WorldWideScience

Sample records for europe co-operation development

  1. Danish environmental support fund for Eastern Europe. Co-operation development 1991-1996 and programme priority areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The publication gives an account of environmental co-operation between Denmark and 12 countries in Eastern Europe. The basis of co-operation is a country programme, describing present and future priority areas in the recipient countries, as an expression of common understanding between the Danish Environmental Protection Agency and the Ministry of Environment in the recipient countries. The publication also describe the environmental efforts made in 1991-1996 under the Danish Environmental Support Fund for Eastern Europe (DESF) administered by the DEPA. (au)

  2. SSI's International Development Co-operation (SIUS). Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szendroe, G.; Grapengiesser, S.; Johansson, Gunnar

    1999-04-01

    SSI's International Development Co-operation (SIUS), the Swedish program for radiation protection work in Central and Eastern Europe, has since its start in 1992 been granted SEK 109 million by the Swedish government. The projects are accessed, planned and performed in close co-operation with partner organisations in Eastern Europe. This report presents the financial status and a summary of the projects, their status and distribution over the countries and project areas. The presentation is updated as of December 1998

  3. Co-operation with Eastern Europe countries taking ENAC as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.

    1994-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, the European Community launched an ambitious programme of nuclear safety assistance. The purpose of this programme is to improve the safety of the Nuclear Power stations in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union plants. It was felt in the Western European nuclear industry that the emphasis should be on finding practical solutions to improve the most urgent problems. To achieve this objective, the nuclear industry in Western Europe founded a consortium called ENAC (European Nuclear Assistance Consortium) comprising companies form seven European countries ( Great Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Italy, Netherlands). The co-operation between theses companies and the Russian designers would ensure that the solutions developed meet the approval of all interested parties. This presentation outlines the overall objectives of ENAC. 2 tabs., 1 fig

  4. Romanian-Danish Environmental Co-operation. Co-operation development 1993-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy has, since 1991, through the Danish Environmental Support Fund, contributed towards protecting the environment and nature in Central and Eastern European countries and has helped to limit regional as well as global pollution. The Romanian Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environmental Protection and the Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy initiated the co-operation in 1993 and an official Agreement was signed in 1994. This publication describes the co-operation between the two countries in the field of the environment in the hope that this will give both the general public of Romania and the international community a better understanding of the work being accomplished. It also gives an overview of the 19 projects developed within this framework, which has a total Danish grant of DKK 77.9 million. (au)

  5. Technical co-operation for nuclear safety in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.; Giuliani, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Agency's programme on technical co-operation for nuclear safety is, largely, responsive in character and the Agency's response is tailored to needs identified by developing countries. However, the Agency's assistance alone is not sufficient: technical co-operation can only be successful and is most effective when there is also a strong input from the counterpart body participating in a particular project. The commitment of national governments is fundamental to success. Technical co-operation is most fruitful if the Agency's assistance capabilities and the recipient country's co-operation capabilities match. Co-operation activities mostly take the form of single projects hosted by individual institutions within a single country; regional and inter-regional projects are also important

  6. SSI`s International Development Co-operation (SIUS). Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szendroe, G.; Grapengiesser, S.; Johansson, Gunnar

    1999-04-01

    SSI`s International Development Co-operation (SIUS), the Swedish program for radiation protection work in Central and Eastern Europe, has since its start in 1992 been granted SEK 109 million by the Swedish government. The projects are accessed, planned and performed in close co-operation with partner organisations in Eastern Europe. This report presents the financial status and a summary of the projects, their status and distribution over the countries and project areas. The presentation is updated as of December 1998

  7. Technical Co-operation between developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In the plan of activities of the project Int/0/060 Technical Cooperation Between Developing Countries a Workshop on Public Awareness Promotional Literature was included with the purpose of preparing public and professional awareness literature and to develop a strategy which would enable Tissue Banks to present their mission to their public,professional health workers and clinical users.To identify the information to be provided to potential donors about the value of the donation.To prepare instructions to be given to potential users about the various types of grafts available.To develop a strategy wi ch would enable Tissue Banks to present themselves to their public and tissue users

  8. Co-Operative Learning and Development Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, V.; McConnell, D.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the theory, nature, and benefits of cooperative learning. Considers the Cooperative Learning and Development Network (CLDN) trial in the JITOL (Just in Time Open Learning) project and examines the relationship between theories about cooperative learning and the reality of a group of professionals participating in a virtual cooperative…

  9. Co-operation in nuclear development: The case of Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroen, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hungary became a Member of the IAEA in 1957 and has participated in the programme of technical assistance and co-operation from its start in 1958. By the end of 1976, Hungary ranked as the fifteenth largest recipient of IAEA technical assistance. Since then, there has been a significant increase in overall technical co-operation activities, and by the end of 1988 a total of over US $9.5 million of assistance had been received by Hungary, making it the fifth largest recipient of all Member States. In view of this situation, a special evaluation review was carried out in 1989 of the IAEA's technical co-operation programme in Hungary over the period 1976-1989. This evaluation review has shown that, simultaneously with the increase in the IAEA's support, there has been a rapid development in Hungary of the national nuclear infrastructure and this has permitted the country to absorb and utilize the assistance provided to the maximum extent. 7 figs

  10. Center for Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe: a platform for co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomik, L.; Kichev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a summary of the current status and the activities of the Centre of Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe (CENS). The CENS is a non-profit and independent association supported by the Swiss and Slovak Governments. The main mission of the CENS is to provide an independent platform for technical co-operation between the regulatory authorities of the Western and Eastern countries. The key partners of the CENS are the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the US Department of Energy (US DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD), the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Germany and the Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), France. The CENS programs for 2003-2004 are presented. It can be considered as a complement to the IAEA activities in the area of short-term and event urgent planning. CENS projects as an example are presented. CENS proposals for co-operation with the Bulgarian institutions are made in connection with the topics of the forum round table discussions

  11. Sweden's Co-operation with Eastern Europe in Radiation Safety 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, Lars van; Andersson, Sarmite; Bejarano, Gabriela; Chirman, Inessa; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Karlberg, Olof; Klasen, Haakan; Olsson, Kjell; Sandberg, Viviana; Stenberg, Tor; Turner, Roland; Wickman, Barbro

    2012-11-01

    In 2011, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority implemented co-operation projects in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Lithuania and Moldova, based on instructions from the Swedish Government and agreements with the European Union and the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency, SIDA. The projects aim at achieving a net contribution to radiation safety (including nuclear safety, nuclear security, waste management, nonproliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness) for the benefit of the host countries and the international community as well as Sweden. This report gives an overview of all the projects implemented in 2011. The project managers from SSM are the cornerstones of our successful work, but all the efforts and dedication by staff members of the facilities and authorities in the mentioned countries are indispensable for the long-term positive outcomes. This report is meant to serve as a detailed account regarding SSM's efforts as part of the Swedish international activities, on which Sweden will report to the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul. The parties to the G-8 Global Partnership have in June 2011 extended the Global Partnership for ten more years, till 2022. Other international frameworks, such as the UNSC Resolution 1540, remain a vibrant instrument by which UN Member States can exchange information on security concerns and request assistance from each other. The projects that SSM implements in Moldova and Georgia have a reference to the aims and purposes of the UNSC Resolution 1540. Much work has been done in the fields of nuclear security and safety, but there are still lots of issues that need to be taken care of. As such, SSM will continue to do its part for nuclear safety and security at the international level, along the lines and priorities set by our Government.

  12. Sweden's Co-operation with Eastern Europe in Radiation Safety 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassen, Lars van; Andersson, Sarmite; Bejarano, Gabriela; Chirman, Inessa; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Karlberg, Olof; Klasen, Haakan; Olsson, Kjell; Sandberg, Viviana; Stenberg, Tor; Turner, Roland; Wickman, Barbro

    2012-03-01

    In 2011, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority implemented co-operation projects in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Lithuania and Moldova, based on instructions from the Swedish Government and agreements with the European Union and the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency, SIDA. The projects aim at achieving a net contribution to radiation safety (including nuclear safety, nuclear security, waste management, nonproliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness) for the benefit of the host countries and the international community as well as Sweden. This report gives an overview of all the projects implemented in 2011. The project managers from SSM are the cornerstones of our successful work, but all the efforts and dedication by staff members of the facilities and authorities in the mentioned countries are indispensable for the long-term positive outcomes. This report is meant to serve as a detailed account regarding SSM's efforts as part of the Swedish international activities, on which Sweden will report to the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul. The parties to the G-8 Global Partnership have in June 2011 extended the Global Partnership for ten more years, till 2022. Other international frameworks, such as the UNSC Resolution 1540, remain a vibrant instrument by which UN Member States can exchange information on security concerns and request assistance from each other. The projects that SSM implements in Moldova and Georgia have a reference to the aims and purposes of the UNSC Resolution 1540. Much work has been done in the fields of nuclear security and safety, but there are still lots of issues that need to be taken care of. As such, SSM will continue to do its part for nuclear safety and security at the international level, along the lines and priorities set by our Government

  13. Organization for security and co-operation in Europe mission to Georgia / Joe McDonagh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    McDonagh, Joe

    2003-01-01

    22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO" esitatud ettekanne OSCE missiooni tegevusest Gruusias

  14. Competition and Co-operation between Stock Exchanges in Europe - Legal Aspects and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig; Clausen, Nis Jul

    2002-01-01

    The article analysis why and how European Stock Exchanges enters into alliances. On the background of alliances as Norex, Euronext and the planned iX the different areas and types of co-operation is discussed.......The article analysis why and how European Stock Exchanges enters into alliances. On the background of alliances as Norex, Euronext and the planned iX the different areas and types of co-operation is discussed....

  15. Integrated co-operative governance in the context of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Nealer

    2011-07-01

    Keywords:Sustainable development, governance, co-operative governance, integrated,organising, and communication. Disciplines:Public Administration, Public Management, Social Welfare, Environmental Management, Municipal public service delivery, Social Development, Organisational Behaviour, Co-operative Governance, Communication, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Organisational Development

  16. Experience and co-operation in the development of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Gladieux, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents various aspects of the international co-operation set up at the Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN) for developing the nuclear engineering education in a European framework, with the Tempus programmes, or worldwide, through the IAEA technical co-operation programme. As such co-operation mainly relies on the courses established in the INSTN for national purposes, a short presentation of them is made first. (author)

  17. IAEA technical co-operation with least developed Member States. Special evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The main purposes of this evaluation were to: Review the overall situation with regard to IAEA technical co-operation with least developed Member States, including specific conditions in nuclear-related activities prevailing in these countries, approaches and practices used by the IAEA in providing assistance to LDCs, and the main results of the co-operation in question. Identify any adjustments to technical co-operation with LDC Member States that may strengthen this activity

  18. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this part the are reviewed: Co-operation with IAEA; Participation of the Slovakia on the 41 st session of the General Conference; The comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization; Co-operation with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development; co-operation with the European Commission; Fulfillment of obligations resulting from the international contracting documents

  19. "Recruitment to the organsization for security and co-operation in Europe`s mission to Bosnia- Herzegovina" : applying organizational theory to effective peacebuilding

    OpenAIRE

    Nørgaard, Benedicte

    2005-01-01

    Research on international peacebuilding has paid very little attention to the possible influence of internal organizational structures within the organizations carrying out the work. This thesis seeks to add to this knowledge, by providing insights into the recruitment and selection process of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH). The purpose of this study is to build knowledge about how the OSCE recruit, and use that knowledge to better ...

  20. Towards co-operative governance in the development and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This means that water policy is cross-sectoral, directly and indirectly affecting and ... policies such as agriculture, urban development, rural development, health, housing, ... Effective implementation of any cross-sectoral policy requires that ...

  1. Efforts to promote scientific co-operation in South-East Europe

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    On 13 and 14 May this year CERN hosted a meeting of a task force entrusted with the task of making recommendations for the reconstruction of scientific collaboration in the countries of South-East Europe (1). This meeting follows a conference attended by delegates from the countries of South-East Europe and international experts which was held in Venice between 24 and 27 March this year. The conference was organised under the aegis of UNESCO's Regional Office for Science and Technology for Europe (ROSTE), attended by representatives of the European Science Foundation (ESF), the European Union and the Academia Europaea as well as by observers from CERN. The aim of the conference was to seek resources and assess the prospects for integration of R&D facilities in the countries of South-East Europe into the networks of European countries. Les membres du groupe de Reconstruction d'une coopération scientifique dans l'Europe du sud-est, réunis au CERN, le 14 mai dernier, dé...

  2. OECD's Development Co-Operation Report highlights critical role of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-02-14

    Feb 14, 2018 ... A global data divide persists today in developing countries. ... From a data perspective, this involves working together with ... This will entail emphasizing soft skills including leadership, change management, strategic thinking, ...

  3. Innovative nuclear reactor development. Opportunities for international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    A number of countries wish to expand their use of nuclear energy or keep open the option of doing so in the future. Any new nuclear generating capacity will be built in the context of increasingly privatized and de-regulated energy markets coupled with heightened public concern over nuclear power. New nuclear power plants must maintain or exceed current levels of safety and must be economically competitive with alternative ways of generating electricity. They must address other challenges as well, among them waste disposal and nonproliferation concerns. This report reviews how some of the innovative nuclear-fission technologies being developed today attempt to address the challenges facing nuclear energy. It suggests some areas for collaborative research and development that could reduce the time and cost required to develop new technologies. The report is a product of the 'Three-Agency Study', a joint project among the International Energy Agency (IEA), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (authors)

  4. International co-operation towards development through fellowship training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Annunziata, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    The IAEA provides support to projects which can have an important impact on the technological and/or economic development of the recipient Member State. Projects selected by each Member State are those to which their Government is committed and to which the Government places a high priority in its development programme. Recipient Governments request support of the IAEA, therefore, only for projects to which they are already committed and to which assistance from the IAEA would provide the input needed to launch and sometimes strengthen the programme to become self-sustaining whenever the assistance is discontinued. More than 400 projects with over 80 Member States are approved for IAEA support each year. These projects contain three components, namely experts, equipment, and fellowships. The technical assistance furnished to recipient countries as fellowships in 1987 amounted to US $9.3 million. Of this amount, the gift-in-kind fellowships provided by 16 donor countries was valued at US $2.5 million

  5. International co-operation in developing the GT-MHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Bar, M.P.; Simon, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    In the Fall of 1995, driven by budget constraints and anti-nuclear sentiments, the US government decided to discontinue financial support of the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). At that time, significant work was underway with participation of several vendors with specialized expertise in various aspects of the GT-MHR. Fortunately the US government provided for documenting the design and development status through an orderly close-out program. Concurrent elimination of government restrictions opened the door for broader international cooperation. Discussion between General Atomics and the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (MINATOM), in the summer of 1994, led to an agreement on a jointly funded design and development program for the GT-MHR. The program is initially focused on the burning of weapons plutonium that becomes available from dismantled nuclear weapons. The long term goal is to utilize the same design for commercial applications - using uranium fuel. This program took advantage of existing technologies and facilities in the US and Russia, but right from the beginning left the door open for broader international cooperation. Accordingly, in January 1996, FRAMATOME has joined the ongoing effort. Discussions are underway with other international entities to join this program. The program is proceeding well. Several Russian laboratories/design organizations are participating with GA and FRAMATOME. Significant improvements in the power conversion system design are a clear example of the benefit of the cooperative effort. Further work needs to be done to confirm fuel and components prior to full deployment, etc., providing ample opportunities for international cooperation in many areas

  6. Economic Co-operation Across the Finnish-Russian Border - Factors of Sluggish Development and Success of Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Rautio, V.; Tykkylaeinen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The post-Cold War era in Europe in the 1990s has caused people to recognize the complexity of economic development and economic co-operation. The opening of borders has not always meant an increase cross-border economic activities in general. On the contrary, the adverse socio-economic development of many border areas has been unanticipated. The Finnish-Russian border is one example of this dissonance. This paper analyses the operation of Finnish companies in economic activities in Russ...

  7. A proposed new mechanism for research and development co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Scientists in developing countries sometimes lack knowledge of recent developments, co-operation with advanced countries, and government appreciation of the importance and quality of their work. The present IAEA mechanisms like CRPs and TC projects are very helpful but do not fully meet R and D co-operation needs of these scientists. A new complementary mechanism of co-operation among the Member States is proposed that would utilize IAEA services through a suitable agreement. The IAEA could help to evaluate joint R and D proposals, to provide an example legal agreement, to monitor progress, to disseminate the results, and, in some cases, to administer joint funds. This new mechanism would be similar to ITER, but on a smaller scale, and applicable to all fields of nuclear R and D. (author)

  8. The IAEA technical Co-operation a partner in development in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Saiedi, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Public Information

    1995-10-01

    Each country was to find means of achieving sustainable development, and for this, technology within a framework of regional and international co-operation are of utmost importance. The IAEA plays a major role in promoting nuclear technologies for development. Highlights of the IAEA`s technical cooperation programme are given in this paper.

  9. The IAEA technical Co-operation a partner in development in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Saiedi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Each country was to find means of achieving sustainable development, and for this, technology within a framework of regional and international co-operation are of utmost importance. The IAEA plays a major role in promoting nuclear technologies for development. Highlights of the IAEA's technical cooperation programme are given in this paper

  10. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: What Happened Next

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Peter; Urban, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an update on what has happened over recent months with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's proposal for an International Early Learning Study, and review responses to the proposed International Early Learning Study, including the concerns that have been raised about this new venture in…

  11. Microcredit management in Ghana : development of co-operative credit unions among the Dagaaba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheneti, Yeshanew

    2007-01-01

    "This thesis focuses on the historical development, the organizational management and the role of credit unions among the Dagaaba in the Upper West Region of Ghana. Co-operative credit unions are well-established financial institutions, with a capacity to mobilize local savings and provide

  12. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Within the Union Nations (UN) framework, the Slovak Republic participated in following activities on environment protection co-operation: UN European Economic Commission, UN Industrial Development Organization, UN Development Programme, UN Human Habitat Organization, UN Environment Programme, and UN Commission on Sustainable Development. Relevant activities of the Slovak Republic in these co-operations as well as in European Union and OECD activities are reviewed. International conventions and other forms of multilateral co-operation, bilateral co-operation, and international programmes and projects in which the Slovak Republic took participate are presented

  13. Co-operation and Competition in Regional Economic Development Associated with Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Competition and co-operation appear in many different social venues. The author gives a variety of examples of co-operative behaviour in economics, politics, research, and everyday life activities such as sports. These four diverse examples illustrate the variety of forms that co-operation may take such as tacit co-operation, incremental co-operation, deep co-operation, etc. The links with the form of democracy (adversary democracy or consensual democracy) are also pointed. However, as with so many other things in life, the key is to the question of co-operation or competition is balance. Co-operation and competition are dialectical opposites. They create and maintain and define each other; they each are incomplete without the other

  14. Strategy-Based Development of Teacher Educators' ICT Competence through a Co-operative Staff Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, Jari; Lattu, Matti; Juuti, Kalle; Meisalo, Veijo

    2006-01-01

    An ICT strategy and an implementation plan for teacher education were created in a co-operative process. Visions and expectations of staff members and students were registered by questionnaires and by making notes during sessions in which the strategy was created. Thereafter, an implementation document, where the staff development programme and…

  15. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) ensured the Slovak Republic (SR) obligations with relation to the international agreements and with the SR membership in the IAEA.International co-operation has been ensured on the basis of the bilateral international agreements. With the Ministry of Foreign Affairs co-operation, the SR fulfilled its financial obligations to this organization in due time and in the full scope. Representing Central and Eastern Europe interest in the Board of Governors, the SR participation in the highest executive in the highest executive authority was finished in 1996.The Board of Governors Vice-chairman position was executed by NRA SR Chairman. 5 national and 6 regional technical co-operation and assistance projects were realized in 1996. 12 organizations participated in these projects and accordingly 104 experts took part in training programmes, scientific visits or as the mission members abroad. Besides, Slovak experts participated at work of technical advisory and consultation groups with the significant assistance. In the framework of IAEA co-operation, the SR was visited by 11 expert missions formed by 28 experts from 19 countries including IAEA. Slovak organizations, namely institutes of the Academy of Sciences, Slovak research centres and universities participated in IAEA scientific and research activities through NRA SR. 15 scientific contracts in total were approved and realized and these contracts are utilized as supplementary financing of the own scientific and research projects. Other international co-operation and regional co-operation activities of the NRA SR in 1996 are reviewed

  16. The Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization : implications for Northeast Asian regional security co-operation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper identifies opportunities for co-operation on regional development and security in the North Pacific region. The Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO) was created in 1993 during bilateral negotiations between the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (US-DPRK) over North Korea's alleged nuclear weapons program. The negotiations resulted in an agreement to freeze North Korea's known nuclear weapons program in return for the construction of two proliferation-resistant 100 MWe light water reactors (LWR) in North Korea, and the provision of 500,000 tons of heavy fuel oil per year until the completion of the LWR construction as compensation for lost energy production capacity resulting from the shutting down of North Korea's nuclear reactors. The author described the activities of KEDO and examined its internal dynamics. The unique circumstances that produced the Agreed Framework and KEDO in response to a major international crisis of the nuclear program in the DPRK were also highlighted along with the US-DPRK bilateral agreement and the multilateral institution involving the United States, South Korea, Japan and the European Union. Financial support from Australia and Canada was discussed along with the mechanism for engaging North Korea in regularized interaction and technical cooperation. It was concluded that KEDO's record of successes and failures is mixed. The energy security issue has been identified as an area that could result in conflict among Northeast Asian countries which are increasingly dependent on oil supplies from the Middle East. In response, numerous multilateral financing mechanisms have been developed to promote joint business opportunities that exploit natural gas resources in the Russian Far East to address Japanese, Korean and Chinese energy needs. 35 refs

  17. Cartalk 2000: development of a co-operative ADAS based on vehicle-to-vehicle communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, P.L.J.; Hallouzi, R.; Dagli, I.; Cseh, C.; Schäfers, L.; Nelisse, M.W.; Bruin, D. de

    2003-01-01

    Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) benefit from using vehicle-to-vehicle communication. In the 5th framework EC project CarTALK2000 co-operative ADAS are designed, tested and evaluated with respect to increasing traffic safety, efficiency and driving comfort. Communication based longitudinal

  18. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: Opening for Debate and Contestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Peter; Dahlberg, Gunilla; Grieshaber, Susan; Mantovani, Susanna; May, Helen; Pence, Alan; Rayna, Sylvie; Swadener, Beth Blue; Vandenbroeck, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is initiating the International Early Learning Study, a cross-national assessment of early learning outcomes involving the testing of 5-year-old children in participating countries. The authors use this colloquium to inform members of the early childhood community about this project and to…

  19. Planning for environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites in Central and Eastern Europe. Proceedings of a workshop held under the technical co-operation project RER/9/022 on environmental restoration in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    An IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation (TC) project RER/9/022 on ''Environmental Restoration'' for central and eastern Europe and the former USSR was launched in 1992 and concluded at the end of 1996. The first phase of this project had the primary purpose of identifying and characterizing radioactively contaminated sites in the region, including evaluation of doses to the general public and other environmental impacts. The main result of this phase of the project were published in IAEA-TECDOC-865. A new 1995-1996 phase of the project focused on the radioactive contamination of uranium mining and milling sites and the development of plans for environmental restoration of these sites. While the 1993-1994 phase aimed at attracting the attention of Member States in the region to a long neglected problem, the second phase served as a stimulus to initiate concrete planning activities that would lead to corrective actions in highly contaminated areas in those countries. As a consequence, the project emphasis shifted from scientific discussions to the identification of responsibilities, planning activities, and the assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of restoration plans. The 1995-1996 phase of the project consisted of a planning meeting and three workshops that addressed different topical themes. The papers compiled in this publication were presented at the last workshop, held in Felix, Romania, 4-8 November 1996. They summarize national situations in environmental contamination as of the end of 1996 and ongoing or planned actions for remediation

  20. International co-operation: a condition for further development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenet, P.

    1994-01-01

    For two main reasons, loss of confidence in nuclear energy and loss of competitiveness, nuclear programmes are in recession, although the very high level of safety and reliability of NPP operation. Efficient co-operation among nuclear operators world wide in order to reach the highest possible standard everywhere. The mission of WANO is to maximize the safety and reliability of the operation of NPPs by exchanging information and encouraging comparison, emulation and communication among its members. (author)

  1. Development of renewable energetics needs knowledge, skills and co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmet, Henn; Tiit, Valdur

    2000-01-01

    develop tight co-operation with all the interested institutions and people. We hope that for the time of the next conference already the Estonian Renewable Energetics Council will be established to fulfil this task successfully. We have also good conditions to develop mutually useful international co-operation. The Estonian Agricultural University is pleased that we could give our share to the success of the conference that took place in our beautiful new main building in Tartu and that we could support the publishing of the present transactions. We hope that we are also in the future able to give our contribution for the development of renewable energetics

  2. Climate protection in Germany`s bilateral development co-operation with the People`s Republic of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.

    1996-12-31

    For globally sustainable development to be achieved, three concerns are central: productive economic growth, social justice and ecological sustainability. Development co-operation supports the realisation of these three goals in partner countries by helping to alleviate poverty, promote economic growth through private-sector development and protect vital natural resources. The aim of globally sustainable development can only be achieved if industrial countries too implement necessary reforms and structural adjustments at every level. Co-operation efforts with partners must therefore be complemented by coherent policies at home. This is a matter of credibility, but also of developmental far-sightedness. Internal reforms in the industrial countries secure financial leeway for their providing foreign assistance in the longer term. Environmental and resource protection as a focal point of Germany`s development co-operation with the PRC aims to preserve vital natural resources, shape economic development in their partner countries in an ecologically sound manner and put China in a position to participate in global endeavours to protect the environment. Climate protection measures figure prominently in this area. This is justified given China`s share of global CO{sub 2} emissions and the potential for energy-saving measures and measures to increase power intensity. This potential is derived primarily from the possibility of using energy-efficient technologies, increasing the relatively low energy prices and making use of renewable sources of energy.

  3. Engineering Competencies in International Development Co-operation - the Case of Capacity Development in Environment (CDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the paper is the need for engineers to develop new competencies, when they are involved in international development cooperation. Drawing on the case of the Post-RIO strategy of capacity development in environment in developing countries, the paper reviews a recent response...... of such courses, which give emphasis to local views on institutional development and policy change. engineers from industrialised countries have a long tradition of working in the third world: building infrastructure to facilitate exports of raw materials during colonial times; implementing development aid...... on the transfer of managerial models across cultures, on how to develop inter-cultural competence in management, and on the significance of differences in engineering and industrial culture. Second, the concepts of dynamic assimilation and local learning processes and their implications for the practicing...

