and by marginal cost, and price-caps. Instruments complementary to tariffs are also examined. The main aim of the article is to contribute to a better understanding of the tariff rules adopted in the electricity sector. (author)

  19. Environmental and social communication and the politics feasibility of the electric sector enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Ribeiro, V. de

    1993-01-01

    This paper updates and presents the conceptual bases of socio-environmental communication and some theoretical aspects relating with political feasibility of enterprises of electric sector, using itself of knowledge produced about the theme and the present experiences of the some sector companies. The following aspects are also included: historical of works about the subject; the present position of electric sector; detailed conceptual bases of political feasibility and socio-environmental communication; existing generation and that one planned in decennial plan of expansion 1993/2002 demonstrating the necessity of socio-environmental communication; conditions and challenges to the use of socio-environmental communications. (C.M.)

  20. Decarbonising the Hungarian Electricity and Heat Sectors: What Is the Least impossible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaderjak, P.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation will report on an economic assessment of decarbonisation scenarios for the Hungarian electricity and heat sectors by 2050. The assessment is based on economic modeling that assumes an expanding application of existing technologies. The results suggest that CO 2 abatement in the heat sector might be a cheaper and more realistic option for decarbonisation in the Hungarian case. With regard to the electricity sector, decarbonisation foreseen in the Commission's 2050 vision (90-95%) is not feasible without a massive application of CCS technology or without a non-foreseeable technology breakthrough.(author)

  1. Spanish electrical sector and Nuclear R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salve, R.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents the global situation of the R and D in Nuclear Sector. The author proposes they way to obtain the best results in the R and D area. This way is: 1.- Clear objectives 2.- Integration of R and D into the enterprise plan. 3.- More decision capacity 4.- To plan the long-term benefits

  2. Link between intermittent electrical energy sources and district heating sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo

    2016-01-01

    Energy has always been one of the key challenges in planning of societies' development worldwide. The COP conference in Paris in December 2015 has shown unprecedented mutual understanding of harmful consequences climate change can cause. Integrating power and heating sectors in an efficient way...

  3. The CO2 emissions of the European power sector: economic drivers and the climate-energy policies' contribution. Working Paper No. 2014 - 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghmans, Nicolas; Cheze, Benoit; Alberola, Emilie; Chevallier, Julien

    2014-10-01

    In the frame of the ongoing debate on the 2030 energy and climate policies in the European Union, this article provides the first assessment of the effectiveness of European energy and climate policies on the CO 2 emissions reductions. This ex-post analysis deals with the CO 2 emissions of the electricity sector covered by the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) during its phases I and II (2005-2012). We analyze the contribution of different variables (including climate and energy policies, energy prices, economic activity and technical features of plants) in the evolution of CO 2 emissions from electricity production plants in Europe. The empirical results allow drawing a number of conclusions regarding the causes of the downward trend in the carbon emissions generated by power production covered by the EU ETS between 2005 and 2012. First, we show that the increased use of renewable energy in electricity production has played a dominant role in the fall in CO 2 emissions in the power sector. Second, the analysis confirms that the economic downturn has played a significant role, although not a dominant one. Third, price substitution effects between coal and gas also seem to have affected carbon emissions. Last but not least, we identify that the price of carbon has also pushed down power CO 2 emissions. (authors)

  4. 2015 Plan. Project 1: methodology and planning process of the Brazilian electric sector expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Planning Process of Brazilian Electric Sector Expansion, their normative aspects, instruments, main agents and the planning cycles are described. The methodology of expansion planning is shown, with the interactions of several study areas, electric power market and the used computer models. The forecasts of methodology evolution is also presented. (C.G.C.)

  5. Estimating the price elasticity for demand for electricity by sector in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roula Inglesi-Lotz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses electricity consumption patterns in South Africa in an attempt to understand and identify the roots of the current electricity crisis. This is done by investigating various economic sectors’ responses to price changes using panel data for the period 1993–2004. Positive and statistically significant price elasticities over this period were found for the transport (rail and commercial sectors while there are positive, but small and statistically insignificant responses to price changes in the agriculture and mining sectors. Only the industrial sector responded to changes in electricity prices according to theory, namely illustrating negative demand elasticities. This sector, however, dominates electricity consumption resulting in aggregate demand elasticities that are negative. These results explain, in part, the current electricity crisis. Given the historic low level of electricity prices in conjunction with, on the whole, a real price decline, i.e. price increases lower than the inflation rate; there was no major incentive to reduce electricity consumption and/or to be efficient. This result supports the notion that prices do have an important signalling effect in the economy. Hence, the electricity prices should be considered not only from an economic growth or social vantage point, but also from a supply and technocratic perspective, which includes environmental factors such as CO2-emissions. Prices should not be determined without considering the system-wide implications thereof.

  6. Vulnerability to terrorist attacks in European electricity decarbonisation scenarios: Comparing renewable electricity imports to gas imports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilliestam, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The decarbonised future European electricity system must remain secure: reliable electricity supply is a prerequisite for the functioning of modern society. Scenarios like Desertec, which partially rely on solar power imports from the Middle East and North Africa, may be attractive for decarbonisation, but raise concerns about terrorists interrupting supply by attacking the long, unprotected transmission lines in the Sahara. In this paper, I develop new methods and assess the European vulnerability to terrorist attacks in the Desertec scenario. I compare this to the vulnerability of today's system and a decarbonisation scenario in which Europe relies on gas imports for electricity generation. I show that the vulnerability of both gas and electricity imports is low, but electricity imports are more vulnerable than gas imports, due to their technical characteristics. Gas outages (and, potentially, resulting blackouts) are the very unlikely consequence even of very high-number attacks against the gas import system, whereas short blackouts are the potential consequence of a few attacks against the import electricity lines. As the impacts of all except extreme attacks are limited, terrorists cannot attack energy infrastructure and cause spectacular, fear-creating outages. Both gas and electricity import infrastructure are thus unattractive and unlikely terrorist targets. - Highlights: • A comparison of terrorism risks of importing solar power and gas for power generation. • Both scenarios show low vulnerability to terrorist attacks. • Within low vulnerabilities, gas imports are less vulnerable than electricity imports. • Causing spectacular, large and long outages is very difficult for attacker. • The attractiveness of gas and power import infrastructure as terrorist target is low

  7. The impact of liberalisation of the electricity market on the hard coal mining sector in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Jacek [Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute of Polish Academy of Sciences, Energy and Environmental Policy Division, Wybickiego 7, 31-261 Krakow (Poland)

    2009-03-15

    The liberalisation of the electricity market changed the conditions of operation not only for the power industry, but also for related sectors. One of the particularly sensitive industries in Poland is coal mining, which is the result of coal-based structure of electricity generation. As it is more difficult, in the liberalised market, to burden consumers with all the costs, electricity producers are eager to transfer the risk of operation to the suppliers. That increases uncertainty about the future of the hard coal industry. The aim of this paper was to quantitatively estimate the impact that liberalisation of the electricity markets may have on the coal mining sector in Poland. First of all, the possible areas of that impact were identified. Then the model, which involved detailed relations in the impact areas identified, was developed and employed to evaluate the performance of the mining sector. The comparison of scenarios of a monopolistic electricity sector with a liberalised one enabled an estimation of the scale of the impact on the mining sector to be made. The results showed that liberalisation causes decreased coal consumption and decreased operating profits in coal companies. However, some savings in electricity costs are possible for coal producers. (author)

  8. The impact of liberalisation of the electricity market on the hard coal mining sector in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacek Kaminski [Mineral and Energy Economy Research Institute of Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland). Energy and Environmental Policy Division

    2009-03-15

    The liberalisation of the electricity market changed the conditions of operation not only for the power industry but also for related sectors. One of the particularly sensitive industries in Poland is coal mining, which is the result of coal-based structure of electricity generation. As it is more difficult, in the liberalised market, to burden consumers with all the costs, electricity producers are eager to transfer the risk of operation to the suppliers. That increases uncertainty about the future of the hard coal industry. The aim of this paper was to quantitatively estimate the impact that liberalisation of the electricity markets may have on the coal mining sector in Poland. First of all, the possible areas of that impact were identified. Then the model, which involved detailed relations in the impact areas identified, was developed and employed to evaluate the performance of the mining sector. The comparison of scenarios of a monopolistic electricity sector with a liberalised one enabled an estimation of the scale of the impact on the mining sector to be made. The results showed that liberalisation causes decreased coal consumption and decreased operating profits in coal companies. However, some savings in electricity costs are possible for coal producers. 42 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs., 1 app.

  9. Generating solutions : summary of the Electricity Sector Council's review of foreign credential recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-15

    The Electricity Sector Council has recognized the increasing requirement to recruit and retain internationally trained workers to offset the anticipated retirement of up to 40 per cent of skilled workers in this sector by 2014. This document provided a brief summary of the review of foreign credential recognition in Canada's Electricity Council which was prepared in February 2008. The purpose of the study was to capture a perceptive picture of Canada's electricity labour force and to assist the Electricity Sector Council in the potential development and implementation of strategies to facilitate the integration of internationally trained workers into Canada's electricity sector. This synopsis report presented the analysis of the study including a discussion of immigration trends; foreign credential recognition in Canada's electricity sector; immigration profiles by region; case study profiles; and recommendations. It was recommended that resources be researched, developed and provided in order to help stakeholders attract, recruit, retain and integrate internationally trained workers. 2 refs.

  10. The impact of liberalisation of the electricity market on the hard coal mining sector in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    The liberalisation of the electricity market changed the conditions of operation not only for the power industry, but also for related sectors. One of the particularly sensitive industries in Poland is coal mining, which is the result of coal-based structure of electricity generation. As it is more difficult, in the liberalised market, to burden consumers with all the costs, electricity producers are eager to transfer the risk of operation to the suppliers. That increases uncertainty about the future of the hard coal industry. The aim of this paper was to quantitatively estimate the impact that liberalisation of the electricity markets may have on the coal mining sector in Poland. First of all, the possible areas of that impact were identified. Then the model, which involved detailed relations in the impact areas identified, was developed and employed to evaluate the performance of the mining sector. The comparison of scenarios of a monopolistic electricity sector with a liberalised one enabled an estimation of the scale of the impact on the mining sector to be made. The results showed that liberalisation causes decreased coal consumption and decreased operating profits in coal companies. However, some savings in electricity costs are possible for coal producers. (author)

  11. Electron Electric Dipole Moment from CP Violation in the Charged Higgs Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowser-Chao, D.; Keung, W.; Chang, D.; Chang, D.

    1997-01-01

    The leading contributions to the electron (or muon) electric dipole moment due to CP violation in the charged Higgs sector are at the two level. A careful model-independent analysis of the heavy fermion contribution is provided. We also consider some specific scenarios to demonstrate how charged Higgs sector CP violation can naturally give rise to large electric dipole moments. Numerical results show that the electron electric dipole moment in such models can lie at the experimentally accessible level. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  12. Industrial and institutional restructuring of the Russian electricity sector: Status and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engoian, Alda

    2006-01-01

    The reform of the Russian electricity industry represents one of the largest and most technically complex post-Soviet era industrial restructurings. This paper presents the framework, status, and perspectives for the Russian electricity sector liberalisation. Uncertainties regarding the effective implementation of the reform are specifically examined. Ultimately the critical analysis of the reform questions the feasibility and adequacy of the recommended measures in the specific Russian context. Current theories fail to answer a fundamental issue, namely how to promote investment in an obsolete electrical infrastructure and, more generally, whether a pure free market model is compatible with physical constraints posed by the electricity sector. A careless deregulation of the Russian electricity system could hinder the country's stable and sustainable development, as its economy and the population's service have traditionally been closely linked to the electricity industry

  13. Industrial and institutional restructuring of the Russian electricity sector: status and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engoian, A.

    2006-01-01

    The reform of the Russian electricity industry represents one of the largest and most technically complex post-Soviet era industrial restructurings. This paper presents the framework, status, and perspectives for the Russian electricity sector liberalisation. Uncertainties regarding the effective implementation of the reform are specifically examined. Ultimately the critical analysis of the reform questions the feasibility and adequacy of the recommended measures in the specific Russian context. Current theories fail to answer a fundamental issue, namely how to promote investment in an obsolete electrical infrastructure and, more generally, whether a pure free market model is compatible with physical constraints posed by the electricity sector. A careless deregulation of the Russian electricity system could hinder the country's stable and sustainable development, as its economy and the population's service have traditionally been closely linked to the electricity industry. (author)

  14. The impacts of market liberalization on innovation processes in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markard, J.; Truffer, B.; Imboden, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Market liberalization has triggered fundamental changes in the electricity sector with far-reaching economic, technical, organizational and ecological consequences. The paper examines how electricity market liberalization has influenced innovation processes at the level of electric utilities and in the electricity sector as a whole. The results are based on an empirical survey including two case studies, green power and fuel cells, in which utility innovation strategies were analysed. From the similarities in both cases and the aggregated effects of innovation strategies, we identify several indications for a general change of innovation processes in the sector: the innovation activity has increased, there is a greater variety of innovation projects, product innovations and organizational innovations have gained importance, innovation networks have become smaller and more specific, and the professionalism of innovation management is improving. (author)

  15. The impact of electricity production upon the environment: the lessons drawn from recent european assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, H.; Beutier, D.

    2004-01-01

    European choices where energy policy is concerned must take account of the effects of each source of electricity production upon both man and the environment. In order to assess these effects, two approaches can be used: the external cost (EC) approach and the life cycle analysis (LCA) approach. Regarding nuclear energy, the documentation for life cycle analysis or for external cost type surveys is more comprehensive than for other forms of production and the values indicated are generally coherent. To a lesser extent, this is also the case of hydro-electricity. Therefore, in general it is relatively simple to establish reference thresholds for these sectors. The exercise becomes rather more difficult in the case of certain, so-called renewable energies, due to their intermittent nature and the high energy intensity processes that they include. This raises the question of national differences and the generic nature of the LCA. Indeed, the incorporation of secondary energy (or even replacement energy) leads to high levels of disparity according to the national mix concerned. A prime example of 'dependent' renewable energy is photovoltaic solar energy. Assessments remain incomplete for several sectors and other limitations apply to the accounting aspects of the LCA approach. (authors)

  16. European Utility Requirements: leveling the European electricity producers' playing ground for new NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard Roche

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since 1992, the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document has been developed by the major European electricity producers. The main driver to this work has been the construction of a unified European market. The electricity producers have set out design requirements adapted to this new European environment, while keeping in mind experience feedback from operating NPPs worldwide. The EUR document is now fully operational and its set of generic requirements have been recently used as bid specification in Finland and in China. The EUR document keeps developing in two directions: 1- completing the assessment of the projects that could be proposed by the vendors for the European market. Five projects have been assessed between 1999 and 2002: BWR90, EPR, EP1000, ABWR and SWR1000. Two new projects are being assessed, the Westinghouse AP1000 and the Russian VVER AES92. It is currently planned to publish these two new assessments in the first half of 2006. Others may be undertaken meanwhile. 2- revision of the generic requirements. A revision C of the volume 4 dedicated to power generation plant is being completed. It includes responses to vendors comments and feedback from the TVO call for bid for Finland 5. A revision D of the volumes 1 and 2 dedicated to nuclear islands is foreseen. The main contributions to this revision are the harmonization actions going on in Europe about nuclear safety (WENRA study on reactor safety harmonization, EC works, evolution of the IAEA guides and requirements), the harmonization works on the conditions of connection to the European HV grid as well as harmonization works on other matters, like codes and standards. This has given a unified frame in which the future nuclear plants can be designed and built. In this frame development of standards designs usable throughout Europe without major design change is possible, thus helping to increase competition, and ultimately to save investment and operating costs

  17. Cultural Economy. The economic impact of the cultural sector from a European perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Colombo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Culture is playing an increasingly important role in the economic development of industrialised countries. Thus, the management of large cultural events and the relationship between cultural management and cultural policies will be key elements in the development of the so-called cultural economy. This article looks at the concept of cultural economy, in terms of the appearance of the idea and the different European methodological positions. The case of the Berlin International Film Festival is taken as an example to show the importance of cultural management with regard to economic development of the sector. This case study also allows for the analysis of the increasingly complex forms of cultural management adopted, as well as their effects on the regulation of the cultural market and their links to other basic economic sectors in urban development.

  18. Economic and institutional dynamics of electricity markets deregulation: the interaction between sectoral regulation and antitrust policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanel, B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define regulatory intervention as a part of a global monitoring procedure allowing the definition and adaptation of market structures and rules, given the observed behavior of market participants. Nevertheless, the possible inefficiency in its (decisional) coordination with competition authorities implies further analysis. We thus adopt a comparative methodology based on the studying PJM and NETA wholesale markets. This analysis enables us to stress two possible 'models' in the distribution and coordination of monitoring powers. The first one privileges a strong 'informational coordination' between the sectoral regulator and the Transmission System Operator. By contrast, the second model is characterized by a constrained informational coordination, leading to a greater 'decisional convergence' between regulatory intervention and antitrust policy. Lastly, we put these conclusions into perspective with the specific issue of the achievement of an efficient and integrated European market for electricity. In particular, we stress the need for a single regulatory agency, which should be given autonomous decisional powers in the adoption of regional markets reform initiatives (author)

  19. Deconstructing hydro: the BC electricity sector in this decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaccard, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper provided speculation regarding the world-wide trend to deregulate electric utilities with particular focus on power deregulation in British Columbia. The four main issues facing electricity reform in British Columbia are to determine if publicly-owned assets should be privatised, how to achieve competitive electricity commodity prices in a de-regulated generation market, to determine the extent to which customers will be allowed direct access to sellers of electricity, and to determine which changes in industry structure are needed to ensure that control over the common carrier does not hinder fair competition. BC Hydro recently issued a plan for the next decade entitled the Integrated Electricity Plan which suggests that almost all growth in supply on the Hydro system will be limited to a few large projects totalling 900 megawatts, to be owned and operated by either BC Hydro or by the Columbia Power Corporation, another Crown entity. This plan is in complete contrast to the evolution of the electricity industry nearly everywhere else in the world where demand growth is being met almost entirely by small- and medium-scale non-utility resources issuing from competitive markets with minimal public funding. This article looks at why BC Hydro will probably be transformed significantly, even dismantled, in the coming decade. The article begins with a section explaining the cause and effects of major changes in the world-wide electricity industry. This is followed by a section reviewing what BC Hydro did in the 1990s while reform was taking place. The article also describes what BC Hydro intends to do in the next decade and explores reasons why this outcome is unlikely. The final section of the article provides an alternative vision of BC Hydro's future over the next decade. 1 tab., 3 figs

  20. On the Pricing of Step-Up Bonds in the European Telecom Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, David; Mortensen, Allan

    This paper investigates the pricing of step-up bonds, i.e. corporatebonds with provisions stating that the coupon payments increase as thecredit rating level of the issuer declines. To assess the risk-neutral ratingtransition probabilities necessary to price these bonds, we introduce...... a newcalibration method within the reduced-form rating-based model of Jarrow,Lando, and Turnbull (1997). We also treat split ratings and adjust forrating outlook. Step-up bonds have been issued in large amounts in theEuropean telecom sector, and we find that, through most of the sample,step-up bonds issued...

  1. Analysis of the renewable energy sector in Spain at the European level comparative; Analisis del sector de las energias renovables en Espana. Estudio comparativo a nivel europeo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, F. J.

    2011-07-01

    The energy sector, in particular renewable energy, represents a strategic sector for the Spanish and European industry. Policy decisions to its regulation or deregulation is critical. Regulatory frameworks mark a way to contrast their effectiveness and efficiency. However, it is necessary to deepen the theoretical foundations as the natural capital or the limits to growth, to place in a framework more accurately. This article presents specific data on the economic, fiscal, labor and environmental conditions to date has involved the promotion of this sector and its international impact. (Author)

  2. Storm in the electricity sector: the emergence of a sharing economy in the case of Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernay, Anne-Lorene; Gauthier, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Dominated by a few actors, the electricity sector has long been very stable. Today, it is facing significant disruption as a result of two political decisions: the liberalization of the sector and the signing of the Kyoto protocol. Surprisingly, the sector is also experiencing the emergence of a new paradigm: that of the sharing economy. The sharing economy is historically unknown in the sector where its appearance seemed rather unlikely. This article traces the emergence and ascension of this paradigm in the Netherlands from the 1980's to nowadays. A business model perspective is adopted. The business model describes how firms create, deliver and capture value. This article shows that the transformation is not a technical one but rather a managerial one with the development of new ways of organizing the production of electricity. It also shows that the sector went from a situation where a small number of isolated initiatives were present to one where an ecosystem was created around sharing activities with many actors present. These actors sometimes compete with each other but, more often, they are complementary to one another. The article goes on to discuss the various forms that the sharing economy takes in the electricity sector and the ways that firms, through their business models, facilitated the emergence and development of this paradigm. Finally, this article criticizes the use of the business model as an instrument to analyse the evolution of a sector

  3. Short- and long-run elasticities of electricity demand in the Korean service sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kyoung-Min; Lim, Seul-Ye; Yoo, Seung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to examine the electricity demand function in the Korean service sector using the annual data covering the period 1970–2011. The short- and long-run elasticities of electricity demand with respect to price and income are empirically estimated using a co-integration and error-correction model. The short- and long-run price elasticities are estimated to be −0.421 and −1.002, respectively. The short- and long-run income elasticities are computed to be 0.855 and 1.090, respectively. Electricity demand in the service sector is inelastic to changes in both price and income in the short-run, but elastic in the long-run. Therefore, it appears that a pricing policy is more effective than the direct regulation of reducing electricity demand in the long-run in order to stabilize the electricity demand in the service sector. Moreover, it is necessary to encourage a more efficient use of electricity to cope with increasing demand for electricity following economic growth because the electricity demand in the service sector is income-elastic in the long-run. - Highlights: • We examine the electricity demand function in the Korean service sector. • We use the annual data covering the period 1970–2011. • The demand function is estimated using a co-integration and error-correction model. • The short- and long-run price elasticities are −0.421 and −1.002, respectively. • The short- and long-run income elasticities are 0.855 and 1.090, respectively

  4. Defining European Wholesale Electricity Markets. An 'And/Or' Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkgraaf, E.; Janssen, M.C.W.

    2009-09-01

    An important question in the dynamic European wholesale markets for electricity is whether to define the geographical market at the level of an individual member state or more broadly. We show that if we currently take the traditional approach by considering for each member state whether there is one single other country that provides a substitute for domestic production, the market in each separate member state has still to be considered a separate market. However, if we allow for the possibility that at different moments in time there is another country that provides a substitute for domestic production, then the conclusion should be that certain member states do not constitute a separate geographical market. This is in particular true for Belgium, but also for The Netherlands, France, and to some extent also for Germany and Austria. We call this alternative approach the 'and/or' approach.