  4. Energy problems of developing countries and the development co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutanen, K; Sahrman, K

    1984-12-15

    The technology, economy and problems of energy sector in developing countries are presented as well as the possibilities of solving energy problems, with special emphasis on how to adapt Finnish energy know-how to the conditions existing in the developing countries. The population in the developing countries has grown explosively. The worst energy problem due to this growth is the shortage of firewood. The fact that wood is used for burning is one reason for the formation of deserts. Today already about one hundred million people in developing countries suffer from shortage of energy. In the following 20-30 years it will threaten already about one billion people. Poverty in the developing countries prevents the use of fossil fuels like oil. It is likely that the developing countries already in the coming decades will have to start to use new and renewable sources of energy, like these are solar and wind energy as well as hydroelectric power. The efficiency of burning fire wood should rapidly be improved. On the other hand reforestration should be increased. Also fossil fuels are needed before new sources of energy can be used. All over the world there has been interest in the energy problems of the developing countries. The World Bank and other financing bodies are increasing their financial aid for different kinds of energy projects. The Finnish development aid is primarily bilateral and concentrated in certain countries. In the 1980's the energy sector will be one of the main fields in our development aid, at the same time as the portion of our development aid from gross national income is increasing.

  5. The regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.

    1978-01-01

    The history of the Agreement, known as the RCA, is given and the operation of the Agreement, its achievements and current projects are described. The Agreement entered into force in 1972 for a period of five years and has been extended for an additional five years. Any IAEA Member State in the area of South Asia, South East Asia, the Pacific and the Far East may become a party to the Agreement. The purpose of the Agreement is to promote and co-ordinate research, development and training projects in nuclear science and technology through co-operation between the appropriate national institutions and with the assistance of the IAEA. The current RCA co-operative projects cover a broad spectrum of technologies and interests, among which are: food and agriculture, medicine, environmental research, industrial applications, training, research reactor use including radioisotope production, and physical research such as nuclear data programs

  6. Planning for environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites in Central and Eastern Europe. Proceedings of a workshop held under the technical co-operation project RER/9/022 on environmental restoration in Central and Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    An IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation (TC) project RER/9/022 on ``Environmental Restoration`` for central and eastern Europe and the former USSR was launched in 1992 and concluded at the end of 1996. The first phase of this project had the primary purpose of identifying and characterizing radioactively contaminated sites in the region, including evaluation of doses to the general public and other environmental impacts. The main result of this phase of the project were published in IAEA-TECDOC-865. A new 1995-1996 phase of the project focused on the radioactive contamination of uranium mining and milling sites and the development of plans for environmental restoration of these sites. While the 1993-1994 phase aimed at attracting the attention of Member States in the region to a long neglected problem, the second phase served as a stimulus to initiate concrete planning activities that would lead to corrective actions in highly contaminated areas in those countries. As a consequence, the project emphasis shifted from scientific discussions to the identification of responsibilities, planning activities, and the assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of restoration plans. The 1995-1996 phase of the project consisted of a planning meeting and three workshops that addressed different topical themes. The papers compiled in this publication were presented at the last workshop, held in Felix, Romania, 4-8 November 1996. They summarize national situations in environmental contamination as of the end of 1996 and ongoing or planned actions for remediation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  7. A European union (EU) co-operation program: Integral, innovative, industrial product design and development, I3PD(2) and project led education (PLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Hvid

    2007-01-01

    and society. Other primary objectives are to ensure high-quality research and education and to enhance technology transfer and to stimulate industry-university partnerships within the EU and stimulate Inter-University co-operation programmes. In this project we are focusing on the importance of curriculum...... development, teachers mobility, exchange of students and industrial co-operation....

  8. Co-operation for weapon technology transfers and technological/economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, K.

    1995-01-01

    This report proposes the basic philosophy of security export controls and future directions thereof, taking into account global changes in the security environment. We hope that appropriate policies based on the proposals will be implemented expeditiously. When the government implements security export control policy, it is most essential to obtain the understanding and co-operation of the general public, as well as exporters. It is also important to closely co-ordinate efforts within the government, including information sharing among the ministries and agencies concerned. Moreover, the government should make efforts to raise the effectiveness of policy measures by fully explaining Japanese security export control policy to other countries, and taking a leading role in international efforts for co-ordination. The proposals in this report provide an overview of future security export controls. Needless to say, there is the need for further and more detailed consideration of individual policy measures. Especially in introducing new controls to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missiles, it is necessary to conduct deliberations taking into full consideration the actual situation surrounding transactions, and to provide a sufficient lead-time. Moreover, it is expected that there will be further, major changes in the international security environment, including the countries of concern. It will be necessary to reexamine security export control policy, recognizing that those changes will alter the premises of such policy. Finally, we wish to state the hope that this report, the first attempt, by the Industrial Structure Council, to focus Japanese thinking on security export controls will act as a catalyst in deepening public understanding of security export controls, and enhancing Japanese security export controls

  9. Women and International Intellectual Co-Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    The article explores ways in which intellectual co-operation at the League of Nations [SDN] provided a space for the engagement of culturally elite women in intellectual co-operation circles in Geneva, Paris and a range of national contexts stretching across Europe, Latin America and Asia. It discusses the language of the "international mind" and…

  10. Text of an African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As of 1 September 1994, notifications of acceptance of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (see INFCIRC/377), in accordance with Article XIII thereof, had been received by the Director General from the Governments of: Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Nigeria, Madagascar, Libya, Morocco, Kenya, Sudan, Ghana, Tanzania, Mauritius, Cameroon, South Africa, Zaire, Ethiopia, Zambia, Niger. The Agreement entered into force on 4 April 1990, the date of receipt of the third notification of acceptance

  11. Agricultural Co-Operatives in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tefera, Delelegne A.; Bijman, Jos; Slingerland, Maja A.

    2017-01-01

    To what extent can co-operatives strengthen rural development in sub-Saharan Africa? This paper explores the development of agricultural co-operatives in Ethiopia, particularly the changes in economic functions. Co-operative development in Ethiopia has been strongly influenced by various political

  12. The text of an African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The document reproduces the text of an African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology among African Member States that was endorsed by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1990

  13. "A model co-operative country": Irish-Finnish co-operative contacts at the turn of the twentieth century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilson, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural co-operative societies were widely discussed across late nineteenth-century Europe as a potential solution to the problems of agricultural depression, land reform and rural poverty. In Finland, the agronomist Hannes Gebhard drew inspiration from examples across Europe in founding the...... that even before the First World War it was Finland, not Ireland, that had begun to be regarded as ‘a model co-operative country’....... between Irish and Finnish co-operators around the turn of the century, and examines the ways in which the parallels between the two countries were constructed and presented by those involved in these exchanges. I will also consider the reasons for the divergence in the development of cooperation, so...

  14. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world.

  15. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  16. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  17. Co-operative development of nuclear safety regulations, guides and standards based on NUSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachner, J.; Boyd, F.C.; Yaremy, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A major need of developing Member States building nuclear power plants (NPPs) of foreign origin is to acquire a capability to regulate such nuclear plants independently. Among other things, this requires the development of national nuclear safety regulations, guides and standards to govern the development and use of nuclear technology. Recognizing the importance and complexity of this task, it seems appropriate that the NPP-exporting Member States share their experience and assist the NPP-importing Member States in the development of their national regulations and guides. In 1983, the Atomic Energy Control Board and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. conducted a study of a possible joint programme involving Canada, an NPP-importing Member State and the IAEA for the development of the national nuclear safety regulations and guides based on NUSS documents. During the study, a work plan with manpower estimates for the development of design regulations, safety guides and a guide for regulatory evaluation of design was prepared as an investigatory exercise. The work plan suggests that a successful NUSS implementation in developing Member States will require availability of significant resources at the start of the programme. The study showed that such a joint programme could provide an effective mechanism for transfer of nuclear safety know-how to the developing Member States through NUSS implementation. (author)

  18. State and business co-operation in settling socio-economic issues: forward to sustainable development of ecologically unfavorable regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkirova, N. N.; Lessovaia, S. N.

    2018-01-01

    The complexity of socio-economic issues of mono-cities located in the ecologically unfavorable regions of Eurasia was disclosed. The economically strategic role of city-forming mining enterprises and their impact on ecological situation was revealed. The general conception of settling the socio-economic problems of mono-cities located in ecologically unfavorable regions was worked out. Various approached to the concentration of financial resources for economic and ecological sustainable development of the regions located on the north of Eurasia holding nature protection actions were submitted. Based on performed critical analysis of the positive international experience of ecological taxation some approaches to reforming current Russian system of ecological taxation were suggested. It was revealed that increasing the social responsibilities of business in the field of waste recycling, environmental protection and monitoring of ecological conditions of territories and state and business co-operation are the most efficient opportunities in settling socio-economic issues of ecologically unfavorable regions.

  19. Multimedia and co-operative work in new product development : A participatory approach to virtual prototyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, P; vanEngelen, J; Terlouw, P; deVreede, GJ

    1996-01-01

    In order to be successful, nov product development requires a balance between market pull and technology push. On a project level this involves forging a link between the (technical) capabilities of the company and the needs of the market place. This paper describes an approach to forge this link

  20. Institutions and Social Change: implementing co-operative housing and environmentally sustainable development at Christie Walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan McClean

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available How can institutions contribute to the building of civil society in the twenty- first century? It is clear that the old laissez-faire approach and the more recent neo-conservative reliance on the market have failed to deliver housing for many people. On the other hand the state-based welfare housing model espoused by the Australian Labor Party over the twentieth century has also been beset by problems. Social alienation, and the crisis in affordable housing make the case that individualist approaches to urban living are not working. More communal solutions are needed - solutions attuned to a complex view of civil society outlined by Michael Edwards' tripartite definition. At the same time the onset of global warming now prompts Australians to create more environmentally sustainable ways of living. Addressing the theme of responsibility, this paper focuses on citizenship in its broader environmental, social and active forms. It analyses interviews and documentary evidence concerning the planning and development of Christie Walk, an innovative, medium density eco-city development in Adelaide. The investigation reveals the effects of some Australian institutions on residents' efforts to live socially and environmentally sustainable lives in an urban environment. The paper offers transdisciplinary research and analysis, linking the fields of history, urban housing, community development and environmental theory.

  1. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V.2: Planning for environmental restoration of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defence related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. It is under these circumstances that the IAEA decided to launch a Technical Co-operation (TC) Project on Environmental Restoration in Central and Eastern Europe. The project was initiated in the latter part of 1992 and ended in 1994. The countries that were involved and represented in this forum are: Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia and the Ukraine. Several experts from countries outside the region participated and offered their co-operation throughout the project. Refs, figs, tabs.

  2. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V.2: Planning for environmental restoration of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defence related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. It is under these circumstances that the IAEA decided to launch a Technical Co-operation (TC) Project on Environmental Restoration in Central and Eastern Europe. The project was initiated in the latter part of 1992 and ended in 1994. The countries that were involved and represented in this forum are: Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia and the Ukraine. Several experts from countries outside the region participated and offered their co-operation throughout the project. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This report on the International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities in 1992 contains an overview of the general issues involved, including both in-house and external developments, resources and delivery, and evaluation of programs; an overview by field of activity and by division within the Agency; an overview by geographic area, distinguishing (i) Africa, (ii) Asia and the Pacific, (iii) Latin America, (iv) and the Middle East and Europe; an overview by component (i.e., experts, equipment, fellowships, training courses, sub-contracts and miscellaneous); and an overview by fund technical assistance and co-operation fund, extrabudgetary resources, United Nations Development Program (UNDP), assistance in kind. It also contains a profile on technical co-operation activities in Latin America. Projects concluded during 1992 are listed together with a description of their achievements. It concludes with implementation summaries. 10 figs, 9 tabs

  4. Nuclear developments in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillebois, C.

    2011-01-01

    The main topics of the presentation: FORATOM’s Mission and vision, Nuclear overview in Europe before and after Fukushima; post-Fukushima political decisions; European Council conclusions; European nuclear industry’s response; EU “Stress Tests” specifications; What will the consequences of Fukushima be?

  5. International cooperation and nuclear development. On the approval of the Argentina - Australia co-operation agreement for the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasol Varela, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Argentina, with its National Atomic Energy Commission, has been maintaining during more than half a century an important activity for the development of nuclear energy and its peaceful applications. As a consequence of this tradition, it has strengthened its experience with the contribution to the international co-operation, as in the case of the Argentina-Australia co-operation agreement for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, signed on August 8th, 2001 and ratified by the Argentine Law No. 26.014. Both countries are parties of several international treaties and conventions: physical protection of nuclear materials, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear accidents, fuel and wastes management, and others. These legal instruments are complemented by agreements for the applications of safeguards with the International Atomic Energy Agency. On the basis of these regulations the parties agreed to establish co-operation conditions in accordance with the pledge of non-proliferation. Furthermore the agreement states that the Governments have the power to designate the governmental organizations or individuals, as well as the legal entities, which will carry out the co-operation. The co-operation covers basic and applied research, development, design, construction and operation of nuclear reactors and other installations of the nuclear fuel cycle, its related technology as well as nuclear medicine, radioisotopes, etc [es

  6. Unemployment and HIV mortality in the countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: 1981–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Williams, Callum; Zeltner, Thomas; Atun, Rifat

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine an association between unemployment rates and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mortality in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Design Multivariate regression analysis. Participants OECD member states. Setting OECD. Main outcome measures World Health Organization HIV mortality. Results Between 1981 and 2009, a 1% increase in unemployment was associated with an increase in HIV mortality in the OECD (coefficient for men 0.711, 0.334–1.089, p = 0.0003; coefficient for women 0.166, 0.071–0.260, p = 0.0007). Time lag analysis showed a significant increase in HIV mortality for up to two years after rises in unemployment: p = 0.0008 for men and p = 0.0030 for women in year 1, p = 0.0067 for men and p = 0.0403 for women in year 2. Conclusions Rises in unemployment are associated with increased HIV mortality. Economic fiscal policy may impact upon population health. Policy discussions should take into consideration potential health outcomes. PMID:28748096

  7. Unemployment and HIV mortality in the countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development: 1981-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Zhou, Charlie; Williams, Callum; Zeltner, Thomas; Atun, Rifat

    2017-07-01

    To determine an association between unemployment rates and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mortality in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Multivariate regression analysis. OECD member states. OECD. World Health Organization HIV mortality. Between 1981 and 2009, a 1% increase in unemployment was associated with an increase in HIV mortality in the OECD (coefficient for men 0.711, 0.334-1.089, p  = 0.0003; coefficient for women 0.166, 0.071-0.260, p  = 0.0007). Time lag analysis showed a significant increase in HIV mortality for up to two years after rises in unemployment: p  = 0.0008 for men and p  = 0.0030 for women in year 1, p  = 0.0067 for men and p  = 0.0403 for women in year 2. Rises in unemployment are associated with increased HIV mortality. Economic fiscal policy may impact upon population health. Policy discussions should take into consideration potential health outcomes.

  8. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V.1: Identification and characterization of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defense related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subject of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V.1: Identification and characterization of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defense related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subject of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. Refs, figs and tabs.

  10. The text of the third agreement to extend the regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology of 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The full text of the third agreement to extend the regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology of 1972 (INFCIRC/167) (extended first in 1977 and then in 1982) for a further period of five years with effect from 12 June 1987, is reproduced

  11. The Text of the Third Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology of 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The text of the Third Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology of 1972 the RCA Agreement, extended first in 1977 and then in 1982, for a further period of five years with effect from 12 June 1987, is reproduced herein for the information of all Members [fr

  12. The Text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology. Latest Status. Declarations/Reservations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology between the Agency and Member States is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Section 9 thereof specifies the Members that may become party to it [es

  13. The Text of the Agreement between the Agency and Sweden for Co-Operation in the Provision of Assistance to Developing Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-02-05

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Sweden relating to Co-operation in the Provision of Assistance to Developing Countries is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 18 January 1970 pursuant to Section 27 thereof.

  14. The Text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology. Latest Status. Declarations/Reservations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology between the Agency and Member States is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Section 9 thereof specifies the Members that may become party to it

  15. The text of the second agreement to extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Second Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology for a further period of five years with effect from 12 june 1997, i.e., through 11 June 2002

  16. The Text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology. Latest Status. Declarations/Reservations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology between the Agency and Member States is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Section 9 thereof specifies the Members that may become party to it [fr

  17. The Text of the Agreement between the Agency and Sweden for Co-Operation in the Provision of Assistance to Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Sweden relating to Co-operation in the Provision of Assistance to Developing Countries is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 18 January 1970 pursuant to Section 27 thereof.

  18. The Text of the Second Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology of 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    The text of the Second Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology of 1972 the RCA Agreement, fist extended in 1977, for a further period of five years with effect from 12 June 1982, is reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  19. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities in international co-operation carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. Professionality of the Bohunice NPPs staff was highly appreciated by inviting them to be the OSART team members

  20. Marketing co-operatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.J. Hendrikse (George); C.P. Veerman (Cees)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMarketing co-operatives (MCs) are analysed from an incomplete contracting perspective. The requirement of the domination of control by the members of a MC is a threat to the survival of a MC in markets where the level of asset specificity at the processing stage of production is

  1. Natural gas co-operation in the Baltic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Co-operation between the gas companies in the Baltic Region has been in place for several years. The overview given in this paper shows that the co-operation has been developed in trade, investments, privatisation and participation in the restructuring process. Finally, through a broad technical co-operation, significant efforts are made to establish common operational practices, codes and standards and the integrity of gas transmission pipelines. The Baltic Region, from a resource and gas interconnection point of view, enjoys a strategic position in the future development of the gas industry in Europe. The Baltic gas sector represents an interesting and growing gas market with the significant gas storage capacity. The region is also located strategically for planned gas interconnections and could serve as a transit corridor for the future gas supplies from western Siberia or the North Sea. This co-operation in the region is being supported by international regulations and agreements such as the Energy Charter between the European Union and the central and east European countries. However, at present the gas industry in the Baltic Region seems to be ahead of these international agreements. It may well be seen that trade arrangements such as Third Party Access are implemented directly by market forces rather than through international agreements. The regional development may thus be a driving force for the implementation of the Internal Energy Market for the gas industry

  2. International co-operation through scientific and technical nuclear societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning Muntzing, L.

    1983-01-01

    As an international organization the American Nuclear Society (ANS) has played an active role in international co-operation of nuclear technology exchange since its establishment in 1954. The ANS has a membership of over 13,000 individuals, of whom approximately 1200 live overseas in forty countries. To carry out the goals of the Society, local sections have been established. Currently the ANS maintains 48 local sections in the United States of America and 8 overseas local sections in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The ANS also has formal agreements for co-operation with The Asociacion Argentina de Tecnologia Nuclear (AATN), the Israel Nuclear Society (INS), and the Chinese Nuclear Society (CNS). In 1977 the Japan Atomic Energy Society (JAES), the European Nuclear Society (ENS), and the ANS co-operation in sponsoring the First International Conference on Transfer of Nuclear Technology (ICONTT I) in Tehran, Iran. In 1982, the Second International Conference on Transfer of Nuclear Technology (ICONTT II), Buenos Aires, Argentina, was sponsored through the co-operation of the AATN, the ENS and the ANS. The ANS and its overseas sections sponsor the Pacific Basin Conference approximately every three years to discuss nuclear matters of concern to the countries around the Pacific Ocean. In 1981 the ANS held a Nuclear Technology Exhibit in Beijing, the People's Republic of China. In addition to meetings, the ANS is extensively involved in the co-operative exchange of applied nuclear research information through its publications. Nuclear Technology, a technical journal, is published monthly under joint ownership of the ENS and the ANS. The ANS has been a leader in voluntary standards development since 1958. In its dedication to the co-operation of international nuclear technology the ANS maintains a comprehensive international exchange of nuclear standards

  3. Why do health and social care providers co-operate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raak, Arno; Paulus, Aggie; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid

    2005-09-28

    Within Europe, although there are numerous examples of poor co-ordination in the delivery of integrated care, many providers do co-operate. We wanted to know why providers are moved to co-operate. In terms of systematic research, this is a new field; researchers have only begun to theorise about the rationales for co-operation. Practically, the issue of achieving co-operation attracts much attention from policymakers. Understanding the reasons for co-operation is a prerequisite for developing effective policy in support of integrated care. Our aim is to explore the comparative validity of different theoretical perspectives on the reasons for co-operation, to indicate directions for further study and for policy making. We used data from three successive studies to perform pattern matching with six established theoretical perspectives: transaction costs economics, strategic choice theory, resource dependence theory, learning theory, stakeholder theory and institutional theory. Insights from the studies were compared for validating purposes (triangulation). The first study concerned the evaluation of the Dutch 'National Home Health Care Programme' according to the case study methodology. The second and third studies were surveys among project directors: questionnaires were based on the concepts derived from the first study. Researchers should combine normative institutional theory, resource dependence theory and stakeholder theory into one perspective, in order to study relationship formation in health and social care. The concept of institutions (rules) is the linchpin between the theories. Policy makers must map the institutions of stakeholders and enable integrated care policy to correspond with these institutions as much as possible.

  4. Co-operation of the CMEA member countries in the development of different reactor types, including certain aspects of their nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasenkov, A.; Barbur, I.; Barchenkov, A.; Molnar, L.; Tolpygo, V.; Khake, V.; Shcherbinin, B.

    1977-01-01

    The report gives an account of the problems of the projected development of atomic power and evaluates its role in the fuel and power complex and long-range development of interconnected power systems of the CMEA member countries. The report emphasizes the importance of scientific and technical co-operation in the creation of thermal and fast-neutron power reactors with 1000-1500MW(e) units, and in the elaboration of nuclear plants for heating services. The positive experience of the international scientific and research group of scientists of the CMEA member countries carrying out reactor-physics studies on critical assemblies is mentioned. The report contains basic conclusions from the forecasts for nuclear power in the CMEA member countries up to 1990, including forecasting methodology; the role of nuclear power plants in saving natural and enriched uranium for a projected period; and the impact of nuclear power development rates on its structure (thermal and fast reactor ratio). It lists the impacts of scientific and technical co-operation of the CMEA member countries on the fuel cycle, including the transport of spent nuclear fuel, its recovery, reprocessing and radioactive waste disposal. Particular effects of co-operation of the CMEA member countries on the radiation safety of nuclear power plants and environmental protection are analysed. The report notes the role of the international economic associations Interatomenergo and Interatominstrument in the accelerated development of nuclear power. (author)

  5. Technical co-operation for development. Introductory statement to the 4th scientific forum during the 45th session of the General Conference. Vienna, 18 September 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2001-01-01

    Dr. ElBaradei opened the forum on Technical Co-operation for Development with some introductory remarks. He said it was the goal of the forum to raise general awareness of some lesser-known nuclear technologies by presenting a number of highly successful examples of technology transfer activities, food security, water resources management, and human health. He raised key questions for consideration, and introduced the chairperson of the forum

  6. H.S.H. Prince Radu of Hohenzollern-Veringen, Special Representative of the Romanian Government for Integration, Co-operation and Sustainable Development

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    H.S.H. Prince Radu of Hohenzollern-Veringen, Special Representative of the Romanian Government for Integration, Co-operation and Sustainable Development (third from left) with (left to right) Florian Ciolacu (Romanian Mission in Geneva), Cornel Comsa (personal adviser to the Prince), Sorin Ilie (CERN), Calin Alexa (ATLAS), Iosif Legrand (Caltech/CMS), Mihaela Gheata (ALICE), Andrei Gheata (ALICE), and Sorin Zgura (ALICE).

  7. The text of an African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The document informs that as of 31 January 1993, the following states sent to the Director General notifications of acceptance of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology: Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Nigeria, Madagascar, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Morocco, Kenya, Sudan, Ghana, Tanzania, Mauritius, Cameroon, South Africa and Zaire. The Agreement entered into force on 4 April 1990

  8. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document presents the status of acceptances as of 21 September 1998 of the extension of the African Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) which entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  9. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document presents the status of acceptances as of 16 March 1999 of the extension of the African Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) which entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000. There are 25 States which notified the acceptance of the Agreement extension

  10. The text of the agreement to extend the regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 1987, for a further period of five years with effect from 12 June 1992. Australia, Bangladesh, the People's Republic of China, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam are parties of this Agreement

  11. Extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-23

    The document presents the status of acceptances as of 6 October 1999 of the extension of the African Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) which entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000. There are 26 States which notified the acceptance of the Agreement extension.

  12. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-19

    The document presents the status of acceptances as of 16 March 1999 of the extension of the African Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) which entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000. There are 25 States which notified the acceptance of the Agreement extension

  13. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-13

    The document presents the status of acceptances as of 21 September 1998 of the extension of the African Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) which entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  14. Task 9: deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Sources of financing for PV-based rural electrification in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Syngellakis, K. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom); Shanker, A. [Innovation Energie Developpement, IED, Francheville (France)

    2004-05-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at how PV-based rural electrification in developing countries can be financed. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the overall rate of successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries through increased co-operation and information exchange. This document provides an introduction to PV project financing, including funding sources available, strategies and planning needed to secure the necessary financial resources for the deployment of PV technologies in developing and transitional economies. Topics discussed include risk analysis and the barriers to financing, sources of financing, considerations and variables that influence financing decisions and the process for securing financing. Various forms of international and national financing are looked at, as are the factors influencing financing decisions.

  15. Ozone measurements 2010. [EMEP Co-operative Programme for Monitoring and Evaluation of the Long-range Transmission of Air Pollutants in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjellbrekke, Anne-Gunn; Solberg, Sverre; Fjaeraa, Ann Mari

    2012-07-01

    From the Introduction: Ozone is a natural constituent of the atmosphere and plays a vital role in many atmospheric processes. However, man-made emissions of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides have increased the photochemical formation of ozone in the troposphere. Until the end of the 1960s the problem was basically believed to be one of the big cities and their immediate surroundings. In the 1970s, however, it was found that the problem of photochemical oxidant formation is much more widespread. The ongoing monitoring of ozone at rural sites throughout Europe shows that episodes of high concentrations of ground-level ozone occur over most parts of the continent every summer. During these episodes the ozone concentrations can reach values above ambient air quality standards over large regions and lead to adverse effects for human health and vegetation. Historical records of ozone measurements in Europe and North America indicate that in the last part of the nineteenth century the values were only about half of the average surface ozone concentrations measured in the same regions during the last 10-15 years (Bojkov, 1986; Volz and Kley, 1988).The formation of ozone is due to a large number of photochemical reactions taking place in the atmosphere and depends on the temperature, humidity and solar radiation as well as the primary emissions of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds. Together with the non-linear relationships between the primary emissions and the ozone formation, these effects complicates the abatement strategies for ground-level ozone and makes photochemical models crucial in addition to the monitoring data. The 1999 Gothenburg Protocol is designed for a joint abatement of acidification, eutrophication and ground-level ozone. It has been estimated that once the Protocol is implemented, the number of days with excessive ozone levels will be halved and that the exposure of vegetation to excessive ozone levels will be 44% down on 1990

  16. Developing a regulatory framework for the financial, management performance and social reporting systems for co-operatives in developing countries: A case study of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Nieman

    2016-08-01

    Findings: The research performed showed that existing reporting frameworks and practices do not meet the reporting requirements of co-operatives in all aspects because of the different nature of co-operatives as opposed to shareholder-owned entities.