  5. European electricity markets reforms: the 'visible hand' of public coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates how proposed reforms on policies to maintain generation adequacy and encourage clean technology investments in a number of European countries modify the role of the market. In these reforms the government, regulator and system operator take on explicit planning and coordination responsibilities with the introduction of capacity mechanisms and long-term support for clean technologies. We highlight the interactions of these mechanisms with the electricity market and how they reallocate risks between generators, government and consumers. The different mechanisms offer varying degrees of autonomy to generators with regards to investment decisions. In a prospective way, the paper also explores how designs of these different mechanisms might converge towards a unified technology neutral mechanism in the long-run. This could involve auctioning of long-term contracts for all types of existing and new capacities, whether it is low carbon or fossil fueled. (authors)

  6. Industrial DSM in a deregulated European electricity market - a case study of 11 plants in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trygg, Louise; Karlsson, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004 Sweden will become part of a common European electricity market. This implies that the price of electricity in Swedish will adapt to a higher European electricity price due to the increase in cross-border trading. Swedish plant is characterized as more electricity-intensive than plant on the European continent, and this, in combination with a higher European electricity price will lead to a precarious scenario. This paper studies the energy use of 11 plants in the municipality of Oskarshamn in Sweden. The aim is to show how these plants can reduce their electricity use to adapt to a European level. We have found that the plants could reduce their use of electricity by 48% and their use of energy by 40%. In a European perspective, where coal-condensing power is assumed to be the marginal production that alters as the electricity demand changes, the decrease in the use of electricity in this study leads to a reduction in global emissions of carbon dioxide of 69,000 tonne a year. Electricity generated in Sweden emits very low emissions of carbon dioxide and have thus consequently very low external cost. The freed capacity in Sweden could therefore replace electricity generated with higher external cost and as a result lower the total external cost in Europe. The emissions from the saved electricity could also be valuable within the EU emissions trading scheme, if the emissions calculation is done assuming the marginal electricity is fossil fuel based

  7. The efficiency improvement potential for coal, oil and electricity in China's manufacturing sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ke; Lin, Boqiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces an improved total-factor ESTR (energy-saving target ratio) index, which combines the sequence technique and the “energy direction” to a DEA (data envelopment analysis) model, in order to measure the possible energy saving potential of a manufacturing sector. Afterward, the energy saving potentials of four different energy carriers, namely coal, gasoline, diesel oil and electricity, for 27 manufacturing sectors during the period of 1998–2011 in China are calculated. The results and its policy implications are as follows: (1) the average ESTRs of coal, gasoline, diesel oil and electricity are 1.714%, 49.939%, 24.465% and 3.487% respectively. Hence, energy saving of manufacturing sectors should put more emphasis on gasoline and diesel oil. (2) The key sectors for gasoline saving is the energy-intensive sectors, while the key sectors for diesel oil saving is the equipment manufacturing sectors. (3) The manufacture of raw chemical materials and chemical products sector not only consumes a large amount of oil, but also has a low efficiency of oil usage. Therefore, it is the key sector for oil saving. (4) Manufacture of tobacco and manufacture of communication equipment, computers and other electronic equipment are the benchmark for the four major energy carriers of energy-saving ratios. - Highlights: • An improved total-factor energy-saving target ratio is proposed. • Energy saving potentials of energy carriers for sectors in 1998–2011 are calculated. • Policy implications for energy savings in sectors and energy carriers are discussed. • Some suggestions for the energy policies of China's economy are discussed

  8. 2015 Plan. Project 9: the institutional base reformulation of electrical sector and the participation of private capital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The structural changes in the electrical sector and the forecast for favoring the private participation in the investments of the sector are discussed, describing the main stages of the institutional evolution. Some economic markers as competitiveness, electric power prices, private capital and the regulations of electric power services are presented. (C.G.C)

  9. The electric sector and its insert in a global scenery; O setor eletrico e sua insercao num cenario globalizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Ricardo Oliveira Lopes

    1999-11-01

    The document discusses the following issues of the Brazilian electric power sector: historical aspects; the creation of the ELETROBRAS and the sectorial debts process; financial and productive globalization; electric industry and the new environment and the new businesses. The author concludes the work detaching the new business appearance in the Brazilian electric power sector.

  10. The Clean Development Mechanism and Sustainable Development in China's Electricity Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul A. Steenhof

    2005-01-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism,a flexibility mechanism contained in the Kyoto Protocol, offers China an important tool to attract investment in clean energy technology and processes into its electricity sector. The Chinese electricity sector places centrally in the country's economy and environment, being a significant contributor to the acid rain and air pollution problems that plague many of China's cities and regions, and therefore a focus of many related energy and environmental policies.China's electricity sector has also been the subject of a number of economic analyses that have showed that it contains the highest potential for clean energy investment through the Clean Development Mechanism of any economic sector in China. This mechanism, through the active participation from investors in more industrialized countries, can help alleviate the environmental problems attributable to electricity generation in China through advancing such technology as wind electricity generation, dean coal technology, high efficient natural gas electricity generation, or utilization of coal mine methane. In this context, the Clean Development Mechanism also compliments a range of environmental and energy policies which are strategizing to encourage the sustainable development of China's economy.

  11. Study the Effect of Value-Added of Services Sector on Forecasting of Electricity Demand in Services Sector due to Price Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mahdi Mostafavi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy is as one of the important effective factors on economic growth and development. In recent decades, numerous studies in different countries to estimate and forecast electricity demand in different parts of the economy have been made. In this paper, using the method ARDL, estimation and forecasting of electricity demand in the services sector of Iran are determined for the time period from 1983 to 2012. Estimated equations show that the added value of the services sector and a significant positive impact on the demand for electricity in this sector. The price elasticity for services sector is smaller than 1 due to low electricity prices and subsidized electricity. Hence, electricity prices have little impact on the demand for electricity. The results of the estimate represents a long-term relationship between the variables in the services sector. In this paper, based on amendments to the law on subsidies and estimated values, anticipated electricity demand until the end of the fifth development plan was carried out. The results indicate an increase in power consumption in the services sector.

  12. Influence of Atlantic SST anomalies on the atmospheric circulation in the Atlantic-European sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kestenare

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of observational data suggest that Sea Surface Temperature (SST anomalies in the Atlantic Ocean have a significant influence on the atmospheric circulation in the Atlantic-European sector in early winter and in spring. After reviewing this work and showing that the spring signal is part of a global air-sea interaction, we analyze for comparison an ensemble of simulations with the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model in T42 resolution forced by the observed distribution of SST and sea ice, and a simulation with the ECHAM4/OPA8 coupled model in T30 resolution. In the two cases, a significant influence of the Atlantic on the atmosphere is detected in the Atlantic-European sector. In the forced mode, ECHAM4 responds to SST anomalies from early spring to late summer, and also in early winter. The forcing involves SST anomalies not only in the tropical Atlantic, but also in the whole tropical band, suggesting a strong ENSO influence. The modeled signal resembles that seen in the observations in spring, but not in early winter. In the coupled mode, the Atlantic SST only has a significant influence on the atmosphere in summer. Although the SST anomaly is confined to the Atlantic, the summer signal shows some similarity with that seen in the forced simulations. However, there is no counterpart in the observations.

  13. The electricity sector and energy policy. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, P.

    1980-01-01

    The whole question of the relationship between the demand for electricity and the alternatives for energising society has become a largely unexamined part of energy policy making. It is to this issue that this paper is directed, as the costs, safety, security and other problems of the fast breeder programme mean that we cannot afford to allow the issue of the electrification of society to remain an unexamined side issue in energy policy decision taking. On the contrary, it is suggested that it ought to be one of the main variables for analysis prior to the fast breeder programme decision. The paper proceeds to examine the concept of 'the electrification of society', used as a short-hand way of expressing a belief in the inevitability and/or the desirability of developing an energy economy in a way in which electricity comes to meet an increasing share of energy end use. (author)

  14. Competition, regulation, and energy efficiency options in the electricity sector: Opportunities and challenges in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Amol Anant

    This dissertation explores issues related to competition in and regulation of electricity sectors in developing countries on the backdrop of fundamental reforms in their electricity sectors. In most cases, electricity sector reforms promoted privatization based on the rationale that it will lower prices and improve quality. In Chapter 2, I analyze this rationale by examining the stated capital cost of independent (private) power producer's (IPPs) power projects in eight developing countries and find that the stated capital cost of projects selected via competitive bidding is on an average about 40% to 60% lower than that of the projects selected via negotiations, which, I argue, represents the extent to which the costs of negotiated projects are overstated. My results indicate that the policy of promoting private sector without an adequate focus on improving competition or regulation has not worked in most cases in terms of getting competitively priced private sector projects. Given the importance of facilitating effective competition or regulation, In Chapter 3, I examine the challenges and opportunities of establishing a competitive wholesale electricity market in a developing country context. I model a potential wholesale electricity market in Maharashtra (MH) state, India and find that it would be robustly competitive even in a situation of up-to five percent of supply shortage, when opportunities for demand response are combined with policies such as divestiture and requiring long-term contracts. My results indicate that with appropriate policies, some developing countries could establish competitive wholesale electricity markets. In Chapter 4, I focus on the demand side and analyze the cost effectiveness of improving end-use efficiency in an electricity sector with subsidized tariffs and electricity shortages and show that they offer the least expensive way of reducing shortages in Maharashtra State, India. In Chapter 5, I examine the costs of reducing carbon

  15. Competing on service and branding in the renewable electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Angela; Pandit, Ameet P.

    2012-01-01

    Green marketing research has traditionally analysed the effect of attitudes and norms on purchase intentions and behaviours. While we are aware of research examining attitudes and behaviours towards green tangible products (e.g., ), there is no understanding regarding how these factors apply to intangible renewable power services. Similarly, branding and its effects are scant in a contemporary green marketing context. Of this research, most has evaluated the product and not service brands. Some have researched the extent of green branding and its effects on attitudes (e.g., ). Despite this, research evaluating the role of renewable electricity retailer brands and their characteristics is limited. This study works towards understanding this and seeks to bind the existing branding, services marketing and consumer behaviour literatures to understand the motivators behind renewable electricity purchase in Australia. With the introduction of contestable customers and the increase in importance of renewable energy around the world, it is imperative that renewable electricity retailers attract consumer interest and attain their consideration. Using focus group research and in-depth interviews from consumers in Australia, this paper analyses the strategic options available to the power provider to increase their appeal to the consumer. Theoretical and managerial implications are reviewed. - Highlights: ► We examine the motivations to adopt renewable electricity by Australian consumers. ► Renewable power suppliers should create a ‘living brand’ where employees are invested in the brand. ► Service interaction is a point of differentiation leading to increased competitive advantage. ► Building a sense of brand community helps build customer loyalty and the rise of green energy programs. ► Functional and emotional brand positioning appeals to consumers can be used to increase adoption.

  16. The transformation of the electric power sector in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, John A.; Tan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    China's industrial transformation of the past thirty years, when its GDP has been increasing by an average of 10% per year, has been underpinned by an energy industrial revolution. Electrical energy is the driver of this transformation, with China utilizing latecomer advantages in building an electrical energy generation machine of prodigious size. In terms of electrical energy generated, China's system has expanded twelve-fold in 30 years, from 280 TWh in 1980 to over 3500 TWh in 2010. In this paper we describe the principal features of this remarkable transformation, examining the official projections to 2020, the semi-official projections to 2050, and offering our own projections based on observed logistic industrial dynamics for the uptake of renewable energies as well as the continuing role to be played by fossil fuels, particularly coal. We emphasize the role to be played by China's construction of a ‘strong and smart’ electric power grid, as envisaged in the 12th Five Year Plan released in March 2011, and the complementary proposals to build a national high speed rail system. We see China as on track to phase out fossil fuels altogether in its power production system by the end of the century. We develop an argument as to why it might be expected that fossil fuel utilization will decline while renewable energy utilization might increase in China, constituting a genuine energy industrial revolution. - Highlights: ► Our interpretation of official projections to 2020. ► Our projections to 2050 using logistic industrial dynamics. ► A strong and smart national power grid. ► A national high-speed rail system.

  17. Restructuring of the electric power sector in Brazil. Analysis of the new institutional structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Marcelo Jose C.; Oliveira, Humberto Renato de; Sampaio, Cristiane Collich

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the risks related to the State of not following its original principles and objectives regarding the energy sector. The challenges and risks of the State with its new function as regulator, through the regulation agencies, will be analysed. A comparison between the institutional structure of the Brazilian electrical sector and other countries will be accomplished, focusing on the following aspects: competition, regulation and commercial operation. (author)

  18. The deregulation of network industries: is the electricity sector an exception?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, F.; Vivet, D.

    2006-01-01

    In view of their special characteristics, network industries have for quite a long time been considered as (natural) monopolies. Network externalities and economies of scale in particular justified this (natural) monopoly thesis. Since the last decade of the past century, however, a trend towards deregulation of such industries has been observed worldwide. This trend started with the successful introduction of competition in the telecommunications sector. The success in that sector is often used as an argument for opening up other network industries to competition as well. The study analyses whether this reasoning can be applied to the electricity sector. At first glance, the sectors electricity and telecommunications seem very similar, as both are network industries having been characterised for a long time by economies of scale, but for which technological progress may have put an end to this scale effect. However, the study points out that there are important differences. In the telecommunications sector, technological progress on the supply side has been accompanied by a strong growth in demand. There is no such demand side effect in the electricity branch. Moreover, due to physical characteristics, the electricity sector seems to be more complicated. In order to introduce competition, the sector has to be split up into sub-sectors (production, transmission, distribution and supply). Only two segments, production and supply, are considered as open markets; transmission and distribution, on the other hand, remain monopolies. This splitting up, however, entails a new kind of costs, the so-called transaction costs. As such the gains from the liberalization in certain segments might (partly) offset increase in the transaction costs resulting from vertical disintegration. (authors)

  19. Expansion plan of the electrical sector; Plan de expansion del sector electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristerna Ocampo, Rafael [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    1996-07-01

    An analysis of the Mexican electrical market in the year 1994 as far as sales of electrical energy and types of users who utilized that energy, is presented. In addition, an analysis is made of the options for the future supply, where the installed electrical capacity in Mexico in 1994 is described. Also the requirements of additional capacity of power generation, from year 1995 to year 2004 are analyzed. In the internal supply of primary energy in Mexico, the hydrocarbons represent 83%, the diversified sources (nuclear, geothermal, hydro and coal) represent 7% and the biomass as well as complementary coal, the 10% balance of the primary energy. Finally an expansion plan of the transmission network of the Mexican electrical system is described. [Spanish] Se presenta un analisis del mercado electrico mexicano en el ano de 1994 en cuanto a ventas de energia electrica y los tipos de usuarios que utilizaron esa energia. Se hace un analisis ademas, de las opciones para la oferta futura, donde se describe la capacidad electrica instalada de Mexico en 1994. Tambien se analizan los requerimientos de capacidad adicional de generacion de 1995 al 2004. En la oferta interna de energia primaria en Mexico, los hidrocarburos representan el 83%, las fuentes diversificadas (nuclear, geotermia, hidro y carboelectrica) representan el 7% y la biomasa asi como el carbon complementario, el 10% restante de la energia primaria. Finalmente se describe un plan de expansion de la red de transmision del sistema electrico mexicano.

  20. Security of supply and investments in the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouttes, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Today, security of supply in electricity can be expressed in new terms, given the development of competition beyond national borders, particularly after the blackouts that occurred in Italy and New-York in 2003. Three causes are put forward to explain the difficulties encountered: the excessive market power of generators; market design that failed to acknowledge the electricity's specific attributes and incoherent government policy at national levels or between neighboring countries. Revisiting these debates, we try to develop the following conjectures: - If there are no regulatory or political barriers to siting, and if the market includes industrial players integrated from generation to marketing, market power is limited and controllable; - It is crucial to take into account the specific attributes of electricity in the design of power markets; - analysis of recent crises reveals them to be related to incoherent, unstable government policy and market design. Herein lies what are no doubt the most important and difficult questions to which economists and experts should devote further structured analyses. (author)

  1. The role of capital costs in decarbonizing the electricity sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Lion; Steckel, Jan Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Low-carbon electricity generation, i.e. renewable energy, nuclear power and carbon capture and storage, is more capital intensive than electricity generation through carbon emitting fossil fuel power stations. High capital costs, expressed as high weighted average cost of capital (WACC), thus tend to encourage the use of fossil fuels. To achieve the same degree of decarbonization, countries with high capital costs therefore need to impose a higher price on carbon emissions than countries with low capital costs. This is particularly relevant for developing and emerging economies, where capital costs tend to be higher than in rich countries. In this paper we quantitatively evaluate how high capital costs impact the transformation of the energy system under climate policy, applying a numerical techno-economic model of the power system. We find that high capital costs can significantly reduce the effectiveness of carbon prices: if carbon emissions are priced at USD 50 per ton and the WACC is 3%, the cost-optimal electricity mix comprises 40% renewable energy. At the same carbon price and a WACC of 15%, the cost-optimal mix comprises almost no renewable energy. At 15% WACC, there is no significant emission mitigation with carbon pricing up to USD 50 per ton, but at 3% WACC and the same carbon price, emissions are reduced by almost half. These results have implications for climate policy; carbon pricing might need to be combined with policies to reduce capital costs of low-carbon options in order to decarbonize power systems.

  2. European electricity; prospective study for 2050 between dreams and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheu, P.

    2015-01-01

    A number of road-maps for the future of the European electricity have been elaborated according to various hypotheses: support more or less important to wind or solar energies, success or failure of carbon capture and storage technologies, more or less gain in energy efficiency. All the prospective studies show a power demand in Europe nearing 4000 TWh in 2030 and less than 5000 TWh in 2050. Another common point is the progressive electrification which means first the de-carbonising of power production means and then the transfer to electricity of uses like heating and transport. All the scenario give a share of at least 50% for renewable energies in 2030 and between 60% and 80% in 2050. The share of nuclear power in the energy mix ranges between 2.5% and 19% while today's nuclear share is over 25%. An alternative roadmap designed by Eurelectric and based on the minimization of costs gives a more important share to nuclear power. (A.C.)

  3. The EEC's single market and the reconstruction of the Nordic electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, O.J.

    1992-01-01

    When the Single Market comes into operation, the author claims, vertically integrated, national and regional monopolies within the electric power sector will be abolished. The nature of the new organization of this sector is as yet unclear. The Nordic countries are beginning to prepare themselves for the new situation. The subject of the article is this prospective development and some of the problems that will arise for the Nordic countries in this respect. The various Nordic proposals and their background are described in addition to the present conditions within the Nordic electric power sector. The special problems which may arise in relation to the Nordic adaption to the Single Market, the forms of adaption that are already beginning (adaptions of regulations, legal aspects etc.) on the part of the authorities and the electric power companies' attitudes and adaptions to expected future conditions are elucidated. (AB)

  4. Project management techniques used in the European Vacuum Vessel sectors procurement for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losasso, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.losasso@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Ortiz de Zuniga, Maria; Jones, Lawrence; Bayon, Angel; Arbogast, Jean-Francois; Caixas, Joan; Fernandez, Jose; Galvan, Stefano; Jover, Teresa [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Ioki, Kimihiro [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lewczanin, Michal; Mico, Gonzalo; Pacheco, Jose Miguel [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Preble, Joseph [ITER Organisation, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Stamos, Vassilis; Trentea, Alexandru [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer File name contains the directory tree structure with a string of three-letter acronyms, thereby enabling parent directory location when confronted with orphan files. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The management of the procurement procedure was carried out in an efficient and timely manner, achieving precisely the contract placement date foreseen at the start of the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contract start-up has been effectively implemented and a flexible project management system has been put in place for an efficient monitoring of the contract. - Abstract: The contract for the seven European Sectors of the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) was placed at the end of 2010 with a consortium of three Italian companies. The task of placing and the initial take-off of this large and complex contract, one of the largest placed by F4E, the European Domestic Agency for ITER, is described. A stringent quality controlled system with a bespoke Vacuum Vessel Project Lifecycle Management system to control the information flow, based on ENOVIA SmarTeam, was developed to handle the storage and approval of Documentation including links to the F4E Vacuum Vessel system and ITER International Organization System interfaces. The VV Sector design and manufacturing schedule is based on Primavera software, which is cost loaded thus allowing F4E to carry out performance measurement with respect to its payments and commitments. This schedule is then integrated into the overall Vacuum Vessel schedule, which includes ancillary activities such as instruments, preliminary design and analysis. The VV Sector Risk Management included three separate risk analyses from F4E and the bidders, utilizing two different methodologies. These efforts will lead to an efficient and effective implementation of this contract, vital to the success of the ITER machine, since the Vacuum Vessel is the biggest single work package of Europe's contribution to ITER and

  5. Environmental regulation and competitiveness: Empirical evidence on the Porter Hypothesis from European manufacturing sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubashkina, Yana; Galeotti, Marzio; Verdolini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the “weak” and “strong” versions of Porter Hypothesis (PH) focusing on the manufacturing sectors of 17 European countries between 1997 and 2009. The hypothesis that well-crafted and well-enforced regulation would benefit both the environment and the firm was originally proposed by Porter (1991) and Porter and van der Linde (1995). To date, the literature has analyzed the impact of environmental regulation on innovation and on productivity mostly in separate analyses and focusing on the USA. The few existing contributions on Europe study the effect of environmental regulation either on green innovation or on performance indicators such as exports. We instead look at overall innovation and productivity impacts. First, focusing on overall innovative activity allows us to account for potential opportunity costs of induced innovations. Second, productivity impacts are arguably the most relevant indicators for the “strong” PH. As a proxy of environmental policy stringency we use pollution abatement and control expenditures (PACE), one of the few sectoral level indicators available. We remedy upon its main drawback, namely potential endogeneity, by adopting an instrumental variable estimation approach. We find evidence of a positive impact of environmental regulation on the output of innovation activity, as proxied by patents, thus providing support in favor of the “weak” PH. This result is in line with most of the literature. On the other front, we find no evidence in favor of the “strong” PH, as productivity appears to be unaffected by the degree of pollution control and abatement efforts. -- Highlights: •Weak and strong Porter Hypothesis. •Panel of manufacturing sectors of 17 European countries between 1997 and 2009. •Look at overall innovation and productivity impacts. •Pollution abatement & control expenditures proxy of environmental policy stringency. •Account for potential endogeneity of PACE by adopting

  6. Power and process: The politics of electricity sector reform in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Christopher David

    In 2007, Uganda had one of the lowest levels of access to electricity in the world. Given the influence of multilateral and bilateral agencies in Uganda; the strong international reputation and domestic influence of its President; the country's historic achievements in public sector and economic reform; and the intimate connection between economic performance, social well-being and access to electricity, the problems with Uganda's electricity sector have proven deeply frustrating and, indeed, puzzling. Following increased scholarly attention to the relationship between political change, policymaking, and public sector reform in sub-Saharan Africa and the developing world generally, this thesis examines the multilevel politics of Uganda's electricity sector reform process. This study contends that explanations for Uganda's electricity sector reform problems generally, and hydroelectric dam construction efforts specifically, must move beyond technical and financial factors. Problems in this sector have also been the result of a model of reform (promoted by the World Bank) that failed adequately to account for the character of political change. Indeed, the model of reform that was promoted and implemented was risky and it was deeply antagonistic to domestic and international civil society organizations. In addition, it was presented as a linear, technical, apolitical exercise. Finally the model was inconsistent with key principles the Bank itself, and public policy literature generally, suggest are needed for success. Based on this analysis, the thesis contends that policymaking and reform must be understood as deeply political processes, which not only define access to services, but also participation in, and exclusion from, national debates. Future approaches to reform and policymaking must anticipate the complex, multilevel, non-linear character of 'second-generation' policy issues like electricity, and the political and institutional capacity needed to increase

  7. A study on the crisis in the electric sector and the movement for its privatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Vianna, Eduardo da.