  17. Co-operation of the CMEA member countries in the developing power reactors of various types, including some aspects of their nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbur, I.; Barchenkov, A.; Molnar, L; Panasenkov, A.; Tolpygo, V.; Hake, V.; Shcherbinin, B.

    1977-01-01

    The report gives an account of the problems of projected development of atomic power and evaluates its role in the fuel and power complex and long-range development of interconnected power systems of the CMEA member countries. The report emphasizes the importance of scientific and technical co-operation in the creation of power reactors on thermal and fast neutrons with 1000-1500 MW unit electric capacity as well as in the elaboration of nuclear plants for heating services. It notes the positive experience of the International scientific and research group of scientists of the CMEA member countries carrying out reactor-physical studies on the critical assembly and its contribution to the elaboration of power reactors. The report contains basic conclusions from the development forecast for nuclear power of the CMEA member countries up to 1990 including forecasting methodology; role of nuclear power plants in saving natural and enriched uranium for a projected period; impact of nuclear power development rates on its structure (thermal and fast reactor ratio); relation between the beginning of mass commissioning of nuclear power plants with fast reactors and the integral demand for nuclear fuel; scale of required capacities of fuel cycle services; time dependence of fuel cycle on nuclear fuel requirements. It examines the problems and lists the results of scientific and technical co-operation of the CMEA member countries in the field of fuel cycle, including the transport of spent nuclear fuel, its recovery, reprocessing and radioactive waste disposal. Particular questions of co-operation of the CMEA member countries to secure radiation safety of nuclear power plants and environmental protection are analyzed. The report notes the role of international economic associations - ''Interatomenergo'' and ''Interatominstrument'' - in the accelerated development of nuclear power on the basis of cooperation and specialization in the manufacture of equipment for nuclear power

  18. H.S.H. Prince Radu of Hohenzollern-Veringen, Special Representative of the Romanian Government for Integration, Co-operation and Sustainable Development

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    H.S.H. Prince Radu of Hohenzollern-Veringen, Special Representative of the Romanian Government for Integration, Co-operation and Sustainable Development, is seen here visiting Microcosm, CERN's on-site exhibition centre. Photo 01: H.S.H. Prince Radu of Hohenzollern-Veringen (right) with his personal adviser Cornel Comsa inside Microcosm's full-scale model of a six-metre section of the LHC. Photos 04-06: H.S.H. Prince Radu of Hohenzollern-Veringen with Emma Sanders from ETT Division.

  19. Extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    As of 4 May 1998, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (INFCIRC/377), had been received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Governments of 22 African States. Zimbabwe is added to the list of 21 States reported in the previous edition (add. 9) to this document. Extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  20. Extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-15

    As of 4 May 1998, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (INFCIRC/377), had been received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Governments of 22 African States. Zimbabwe is added to the list of 21 States reported in the previous edition (add. 9) to this document. Extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  1. Co-operation Agreement between the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment of the Republic of Cuba (CITMA) and CERN concerning The Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the CERN collaboration with Latin America, co-operation agreements have been established with Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Mexico and Peru. They have made possible a growing participation by Latin American particle physicists in the CERN programme, which has important potential for the future. The Cuban particle physics community is highly motivated and relatively advanced, both scientifically and technologically, since many of its members have been trained in installations of the former Soviet Union, many of which now participate in CERN's cooperation with Russia. In addition, Cuba has a good number of experienced computer scientists. A group from the Cuban Institute CEADEN (Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarollo Nuclear) has recently been accepted unanimously into the ALICE collaboration, with agreed contributions to off-line software and Grid middlewave. Additional Cuban contributions to show controls, data acquisition and testing electronics for the Silicon drift decte...

  2. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V. 3: Technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defence related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subjects of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. The second part of the project and the second workshop (Piestany, Slovak Republic, 12-16 April 1994) involved planning and preparing the identified sites for restoration. This included items such as the restoration objectives, dose and environmental assessment, cost analysis, strategy and prioritization. Eventually, the third part of the project covered technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration. The third and final workshop was held in Rez, Czech Republic, 12-16 December 1994. Refs, figs, tabs.

  3. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V. 3: Technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defence related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subjects of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. The second part of the project and the second workshop (Piestany, Slovak Republic, 12-16 April 1994) involved planning and preparing the identified sites for restoration. This included items such as the restoration objectives, dose and environmental assessment, cost analysis, strategy and prioritization. Eventually, the third part of the project covered technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration. The third and final workshop was held in Rez, Czech Republic, 12-16 December 1994. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Japan-Australia co-operative program on research and development of technology for the management of high level radioactive wastes. Final report 1985 to 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, K.; Vance, E.; Lumpkin, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Mitamura, H.; Banba, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The overall aim of the Co-operative Program has been to promote the exchange of information on technology for the management of High-Level Wastes (HLW) and to encourage research and development relevant to such technology. During the 13 years that the Program has been carried out, HLW management strategies have matured and developed internationally, and Japan has commenced construction of a domestic reprocessing and vitrification facility for HLW. The HLW management strategy preferred is a national decision. Many countries are using vitrification, direct disposal of spent fuel or a combination of both to handle their existing wastes whereas others have deferred the decision. The work carried out in the Co-operative Program provides strong scientific evidence that the durability of ceramic waste forms is not significantly affected by radiation damage and that high loadings of actinide elements can be incorporated into specially designed ceramic waste forms. Moreover, natural minerals have been shown to remain as closed systems for U and Th for up to 2.5 b y. All of these results give confidence in the ability of second generation waste forms, such as Synroc, to handle future waste arisings that may not be suitable for vitrification 87 refs., 15 tabs., 22 figs.

  5. Decommissioning co-operation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Euratom treaty, member states of the European Community have since 1978 been conducting successive five-year R and D programmes in the field of decommissioning on the basis of cost-sharing contracts. The main objective of the programmes is to establish safe, socially acceptable and economic decommissioning strategies for obsolete nuclear plant. The programmes share the common aim of all Euratom activities in promoting cooperation, scientific exchange and industrial competition within the Community. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy development in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banal, Michel

    1975-01-01

    The present state of the nuclear development in Europe is discussed. Power plants already operating and those presently being built or to be put in operation before 1980 are considered. Only the large industrial countries near France are dealt with, the situation of the Eastern countries being too different to be envisaged in the same paper. A table gives the whole electric power production and its nuclear component for the more important industrial countries in 1974, the respective powers of the power plants operating on january 1, 1975 and those that must be in operation in 1980 and 1985, in the same countries, France, the U.K., Germany, Spain, Italy, Sweden and Belgium are successively considered [fr

  7. The Text of the Third Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA). Latest Status. Extension of Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The text of the Third Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, t he 1987 RCA , is reproduced herein for the information of all Members [es

  8. The Text of the Fourth Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA). Extension of Agreement. Latest Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Fourth Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 'the 1987 RCA', is reproduced herein for the information of all Members [es

  9. The Text of the Fourth Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA). Extension of Agreement. Latest Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Fourth Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 'the 1987 RCA', is reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  10. The text of the Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 1987. Status of acceptances as of 28 February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The document gives the status of acceptances as of 28 February 1993 of the agreement to extend regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology from 1987

  11. Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  12. Sustainable energy developments in Europe and North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Europe and North America account for 70% of world energy consumption; 61% of which is fossil fuels. Energy trends and patterns in this region, if pursued, would have a large impact on region- and world-wide energy and ecosystems. This report addresses the issues of whether projected trends and supply structures would be 'sustainable' i.e. meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs; what adaptations are warranted; and what role could and should be played by regional energy and environmental co-operation: including through the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. The report is divided into three parts. Part 1 studies the interrelationships between environmental and energy policies in Europe and North America until 2010 and beyond. Part II contains research notes on CO{sub 2} concentration and energy scenarios; investment requirements of the energy supply industries in the ERE region for 1980-2000; energy technologies for the first decades of the 21st century. Scope and conditions for enhancing energy efficiency in the ERE region; CO{sub 2} and climate variation and its impact on energy policy in the USSR and European CMEA countries; the role of new and renewable sources of energy; projected energy developments in the ERE region until 2010, and pollution: synopsis of various international studies on the sustainability of energy developments. Part III describes the energy program of the UN-ECE.

  13. Co-operative agreement for Arab States in Asia for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (ARASIA). Entry into force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Co-operative Agreement for Arab States in Asia for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (ARASIA), pursuant to Article XII, entered into force upon receipt by the Director General of the Agency of notification of acceptance by three Arab Member States of the Agency in Asia, in accordance with Article XI, i.e. on 29 July 2002. The Agreement shall continue to be in force for a period of six years from the date of its entry into force and may be extended for further period(s) if the States Parties so agree. The text of the Agreement is reproduced in the Annex hereto for the information of all Member States. By 20 November 2002, there were 5 Parties to the above Agreement

  14. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    As of 31 January 1998, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology(INFCIRC/377), has been received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Governments of 21 African States. Uganda is added at the at the list of 20 African States reported in the previous addition to the document (INFCIRC/377/Add.8). Pursuant to Article XIV.2 of the original Agreement the extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  15. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    As of 31 December 1996, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) (see INFCIRC/377), had been received by the Director General from the Governments of 20 African countries. Niger, Libya and Mali are added at the list of 17 countries reported in the previous addition of the document (INFCIRC/377/Add.7). Pursuant to Article XIV.2 of the original Agreement, the extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  16. Economic and cultural correlates of subjective wellbeing in countries using data from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaygisiz, Esma

    2010-06-01

    The correlations among indicators of objective well-being, cultural dimensions, and subjective well-being were investigated using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) data from 35 countries. The subjective well-being measures included life satisfaction as well as six positive and six negative indexes of experience. Positive and negative experience scores were subjected to principal component analysis, and two positive experience components (labeled as "positive experiences" and "time management") and two negative experience components (labeled as "pain, worry, and sadness" and "anger and boredom") were extracted. Objective well-being included economic indicators, education, and health. The cultural variables included Hofstede's and Schwartz's cultural dimensions, national Big Five personality scores, and national IQs. High life satisfaction was positively related to Gross Domestic Product, life expectancy, education, individualism, affective and intellectual autonomy, egalitarianism, and conscientiousness, whereas low life satisfaction was related to unemployment, unequal income distribution, power distance, masculinity uncertainty avoidance, embeddedness, hierarchy, and neuroticism.

  17. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-24

    As of 31 January 1998, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology(INFCIRC/377), has been received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Governments of 21 African States. Uganda is added at the at the list of 20 African States reported in the previous addition to the document (INFCIRC/377/Add.8). Pursuant to Article XIV.2 of the original Agreement the extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000.

  18. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-28

    As of 31 December 1996, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) (see INFCIRC/377), had been received by the Director General from the Governments of 20 African countries. Niger, Libya and Mali are added at the list of 17 countries reported in the previous addition of the document (INFCIRC/377/Add.7). Pursuant to Article XIV.2 of the original Agreement, the extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000.

  19. Inter-sectoral conflict and recreational fisheries of the developing world : opportunities and challenges for co-operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Shannon D.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Danylchuk, Andy J.; Beard, T. Douglas; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The recreational fishing sector is growing rapidly in the developing world with the potential to realize economic benefits estimated at tens of billions of dollars annually. These opportunities are accompanied by numerous ecological risks such as overfishing and habitat disturbance. To date, there has been little focus on sociological issues surrounding the growth of recreational fisheries in these areas. This chapter examines sources of potential conflict among small-scale fishing sectors in the developing world with particular attention paid to identification of key issues constraining stewardship of recreational fisheries. We identified conflicts related to fisher competition for access to resources, socio-demographic change, cultural differences, and governance as areas of concern among small-scale fisheries, and offer examples of successful and failed attempts to reduce, mitigate or solve these conflicts. The reality of limited resource availability will require that communication, proactive management strategies and cooperation be encouraged among sectors to maximize resiliency of the social-ecological system and to promote sustainability of fishing practices. We recommend stewardship initiatives that include avenues for stakeholder participation and establishing adaptive management strategies, particularly for emerging recreational fisheries in the developing world.

  20. Transnational Research Co-operation: Opportunities and Challenges for transnational research co-operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the NGOs have a lot of international experience (mainly in Denmark and Germany) as partners in different co-operation projects. Almost all the NGOs have recognized the important role of the scientific information in their activity. NGOs also feel the need for an easy access to required information...... for transnational co-operation like: an investigation/project concerning the driving forces behind urban development,or a co-operation in the field of wastewater reuse and minimization of wastewater loads and discharge, or a service page (internet) to search for potential partners. The governmental institutions...... in order to improve transnational cooperation are identified to be: • Search for national/international project partners • Access to existent co-operation projects or networks • Develop in common project proposals on themes requested by community groups • Exchange information/good operational practices...

  1. Development of co-operation between a research institute and enterprises in the context of marketing communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Niemczyk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the article is presentation of results of recent research on the effectiveness of practical solutions used in marketing communication of the Institute of Logistics and Warehousing, leading to development of cooperation with enterprises. Thanks to the management, the appropriate information reaches definite groups of clients through multiple channels. E-marketing of scientific and research organizations is carried out mainly through web sites, web portals, social media. The analytical and research instruments in the marketing of scientific and research organisations used for measuring the effectiveness and efficacy of marketing communication include: Google Analytics, Seo Stat, Salesmanago, Advertising Value Equivalency and a range of reports. Product line and product managers are employees who are highly qualified and often possess unique competences. Ongoing research coupled with direct contact with companies results in a constant improvement in the services rendered and generation of innovative products.

  2. The Shanghai Co-operation Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Splidsboel

    New regional organisations are always interesting to follow as they will tell us more about the things that make or break this type of co-operation. Originally established as “The Shanghai Five” in 1996, The Shanghai Co-operation Organisation (SCO) has been successful at reducing tension between...... the member states but it has since found it very hard to come up with a more ambitious agenda. Mutual suspicion and zero-sum thinking clearly run deep and the continued development of the organisation has suffered as a result of this. All told, the SCO is much more façade than real policy substance....

  3. International relations and co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the international relations and co-operation of the UJD are presented. International community is aware of the fact that nuclear energy shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and on condition of high standard of nuclear safety. Therefore, the long-term aim of UJD in the area of international relations is to maintain and develop internationally recognised system of state supervision upon the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to reach internationally accepted level of nuclear safety in the Slovak Republic. There are many important international treaties (Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Convention on Nuclear Safety, etc.) to which slovakia is a party. In order to meet the obligations of these treaties UJD has the main aim for contribute to the process of international disarmament, and to a mutually advantageous co-operation. By means of the most important international organisations (e.g. International Atomic Energy Agency) the Slovak Republic actively participates in the international co-operation. Under the leadership of UJD, Slovak institutions participate in many projects and activities which have the aim to improve the safety of nuclear international obligations. In addition, UJD actively participates in the integration process of the Slovak Republic into European and Trans-Atlantic structures. Since 1993 the co-operation with the European Commission and the Nuclear Energy Agency of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD/NEA) has been successfully implemented. Besides multilateral co-operation UJD attaches extraordinary importance to bilateral co-operation, in particular with neighbouring countries. Regular meetings of senior Slovak experts with foreign experts are organised, with the aim to exchange the newest experiences and information on peaceful use of nuclear energy. Also in

  4. Co-operatives in the Cultural Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Sandoval

    2015-04-01

    development of legislation for co-operatives in the 19th century. Robin Murray is an industrial economist. He was Director of Industry at the Greater London Council (GLC in the 1980s, and has been a Research Fellow at the University of Sussex, the Director of Development for the Government of Ontario and co-founder of Twin and Twin Trading. He is an associate of Co-operatives UK and author of Co-operation in the age of Google. http://www.uk.coop/ageofgoogle Sion Whellens is a member of the graphic design and print co-operative Calverts. As part of the Principle Six partnership, he also advises and supports co-ops in creative industries. http://www.calverts.coop

  5. Development of Regenerative Braking Co-operative Control System for Automatic Transmission-based Hybrid Electric Vehicle using Electronic Wedge Brake

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Jiweon; Ko, Sungyeon; Bak, Yongsun; Jang, Mijeong; Yoo, Byoungsoo; Cheon, Jaeseung; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2013-01-01

    This research proposes a regenerative braking co-operative control system for the automatic transmission (AT)-based hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). The brake system of the subject HEV consists of the regenerative braking and the electronic wedge brake (EWB) friction braking for the front wheel, and the hydraulic friction braking for the rear wheel. A regenerative braking co-operative control algorithm is suggested for the regenerative braking and friction braking, which distributes the braking...

  6. Co-operatives as heating entrepreneurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkasalo, M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of heating entrepreneurship functioning in the form of a co operative is to make the use of the wood chips competitive primarily through district heating of municipal centres. When compared with the conventional heating mode the reliability of chip delivery and the remuneration paid to the co-operative for attending to the running of the heating centres are considered to be the competitive advantages. The system has proven to be a working one; one indication of this is its growing application in the country. In the spring of the year 2000 there were 26 chip-based energy co-operative active in Finland. The first time that the use of bioenergy underwent a powerful rise was in the 1970s as a consequence of the oilcrises. Subsequently the enthusiasm shown to this energy form subsided. Then in the early 1990s, biofuels once again became a subject of interest mainly due to environmental issues, the restructuring of rural areas and silvicultural reasons. With the past decades' experiences forming the basis, the development needs associated with the use of bioenergy were in fresh memory and they were addressed on a wide font. Boiler technology related to solid fuels evolved rapidly and the least successful manufacturers had been eliminated by the recession. In the case of co-operative heating entrepreneurship, the commonest form neither the district heating centre nor the system of heat-transfer pipes belong to co-operative society. The co-operative is responsible only for the delivery of the fuel and for looking after the heating plant. Remuneration is generally based on the amount of energy leaving the district heating plant. Thus the heat dissipated at the heating plant is the co-operative's problem and the heat dissipated during transfer are the energy buyer's problem. The investor in the equipments usually the local municipality or an energy utility. In some cases the co-operative owns the equipments well, in which case it is correct to speak of

  7. Development of Healthy Cities networks in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepel, Eberhard

    2007-01-01

    The Healthy Cities network in Europe was inspired by the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion when it was launched in 1987. The networking process was initiated by the WHO Regional Office for Europe, but developed its own dynamics in different European countries during a time marked by fundamental political transformations in many of the countries of Eastern Europe. The networks then connected with the 'Local Agenda 21' and the 'Sustainable Cities and Towns Campaign' to create a new and broader programmatic agenda at the local level. In particular, the ''Aalborg plus 10 - commitments"--of local governments in 2004 have the potential to inspire a new phase of participatory and sustainable policies at the level of local communities in Europe. However, the extent to which these initiatives will influence the macro-politics of the European Union towards a proclaimed "Europe of Citizens" remains to be watched carefully during the coming years.

  8. Proposal for an IAEA - sponsored project of interregional co-operation for training of nuclear scientists in developing countries, using the expertise available in the nuclear data field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.; Schmidt, J.J.

    1980-07-01

    During the Winter College on Nuclear Physics and Reactors jointly organized by the IAEA and the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in January - March 1980 and held at the ICTP in Trieste, a Working Group was convened from participants in the Interregional Advanced Training Course on Applications of Nuclear Theory to Nuclear Data Calculations for Reactor Design. The Working Group examined the current fast neutron nuclear data requirements for nuclear technologies and discussed possible means to meet these requirements, with a major emphasis on the possible contributions by and benefit for the developing countries. The Working Group concluded that the organisation of an IAEA-sponsored Project of Interregional Co-operation for Training of Nuclear Scientists in Developing Countries, Using the Expertise Available in the Nuclear Data Field, would be the best solution to cope with the problems in question and drafted an outline of the technical programme and organization of such a project the revised version of which is presented in this report

  9. Outlook for the IAEA's technical co-operation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samiei, Massoud

    1998-01-01

    This is a slide presentation dealing with the following subjects: - the IAEA's programmes; - the technical co-operation programme; - past trends in the TC programme; - new initiatives in TC; - TC programme profile; - perspectives for the future. The major programmes conducted by IAEA are concerning: - nuclear power and fuel cycle; - nuclear applications; - nuclear, radiation and waste safety, nuclear verification and security material; - management of technical co-operation; - policy making, coordination and support. In relation with the IAEA role in development process the author presents the legal framework for TC, the programme structure, and programme areas, resources, budgets, cycle, approval and implementation. Two plots regarding the recipients with and without NPP's are displayed for the period 1980-1994. Also, according to the status of the member states (without and with nuclear power programme) the programme priorities are presented. For the first case these are: radiation and waste safety, food and agriculture, water resources management human health and nutrition, human resources development, environmental protection and industrial applications. For the second case there are mentioned: radiation and nuclear safety, nuclear power operation and maintenance management, radioactive waste management, environment protection and sustainable energy options. Concerning the regional distribution the following figures are given for 1997: West Asia, 9%; Europe, 18%; Inter-regional, 11%; Africa, 24%; Latin America, 21%; East Asia and Pacific, 17%. In conclusion, the hope is expressed that the value of Technical Co-operation Programme would be seen not only in the successful transfer of technology but also, in the way that the nuclear technologies may satisfy demands for sustainable development by having a lasting impact on the life of the majority in a cost effective and environmentally sound manner

  10. FY 1998 Report on development of technologies for commercialization of photovoltaic power systems. International co-operative project (IEA implementing agreement for a co-operative programme on photovoltaic power systems); 1998 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu kokusai kyoryoku jigyo. IEA taiyoko hatsuden system kenkyu kyoryoku program jisshi kyotei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are outline of the International Energy Agency/Co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems (IEA/PVPS). Japan signed the IEA Implementing Agreement for a co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems in April 1993, and has been participating in the programme for research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange and introduction promotion, among others. This programme is managed by Executive Committee composed of the representatives, one nominated by each participating country, and each task is managed by each Operating Agency. There are 9 tasks (Tasks 1 to 9), and Executive Committee deliberates and approves the plans, and manages the progresses, budgetary plans and budgets for each task. IEA implementing agreement for a co-operative programme on PVPS, originally set effective for 5 years, has been extended for another 5 years to 2002, and the second phase activities have been started. The 9th to 11th Executive Committee meetings were held during the 1997-1998 period in Denmark, ROK, Spain, Austria and Australia, respectively. (NEDO)

  11. 9 May 2008 - Signature of the Protocol to the co-operation agreement dated 21 January 2006 between King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on behalf of the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, represented by M. I. Al-Suwaiyel and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), represented by R. Aymar, concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    9 May 2008 - Signature of the Protocol to the co-operation agreement dated 21 January 2006 between King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on behalf of the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, represented by M. I. Al-Suwaiyel and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), represented by R. Aymar, concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy physics

  12. Plants growing on contaminated and brownfield sites appropriate for use in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development terrestrial plant growth test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnett, Danielle E; Lawrence, Victoria K; Hutchings, Tony R; Hodson, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) terrestrial plant test is often used for the ecological risk assessment of contaminated land. However, its origins in plant protection product testing mean that the species recommended in the OECD guidelines are unlikely to occur on contaminated land. Six alternative species were tested on contaminated soils from a former Zn smelter and a metal fragmentizer with elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. The response of the alternative species was compared with that of two species recommended by the OECD: Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) and Trifolium pratense (red clover). Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) and Poa annua (annual meadowgrass) had low emergence rates in the control soil and so may be considered unsuitable. Festuca rubra (Chewings fescue), Holcus lanatus (Yorkshire fog), Senecio vulgaris (common groundsel), and Verbascum thapsus (great mullein) offer good alternatives to the OECD species. In particular, H. lanatus and S. vulgaris were more sensitive to the soils with moderate concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn than the OECD species. © 2010 SETAC.

  13. Co-operation Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Lithuania and CERN concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Lithuanian physicists have been active for some years in the RD39 and RD50 experiments at CERN, and have recently established contacts with representatives of the CMS collaboration. The Lithuanian physics community has particular strengths in applied physics, electronics and computing. During a recent visit to Vilnius by CERN representatives, the Institute of Physics and the University of Vilnius expressed their eagerness to expand collaboration with CERN in both, experimental and theoretical physics. Official support for this initiative was expressed by the leadership of the Lithuanian Academy of Sciences and by the Minister of Science, within a general policy of integrating Lithuanian scientists with European institutions. This objective was furthered by a recent visit to CERN by the president of the Lithuanian Academy of Sciences, and contacts are developing well. Following the example of Estonia, Lithuania would now become the second Baltic State having a Cooperation Agreement with CERN.

  14. Yearbook of International Co-operation on Environment and Development 2002/2003; an independent publication from the Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokke, Olav Schram; Thommessen, Oeystein B.

    2002-07-01

    The Yearbook of International Cooperation on Environment and Development aims to demonstrate the status of collaboration, the main obstacles to effective international solutions, and how to overcome them. The Yearbook assesses the achievements and the shortcomings of international co-operation, and helps the reader to distinguish between rhetoric and reality. The combination of independent, high-quality analysis and updated reference material makes this Yearbook an indispensable guide for decision-makers in government, international organizations, NGOs, and industry, as well as an essential source book for academic institutions, students, and libraries serving the concerned public. Current Issues and Key Themes in this edition focus on: (1) how effective environmental mega-conferences are in global environmental governance; (2) how the climate change regime can achieve its objective by addressing the very real concerns about climate-change impacts on human beings as much as on healthy ecosystems; (3) how the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme has been an effective regional agent for environmental protection and how it should cope with the challenges ahead; (4) how the Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty has contributed to strengthening international cooperation within the Treaty, but nevertheless is hampered by the vagueness of some core requirements and by the unresolved issues of jurisdiction, control, and enforcement in the Antarctic; (5) how the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands-neither rigorous nor extensive in its obligations-has acted as a vehicle for the development of a reasonably detailed policy framework for wetland conservation; (6) how Friends of the Earth International-among the world's largest, most diverse, and most influential environmental NGOs-has such internal diversity, in addition to its geographic spread and lack of agreed political ideology, that it risks its external profile becoming blurred and its internal

  15. The Text of the Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 1987. Status of Acceptances as of 28 February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    As of 28 February 1993, notifications of acceptance of the Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 1987 (See INFCIRC/ 167/Add.15), in accordance with Article 2 thereof, had been received by the Director General from the Governments [ru

  16. The Text of the Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 1987. Status of Acceptances as of 28 February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    As of 28 February 1993, notifications of acceptance of the Agreement to Extend the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 1987 (See INFCIRC/ 167/Add.15), in accordance with Article 2 thereof, had been received by the Director General from the Governments [es

  17. Large wind turbine development in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zervos, A. [Center for Renewable Energy Sources, Attikis (Greece)

    1996-12-31

    During the last few years we have witnessed in Europe the development of a new generation of wind turbines ranging from 1000-1500 kW size. They are presently being tested and they are scheduled to reach the market in late 1996 early 1997. The European Commission has played a key role by funding the research leading to the development of these turbines. The most visible initiative at present is the WEGA program - the development, together with Europe`s leading wind industry players of a new generation of turbines in the MW range. By the year 1997 different European manufacturers will have introduced almost a dozen new MW machine types to the international market, half of them rated at 1.5 MW. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Development of superconducting power devices in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tixador, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Europe celebrated last year (2008) the 100-year anniversary of the first liquefaction of helium by H. Kammerling Onnes in Leiden. It led to the discovery of superconductivity in 1911. Europe is still active in the development of superconducting (SC) devices. The discovery of high critical temperature materials in 1986, again in Europe, has opened a lot of opportunities for SC devices by broking the 4 K cryogenic bottleneck. Electric networks experience deep changes due to the emergence of dispersed generation (renewable among other) and to the advances in ICT (Information Communication Technologies). The networks of the future will be 'smart grids'. Superconductivity will offer 'smart' devices for these grids like FCL (Fault Current Limiter) or VLI (Very Low Inductance) cable and would certainly play an important part. Superconductivity also will participate to the required sustainable development by lowering the losses and enhancing the mass specific powers. Different SC projects in Europe will be presented (Cable, FCL, SMES, Flywheel and Electrical Machine) but the description is not exhaustive. Nexans has commercialized the first two FCLs without public funds in the European grid (UK and Germany). The Amsterdam HTS cable is an exciting challenge in term of losses for long SC cables. European companies (Nexans, Air Liquide, Siemens, Converteam, ...) are also very active for projects outside Europe (LIPA, DOE FCL, ...).