    1991-03-01

    The fact that the electricity sector in Brazil is now facing serious economic and financial constraints, which in fact jeopardise its prospective expansion, is a consensus. This, alongside with the sharp downfall in revenues that the Social Welfare State is undergoing has clearly favoured the position of those who are for the privatisation of the whole state-owned productive sector, including the companies of the electricity area. In particular, the idea that the present crisis is due to the failure of the state as entrepreneur has gained significant grounds. In view of this reality, the chief goal of the present piece of academic work is to ascertain the factors that, over the years, have contributed to the absolute rule of the government-owned enterprises over the entire electricity sector, in Brazil. An inevitable by-product of such approach is what we intended to be a thorough research into the causes of the utter depletion of the financial capacity of this sector, notably in the late seventies, and the feasibility of the privatisation of the electricity sector. (author). 118 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Modelling the rebound effect with network theory: An insight into the European freight transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzzenenti, Franco; Basosi, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a two pronged approach to the study of the rebound effect, with the aim of assessing the magnitude of the effect in the European freight transport sector and proposing a new modelling framework based on network theory. The (direct) rebound effect is assessed with: 1) an econometric regression; 2) a model based on network theory and statistical mechanics. According to the econometric model the European road freight transport sector undergone a negative rebound between of −74% between 1998 and 2007 and −146% between 1998 and 2011. The network analysis delivers an estimation of network rebound ranging between −29.37% and −7.25. Overall, these results indicate that energy efficiency in Europe, between 1998 and 2011, succeed in reducing the energy consumptions amid an increasing demand for transports. Results on rebound estimation depend on the decision of using GDP as an exogenous variable, an assumption that leaves questions open about the causality chain between growth and transports. Furthermore, the network analysis highlights a structural change –a migration of production factors offshore, that might partially explain this negative effect. In this view, rebound effect analysis on a local or regional scale is becoming more and more uncertain in a globally interconnected economic context. - Highlights: • An evaluation of direct rebound effect in the freight transports with an econometric model is performed. • A new concept of rebound effect based on network theory is presented and implemented. • A comparative analysis of the two different approaches is developed. • Both models indicate that the there was a negative rebound effect in European freight transports. • Network theory proved to be a promising approach to energy systems and rebound effect modelling.

  9. Point Climat no. 17 'The role of the forestry sector in reducing European emissions: the European Commission starts with a tally'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellassen, Valentin; Deheza, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Briefs' presents, in a few pages, hot topics in climate change policy. This issue addresses the following points: On March 12 2012, after two years of consultations and reviews, the European Commission published a decision proposal regarding the inclusion of the land use and forestry sector in European climate policy. The aim of this proposal is to impose accounting rules that are consistent with the decisions of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and to harmonise them between Member States. Meanwhile, the issue of economic incentives aimed at guaranteeing the sector's contribution to climate mitigation is postponed until a later date

  10. Flexible demand in the GB domestic electricity sector in 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drysdale, Brian; Wu, Jianzhong; Jenkins, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Annual domestic demand by category and daily flexible load profiles are shown to 2030. • Valuable flexible demand requires loads to be identifiable, accessible, and useful. • The extent of flexible demand varies significantly on a diurnal and seasonal basis. • Barriers to accessing domestic demand include multiple low value loads and apathy. • Existing market structure a barrier to fully rewarding individual load flexibility. - Abstract: In order to meet greenhouse gas emissions targets the Great Britain (GB) future electricity supply will include a higher fraction of non-dispatchable generation, increasing opportunities for demand side management to maintain a supply/demand balance. This paper examines the extent of flexible domestic demand (FDD) in GB, its usefulness in system balancing and appropriate incentives to encourage consumers to participate. FDD, classified as electric space and water heating (ESWH), and cold and wet appliances, amounts to 59 TW h in 2012 (113 TW h total domestic demand) and is calculated to increase to 67 TW h in 2030. Summer and winter daily load profiles for flexible loads show significant seasonal and diurnal variations in the total flexible load and between load categories. Low levels of reflective consumer engagement with electricity consumption and a resistance to automation present barriers to effective access to FDD. A value of £1.97/household/year has been calculated for cold appliance loads used for frequency response in 2030, using 2013 market rates. The introduction of smart meters in GB by 2020 will allow access to FDD for system balancing. The low commercial value of individual domestic loads increases the attractiveness of non-financial incentives to fully exploit FDD. It was shown that appliance loads have different characteristics which can contribute to an efficient power system in different ways

  11. A strategy for an advanced nuclear-electric sector - proliferation-proof, environmentally-sound, economical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for deployment of an advanced nuclear-electric power sector that is ultimately fueled only by recycled uranium. The sector is optimized on a system basis to meet several objectives in the context of international safeguards against diversion of plutonium and proliferation of nuclear weapons. These objectives include: generation of electric power efficiently and economically; performance with utmost predictable safety; minimization of environmental impacts through conservation of natural resources, consumption of actinides and long-lived fission products, and responsible disposal of unavoidable waste; and consumption of spent fuel from currently used reactors. (author)

  12. The residential electricity sector in Denmark: A description of current conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitzing, Lena; Katz, Jonas; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten

    We provide an overview of the current conditions and framework for residential electricity consumption in Denmark. This includes a general overview of the sector, the retail market and the regulatory framework. We describe the regulations currently in place and changes which have been decided...... in the area, which are listed in the Glossary towards the end of the report. We also attach a list and description of the major sources of information and data that can be obtained and downloaded for analysis of the Danish residential electricity sector....

  13. Introducing the emissions trading system to China’s electricity sector: Challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Fei; Wang, Xin; Zhiqiang, LV

    2014-01-01

    We examine the challenges and opportunities to introduce emissions trading (ETS) in China’s electricity sector, in which the interaction between ETS and electricity market reform plays a major role. China’s electricity sector is currently in a slow progress towards a more competitive and market-based system. Both equal share dispatching policy and regulated wholesale and retail pricing policies pose significant challenges for implementation of ETS in China’s electricity sector. One of the important points of ETS is to give a price for carbon emissions and establish a cost pass-through mechanism (reminded that the essential of carbon pricing is to put a price on carbon emissions that is equal to discounted value of the external damages). It should be regarded as a part of broader policy package for energy and resources price reform. This will require that any low-carbon power policy should be considered as a part of whole policy package aiming at further liberalizing the electricity sector in China. Three policy options are identified to incorporate ETS with electricity reform under different circumstances. A combination of those three options is also proposed to break the lock and reinforce the positive interaction between ETS and the transition towards a competitive electricity system, in link with current pilot ETS designs. A roadmap to introduce ETS in a stepwise manner is suggested. - Highlights: • We assess the institutional barriers of electricity market to ETS in China. • Major challenges to ETS come from equal share dispatching an regulated pricing policies. • Several options are examined to reconcile the ETS and electricity market in China

  14. Ontario's changing electrical sector : implications for air quality and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrota, K.; De Leon, F.

    1999-03-01

    Concerns regarding the changes to Ontario's electricity sector and the impacts that these changes may have on the environment and public health are discussed. Two of the major changes include the implementation of the Nuclear Asset Optimization Plan, and the introduction of competition to Ontario's electrical market. Both changes could have profound impacts on air quality in Toronto and the rest of Ontario. This report recommends that the Ontario Minister of Environment and the Ontario Minister of Energy, Science and Technology establish: a regulatory framework to ensure that competition in Ontario's electrical sector does not lead to greater reliance on coal-fired generating stations and further degradation of air quality, human health and the environment in Toronto and the rest of southern Ontario; annual air emission caps for the entire electrical sector to limit the volume of air pollutants released each year; a renewable energy standard which defines the percentage of electricity that must be generated with renewable energies by electrical suppliers serving Ontario consumers; and a public benefit fund to support the promotion of energy conservation and the development of renewable energies with a surcharge on the transmission of electricity. 35 refs., 5 tabs

  15. Health sector solidarity: a core European value but with broadly varying content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Although the concept of solidarity sits at the center of many European health sector debates, the specific groups eligible for coverage, the financing arrangements, and the range of services and benefits that, together, compose the operational content of solidarity have all changed considerably over time. In prior economic periods, solidarity covered considerably fewer services or groups of the population than it does today. As economic and political circumstances changed, the content of solidarity changed with them. Recent examples of these shifts are illustrated through a discussion of health reforms in Netherlands, Germany and also Israel (although not in Europe, the Israeli health system is similar in structure to European social health insurance systems). This article suggests that changed economic circumstances in Europe since the onset of the 2008 financial crisis may lead to re-configuring the scope and content of services covered by solidarity in many European health systems. A key issue for policymakers will be protecting vulnerable populations as this re-design occurs.

  16. Market Barriers to Increased Efficiency in the European On-road Freight Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarnink, S.; Faber, J.; Den Boer, E.

    2012-10-15

    There are numerous technical and operational measures available to improve the fuel efficiency of truck fleets, but many of these measures are currently not universally implemented. Even cost-effective measures (i.e., measures which can be implemented with net fuel savings that outweigh the initial technology costs and potentially at a net profit) are often not adopted. The main barrier is the lack of information on the fuel savings of individual technical measures for trucks and especially trailers. While many transport companies and all original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are aware that certain technologies exist, few respondents believe that these technologies are cost-effective. As a result of this belief, the supply of fuel-saving technologies from OEMs is limited. This report aims to better understand the reasons for the limited adoption of cost-effective fuel-saving technologies and to inform the policy-making process in the European Union and abroad, and specifically to provide input to the European Commission's strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from HDVs. The primary goal of the study is to identify the barriers to the implementation of technologies that improve fuel efficiency in the European road freight transport sector. For this report, the existence and importance of barriers were analyzed through surveys of and interviews with transport companies, OEMs, shippers and logistics service providers.

  17. Deregulation in the electricity sector: Understanding strategic and regulatory risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, E.R. [City Univ. Business School, Dept. Management Systems and Information, London (United Kingdom); Bunn, D.W. [London Business School, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    This paper is motivated by our experiences since 1990 with developing system simulation models to help UK companies in the restructured electricity industry understand the radically different market within which they must become competitive. When public utilities such as electricity have been restructured, deregulated and/or privatised, the process has often been associated with a major change in the competitive environment. As a consequence, the strategic and regulatory uncertainties ahead for these companies are unprecedented. In such a market there has been no historical evolution and all the participants including the regulatory institutions have very little understanding of how it will operate in the short term and evolve in the future. In this situation, the use of systems dynamic models appears to offer an attractive way of gaining insights into how aspects of the competitive market might evolve. In the absence of real experience and relevant analogies, learning from models assumes a key role. Such models cannot be validated empirically, but can be developed to represent how the system is designed to operate. From such a prototypical basis, sensitivity analysis can generate insights on the strategic opportunities created failings in the market design, or its potential instability to shocks and market imperfections. (au)

  18. Carbon dioxide emissions from the electricity sector in major countries: a decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzheng; Liao, Hua; Du, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ce; Wang, Jin-Wei; Liu, Yanan

    2018-03-01

    The electric power sector is one of the primary sources of CO 2 emissions. Analyzing the influential factors that result in CO 2 emissions from the power sector would provide valuable information to reduce the world's CO 2 emissions. Herein, we applied the Divisia decomposition method to analyze the influential factors for CO 2 emissions from the power sector from 11 countries, which account for 67% of the world's emissions from 1990 to 2013. We decompose the influential factors for CO 2 emissions into seven areas: the emission coefficient, energy intensity, the share of electricity generation, the share of thermal power generation, electricity intensity, economic activity, and population. The decomposition analysis results show that economic activity, population, and the emission coefficient have positive roles in increasing CO 2 emissions, and their contribution rates are 119, 23.9, and 0.5%, respectively. Energy intensity, electricity intensity, the share of electricity generation, and the share of thermal power generation curb CO 2 emissions and their contribution rates are 17.2, 15.7, 7.7, and 2.8%, respectively. Through decomposition analysis for each country, economic activity and population are the major factors responsible for increasing CO 2 emissions from the power sector. However, the other factors from developed countries can offset the growth in CO 2 emissions due to economic activities.

  19. The electricity prices in the European Union. The role of renewable energies and regulatory electric market reforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Blanca; López, Ana J.; García-Álvarez, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The European Union electricity market has been gradually liberalized since 1990s. Theoretically, competitive markets should lead to efficiency gains in the economy thus reducing electricity prices. However, there is a controversial debate about the real effects of the electricity liberalization on electricity prices. Moreover, the increased generation of electricity from renewable energies RES-E (Electricity from Renewable Energy Sources) is also integrated in wholesale market reducing wholesale prices, but the final effect over household prices is not clear. In order to contribute to this debate, this paper provides an empirical investigation into the electricity prices determinants. In fact we develop econometric panel models to explore the relationship between the household electricity prices and variables related to the renewable energy sources and the competition in generation electricity market. More specifically we use a panel data set provided by Eurostat and covering 27 European Union countries during the period 1998–2009. Our results suggest that electricity prices increase with the deployment of RES-E and with the expansion of greenhouse gas emissions produced by energy industries- as a European Union CO 2 emission trading scheme exists. Results also reveal that country's characteristics can affect household electricity prices. -- Highlights: ► Electricity liberalized markets should lead to reduce electricity prices. ► The use of renewable energies (RES) reduce wholesale electricity prices. ► However, household electricity prices are increasing in European Union. ► Panel data models are developed to investigate the effect of RES and electricity competition on household electricity prices. ► We find that the deployment of RES increases prices paid by consumers in a liberalized market.

  20. Simulating the Impacts of Climate Extremes Across Sectors: The Case of the 2003 European Heat Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, J.; Zhao, F.; Reyer, C.; Breuer, L.; Coll, M.; Deryng, D.; Eddy, T.; Elliott, J. W.; Francois, L. M.; Friend, A. D.; Gerten, D.; Gosling, S.; Gudmundsson, L.; Huber, V.; Kim, H.; Lotze, H. K.; Orth, R.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Tittensor, D.; Vautard, R.; van Vliet, M. T. H.; Wada, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Increased occurrence of extreme climate or weather events is one of the most damaging consequences of global climate change today and in the future. Estimating the impacts of such extreme events across different human and natural systems is crucial for quantifying overall risks from climate change. Are current models fit for this task? Here we use the 2003 European heat wave and drought (EHW) as a historical analogue for comparable events in the future, and evaluate how accurately its impacts are reproduced by a multi-sectoral "super-ensemble" of state-of-the-art impacts models. Our study combines, for the first time, impacts on agriculture, freshwater resources, terrestrial and marine ecosystems, energy, and human health in a consistent multi-model framework. We identify key impacts of the 2003 EHW reported in the literature and/or recorded in publicly available databases, and examine how closely the models reproduce those impacts, applying the same measure of impact magnitude across different sectors. Preliminary results are mixed: While the EHW's impacts on water resources (streamflow) are reproduced well by most global hydrological models, not all crop and natural vegetation models reproduce the magnitude of impacts on agriculture and ecosystem productivity, respectively, and their performance varies by country or region. A hydropower capacity model matches reported hydropower generation anomalies only in some countries, and estimates of heat-related excess mortality from a set of statistical models are consistent with literature reports only for some of the cities investigated. We present a synthesis of simulated and observed impacts across sectors, and reflect on potential improvements in modeling and analyzing cross-sectoral impacts.

  1. Energy saving or privatization? The case of the electric residential sector of Mexico; Ahorro de energia o privatizacion? El caso del sector electrico residencial de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Rafael [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The validity of the premise that proposes the privatization of the electric sector as a solution to the problem of obtaining enough investment capital for the continuous expansion of the electric sector is examined. It is shown that the growth of the demand foreseen for the residential sector for year 2000, can be totally reduced by introducing technologies economically feasible to increase the efficiency and end uses of the residential electricity. With the efficient use of the electricity, the economical development is allowed for the residential sector, without large increments of the residential electricity demand. [Espanol] Se examina la validez de la premisa que propone la privatizacion del sector electrico como una solucion al problema de conseguir suficientes capitales de inversion para la continua expansion del sector. Se muestra que se puede reducir casi totalmente el crecimiento en la demanda prevista del sector residencial al ano 2000, introduciendo tecnologias economicamente factibles para aumentar la eficiencia en los usos finales de electricidad residencial. Con el uso eficiente de la electricidad, se permite el desarrollo economico del sector residencial sin grandes incrementos en la demanda residencial de electricidad.

  2. Energy saving or privatization? The case of the electric residential sector of Mexico; Ahorro de energia o privatizacion? El caso del sector electrico residencial de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Rafael [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The validity of the premise that proposes the privatization of the electric sector as a solution to the problem of obtaining enough investment capital for the continuous expansion of the electric sector is examined. It is shown that the growth of the demand foreseen for the residential sector for year 2000, can be totally reduced by introducing technologies economically feasible to increase the efficiency and end uses of the residential electricity. With the efficient use of the electricity, the economical development is allowed for the residential sector, without large increments of the residential electricity demand. [Espanol] Se examina la validez de la premisa que propone la privatizacion del sector electrico como una solucion al problema de conseguir suficientes capitales de inversion para la continua expansion del sector. Se muestra que se puede reducir casi totalmente el crecimiento en la demanda prevista del sector residencial al ano 2000, introduciendo tecnologias economicamente factibles para aumentar la eficiencia en los usos finales de electricidad residencial. Con el uso eficiente de la electricidad, se permite el desarrollo economico del sector residencial sin grandes incrementos en la demanda residencial de electricidad.

  3. Balancing reserves within a decarbonized European electricity system in 2050. From market developments to model insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Casimir

    2017-01-01

    This paper expands the discussion about future balancing reserve provision to the long-term perspective of 2050. Most pathways for a transformation towards a decarbonized electricity sector rely on very high shares of fluctuating renewables. This can be a challenge for the provision of balancing reserves, although their influence on the balancing cost is unclear. Apart from the transformation of the generation portfolio, various technical and regulatory developments within the balancing framework might further influence balancing costs: i) dynamic dimensioning of balancing reserves, ii) provision by fluctuating renewables or new (battery) storage technologies, and iii) exchange of balancing reserves between balancing zones. The first part of this paper discusses and transforms these developments into quantitative scenario definitions. The second part applies these scenarios to dynELMOD (dynamic Electricity Model), an investment model of the European electricity system that is extended to include balancing reserve provision. In contrast to other models applied in most papers on balancing reserves, this model is capable of evaluating the interdependencies between developments in balancing reserve provision and high shares of fluctuating renewables jointly. The results show that balancing reserve cost can be kept at current levels for a renewable electricity system until 2050, when using a dynamic reserve sizing horizon. Apart from the sizing horizon, storage capacity withholding duration and additional balancing demand from RES are the main driver of balancing costs. Renewables participation in balancing provision is mainly important for negative reserves, while storages play an important role for the provision of positive reserves. However, only on very few occasions, additional storage investments are required for balancing reserve provision, as most of the time sufficient storage capacities are available in the electricity system.

  4. Balancing reserves within a decarbonized European electricity system in 2050. From market developments to model insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Casimir [German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Energy, Transportation, Environment; Univ. of Technology, Berlin (Germany). Workgroup for Infrastructure Policy (WIP)

    2017-03-30

    This paper expands the discussion about future balancing reserve provision to the long-term perspective of 2050. Most pathways for a transformation towards a decarbonized electricity sector rely on very high shares of fluctuating renewables. This can be a challenge for the provision of balancing reserves, although their influence on the balancing cost is unclear. Apart from the transformation of the generation portfolio, various technical and regulatory developments within the balancing framework might further influence balancing costs: i) dynamic dimensioning of balancing reserves, ii) provision by fluctuating renewables or new (battery) storage technologies, and iii) exchange of balancing reserves between balancing zones. The first part of this paper discusses and transforms these developments into quantitative scenario definitions. The second part applies these scenarios to dynELMOD (dynamic Electricity Model), an investment model of the European electricity system that is extended to include balancing reserve provision. In contrast to other models applied in most papers on balancing reserves, this model is capable of evaluating the interdependencies between developments in balancing reserve provision and high shares of fluctuating renewables jointly. The results show that balancing reserve cost can be kept at current levels for a renewable electricity system until 2050, when using a dynamic reserve sizing horizon. Apart from the sizing horizon, storage capacity withholding duration and additional balancing demand from RES are the main driver of balancing costs. Renewables participation in balancing provision is mainly important for negative reserves, while storages play an important role for the provision of positive reserves. However, only on very few occasions, additional storage investments are required for balancing reserve provision, as most of the time sufficient storage capacities are available in the electricity system.

  5. Ideas, Individuals, and Institutions : Notion and Practices of a European Electricity System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagendijk, Vincent

    2018-01-01

    Based upon extensive multi-archival research, this article traces the long lineage of the notion of European electricity network. Since the 1930s engineers and policy makers conceived of a geographical conception for rationalising and optimising electricity supply: a European one. This article

  6. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  7. Radical Prosumer Innovations in the Electricity Sector and the Impact on Prosumer Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Lavrijssen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The electricity sector is in a transition towards a Smart Energy System where the roles of private and institutional actors are evolving. This work deals with the influence of some technological innovations, enabling social innovations such peer to peer trading and the participation in local energy collectives, on the regulation of the rights and obligations of consumers and prosumers in the electricity sector. It identifies the main radical innovations in the electricity market and analyses the legal and related non-legal obstacles that may impede the empowerment of energy consumers and prosumers. Some recommendations are provided to ensure that consumers and prosumers are empowered and can benefit from these new technological and social innovations in the electricity market. The recommendations relate to an accurate definition of prosumers and active consumers, the integration of demand response, the evolving role of distribution network operators and the birth of peer-to-peer trading.

  8. Acquisitions in the Electricity Sector: Active vs. Passive Owners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nese, Gjermund

    2002-07-01

    The starting point of this paper is a mixed oligopoly market consisting of n privately owned profit maximizing firms and 1 state-owned welfare maximizing firm. Motivated by the trend of mergers and acquisitions in the liberalized electricity markets, and by the debate about public or private ownership, the paper looks at two cases. In Case 1, the state-owned company acquires an ownership share in one of the private companies. In Case 2, the state-owned company is partially privatised. The paper focuses on differences in generated quantities and social surplus, depending on whether the investors behind the acquisitions are behaving as active or passive owners. One result shows that in the case of partial privatization, passive ownership provides the highest total industry generation, while active ownership induces maximum social surplus. (author)

  9. The Impact of Electricity Sector Privatization on Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Eiras, Martin; Rossi, Martín

    2008-01-01

    We use province-level data for Argentina to test for the causal relation between electricity distribution and health. We are interested in the impact of privatization on two output measures, incidence of low birth weight and child mortality rates caused by food poisoning. Privatization improves...... service coverage which, through the use of refrigerators, may improve nutritional intake. Privatization also results in a reduction in the frequency of interruptions, and thus may reduce the likelihood of food poisoning. We find some evidence that privatization reduced the frequency of low birth weight...... and child mortality rates caused by food poisoning. Results are not strong enough to inform the policy debate with respect to the benefits that privatizations have on the welfare of the poor....

  10. Acquisitions in the Electricity Sector: Active vs. Passive Owners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nese, Gjermund

    2002-01-01

    The starting point of this paper is a mixed oligopoly market consisting of n privately owned profit maximizing firms and 1 state-owned welfare maximizing firm. Motivated by the trend of mergers and acquisitions in the liberalized electricity markets, and by the debate about public or private ownership, the paper looks at two cases. In Case 1, the state-owned company acquires an ownership share in one of the private companies. In Case 2, the state-owned company is partially privatised. The paper focuses on differences in generated quantities and social surplus, depending on whether the investors behind the acquisitions are behaving as active or passive owners. One result shows that in the case of partial privatization, passive ownership provides the highest total industry generation, while active ownership induces maximum social surplus. (author)

  11. Electric power and the global economy: Advances in database construction and sector representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jeffrey C.