  19. Biotechnological research in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, H J

    1982-01-01

    The current research possibilities in the expanding field of biotechnology in Europe are very briefly described. Remarks on research and development are limited to six topics: fermented food products; biomass production; product formation; bioreactors; waste-water treatment, environmental processes and methane formation; central research institutions. It is summarised that increased efforts at co-operation on all levels are vital for an improved development in the field of biotechnology throughout Europe.

  20. Nuclear new developments in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucaciu, G.; Chirica, T.

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The European nuclear industry has supported a common EU-level approach to analyzing the consequences of the Fukushima accident and to developing a common framework for reassessing the safety of its nuclear power plants; FORATOM assertion is that nuclear power should feature prominently in the EC Energy Roadmap 2050 later this year; Long-term benefits of nuclear for EU energy supply remain valid: security of supply, competitiveness and low-carbon; Innovative financial instruments are requested for large projects finance; Fukushima will complicate the financing and insurance frames, and possibly affect the overall cost of the nuclear projects; Fair treatment of all production technologies is required

  1. Role of proper response schemes, legislation and regional co-operation in combating illicit trafficking of nuclear materials in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Bulgaria's geographical location - between Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East - exposes it to much illegal trafficking: of people, arms, drugs, etc. The trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials in Bulgaria can be divided in two main parts - internal and transit. Internal trafficking consists of stolen radioactive sources such as counters and densitometers, irradiation devices, tools for removing static electricity, and smoke detectors, which mainly contain the isotopes 137 Cs, 60 Co, 192 Ir, 226 Ra and 241 Am. The external trafficking of illicit nuclear materials is connected with transfer of raw materials and expensive metals from the former Soviet Union to countries in Western Europe and the Middle East, including aluminium, osmium, caesium, scandium, rare earth elements, red mercury, plutonium and enriched uranium. Detecting internal and external trafficking poses serious problems for the Bulgarian authorities, in terms of equipment and qualified personnel at the borders and inside the country. Developing countries need protocols for detecting and responding to illicit trafficking of nuclear materials, which is a new threat that requires rapid implementation of comprehensive measures and efforts, novel approaches, coordination of services and institutions, and even new legislation. The paper describes a three step model for better and more rapid responses for combating illicit nuclear trafficking in Bulgaria.The steps involve developing first response protocols, using nondestructive analytical means to categorize materials on-site, followed by in-depth analysis. It is also important to initiate contacts with neighbouring countries to foster regional collaboration among law enforcement agencies, customs authorities, analytical laboratories, etc., to improve efficiency in combating illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. (author)

  2. Development and field evaluation of animal feed supplementation packages. Proceedings of the final review meeting of an IAEA Technical Co-operation Regional AFRA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    Inadequate nutrition is one of the major constraints limiting livestock production in African countries. The ruminants in the smallholder sector depend on natural pasture and fibrous crop residues for their survival, growth, reproduction and production. Since quality and quantity of the natural pasture vary with season, animals dependent on it are subjected to nutritional stress in the dry season when feed resources are senesced and in short supply leading to decreased animal productivity. The main objective of the IAEA Technical Co-operation Regional AFRA Project 11-17 (RAF/5/041) was the improvement of ruminant livestock production in AFRA Member States. It had two main components: (a) the development and dissemination of cost-effective and sustainable feed supplementation packages which are based on locally available feed resources; and (b) establishment of the 'Self-coating Radioimmunoassay' technique for measuring progesterone in the milk and blood of ruminants. The project has developed a number of feed supplementation packages using feed resources available on-farm and by-products from agro-industrial processes. The packages involve the use of multi-nutrient blocks containing molasses and urea or poultry litter, ensilage of fibrous crop residues with poultry litter, leguminous fodder, mineral blocks etc. These packages have been evaluated on-station and on-farm to assess their potential to enhance productivity of ruminants. The cost-benefit ratio for feeding supplementation packages has been established. As a result of their use, income of the farmers has been shown to increase substantially. Needless to say, the scientists, agricultural extension officers, policy makers and the governments must work hand-in-hand to capitalize on this and ensure wider application and extension of the packages, and develop strategies for sustaining them. Radioimmunoassay for progesterone has been used in this project mainly for the assessment of ovarian activity in order to

  3. International Economic Association on organization of co-operative production and development of equipment and providing technical assistance in construction of nuclear power plants - ''INTERATOMENERGO''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tsev, N.D.

    1979-01-01

    History is stated of foundation of the International Economic Association ''Interatomenergo''. Structure is given of the Association and the list of main problems to be solved by it. Project is given of the programm of co-operation in the field of scientific and technical works as well as of design and projecting works in creation of new types of equipment for nuclear power plants, in particular, creation of serial power units with improved WWER-1000 reactor. Directions are stated of activity of the Association in the field of providing assistance in construction and exploitation of nuclear power plants as well as in training of operational personnel [ru

  4. AFRA. African Regional Co-operative Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This publication provides an outline of the African Regional Co-operation Agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA). The agreement stems from an initiative of several African member states of the IAEA to get the agency to help establish an African regional arrangement which would be similar to arrangements which were already in place in the Asian and Latin American regions. Through this regional approach to development, AFRA seeks to accelerate moves toward self-sufficiency in scientific disciplines and appropriate technologies by coordinating intellectual and physical resources and disseminating innovative methods and practices in a cost-effective manner

  5. Sustainability indicators - a tool for regional co-operation

    OpenAIRE

    Koitka, Heike

    2002-01-01

    Sustainability indicators are more than just numbers. Besides their main function of illustrating the complex vision of sustainability they could support some factors for success of regional co-operation through their development. Today the discussion on indicators and co-operation is mainly separated from each other. Sustainability indicators are developed on all spatial levels from neighbourhoods up to the United Nations. In some cases the indicators are developed but remain unused. Regiona...

  6. Example of International Co-Operation in the Frame of the Project Phare (TEMPUS) in Innovations in Teaching of Environmental Hydrogeology in Engineering Education in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grmela, Arnost; Rapantova, Nadia

    The international TEMPUS (Trans-European Co-operating and Mobility Scheme for Higher Education between Central/Eastern Europe and European Union) project lasted from 1995-1997. In the framework of TEMPUS, a material and knowledge background was developed in order to ensure the education of the branch Geological Engineering with specialization in…

  7. Retail Market Structure Development in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Machek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is analyzing the trends and development in the retailing sector in Central Europe, namely in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. These markets serve about 63 million inhabitants. The retail industry in Central Europe has changed dramatically in the last two decades, and has become a model for successful transformation of emerging markets. The retail market is highly concentrated and dominated by Western European retail chains. International retail chains are using all formats of modern distribution. This article is focusing on the development of hypermarkets, supermarkets and discount stores. Due to the international retail chains, Central European countries benefit from a dense network of modern shopping places; the intense competition of highly productive retailers contributes to the lower level of inflation rate because of the so-called Wal-Mart Effect. The constant pressure on prices influences the marketing strategies of both retailers and suppliers.

  8. SOLAR ENERGY POLICY DEVELOPMENTS IN EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela PÃCE?ILÃ

    2015-01-01

    Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy sources in Europe offering new possibilities to generate electricity and heat. In this context, the study provides accurate information about researches that characterize the solar resource and investigates the potential of solar energy in European countries. The analysis is also focused on the current status of market development including photovoltaic capacity, electricity production from solar photovoltaic power, solar thermal capa...

  9. An Effect of the Co-Operative Network Model for Students' Quality in Thai Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanthaphum, Udomsin; Tesaputa, Kowat; Weangsamoot, Visoot

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed: 1) to study the current and desirable states of the co-operative network in developing the learners' quality in Thai primary schools, 2) to develop a model of the co-operative network in developing the learners' quality, and 3) to examine the results of implementation of the co-operative network model in the primary school.…

  10. The text of the third agreement to extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA). Extension of agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The text of the Third Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology, 'the 1987 RCA', is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Pursuant to Article 1 of the Third Agreement to Extend the 1987 Regional Co-operative Agreement, the 1987 RCA shall continue in force for a further period of five years with effect from 12 June 2002, i.e., through 11 June 2007. As of 15 May 2002, notifications of acceptance had been received by the Director General from the Governments of Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Viet Nam. The latest status list is attached

  11. Assuring nuclear energy's future through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upson, P.

    1999-01-01

    It is invited lecture as the introduction to the sixt international meeting entitled Nuclear Energy in Central Europe. Good commercial operation, public information and education are needed to win the confidence of the public, and to attract young people to take over the industry's founding generation. Stimulating international co-operation and transfer of best practices can assure this happens across the whole of the Europian nuclear industry

  12. Potential interest in Europe in SPS development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhartz, K K

    1980-06-01

    The Solar Satellite Power System is a concept whereby large solar-energy converters are placed in outer space and the electrical energy produced is transmitted back to earth as microwave radiation. A number of studies, performed mainly in the United States, are aimed at assessing the technical, economic, social and health aspects of this concept. This paper does not address the feasibility of the SPS as such, but discusses the potential contribution that an SPS could make to the European energy scenario, the economic impact of the SPS as an indigenous European energy source, and the potential importance of the SPS as a technology driver. A European network of forty solar power satellites could supply electrical energy equal to Europe's present electrical energy production and significantly reduce Europe's dependence on energy imports. Additionally the development of a power satellite technology, if started by the United States, is expected to lead to such an advancement in technology in key areas, e.g., space industrialisation, photovoltaic energy conversion and wireless transmission of energy, that Europe would rapidly lose technical competence in many important fields if it were not to participate.

  13. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This first part of a two-part report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. Part 1 of this two-part document discusses three generic models. The second, separate part of the document provides a number of examples demonstrating the models described. This report focuses on the implementation of SHS. However, a considerable amount of the PV market in developing countries is stated as consisting of large systems providing electricity for social services, such as light for schools, mosques, churches, communal centres, refrigeration for health centres and drinking water for communities. It is noted that there are considerable differences between the 'social market' and the 'private market' for SHS. The 'social market' generally consists of large systems but fewer in number. The guide does not cover the detailed technical aspects of a Solar Home System or the issue of recycling old batteries.

  14. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. The role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. C. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Bates, J. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries. The objective of this document is to provide assistance to those project developers that are interested in implementing or improving support programmes for the deployment of PV systems for rural electrification. It is to enable them to address and implement quality assurance measures, with an emphasis on management, technical and training issues and other factors that should be considered for the sustainable implementation of rural electrification programmes. It is considered important that quality also addresses the socio-economic and the socio-technical aspects of a programme concept. The authors summarise that, for a PV programme, there are three important areas of quality control to be implemented: quality management, technical standards and quality of training.

  15. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. PV for rural electrification in developing countries - Programme design, planning and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Wilshaw, A. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the design, planning and implementation of PV programmes. The guide contains details on the preparation for PV programmes, including the assessment of needs, stakeholder consultation, social context analysis, supply options and national policy considerations. The establishment of goals, delivery modes, timelines, logistics and quality assurance are discussed. Further, the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of PV programmes is discussed, as are a number of methodologies that have been developed with the aim of improving programme design and implementation. The guide highlights issues pertinent to rural energy programmes in developing countries and leads programme administrators through the process of planning, implementing and evaluating a PV programme.

  16. Sprawl and sustainable urban development in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin-Mićić Marija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50 years urban development in Europe has been affected by extensive urban sprawl. Environmental, economic and social impacts of long lasting sprawl are threatening urban identity, urban culture and cultural identity of European territory. Last two decades the main concept in European planning and governance system has been the sustainable development, namely sustainable urban development and its implementation. We ought to be realistic about the possibilities to counter sprawl. Realistic seams to steer sprawling tendencies in more suitable and sustainable manner, so called smart urban sprawl. This paper analyses the planning concepts and gives the brief review of current policies for steering the urban sprawl in EU, which are considered to be of importance in achieving more sustainable urban development and efficient urban management in Serbia.

  17. International co-operation. Key issue paper no. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    In accordance with guidance provided by the Steering Group, this report assesses the adequacy and effectiveness of international co-operation relating to the nuclear fuel cycle, with a view toward identifying any needed new forms or arrangements for co-operation. In more specific terms, the Steering Committee`s guidance identified the following questions: Is the existing international framework sufficient for: the safe and secure operation of the fuel cycle; the economic and orderly development of the world`s nuclear energy systems (or their phase-out should this take place); international co-operation in R and D; international co-operation in industrial activities? Are there places where these requirements overlap or interact so as to impede activities which are desirable? Can new forms of co-operation be foreseen which would make it easier to implement any of the fuel cycle options in a safe, secure and responsible way? Are there other new forms of international co-operation which would affect the fuel cycle, e.g. regional institutions; international plutonium management regime and/or storage? Finally: What is the appropriate role of IAEA in any of these?.

  18. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. PV for rural electrification in developing countries - A guide to capacity building requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J.; Gunning, R. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom); Stapleton, G. [Global Sustainable Energy Solutions Pty Ltd, GSES, Ulladulla 2539 (Australia)

    2003-03-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the topic of 'capacity building' in rural electrification projects. Capacity building is defined here as the development of an organisation's or individual's core knowledge, skills and capabilities in order to build and enhance the organisation's effectiveness and sustainability. This document identifies capacity building measures that should be undertaken as an integral component of a PV-based rural electrification implementation programme. Capacity building is to be facilitated through the provision of technical support activities, training, specific technical assistance and resource networking. The assessment of existing knowledge and the identification of training needs are discussed and training needs and their implementation by governmental and commercial players is discussed. Eleven case studies complete the report.

  19. Activities and co-operations in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Dunjiu

    1991-01-01

    The items of activities and co-operations in 1990 are listed. It includes the meetings held by CNDC at home, the international meetings held in China, the international meetings, workshop or training course attended by chinese scientists and other activities and co-operations related to CNDC

  20. Obstetric care: competition or co-operation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Meijer, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of co-operation within maternity and obstetric care between midwives, general practitioners (GPs) and obstetricians. DESIGN: descriptive correlational study. SETTING: The Netherlands. Policy is towards more co-operation between

  1. The Co-Operative: Good with Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Max

    2015-01-01

    The article is a summary of a small-scale research project which considers the formation of Co-operative Trust Schools. This was carried out in 2013 at a time when the number of schools becoming Academies and Trust Schools through the Co-operative College was burgeoning. Through questionnaire, interview, documentary analysis and exploration of…

  2. Extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA). Status of Acceptances as of 30 July 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    As of 30 July 1998, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) (INFCIRC/377), had been received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Governments of 23 African States. Senegal is added to the list of 22 States reported in the previous edition (add.10) of this document. The extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  3. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA). Status of acceptances as of 30 September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    As of 30 September 1995, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (see INFCIRC/377), has been received by the Director General from the Governments of: Tunisia, Egypt, Madagascar, South Africa, Ethiopia, Algeria, Mauritius, Sudan, Tanzania, Cameroon, Kenya, Zaire, Morocco, Sierra Leone, Namibia, Nigeria, Ghana. Pursuant to Article XIV.2, (of the original Agreement) the extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  4. Extension of the African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA). Status of acceptances as of 30 September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    As of 30 September 1995, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (see INFCIRC/377), has been received by the Director General from the Governments of: Tunisia, Egypt, Madagascar, South Africa, Ethiopia, Algeria, Mauritius, Sudan, Tanzania, Cameroon, Kenya, Zaire, Morocco, Sierra Leone, Namibia, Nigeria, Ghana. Pursuant to Article XIV.2, (of the original Agreement) the extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000.

  5. Extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA). Status of Acceptances as of 30 July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-13

    As of 30 July 1998, notifications of acceptance of the extension of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (AFRA) (INFCIRC/377), had been received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Governments of 23 African States. Senegal is added to the list of 22 States reported in the previous edition (add.10) of this document. The extension entered into force on 4 April 1995, upon expiration of the original Agreement, and will remain in force for an additional period of 5 years, i.e. through 3 April 2000

  6. Co-operatives and Normative Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregn, Kirsten; Jagd, Søren

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the conditions for applying normative control in co-operatives. For normative control to be effective two conditions are found particularly important: Individuals must be morally involved and the organization must have a system of making it possible to link common norms...... and individual action. If these conditions are not fulfilled, as may be the case in many co-operatives, normative control cannot be expected to work. The problems of normative control in co-operatives may then not be caused by the use of normative control as such, but may instead be a problem of securing...

  7. Potato developments in a changing Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, N.U.; Haverkort, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The papers in this book reflect societal and commercial changes such as consumer behaviour and marketing aspects in relation to fresh and processed potatoes in western, central and eastern Europe. Seed trade between western and central Europe is entering a new stage with altered inspection

  8. FY 1998 Report on development of technologies for commercialization of photovoltaic power systems. International co-operative project (IEA implementing agreement for a co-operative programme on photovoltaic power systems, 9th and 10th executive committee meetings); 1998 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu kokusai kyoryoku jigyo. IEA taiyoko hatsuden system kenkyu kyoryoku program jisshi kyotei dai 10 kai dai 9 kai iinkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are outline of the International Energy Agency/Co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems (IEA/PVPS), and minutes of the 9th and 10th executive committee meetings. Japan signed the IEA Implementing Agreement for a co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems in April 1993, and has been participating in the programme for research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange and introduction promotion, among others. The tasks are composed of exchange and dissemination of information on PVPS, operational performance and design of PVPS, use of PVPS in stand alone and island applications, grid interconnection of building integrated and other dispersed PVPS, design and grid interconnection of dispersed PVPS, e.g., roof type, design and operation of modular PV plants for large scale power generation, PV in the built environment, and feasibility study on large scale PV power generation utilizing desert areas. The 9th and 10th executive committee meetings include the co-operative programme progress reports and technical tours. (NEDO)

  9. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    benefits of PIM, a concept of Co-operative Intelligent Memory (CIM) was developed by the intelligent system group of University of Hertfordshire, based on the previously developed Co-operative Pseudo Intelligent Memory (CPIM). This paper provides an overview on previous works (CPIM, CIM) and realization......In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potential...

  10. The development of gas hubs in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miriello, Caterina; Polo, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the development of wholesale markets for natural gas at the different stages of market liberalization. We identify three steps in the process: wholesale trade initially develops to cope with balancing needs when the shippers and suppliers segments become more fragmented; once the market becomes more liquid, it turns out to be a second source of gas procurement in alternative to long term contracts; finally, to manage price risk financial instruments are traded. We review in detail the different regulatory measures that must be introduced to create an efficient and functioning wholesale gas market. Finally, we analyze the evolution of gas hubs in the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy in terms of market rules and market liquidity. We argue that each of these country cases can be easily located into the evolutionary path we have highlighted at the beginning, with the UK and the Netherlands leading the process, Germany and Italy constrained by limited supply; Italy is also showing an interesting counterfactual. -- Highlights: •The paper illustrates development paths for natural gas hubs in Europe. •Wholesale trade increases with competition. •The regulatory settings of UK, Netherlands, Germany and Italy are reviewed. •Each country is located into the evolutionary path highlighted in the analytical framework

  11. China and CERN renew their Co-operation Agreement

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Liu Yanhua, Chinese Vice Minister of Science and Technology, and Dr. Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN, sign a new Co-operation Agreement between the Government of the People's Republic of China and CERN. During his visit to CERN on 17 February, Liu Yanhua, Vice Minister of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China, signed a new Co-operation Agreement with the Laboratory. The Agreement, which is valid for a period of five years and renewable, lays down the framework for the development of scientific and technological co-operation between CERN and China. This includes China's participation, as a non-Member State, in CERN's research projects as well as its main programmes. Robert Aymar and Liu Yanhua underlined that this Agreement will provide an excellent framework for close co-operation on the LHC Programme and Grid and accelerator technologies. Scientific co-operation between China and CERN is nothing new, as Chinese physicists already took part in the LEP experiments. Today, CERN's C...

  12. New co-operation agreement between CERN and JINR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer (left) and JINR Director Alexei Sissakian (right). On Thursday 28 January, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer and JINR Director Alexei Sissakian signed a new enlarged co-operation agreement to continue and enhance the scientific and technical co-operation of the two institutes in the field of high-energy physics. CERN and JINR have a long and successful history of collaboration extending back to the earliest days of their existence. The first informal meeting on international co-operation in the field of high-energy accelerators took place at CERN in 1959. It was attended by senior scientists from the United States, the USSR (including JINR) and CERN. Both JINR and CERN have played the role of a bridge between East and West for decades, contributing to the development of international scientific co-operation. In 1992 JINR signed a co-operation agreement with CERN that included an important number of protocols covering JINR’s participation in the construction of th...

  13. Co-operative approaches to regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huigen, Hans; Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

    1997-01-01

    The case studies in this occasional paper are about ways in which governments and businesses are seeking to address economic and social problems by using new forms of co-operation that are different...

  14. Agricultural Productivity, Co-Operatives and Organisational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania ... can enhance productivity and increase farmers' income by bringing financial services closer. ... of Kimuli Agricultural Marketing Co-operative Society (AMCOS) and Muungano Savings and ...

  15. Report on fabrication of pin components for fuel fabrication in FUJI project (Co-operation in the research and development of advanced sphere-pac fuel among PSI, JNC, and NRG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Hinai, Hiroshi; Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Kono, Shusaku; Matsuzaki, Masaaki

    2003-03-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has conducted the co-operation concerning vibro-packed fuels with Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland and Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) in the Netherlands. The project 'Research and Development of advanced Sphere-pac Fuel' is called FUJI (FUel irradiations for JNC and PSI) Project. In this project, three types of fuels that are sphere-pac fuels, vipac fuels, and pellet fuels will be irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) to compare their performance. Based on the drawing which has been agreed among three parties, fabrication of the pin components and welding of the upper and lower connection end plugs were performed in accordance with ISO9001 in JNC. This report describes data of the fabricated pin components, results of welding qualification tests, and quality assurance of the welded components. The fabrication of pin components was successfully completed and they were delivered to PSI in October 2002. (author)

  16. Supersurveillance, Democracy, and Co-Operation--The Challenge for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, John

    2014-01-01

    The paper explores pedagogies of surveillance and counter pedagogies of radical democracy and co-operative practice and their implications for continuing professional development (CPD). Teachers have had to respond to an increasing naturalisation of surveillance in schools. However, this naturalisation can be countered by drawing upon the emergent…

  17. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakr, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    In 1975 Tanzania became the newest African Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency, bringing the total African membership of the Agency up to 25 countries. The other African Member States are: Algeria; United Republic of Cameroon; Egypt; Ethiopia; Gabon; Ghana; Ivory Coast; Kenya; Liberia; Libyan Arab Republic; Madagascar; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; Sierra Leone; South Africa; Sudan; Tunisia; Uganda; Zaire; Zambia. Membership of the Agency entitles these countries to receive assistance both from the Regular Programme of the Agency and from UNDP resources, while non-Member States in the region only receive Agency assistance financed from the latter source. Any attempt to look at the technical co-operation programme in Africa must start by stressing the wide differences between African countries in their level of scientific and technical development ranging from countries with advanced atomic energy programmes to countries just crossing the threshold towards the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Perhaps the most striking and marked difference is in the quality and number of nuclear energy scientists and technologists available. In view of this, the technical assistance programme in the African context has been a selective one, guided by considerations of pragmatism and responsiveness to particular requirements of the different individual countries and not by any doctrinaire or ready-made strategy for assistance. (author)

  18. International co-operation and the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    di Primio, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The transfer of technology from developed countries is usually done through industrial enterprises. The local industrialization of imported technology does not necessarily imply that full benefit is extracted from its application. A pre-established scientific and technical infrastructure is needed to understand and incorporate it, and to develop methods for improvement and use at the industrial level, in the frame of national conditions. The transference of nuclear technology has recently shown new concepts for implementation. It is becoming a rule that massive industrial nuclear technology transfer to developing nations is tied to a requirement for simultaneous assistance in creating or promoting the infrastructure. An example of international co-operation to meet this requirement is the Argentine-German Agreement for the Peaceful Applications of Nuclear Energy. Since 1971 this has been used to strengthen the scientific and technical programmes of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission in the relevant fields of industrial applications. The objectives and implementation of the agreement are described: co-operative actions were initially directed to the infrastructure needed to support the nuclear fuel cycle industry. The results achieved during the period 1971-1976 are critically analysed. This analysis has influenced the selection of future co-operative projects as well as the extension of the co-operation to other nuclear fields of common interest. (author)

  19. The Text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology. Acceptance of the Agreement by Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    On 23 October 1974 the Government of Bangladesh notified the Agency of its acceptance of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology between the Agency and Member States, in accordance with Section 9 thereof. Pursuant to Section 10, the Agreement consequently entered into force with respect to the Government of Bangladesh on that date

  20. Promoting regional energy co-operation in South Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Leena; Misra, Neha

    2007-01-01

    Energy is a key ingredient of the socio-economic development of any region. South Asia is not only one of the fastest growing regions in the world; it is also one of the poorest, which thus puts energy at the very heart of the development process in the region. This paper looks at the challenges faced by the South Asia sub-region for economic co-operation (SASEC) comprised of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India and Nepal, and also at the role of greater regional energy co-operation therein. The region is characterized by pressures of growing economies and increasing population. While the per capita energy consumption is one of the lowest in the world, energy intensity continues to be very high. A large portion of the population lacks access to modern sources of energy and depends on traditional sources that are not only inefficient but also have severe health and environmental problems associated with them. Increasing oil import dependency and huge investment needs for energy market development pose a further challenge. The region has a good resource potential and tremendous scope for energy co-operation, which can play a key role in addressing many of these energy security concerns and in putting it on the path of sustainable development. It is ironic that the record in the area has been so limited and that too in the most basic form of co-operation, i.e. bilateral arrangements between countries. This paper puts forth a multi-pronged strategy for sub-regional energy co-operation encompassing softer options aimed at confidence building to more substantial and larger scale co-operation efforts. Delays in decision making to ensure stronger and mutually beneficial co-operation efforts are associated with high costs not only to the energy sector but also for the entire development agenda. With the precarious energy situation in the region and unprecedented increases in international oil prices seen in recent times, it is high time for policy makers, financing institutions, NGOs

  1. Primary care workforce development in Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Heinemann, S.; Gress, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a large variation in the organization of primary care in Europe. In some health care systems, primary care is the gatekeeper to more specialized care, whilst in others patients have the choice between a wide range of providers. Primary care has increasingly become teamwork.

  2. Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czvikovszky, T.; Dobó, J. [Research Institute for Plastics, Budapest (Hungary)

    1968-10-15

    The preparation of wood-plastic combinations can be regarded as a special field of graft-copolymerization. It is therefore quite understandable why this idea was first introduced by graft-copolymerization specialists. On the basis of the theory and technique of radiation-induced graft- copolymerization, which has been greatly developed since 1950, wood-plastic combinations appeared simultaneously in the United States of America and in Europe. As is known, intensive American research on wood-plastic combinations is based on four patents by Kenaga from 1958, which were published in 1963. The worldwide interest in the matter was initiated, however, by Karpov's paper of 1960 based on Soviet patents from 1958 and 1960.

  3. Energy technology and opportunities for East-West co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, S.

    1991-01-01

    The private sector is probably the principal Western actor in Central and Eastern Europe. The accelerated political reforms in the East have improved the prospects for Western partners to invest in the energy sector and collaborate on energy technology development and transfer while taking advantage of the specific local benefits offered. These benefits are primarily found on the energy production side where the specific knowledge of the Western partner may be employed for the development of energy markets in the East. Conversely, the Central and Eastern European countries appear to be looking to co-operation with Western partners to provide them with access to capital, technology and organizational know-how, as well as, to Western markets. The primary long-term economic aim of Central and Eastern European governments must be to promote a market based economy. This requires not merely the definition of an official energy price system, but also the presence of legal and other institutions to establish property rights, civil contractual laws, trade policy and framework conditions for the free development of market forces and private enterprise. The IEA, International Energy Agency, as an example of the effectiveness of international co-operation, may be in the position to provide some assistance on technical and policy matters

  4. Natural gas in Europe: Development prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasetto, R.

    1992-01-01

    Today, natural gas covers 16% of primary energy demand in Europe. Consumption of this fuel is set at about 380 billion cubic meters to which we can add about 700 billion consumed in the ex-COMECON countries. Europe's consumption alone is forecasted by many to rise to 500 billion cubic meters at the turn of the century and to 600 billion by the year 2010. It is expected that the power plant sector will account for one-third of this rise in consumption. Even if domestic production of this fuel is maximized and foreign suppliers maintain their production trends, the expected demand increases in industriali--ed countries can be sufficiently satisfied only by recourse to new suppliers located in the far reaches of the globe

  5. Advancing regional co-operation in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksoudi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA's regional co-operation programme in Africa was initiated in 1983, with two regional projects dealing with hydrology and insect physiology and biochemistry. The paper describes the structure of this Regional Programme, the sources of finance and the projects currently in operation in agriculture and hydrology. 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. FY 1998 Report on development of technologies for commercialization of photovoltaic power systems. International co-operative project (IEA implementing agreement for a co-operative programme on photovoltaic power systems, 11th and 12th executive committee meetings); 1998 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu kokusai kyoryoku jigyo. IEA taiyoko hatsuden system kenkyu kyoryoku program jisshi kyotei dai 12 kai dai 11 kai shikko iinkai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are outline of the International Energy Agency/Co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems (IEA/PVPS), and minutes of the 11th and 12th executive committee meetings. Japan signed the IEA Implementing Agreement for a co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems in April 1993, and has been participating in the programme for research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange and introduction promotion, among others. Presented to the 11th executive committee meeting are progresses in each task, review of the PVPS programme by an independent reviewer, strategy for the next term of the PVPS agreement, and marketing of PV in the IEA member countries. The meeting also has confirmed the action plans and partial responsibilities. In the 12th executive committee meeting, the progresses of the tasks, e.g., objects, activities and problems, are reported, and reviewed by the participants. Discussed in the task 1, information exchange, are new communication methods, publication frequency and contents of Internal Survey Report, and opening of the internet home page, among others. (NEDO)

  7. Co-operation and Self-Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Co-operation has its specific meanings in physical (dissipative, biological (autopoietic and social (re-creative systems. On upper hierarchical systemic levels there are additional, emergent properties of co-operation, co-operation evolves dialectically. The focus of this paper is human cooperation. Social systems permanently reproduce themselves in a loop that mutually connects social structures and actors. Social structures enable and constrain actions, they are medium and outcome of social actions. This reflexive process is termed re-creation and describes the process of social selforganization. Co-operation in a very weak sense means coaction and takes place permanently in re-creative systems: two or more actors act together in a co-ordinated manner so that a new emergent property emerges. Co-action involves the formation of forces, environment and sense (dispositions, decisions, definitions. Mechanistic approaches conceive coaction in terms of rational planning, consciousness, intention, predictability, and necessity. Holistic approaches conceive coaction in terms of spontaneity, unconscious and unintended actions, non-predictability, chance. Dialectic approaches conceive co-action in terms of a unity of rational planning and spontaneous emergence, a unity of conscious and unconscious aspects and consequences, and a unity of necessity and chance. Co-operation in a strong sense that is employed in this paper means that actors work together, create a new emergent reality, have shared goals, all benefit from co-operating, can reach their goals in joint effort more quickly and more efficiently than on an individual basis, make concerted use of existing structures in order to produce new structures, learn from each other mutually, are interconnected in a social network, and are mutually dependent and responsible. There is a lack of cooperation, self-determination, inclusion and direct democracy in modern society due to its antagonistic

  8. IAEA technical co-operation and the NPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez Ocon, C.

    1985-01-01

    The IAEA technical co-operation programme promotes nuclear techniques and technologies in the developing countries. The Statute, the NPT, and the Revised Guiding Principles all reflect the desire of countries to foster an international climate where it will be unacceptable for a non-nuclear-weapon State to indulge in the development of military nuclear technology and reprehensible for States possessing this technology to offer it to others

  9. International co-operation in the field of wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The use of wind energy is expanding rapidly worldwide. At the end of 1996 over 6000 MW was installed and the annual increase has during the last years exceeded 1000 MW. The development is also reaching more and more countries. In order to maintain technical and commercial development international co-operation is needed to secure cost-effectiveness, reliability and safety of the technology. International recommendations, harmonisation and standardisation is promoted by several international organizations like IEA, IEC and the classification organisations

  10. Incentives to strengthen international co-operation in R and D for advanced nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthesen, E.; Bakunyaev, A.D.; Gibson, I.H.; Hosemann, J.P.; Tavoni, R.; Versteegh, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the need for International Co-operation in R and D for Advanced Reactors in order to maintain options for the future deployment of nuclear power against the current background of declining R and D capability in Europe

  11. Family co-operation programme description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, H A; Terry, T

    1990-01-01

    Current parenting practices indicate a continuing trend towards less family interaction. Institutional attempts to intervene with parents often fail. The 'Family Co-operation Programme' provides a tangible method for families and schools to work together in preventing alcohol and drug abuse, by utilising the positive influence of the home and strengthening family relationships. The Board of Education for the State of Utah has tested and is currently implementing a unique, low-cost, alternative to impact on the home. Utilising a K-12 alcohol/drug abuse school-based curriculum, the child, based on his/her inclass training, becomes the resource for family co-operation activities. These include training in coping skills, decision-making, resistance to peer persuasion, increased self-esteem and alcohol/drug information. Grade level materials go home with the child, who returns a requested parent evaluation. Data for over one thousand families show the positive impact of the activities.

  12. Nordic Model of Subregional Co-Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzela Joanna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nordic co-operation is renowned throughout the world and perceived as the collaboration of a group of countries which are similar in their views and activities. The main pillars of the Nordic model of co-operation are the tradition of constitutional principles, activity of public movements and organisations, freedom of speech, equality, solidarity, and respect for the natural environment. In connection with labour and entrepreneurship, these elements are the features of a society which favours efficiency, a sense of security and balance between an individual and a group. Currently, the collaboration is a complex process, including many national, governmental and institutional connections which form the “Nordic family”.

  13. NEA international co-operative projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This text is consecrated at the international co-operative projects of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of reactor safety (Halden reactor project, Loft project, studies on the damaged Three Mile Island unit-2 reactor, inspection of reactor steel components, incident reporting system) and in the field of radioactive waste management (Stripa project, geochemical data bases, Alligator river project, seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste, decommissioning of nuclear facilities)

  14. Academic Talent Development in North America and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvin, Linda; Subotnik, Rena F.

    2015-01-01

    First we describe one particular model of talent development (Jarvin and Subotnik in The handbook of secondary gifted education. Prufrock Press, Waco, 2006) and situate it in perspective to other models developed in North America and Europe. We then discuss the implications of this view of giftedness on education and review related resources and…

  15. Europe

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Voilà deux militants de la cause européenne qui plaident, chacun à sa manière, pour un sursaut afin que renaisse ce « désir d’Europe » qui nous fait tant défaut. « Il n’est pas trop tard, mais il est temps… », écrit P. COLLOWALD dans ses mémoires préfacées par Jacques Delors. Constatant que, « dans les jugements hâtifs de notre époque, on manque souvent de discernement, par ignorance et par manque de recul historique », cet ancien responsable de l’information à la Commission et au Parlement e...

  16. Development of electronic commerce in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Alin Daniel MUNTEANU

    2012-01-01

    Among the many potential benefits of electronic commerce include lower prices, access to a wider range of goods, development of innovative services and creating jobs. Online purchases represent about 3% of European retail trade. But the development of uniform electronic markets still face numerous obstacles.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF MUSEUMS, ARCHIVES AND LIBRARIES IN E-EUROPE: PROJECT OF EC CALIMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozuraite, Vita

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the social role of local cultural institutions of all kinds has changed. A shift from the use of information on traditional paper-based carriers to electronic formats has takenplace. The implementation of technology has brought about the modernisation of basic work processes and widened the range of services and channels of access. There is closer intra- and interdomain co-operation both at national and international level. It is no longer easy to draw clear boundaries between archives, libraries and museums in terms of digital content provision.Memory institutions such as libraries, museums and archives are adjusting themselves to the digital age. Web-based services have been expanded, remote use of online catalogues and the accessibility of digitised heritage have all been improved. The task now is to create and promote new services which reach and motivate more people. New services require new tools, many of them ICT-based – and above all a new attitude.CALIMERA (Cultural Applications: Local Institutions Mediating Electronics Resource Access Co-ordination Action, funded under Information Society Technologies Sixth Framework Programme has set out to help ordinary citizens right across Europe to join e-Europe through the digital services provided by their local cultural institutions. CALIMERA has continued to contribute to the sharing of best practice, producing guidelines and roadmaps with a special focus of local archives and museums and addressing the needs of the end user.The aim of CALIMERA Best Practice Guidelines is to provide policy makers and professionals working in cultural institutions at the local level with a concise and relevant summary of the state of the art in the use of new technologies. These Guidelines are intended to explain in a readable way how these technologies can be deployed to develop digital services designed to meet real user needs – social, cultural and economics – to stimulate wider

  18. Technical co-operation report for 2000. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers three separate topics. Part one fulfills the Agency's obligation under the General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/18 to report on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation. It covers the period from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001. The report examines the finalization of the 2001-2002 technical co-operation programme and several key concepts of the Technical Co-operation Strategy such as Partners in Development, Technical Co-operation among Developing Countries, and the continuing evolution of Regional Resource Centres. Reflecting an important trend in the technical co-operation programme, which was mandated by the General Conference, the report describes the results achieved in several programmes in least developed countries. Part two reports on the major achievements of the technical co-operation programme in 2000 in the different regions of the world. Part three presents a summary of the financial and non-financial parameters of the technical co-operation programme. The supplement to the report provides a more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements and non-financial indicators

  19. Technical co-operation report for 2000. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report covers three separate topics. Part one fulfills the Agency's obligation under the General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/18 to report on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation. It covers the period from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001. The report examines the finalization of the 2001-2002 technical co-operation programme and several key concepts of the Technical Co-operation Strategy such as Partners in Development, Technical Co-operation among Developing Countries, and the continuing evolution of Regional Resource Centres. Reflecting an important trend in the technical co-operation programme, which was mandated by the General Conference, the report describes the results achieved in several programmes in least developed countries. Part two reports on the major achievements of the technical co-operation programme in 2000 in the different regions of the world. Part three presents a summary of the financial and non-financial parameters of the technical co-operation programme. The supplement to the report provides a more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements and non-financial indicators.

  20. Unravelling historical cost developments of offshore wind energy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormolen, J. A.; Junginger, H. M.; van Sark, W. G J H M

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insights in the cost developments of offshore wind energy in Europe. This is done by analysing 46 operational offshore wind farms commissioned after 2000. An increase of the Capital Expenditures (CAPEX) is found that is linked to the distance to shore and depth of more

  1. The Renewal of HTR Development in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittner, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    The European HTR-Technology Network (HTR-TN), created in 2000, presently groups 20 organisations from European nuclear research and industry for developing the technologies of direct-cycle modular HTRs, which presently raise a large world-wide interest, because of their high potential for economic competitiveness, natural resource sparing, safety and minimisation of the waste impacts, in line with the goals of sustainable development of Generation IV. All aspects of HTR technologies are addressed by HTR-TN, from the reactor physics to the development of materials, fuel and components. Most of this activity is supported by the European Commission in the frame of its 5. EURATOM Framework Programme. The first results of HTR-TN programme are given: the analysis of the reactor physics international benchmark on the commissioning tests of HTTR (Japan), the long term behaviour of spent HTR fuel in geologic disposal conditions, the preparation of a very high burnup fuel irradiation and the development of fabrication processes for producing high performance coated particles, etc. (authors)

  2. INTEREST RATE DERIVATIVES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    SLOBODAN CEROVIC; MARINA PEPIC

    2011-01-01

    Financial derivatives (interest rate futures, options and swaps) are a very simple way to minimize interest rate risk and therefore are extremely popular. The value of interest rate derivatives transactions in the world is increasing dramatically. Unfortunately, this is not the case with developing countries in Europe. Although significantly increased in the last decade, interest rate derivatives markets in developing countries are still in nascent stage. In most developing countries still t...

  3. International solar energy research co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P.; Peippo, K.; Konttinen, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    Finland has participated in several IEA activities during 1996-97. HUT coordinates the activities, but practical participation in collaborative actions take place both in industrial companies and research organisations. Neste Ltd has directly participated in several tasks and information of results has been disseminated more widely to Finnish industries and organisations. Co-operation projects covered here are: (1) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 1 `Information dissemination`, (2) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 3 `Use of Photovoltaic systems in Stand Alone and Island Applications`, (3) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 7 `Photovoltaics in built environment`, (4) IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program Task 16 `Photovoltaics in buildings` and (5) IEA Working Group `Materials in Solar Thermal Collectors`

  4. Ideological leaning and praxis of housing co-operatives in South Africa: Matters arising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jimoh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social movements came about as a result of dissatisfaction felt by society from the status quo. They present their grievances through demonstrations, strikes, riots, occupation of land, boycott of business or by the development of social and economic alternatives such as self-help schemes or saving clubs. In South Africa, people join housing co-operatives because it takes a long time to wait for the Reconstruction Development Project (RDP houses promised by the Government. The leaning of 5 housing co-operatives was examined within the context of ideology and praxis that are components of triad model. This was done through multi-case study whereby the chairpersons of the housing co-operatives were interviewed using structured interview format. Findings from the study indicated that all the housing co-operatives were not open and voluntary; also, the housing co-operatives were not administered the same way. In all, efforts were put in by the housing co-operatives in engendering the ideology of co-operatives on one hand and the government on the other hand in providing the necessary subsidy so that the gap in the housing deficit could be bridged since this fitted its policy on housing. 

  5. Ideological leaning and praxis of housing co-operatives in South Africa: Matters arising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jimoh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social movements came about as a result of dissatisfaction felt by society from the status quo. They present their grievances through demonstrations, strikes, riots, occupation of land, boycott of business or by the development of social and economic alternatives such as self-help schemes or saving clubs. In South Africa, people join housing co-operatives because it takes a long time to wait for the Reconstruction Development Project (RDP houses promised by the Government. The leaning of 5 housing co-operatives was examined within the context of ideology and praxis that are components of triad model. This was done through multi-case study whereby the chairpersons of the housing co-operatives were interviewed using structured interview format. Findings from the study indicated that all the housing co-operatives were not open and voluntary; also, the housing co-operatives were not administered the same way. In all, efforts were put in by the housing co-operatives in engendering the ideology of co-operatives on one hand and the government on the other hand in providing the necessary subsidy so that the gap in the housing deficit could be bridged since this fitted its policy on housing.

  6. Developing financeable projects in Central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelberg, R.; Prerad, V. [POWER International, Josefov (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    POWER`s engineering and development experience in the Czech Republic creating financeable projects within the power generation industry will be presented. POWER has been involved in the Czech Republic`s privatization process, environmental legislation as well as formation of the regulatory environment. Strategic methods for accomplishing the development of financeable projects often include ownership and financial restructuring of the projects. This is done by utilizing internal cash flows, external debt and equity placement (provided by international financial institutions) by restructuring the facility`s contractual relationships and operations (providing as least cost solution to engineering) and possibly using existing governmental guarantees. In order to make any recommendations on how to come into compliance with the country`s environmental legislation, it is necessary to begin with an analysis of the existing facility. This involves preparation of technical and economic feasibility study, evaluation of technology and preliminary engineering solutions. It further involves restructuring of power sales agreements, heat sales agreements, and fuel supply agreements. The goal is to provide suitable security for the equity and debt financing participants by mitigating risk and creating a single purpose business unit with predictable life and economics.

  7. Regional long-term co-operation in the field of nuclear and radiation emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladek, V.; Metke, E.; Janko, K.; Hohenberg, J. K.; Hofer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally covered by methodical and coordinative activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Member States of the IAEA and by the European Commission (EC) in EU Member and EU Accession Countries. However, the regional harmonisation of emergency arrangements is an important trend of emergency preparedness. The present paper gives a couple of illustrative examples for a regional co-operation in the field of emergency preparedness in Central Europe and an overview on international exercises in this region. The penultimate section contains an outlook on future activities regarding regional co-operation in Central Europe. The following topics have been suggested inter alia: the harmonisation of intervention criteria and countermeasures, co-ordination in the field of information of the public, comprehensive bi lateral and multilateral exercises, exchange of experts between the national nuclear emergency centres and inter-comparison calculations of the computer codes. (authors)

  8. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning

  9. Local and Sustainable Food Supply: The Role of European Retail Consumer Co-operatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hingley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  This paper investigates the rationale for local and sustainable food systems and retailer co-operatives as their entry points within local conditions. Emphasis is on localised food networks and connection between socially as well as environmentally sustainable production, distribution and consumption. Investigated is the premise that co-operative organisational structures, for reasons of their long-term socially responsible origins are at the forefront of development of local and sustainable food systems and are thereby in a position to offer a specific contribution to market development. Two key research questions are proposed: Firstly, is there a pre-determination of co-operatives to issues of sustainable and local food sourcing given the historical and practical context of their ethical/socially responsible and stakeholder-based business model? Secondly, do co-ops express support for re-localising food systems and what contribution do they make concerning sustainable food and their relationships with local food suppliers? The method of investigation is through a two country retailer co-operative sector analysis and comparison (Finland and Italy. The enquiry is qualitative and exploratory in nature in the form of an embedded, multiple case design. The paper makes practical and theoretical contribution to knowledge concerning interpretation of ‘localness’ in food, the role of co-operatives and the co-operative ethos in sustainable food systems and the development of the local food economy. Results of the study show a positive relationship between co-operative ethos and (social sustainability in local food, but the de-centralised nature of retailer co-operation also provides a barrier to replication of good practice.

  10. Oil refining and product market developments in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.

    1991-01-01

    One political development in Europe that will affect the petroleum refining industry is the opening of a single market among the European Commission countries. Although the single market officially opens on January 1, 1993, a single market for energy will not happen at that time. Most European countries feel that refining is a strategic industry and adopt some form of protectionism in this sector. Environmental policy in Europe tends to be separate from energy policy, making conflicts in setting standards for emissions and fuel composition somewhat inevitable. For example, both environmental and energy policies favor a carbon tax on fuels; the EC environmental commission does not want to be seen as favoring nuclear power, so it favors penalizing all fuels about the same amount, while the energy commission says the carbon tax should be related to the fuel carbon content. A measure affecting the refining industry is the proposal for reducing sulfur in diesel fuel. By 1994 EC countries will have a common 0.2% standard and by 1996 a 0.05% standard for automotive diesel. To meet the latter standard, refineries will need upgrading at an estimated cost of US$4 billion. Another political consideration for the refining industry is whether eastern Europe should be part of the EC energy community. However, if there is a reluctance in the western European countries for a single western market, there is even less enthusiasm for an energy market that includes eastern Europe as well. In addition, there is a reluctance to accept that there should be a free flow of petroleum products from east to west

  11. Developments in physical weed control in Northwest Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riemens, Marieen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In North West Europe there is an increasing need for advanced weed control methods. This paper gives an overview of the developments in physical weed control methods. Current innovations in interrow weeding focus on systems that take over the steering function of the driver in order to make them more precise and reduce crop losses. The latest developments in intrarow weeding techniques involve technologies that automatically detect and classify crop and weed plants and use this information to guide a weeding device. Several commercially available examples are presented.

  12. Memorandum of Understanding between CERN and the Government of New-Zealand concerning the Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    New Zealand has a pioneering tradition in experimental fundamental physics that originated with Ernest Rutherford. The country currently has active research programmes in the related areas of astrophysics and theoretical physics. Experimental groups from the Universities of Auckland and Canterbury have recently been accepted into the CMS collaboration. They are planning a contribution to the CMS pixel detector, and have already started simulations of heavy-ion collisions in CMS. They have also expressed interest in the applications of pixel imaging technology to medicine, and in Grid computing. Collaboration with CERN is seen by the New Zealand Government as an important element in its strategy of seeking linkages with international research networks and overcoming the country's relative geographical isolation. The proposed Agreement (which, taking into account specific New Zealand legal constraints, is named « Memorandum of Understanding » instead of, as is usual at CERN,« Co-operation Agreement ») would...

  13. Development of Europe's gas hubs: Implications for East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunpeng Shi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas trading hubs have been initially developed in the US in 1980s, UK in 1990s, more recently in European in the 2000s and mulled in East Asia now. Due to its freshness and diversification in nationality, governance and culture, the European hub experience can offer valuable lessons for East Asia. This paper seeks to advance understanding of gas hub development in Europe and provide lessons for East Asia. The European experience highlights that market liberalization and transition of gas pricing mechanism are necessary in creating the competitive markets that are needed for functional gas hubs. Political will and regulations further safeguard the competition environment needed for hub development. Natural factors, such as significant domestic production and culture could have a significant impact on the hub development and transition of pricing mechanism. In East Asia, the path to gas trading hubs might be more difficult than in Europe but a growing market creates an opportunity to start new terms with new contracts. Nevertheless, East Asian needs to work hard to development its indigenous gas or LNG trading hubs.

  14. Radioactive waste: from national programmes to community co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Yves

    1981-01-01

    An important community programme for the management and storage of waste was introduced 5 years ago although research and development has been carried out on a wide basis for 20 years. There is in fact no contradiction in this, but knowledge of the composition of waste has evolved with the development of nuclear energy, requirements have become stricter while the number of possible handling methods tends to result in postponement of decisions. According to the author, a thorough community co-operation in this field should make it easier to easier to known what to choose and also to decide on the course to be taken. It should also facilitate the obtaining of a consensus of opinion -acceptable to every-one- in relation to the management of radioactive waste [fr

  15. Self-reliance through regional co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glubrecht, H.

    1975-01-01

    Article 52 of the Charter of the United Nations is concerned with the usefulness of Regional Arrangements which 'are appropriate for regional action'. Such arrangements need not be considered only with regard to their political aspects but also as organizational structures which can be helpful in the development of science and technology in less developed countries. The definition of a 'Region' can be difficult, but is easier if scientific rather than political co-operation is intended. The International Atomic Energy Agency has undertaken a first step in this direction through its Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology in South and Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Far East (RCA) which has been signed by six countries so far. This Agreement leaves it to the Member States to initiate cooperative projects. The IAEA will take steps to establish the project if at least three Member States are willing to participate. The implementation of the project will be defined by negotiations with the Member States and the IAEA will only play the role of a co-ordinator. Annual meetings of representatives of those countries which are parties of the RCA and of others from the region which might be interested in joining the Agreement provide the possibility of a continuing exchange of new ideas. Regional activities are also undertaken by means of 'Co-ordinated Research Programmes', which mostly include some co-operation with LDCs. The RCA has initiated two new ideas, that of carrying out the projects exclusively by the countries of the region and that of taking the step from co-ordination to cooperation by means of continuous and intensive exchange of information as well as of personnel. Its main objective is to aim at a reasonable division of labour between the parties and to use expensive equipment jointly. It is to be hoped that this venture will lead to an increasing degree of self-reliance within the

  16. Fuelwood in Europe for environment and development strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahkola, A; Laine, J; Lund, P [Helsinki University of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Centre for Energy Technology

    1997-12-01

    The study of the conditions of a higher fuelwood mobilisation in Europe, takes place within the objectives of energy, environmental, agricultural and regional development policies implemented at the European level. The study aims at estimating the evolution of fuelwood consumption, the additional potential of available fuelwood, new possible uses of fuelwood, socio-economic and environmental implications of its mobilisation. This study deals with five European Union countries: Austria, Finland, France, Portugal and Sweden. This study is financed by EC, its contract number is JOR3-CT95-0004. (orig.)

  17. Development of Competitive Gas Trading in Continental Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In this publication the IEA examines the history of major gas markets' development in OECD Europe, and explores the possible expansion of trading through the mechanism of different hubs across the region. Lessons learned from North American markets on the benefits of regulatory convergence and investor-friendly legal framework are an important part of the analysis. Competitive trading based on transparent, non-discriminatory rules in a flexible and integrated European gas market will lead to more efficiency, timely investment, and greater market resilience, therefore ensuring more security for both customers and suppliers in the long term.

  18. Global environmental change and sustainable development in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, J.; Liberatore, A.; Grundlach, K. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    The document contains all but two papers presented at the Workshop as well as a summary of the contributions and discussions, a list of socio-economic research priorities identified at the meeting and a policy brief based on the themes woven together at the Workshop. The workshop was organised within the framework of the European Network for Research in Global Change (ENRICH). Papers include: global environmental change and sustainable development in Europe and in the Mediterranean basin, water management and global environmental change policies, human impacts on the nitrogen cycle, the merchandising of biodiversity, environmental performance indicators, urban sustainability indicators and strategies for sustainability.

  19. Strengthening political co-operation through multilateral disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekeus, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Sweden discussed how the multilateral disarmament concept has contributed and still can contribute to strengthen political co-operation. This approach is the opposite to the usual question on how to achieve multilateral disarmament through political co-operation

  20. Bioenergy development pathways for Europe. Potentials, costs and environmental impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wit, M.P.