    The electricity sector plays a crucial role in the global economy. The sector is a major consumer of fossil fuel resources, producer of greenhouse gas emissions, and an important indicator and correlate of economic development. As such, the sector is a primary target for policy-makers seeking to address these issues. The sector is also experiencing rapid technological change in generation (e.g. renewables), primary inputs (e.g. horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing), and end-use efficiency. This dissertation seeks to further our understanding of the role of the electricity sector as part of the dynamic global energy-economy, which requires significant research advances in both database construction and modeling techniques. Chapter 2 identifies useful engineering-level data and presents a novel matrix balancing method for integrating these data in global economic databases. Chapter 3 demonstrates the relationship between matrix balancing method and modeling results, and Chapter 4 presents the full construction methodology for GTAP-Power, the foremost, publicly-available global computable general equilibrium database. Chapter 5 presents an electricity-detailed computational equilibrium model that explicitly and endogenously captures capacity utilization, capacity expansion, and their interdependency - important aspects of technological substitution in the electricity sector. The individual, but interrelated, research contributions to database construction and electricity modeling in computational equilibrium are placed in the context of analyzing the US EPA Clean Power Plan (CPP) CO 2 target of 32 percent reduction of CO2 emissions in the US electricity sector from a 2005 baseline by 2030. Assuming current fuel prices, the model predicts an almost 28 percent CO2 reduction without further policy intervention. Next, a carbon tax and investment subsidies for renewable technologies to meet the CPP full targets are imposed and compared (Chapter 6). The carbon tax

  12. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  13. The Electricity Usage Pattern for Cooker Manufacturing in Three European Countries. A Benchmarking Study of Electrolux Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nord-Aagren, Elisabet

    2002-12-01

    The European electricity market became deregulated by January 1999 and it is now free to trade electricity across borders. The price of electricity varies to a great extent among the countries within the European Union. Swedish electricity will increasingly be an export product on the European electricity market, due to the lower price compared with other countries in Europe. Energy statistics and studies indicate a clear relation between electricity price and electricity use. For the industrial sector in countries with low electricity prices, electricity is a major energy source. Electricity is the dominant energy source, not only for industrial processes but also for support processes, e.g. process heating and heating of the premises. The situation is quite different for industry in countries with high electricity prices. Electricity is sparingly used and only for electricity-specific processes. This thesis presents a benchmarking study of the electricity usage pattern for Electrolux cooker manufacturing in three European cities, i.e. Fredericia in Denmark, Spennymoor in England and Motala in Sweden. The basic idea is to investigate the relation between electricity price and use for cooker manufacturing and explain the differences. The results show that a high electricity price corresponds to a low electricity use and vice versa. Motala has the highest electricity use and the lowest electricity price. Spennymoor's electricity use is half of Motala's and the electricity price is about double Motala's. Spennymoor and Fredericia have about the same electricity price. They differ mainly in which energy source is used for process heating. The total energy use per cooker at Motala is rather close to that of Fredericia. They use less energy than Spennymoor, which has a high gas use. The total energy cost for Fredericia is 45.9 SEK/unit, Motala is 23.7 SEK/unit and Spennymoor is 40.9 SEK/unit. In this study the unit process method was used. The method is a

  14. Report on the behalf of the inquiry commission related to past, present and future costs of the nuclear sector, to the reactor exploitation duration, and to various economic and financial aspects of production and commercialization of nuclear electricity within the frame of the French and European electric mix, as well as to the consequences of the shutting down and dismantling of nuclear reactors, notably the Fessenheim power plant - Nr 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brottes, Francois; Baupin, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This official report first describes the role of nuclear energy in the European electric system: economic context (pricing mode, interconnection leading to a European price), similar situations and different policies in Germany, Belgium and UK. It proposes the contribution of the inquiry commission: a constrained energy transition, a shared diagnosis on the status of the European electric system but two possible solutions, nuclear as an economy on its own requiring a strong commitment of public authorities. The next part addresses the front end of the nuclear cycle, i.e. how to ensure the supply of the French nuclear fleet (world resources, demand-supply balance, weak relationship between uranium price and nuclear electricity price). The inquiry commission outlines and discusses the roles of AREVA for the front end, EDF which tries to be less vulnerable, and the State (EDF's regulator and Areva's support). The third part addresses the maintenance and subcontracting expenses: maintenance as a major challenge to control costs, subcontracting as a choice of industrial policy. The inquiry commission notices that EDF has not yet reached a full control of maintenance and that subcontracting remains a matter of controversy. The fourth part discusses the fleet evolution: entry in the fourth decade, a life extension project which requires safety improvement. The inquiry commission discusses the numerous uncertainties of the industrial project, outlines that the construction of a new fleet requires huge investments, that the future of the nuclear fleet requires a global approach, and that shutting down nuclear plants requires support. The fifth part discusses the correct assessment of the amount of future expenses and how to secure their funding: the main future expenses are those related to installation dismantling and to nuclear wastes. The inquiry commission outlines the uncertainties about this funding. The sixth chapter addresses reprocessing activities, MOX fuel and

  15. Evaluating the application of different pricing regimes and low carbon investments in the European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oggioni, Giorgia; Smeers, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The EU-ETS is the first measure initiated by the EU to contribute to the decarbonization of the European energy sector. It is a cap and trade system that requires industries participating to the program to procure allowances to cover their emissions. Electricity Intensive Industries (EIIs) have complained that the system put their European plants at disadvantage compared to facilities located outside the EU. They have asked for actions to mitigate this effect; one of them is to have access to long term contracts with electricity suppliers, ideally with those operating carbon free plants. This paper presents and illustrates a method for assessing the impact of this measure on EIIs participating to the EU cap and trade system. We model a power market segmented in two consumer groups EIIs and the rest of the market (N-EIIs). These two groups are subject to different price regimes: EIIs purchase electricity from dedicated base-load power plants at average cost price, while N-EIIs are supplied at marginal cost. The French Exeltium and the Belgian Blue Sky consortia are existing examples of this market organization. The expanse of the territories that can be covered by these systems depends on the organization of transmission organization and on national energy position relative to carbon free generation. We examine two different types of long term average cost based contracts that differ by the organization of transmission and study their impact under different national energy policies. We formulate the problem of operations and investment in this market as a spatial equilibrium model where generators can invest in new capacity subject to different regional constraints. Transmission is organized according to a “flow based” approach as foreseen by Regulatory Authorities and Transmission System Operators in Europe. We also examine the impact of nuclear policies. CO 2 emission allowances are auctioned and tradable. We describe the models and discuss their policy

  16. A socio-economic impact assessment of the European launcher sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Luca del; Scatteia, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    In a context where the economic strains are challenging European policies as well as the very fabric of governmental contributions to public life, innovation and efficacy of public policy in research are called upon to support growth in Europe and to sustain employment and entrepreneurial capacities. Governments need evidence that the investments in space, while providing strategic tools to implement sovereign policies, create jobs and build the competitive European economy of the future. This is particularly true when the decisions at stake have a potential bearing on the future of the European space sector for at least the next 30 years, as it has been the case for the ESA Council at ministerial level meeting in December 2014. On that occasion, Ministers took the decision to start the development of a new Ariane 6 launcher and Vega evolutions having a critical bearing on the Member States' strategic industrial capabilities and on the sustainability of the European guaranteed access to space. Given the importance of the subject, and following similar studies undertaken in the past for e.g. the Ariane 1-4 programme, the Agency has requested an independent consulting team to perform a dedicated study to assess ex-post the direct, indirect and induced socio-economic impacts of the Ariane 5 programme (mid-term evaluation) and of the Vega programme (early evaluation) globally, at European level, and within the economies and industries of each ESA Member State. This paper presents the assessment of the socio-economic impacts allowing the evaluation of the return on public investments in launchers through ESA in a wider perspective, going beyond the purely economic terms. The scope of the assessment covered in total approximately 25 ESA programmatic and activity lines and 30,000 commitments from 1986 to end 2012. In the framework of the study, the economic impact of the European launcher programmes is measured through a GDP impact defined as the straight economic

  17. Revisiting CO2 mitigation potential and costs in China's electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenjia; Wang Can; Chen Jining

    2010-01-01

    To improve the reliability of sectoral mitigation potential and cost analysis, this paper made an in-depth exploration into China's electricity sector's thermal efficiency and inner structure. It is found that unlike what many literatures portray, China is actually among the world's leaders in coal-fired power plants' generating efficiencies; besides, although there are still numerous small and inefficient generating units in the current generation fleet, many of them are in fact playing important roles in supporting local economic development, meeting peak load needs, balancing heat and electricity supply and providing job opportunities to the local economy, therefore their existence does not necessarily mean low-cost mitigation potential. Given the efficiency and structural characteristics of China's electricity sector, it is pointed out that some other mitigation options, such as demand side management, IGCC and renewable energy as well as the break-through of CCS technology may play an even more important role in emission reduction. Considering the significant lock-in effects in electricity sector, it is warned that China, if continues putting majority investment in large and advanced coal-fired generating units, will face another round of chasing-after for the new and advanced renewable generation technologies. Therefore China should put more efforts in renewable generation technologies now.

  18. Conceptual design of an electricity generating tritium breeding blanket sector for INTOR/NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.

    1984-01-01

    A study is made of a fusion reactor power blanket and its associated equipment with the objective of producing a conceptual design for a blanket sector of INTOR, or one of its national variants (e.g. NET), from which electricity could be generated simultaneously with the breeding of tritium. (author)

  19. 2016 Standard Scenarios Report: A U.S. Electricity Sector Outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steinberg, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCall, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Richards, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sigrin, Benjamin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Porro, Gian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a study sponsored by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) that aims to document and implement an annual process designed to identify a realistic and timely set of input assumptions (e.g., technology cost and performance, fuel costs), and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios), initially for electric sector analysis.

  20. Radical prosumer innovations in the electricity sector and the impact on prosumer regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavrijssen, Saskia; Carrillo, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    The electricity sector is in a transition towards a Smart Energy System where the roles of private and institutional actors are evolving. This work deals with the influence of some technological innovations, enabling social innovations such as peer to peer trading and the participation in local

  1. Modeling of electricity savings in the Danish household sector using Balmorel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trivella, Alessio; Baldini, Mattia

    In this paper we examine the investments in energy-efficient household appliances from an energy system perspective. We consider a set of ten appliances constituting the majority of the electricity consumption in the private household sector, and investigate whether investing in improved energy...... efficiency can compete with the cost of electricity supply from existing or new power plants. To assess the analysis, Balmorel, a linear optimization model for heat and power sectors, has been extended in order to assess the best possible investments in more efficient household appliances. The model is non......-exclusively tested on the Danish energy system under different scenarios, and computational experiments show that several energy efficiency measures in the household sector should be regarded as valuable investments, while others would require some form of support to become profitable. The analysis also reveals...

  2. CO2 trade and market power in the EU electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinggaard Svendsen, G.; Vesterdal, M.

    2002-01-01

    The EU commission is planning to launch an emission trading market for greenhouse gases within near future. This to meet its obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. After a theoretical discussion on market power in such a market, wc turn to the empirical evidence which suggests that a reasonable number of sources of C02 emissions in the power sector exists for bollers larger than 25MW. Overall, together with the contestable single market for electricity, the risk of significant strategies behaviour seems negligible. Thus, the electric utility sector seems a suitable testing ground for an EU-scheme of emissions trading. In the longer run, it will be important to broaden the scope of the trading scheme as the inclusion of other sectors will further limit the risk of market power. (au)

  3. CO2 trade and market power in the EU electricity sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinggaard Svendsen, G; Vesterdal, M

    2002-07-01

    The EU commission is planning to launch an emission trading market for greenhouse gases within near future. This to meet its obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. After a theoretical discussion on market power in such a market, wc turn to the empirical evidence which suggests that a reasonable number of sources of C02 emissions in the power sector exists for bollers larger than 25MW. Overall, together with the contestable single market for electricity, the risk of significant strategis behaviour seems negligible. Thus, the electric utility sector seems a suitable testing ground for an EU-scheme of emissions trading. In the longer run, it will be important to broaden the scope of the trading scheme as the inclusion of other sectors will further limit the risk of market power. (au)

  4. Basel III Global Liquidity Standards: Critical Discussion and Impact onto the European Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Bučková

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Together with the Basel III regulatory equity rules, two liquidity ratios have been published. Resulting from the illiquidity of some banks during the financial crisis in 2008, these ratios shall help to prevent further crisis in the European banking sector. But do they really fulfill their aim? This article presents the new liquidity ratios, the actual liquidity situation in banks and describes the consequences for banks at a simplified example. It has to be stated that implementing more detailed liquidity frameworks into the banking supervision process is necessary. The financial crisis in 2008 showed that several banks did not have adequate liquidity risk models and processes to prevent illiquidity. But the LCR and the NSFR seem to be wrong methods. Both ratios will increase. The implementation of both ratios has to be done very carefully in order to prevent this.

  5. Transmission capacities and competition in Western European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiridonova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The integration of national electricity markets into a single European one is expected to reduce the ability of dominant players to exercise market power. This paper investigates whether or not existing transmission capacities of cross-border interconnectors are sufficient to achieve this result and create vigorous competition in the market. A model with two decision levels is used. On the first level profit maximizing generators play Cournot game against each other. On the last level the system operator clears the market and determines flows in the network to maximize social welfare subject to a set of physical constraints. As each strategic generator anticipates her impact on equilibrium prices and congestion in the system, her optimization problem is subject to equilibrium constraints from the system operator's problem. The analysis demonstrates that interconnector capacities in Western Europe are insufficient for integration alone to reduce the exercise of market power. I compare several possible competition-enhancing policies: expansion of interconnectors and different scenarios of national markets’ restructuring. I show that although increase of line capacity is a useful tool to stimulate competition in an integrated market, it is not a substitute for the restructuring of large players. - Highlights: •The ability of integration to reduce market power depends on transmission capacities. •In the model firms compete in quantities, know their impact on prices and congestion. •In Western Europe integration will not diminish market power. •Line extension stimulates competition but is not a substitute for the regulation.

  6. The argentine electric sector reform and its correlation with energy efficiency; La reforma del sector electrico argentino y su relacion con la eficiencia energetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, Claudio [MGM International (Argentina)

    2005-04-15

    The reforms in the Argentine electrical sector and the effect these have originated in the energy efficiency policies for public sector are presented. The characteristics exposed of the Argentina Electric sector previous to the 1992 transformation are the departing base that gave rise to the reform fundaments, generating privatizations and a vertical economic scheme. The transformation of the electric sector departing from its environmental regulations yielded in a quality service, good electricity distribution, better prices and proper energy efficiency. [Spanish] Se presentan las reformas en el sector electrico argentino y el efecto que han tenido sobre las politicas de eficiencia energetica elaboradas en el sector publico. Las caracteristicas expuestas del sector electrico argentino previas a la transformacion de 1992 son la base de partida que dio lugar a los fundamentos de la reforma generando privatizaciones y un esquema economico vertical. La transformacion del sector electrico a partir de sus regulaciones energeticas y ambientales redituaron en calidad de servicio, de distribucion de electricidad, precios y en la propia eficiencia energetica.

  7. Evaluation of the energy efficiency evolution in the European road freight transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzzenenti, F.; Basosi, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate energy efficiency in the European freight transport sector over three decades, according to a variety of indicators, methodologies and databases. The aim is, on the one hand, of determining major drawbacks in energy efficiency metrics, on the other hand, identifying a possible trend in the sector. The present analysis shows that energy efficiency evaluation is generally subject to misinterpretation and distortion with regard to the methods and data source adopted. Two different indicators (energy intensity and fuel economy) were initially taken into account to select the most suitable for evaluating vehicles' efficiency. Fuel economy was then adopted and measured according to two different methodologies (top-down and bottom-up). We then considered all the possible sources of distortion (data sources employed, methods of data detection, speed of detection, power enhancement, size factor) with the aim of accomplishing a sound estimation. Fuel economy was eventually divided with the maximum power available (adjusted fuel economy), to account for the power shift of vehicles, that represents a further efficiency improvement.

  8. Sectoral and regional impacts of the European carbon market in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robaina Alves, Margarita; Rodriguez, Miguel; Roseta-Palma, Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Across Europe, CO 2 emission allowances represent one of the main policy instruments to comply with the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. In this paper we use microdata to address two issues regarding the impact of the European Carbon Market (EU ETS). First, we analyze the sectoral effects of the EU ETS in Portugal. The goal is to study the distributive consequences of imbalances, with the novelty of taking into account firm financial data to put values into context. We show that a large majority of installations in most sectors had surpluses and the opportunity to raise remarkable revenues in some cases. We also look at the regional impact, since the pre-existing specialization of different regions in the production of different goods and services might lead to an uneven economic impact of the allowance market. In particular, Portuguese data indicate a distribution of revenue from low income to high income regions, or rather, between installations located in those regions. We focus on the first phase of the EU ETS, using data for each one of the 244 Portuguese installations in the market as well as financial data for 80% of these installations, although we also present data for 2008 and 2009. - Research highlights: → Analysis of distributional impact of the EU ETS for Portuguese sectors and regions. → EU ETS microdata, economic data and firm financial data used to provide context. → Most installations had surpluses and in some cases may have raised notable revenues. → There seems to be an income distribution effect from low to high-income regions. → Thermoelectric generation most likely to be short, but results vary with rainfall.

  9. Sectoral and regional impacts of the European carbon market in Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robaina Alves, Margarita, E-mail: mrobaina@ua.p [GOVCOPP and Department of Economics, Management and Industrial Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rodriguez, Miguel [Department of Applied Economics, University of Vigo, Facultade Empresariais e Turismo, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Roseta-Palma, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.roseta@iscte.p [Department of Economics and UNIDE, ISCTE-Lisbon University Institute, Av. Forcas Armadas, 1629-026 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    Across Europe, CO{sub 2} emission allowances represent one of the main policy instruments to comply with the goals of the Kyoto Protocol. In this paper we use microdata to address two issues regarding the impact of the European Carbon Market (EU ETS). First, we analyze the sectoral effects of the EU ETS in Portugal. The goal is to study the distributive consequences of imbalances, with the novelty of taking into account firm financial data to put values into context. We show that a large majority of installations in most sectors had surpluses and the opportunity to raise remarkable revenues in some cases. We also look at the regional impact, since the pre-existing specialization of different regions in the production of different goods and services might lead to an uneven economic impact of the allowance market. In particular, Portuguese data indicate a distribution of revenue from low income to high income regions, or rather, between installations located in those regions. We focus on the first phase of the EU ETS, using data for each one of the 244 Portuguese installations in the market as well as financial data for 80% of these installations, although we also present data for 2008 and 2009. - Research highlights: {yields} Analysis of distributional impact of the EU ETS for Portuguese sectors and regions. {yields} EU ETS microdata, economic data and firm financial data used to provide context. {yields} Most installations had surpluses and in some cases may have raised notable revenues. {yields} There seems to be an income distribution effect from low to high-income regions. {yields} Thermoelectric generation most likely to be short, but results vary with rainfall.

  10. Energy and competition: research on the legal changes induced by the liberalization of the electricity and gas sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The liberalization of the electricity and gas sectors, as triggered by the European Community right, has generated deep juridical mutations. These mutations are, first, linked with market organization. In front of the diversity of the national organizations in both sectors, the European Community right could not impose a unique model of liberalization. It has established a set of common rules and principles to the different member states with the aim of ensuring the development of a competitive market. The introduction of competition gives access to the different activities of these sectors to the newcomers. However, because of their characteristics, competition cannot apply uniformly to the overall activities in concern. Two logics, one of natural monopoly, and the other of competition, will thus cohabit together. Moreover, the introduction of competition is managed. This management is characterized by the search for a new equilibrium between competition and general interest imperatives and by the creation of a new regulation authority at the institutional level. These mutations are also linked with market operation. Liberalization leads to a multiplication and an increase of the complexity of the contractual relations between the operators, the control of which is fundamental to ensure a good market operation. This mutation of operations is followed by a mutation of operators. Those are submitted to a dissociation trend of their activities in order to prevent discriminations and to fight against cross subventions. On the other hand, the operators' mutation shows a huge recombination movement which is characterized by a multiplication of concentration operations, leading to a remodeling of the market structure. (J.S.)

  11. The Italian energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The energy sector in Italy, as in Europe and in many other areas of the world, is undergoing rapid and profound changes. The 1986 ratification of the European Single Act was intended to create a European internal market, where circulation of people, capital, goods, and services would reach the highest possible liberalization. In 1988, in the document The Energy Internal Market, the European Union (EU) commission stressed the need for creation of an internal energy market--free of obstacles--to increase security of supply, to reduce costs, and to strengthen the competitiveness of the European economic system. In 1990, the Community Council adopted directives to implement the EU energy sector. This article describes Italy's role as part of the EU energy sector. It covers the following topics: the Italian energy sector; electricity vs gas transportation; project finance; recent developments advance Italian power industry; specifying powerplant components -- Italian stype; buyers' guide to Italian equipment, services

  12. European CO2 emission trends: A decomposition analysis for water and aviation transport sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, V.; Galmarini, S.

    2012-01-01

    A decomposition analysis is used to investigate the main factors influencing the CO 2 emissions of European transport activities for the period 2001–2008. The decomposition method developed by Sun has been used to investigate the carbon dioxide emissions intensity, the energy intensity, the structural changes and the economy activity growth effects for the water and the aviation transport sectors. The analysis is based on Eurostat data and results are presented for 14 Member States, Norway and EU27. Results indicate that economic growth has been the main factor behind the carbon dioxide emissions increase in EU27 both for water and aviation transport activities. -- Highlights: ► Decomposition analysis is used to investigate factors that influenced the energy-related CO 2 emissions of European transport. ► Economic growth has been the main factor affecting the energy-related CO 2 emissions increases. ► Investigating the CO 2 emissions drivers is the first step to define energy efficiency policies and emission reduction strategies.

  13. Linear and nonlinear causality between sectoral electricity consumption and economic growth: Evidence from Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Cheng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Pin; Chang, Chih-Heng

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the linear and nonlinear causality between the total electricity consumption (TEC) and real gross domestic production (RGDP). Unlike previous literature, we solve the undetermined relation between RGDP and electricity consumption by classifying TEC into industrial sector consumption (ISC) and residential sector consumption (RSC) as well as investigating how TEC, ISC, and RSC influence Taiwan's RGDP. By using the Granger's linear causality test, it is shown that (i) there is a bidirectional causality among TEC, ISC, and RGDP, but a neutrality between RSC and RGDP with regard to the linear causality and (ii) there is still a bidirectional causality between TEC and RGDP, but a unidirectional causality between RSC and RGDP with regard to the nonlinear causality. On the basis of (i) and (ii), we suggest that the electricity policy formulators loosen the restriction on ISC and limit RSC in order to achieve the goal of economic growth.

  14. Guidelines for price cap regulation in the Dutch electricity sector for the period 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.; Newbery, D.; Tjin, T.; Verdonkschot, I.; Buitelaar, T.; Van Gent, C.