    2011-09-26

    Fossil resources dominate the global energy system today which cannot be sustained indefinitely. Bioenergy use can meet a large share of future energy supply sustainably. For example, it can substitute fossil fuels including petroleum, and when sustainably produced, bioenergy avoids greenhouse gas emissions. However, with the recent increase of modern bioenergy use several drawbacks have become apparent that may lead to negative ecological impacts. Europe plays an important role in the further sustainable development of bioenergy due to its ambitious renewable energy policies and its state-of-the-art agricultural sector. The main objective of this thesis is to evaluate development pathways for bioenergy in Europe by assessing preconditions for its development, an economic outlook for such development and an assessment of its environmental implications. The technical European biomass potential has a substantial potential to contribute to Europe's energy consumption. Energy crop production on European croplands and grasslands supplemented with agricultural and forestry residues offers an ultimate technical potential of 27.7 EJ y-1. These findings were based on the assumption that agricultural land needs for future domestic food production decrease as productivities per hectare increase. Central and Eastern Europe pose the more attractive region with relatively high potentials and low costs. In European agriculture, it is possible to combine large-scale biomass production with food production sustained at current levels, without direct or indirect land-use changes and while accomplishing significant net cumulative greenhouse gas emission reductions when both bioenergy and agricultural production are considered. To accomplish this situation two preconditions need to be met: a gradual intensification of food production and implementation of structural improvements to agricultural management. Based on the current economic performance and future prospects for

  1. Conventional armed forces in Europe: Technology scenario development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houser, G.M.

    1990-07-01

    In January 1986, the Soviet Union's Mikhail Gorbachev proposed elimination of all nuclear weapons by the year 2000. In April of that year, Mr. Gorbachev proposed substantial reductions of conventional weapons in Europe, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Ural Mountains, including reductions in operational-tactical nuclear weapons. In May 1986, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) responded with the Brussels Declaration on Conventional Arms Control,'' which indicated readiness to open East/West discussions on establishing a mandate for negotiating conventional arms control throughout Europe. The Group of 23,'' which met in Vienna beginning in February 1987, concluded the meeting in January 1989 with a mandate for the Conventional Armed Forced in Europe (CFE) negotiations. On 6 March 1989, CFE talks began, and these talks have continued through six rounds (as of April 1990). Although US President George Bush, on 30 May 1989, called for agreement within six months to a year, and the Malta meeting of December 1989 called for completion of a CFE agreement by the end of 1990, much remains to be negotiated. This report provides three types of information. First, treaty provisions brought to the table by both sides are compared. Second, on the basis of these provisions, problem areas for each of the provision elements are postulated and possible scenarios for resolving these problem areas are developed. Third, the scenarios are used as requirements for tasks assigned program elements for possible US implementation of a CFE treaty. As progress is achieved during the negotiations, this report could be updated, as necessary, in each of the areas to provide a continuing systematic basis for program implementation and technology development. 8 refs.

  2. Realities of technical co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxo, A.; Villaros, P.; Naudet, G.

    1978-01-01

    The decision to develop the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, especially the generation of electricity, is usually based - particularly in the developing countries - on numerous considerations, mainly of an economic and political nature. Since the resources of nuclear technology are concentrated, relatively speaking, in the advanced countries, the use of nuclear energy by countries that have decided to go nuclear is based on effective co-operation between the exporting and importing countries. The present paper is intended as an additional contribution to consideration of the realities of such co-operation. The authors first mention the specific features of nuclear development, after which they consider, on the basis thereof, the different forms of co-operation required for the transfer of technological knowhow, and the conditions determining the effectiveness of such transfer. This effectiveness is not linked solely to the competence of the personnel concerned or to smooth organizational procedures, but also to decisive socio-psychological factors. Having analysed these factors, the authors examine the salient problems of co-operation arising during the process of nuclear development. Co-operation ever better adapted to the purpose and taking human considerations into account will enable importing countries to acquire the nuclear knowhow that will promote their economic and social development. (author)

  3. New Zealand signs up to co-operate with CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    On 4 December 2003 a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between CERN and the government of New Zealand was signed in the presence of Peter Hamilton, New Zealand's ambassador to Switzerland. This MoU concerns the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy particle physics between Ernest Rutherford's birthplace and CERN, which now hosts one of the world's most ambitious scientific endeavours, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).    In anticipation of the MoU, two New Zealand universities (the University of Auckland and the University of Canterbury in Christchurch) have already joined the CMS collaboration to work on pixel detectors, where they can benefit from the expertise of the pixel group at the Paul Scherrer Institute. These detectors are not only valuable in high-energy particle physics, but also serve medical applications.

  4. Co-operation in the development of a policy and strategy for the management of spent nuclear fuel (including provisions for its safe interim storage) and radioactive waste in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuloaga, P.; Molina, M.; Barcena, J.; Salas, E.; Sanchez, M.; Codee, H.; Deckers, J.

    2013-01-01

    The European Commission decided in 2010 to finance a project for providing technical support for the definition and establishment of a national policy and strategy for radioactive waste management in Mexico. the Project was in the framework of the Nuclear Safety Co-operation Instrument (NSCI), a European mechanism which finances measures to support a higher level of nuclear safety, radiation protection and the application of efficient and effective safeguards of nuclear materials in third countries. Eventually, the Project was a awarded to a Consortium made up by four Spanish companies, ENRESA, Empresarios Agrupados International SA, Iberdrola Ingenieria SAU, Westinghouse Spain SAU, and two foreign ones, COVRA NV and Belgoprocess NV. Both ENRESA and COVRA are waste management agencies, the first responsible of these activities in Spain, the second one in the Netherlands. ENRESA acts as the leader of the Consortium. The project started early in 2013 and will last until March 2015. All along this period, the Mexican system for spent fuel and radioactive waste management will be scrutinized and proposals made for its upgrading according to the best international and European standards of safety and performance. A Policy and Strategy document will be proposed, as well as significant improvements for the different institutional layers, practices and elements of the Mexican system. A total of 40 specialists are involved in the project of which 30 are Spaniards. (Author)

  5. Co-operation in the development of a policy and strategy for the management of spent nuclear fuel (including provisions for its safe interim storage) and radioactive waste in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuloaga, P.; Molina, M.; Barcena, J.; Salas, E.; Sanchez, M.; Codee, H.; Deckers, J.

    2013-10-01

    The European Commission decided in 2010 to finance a project for providing technical support for the definition and establishment of a national policy and strategy for radioactive waste management in Mexico. the Project was in the framework of the Nuclear Safety Co-operation Instrument (NSCI), a European mechanism which finances measures to support a higher level of nuclear safety, radiation protection and the application of efficient and effective safeguards of nuclear materials in third countries. Eventually, the Project was a awarded to a Consortium made up by four Spanish companies, ENRESA, Empresarios Agrupados International SA, Iberdrola Ingenieria SAU, Westinghouse Spain SAU, and two foreign ones, COVRA NV and Belgoprocess NV. Both ENRESA and COVRA are waste management agencies, the first responsible of these activities in Spain, the second one in the Netherlands. ENRESA acts as the leader of the Consortium. The project started early in 2013 and will last until March 2015. All along this period, the Mexican system for spent fuel and radioactive waste management will be scrutinized and proposals made for its upgrading according to the best international and European standards of safety and performance. A Policy and Strategy document will be proposed, as well as significant improvements for the different institutional layers, practices and elements of the Mexican system. A total of 40 specialists are involved in the project of which 30 are Spaniards. (Author)

  6. Different Aspects of Regional Development in East-Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PÁL SZABÓ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore and analyze the main characteristics of East-Central Europe’s spatial structure, including its changes during the recent years. In many territorial researches, there is an intention to define different types of regions and to establish territorial regularities, create models, etc. In this case, we analysed the regions of East-Central Europe based on their comprehensive socio-economic data and described the most important characteristics of the spatial structure of this macroregion from different perspectives. Some results show that the social and economic core areas are highly separated from each other and the development “image” of East-Central Europe has remained the same viewing from the aspects of bigger, homogenous areas, but became more mosaic with the appearance of some separated and improving regions, strengthening the model of the “Bunch of Grapes”, not the "Boomerang". Other results show that it is difficult to create a spatial structure model for this macroregion, because the results may depend on the viewpoints.

  7. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle technology in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, Janne

    2004-01-01

    Research and development on nitride fuels for minor actinide burning in accelerator driven systems is performed in Europe in context of the CONFIRM project. Dry and wet methods for fabrication of uranium free nitride fuels have been developed with the assistance of thermo-chemical modelling. Four (Pu, Zr) pins have been fabricated by PSI and will be irradiated in Studsvik at a rating of 40-50 kW/m. The thermal conductivity of (Pu, Zr)N has been measured and was found to be in agreement with earlier theoretical assessments. Safety modeling indicates that americium bearing nitride fuels, in spite of their relatively poor high temperature stability under atmospheric pressure, can survive power transients as long as the fuel cladding remains intact. (author)

  8. International co-operation in the nuclear field - past, present and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1978-01-01

    On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of its creation, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (NEA/OECD) held a symposium in Paris on 1 and 2 February 1978. Some 200 participants from the 23 Member countries of the NEA as well as representatives of the Commission of European Communities, FORATOM and the IAEA attended the symposium. At a panel discussion at the symposium, led by Dr. Sigvard Eklund, Director General of the IAEA, the future of international co-operation between advanced nations in the nuclear field was discussed. While recognizing that nuclear energy is at present going through a period of uncertainty pending resolution of the intertwined problems of gaining public confidence and of non-proliferation, the panel expressed its strong confidence in the future of nuclear power, and the vital contribution it would make, particularly between now and the end of the century. During the meeting, a critical review was made of the way in which international co-operation has evolved since the early stages of peaceful nuclear development, and of the influence on this co-operation of the changing relationship between government and industry. The contribution of international co-operation - and its limitations - was carefully scrutinized, notably in the crucial area of the nuclear fuel cycle

  9. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 2: Practical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This second part of a report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home Systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. The first part of this two-part document discussed three generic models. Part 2 of the document is based on work prepared for the Renewable Energy Supply Models (RESUM) project. Examples are quoted which describe the operations of a number of companies supplying solar home systems in developing countries. These examples of practical experience provide a description of businesses, highlighting the success and failure factors of the organisations. They are only a sample of the many PV companies operating internationally and are not to be considered as a critical evaluation of the implementation models; they attempt to give the reader an idea of the realities of using the models in practice.

  10. Development of wood pellets market in South East Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glavonjić Branko D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of researching wood pellets market in nine countries in South East Europe and Slovakia. Objective of the research was to observe the actual situation regarding the number of producers, size of installed capacities, production volume, foreign trade flows and existing problems and obstacles which significantly limit the sustainable development of wood pellets market in the selected countries. Selection of such an objective results from the fact that according to the stated elements there are no sufficiently reliable data, wherefore this region is a huge gap in numerous reports of international and national organizations and institutions. Results of the conducted research show that in the middle of 2014, 245 producers were engaged in wood pellets production in South East Europe and Slovakia, 116 of which were located in Bulgaria and Serbia. Most of the producers of wood pellets has installed capacities of 1,000-5,000 tons annually, while only 18 factories in the entire region have the installed capacity over 30,000 tons/year. Observed collectively in all stated countries, the total installed capacities for wood pellets production were 2.2 million tons in 2013 and the realized production was 1.36 million tons. The largest part of the produced amounts of wood pellets in this region is exported. 1.06 million tons were exported from the region in 2013, which is 77.9% of the realized production. Such high export is the result of the underdevelopment of the local market (Slovenia is the only exception and the problems which exist and limit its faster development in most countries.

  11. The Text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology. Latest Status. Declarations/Reservations; Texto de un Acuerdo de Cooperacion Regional Para la Investigacion, el Desarrollo y la Capacitacion en Materia de Ciencias y Tecnologia Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-08-18

    The text of a Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology between the Agency and Member States is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Section 9 thereof specifies the Members that may become party to it [Spanish] Para conocimiento de todos los Estados Miembros en el presente documento se transcribe el texto de un Acuerdo de Cooperacion Regional para la investigacion, el desarrollo y la capacitacion en materia de ciencias y tecnologia nucleares entre el Organismo y los Estados Miembros. En la Seccion 9 se especifican los Estados Miembros que pueden ser partes en el Acuerdo.

  12. Finnish experience on emergency preparedness co-operation work and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovijarvi, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. According to the 'Security Strategy for Society' the responsibilities are shared across society and the normal division of duties shall be maintained unchanged as far as possible in all situations. While the competent authority is always in charge of making decisions other administrative sectors may be cooperation partners. This applies to the representatives of business community and organization as well. The first regional co-operation group for NPP emergency preparedness consisting of the representatives of regional rescue service, NPP licensee and STUK was established in 2008 to develop the external rescue plan, arrange training etc. Today co-operation groups are working for both Finnish emergency planning zones. Examples of the co-operation results are discussed in the presentation. (author)

  13. Diverging business strategies towards climate change : a USA-Europe comparison for four sectors of industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerd, van der K.F.; Wit, de C.M.; Kolk, A.; Levy, D.L.; Vellinga, P.; Behlyarova, E.

    2004-01-01

    The research project has investigated what strategies specific sectors of industry develop to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In an USA-Europe co-operation, researchers have analysed emerging climate strategies in the oil industry, the automobile industry, the chemical industry and the bank and

  14. Quality, Coherence and Co-operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present an analytical framework to examine how qualities are mediated between producers and consumers, and how this is linked to the way the food chain is constructed, who is involved, and the way the market is developed. The framework is a reorientation to see food ...

  15. Danish wind energy co-operatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranaes, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    An outline is given of the historical development of Danish wind energy cooperatives. Topics covered include wind turbine owners and their relations with parliament and public authorities, the power station companies and the wind turbine industry. Interest in the environment and support of popular cooperative activities in the local community are essential to success. (UK)

  16. NATO, Libya operations and intelligence co-operation – a step forward?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Adam David Morgan

    2011-01-01

    developments can be opened up for some further analysis, forming the main focus of this article. Ultimately, this article concludes that, over time and albeit while gradual, we have seen what can be regarded as ‘a step forward’ in co-operative intelligence activities in Libya. Although several pressing......"With the ‘fall’ of Tripoli towards the end of August 2011, it has become increasingly apparent that the intelligence co-operation witnessed in Libya during the NATO campaign performed an increasingly important role in realizing operational and strategic ‘successes’. These recent intelligence...

  17. The economic and social significance of RCA regional co-operative projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    The regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) is an established and valuable instrument between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Member States in South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific or Far East for assisting in the transfer of modern technology to areas having economic and social importance to the region. The purpose of this review is to identify on-going or planned work which is designed to help achieve this goal. Currently approved RCA Regional Co-operative Research Projects are listed

  18. Upcrowding energy co-operatives - Evaluating the potential of crowdfunding for business model innovation of energy co-operatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Mathias Georg; Jovanović, Tanja; Voigt, Kai-Ingo

    2017-08-01

    Practice and theory have proven the relevance of energy co-operatives for civic participation in the energy turnaround. However, due to a still low awareness and changing regulation, there seems an unexploited potential of utilizing the legal form 'co-operative' in this context. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the crowdfunding implementation in the business model of energy co-operatives in order to cope with the mentioned challenges. Based on a theoretical framework, we derive a Business Model Innovation (BMI) through crowdfunding including synergies and differences. A qualitative study design, particularly a multiple-case study of energy co-operatives, was chosen to prove the BMI and to reveal barriers. The results show that although most co-operatives are not familiar with crowdfunding, there is strong potential in opening up predominantly local structures to a broader group of members. Building on this, equity-based crowdfunding is revealed to be suitable for energy co-operatives as BMI and to accompany other challenges in the same way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Japan and atomic co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    Japan, which is host country for the Ninth Regular Session of the Agency General Conference, has an important programme of nuclear power development to meet future needs. In addition, Japan is active in other applications of atomic energy and is building up a domestic nuclear engineering industry. Japan has profited by the Agency as a channel of international cooperation, and was a party to the first bilateral agreement in which the responsibility for administering safeguards against the diversion of materials to military purposes, was transferred to the Agency. Japan has also lent support to Agency programmes by gifts, training courses, research, and the loan of experts. In 1961, the Japan Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) formulated the 'Long-Range Programme for Development and Utilization of Atomic Energy', on the basis of the economic prospects of nuclear power generation, and the conditions necessary to meet the ever-increasing domestic energy demands. According to this programme, in the light of power reactor development trends overseas, it is expected that nuclear power costs will compete with those of oil burning stations by 1970. On this basis, total nuclear power generating capacity of 1000 MW(e) will be attained by 1970, and 7000 - 9 500M(e) by 1980. As a prelude to the above programme the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPCO) began construction in 1959 of a graphite-moderated gas-cooled nuclear power station (Improved Calder Hall type) of 165 MW(e) gross capacity. This is now progressing smoothly, and reached criticality in May 1965; it is expected to supply commercial power by the end of this year. The second nuclear power station will be built by the same company on the coast of the Japan Sea, with a light water-moderated reactor of 250 - 300 MW(e) capacity. The construction plan i s currently being pushed forward for completion in 1970. Thereafter three private utility companies - Tokyo, Kansai and Chubu Electric Companies - are doing preparatory work for

  20. Regulatory co-operation: The next decade. Annex III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, E.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power has great potential to help satisfy the increased demands for electrical energy and allay concerns about the environmental damage done by electric power generation due to fossil fuels. Experience has shown that the cautious approach to nuclear power development, dictated by the knowledge of the destructive power that could be released by an accident, has been justified. The cooperation fostered by the IAEA has helped designers, constructors, operators and regulators share data and experiences and this has helped to ensure that basic standards and procedures are in place in all countries with nuclear power programmes. But, the reminders of the need for greater care provided by the two major reactor accidents in the last dozen years and doubts in the minds of the general public have reinforced the need for further co-operation in the next decade. National regulators will have to play their full part in the development of international standards which will not only lead to the necessary levels of safety but be widely recognized as doing so

  1. Developing a typology for local cattle breed farmers in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, K; Diaz, C; Gandini, G; de Haas, Y; Lilja, T; Martin-Collado, D; Pizzi, F; Hiemstra, S J

    2012-12-01

    Recognizing cultural diversity among local breed farmers is crucial for the successful development and implementation of farm animal genetic resources FAnGr conservation policies and programmes. In this study based on survey data collected in the EUropean REgional CAttle breeds project from six European countries, a typology of local breed farmers was designed and profiles for each of the farmer types were developed to assist these policy needs. Three main farmer types were constructed: production-oriented, product and service-oriented and hobby-oriented farmers. In addition, seven subtypes were characterized under the main types: sustainable producers, opportunists, multi-users, brand makers, traditionalists, pragmatists and newcomers. These types have many similarities to the 'productivist', 'multifunctional' and 'post-productivist' farmer types. The typology not only reveals the high level of diversity among local cattle breed farmers in Europe, which presents an opportunity for the in situ conservation of animal genetic resources, but also a challenge for policy to meet the differing requirements of the farmer types. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Status of EUVL mask development in Europe (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jan H.

    2005-06-01

    EUV lithography is the prime candidate for the next generation lithography technology after 193 nm immersion lithography. The commercial onset for this technology is expected for the 45 nm half-pitch technology or below. Several European and national projects and quite a large number of companies and research institutions in Europe work on various aspects of the technological challenges to make EUV a commercially viable technology in the not so far future. Here the development of EUV sources, the development of an EUV exposure tools, metrology tools dedicated for characterization of mask, the production of EUV mask blanks and the mask structuring itself are the key areas in which major activities can be found. In this talk we will primarily focus on those activities, which are related to establish an EUV mask supply chain with all its ingredients from substrate production, polishing, deposition of EUV layers, blank characterization, mask patterning process and the consecutive metrology and defect inspection as well as shipping and handling from blank supply to usage in the wafer fab. The EUV mask related projects on the national level are primarily supported by the French Ministry of Economics and Finance (MinEFi) and the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

  3. Urban wastewater development in Central and Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somlyódy, László; Patziger, Miklós

    2012-01-01

    In the early nineties the region of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE, more than 1 million km² and 100 million inhabitants) went through fundamental political, economic and social changes which eventually led to the European integration process. This positively influenced urban water and wastewater management , which had an unbalanced structure and rather low level of development. The paper outlines first the 1990 situation (water supply, sewerage and wastewater treatment (WWT)) and the infrastructure development of the last two decades, on the basis of a comprehensive data collection for six countries (Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia). Austria serves as a reference basis. Alterations of some of the drivers such as GDP (Gross Domestic Product), water tariff, investment funding and legislation are studied in detail. Then, the paper focuses on WWT by analyzing data of 20 large plants. Influent and effluent quality is evaluated. Technology indicators are estimated and assessed. They include plant removal rates and violation ratios assuming the application of the Urban Wastewater Directive, primary clarifier removal rates, actual anoxic volume and sludge age in comparison with the recommendations of the ATV guideline, criteria of secondary settling tanks and energy consumption. Finally, nutrient removal rates and upgrading options are outlined.

  4. Nuclear Research and Development Institutes in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The science and technology (S and T) sector is faced today with complex and diverse challenges. National science budgets are under pressure, and many countries are changing how research and development (R and D) is funded, reducing direct subsidies and introducing competition for both governmental and alternative sources of revenue. On the other hand, the transition toward knowledge-based economies is creating new opportunities in the S and T sector as governments look to it to foster economic growth through innovation. A number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe have recently joined the European Union (EU) which has defined the Lisbon Strategy to create a 'knowledge triangle' of research, education and innovation to underpin the European economic and social model, and economic growth. This strategy seeks to increase investment in science and technology across the EU to a target of 3% of GDP by 2010, with two-thirds of funds coming from the private sector. By comparison, funding for R and D in most Central and Eastern European countries is only around 1% GDP, of which about 90% is provided by the governments. R and D has become more international, reflecting a more interdependent and globalized world. R and D progress is not only of interest to individual countries but also tries to respond to the needs of a broader society. Governments still maintain national networks, but increasingly emphasize international cooperation, both to avoid duplication of expensive infrastructure, and because scientific excellence requires an exchange of ideas and cooperation that crosses borders. These challenges and opportunities directly impact the research and development institutes (RDIs), including the nuclear RDIs. It is important for the nuclear RDIs to take account of these trends in the broader S and T sector in their vision and strategy. Several nuclear RDIs have become very successful, but others are struggling to adapt. The challenges have been particularly severe

  5. Co-operative learning and adaptive instruction in a mathematics curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, J.; Herfs, P.G.P.; Mertens, E.H.M.; Perrenet, J.Chr.

    1994-01-01

    The AGO 12 to 16 Project (the acronym AGO stands for the Dutch equivalent of 'Adaptive Instruction and Co-operative Learning') seeks to develop and evaluate a mathematics curriculum which is suitable for mixed-ability groups in secondary education. The research questions we will address here are,

  6. The energy sector in Northeast Asia : new projects, delivery systems and prospects for co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the needs and opportunities for energy co-operation in Northeast Asia, with particular reference to development of resources in eastern Russia, Siberia and the Far East to supply energy to consumers in Northeast Asia. Given the high projected demand for energy resources, Japan, South Korea and China are compelled to consider diversifying their energy supplies and developing new links with eastern Russia. The environmental degradation caused by coal burning in China is another incentive for looking for sources of natural gas in Eurasia. Russia and Japan are concentrating on the Sakhalin oil and gas projects. China and Russia have agreed to work closely in the energy sector, focusing on a pipeline from the natural gas field near Irkutsk. The challenges lies in developing a co-ordinated approach to energy resource development and use, by modifying energy policies and long-term supply outlooks. Another challenge lies in the fact that private investors and intergovernmental co-operation are required to build an expensive cross-border infrastructure to transport natural gas, electricity and oil. Co-operation is also required to improve energy efficiency, modernize existing facilities and promote cleaner sources of energy, energy conservation and environmental protection. This report examined forecasted energy demand and imports in Northeast Asia and identified opportunities for co-operation. refs., tabs

  7. Energy Technology Initiatives - Implementation Through Multilateral Co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    New technologies will be critical in addressing current global energy challenges such as energy security. More must be done, however, to push forward the development and deployment of the technologies we need today and will need in the future. Government leaders have repeatedly underlined the crucial role of industry and businesses in advancing energy technologies and the importance of strong collaboration among all stakeholders to accelerate technology advances. To attain these goals, increased co-operation between industries, businesses and government energy technology research is indispensable. The public and private sectors must work together, share burdens and resources, while at the same time multiplying results and outcomes. The 42 multilateral technology initiatives (Implementing Agreements) supported by the IEA are a flexible and effective framework for IEA member and non-member countries, businesses, industries, international organisations and non-government organisations to research breakthrough technologies, to fill existing research gaps, to build pilot plants, to carry out deployment or demonstration programmes -- in short to encourage technology-related activities that support energy security, economic growth and environmental protection. This publication highlights the significant accomplishments of the IEA Implementing Agreements.

  8. A review of IAEA's technical co-operation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samiei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Technical Co-operation (TC) Programme is part of the Agency's mandate 'to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' The IAEA's role under this Programme is that of a scientific and technical agency making a discrete but significant contribution to sustainable development goals through the transfer of nuclear science and technology. TC is a high impact programme focusing on development needs with about 800 active projects annually with a budget of over $70M, 30% of which is targeted on training and capacity building in over 100 Member States. Since 1970, over 80,000 scientists and specialists from developing countries have been trained in nuclear science and technology and in nuclear power and safety. A number of trends in the world at large will be likely to influence the Agency's TC programme in the next several years: The use of nuclear technologies in developing countries is growing as local infrastructures improve and technology transfer increases, especially among developing countries; Some countries and institutions are becoming more self-reliant as viable markets develop for nuclear technology, based on an increased awareness of their benefits; As facilities age, safe strategies for life extension and for decommissioning are assuming increasing importance, while there is some renewed positive attention to nuclear power in several parts of the world. Concern is increasing related to the potential for malicious acts involving nuclear facilities or unsecured nuclear and other radioactive material. As the nuclear workforce ages, the management of nuclear knowledge is gaining increasing importance, including the need to maintain the safety and security of nuclear installations and their continued reliable operation. It is difficult to forecast precisely how these trends will influence the assistance requested by Member States, but it is already clear that there will be increased

  9. Technical co-operation report for 2002. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    General Conference resolution GC(46)/RES/10 reiterated the need to strengthen the technical co- operation programme and requested the Director General to report to the Board of Governors periodically and to the General Conference at its forty-seventh (2003) session on the implementation of resolution GC(46)/RES/10. Part A of this report responds to the General Conference resolution by providing an overview of the progress achieved in technical co-operation policies, strategies, working relations, and internal management during the period 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2003, as well as the major new challenges facing the technical co-operation programme. Part B reports on operational activities and programme performance at the country and regional levels during the calendar year 2002, and Part C reviews the use of financial and human resources in the programme at an aggregate level. As part of its efforts to refine policies for improving programme development, the Agency reviewed the Technical Co-operation Strategy in 2002. The resulting document, The Technical Co-operation Strategy: the 2002 Review (document GOV/INF/2002/8/Mod.1), states that the strategic goal originally identified in the Strategy in 1997 remains valid, and defines four objectives to guide the technical co-operation programme: applying the central criterion (strong government commitment), developing strategic partnerships, increasing the level of funding for technical co-operation, and promoting greater sustainability and self-reliance of nuclear institutions. In line with the Technical Co-operation Strategy, one of the key features of the Agency.s work in 2002 was continuing consultations with Member States at both the policy and operational levels on the management of the ongoing technical co-operation programme and on planning for future activities. The dialogue with Member States aimed at clarifying the strategic objectives and key tools for the utilization of resources to achieve maximum

  10. SMEs and their co-operation with academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Jean Michel; Strömqvist, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Co-operation between SMEs and Academia can be a win-win situation when each partner understands the constraints of the other. SMEs are often leaders in innovation; therefore more ready to share interest in research. They are flexible and dynamic. They need a short feed-back to sustain their co-operation. Academia is often more long-term oriented and more question- than answer-oriented. A code of conduct can ease the relationship because it can anticipate the potential problems.