    2000-02-01

    July 1999 The Netherlands Electricity Regulatory Service (DtE) published an Information and Consultation Document on the title subject. By means of price cap regulation tariffs are determined such that businesses are stimulated continuously to organize their total processes and operation as efficient as possible. In the consultation document a large number of questions with respect to the future organization and planning of the system of economic regulation of the electricity sector in the Netherlands can be found. Many reactions and answers were received, compiled and analyzed. The results are presented in this report, which forms the framework for the DtE to shape the economic regulation of the Dutch electricity sector

  15. Analysis of the market penetration of clean coal technologies and its impacts in China's electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hao; Nakata, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses policy instruments for promoting the market penetration of clean coal technologies (CCTs) into China's electricity sector and the evaluation of corresponding effects. Based on the reality that coal will remain the predominant fuel to generate electricity and conventional pulverized coal boiler power plants have serious impacts on environment degradation, development of clean coal technologies could be one alternative to meet China's fast growing demand of electricity as well as protect the already fragile environment. A multi-period market equilibrium model is applied and an electricity model of China is established to forecast changes in the electricity system up to 2030s. Three policy instruments: SO 2 emission charge, CO 2 emission charge and implementing subsidies are considered in this research. The results show that all instruments cause a significant shift in China's electricity structure, promote CCTs' competitiveness and lead China to gain great benefit in both resource saving and environment improvement. Since resource security and environment degradation are becoming primary concerns in China, policies that could help to gain generations' market share of advanced coal-based technologies such as CCTs' is suitable for the current situation of China's electricity sector. (author)

  16. Swinging boys to take over the E-world. The role of engineers in a liberalized electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2000-01-01

    The relatively reliable but also static electricity sector will in a few years change into a free market sector, including market shares, electricity exchanges and the inevitable rise of swinging persons. The market will regulate it all, but at the cost of what? An overview is given of the consequences of the liberalization process of the energy market in Europe

  17. The insertion perspective of electric power independent producer in the Brazilian electric power sector; A perspectiva da insercao do produtor independente de energia eletrica no setor eletrico brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borelli, Alessio Bento; Bermann, Celio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Programa Interunidades de Pos-Graduacao em Energia]. E-mail: mborelli@netpoint.com.br; cbermann@iee.usp.br

    1999-07-01

    The central issue of debate was the need to align the energy sector's options and organization with changing global patterns of economic and social development, characterized by the increasing role played by the private sector, greater integration in the world economy, and new economic and social priorities such as efficiency, decentralization, deregulation, and a closer attention to environmental issues. The aim of this work is to evaluate the electric power independent producer participation in Brazilian electric power sector.

  18. Liberalisation of the electricity sector and development of distributed generation: Germany, United Kingdom and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menanteau, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    Historically, electricity systems have been made up of small local networks gradually becoming incorporated to benefit from the diversity of demand and the economies of scale in electricity generation that are possible with large interconnected systems. Today, this logic would seem to have certain limits, now that the benefits related to the size of production units appear to have been exhausted and in view of the growing difficulties in developing new transmission infrastructures. At the same time, there have been considerable improvements in the technical and economic performance of modular generating techniques, which are now enjoying significant development under the effect of electricity sector liberalization and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of the present paper is to analyse the effect of electricity sector liberalization on the development of distributed generation, and more specifically to examine the conditions in which these new electricity generating technologies can be diffused in a liberalized framework. The paper looks first at how competition has affected the electricity market. This analysis is followed by an examination of the problems of integrating distributed generation into electricity systems. In the third part of the paper, three brief case studies highlight the principal differences between Germany, the United Kingdom and France in the field of distributed generation. This brief analysis reveals that the institutional framework in which distributed generation must operate and the price signals given to electricity sector actors play as big a part as traditional incentives, certificates, bidding systems or guaranteed feed-in tariffs in driving the deployment process. (author)

  19. An assessment of the cyber security legislation and its impact on the United States electrical sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Joshua

    The purpose of this research was to examine the cyber-security posture for the United States' electrical grid, which comprises a major component of critical infrastructure for the country. The United States electrical sector is so vast, that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) estimates, it contains more than 6,413 power plants (this includes 3,273 traditional electric utilities and 1,738 nonutility power producers) with approximately 1,075 gigawatts of energy produced on a daily basis. A targeted cyber-security attack against the electric grid would likely have catastrophic results and could even serve as a precursor to a physical attack against the United States. A recent report by the consulting firm Black and Veatch found that one of the top five greatest concerns for United States electric utilities is the risk that cybersecurity poses to their industry and yet, only one-third state they are currently prepared to meet the increasingly likely threat. The report goes on to state, "only 32% of electric utilities surveyed had integrated security systems with the proper segmentation, monitoring and redundancies needed for cyber threat protection. Another 48 % said they did not" Recent estimates indicate that a large-scale cyber-attack against this sector could cost the United States economy as much as a trillion dollars within a weeks' time. Legislative efforts in the past have primarily been focused on creating mandates that encourage public and private partnership, which have been not been adopted as quickly as desired. With 85 % of all electric utilities being privately owned, it is key that the public and private sector partner in order to mitigate risks and respond as a cohesive unit in the event of a major attack. Keywords: Cybersecurity, Professor Riddell, cyber security, energy, intelligence, outlook, electrical, compliance, legislation, partnerships, critical infrastructure.

  20. European Experience and Ukrainian Realities in the Policy of Financial Support Entrepreneurial Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Savchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim/purpose - We want to provide recommendations to bridge the gap in access to financing of the entrepreneurial sector in Ukraine based on the analysis of European experience, EBF approaches, financial funds for SMEs and the current state of the credit market in Ukraine. Design/methodology/approach - We used the general scientific methods of knowledge, conceptual tenets of the theory of market economy, abstract logical analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, historical (to determine the nature and causes of bank investment in SMEs, refine categories and terms; formalization, systems analysis (to determine factors of investment banking, institutional and legal environment; statistical, retrospective analysis. The results of surveys conducted by the EBF on the issues of support and development of SMEs are used, own research of 120 Ukrainian SMEs, which was conducted during the period from January to July 2016. The nature of the research questions was reinforced by the decision to survey only SMEs. Independent reporting (from entrepreneurs or CEOs was used to account for both business activity and the external sources of information. Findings - Policy initiatives should primarily be developed at the national level in the field of lending to SMEs based on the European experience and Ukrainian realities; it is necessary to develop an understanding of the need for access to certain types of information; SMEs are the main providers and the most valuable source of credit information. Research implications/limitations - When using the methods of calculation creditworthiness perhaps to take into account the methods for assessing the quality of management, the image of the enterprise, ISO certificates. Originality/value/contribution - Based on the cross-country comparison of the EU and Ukraine, highlight the necessity of focusing on some legal unification of SME lending procedures for the development of a culture of sustainable entrepreneurship

  1. Natural-gas-powered thermoelectricity as a reliability factor in the Brazilian electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, E.; Oliveira, J.C.S. de; de Oliveira, P.R.; Alonso, P.S.R.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of natural-gas-powered thermoelectricity into the Brazilian generation sector can be considered as a very complex energy, economic, regulatory and institutional revision. Brazil is a country with very specific characteristics in electricity generation, as approximately 80% of the generating capacity is based on hydroelectricity, showing strong dependency on rain and management of water reservoirs. A low rate of investment in the Brazilian Electricity Industry in the period of 1995-2000, associated with periods of low rainfall, led to a dramatic lowering of the water stocks in the reservoirs. With this scenario and the growing supply of natural gas, both from within Brazil and imported, natural gas thermal electric plants became a good option to diversify the electrical supply system. In spite of the Brazilian Government's efforts to install such plants, the country was faced with severe electricity rationing in 2001. The objective of this work is to show the need to continue with the implementation of natural gas thermal electricity projects, in a manner that allows flexibility and guarantees greater working reliability for the entire Brazilian electricity sector. Taking into account the world trend towards renewable energy, the perspectives of usage of biofuels in the Brazilian Energy Matrix and in electrical energy generation are also analyzed. The very issue of electrical power efficiency in Brazil and its challenges and strategic proposals from the standpoint of Government Programs and results provided so far are presented. The technological constraints in order to put on stream the thermal electric plants are also analyzed. The article concludes with a positive perspective of the usage of natural gas as to be the third pillar in the Brazilian Energy Matrix for the years to come

  2. Tracking the genealogy of CO2 emissions in the electricity sector: An intersectoral approach applied to the Spanish case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarancon Moran, Miguel Angel; Albinana, Fernando Callejas; Del Rio, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the factors leading to CO 2 emissions in the Spanish electricity generation sector in order to propose effective mitigation policies aimed at tackling those emissions. Traditionally, two broad categories of those factors have been considered in the literature: those related to the supply of electricity (technological features of the sector) and those related to the level of economic activity (demand factors). This paper focuses on an additional element, which has usually been neglected, the structural factor, which refers to the set of intersectoral transactions (related to the technologies used in other productive sectors) which connect, in either a direct or an indirect way, the general economic activity with the supply of electricity and, thus, with the emissions of the electricity generation sector. This analysis allows us to identify the so-called 'sectors structurally responsible for emissions' (SSER), whose production functions involve transactions which connect the demand for goods and services with the emissions of the electricity generation sector. The methodology is based on an input-output approach and a sensitivity analysis. The paper shows that there are structural rigidities, deeply ingrained within the economic system, which lead to emissions from the electricity generation sector for which this sector cannot be held responsible. These rigidities limit the effectiveness of policies aimed at emissions mitigation in this sector. (author)

  3. Cross-Country Electricity Trade, Renewable Energy and European Transmission Infrastructure Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Abrell, Jan; Rausch, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a multi-country multi-sector general equilibrium model, integrating high-frequency electricity dispatch and trade decisions, to study the e ects of electricity transmission infrastructure (TI) expansion and re- newable energy (RE) penetration in Europe for gains from trade and carbon dioxide emissions in the power sector. TI can bene t or degrade environ- mental outcomes, depending on RE penetration: it complements emissions abatement by mitigating dispatch problems associ...

  4. Business strategy in the electric sector: trading in the paraguay electric sector; Estrategias de negocios en el sector electrico: comercializacion en el sistema electrico paraguayo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, Carlos M.; Soto, Ruben E. Brasa [Itaipu Binacional - Usina Hidroelectrica de Itaipu, Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: cartin@itaipu.gov.py

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents an suitable analysis for a energy tradder which intends to operate in the paraguay electric market. First, the paper describes the main conceptual aspects and afterwards, formulate hypothesis on the possible highlights on the operative modes of negotiation and finally some results obtained based on hypothesis and simulation.

  5. Between the state and market: Electricity sector reform in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamasb, Tooraj

    2006-01-01

    Developing countries have had to reform technically and financially less efficient electricity sectors than developed countries with less resources and weaker institutions. This paper examines the reform experience and lessons in these countries. The paper reviews private participation and key reform steps such as restructuring, competition, and regulation. The role of contextual factors such as system size, institutional endowment, and international organizations are then discussed. It then argues that there is a need for redefining the role of the state rather than a full withdrawal from the sector and that many countries should adopt simpler reform models and gradual implementation. (author)

  6. Horizon 2000: Vision of the development of a custom-oriented electric power market in a European perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-10-01

    After a perspective on the development in the seventies and eighties in chapter one, it is stated that, given the developments in the field of liberalization and the manifest internationalization of the European electricity market (chapter two), the Dutch electricity sector is not yet ready for an open European market (chapter three). A revision of the present electricity model does not seem to be the right method, because of the built-in contradictions and the reactive manner in which new developments can be handled (chapter four). Therefore, at this crossroad a new starting point has to be chosen in order for the Dutch electricity sector to be able to handle the developments in a pro-active way. At the same time this offers a solution to the instability, which threatens to the Dutch electricity market as a result of the fast growth of cogeneration capacity. In the new vision Horizon 2000 (outlined in chapters 5-9) the focus is shifted from central planning and cost pooling to customer-orientation within an open market. The market parties get, on the basis of autonomous responsibilities, multiple buying and selling options. A stepwise implementation of Horizon is explained in chapter 10, while the consequences of the market model Horizon 2000 are indicated as positive in chapter eleven. It must be stressed that this report is meant to be a working paper, open for discussion. Both the vision on the market and its consequences for the organization model have to be elaborated in more detail. 30 figs., 27 tabs.,

  7. The impact of the new public management: Challenges for coordination and cohesion in European public sectors (review essay)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven); G. Hammerschmid (Gerhard)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNew Public Management has been around for a quarter of a century in European public sectors, yet despite the movement’s emphasis on indicators and evidence, there have been surprisingly few encompassing evaluations. In this paper, we provide an overview of academic evaluation and

  8. Analysis of environmental impacts of renewable energy on the Moroccan electricity sector: A System Dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentouf, M.; Allouch, M.

    2018-05-01

    Producing electricity at an affordable price while taking into account environmental concerns has become a major challenge in Morocco. Moreover, the technical and financial issues related to renewable electricity plants are still hindering their efficient integration in the country. In fact, the energy sector (both electricity and heat) accounted for more than half of all Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions in the kingdom due to the major reliance on fossil fuels for answering the growing local demand. The key strategies to alleviate this critical situation include the integration of more renewable energies in the total energy mix and the enhancement of energy efficiency measures in different sectors. This paper strives to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon dioxide mitigation in Moroccan electricity sector following the actual and projected strategies and (2) highlight the policy schemes to be taken in order to achieve the ambitious carbon dioxide mitigation targets in the mid-term. A system dynamics model was built in order to simulate different scenarios of carbon dioxide mitigation policies up to 2030. The results shows that the achievement of renewable energies projects by 2030 could save 228.143 MtCO2 between 2020 and 2030 and an additional 18.127 MtCO2 could be avoided in the same period by enhancing energy efficiency measures.

  9. EdF competing in the European electricity market. Interview with Francois Ailleret, Electricite de France, Paris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The French nuclear power program was pushed through in order to reduce the country's dependence on imported fossil sources of energy. Nuclear power and hydro power have achieved a level of self-sufficiency in the energy sector of more than 50%. It should be emphasized that the French nuclear power program was largely self-financed. Electricite de France (EdF) considers itself well prepared for the European market, provided the creation of the single market implies that electricity rates are taken as a yardstick of competitiveness. Negotiations about a European directive on deregulating the electricity market were for the government to hold. EdF pleaded in favor of preserving for each country a certain leeway for shaping its own policy. The road to deregulation was to be opened, but the specific situation of each country was to be taken electricity to be passed through imposes narrow constraints upon an expansion of exchanges of electricity, and public acceptance is not very likely to be achieved for the construction of new international high voltage transmission lines. (orig.) [de

  10. Impacts of High Variable Renewable Energy Futures on Wholesale Electricity Prices, and on Electric-Sector Decision Making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seel, Joachim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Andrew D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiser, Ryan H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Deb, Sidart [LCG Consulting, Los Altos, CA (United States); Asokkumar, Aarthi [LCG Consulting, Los Altos, CA (United States); Hassanzadeh, Mohammad [LCG Consulting, Los Altos, CA (United States); Aarabali, Amirsaman [LCG Consulting, Los Altos, CA (United States)

    2018-05-11

    Increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy (VRE) can affect wholesale electricity price patterns and make them meaningfully different from past, traditional price patterns. Many long-lasting decisions for supply- and demand-side electricity infrastructure and programs are based on historical observations or assume a business-as-usual future with low shares of VRE. Our motivating question is whether certain electric-sector decisions that are made based on assumptions reflecting low VRE levels will still achieve their intended objective in a high VRE future. We qualitatively describe how various decisions may change with higher shares of VRE and outline an analytical framework for quantitatively evaluating the impacts of VRE on long-lasting decisions. We then present results from detailed electricity market simulations with capacity expansion and unit commitment models for multiple regions of the U.S. for low and high VRE futures. We find a general decrease in average annual hourly wholesale energy prices with more VRE penetration, increased price volatility and frequency of very low-priced hours, and changing diurnal price patterns. Ancillary service prices rise substantially and peak net-load hours with high capacity value are shifted increasingly into the evening, particularly for high solar futures. While in this report we only highlight qualitatively the possible impact of these altered price patterns on other demand- and supply-side electric sector decisions, the core set of electricity market prices derived here provides a foundation for later planned quantitative evaluations of these decisions in low and high VRE futures.

  11. Economic analysis of the expected environmental impact of the Single European Market through the transport, waste and energy sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brutscher, S.

    1993-01-01

    Similarly to other studies the present dissertation presupposes that the Single European Market will lead to an increase in transport waste quantities, and energy consumption and consequently to greater environmental pollution. Of central importance here is the concept of ''expletive costs'' introduced in this paper which describes that damage to the natural and human environment which is not compensated. It forms out that the sectors of transport, waste, and energy alone will most probably send the expletive costs of the Single European Market into astronomic dimensions. In view of the interdependencies of these three sectors it seems doubtful whether the economic benefit to be expected from the establishment of the Single European Market can justify the additional environmental damage thus caused. (HP) [de

  12. The role of power exchanges for the creation of a single European electricity market: market design and market regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisseleau, F.

    2004-01-01

    The electricity sector worldwide is undergoing a fundamental transformation of its institutional structure as a consequence of the complex interactions of political, economic and technological forces. The way the industry is organized is changing from vertically integrated monopolies to unbundled structures that favor market mechanisms. This process in Europe, known as the liberalization process, has had a wide impact on the European electricity industry. The focus of this dissertation is an analysis of the role of electricity power exchanges in the recently liberalized electricity markets of Europe. In the context of creating a competitive electricity market at a European level, the key questions considered are the functioning of these power exchanges with respect to electricity characteristics, market design and regulatory framework. In Europe, very little attention has been paid to the role of these new marketplaces and to the issue of market design in general. Hence the main purpose of this work was to analyze how these marketplaces facilitate the trading of electricity and the role they can play in the construction of a pan-European competitive electricity market. An analysis of power exchange requires taking into account the 'double-duality' of such institutions. One, power exchanges are both a market and an institution. As a market they facilitate the trading of electricity and determine an equilibrium price. As an institution power exchanges have their own objectives and constraints, and play a role in the market design of the overall electricity market. Two, the relationship between electricity power exchanges and liberalization is neither linear nor one way: liberalization encourages the birth of such marketplaces yet marketplaces are more than the results of such process, they are also a driving force of the liberalization process. This thesis is divided into three parts. The current situation in Europe and different existing theoretical approaches in

  13. Electric vehicles or use of hydrogen in the Danish transport sector in 2050?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Klaus; Pizarro Alonso, Amalia Rosa; Karlsson, Kenneth Bernard

    and calculates socio economic costs. It is used to model the different transport scenarios and their system integration with the electricity and heating sectors. The major findings of this paper are that an increased share of electric vehicles could significantly reduce the socio-economic cost of the system...... in 2050. Compared to the EV scenario, H2 generation from electrolysis is more flexible and the production can therefore to a larger degree be used to out-balance fluctuating electricity surplus from a high share of wind energy in the power system. H2 production may generate heat that can be used...... as district heating - replacing traditional heating plants, heat pumps and in some cases combined heat and power plants. Therefore the energy generation mix (electricity and heat) is more affected in the H2 scenario than in the EV scenario. Whether the H2 scenario is more costly to implement than the EV...

  14. The opening of the Mexican electric sector to foreign investment. Volume 1; La apertura externa en el sector electrico Mexicano. Volumen 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintanilla Martinez, Juan [eds.] [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    This document is the first one of three volumes of the 1. Seminar on the Current Conditions and Perspectives of the Electric Sector in Mexico, organized by the Programa Universitario de Energia and the Instituto de Investigaciones Economicas (University Program of Energy and the Institute of Economic Research, both of them agencies of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM)). The titles of the three volumes are the following: Volume 1.- The opening of the Mexican Electric Sector to foreign investment. Volume 2.- Concrete innovation and technological learning experiences at the Luz y Fuerza del Centro enterprise. Volume 3.- The Electric Energy and the Environment in Mexico. This first volume deals on the World tendencies towards the privatization; the new financing techniques and the reorganization of the Mexican electric industry; the electric rates in the residential sector; the distribution of the income and the electricity expense in Mexican homes, the privatization of the energy in Mexico and the production costs in generation projects planning. These documents were formulated by specialists of the Electric Sector, from the Electric Sector itself as well as from academic entities, public and private [Espanol] Este documento constituye el primero de tres volumenes del Primer Seminario sobre Situacion y Perspectivas del Sector Electrico en Mexico, organizado por el Programa Universitario de Energia y el Instituto de Investigaciones Economicas, ambas dependencias de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM). Los titulos de los tres volumenes son los siguientes: volumen 1: La apertura externa del sector electrico mexicano, volumen 2: Experiencias concretas de innovacion y aprendizaje tecnologico en la empresa Luz y Fuerza del Centro, volumen 3: Energia electrica y medio ambiente en Mexico. Este primer volumen trata sobre las tendencias mundiales hacia la privatizacion; las nuevas tecnicas de financiamiento y reorganizacion de la industria

  15. Liberalisation of the German electricity sector and the role of energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, J.; Betz, R.; Gagelmann, F.; Jochem, E.; Koewener, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the impacts of the liberalisation of the German electricity market and describes the existing energy policy and recent responses to the liberalisation with respect to the electricity sector. In the first section, electricity supply, electricity consumption and the structure of the electricity market are described. In the second section, the legal framework for the liberalisation of the electricity market in Germany and the consequences for prices, market structure, legal form of utilities, investment, cogeneration and products offered are presented. The final section first provides an overview of the national and international climate policy targets as well as the agreed upon phase-out of nuclear energy. Finally, existing electricity policy instruments and policy responses to the liberalised electricity market are reported. These policy instruments include support for hard coal and lignite, the new ecological-tax reform, the promotion of renewable energy sources, support for cogeneration, voluntary agreements, and the flexible mechanisms for greenhouse gas emission reductions as introduced in the Kyoto protocol. (orig./CB)

  16. Perspectives of new fossil-fuelled power plants with CO2 capture in the liberalised European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Against the background of an increasing importance of climate change mitigation and the liberalization of the European energy supply this study assesses the perspectives of power plants with Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS power plants represent one option to reduce CO 2 emissions of fossil energy based electricity production significantly. In this study the deployment of CCS power plants is investigated for the European electricity market until 2050 taking different energy and climate policy framework conditions into consideration. By applying an integrated model-based approach, structural changes of the whole energy system are incorporated, including their implications on costs and emissions. The study addresses uncertainties concerning future CCS power plant invest costs and efficiencies explicitly, and analyses the effects of changes of these parameters with respect to the perspectives of CCS power plants in Europe. Thereby, interdependencies on horizontal level related to competition of different technologies within the electricity sector are examined, but also vertical interdependencies resulting from effects between the upstream and energy demand sectors. In order to reflect the heterogeneity among the national energy systems in Europe, country specific particularities on technical aspects and energy policy are taken into account, such as potentials and costs of CO 2 storage, and national regulations on the use of nuclear power and renewable energy. The results of the analysis reveal a strong influence of the stringency of the EU greenhouse gas reduction target and the policy on the use of nuclear energy on the perspectives of CCS power plants in the European electricity market. Comparing the influence of different policy frameworks analysed in this study with the influences of the variation of the technical and economic CCS power plant parameters shows, that uncertainties concerning energy policy measures can have a stronger influence on the

  17. Funding for universal service obligations in electricity sector: the case of green power development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favard, P.; Mirabel, F.; Poudou, J.Ch

    2002-07-01

    The process of deregulation in network industries, in particular in the electric sector, raises the problem of financing the Universal Service Obligations (USO) corresponding to the production, transport and distribution operations. In this paper, we study three ways of funding for an USO of production, especially the 'green' electricity development; the financing with cross-subsidies, the implementation of a fund (financing by a tax) and finally a voluntary funding system by direct subscriptions of consumers. We notably show that this last one Pareto dominates mostly, from a welfare point of view, the other scenarios. (authors)

  18. The Effect of Mitigation Policy on Regional Climate Impacts on the U.S. Electric Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. M.; Sun, Y.; Strzepek, K.; McFarland, J.; Boehlert, B.; Fant, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change can influence the U.S. electricity sector in many ways, the nature of which can be shaped by energy and environmental policy choices. Changing temperatures affect electricity demand largely through heating and cooling needs, and temperatures also affect generation and transmission system performance. Altered precipitation patterns affect the regional and seasonal distribution of surface water runoff, which changes hydropower operation and thermal cooling water availability. The extent to which these stimuli influence U.S. power sector operation and planning will depend to some extent on whether or not proactive policies are enacted to mitigate these impacts. Mitigation policies such as CO2 emissions limits or technology restrictions can change the makeup of the electricity system while reducing the extent of climate change itself. We use the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a U.S. electric sector capacity expansion model, to explore electric sector evolution through 2050 under alternative climate and policy assumptions. The model endogenously represents climate impacts on load, power system performance, cooling water availability, and hydropower, allowing internally consistent system responses to climate change along with projected technology, market, and policy conditions. We compare climate impacts across 5 global circulation models for a 8.5 W/m2 representative concentration pathway (RCP) without a climate mitigation policy and a 4.5 W/m2 RCP with climate mitigation. Climate drivers affect the capacity and generation mix at the national and regional levels, with relative growth of wind, solar, and natural gas-based technologies depending on local electricity system characteristics. These differences affect regional economic impacts, measured here as changes to electricity price and system costs. Mitigation policy reduces the economic and system impacts of climate change largely by moderating

  19. Industry sector analysis, Mexico: Electric power production and distribution equipment. Export Trade Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.S.; Miller, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    The Industry Sector Analyses (I.S.A.) for electric power production and distribution equipment contains statistical and narrative information on projected market demand, end-users, receptivity of Mexican consumers to U.S. products, the competitive situation - Mexican production, total import market, U.S. market position, foreign competition, and competitive factors, and market access - Mexican tariffs, non-tariff barriers, standards, taxes and distribution channels. The I.S.A. provides the United States industry with meaningful information regarding the Mexican market for electric power production and distribution equipment

  20. Funding for universal service obligations in electricity sector: the case of green power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favard, P.; Mirabel, F.; Poudou, J.Ch.

    2002-07-01

    The process of deregulation in network industries, in particular in the electric sector, raises the problem of financing the Universal Service Obligations (USO) corresponding to the production, transport and distribution operations. In this paper, we study three ways of funding for an USO of production, especially the 'green' electricity development; the financing with cross-subsidies, the implementation of a fund (financing by a tax) and finally a voluntary funding system by direct subscriptions of consumers. We notably show that this last one Pareto dominates mostly, from a welfare point of view, the other scenarios. (authors)

  1. Flexibility and reliability in long-term planning exercises dedicated to the electricity sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maizi, Nadia; Drouineau, Mathilde; Assoumou, Edi; Mazauric, Vincent

    2010-09-15

    Long-term planning models are useful to build plausible options for future energy systems and must consequently address the technological feasibility and associated cost of these options. This paper focuses on the electricity sector and on problems of flexibility and reliability in power systems in order to improve results provided by long-term planning exercises: flexibility needs are integrated as an additional criterion for new investment decisions and, reliability requirements are assessed through the level of electrical losses they induced and a related cost. These approaches are implemented in a long-term planning model and demonstrated through a study of the Reunion Island.

  2. Operationalizing clean development mechanism baselines: A case study of China's electrical sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhof, Paul A.

    The global carbon market is rapidly developing as the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol draws closer and Parties to the Protocol with greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets seek alternative ways to reduce their emissions. The Protocol includes the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), a tool that encourages project-based investments to be made in developing nations that will lead to an additional reduction in emissions. Due to China's economic size and rate of growth, technological characteristics, and its reliance on coal, it contains a large proportion of the global CDM potential. As China's economy modernizes, more technologies and processes are requiring electricity and demand for this energy source is accelerating rapidly. Relatively inefficient technology to generate electricity in China thereby results in the electrical sector having substantial GHG emission reduction opportunities as related to the CDM. In order to ensure the credibility of the CDM in leading to a reduction in GHG emissions, it is important that the baseline method used in the CDM approval process is scientifically sound and accessible for both others to use and for evaluation purposes. Three different methods for assessing CDM baselines and environmental additionality are investigated in the context of China's electrical sector: a method based on a historical perspective of the electrical sector (factor decomposition), a method structured upon a current perspective (operating and build margins), and a simulation of the future (dispatch analysis). Assessing future emission levels for China's electrical sector is a very challenging task given the complexity of the system, its dynamics, and that it is heavily influenced by internal and external forces, but of the different baseline methods investigated, dispatch modelling is best suited for the Chinese context as it is able to consider the important regional and temporal dimensions of its economy and its future development

  3. A decarbonization strategy for the electricity sector: New-source subsidies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    An expedient phase-out of carbon emissions in the electricity sector could be facilitated by imposing carbon fees and applying the revenue exclusively to subsidize new, low-carbon generation sources. Since there would initially be no 'new sources', fees would be substantially zero at the outset of the program. Nevertheless, the program would immediately create high price incentives for low-carbon capacity expansion. Fees would increase as new, low-carbon sources gain market share, but price competition from a growing, subsidized clean-energy industry would help maintain moderate retail electricity prices. Subsidies would automatically phase out as emitting sources become obsolete.

  4. When should green technology support policies supplement the carbon price? The case of the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the literature on optimal policy choice. It studies the use of policy combinations to mitigate greenhouse gases emissions from electricity production. One finding applies to cases where uncertainty is such that the risk of a nil carbon price cannot be excluded. A cap on emissions alone may then not trigger enough abatements, justifying the addition of e.g. a renewable subsidy. When considering a transition toward a carbon free electricity sector, capital accumulation causes complex dynamic effects to happen. We find that decisions taken by comparing the leveled costs of abatement technologies, even including carbon costs, would favor intermediate technologies (e.g. gas plants) to the detriment of more-expensive but lower-carbon technologies (renewable power), leading to a suboptimal investment schedule. This thesis also studies the effects of marginal policy changes in a mix comprising the main French instruments. We find that surprisingly, adding a tariff for renewables financed by a tax on electricity consumption to a cap on emissions and a subsidy for energy efficiency will reduce the consumer electricity price when the non-renewable production is fixed and does not depend on the carbon price. The assessment of the French climate policies in the electricity sector shows that overlapping policies for mitigation may be justified by multiple carbon price failures, even if the ideal long-term policy mix depends on the carbon price trajectory. (author)

  5. Re-regulation of the Russian electricity sector; Neuregulierung der russischen Elektrizitaetswirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telke, Juergen [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Osteuropaeisches Recht

    2011-04-15

    The Russian electricity sector is going through a phase of radical change. Time-honoured structures are being modernised through privatisation, unbundling and liberalisation, creating a number of interesting investment opportunities. However, prospective investors should take the specifics of the Russian market into account in order to gain a fuller picture of investment opportunities and risks in the areas of production, transmission, wholesale and retail trade.

  6. GEOLAW AND THE GEOGRAPHIC-CARTOGRAPHIC CONSTRUCTION AS INSTRUMENT OF PUBLIC POLITICS IN THE ELECTRICITY SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Ugeda Sanches, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    The present study shows the interdisciplinarity between Geosciences and Law as an inseparable element of the construction of public politics that presuppose the use of geotechnologies. There is a demonstration of how this interdisciplinarity is treated by the law throughout the history of Brazil, as well as its application in the electricity sector, especially in the monitoring and control process of the Agência Nacional de Energia Elétrica (ANEEL).

  7. Marketing Integration for the Implementation of Territorial and Sectoral Approach to the Management of Electricity Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan A. Unshchikov; Rashida T. Unshchikova

    2017-01-01

    This article contains a proposal for a new approach to management of development of electric power in the multi-level governance system. To improve the effectiveness of the multi-level governance is offered by the wide use of marketing. Tools of investment marketing can be used to match demand and supply, using all levels of management. To do this, the subjects at every level of government carried out an identical procedure horizontal integration of sectoral and territorial marketing. Isolate...

  8. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  9. Free Switzerland from fossil energy sources - Clear proposals for the building, transportation and electrical power sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordmann, R.

    2010-10-01

    A comprehensive review of the current situation of energy resources and consumption and of the prevailing framework like climate change is given, with a focus on Switzerland. The author, a member of the Lower House of the Swiss Parliament, presents facts and figures in a simple language, illustrated by tables and diagrams, in a well structured, easy-to-read book, with detailed indications of his data sources. Starting from the limited character of fossil energy sources, 'peak-oil' and the necessary reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the author states that nuclear energy is not the solution. Action is absolutely needed, but which policy should be adopted? A global strategy is required that includes the stabilization of the world population as a key factor. An international agreement signed by as many states as possible should create stringent commitments. The developed countries have to demonstrate that prosperity and high life standard are compatible with an economy based on renewable energy sources. This will give to the most ambitious countries a significant advantage on new markets created by renewable energy use and energy efficiency. The author goes on by describing the current status of the technologies needed. What regards the particular case of Switzerland, this country is strongly dependent on energy import - mainly fossil - and CO 2 emissions arise mainly from the building and transportation sectors. A 50% efficiency improvement until 2030 is needed in fossil energy use. Electricity use has to become more efficient as well. Electricity generation - today about 60% renewable - shall move towards 100% renewable. The next chapters discuss clear realistic proposals on how to achieve these goals in the transportation sector ('Intelligent mobility'), the building sector ('Retrofitting the buildings to get them up-to-date') and the electrical power sector ('Entirely renewable electricity'). The title of the conclusion chapter: 'Focus again on the general

  10. 2015 Plan. Project 7: the environmental issue and the electrical sector. Transmission systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The main impacts in socio-environmental analysis of transmission lines and substations for expansion of the Brazilian electrical sector are described, showing the actions of social compensation aiming a better insertion of the transmission lines and the substations. The issues relating with the natural and native reserves, the supply to the large consumer centers and the socio-environmental licensing of transmission enterprises are also discussed. (C.G.C.)

  11. Technical efficiency of Spanish electrical sector: analysis of 1998-2001 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Moya, E.; Arevalo Quijada, M. T.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse the technical efficiency of the energy Spanish sector in the course of the stage of liberalization (1998-2001). The study uses the non parametric approach of DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis) to derive Malaquist productivity indexes. In the study there is revealed the improvement of productivity of the mentioned companies, as well as the major differentiation between electrical considered companies. (Author) 23 refs

  12. Liberalisation and Corporate Strategic Behaviours: A Taxonomy of the European Electric Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavone Francesco; Quintano Michele

    2012-01-01

    Liberalisation in the European electricity market greatly increased the number of corporate mergers and acquisitions. This article proposes a taxonomy of the strategic behaviours of European electricity firms after the recent continental industry liberalisation. We analysed the operations of mergers and acquisitions of these companies. The «five competitive forces» model by Michael Porter was used in order to develop the taxonomy. Our analysis outlines three main strategic types: "omnivorou"s...

  13. International Rivalry In The Energy Sector: The Eastern European Market Of Atomic Energy In Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Borovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the post-bipolar world nuclear power has become one of the areas of competition and rivalry betweenRussiaand the West. The comprehensive analysis of theoretical publications allows us to consider international competition as an abstract, depoliticized contest of states and other international actors (including companies for some limited (mainly economic benefits. International rivalry is more a political process, necessarily involving some rival pairs of states (or groups of states that compete with each other not only to get some benefits, but to expand their territory or power. The competition and rivalry betweenRussiaand the West in the sphere of nuclear power are especially apparent in the Eastern European region where the American, European and Japanese corporations, with the support of the Western foreign ministries and EU institutions, try to achieve two main goals. The first goal is to win the contracts to build new power units, especially in tenders where Rosatom participates. The second goal is to become suppliers of nuclear fuel for multiple Russian- or Soviet-made VVER-type reactors, which are functioning or will be run in a number of countries in the region (Slovakia,CzechRepublic,Hungary,Bulgaria, andUkraine. Such activities can involve high risks. The West’s efforts to curb the dominant position of "Rosatom" inEastern Europeare formally associated with the need to create a "competitive market" of nuclear services in the region and to ensure the European energy security. It is also noteworthy that the expansion of Rosatom (and its predecessors to foreign markets, including Eastern Europe, is actively supported by the Russian state which in the second half of the 1990s – after a failed attempt of following in the footsteps of the West – joined in the rivalry, mostly imposed by the U.S. and their allies. As shown by the analysis,Russiaand the West, primarily theUnited States, are involved in the nuclear power sector to

  14. Tipping points for carbon dioxide and air pollution benefits: an energy systems analysis of natural gas verses electric technologies in the U.S. buildings sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our analysis examines emission trade-offs between electricity and natural gas use in the buildings sector at the system level, including upstream emissions from the electric sector and natural gas mining emissions.

  15. An Introduction of Gas Business and Its Competitiveness for Electricity Sector in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, A.; Sumardi, I.

    2007-07-01

    Gas Industry becomes the most important energy business in Indonesia, since Indonesia is not the oil exporter country any longer recently. The large gap between production and consumption of gas shows that the availability of this energy is huge, and lack of accessibility and acceptability. The utilization of gas, especially for electricity sector is very low, with only 7% of total consumption. Some experiences in Indonesia shows that not all of stakeholders and participants in this gas business know comprehensively about the basic system of gas system; what is gas contract; the anatomy of gas contract; the relationship and systematic flow diagram between seller and buyer; the natural gas development; the gas pricing; and so on. This paper obtains the framework of the real gas business in Indonesia and gives the real example of its competitiveness among the other energy types used in electricity sector. An understanding that aims in promoting sustainable economic growth and the security of supply in electricity sector in Indonesia is also discussed in detail. (auth)

  16. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles in the US Transportation Sector Following Optimistic Cost and Efficiency Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzmohammadian, Azadeh; Henze, Daven K; Milford, Jana B

    2017-06-20

    This study investigates emission impacts of introducing inexpensive and efficient electric vehicles into the US light duty vehicle (LDV) sector. Scenarios are explored using the ANSWER-MARKAL model with a modified version of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) 9-region database. Modified cost and performance projections for LDV technologies are adapted from the National Research Council (2013) optimistic case. Under our optimistic scenario (OPT) we find 15% and 47% adoption of battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in 2030 and 2050, respectively. In contrast, gasoline vehicles (ICEVs) remain dominant through 2050 in the EPA reference case (BAU). Compared to BAU, OPT gives 16% and 36% reductions in LDV greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for 2030 and 2050, respectively, corresponding to 5% and 9% reductions in economy-wide emissions. Total nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and SO 2 emissions are similar in the two scenarios due to intersectoral shifts. Moderate, economy-wide GHG fees have little effect on GHG emissions from the LDV sector but are more effective in the electricity sector. In the OPT scenario, estimated well-to-wheels GHG emissions from full-size BEVs with 100-mile range are 62 gCO 2 -e mi -1 in 2050, while those from full-size ICEVs are 121 gCO 2 -e mi -1 .

  17. IFRIC 12, ICPC 01 and Regulatory Accounting: Influences on Formation of Tariffs in the Electricity Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natan Szuster

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate to what extent the IFRIC12 and ICPC01 accounting characteristics can influence in the formation of tariffs in the electricity sector in Brazil. The choice of this sector is justified by its economic relevance, its importance for the development of the country and mainly because it uses specific regulatory accounting rules. With a purely qualitative approach - justified by the incipient stage of the current research in this area – we conducted a theoretical study, focusing on qualitative information, through research of the literature and documents. The results show that the pricing model may change under the IFRIC 12 and ICPC 01 standards, which makes the effective application of these accounting standards in the environment regulated by the National Electric Energy Agency (ANEEL a difficult and complex task. The study also indicates that the main difference between the regulatory accounting system promoted by ANEEL and the international standards is the impossibility of recognizing regulatory assets and liabilities under the latter system. Therefore, the Brazilian electricity sector is one of those that may have its financial statements most affected by the convergence of Brazilian accounting standards to international standards.

  18. Cost function estimates, scale economies and technological progress in the Turkish electricity generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Akkemik, K.

    2009-01-01

    Turkish electricity sector has undergone significant institutional changes since 1984. The recent developments since 2001 including the setting up of a regulatory agency to undertake the regulation of the sector and increasing participation of private investors in the field of electricity generation are of special interest. This paper estimates cost functions and investigates the degree of scale economies, overinvestment, and technological progress in the Turkish electricity generation sector for the period 1984-2006 using long-run and short-run translog cost functions. Estimations were done for six groups of firms, public and private. The results indicate existence of scale economies throughout the period of analysis, hence declining long-run average costs. The paper finds empirical support for the Averch-Johnson effect until 2001, i.e., firms overinvested in an environment where there are excess returns to capital. But this effect was reduced largely after 2002. Technological progress deteriorated slightly from 1984-1993 to 1994-2001 but improved after 2002. Overall, the paper found that regulation of the market under the newly established regulating agency after 2002 was effective and there are potential gains from such regulation. (author)

  19. New model of Brazilian electric sector: implications of sugarcane bagasse on the distributed generation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Celso E.L. de; Rabi, Jose A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (GREEN/FZEA/USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos. Grupo de Pesquisa em Reciclagem, Eficiencia Energetica e Simulacao Numerica], Emails: celsooli@usp.br, jrabi@usp.br; Halmeman, Maria Cristina [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCA/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas

    2008-07-01

    Distributed generation has become an alternative for the lack of resources to large energy projects and for recent facts that have changed the geopolitical panorama. The later have increased oil prices so that unconventional sources have become more and more feasible, which is an issue usually discussed in Europe and in USA. Brazil has followed such world trend by restructuring the electrical sector as well as major related institutions, from generation to commercialization and sector regulation while local legislation has enabled the increase of distributed generation. It regulates the role of the independent energy producer so as to provide direct business between the later and a great consumer, which is an essential step to enlarge energy market. Sugarcane bagasse has been used to produce both electric energy and steam and this paper analyzes and discusses the major implications of a new model for Brazilian electric sector based on sugarcane bagasse use as means to increase distributed generation process, particularly concerned with the commercialization of energy excess. (author)

  20. Tariffs and investments at the Brazilian electric sector; Tarifas e investimentos no setor eletrico brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, Jorge Alberto Alcala; Almeida, Denizart do Rosario [ELETROBRAS - Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The objective of the work is to identify the impacts of the variations in the tariffs of the electricity on the standard of growth of the consumption of electric energy, and the role that these variations had exerted in the allocation of resources by the companies of the sector, in the period 1995-2004. In this period, changes in the habits of consumption of energy due the adopted during the rationing, explain, in part, the reduction of the income-elasticity of the consumption of electric energy, but the contribution of a significant effect-price was important for this reduction. Also are evidenced, in this work, the categories of use and the regions that had more contributed for this effect. For the allocation of resources, from 1998 a decline of the participation of the investments in the sector in the total of investments of the economy is observed, with the companies of the sector presenting differentiated behaviors visibly. The companies of distribution apparently more privileged for the formation of resources, have presented, in the recent years, a declining evolution in its rate of investments when compared with the others segments. Among the determinative factors of the decisions of investment of the companies of distribution, can be mentioned the change in the standard of growth of the consumption and the effect of the evolution of the opportunity cost of the inversions. (author)

  1. The consumption of electric power on the tertiary sector - an instrument for economical and social analysis and market studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villela, L.E.

    1991-04-01

    The main subjective of this thesis is to analyse the effects of the growth of the tertiary sector on the electric power demand. In order to accomplish this goal an economical and social, analysis of the tertiary sector is made to identify its dynamic, its relations with the other sectors of the economy and to describe the methodologies for measuring the overall tertiary production. Afterwards it is made an analysis of the electric power consumption evolution in the tertiary sector, in order to identify the consumption per region of the country, per consumers and tertiary subsectors. It is also analysed the product power intensify and, finally its described the present tariff system. (author)

  2. The European Union: When the Commission and Governments put the Future of Electricity Producers at Stake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourne, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    RWE, EON, EDF, ENGIE and other large utilities are in financial turmoil. This situation, which would have been unlikely twenty years ago, is related to several failures in governance within the EU as well as to global evolutions. This Edito Energie analyses the situation of large European electricity producers in light of the European energy policy

  3. Towards a single European electricity market : A structured approach to regulatory mode decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the processes through which the rules and regulations that govern European electricity markets - and inherently, their integration process - are established. So far, European policy makers have largely followed a 'trial-and-error' approach to finding an appropriate regulatory

  4. Sustainable development outlooks of the Estonian energy sector for convergence with the European Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laur, Anton; Tenno, Koidu; Soosaar, Sulev

    2002-01-01

    The article presents an overview of a research conducted in the Estonian Inst. of Economics and the Estonian Energy Research Inst. with the objectives to: analyse the dynamics of the main Estonian energy use indicators over the last 8-10 years with the background of general macroeconomics developments; compare these indicators with the respective energy indicators in the European Union Member States and Candidate Countries; evaluate Estonia's potential to catch up by the energy use efficiency (GDP energy intensity) of the average level of EU countries, modelling our possible development scenarios of GDP and TPES. The research results indicates several positive development tendencies (e.g. reduction of TPES and CO 2 emissions with the background of economic growth) in the Estonian energy sector, as well as convergence with the EU countries in terms of GDP energy intensity. Unfortunately, the model analysis results demonstrate that it takes a lot of time for Estonia to reach the current EU level - even under the most favourable GDP and TPES development conditions, 25-30 years. The primary reason is the very low level of our GDP per capita compared to the EU countries. (author)

  5. “Green” fuel tax on private transportation services and subsidies to electric energy. A model-based assessment for the main European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartocci, Anna; Pisani, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the environmental and macroeconomic implications for France, Germany, Italy and Spain of taxing motor vehicle fuels for private transportation, a sector not subject to the Emissions Trading System, so as to reduce taxes on electricity consumption and increase subsidies to renewable sources of electricity generation. The assessment is based on a dynamic general equilibrium model calibrated for each of the four countries. The results suggest that the measures posited will reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector and favor the development of electricity generation from renewable sources, thus limiting the growth of emissions from electricity generation. The measures do not jeopardize economic activity. The results are robust whether implementation is unilateral in one country or simultaneous throughout the EU. - Highlights: • The European Union's Agenda 2020 calls for member countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase renewable energy. • We evaluate implications in the EU of taxing fuels for private transportation, reducing taxes on electricity and increase subsidies to renewable sources of electricity. • The assessment is based on a dynamic general equilibrium model. • The measures reduce emissions, in particular in the transportation sector, favor electricity generation from renewable sources and do not jeopardize economic activity

  6. The European forest sector: past and future carbon budget and fluxes under different management scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Roberto; Grassi, Giacomo; Kurz, Werner A.; Fiorese, Giulia; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    The comprehensive analysis of carbon stocks and fluxes of managed European forests is a prerequisite to quantify their role in biomass production and climate change mitigation. We applied the Carbon Budget Model (CBM) to 26 European countries, parameterized with country information on the historical forest age structure, management practices, harvest regimes and the main natural disturbances. We modeled the C stocks for the five forest pools plus harvested wood products (HWPs) and the fluxes among these pools from 2000 to 2030. The aim is to quantify, using a consistent modeling framework for all 26 countries, the main C fluxes as affected by land-use changes, natural disturbances and forest management and to assess the impact of specific harvest and afforestation scenarios after 2012 on the mitigation potential of the EU forest sector. Substitution effects and the possible impacts of climate are not included in this analysis. Results show that for the historical period from 2000 to 2012 the net primary productivity (NPP) of the forest pools at the EU level is on average equal to 639 Tg C yr-1. The losses are dominated by heterotrophic respiration (409 Tg C yr-1) and removals (110 Tg C yr-1), with direct fire emissions being only 1 Tg C yr-1, leading to a net carbon stock change (i.e., sink) of 110 Tg C yr-1. Fellings also transferred 28 Tg C yr-1 of harvest residues from biomass to dead organic matter pools. The average annual net sector exchange (NSE) of the forest system, i.e., the carbon stock changes in the forest pools including HWP, equals a sink of 122 Tg C yr-1 (i.e., about 19 % of the NPP) for the historical period, and in 2030 it reaches 126, 101 and 151 Tg C yr-1, assuming constant, increasing (+20 %) and decreasing (-20 %) scenarios, respectively, of both harvest and afforestation rates compared to the historical period. Under the constant harvest rate scenario, our findings show an incipient aging process of the forests existing in 1990: although NPP

  7. Employment trends in the U.S. Electricity Sector, 2008–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haerer, Drew; Pratson, Lincoln

    2015-01-01

    Between 2008–2012, electricity generated (GWh) from coal, the longtime dominant fuel for electric power in the US, declined 24%, while electricity generated from natural gas, wind and solar grew by 39%, 154%, and 400%, respectively. These shifts had major effects on domestic employment in those sectors of the coal, natural gas, wind and solar industries involved in operations and maintenance (O&M) activities for electricity generation. Using an economic input–output model, we estimate that the coal industry lost more than 49,000 jobs (12%) nationally over the five-year period, while in the natural gas, solar, and wind industries, employment increased by nearly 175,000 jobs (21%). We also combine published ratios for jobs per unit of fuel production and per megawatt of power plant capacity with site-specific data on fuel production and power plant retirements, additions and capacity changes to estimate and map direct job changes at the county level. The maps show that job increases in the natural gas, solar and wind industries generally did not occur where there were significant job losses in the coal industry, particularly in West Virginia and Kentucky. -- Highlights: •We examine shifts in the U.S. electricity industry from 2008–2012 by sector. •We use an economic input–output model to estimate direct and indirect jobs. •We conducted an analytical, county level geospatial analysis using ArcGIS. •The coal sector suffered significant job losses, mainly in traditional coal regions. •Those losses were offset by gains, but typically not in the same geographic areas

  8. Bridging Climate Change Resilience and Mitigation in the Electricity Sector Through Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: Emerging Climate Change and Development Topics for Energy Sector Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sarah L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hotchkiss, Elizabeth L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bilello, Daniel E [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Watson, Andrea C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Holm, Alison [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Reliable, safe, and secure electricity is essential for economic and social development and a necessary input for many sectors of the economy. However, electricity generation and associated processes make up a significant portion of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contributing to climate change. Furthermore, electricity systems are vulnerable to climate change impacts - both short-term events and changes over the longer term. This vulnerability presents both near-term and chronic challenges in providing reliable, affordable, equitable, and sustainable energy services. Within this context, developing countries face a number of challenges in the energy sector, including the need to reliably meet growing electricity demand, lessen dependence on imported fuels, expand energy access, and improve stressed infrastructure for fuel supply and electricity transmission. Energy efficiency (EE) and renewable energy (RE) technical solutions described in this paper can bridge action across climate change mitigation and resilience through reducing GHG emissions and supporting electric power sector adaptation to increasing climate risk. Integrated planning approaches, also highlighted in this paper, play an integral role in bringing together mitigation and resilience action under broader frameworks. Through supporting EE and RE deployment and integrated planning approaches, unique to specific national and local circumstances, countries can design and implement policies, strategies, and sectoral plans that unite development priorities, climate change mitigation, and resilience.