  11. International co-operation in nuclear data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordborg, C.

    2003-01-01

    The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation serves as a forum for the exchange of information on required improvements to evaluated nuclear data libraries used in all nuclear application areas. The main objective is to identify the major discrepancies in existing evaluated data libraries and to resolve these discrepancies in specifically established expert groups. The long-term goal is to have converging evaluated data libraries. This co-operative effort is very successful. It has resolved a number of outstanding nuclear data problems and has issued 15 reports in support of the studies undertaken jointly. (author)

  12. Political Economy of Tradeable Permits. Competitiveness, Co-operation and Market Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convery, F.J.; Dunne, L.; Redmond, L.; Ryan, L.B.

    2003-01-01

    of our workshop series with publication of these proposals was fortuitous, and provided a continuing deliberative thread to our workshops as they unfolded. The formal withdrawal from the Kyoto Process by the US added another dimension which was incorporated into the research agenda. Our brief did not confine us to climate change or indeed to Europe, but inevitably much of our focus was shaped by these developments. In Venice, Egenhofer (2001) provided a very comprehensive 'state of the art' as regards the theory and (especially) the practise of emissions trading, and its links with other policy instruments, notably taxation. As regards the latter, he notes that 'On a practical level, taxation increasingly is used as a stick to convince industry to accept cap and trade emissions trading programmes'. Typically, firms accepting an absolute cap and participation in cap-and-trade programmes are exempted from environmental or carbon taxes as evidenced in the UK where companies accepting to participate in the ET scheme are exempted up to 80% of the UK climate change levy. The criteria applied in the evaluation of emissions trading are typified by the paper by Boemare and Quirion (2001). They assess the Commission's proposal in some detail, and touch on 10 other schemes from a variety of perspectives, including number of participants and spatial coverage and permit allocation. For each theme, they set out the relevant theoretical framework and its implications, and then assess practise. The parts of their template which address competitiveness, co- operation and market power provides a convenient framework into which to incorporate some of the relevant political economy issues that were addressed in the research literature presented at the workshops

  13. Political Economy of Tradeable Permits. Competitiveness, Co-operation and Market Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Convery, F.J.; Dunne, L.; Redmond, L.; Ryan, L.B. [Department of Environmental Studies, University College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2003-07-01

    occurrence of the initiation of our workshop series with publication of these proposals was fortuitous, and provided a continuing deliberative thread to our workshops as they unfolded. The formal withdrawal from the Kyoto Process by the US added another dimension which was incorporated into the research agenda. Our brief did not confine us to climate change or indeed to Europe, but inevitably much of our focus was shaped by these developments. In Venice, Egenhofer (2001) provided a very comprehensive 'state of the art' as regards the theory and (especially) the practise of emissions trading, and its links with other policy instruments, notably taxation. As regards the latter, he notes that 'On a practical level, taxation increasingly is used as a stick to convince industry to accept cap and trade emissions trading programmes'. Typically, firms accepting an absolute cap and participation in cap-and-trade programmes are exempted from environmental or carbon taxes as evidenced in the UK where companies accepting to participate in the ET scheme are exempted up to 80% of the UK climate change levy. The criteria applied in the evaluation of emissions trading are typified by the paper by Boemare and Quirion (2001). They assess the Commission's proposal in some detail, and touch on 10 other schemes from a variety of perspectives, including number of participants and spatial coverage and permit allocation. For each theme, they set out the relevant theoretical framework and its implications, and then assess practise. The parts of their template which address competitiveness, co- operation and market power provides a convenient framework into which to incorporate some of the relevant political economy issues that were addressed in the research literature presented at the workshops.

  14. IAEA's technical co-operation programme and its role in assisting member states in the safe utilisation of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this contribution the author deals with the technical co-operation projects of the IAEA. The Agency's technical co-operation programme is a most welcome mechanism for the transfer of nuclear technology, and to developing countries it is certainly the most attractive side of the Agency, since it is through this programme that the IAEA can contribute to the solution of their problems through the provision of know-how, technology and training. (authors)

  15. Beyond Public and Private: A Framework for Co-operative Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Neary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Universities in the UK are increasingly adopting corporate governance structures, a consumerist model of teaching and learning, and have the most expensive tuition fees in the world (McGettigan, 2013; OECD, 2015. This article discusses collaborative research that aimed to develop and define a conceptual framework of knowledge production grounded in co-operative values and principles. The main findings are outlined relating to the key themes of our research: knowledge, democracy, bureaucracy, livelihood, and solidarity. We consider how these five ‘catalytic principles’ relate to three identified routes to co-operative higher education (conversion, dissolution, or creation and argue that such work must be grounded in an adequate critique of labour and property, i.e. the capital relation. We identify both the possible opportunities that the latest higher education reform in the UK affords the co-operative movement as well as the issues that arise from a more marketised and financialised approach to the production of knowledge (HEFCE, 2015. Finally, we suggest ways that the co-operative movement might respond with democratic alternatives that go beyond the distinction of public and private education.

  16. Challenges of urbanization and peri-urban development in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Nilsson, Kjell Svenne Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Urbanisation has arguably been the most significant process of land use change in Europe since Second World War. Over 70% of Europe's population now lives in urban areas, which in turn, have grown in area by almost 80% over the last fifty years (EEA 2006). Urban areas cover approximately five...... percent of the territory of the European Union (EU25), and are growing more than twice as fast as the European population. A general consequence of the urbanisation trend and increasing wealth and mobility is urban sprawl, as well as the emergence of peri-urban areas....

  17. Technical co-operation report for 2002. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    General Conference resolution GC(46)/RES/10 reiterated the need to strengthen the technical co- operation programme and requested the Director General to report to the Board of Governors periodically and to the General Conference at its forty-seventh (2003) session on the implementation of resolution GC(46)/RES/10. Part A of this report responds to the General Conference resolution by providing an overview of the progress achieved in technical co-operation policies, strategies, working relations, and internal management during the period 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2003, as well as the major new challenges facing the technical co-operation programme. Part B reports on operational activities and programme performance at the country and regional levels during the calendar year 2002, and Part C reviews the use of financial and human resources in the programme at an aggregate level. As part of its efforts to refine policies for improving programme development, the Agency reviewed the Technical Co-operation Strategy in 2002. The resulting document, The Technical Co-operation Strategy: the 2002 Review (document GOV/INF/2002/8/Mod.1), states that the strategic goal originally identified in the Strategy in 1997 remains valid, and defines four objectives to guide the technical co-operation programme: applying the central criterion (strong government commitment), developing strategic partnerships, increasing the level of funding for technical co-operation, and promoting greater sustainability and self-reliance of nuclear institutions. In line with the Technical Co-operation Strategy, one of the key features of the Agency.s work in 2002 was continuing consultations with Member States at both the policy and operational levels on the management of the ongoing technical co-operation programme and on planning for future activities. The dialogue with Member States aimed at clarifying the strategic objectives and key tools for the utilization of resources to achieve maximum

  18. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  19. Co-Operative Training in the Sheffield Forging Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give details of an operation carried out in Sheffield to increase the recruitment of young men into the steel forging industry. Design/methodology/approach: The Sheffield Forges Co-operative Training Scheme was designed to encourage boys to enter the forging industry and to provide them with training and…

  20. Co-Operative Processes: An Approach From Social Constructionism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Keynote address to the 7th International Conference on Multi-Organisational Partnerships and Co-operative Strategy. Leuven, Belgium, July 6th-8th, 2000 Organisational worlds increasingly are felt to be fragmented, equivocal, and constantly changing. ’Today’s’ knowledge may be found to be more

  1. Military co-operation with South Caucasus countries / Rafal Seniuch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seniuch, Rafal

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Poola ja Lõuna-Kaukaasia vabariikide vahelisest sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  2. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    perspective however, there are probably substantial resources available for response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The problem is that during an emergency, these resources are not where they are needed. Most resources are under authority control in the respective countries, but if all countries would commit themselves to contribute to such assistance arrangements between countries and invoke all resources available and efficiently co-ordinate and route them to where they are mostly needed, the international community and individual States would achieve a better and more efficient response to emergencies. Resources could in this respect be everything that is needed to respond to an emergency, e.g. equipment, expertise, assessment capabilities or other services. These arrangements should be global arrangements as bi-lateral or regional arrangements are only adequate for some scenarios. The Convention an Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention an Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency established in 1986 are at present acceded by approx. 85 IAEA Member States. These conventions constitute the framework of international co-operation on response to nuclear and radiological emergencies between States and describe the obligations and mechanisms of international notification and assistance. The conventions recognize the need for a co-ordinating and facilitating body in this co-operation and the IAEA has been given this role. The conventions an Assistance and Early Notification provide a good framework for achieving international co-operation an nuclear emergency response. It has however been recognised that the implementation of these conventions needs to be improved. This is the responsibility of acceding states. To efficiently share information between many states, it is necessary to establish a standard international communication platform for information exchange with a communication strategy and standardization

  3. Securing co-operation from persons supplying statistical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubenque, M. J.; Blaikley, R. M.; Harris, F. Fraser; Lal, R. B.; Neurdenburg, M. G.; Hernández, R. de Shelly

    1954-01-01

    Securing the co-operation of persons supplying information required for medical statistics is essentially a problem in human relations, and an understanding of the motivations, attitudes, and behaviour of the respondents is necessary. Before any new statistical survey is undertaken, it is suggested by Aubenque and Harris that a preliminary review be made so that the maximum use is made of existing information. Care should also be taken not to burden respondents with an overloaded questionnaire. Aubenque and Harris recommend simplified reporting. Complete population coverage is not necessary. Neurdenburg suggests that the co-operation and support of such organizations as medical associations and social security boards are important and that propaganda should be directed specifically to the groups whose co-operation is sought. Informal personal contacts are valuable and desirable, according to Blaikley, but may have adverse effects if the right kind of approach is not made. Financial payments as an incentive in securing co-operation are opposed by Neurdenburg, who proposes that only postage-free envelopes or similar small favours be granted. Blaikley and Harris, on the other hand, express the view that financial incentives may do much to gain the support of those required to furnish data; there are, however, other incentives, and full use should be made of the natural inclinations of respondents. Compulsion may be necessary in certain instances, but administrative rather than statutory measures should be adopted. Penalties, according to Aubenque, should be inflicted only when justified by imperative health requirements. The results of surveys should be made available as soon as possible to those who co-operated, and Aubenque and Harris point out that they should also be of practical value to the suppliers of the information. Greater co-operation can be secured from medical persons who have an understanding of the statistical principles involved; Aubenque and

  4. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1984. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The year 1984 can be described as one during which efforts were made to increase momentum in the development co-operation between the Agency and its Member States while continuing to improve the quality of the technical assistance rendered. For the first time, the adjusted programme exceeded $50 million. During the year, changes were introduced in the administration of the programme in line with recommendations endorsed by the Board in 1983 at the end of its first technical co-operation policy review. In 1984, when the new technical co-operation policies were applied, there were three principal aims. First, the flow of Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund resources was to be improved; by decreasing accumulated unobligated balances, an optimum level of resource utilization was to be attained by 1986. Second, procedures for the procurement of goods and services were to be streamlined in order to permit substantial increases in programme delivery. Third, systematic project evaluation was to lead to a number of specific actions that would increase the effectiveness of the Agency's development assistance. With regard to the first aim, implementation increased by 44% over the 1983 level, passing the $30 million mark in October and reaching $36.6 million by the end of the year. Of this amount, $31.8 million related to the implementation of activities programmed for 1984. Therefore, an increase in total resources of only 4% was accompanied by an increase in current-year implementation of 34%. As a result, the upward trend in the unobligated balance was checked, and earmarkings against the TACF actually decreased. The implementation rate against the TACF rose from 58% in 1983 to 65% in 1984, reaching the level that had been set as a target. If this performance can be maintained in 1985, it will be possible to reach the optimum level of TACF resource utilization one year earlier than originally expected. As regards the second aim, streamlined procedures introduced in

  5. International co-operation in use of computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterling, T D [Medical Computing Centre, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1966-06-15

    National and international co-operation takes on concreteness in the exchange of programmes and research results . On a practical level and for the exchange of actual techniques the diversity between computers and computer languages may offer almost overwhelming obstacles which can be overcome but not without considerable effort. If computing centres have similar constellations of hardware, then the exchange of programmes is of course routine. We were able to exchange programmes with the Cancer Institute Board at Melbourne, Australia. It turned out that our programmes, although developed for a {sup 60}Co teletherapy beam unit (Model Eldorado A), could be fitted to the dose distribution from the Melbourne 4-MeV linear accelerator with the change of a few constants. The work of fitting the equations themselves was done by the Melbourne group. Once the new constants were found it was a simple matter of transcribing our programme on a reel of magnetic tape and returning it to Melbourne. Treatment centres may have access to different computers. However, it is becoming increasingly true that different computers will be able to accept programmes written in many languages. Language compatibility makes it possible t o take programmes and to rewrite them, at a very small cost, to fit another computer. Very often the only changes that have to be introduced are of 'input-output' instructions . If this is the case , then a copy of the flow diagram and a print-out of the source programme is usually all that is needed to make a programme operational on a different machine. But even here we have found it desirable t o send a programmer along so that resolution of detailed problems may be expedited. In this way we exchanged programmers with the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at St. Louis, Missouri to make our own external beam methods compatible with their computer and to make their interstitial and intracavitary programmes operational on ours.

  6. In search of a railway Europe : transnational railway developments in interwar Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anastasiadou, E.

    2009-01-01

    Most conventional histories that address the creation and development of railway networks start from national developments. Recent scholarship on this topic, however, has stressed the importance of formulating a transnational perspective on technological developments and infrastructural developments

  7. FUNCIÓN DE LAS COOPERATIVAS EN LA NORMATIVA DE FOMENTO DEL DESARROLLO RURAL/FUNCTION OF THE CO-OPERATIVES IN THE REGULATION OF THE RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROMOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis GALLEGO SEVILLA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Las sociedades cooperativas son agentes económicos con gran implantación en el ámbito agrario y constituyen uno de los instrumentos más eficaces para ejecutar los objetivos de la política comunitaria de desarrollo rural. El marco jurídico del desarrollo rural se halla fundamentalmente en la legislación de la Unión Europea, que establece un complejo sistema de medidas y que actualmente gira entorno al Reglamento (CE nº 1698/2005, relativo a la ayuda al desarrollo rural a través del Fondo Europeo Agrícola de Desarrollo Rural (FEADER. El Derecho interno de los Estados miembros aplica e implementa la normativa comunitaria, pero además contiene una regulación propia sobre cooperativas y desarrollo rural. En el caso español, hay que tener en cuenta las normas estatales y autonómicas tanto en materia de cooperativas como de desarrollo rural. El presente trabajo, partiendo de la legislación sustantiva española, analiza el papel que desempeñan las cooperativas agrarias en el actual marco jurídico comunitario, estatal y autonómico en materia de desarrollo rural. Las cooperativas agrarias pueden ser agentes promotores del desarrollo local cuando actúan como interlocutores de la administración pública y como miembros de los “grupos de acción local” constituidos mediante la metodología LEADER. Igualmente, las cooperativas agrarias pueden ser beneficiarias de las ayudas suplementarias que algunas Comunidades Autónomas establecen para llevar a cabo acciones de fomento del desarrollo local./Cooperatives are economic agents widely established in the agrarian sector and constitute one of the most effective tools to attain the objectives of the European Union policies for rural development. The legal framework for rural development is mainly found in the European Union’s legislation which implements a complex system of measures and that nowadays revolves around the (CE Regulation no. 1698/2005, on support for rural development by

  8. Gas Storage in Europe, recent developments and outlook to 2035

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hureau, Geoffroy

    2015-01-01

    These slides present: the European gas storage market in 2014 (Review of 2014 trends, Current challenges, Role of storage); the Outlook to 2035 (Supply/Demand factors, Estimated Storage needs, Project backlog). In conclusion: an over capacity is expected until 2025.Supply and demand evolution, market liberalization and environmental constraints on coal will drive a new period of growth for UGS. Cedigaz estimates that European UGS capacity will increase by around 45 bcm by 2035. UGS projects represent 77 bcm Of which 22 bcm is under construction, there is a majority of salt-cavern projects (market liberalization), not so much new seasonal storage (security of supply?), not all planned storage will be built (Projects under competition for the same (regional) market, the situation is quite contrasted between NW Europe and South-Southeast Europe (and UK)). The challenges are the investment and the security of supply

  9. Developments in the US gas industry - no model for Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, F H

    1988-09-01

    The deregulation measures in the USA have led to increased regulation in the gas industry. There is no reason why these measures should be adopted in Europe. After a few remarks on the beginning of state regulation in the USA gas industry, the article goes on to consider the consequences of this policy (supply bottlenecks as a result of cost-oriented regulation of gas prices, surplus supply as a result of regulation-induced price increases).

  10. Developing climatic scenarios for pesticide fate modelling in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blenkinsop, S.; Fowler, H.J.; Dubus, I.G.; Nolan, B.T.; Hollis, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A climatic classification for Europe suitable for pesticide fate modelling was constructed using a 3-stage process involving the identification of key climatic variables, the extraction of the dominant modes of spatial variability in those variables and the use of k-means clustering to identify regions with similar climates. The procedure identified 16 coherent zones that reflect the variability of climate across Europe whilst maintaining a manageable number of zones for subsequent modelling studies. An analysis of basic climatic parameters for each zone demonstrates the success of the scheme in identifying distinct climatic regions. Objective criteria were used to identify one representative 26-year daily meteorological series from a European dataset for each zone. The representativeness of each series was then verified against the zonal classifications. These new FOOTPRINT climate zones provide a state-of-the-art objective classification of European climate complete with representative daily data that are suitable for use in pesticide fate modelling. - The FOOTPRINT climatic zones provide an objective climatic classification and daily climate series that may be used for the modelling of pesticide fate across Europe

  11. Contrasting ERP absorption between transition and developed economies from Central and Eastern Europe (CEE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernroider, Edward W.N.; Sudzina, Frantisek; Pucihar, Andreja

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates Enterprise Resource Planning absorption in transition and developed economies in Central and Eastern Europe. Using absorptive capacity theory and data envelopment analysis, we view organizational transformation in Enterprise Resource Planning absorption as an economic...

  12. IAEA technical co-operation activities in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The desire to extend the many benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear technology to all countries led as long ago as 1957 to the establishment of the IAEA and to immediate introduction of a technical co-operation programme. In the more than thirty years that have passed since that time, the potential applications of nuclear techniques have greatly expanded. Over the period, many of the applications have moved from research laboratories into hospitals, farms and industrial enterprises. The direct resources made available to the IAEA by its Member States to support technology transfer processes have grown rapidly since the late 1950s. The current trends in the technical co-operation activities of the IAEA and some examples of projects supported by the IAEA are briefly presented in this document

  13. BANKING SYSTEM STABILITY: COMMERCIAL AND CO-OPERATIVE BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru-Cristian OANEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Commercial banks and co-operative banks are credit institutions, but there are some differences between the main operations proceeded by each of them. Based on these specific characteristics, we want to identify the manner in which financial crisis affected their activity. As we all know, the financial crisis had a major impact in the United States, the “natal” country of the crisis, because great banks such as Lehman Brothers or Merrill Lynch have bankrupted. Even if the Romanian banking system was not affected by such catastrophic situations, surely the financial crisis had a significant impact on it. This topic is worth to be analysed, because we would be able to identify the risk differences between these two types of business: commercial banks versus co-operative banks.

  14. Entrepreneurship and innovation: the co-operative society as a commercial option to development Empreendedorismo e inovação: a cooperativa como alternativa empresarial para o desenvolvimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Ribeiro Rodrigues Alves

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The crisis of the traditional capitalism urges innovation. The cooperative is an alternative way of usual commercial organization, and it does this without compromising the institutes of free enterprises and private property. Cooperativism promotes ethics and democracy as an environment of entrepreneurship. The profits are shared according to the participation in the activities and not according to how much the person have paid before. The experience of cooperativism in developed countries shows how much it is profitable and good to economics and society.A crise da forma tradicional de capitalismo clama por inovações. A cooperativa é uma forma alternativa à organização empresarial tradicional, sem deixar de assegurar a livre iniciativa e a propriedade privada. O cooperativismo preza a ética e a democracia num ambiente propício ao empreendimento. Pressupõe uma cultura de desapego ao poder estabelecido com base no capital investido, e a participação nos resultados proporcional à conduta proativa do empreendedor. A experiência das cooperativas em países de alto grau de desenvolvimento corrobora o acerto desta forma de organização e se mostra útil para o desenvolvimento econômico e social do empreendedor.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy: An interdisciplinary co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Rassow, J.; Moss, R.L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Heimans, J.; Gabel, D.; Vries, M.J. de; Touw, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The international (European) undertaking in BNCT in the Netherlands has required close scrutiny of the organisational structure required to establish BNCT facilities. The multidisciplinary co-operation and the tasks of the participants in the hospital (Radiation Oncologist, Medical Physicist, Pharmacist and other medical and paramedical staff) and those attached to the reactor) are described. The organisational structure and regulatory aspects required for the international functioning of the Petten treatment facility are provided for guidance to new projects in this field. (author)

  16. Action plan for Nordic energy co-operation 2006-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Action Plan for Nordic Energy Co-operation 2006-2009 is targeted at creating a visible and sustainable contribution to solving the most important and politically most relevant energy policy challenges faced by the Nordic region. The plan concentrates on three main areas: Energy markets; Sustainable energy system; and Nordic impact on the international agenda. The Action Plan is the energy sector's contribution to the implementation of the Nordic strategy 'Sustainable Development - New Bearing for the Nordic Countries' and to a number of the Nordic Council's recommendations for the development of the Nordic energy sector. An important element of the implementation of the action plan is on-going contact and information sharing between the Nordic Energy Policy co-operation and the Nordic Energy Research. The continues dialogue between the Nordic Council of Energy Ministers and The Nordic Council on future energy policy challenges will likewise be an important part of the political process. (BA)

  17. The Text of the Agreement of 8 July Extending the Asian Regional Co-Operative Project on Food Irradiation. Extension Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The text of the Agreement to Extend the Agreement of 23 May 1980 Establishing the Asian Regional Co-operative Project on Food Irradiation within the framework of the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology of 1972, as extended in 1977 and in 1982, is reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  18. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievering, N.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Recent changes in the United States' nuclear policy, in recognition of the increased proliferation risk, have raised questions of US intentions in international nuclear fuel and fuel-cycle service co-operation. This paper details those intentions in relation to the key elements of the new policy. In the past, the USA has been a world leader in peaceful nuclear co-operation with other nations and, mindful of the relationships between civilian nuclear technology and nuclear weapon proliferation, remains strongly committed to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, IAEA safeguards and other elements concerned with international nuclear affairs. Now, in implementing President Carter's nuclear initiatives, the USA will continue its leading role in nuclear fuel and fuel-cycle co-operation in two ways, (1) by increasing its enrichment capacity for providing international LWR fuel supplies and (2) by taking the lead in solving the problems of near and long-term spent fuel storage and disposal. Beyond these specific steps, the USA feels that the international community's past efforts in controlling the proliferation risks of nuclear power are necessary but inadequate for the future. Accordingly, the USA urges other similarly concerned nations to pause with present developments and to join in a programme of international co-operation and participation in a re-assessment of future plans which would include: (1) Mutual assessments of fuel cycles alternative to the current uranium/plutonium cycle for LWRs and breeders, seeking to lessen proliferation risks; (2) co-operative mechanisms for ensuring the ''front-end'' fuel supply including uranium resource exploration, adequate enrichment capacity, and institutional arrangements; (3) means of dealing with short-, medium- and long-term spent fuel storage needs by means of technical co-operation and assistance and possibly establishment of international storage or repository facilities; and (4) for reprocessing plants, and related fuel

  19. security co-operation in the southern african development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arianne

    security and stability) are driven by national interest rather than regional interest – as realists argue ... For a long time, institutions were at the heart of political science and ..... insecurity and political instability” (Ndlovu, 2006:7). The thrust of his ...

  20. Imagining Powerful Co-Operative Schools: Theorising Dynamic Co-Operation with Spinoza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    The recent expansion of the English academies programme has initiated a period of significant change within the state education system. As established administration has been disrupted, new providers from business and philanthropy have entered the sector with a range of approaches to transform schools. This paper examines the development of…

  1. Fast reactor collaboration in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.I.

    1987-01-01

    Fast reactors have been developed in several European countries, the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Italy. A suggestion to collaborate on fast reactor research and development resulted in an Intergovernmental Memorandum of Understanding signed in 1984 by the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Belgium. Holland was expected to join later. This provided for co-operation between electric utilities, reactor design, research and development companies and fuel cycle companies. Three steering committees have so far been set up, the European fast reactor utilities Group, the European research and development and the European fuel cycle steering committees. Progress on these is detailed. The main areas of technology exchange are listed in the Appendix. The possibility exists for a series of three large demonstration plants to be built in Europe and a fuel reprocessing plant to confirm the reactor system. (U.K.)

  2. Local climate activities in co-operation between municipality, civil society and science shop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    The Science Shop at DTU co-operates with the local municipal administration and the local branch of an environmental NGO about climate change. The co-operation was initiated by a proposal to the Science Shop from the municipal administration. Since the Science Shop requests civil society...... involvement in projects it was proposed to involve the local branch of the environmental NGO. The starting point was topics developed by the administration and the NGO together and announced to students as part of the Science Shop project supply. The focus is climate impact of local activities and strategies...... are initiated and co-ordinated by a group with members from municipal administration, the local NGO and the Science Shop. All projects have involved student projects, but most projects have also contributed to ongoing research activities. The projects up till now have focused on the municipal food supply...