  9. Economical and technical origins of the electricity sector nationalization in Quebec: the mixed regime experience, from 1944 to 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellavance, Claude

    2003-01-01

    For almost twenty years (1944-1963), private and public firms coexisted in the electricity sector in Quebec. We would like, in this article, to relate the growth of a state company (Hydro-Quebec) to the decline of the private sector, the networks' interconnection, and the confirmation of the hydraulic channel as the quasi unique source of primary energy for electricity production in that province. We will also check whether the mixed regime really was a case of 'yardstick competition' or not. Finally, we will examine the accuracy of the 'natural monopoly' concept as applied to the evolution of the electricity sector in Quebec before the second nationalization in 1963

  10. Diversity of fuel sources for electricity generation in an evolving U.S. power sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLuccia, Janelle G.

    Policymakers increasingly have shown interest in options to boost the relative share of renewable or clean electricity generating sources in order to reduce negative environmental externalities from fossil fuels, guard against possible resource constraints, and capture economic advantages from developing new technologies and industries. Electric utilities and non-utility generators make decisions regarding their generation mix based on a number of different factors that may or may not align with societal goals. This paper examines the makeup of the electric power sector to determine how the type of generator and the presence (or lack) of competition in electricity markets at the state level may relate to the types of fuel sources used for generation. Using state-level electricity generation data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration from 1990 through 2010, this paper employs state and time fixed-effects regression modeling to attempt to isolate the impacts of state-level restructuring policies and the emergence of non-utility generators on states' generation from coal, from fossil fuel and from renewable sources. While the analysis has significant limitations, I do find that state-level electricity restructuring has a small but significant association with lowering electricity generation from coal specifically and fossil fuels more generally. Further research into the relationship between competition and fuel sources would aid policymakers considering legislative options to influence the generation mix.

  11. Sustainability in the Dutch Electricity Sector; Duurzaamheid in de Nederlandse Elektriciteitssector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde-Ramsing, J.; Steinweg, T.; Ten Kate, A.; Racz, K.

    2012-02-15

    The aim of this project is to create public awareness of the sustainability of electricity companies that are active in the Netherlands. The report acts as background study for the ranking of electricity suppliers that will be published in March 2012 by the Consumentenbond (Consumer Association)and Greenpeace. The project builds on the 2010 report on 'Sustainability in the Dutch Power Sector', but is extended with suppliers which do not own generation capacity themselves. Each company has been examined for the following items: Fuel mix of current generation capacity or purchased electricity in Europe; Fuel mix of supplied electricity in the Netherlands; Overview of ongoing investments in new generation capacity; Overview of the announced investment plans in new generation capacity [Dutch] Het doel van het project is om publieke bewustwording te creeren van de duurzaamheid van elektriciteitsbedrijven die in Nederland actief zijn. Het rapport dient als achtergrondonderzoek voor de ranking van elektriciteitsleveranciers die in maart 2012 gepubliceerd zal worden door de Consumentenbond en Greenpeace. Het project bouwt voort op het in 2010 gepubliceerde rapport 'Sustainability in the Dutch Power Sector', maar is uitgebreid met leveranciers die zelf geen opwekkingscapaciteit bezitten. Voor elk bedrijf zijn de volgende punten onderzocht: Brandstofmix van huidige opwekkingscapaciteit of ingekochte stroom in Europa; Brandstofmix van geleverde elektriciteit in Nederland; Overzicht van de lopende investeringen in nieuwe opwekkingscapaciteit; Overzicht van de aangekondigde investeringsplannen in nieuwe opwekkingscapaciteit.

  12. Pollution from the electric power sector in Japan and efficient pollution reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Kyohei; Yamane, Fumihiro

    2012-01-01

    Under the scheme of the Kyoto Protocol, there are plans for the efficient reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. In the electric power sector, nuclear power generation, which emits no carbon dioxide in the process of generating electricity, has come under scrutiny. However, this energy produces a new environmental issue: the disposal of radioactive waste. First, we derive shadow prices of carbon dioxide and low-level waste as marginal abatement costs in the case of the electric power sector in Japan, employing a directional output distance function. It is found that the shadow prices are US$39 per tonne for carbon dioxide and US$1531 per liter for low-level waste. Secondly, we calculate the indirect Morishima elasticity between carbon dioxide and low-level waste in order to identify their substitutability, and it is found that the substitution of low-level waste for carbon dioxide is easier than the reverse. This result suggests that, with the amount of generated electricity fixed, carbon dioxide can be substituted more easily by low-level waste when the relative price of carbon dioxide increases, for example, as a result of implementation of a carbon dioxide tax or an emissions trading system.

  13. Testing for convergence in electricity consumption across Croatian regions at the consumer's sectoral level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borozan, Djula

    2017-01-01

    Using the panel unit tests with and without structural break(s), the convergence hypothesis in relative per capita electricity consumption series is tested across Croatian regions during the period 2001–2013. The results are mixed, depending primarily on the consumption sector considered and the test applied. They indicate the necessity to conduct analysis and formulate energy policy measures on the sector-disaggregated and regional-specific electricity consumption time series. The Croatian electricity markets are not fully integrated, and some regions are faced with statistically significant structural break(s), demonstrating thereby the Croatian gradual energy reform process with several sudden innovations, significant regional differences, and the market dependence on expectations, domestic and international economic and non-economic innovations. The impacts of innovations are likely to be permanent for most of the regions, and their electricity consumption behaviours are likely to be path dependent. Consequently, innovations into the energy markets, including government interventions, may have long-run effects, indicating that space and time for experimenting with alternative mechanisms are quite limited.

  14. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be

  15. Sectoral agreements and competitive distortions - a Swedish perspective; Effects of EU Emissions Trading System for European industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zetterberg, Lars; Holmgren, Kristina

    2009-03-15

    The objectives of this study are to: Give an overview of the current discussion concerning competition distortion in relation to climate policy; Describe results from some studies estimating the actual competition situation for selected activities; Describe what sector agreement models are suggested/ discussed by EU; Describe what sectors are most interesting to target with a sector agreement from a Swedish point of view; Analyse what parameters are important for reducing competition distortion for Swedish Industry. Two studies, for the United Kingdom and Germany, have recently assessed the potential cost impact for different industrial sectors of CO{sub 2}-prices due to the EU ETS. The sectors with high potential impact, with a maximum value at stake larger than 10%, are in the United Kingdom Lime and cement, Basic iron and steel, Starches, Refined petroleum, Fertilizers and Nitrogen compounds and Aluminium. In Germany: Cement and lime, Fertilizers and nitrogen compounds, Basic iron and steel, Aluminium, Paper and board, Other basic inorganic compounds and Coke, refined petroleum and nuclear fuels. Ex-ante studies of the impacts of competitiveness and carbon leakage due to the EU ETS fail to find actual impacts. However, that does not mean that there will be no impact in the future, which hold changes both in the EU ETS (method for allowance allocation, allowance prices etc) and possibly also other important circumstances. In this study, based on official Swedish statistics, the maximum value a stake has been calculated for 52 Swedish sectors. Seven sectors have a maximum value a stake of more than 4%: Coke and refined petroleum (21%), Pulp and paper (11%), Basic metals (10%), Non-metallic mineral (9%), Metal ore mines (6%), Air transport (5%) and Electricity, gas and heat (4%). If Air transport and Electricity, gas and heat are omitted, the five remaining sectors account for 22% of Sweden's carbon emissions. In late 2008, the EU proposed three types of

  16. Impact of Variable Renewable Energy on European Cross-Border Electricity Transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; De Vries, L.J.; Fulli, G.

    2012-01-01

    The estimated growth of Europe’s electricity demand and the policy goals of mitigating climate change result in an expected increase in variable renewable energy. A high penetration of wind and solar energy will bring several new challenges to the European electricity transmission network. The

  17. Th european market of the electric power; Le marche europeen de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document presents the CRE (commission of the Electric power Control) progress report concerning the first july 2000 to the 30 june 2001. Three main subjects are discussed, illustrated by economic data and graphs: the electric power european market, the french market control and the CRE. A special interest is given to the deregulation of the market and its consequences. (A.L.B.)

  18. Th european market of the electric power; Le marche europeen de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document presents the CRE (commission of the Electric power Control) progress report concerning the first july 2000 to the 30 june 2001. Three main subjects are discussed, illustrated by economic data and graphs: the electric power european market, the french market control and the CRE. A special interest is given to the deregulation of the market and its consequences. (A.L.B.)

  19. Use of electric vehicles or hydrogen in the Danish transport sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Klaus; Pizarro Alonso, Amalia Rosa; Karlsson, Kenneth Bernard

    2015-01-01

    of the energy system in 2050. Electricity demand for H2 generation via electrolysis is more flexible than EV charging and the production can therefore, to a larger degree be used to out-balance variable electricity surplus from a high share of wind and solar energy in the power system. H2 production may...... compares a likely scenario with two alternative ways to achieve the goal - either with a high percentage of electric vehicles (EV) or with a high percentage of hydrogen (H2) use in the transport sector. The STREAM model - an energy scenario simulating tool - provides insight into different potential energy...... cost of the energy system than a lower level of electrolyser capital cost. Therefore, the major driver of a successful H2 scenario is a high efficient and flexible H2 production in 2050. In other words, from a socio-economic view point this paper International Conference on Energy, Environment...

  20. Electricity sector in Mexico. Current status. Contribution of renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino-Solorzano, Yoreley; Villicana-Ortiz, Eunice; Gutierrez-Trashorras, Antonio J.; Xiberta-Bernat, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The challenge facing the world electricity sector is the cost incurred in maintaining the system and seeing to the environmental effects it causes. In Mexico the grid is supplied by thermal plants fed by oil products. Its great potential of renewable energies clearly shown in studies by national and international scholars has led the government to become more committed to take advantage of these energies. The goal is to reduce dependence on fossil fuels to generate electricity and to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. In this article we analyse the current state of renewable energies, the conditions needed to foster them and the legislative changes already introduced to promote their greater part in the national electricity grid. (author)

  1. Electricity sector in Mexico. Current status. Contribution of renewable energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino-Solorzano, Yoreley [Departamento de Ing. Electrica-Electronica, Instituto Tecnologico de Veracruz, Calzada Miguel A. de Quevedo 2779, 91860 Veracruz (Mexico); Villicana-Ortiz, Eunice; Gutierrez-Trashorras, Antonio J.; Xiberta-Bernat, Jorge [Departamento de Energia, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros de Minas, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Independencia, 13, 2a Planta, 33004 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    The challenge facing the world electricity sector is the cost incurred in maintaining the system and seeing to the environmental effects it causes. In Mexico the grid is supplied by thermal plants fed by oil products. Its great potential of renewable energies clearly shown in studies by national and international scholars has led the government to become more committed to take advantage of these energies. The goal is to reduce dependence on fossil fuels to generate electricity and to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. In this article we analyse the current state of renewable energies, the conditions needed to foster them and the legislative changes already introduced to promote their greater part in the national electricity grid. (author)

  2. Electric sector deregulation and restructuring in Latin America: lessons to be learnt and possible ways forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnick, H.; Zolezzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    The pioneering restructuring and deregulation process of the electricity industry, which started in Latin America as early as 1982, is assessed. Chile and Argentina, among others, have been at the forefront of innovation in the creation of electricity markets. The experience gained and the principal difficulties encountered in these 18 years are reviewed, highlighting the weaknesses and successes of the deregulation processes. A review is made of the challenges and prospects for development of the electrical sector in the region, where energy integration across countries flourishes and world energy players have started acquiring regional utilities. Regulations and market structures are being evaluated, and countries are introducing changes, the danger being that the remedies being considered may be worse than the disease. (Author)

  3. Education and training of experts for the nuclear power sector at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, J.; Slugen, V.; Miglierini, M.; Necas, V.; Hascik, J.; Pavlovic, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava has been training experts for the nuclear sector for over 40 years now. Current status and trends in nuclear education within the faculty's educational system, encompassing BSc, MSc and PhD studies, are highlighted. Dedicated training courses in the safety aspects of operation of the nuclear power installations are also organized for NPP staff. Periodical training is also provided to supervising physicists at the Jaslovske Bohunice and Mochovce nuclear power plants. Major international projects aimed at nuclear knowledge management and preservation are highlighted and the ENEN - European Nuclear Education Network project is described. (P.A.)

  4. European power struggles. Can the EU's decarbonisation agenda break the state-company axis in the power sector?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sattich, T; Ydersbond, IM; Scholten, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Europe’s power system is still marked by a distinct national component, and despite some regions with strongly integrated power systems, electricity supply today still has a largely national basis. Policies to decarbonise the power sector may fundamentally alter this situation, because power

  5. Pan-European management of electricity portfolios: Risks and opportunities of contract bundling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gampert, Markus; Madlener, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Due to the liberalization of energy markets in the European Union, today's European utilities not only focus on electricity supply, but also offer exchange-traded 'structured products' or portfolio management for unbundling financial and physical risk positions. Many utilities are only able to provide these services in their domestic markets. In a globalized economy, the need for a centrally organized pan-European portfolio management has arisen, as it allows a simplified commodity sourcing in combination with an optimized risk management. In this paper, we examine the challenges to be overcome for establishing a European-wide bundling of electricity contracts. For this purpose, a case study based on the business perspective of RWE Supply and Trading in Central and Eastern Europe is carried out. In a first step, we analyze general requirements for a pan-European bundling of electricity contracts. Then, RWE's situation in Europe is examined, based on which we finally propose a concept to meet customer demands in Central and Eastern Europe. - Research highlights: → Analysis of electricity market liberalization in Central and Eastern Europe. → Identification of requirements and problems for pan-European bundling of contracts. → Case study based on RWE Supply and Trading perspective in Central and Eastern Europe. → Model development for pan-European unbundling of financial/physical risk positions.

  6. Service and obligations of public service in the electrical sector law; Servicio universal y obligaciones de servicio publico en la Ley del Sector Electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuetara Martinez, J.M. de la; Gonzalez Sanfiel, A.

    1998-12-01

    Our article starts from the need of reconsidering the traditional public service concept; to this goal, the new categories universal service and public service obligations are useful instruments. After defining its notes, we identify them as different kinds of a common gender and separate then from other next categories, as are general interest services and policy obligations. Finally, we applied the obtained findings to the Electricity Sector, identifying an universal service in the supply of electrical energy to all the claimants and various concrete public service obligations in its principal sub sectors (production, transportation, distribution, trading and supply). (Author)

  7. For the Benefit of California Electricity Ratepayers: Electricity Sector Options for the Use of Allowance Value Created under California’s Cap-and-Trade Program

    OpenAIRE

    Burtraw, Dallas; McLaughlin, David; Szambelan, Sarah Joh

    2012-01-01

    California will implement a cap-and-trade program to limit emissions of carbon dioxide covering industry and electricity sector emissions in 2013, expanding to cover transportation and natural gas in 2015. Although cap-and-trade would increase annual electricity costs for the average customer by $30 to nearly $100, the allowance value created under the program can offset all of these costs and even reduce electricity bills. California’s Air Resources Board has directed electricity regulators ...

  8. Nigeria's electric power sector reform: what should form the key objectives?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeme, J.; Ebohon, O.J.

    2005-01-01

    Nigeria's electric power sector requires substantial reform if the country's economic development and poverty alleviation program is to be realised. This understanding is behind the reform programme recently initiated by the Nigerian government with the goal of privatising the national electric power monopoly, NEPA. Currently, the country faces serious energy crisis due to declining electricity generation from domestic power plants which are basically dilapidated, obsolete, unreliable and in an appalling state of disrepair, reflecting the poor maintenance culture in the country and gross inefficiency of the public utility provider. Building on an analysis of the major shortcomings of the current electric power company, this paper presents the central issues that should form the key objectives of the proposed reform. This include corporatization of the electric power industry, increasing access and power delivery capacity, constraining the costs of the power industry and increasing efficiency and share of renewables in energy generation, as well as minimising environmental damage. We conclude with the observation that efforts at reform will not yield the desired result if the current end-user inefficiency is not constrained. As Nigeria implements its national utility privatisation programme, it is hoped that this review will benefit policy makers and emerging managers and providers of electricity service in the country

  9. A glance to the future of the electric sector: prospective CIDET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henao Velez, Lucio Mauricio; Aristizabal Rendon, Claudia Elena

    2004-01-01

    In the year 2002, the Corporation, Centre for Research and Technological Development for the Colombian Electricity Sector, CIDET, carried out an exercise in Foresight which has served to identify those technological developments which the companies in this sector will require in the coming years to position themselves adequately in the new market dynamics, and to define the role that the Centre. As an institution of science, technology and innovation, should take on in order to contribute to such companies achieving this goal. The main 19 technologies that the CIDET should promote to achieve this competitive dynamic in a globalized environment include management technologies, integration of the electricity network between countries and design, consultation and technical services. More than 150 experts in the sector from 29 Colombian institutions took part in the exercise, which was methodologically oriented using a combination of methods and several tools such as the consultation with experts through Delphi type rounds, Regnier's Abacus, Structural Analysis, the Hypothesis Game, and Scenario Axes. The contribution to the growth and development of the Corporation was, perhaps, one of the greatest promises for the future provided by the exercise

  10. Integrating competition and planning: A mixed institutional model of the Brazilian electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajay, S.V.

    2006-01-01

    During the past decade, the Brazilian electric power sector went through similar institutional changes taken place in both developing and developed countries. The main goals for such changes were to inject competition into the generation and supply links of the sector's production chain and to reduce public debt via privatization of state-owned utilities that dominated the pre-reform sector. This paper discusses why these changes took place in Brazil and explains why the results of the reform model implemented by the previous federal administration were unsatisfactory. The current federal administration has substantially altered the prior model, aiming to remedy insufficient private investment in new power stations that caused a serious power shortage in 2001. The paper addresses the main characteristics of the new model, which implements (a) public biddings of new power plants for all distribution utilities in the country, and (b) forward planning of optimal commissioning times and capacity of new plants. The paper ends with a discussion of the potential benefits and drawbacks of the new scheme and the role of the regulator in the early stage of the ongoing transition in the Brazilian electrical power industry. (author)

  11. Why European Entrepreneurs in the Water and Waste Management Sector Are Willing to Go beyond Environmental Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Rabadán

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability in the water sector in Europe is a major concern, and compliance with the current legislation alone does not seem to be enough to face major challenges like climate change or population growth and concentration. The greatest potential for improvement appears when companies decide to take a step forward and go beyond environmental legislation. This study focuses on the environmental responsibility (ER of European small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in the water and waste management sector and analyzes the drivers that lead these firms to the adoption of more sustainable practices. Our results show that up to 40% of European SMEs within this industry display environmental responsibility. Market pull has a low incidence in encouraging ER, while values and the strategic decisions of entrepreneurs seem decisive. Policy makers should prioritize subsidies over fiscal incentives because they show greater potential to promote the adoption of environmental responsibility among these firms.

  12. Estimating elasticities of demand for natural gas in the European household sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Asche, Frank; Tveteras, Ragnar

    2005-12-15

    This paper analyzes the residential natural gas demand in 12 European countries using a dynamic loglinear demand model, which allows for country-specific elasticity estimates in the short-run and long run. The explanatory variables include a heating degree days index, real prices of natural gas, light fuel oil, electricity, and real private income per capita. Our data set is a country panel with annual observations from 1978 to 2002. Short panel data sets like this represents a challenge for econometric estimation, as standard estimators often provide implausible estimates of elasticities. The demand model is estimated using both homogeneous and heterogeneous estimators, with a particular focus on the shrinkage estimator (an empirical Bayes estimator). The shrinkage short-run own-price and income elasticity tend to be very inelastic, but with greater long-run responsiveness. We provide support for employing a heterogeneous estimator such as the shrinkage estimator. But the empirical results also motivate a further scrutiny of its properties. We also consider the problem of reporting t-statistics of shrinkage estimators in the empirical Bayes (EB) framework and the problem of using the delta method to approximate the elasticities. The delta method biases upward the t-statistics of the shrinkage elasticities. An alternative approach, the bootstrap sampling methods obtained more reliable confidence intervals. We call into question - is the traditional way of constructing confidence intervals or t-statistics of the shrinkage estimator to naive. (Author)

  13. Cyber Threat and Vulnerability Analysis of the U.S. Electric Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, Colleen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Mission Support Center; Sterbentz, Dane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Mission Support Center; Wright, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Mission Support Center

    2016-12-20

    With utilities in the U.S. and around the world increasingly moving toward smart grid technology and other upgrades with inherent cyber vulnerabilities, correlative threats from malicious cyber attacks on the North American electric grid continue to grow in frequency and sophistication. The potential for malicious actors to access and adversely affect physical electricity assets of U.S. electricity generation, transmission, or distribution systems via cyber means is a primary concern for utilities contributing to the bulk electric system. This paper seeks to illustrate the current cyber-physical landscape of the U.S. electric sector in the context of its vulnerabilities to cyber attacks, the likelihood of cyber attacks, and the impacts cyber events and threat actors can achieve on the power grid. In addition, this paper highlights utility perspectives, perceived challenges, and requests for assistance in addressing cyber threats to the electric sector. There have been no reported targeted cyber attacks carried out against utilities in the U.S. that have resulted in permanent or long term damage to power system operations thus far, yet electric utilities throughout the U.S. have seen a steady rise in cyber and physical security related events that continue to raise concern. Asset owners and operators understand that the effects of a coordinated cyber and physical attack on a utility’s operations would threaten electric system reliability–and potentially result in large scale power outages. Utilities are routinely faced with new challenges for dealing with these cyber threats to the grid and consequently maintain a set of best practices to keep systems secure and up to date. Among the greatest challenges is a lack of knowledge or strategy to mitigate new risks that emerge as a result of an exponential rise in complexity of modern control systems. This paper compiles an open-source analysis of cyber threats and risks to the electric grid, utility best practices

  14. The impact of high temperature superconductivity on the electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsky, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The progress and prospects for the application of high temperature superconductivity to the Electric Power Sector has been the topic of an IEA Implementing Agreement, begun in 1990. The present Task Members are Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and the United States. As a result of the Implementing Agreement, work has been done by the Operating Agent with the full participation of all the member countries. This work has facilitated the exchange of information among experts in all countries and has documented relevant assessments. Further, this work has examined the status of high amperage conductor, fault-current limiters, superconducting magnetic energy storage, cables, rotating machines, refrigeration, and studies of the power system. The Task Members find more progress toward applications than many expected five years ago and the grounds for further international collaboration to hasten the use of superconductors in the power sector, early in the 21st century

  15. Supplier Selection Process Using ELECTRE I Decision Model and an Application in the Retail Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuzhan Yavuz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Supplier selection problem is one of the main topic for the today’s businesses. The supplier selection problem within the supply chain management activities is very important for the businesses, particularly operating in the retail sector. Thus, in this study, the supplier selection problem was discussed in order of importance between energy drinks suppliers of food business in the retail sector. Costs, delivery, quality and flexibility variables were used to select suppliers, and ELECTRE I Method, one of the multiple decision methods, was used to ranking suppliers according to this variables. Which suppliers are more important for the food company was determined by ranking suppliers according to computing net superior values and net inferior values. Results obtained werepresented in tables and certain steps

  16. The liberalization of the European gas sector and the strategic positioning of firms: A dynamic approach for corporate competence building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avadikyan, A.; Amesse, F.; Cohendet, P.; Heraud, J-A.

    2002-01-01

    A framework to explain how competitive changes occurring in one sector can affect both the dynamics of required competencies and the frontiers with adjacent sectors is proposed. When applied to the natural gas sector, the results provide a better understanding of how competencies in the sector evolve according to the new market structure and the strategic movements engaged in by the different players. The proposed framework combines the two approaches -- evolution and strategy -- to show that a firm's competencies define both membership in a specific sector and its distinctiveness from its competitors. To define the strategic positioning process the concept of core competencies is introduced, i.e. competencies developed by firms through their specific history which, when combined in a specific manner with new competencies could give them sustainable competitive advantage. Finally, the authors explain the concept of dynamic capabilities, which rely on a set of organizational and strategic processes needed to integrate, develop and create new competencies in order to initiate, or to adapt to market changes. The final conclusion is that the recent liberalization of the European gas and power sectors weakened institutional entry barriers, a phenomenon which compelled operators traditionally protected by regional or national monopolies to compete with other potential actors. With specific reference to the gas, power and oil industries it is stated that if they had relatively clear frontiers in the past, these frontiers have now become increasingly permeable. However, this weakening of institutional barriers has a beneficial consequence: it allows companies to deploy strategies to take advantage of new growth and rent appropriation opportunities. Examples of adaptation by European oil companies, power companies and natural gas firms are used to illustrate the principles embodied in the proposed framework. 18 refs., 1 fig

  17. Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, Henrik; Kempton, Willett

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale sustainable energy systems will be necessary for substantial reduction of CO 2 . However, large-scale implementation faces two major problems: (1) we must replace oil in the transportation sector, and (2) since today's inexpensive and abundant renewable energy resources have fluctuating output, to increase the fraction of electricity from them, we must learn to maintain a balance between demand and supply. Plug-in electric vehicles (EVs) could reduce or eliminate oil for the light vehicle fleet. Adding 'vehicle-to-grid' (V2G) technology to EVs can provide storage, matching the time of generation to time of load. Two national energy systems are modelled, one for Denmark, including combined heat and power (CHP) and the other a similarly sized country without CHP (the latter being more typical of other industrialized countries). The model (EnergyPLAN) integrates energy for electricity, transport and heat, includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment (wind resource and weather-driven need for heat). Four types of vehicle fleets are modelled, under levels of wind penetration varying from 0% to 100%. EVs were assumed to have high power (10 kW) connections, which provide important flexibility in time and duration of charging. We find that adding EVs and V2G to these national energy systems allows integration of much higher levels of wind electricity without excess electric production, and also greatly reduces national CO 2 emissions

  18. Climate change impact and resilience in the electricity sector: The example of Austria and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totschnig, G.; Hirner, R.; Müller, A.; Kranzl, L.; Hummel, M.; Nachtnebel, H.-P.; Stanzel, P.; Schicker, I.; Formayer, H.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the resilience of possible future electricity and heating systems in regard to climate change and fuel price shocks. The dynamical simulation model HiREPS of the Austrian and German electricity, heating and cooling sectors was used for this analysis. The electricity generation cost and changes in the required secured capacity were used as indicators for the resilience of the energy system. The results show, that the analysed changes in the natural gas price have larger impact on the electricity generation cost than weather variability between different years or climate change. Especially the fossil fuel based scenario showed high sensitivity to the gas price. Analysis of the required secured capacity shows, that in the last quarter of the 21st century the annual maximum residual loads are growing and are dominated by strong cooling demand peaks. Promoting passive cooling options, efficient building designs and options for a controlled down regulation of cooling devices seems to be advisable to avoid installing large thermal power plant backup capacities. The evaluated climate model simulations show only small changes in photovoltaic, wind and hydro power generation for 2051−2080 in Austria and Germany. - Highlights: • Natural gas price has larger impact on the electricity cost than climate variability. • End of 21st century the annual maximum load is set by summer cooling demand peaks. • Promoting passive cooling options is advisable to avoid large backup capacities. • Only small changes in photovoltaic, wind and hydro power generation up to 2080.

  19. New evidence on the impact of structural reforms on electricity sector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polemis, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of electricity industry over the last decades has shown substantial differences between OECD countries. This paper empirically investigates to what extent different structural forms of regulation, competition and privatisation explain these international differences. It distinguishes three modes of electricity performance: a) net generation per capita, b) installed capacity and c) labour productivity. The empirical model spans the period 1975–2011 and uses panel data econometric techniques. Our analysis reveals that there is a strongly significant interaction impact on the level of electricity performance between regulation and competition. The empirical findings do confirm that a robust independent regulatory scheme must be implemented in order to achieve a competitive electricity market. - Highlights: •We assess the impact of structural reforms on OECD electricity sector performance. •Regulation has stronger impact on performance when interaction terms are present. •Privatisation has unambiguous effect on the elements of performance. •The combined effect of reforms on performance is more aggressive in the long run.

  20. R&D+ i Strategic Management in a Public Company in the Brazilian Electric Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy De Quadros Carvalho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is - by reporting an experience of structuring processes and tools related to the strategic management of R&D in the electricity sector – to show the conditions and potential for improved efficiency, efficacy, and effectiveness in the R&D program set by ANEEL. The methodology is action research. This is because the proposed and tested model is the result of reflection and resolution of critical organizational issues, applied in a public company in the electric power sector. Act No. 9,991 of July 24, 2000 provides for the obligation on the part of concessionaires, permittees, and licensees in the electric power sector to invest part of their operating revenue in research and development (R&D. For the effective implementation of these legal obligations, companies prepare their annual R&D programs, comprising projects that aim at developing innovative solutions for their processes and increasing business efficiency. However, the urgency to comply with the contractual provisions, coupled with the small amount of experience most companies have when it comes to carrying out R&D activities and projects, has led to the gradual formation of a mode of R&D implementation and management that does not favor its optimization and alignment with the goals the utility companies and the sector’s own technological development . The approach proposed in this paper consists of structuring the processes and tools related to the management of R&D driven by innovation (R&D+i and aligned with with the business strategy. These processes include the adoption of procedures and tools to manage structured, integrated decision-making flows involved in the innovation process, aiming at full alignment with business goals and objectives.

  1. European experiences as guidelines for public, private and civil sector role redefinition in spatial policy formulation process in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The period of post-socialist transition in Serbia brings more complex actors environment compared to socialistic period, while institutional arrangements are not enough developed to actively involve different groups of actors in spatial policy formulation process. In order to gather certain knowledge as guidelines for redefining institutional practices in Serbia, institutional framework of Serbia was compared in this paper with institutional framework of three developed European countries, especially in relation to the roles of public, private and civil sector in spatial policy formulation process. The European countries selected for the analysis are United Kingdom, Netherlands and Germany because of diverse national administrative traditions, so different institutional arrangements could be researched. By comparing institutional framework in Serbia with the ones in developed European countries following questions are researched: which actors are missing in Serbia, what are the ways institutional arrangements for different groups inclusion into spatial policy formulation process are formed, what are the differences between the roles of certain groups of actors in decision-making process. Current roles of actors in spatial policy formulation process in Serbia are reviewed and possible directions for public, private and civil sector role redefinition in Serbia are discussed in accordance with experiences of developed European countries.

  2. Version 2.0 of the European Gas Model. Changes and their impact on the German gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmert, David; Petrov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015 ACER, the European Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators, presented an updated version of its target model for the inner-European natural gas market, also referred to as version 2.0 of the Gas Target Model. During 2014 the existing model, originally developed by the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) and launched in 2011, had been analysed, revised and updated in preparation of the new version. While it has few surprises to offer, the new Gas Target Model contains specifies and goes into greater detail on many elements of the original model. Some of the new content is highly relevant to the German gas sector, not least the deliberations on the current key issues, which are security of supply and the ability of the gas markets to function.

  3. Influence of financial crisis in new investments international Brazilian electric sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, Jorge Alcala; Cantuaria, Andre Luis

    2010-09-15

    Electricity sector in addition to being a public utility, requires a substantial investment, explore natural resources and the basis of all production chains and consumption of our society. In conclusion, the econometric model used to study the investment to 2010 by Eletrobras meets a correlation acceptable. So a well dependence exists between power and investment in the projects selected. The lack of sophistication and low level of development in credit derivatives financial systems in Brazil, both as a healthy situation of the accounts and balance sheets, due to bitter experience in past crises are allowing a better resistance now.

  4. Investments in the Brazilian electric sector; Os investimentos no setor eletrico brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Arthur Octavio Pinto Barreto de

    2008-05-15

    This work covers the investments in the Brazilian electric sector. Initially it describes the investments since 1879 in order to give a better understanding of the historical return obtained by investors, associated risks, investors' profile and investment's funding. Then some financial considerations related to new investments analysis are presented, emphasizing: the discounted cash flow theory, the equity return, the business risks and the characteristics of the main project accounts. Additionally, a hydroelectric case study is presented, in which the effect at the energy price of uncertainties in cost's projections, regional tax benefits, tax alternatives, and others are stressed. (author)

  5. Investments in the Brazilian electric sector; Os investimentos no setor eletrico brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Arthur Octavio Pinto Barreto de

    2008-05-15

    This work covers the investments in the Brazilian electric sector. Initially it describes the investments since 1879 in order to give a better understanding of the historical return obtained by investors, associated risks, investors' profile and investment's funding. Then some financial considerations related to new investments analysis are presented, emphasizing: the discounted cash flow theory, the equity return, the business risks and the characteristics of the main project accounts. Additionally, a hydroelectric case study is presented, in which the effect at the energy price of uncertainties in cost's projections, regional tax benefits, tax alternatives, and others are stressed. (author)

  6. Participation in the ABWR Man-Machine interface design. Applicability to the Spanish Electrical Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; Manrique Martin, A.; Nunez, J.

    1997-01-01

    Project coordinated by DTN within the advanced reactor programme. Participation in the design activities for the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) man-machine interface was divided into two phases: Phase I: Preparation of drawings for designing, developing and assessing the advanced control room Phase II: Application of these drawings in design activities Participation in this programme has led to the following possible future applications to the electrical sector: 1. Design and implementation of man-machine interfaces 2. Human factor criteria 3. Assessment of man-machine interfaces 4. Functional specification, computerised operating procedures 5. Computerised alarm prototypes. (Author)

  7. CROSS COMPLIANCE AND COMPETITIVENESS OF THE EUROPEAN BEEF AND PIG SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    de Roest, Kees; Jongeneel, Roelof A.; Dillen, Koen; Winsten, Jonathan R.

    2008-01-01

    Beef and pig production are important sectors affected by the cross-compliance policy. Full compliance with SMRs and GAECs generates costs and benefits which may have an impact on the competitiveness of these sectors on the world market. Compliance with the Nitrate Directive, animal identification and registration requirements and animal welfare standards can give rise to non-negligible cost of production increases at individual farm level and at sector level. Additional costs can be relevant...

  8. Competition policies and environmental quality: Empirical analysis of the electricity sector in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asane-Otoo, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, electricity markets across OECD countries have been subjected to profound structural changes with far-reaching implications on the economy and the environment. This paper investigates the effect of restructuring – changes in entry regulations, the degree of vertical integration and ownership structure – on GHG emissions. The findings show that competition policies – particularly reducing the degree of vertical integration and increasing privatization – correlate negatively with emission intensity. However, the environmental effect of reducing market entry barriers is generally insignificant. Integration of competition and stringent environmental policies are required to reduce GHG emissions and improve environmental quality. - Highlights: •Empirical study on competition policies and GHG emissions from the electricity sector. •Product market regulation scores for OECD countries are used to measure the extent of competition. •Evidence of a positive relationship between competition policies and environmental quality. •Integration of competition and stringent environmental policies is recommended.

  9. Freer markets and the abatement of carbon emissions. The electricity-generating sector in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, Madhu; Zilberman, David

    1999-01-01

    This paper develops a framework to explore the implications of trade and domestic policy distortions for the magnitude of carbon emissions and for the welfare costs of abating these emissions. An application to the electricity-generating sector in India shows that economic policy reforms can also be effective environmental policy instruments and reduce carbon emissions even in the absence of an emissions tax. This reduction in emissions is accompanied by an increase in domestic welfare, an increase in electricity output, and conservation of coal. Coordinating trade and domestic policy reform with an emissions tax policy reduces emissions further, while leading to gains in welfare that are greater than those under an emissions tax policy alone

  10. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Jeffrey [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paranhos, Elizabeth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Boyd, William [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Carlson, Ken [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Domestic natural gas production was largely stagnant from the mid-1970s until about 2005. However, beginning in the late 1990s, advances linking horizontal drilling techniques with hydraulic fracturing allowed drilling to proceed in shale and other formations at much lower cost. The result was a slow, steady increase in unconventional gas production. The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset from the wider dialogue on natural gas; regarding the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity; existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and changes in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns; natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices; and demand for natural gas in the electric sector.

  11. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

  12. CAPM (Capital Asset Pricing Model) and regulation in Brazilian electric distribution sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Rinaldo Caldeira; Parente, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the use of Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) Beta in the Brazilian electric distribution sector tariffs review. The betas applied by the Regulatory Agency are defined using data from the American, English and Brazilian markets. These betas will then be compared to the betas obtained in the domestic market. The betas were directly obtained from an economic-financial databank largely employed by the market. The sample is composed of companies' shares, priced at Sao Paulo Stock Market. Their main activity is the distribution of electric energy between July 2002 and July 2007. The results of mean betas obtained for the distribution segment, with values close to the ones applied by the regulatory agency for the cycle of tariff reviews between 2007-2010. (author)

  13. Comparing the value of bioenergy in the heating and transport sectors of an electricity-intensive energy system in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assefa Hagos, Dejene; Gebremedhin, Alemayehu; Folsland Bolkesjø, Torjus

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the most valuable sector for the use of bioenergy in a flexible energy system in order to meet the energy policy objectives of Inland Norway. A reference system was used to construct alternative systems in the heating and transport sectors. The alternative system in the heating sector is based on heat pumps and bio-heat boilers while the alternative systems in the transport sector are based on three different pathways: bio-dimethyl ether, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and battery electric vehicles. The alternative systems were compared with the reference system after a business-economic optimisation had been made using an energy system analysis tool. The results show that the excess electricity availability due to increased energy efficiency measures hampers the competitiveness and penetration of bio-heating over heat pumps in the heating sector. Indeed, the synergy effect of using bio-dimethyl ether in the transport sector for an increased share of renewable energy sources is much higher than that of the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and battery electric vehicle pathways. The study also revealed that increasing renewable energy production would increase the renewable energy share more than what would be achieved by an increase in energy efficiency. -- Highlights: •Bio-heating is less competitive over heat pump for low quality heat production. •Renewable energy production meets policy objectives better than system efficiency. •Bioenergy is more valuable in the transport sector than the heating sector

  14. The IFIEC method for the allocation of CO2 allowances in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme. A review applied to the electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart Wesselink; Sebastian Klaus Alyssa; Gilbert Kornelis Blok

    2008-03-01

    Recently the European Commission has published a proposal to improve the function of the EU-ETS by amending the Directive which establishes the EU-ETS. The main changes proposed are the establishment of one EU-wide cap and the use of auctioning for a much greater share of allowances than is currently the case, replacing most of the allocation free of charge. Auctioning of allowances will eliminate the so-called windfall profits that occur under the current allocation free of charge that is based on historic production and emission levels; a grandfathering approach. IFIEC EUROPE, the international federation of industrial energy consumers, asked Ecofys to review the method that IFIEC has developed in recent years to allocate CO2 allowances in the EU emissions trading scheme (EU-ETS). According to IFIEC, their allocation method guarantees the same environmental outcome as other methods, without causing windfall profits and with lower risks of competitiveness loss for so-called exposed industrial users of electricity. It was decided to focus this study on the European electricity sector. This was done for several reasons: CO2 emissions from electricity generation cover a large part of the overall emission under EU-ETS, the electricity sector has a single well defined output (electricity) that can be used to illustrate the potential impact of the IFIEC benchmark based allocation approach, and electricity is a substantial cost factor for IFIEC members. This evaluation covers many aspects of IFIEC's method and compares these with two other allocation methods: auctioning and historic grandfathering. Within the IFIEC method two example approaches are evaluated: a single benchmark for electricity production and fuel-specific benchmarks for coal and gas fired electricity production. In the evaluation, we cover the following aspects: What is the IFIEC method; how does it differ from other allocation methods in character (chapter 2); What is the impact of different allocation

  15. STIMULATING THE ATTRACTION OF INVESTMENTS IN THE PROCESSING SECTOR – A NECESSITY IN THE CONTEXT OF EUROPEAN MILK MARKET LIBERALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana GRODEA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A main challenge for the players on the world dairy market is to efficiently respond to the changes of the local markets characteristics, in the context of an increasingly fierce competition for the raw milk obtained on the farms. From the analysis, it results that the performance of the Romanian milk sector is seriously affected by the excessive fragmentation of supply, which reveals the subsistence and semi-subsistence phenomenon that persists in the milk sector, as the main factor that constrains competitiveness growth. In reference to the volume of investments in the dairy processing sector, it results that this had a slow growth rate in the investigated period, the share in total investments in the food sector ranging from 7.8% (2000 to 16.9% (2011. The investments in agriculture in total investments accounted for 4.9% in the year 2012. In order to adapt to the competition on the European Single Market, the Romanian sector has to receive support through investments, in the conditions in which there is a favourable global conjuncture for the consumption of dairy products, in which their prices are expected to raise on the basis of the increasing demand of the development regions.

  16. The low cost of quality improvements in the electricity distribution sector of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corton, Maria Luisa; Zimmermann, Aneliese; Phillips, Michelle Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the impact of introducing output-based incentives in the price-cap regulatory regime of the Brazilian electricity distribution sector. We focus on the trade-off between operating costs and quality improvement, hypothesizing a positive relationship. Operating costs include maintenance and repair expenses. The regulator sets limits for service continuity and non-technical energy losses in each regulatory period. Service continuity refers to the average length of interruptions in electricity distribution. Non-technical losses refer to losses due to factors specific to the distribution segment. Quality incentives include peer-pressure and penalties/rewards for compliance with minimum quality standards. We model operating costs using a GMM framework to acknowledge endogeneity of variables. The model is dynamic given the inclusion of regulatory lags to recognize past cost behavior. Findings reveal a small trade-off between costs and quality. We conclude that quality improvements are not costly relative to the potential savings from complying with quality standards. We also find that the impact on operating costs is larger when energy losses increase compared to the cost effect due to increases in duration of outages. These findings suggest areas of attention in managerial decision making, and serve as valuable information to the regulator in tailoring quality incentives for this sector. - Highlights: • The article focuses on the impact of quality improvements on operating costs. • We find a very small tradeoff between quality improvements and operating costs. • We find the impact of a large share of electricity losses on costs larger compared to the impact of longer outages. • The results serve the regulator to adjust incentives for quality improvement. • The results serve the regulator in tailoring regulatory values for electricity losses and outages.

  17. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report's purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science ampersand Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections

  18. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-08-25

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report's purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections.

  19. Published assessments bearing on the future use of ceramic superconductors by the electric power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giese, R.F.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1992-08-25

    Much has been written about ceramic superconductors since their discovery in 1986. Most of this writing reports and describes scientific research. However, some authors have sought to put this research in context: to assess where the field stands, what might be technically feasible, what might be economically feasible, and what potential impacts ceramic superconductors will bring to the electric power sector. This report`s purpose is to make the results of already published assessments readily available. To that end, this report lists and provides abstracts for various technical and economic assessments related to applications of High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) to the electric power sector. Those studies deemed most important are identified and summarized. These assessments were identified by two means. First, members of the Executive Committee identified some reports as worthy of consideration and forwarded them to Argonne National Laboratory. Twelve assessments were selected. Each of these is listed and summarized in the following section. Second, a bibliographic search was performed on five databases: INSPEC, NTIS, COMPENDEX, Energy Science & Technology, and Electric Power Database. The search consisted of first selecting all papers related to High Temperature Superconductors. Then papers related to SMES, cables, generators, motors, fault current limiters, or electric utilities were selected. When suitable variants of the above terms were included, this resulted in a selection of 493 citations. These citations were subjected to review by the authors. A number of citations were determined to be inappropriate (e.g. a number referred to digital transmission lines for electronics and communications applications). The reduced list consisted of 200 entries. Each of these citations, with an abstract, is presented in the following sections.

  20. Planning Energy Sector Development in Croatian Agricultural Sector Following Guidelines of the European Energy Policy 20-20-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirac, M.; Krajacic, G.; Duic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Energy system planning is among the most important tasks of any society. A stable energy system is a foundation for economic growth, growing living standard and general prosperity of the society. Agriculture represents an important factor in overall Croatian economy; therefore, planning of the agriculture's energy system is a major task. To foresee the trend of consumption and to ensure reasonable economic energy supply in accordance with this trend is a process which should be continuously optimised so that the planned scenario could reflect actual situation. The agriculture, thanks to natural resources, land features and climate advantages represents a major economic sector. This activity has significant impact on food industry, trade, tourism, transport, chemical industry, etc. The relevance of agriculture is also visible in the present number of employees, future potential for employment and foreign trade balance. According to numerous parameters, agricultural activities in Croatia lag behind the EU countries. Great potential can be achieved by implementation of measures for energy intensity reduction and productivity increase.(author).