  3. Cross-border Co-operation and Policy Networks in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trémolières, Marie; Walther, Olivier

    This publication examines how policy actors involved in cross-border co-operation contribute to the regional integration process in West Africa. It uses a pioneering methodology, known as social network analysis, to visualise the formal and informal relationships between actors involved in cross...... West Africa to develop cross-border initiatives in a number of ways. Combining these two analyses with the perceptions of regional policy makers as to which border areas they consider as priorities for regional integration, the publication concludes with the analytical foundations for more effective......-border policy networks, showing that borders have notable and diverse impacts on exchanges of information and the relative power of networks. The report then analyses a range of regional indicators of co-operation potential, visually demonstrating that borders can also affect the ability of sub-regions within...

  4. Co-operation between Slovenia and Croatia in the low- and intermediate level radioactive waste repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Subasic, D.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Tomse, P.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the LILW repository project development in Slovenia and Croatia from the viewpoint of co-operation of national agencies for radioactive waste management - ARAO in Slovenia and APO in Croatia. The project performance, as well as the co-operation itself, are based on the fact that NPP Krsko, sited in Slovenia, is the joint venture facility of both countries, which are consequently obliged to find a proper solution for final disposal of operational and decommissioning radioactive waste generated by the plant. The main aspects of the project development in both countries, such as LILW repository site selection and characterisation, development of repository conceptual design, performance assessment/safety analysis procedures and public participation, are presented in the paper. Based on separate descriptions of the project development in Slovenia and Croatia respectively, the main aspects of co-operation between ARAO and APO are elaborated.(author)

  5. CO2 for refrigeration. Co-operation with Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredesen, Arne M.

    2000-01-01

    NTNU and SINTEF Energy Research, Norway, have co-operated closely with universities in Indonesia on the use of CO2 as a working fluid in refrigeration systems. The Asian market is the largest in the world and so it is very important to use environmentally friendly working fluids. In Indonesia, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) plays a leading role in the efforts to meet the national emission goals. For economical reasons, Indonesia considers natural working fluids such as CO2 rather than the new expensive synthetic ones

  6. A comparison of recent developments in the energy grid industries in the USA and in Europe: the lessons for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of recent developments in the electricity and gas industries in the USA and Europe shows that competition is not a panacea in these industries. A central role should not be given to wholesale or retail spot markets in a doctrinaire, uniform way. The physical and technical realities of these industries (the non-storability of electric power, the difficulties of access to gas resources, the rigid infrastructures and the high capital intensity) must be taken into account in any critical examination of the 'common model' of (quasi-) vertical integration which seeks to establish suitable forms of competition. Of these two industries, it would seem that gas appears more suited to the incorporation of a certain amount of competition for the sake of greater efficiency. 11 refs

  7. Greening of electricity in Europe: challenges and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, Atle; Koefoed, Anne Louise

    2003-01-01

    Against the background of underlying ecological challenges and rapid de-regulation of energy markets, the article explores commercial and political dimensions of greening of electricity in Europe. The article has a dual economic and political focus: From a commercial point of view it argues that the European green electricity approaches can be sorted into two types based on a classical distinction between standardised commodification and specialised segmentation. From a political point of view, it argues that the European green electricity approaches can be sorted into two categories, EU- and nationally-orientated renewable energy policies. Drawing on examples from the other case studies presented in this volume, supplemented with other material, the article analyses greening of electricity industry under various market-politics combinations and discusses strengths and weaknesses of each approach as it is applied in the European context. In a final section the article relates the discussion of political and commercial organisation of greening of electricity industry to underlying ecological challenges and the need for a locational differentiation of greening policies

  8. LNG development across Europe: Infrastructural and regulatory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorigoni, Susanna; Portatadino, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a cross-section infrastructural and regulatory analysis of the European LNG sector is presented. The LNG chain is maintained as being a good tool to enlarge the number of natural gas exporters to Europe, adding in this way to competition and to the achievement of the targets of the liberalisation process, which is a decrease in price for final customers and security of supply. The main reason for this is to be identified in the minor specificity of the regasification-plant-related investment compared with pipeline transportation. As a matter of fact, as the infrastructural analysis will show, the construction of new LNG receiving terminals is likely to bring about an increase in the number of importers fostering competition among them and shrinking their margins among the value chain. In this context, regulation is meant to play a key role in promoting investments without hindering competition. Nevertheless it is questionable whether LNG will be able to introduce competition beyond the European border (that is among producers) according to the forecasted supply and demand balance that is leading to a seller's market in the upstream sector. In this case, a huger part of the rent would go to the exporters leaving minor scope for competition down the European border. (author)

  9. Technical co-operation report for 2001. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Using nuclear technology as an effective tool for development is the challenge faced by the Agency's technical co-operation programme. This was the subject of the 4th IAEA Scientific Forum, entitled 'Nuclear technology for sustainable development: serving human needs,' which was held in conjunction with the 45th General Conference in September 2001. Opening the Forum, Professor Jeffrey Sachs of Harvard University emphasized the importance of developing mechanisms to mobilize science and technology to meet the growing challenge of serving human needs in a sustainable manner and commended the Agency for its achievements in this regard. This report provides information on how the technical co-operation programme has responded to that challenge over the past year. One of the highlights of the technical co-operation programme in 2001 was the launching of the Pan-African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in October. This represented the culmination of years of effort by African Member States, working in partnership with the Agency and the Organization for African Unity (OAU), and was an important milestone in the progress of applying the sterile insect technique (SIT) to the area-wide eradication of the tsetse fly in Africa. It is a good example of how science and technology can contribute to socio-economic development with a direct impact at the community level. The level of Member States' pledges to the Technical Co-operation Fund (TCF) for 2001, more than $59 million, was the second highest ever. This represented a rate of attainment of 80.01% (as of 31 March 2002), thus achieving the target set by the General Conference for that year. The extra budgetary contributions, more than $7 million, were the highest in ten years. These contributions, together with payments of assessed programme costs and other income, meant that total new resources for the year reached $71.1 million. In December 2000, the Board approved an

  10. Technical co-operation report for 2001. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Using nuclear technology as an effective tool for development is the challenge faced by the Agency's technical co-operation programme. This was the subject of the 4th IAEA Scientific Forum, entitled 'Nuclear technology for sustainable development: serving human needs,' which was held in conjunction with the 45th General Conference in September 2001. Opening the Forum, Professor Jeffrey Sachs of Harvard University emphasized the importance of developing mechanisms to mobilize science and technology to meet the growing challenge of serving human needs in a sustainable manner and commended the Agency for its achievements in this regard. This report provides information on how the technical co-operation programme has responded to that challenge over the past year. One of the highlights of the technical co-operation programme in 2001 was the launching of the Pan-African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in October. This represented the culmination of years of effort by African Member States, working in partnership with the Agency and the Organization for African Unity (OAU), and was an important milestone in the progress of applying the sterile insect technique (SIT) to the area-wide eradication of the tsetse fly in Africa. It is a good example of how science and technology can contribute to socio-economic development with a direct impact at the community level. The level of Member States' pledges to the Technical Co-operation Fund (TCF) for 2001, more than $59 million, was the second highest ever. This represented a rate of attainment of 80.01% (as of 31 March 2002), thus achieving the target set by the General Conference for that year. The extra budgetary contributions, more than $7 million, were the highest in ten years. These contributions, together with payments of assessed programme costs and other income, meant that total new resources for the year reached $71.1 million. In December 2000, the Board approved an

  11. HPC Co-operation between industry and university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhle, R.

    2003-01-01

    The full text of publication follows. Some years ago industry and university were using the same kind of high performance computers. Therefore it seemed appropriate to run the systems in common. Achieved synergies are larger systems to have better capabilities, to share skills in operating and using the system and to have less operating cost because of larger scale of operations. An example for a business model which allows that kind of co-operation would be demonstrated. Recently more and more simulations especially in the automotive industry are using PC clusters. A small number of PC's are used for one simulation, but the cluster is used for a large number of simulations as a throughput device. These devices are easily installed on the department level and it is difficult to achieve better cost on a central site, mainly because of the cost of the network. This is in contrast to the scientific need which still needs capability computing. In the presentation, strategies will be discussed for which cooperation potential in HPC (high performance computing) still exists. These are: to install heterogeneous computer farms, which allow to use the best computer for each application, to improve the quality of large scale simulation models to be used in design calculations or to form expert teams from industry and university to solve difficult problems in industry applications. Some examples of this co-operation are shown

  12. International co-operation in the field of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1988-10-01

    Operational safety in nuclear power plants is without doubt a field where international co-operation is in constant progress. Accounting for over 80 per cent of the 400 reactors in service throughout the world, the menber countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) are constantly striving to improve the exchange and use of the wealth of information to be gained not just from power plant accidents and incidents but from the routine operation of these facilities. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) helps the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy to meet the NEA's objectives in the safety field, namely: - to promote co-operation between the safety bodies of member countries - to contribute to the safety and regulation of nuclear activities. The CSNI relies on the technical back-up of several different working groups made up of experts appointed by the member countries. For the past three years I have had the honour of chairing Principal Working Group 1 (PWG 1), which deals with operating experience and human factor. It is in this capacity that I will attempt to outline the group's various activities and its findings illustrated by a few examples

  13. Ignalina plant licensing process, international co-operation and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystedt, P.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge for Lithuania as a country with regained independence was to perform a licensing review in a way never done before in the country and in a time schedule that was extremely short. The work included establishing of the licensing base, strengthening the regulatory authority and organising the technical support, establish and implement a safety improvement program, production of the safety case and review of the safety case, and to derive a conclusion regarding whether to issue a licence or not. This was to be done together with other tasks, such as implementation of modifications included in the safety improvement programme at Ignalina, implementation of a new storage for spent fuel and, most important of all, to manage the operational safety at the plant. The achievements are impressive seen in view of the point of start and in view of the time and resources that have been available. Lithuania has put forward a unique safety documentation of an RBMK reactor and presented an in-depth safety evaluation in full openness to Western experts, giving the unique possibility to compare the safety of the Ignalina reactors to Western standards. The co-operation that has been established between Lithuania and Western experts through different assistance programmes is of outmost value, for all involved parties. Co-operation should continue as one element of the challenges for the future

  14. Nuclear data standards - International Evaluation Co-operation volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.D.; Shibata, K.; Vonach, H.; Hambsch, F.J.; Chen, Z.; Hofmann, H.M.; Oh, S.Y.; Badikov, S.A.; Gai, E.V.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Smith, D.L.; Hale, G.M.; Kawano, T.; Larson, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The working party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries) and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries is organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report was issued by Subgroup 7, which was in charge of producing new evaluated neutron cross-section standards. When starting the project, there was a general consensus on the need to update these standards, as significant improvements had been made to the experimental database since 1991 when the last evaluation of these standards was performed. The present work was accomplished through efficient collaboration between a task force of the US Cross-section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Subgroup 7 of the Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. Work is reported on the results of an international effort to evaluate the neutron cross-section standards. The evaluations include the H(n,n), 6 Li(n,t), 10 B(n,α), 10 B(n,α1γ), 197 Au(n,γ), 235 U(n,f) and 238 U(n,f) standard reactions. Evaluations were also produced for the non-standard 238 U(n,γ) and 239 Pu

  15. International co-operation on decommissioning - Achievements of the NEA Co-operative programme 1985-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities is attracting a growing interest in all countries where an increasing number of plants are reaching the end of their operational life and will have to be decommissioned in the next few years. In response to this interest, the NEA set up in 1985 an international programme of technical co-operation between decommissioning projects in eight OECD countries. This report describes the programme and the participating projects, reviews the experiences accumulated during the first five-year term of this international undertaking, and discusses what remains to be done

  16. Do co-operative organisations contribute to a process of democratisation? : the case of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Moberg, Liv

    1998-01-01

    Do co-operative organisations contribute to a process of democratisation? The Case of Tanzania May co-operative organisations be said to perform a role of any importance in processes of democratisation? The objective of my thesis is to answer this question theoretically and to illustrate with the case of Tanzania. It can thus be formulated in two parts; one theoretical and one empirical; May co-operative organisations contribute to a process of democratisation? Do co-operative organi...

  17. Method for predicting future developments of traffic noise in urban areas in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Hout, D. van den; Janssen, S.; Kugler, U.; MacA, V.

    2010-01-01

    Traffic noise in urban areas in Europe is a major environmental stressor. In this study we present a method for predicting how environmental noise can be expected to develop in the future. In the project HEIMTSA scenarios were developed for all relevant environmental stressors to health, for all

  18. Sensitising rural policy: Assessing spatial variation in rural development options for Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, van D.B.; Verburg, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Regional distinctiveness is supported by the European Union in rural development policy. However, there is little information about the spatial distribution of the potential for rural development across Europe. The concept of territorial capital is used to consider spatial characteristics in

  19. Regional economic development in Europe : the role of total factor productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; Klasing, Mariko J.; Milionis, Petros

    2018-01-01

    Regional economic development in Europe: the role of total factor productivity. Regional Studies. This paper documents the fact that the large and persistent differences in economic development across subnational regions in European Union countries can largely be attributed to differences in total

  20. The potential for integrated landscape management to fulfil Europe's commitments to the Sustainable Development Goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, Carsten; Garcia-Martin, Maria; Raymond, Christopher M.; Shaw, Brian J.; Plieninger, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this perspective essay is to discuss how integrated landscape management (ILM) can contribute to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda in Europe. Challenges for sustainable development become evident in the emergence of land-use conflicts. Facing multiple,

  1. A model of Franco-German co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Leverenz, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the power station industry in Germany and France decided to further development of nuclear power station technology. As an initial stage, design measures were taken to reduce the probability of serious faults even further, below its existing, already very low level. Furthermore, steps were taken to restrict even these hypothetical faults, so that their effects are confined to the installation itself and do not have serious consequences for the people who live in the vicinity of the installation. There is no need for measures such as evacuation and resettlement of local residents. In particular, the fact that the output has been increased to 1750 MW, with the resultant low specific construction costs, produces low power generation costs, without compromising security. Comprehensive standardisation of the layout reduces the amount of time engineers spend on design and installation and exploits the advantages of series production. Operating costs are minimised by a high degree of availability, of 92%, and an increased degree of efficiency, of 36%, which have been achieved by means of an optimised maintenance concept. Increased burn-up means that fuel costs also contribute to low power generation costs. The EPR therefore represents more than a single option for power generation in the future in Germany, France, Europe and across the world. (orig.) [de

  2. Co-operatives in chains: institutional restructuring in the Dutch fruit and vegetables industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.J. Bijman (Jos); G.W.J. Hendrikse (George)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCo-operatives play a major role in the agricultural and food industry. Co-operatives, by the very nature, are producer-oriented firms. As market conditions for food products have changed in recent decades, the question is raised whether co-operatives are still efficient organisations for

  3. Summary Record of the Twenty-Sixth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document is the executive summary of WPEC's 26. meeting held in 2014. It presents a brief review of the 2 days meeting in particular the Reports on experimental activities in Europe, Japan, USA and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL) with the discussion of future plans, the Review of final or near-final subgroup reports, the Status of ongoing subgroups, the Proposals for new subgroups and some information about Conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community. A list of participants and a list of reports presented at this meeting are attached in appendix

  4. Protocol to co-operation agreement with Iran

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A Co-operation Agreement between CERN and Iran will be signed in the coming weeks within the framework of the decisions taken by the Committee of Council and Council in June 1989. In view of implementing this Agreement, a Protocol between CERN and the International Scientific Meetings Office of the Ministry of Science of the Islamic Republic of Iran has been drawn up. It concerns the participation of scientific Institutions of Iran in the CMS Collaboration where CERN is acting on behalf of this Collaboration. This Protocol incorporates the agreement between CMS and ISMO on the Iranese contribution. It does not involve any financial commitment for CERN. The Protocol mainly addresses the status of the Iranese scientists at CERN, the supply by ISMO of the support tables for CMS, as well as the usual provisions concerning delivery and customs, guarantees, responsibilities, intellectual property and disputes. This Protocol is submitted to the Finance Committee for information.

  5. Strategic Stakeholder Communication and Co-operation in Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2002-01-01

    in this process is strategic stakeholder relationships like communication and co-operation. The paper addresses this topic based on a proposed approach for identifying and evaluating the influence from various groups of stakeholders as well as the findings from recent surveys of environmental management......Ever since the introduction of the first major Danish environmental protection law in 1974, environmental regulation has been instrumental in pushing industry towards adopting environmentally less harmful behaviour. However, since the early 1990s, pressure from a growing number of other...... stakeholders, such as for example customers, NGO's, neighbours, etc., has increasingly driven industry towards incorporating environmental considerations in their decisions and activities to an extent which justifies placing Danish companies at the cutting edge of industrial greening. An essential element...

  6. Technical Co-operation Report for 1996. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme made further progress during 1996 in implementing recent initiatives to strengthen efficiency and effectiveness. These initiatives seek to maximize the developmental contribution of counterpart institutions by emphasizing the management of technology to solve social and economic problems. The new direction has been embodied in the term ''Partners in Development''. The Partners in Development approach is reflected in last year's Report to the Board of Governors and the General Conference on Strengthening of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities, which provided an update on ongoing activities and elaborated new initiatives. The 1995 Technical Cooperation Report focused on the progress in implementing these initiatives. Next year, the Secretariat plans to combine the TC Report with the Report on Strengthening of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities in order to improve the clarity, consistency and economy of these presentations. Establishing a development partnership with Member States is the central goal of a new Strategy for TC. The refinement of this strategy required considerable effort during 1996, when the process first began to define objectives, targets and the means of accomplishing them. Alongside internal consultations, the role of SAGTAC became instrumental in reaching consensus on the main elements of the strategy. Future efforts include the formulation of implementation plans for the strategy. Once completed, the strategy will be presented to the TACC and Board in 1997. Reflecting these developments, section A of this Report presents the basic features of the TC Strategy, and the approach to be taken to achieve its objectives. The Strategy addresses among others the recommendations contained in resolution GC(40)/RES/13 on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation: activities to improve the scientific and technological capabilities of developing countries; to achieve sustainable

  7. International co-operation in the nuclear field. Europe and OCDE countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1981-05-01

    This report highlights the political factors underlying nuclear cooperation in the European context. It analyses the institutional structure for such cooperation and describes the different vocations of international organisations in the nuclear field (NEA, IAEA, Euratom). Finally the report gives concrete examples of international nuclear cooperation, with an emphasis on its legal aspects. (NEA) []Le present expose fait ressortir les facteurs politiques de la cooperation nucleaire notamment dans le contexte europeen. Il analyse la structure institutionnelle de cette cooperation et evoque les differentes vocations des organismes internationaux dans le domaine nucleaire (AEN, AIEA, Euratom). Il donne enfin des exemples concrets en mettant l'accent sur ses aspects juridiques

  8. Understanding the development of temporary agency work in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.S. Koene (Bas); J. Paauwe (Jaap); J.P.M. Groenewegen (John)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis article develops an explanatory framework for understanding the growth and development of temporary agency work (TAW) and the related industry. The analysis shows that explanations based on economic logic are helpful in understanding the choice of TAW in general. These explanations,

  9. HUMAN CAPITAL AND DEVELOPMENT: SOME EVIDENCE FROM EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattoscio Nicola

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of development is not only referred to the level or to the growth rate of GDP of a country, but it concerns different aspects of individual life. Development leads to a changing of values, behaviours and attitudes of people interested in it and in the well-being of the whole society. \\r\

  10. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme in Chile, 1981-1991. Country programme evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Agency support for nuclear activities in Chile dates back to the early 1960s. During the last ten years, the period covered by this evaluation, this support has considerably expanded. In the period 1981-1991, 62 Agency projects with allotments amounting to over $7 million were completed or are under implementation. Through this co-operation Chile has received 360 man-months of expert services, $3.4 million worth of equipment, and 105 fellowships for some 390 man-months of training. In addition, 262 Chileans attended 219 Agency regional and interregional training courses, and Chilean institutions were awarded 40 research contracts worth over $325,000. This evaluation covers ten years of Agency technical co-operation with Chile, during which 35 projects were completed and 27 are still being implemented. Eight major sectors received assistance: general atomic energy development; nuclear physics; nuclear raw materials; nuclear engineering and technology; nuclear techniques in agriculture; nuclear medicine; hydrology; and nuclear safety. The evaluation concluded that, overall, the Agency's technical co-operation activities have, in keeping with the national priorities concerning peaceful nuclear applications, contributed substantially to the establishment of Chile's nuclear scientific and technical infrastructure, and played a major role in Chile's efforts to introduce nuclear applications in a number of sectors of the economy, with many benefits for broader national development objectives. Another strength of the Agency's programme with Chile is the high level of commitment and dedication that was noted in the great majority of recipient institutions, and in particular at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CChEN. Mention should also be made of the fact that bureaucracy appears to be less severe than in some other developing countries, and that constraints that frequently affect other countries, such as insufficient counterpart commitment and lack of continuity of

  11. FY 1998 New Sunshine Project. International co-operative project (Summary); 1998 nendo new sunshine keikaku. Kokusai kyoryoku jigyo (sogoban)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are the basic plans for the international co-operative projects for development of technologies for commercialization of photovoltaic power systems (e.g., IEA co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems), and the minutes of the FY 1997 and 1998 meetings of the Solar Energy Technology International Research Co-operative Committee. Japan is responsible for implementing the following projects for promoting international cooperation for, e.g., IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS): research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange, introduction promotion, etc. for IEA/PVPS Programme; and research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange, introduction promotion, etc. for IEA/Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. Japan is also implementing the co-operative projects for the photovoltaic power systems with the Summit participants, based on Science and Technology Working Group established by the Versailles Summit, technology cooperation with, e.g., Australia, and bilateral information exchange and technological survey projects with those countries which have already developed solar energy systems, e.g., USA, France, Spain and Italy. (NEDO)

  12. Income inequality, decentralisation, and regional development in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tselios, Vassilis; Rodriguez-Pose, Andres; Pike, Andy; Tomaney, John; Torrisi, Gianpiero

    This paper deals with the relationship between decentralisation, regional economic development, and income inequality within regions. Using multiplicative interaction models and regionally aggregated microeconomic data for more than 100000 individuals in the European Union (EU), it addresses two

  13. Cooperation Agreement between the Government of Australia and the European Orgaization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in the research projects of CERN Ministry - Regulatory Decree No 3/92 of 6 March

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The agreement provides for co-operation on research projects. Australian specialists may participate in CERN research projects, in particular in connection with the Large Electron-Position Collider-LEP. The Agreement entered into force on the date of its signature for an initial period of five years and is renewable. (NEA)

  14. Towards development of a deposition monitoring network for air pollution of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erisman JW; Mennen MG; Fowler D; Flechard CR; Spindler G; Gruner A; Duyzer JH; Ruigrok W; Wyers GP; LLO; TNO; ECN; ITE (Engeland); IFT (Duitsland)

    1996-01-01

    In 1993 werd vanuit het LIFE project van de Europese Commissie DG XI het project 'Towards the development of a deposition monitoring network for air pollution of Europe' gefinancierd. Het doel van dit project was het ontwikkelen en implementeren van een depositiemonitoring-methode voor

  15. Towards development of a deposition monitoring network for air pollution of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erisman JW; Mennen MG; Fowler D; Flechard CR; Spindler G; Gruner A; Duyzer JH; Ruigrok W; Wyers GP; LLO; TNO; ECN; ITE (Engeland); IFT (Duitsland)

    1996-01-01

    In January 1993 within the framework of the LIFE programme a project was financed which aim was to develop a deposition monitoring method for air pollution of Europe. This method should be used to extend existing European monitoring networks of air concentrations to provide deposition inputs on an

  16. STATE AND DEVELOPMENT PROSPECTS OF GERMANY CONSULTING MARKET IN THE CONTEXT OF EUROPE-WIDE TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kovalska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the actual state of consulting market in Germany. The structural configuration of the Germany consulting market on functional grounds, with the customer's branch, as well as geographically were analyzed. The main prospects of German consulting market development in the context of Europe-wide trends have been defined.

  17. Airline network development in Europe and its implications for airport planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouwt, G.

    2007-01-01

    Order by Fax Printer Friendly PDF Brochure Send to Friend Enquire before Buying Hard Copy Airline Network Development in Europe and its Implications for Airport Planning Ashgate Publishing, March 2007, Pages: 300 Description Table of Contents Enquire before Buying Send to a Friend The ongoing

  18. Scenarios for the development of the electricity economy in Continental Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutschi, Christoph; Stigler, Heinz; Jagl, Alexander; Nischler, Gernot; Huber, Christoph; Bachhiesl, Udo

    2010-09-15

    ATLANTIS is a multi purpose scenario model for the investigation of effects in the electricity system of continental Europe. The model consists of a physical part for the simulation of power generation and load flow as well as an economic part for the investigation of power markets and the business development of generation and supply companies.

  19. Why we need to question the democratic engagement that adolescents in Europe develop.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I. de; Veugelers, W.

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, academics in various disciplines have stressed the need to address democratic deficits in Europe as well as lacunae in the citizenship development of European youth. In this article we explore the value of various types of democratic engagement for

  20. Building for consumption: an institutional analysis of peripheral shopping center development in northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, D.V.H.

    2004-01-01

    In West Europe, one of the most contested kinds of urban development is the out-of-town shopping center. Pointing to the US experience, these are viewed as threats to the vitality of traditional town centers, and are often actively discouraged by planning legislation. This notwithstanding,

  1. Development of tritium permeation barriers on Al base in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamati, G.; Chabrol, C.; Perujo, A.; Rigal, E.; Glasbrenner, H.

    The development of the water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) DEMO fusion reactor requires the production of a material capable of acting as a tritium permeation barrier (TPB). In the DEMO blanket reactor permeation barriers on the structural material are required to reduce the tritium permeation from the Pb-17Li or the plasma into the cooling water to acceptable levels (HIP) technology and spray (this one developed also for repair) deposition techniques. The final goal is to select a reference technique to be used in the blanket of the DEMO reactor and in the ITER test module fabrication. The activities performed in four European laboratories are summarised here.

  2. Celebrating Co-operation among Saskatchewan’s Libraries: The Multitype Library Board, 1996-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Shires

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Saskatchewan’s Multitype Library Board (MLB celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2016. It was established under the passage of the provincial government’s The Libraries Co- operation Act in 1996 to facilitate the co-operative development of the multitype library system in Saskatchewan. This legislation is unique in Canada. The MLB is a Minister of Education Advisory Board and it provides a forum to promote and facilitate co-operation among over 320 public libraries in 10 provincial systems, 25 post-secondary libraries, 755 school libraries, several special libraries, and other information providers. Major milestones of the MLB include helping to eliminate the Provincial Sales Tax on library subscriptions, establishing a provincial digitization plan, and creating a cross-sector database licensing program that has resulted in a projected value of 14.8 million dollars to Saskatchewan users in 2014. The development of the MLB and the impact of the programs it has initiated will be discussed, and recommendations for developing a collaborative initiative will be provided. Le Multitype Library Board (MLB de Saskatchewan fête son 20e anniversaire en 2016. Il était établi sous l’Acte The Libraries Co-operation du parti Libéral en 1996 pour faciliter le développement coopératif du système de bibliothèque Multitype en Saskatchewan. Cette législation est unique au Canada. Le MLB est un comité consultatif du ministère de l’Éducation et il fournit un forum pour promouvoir et faciliter la coopération entre plus de 320 bibliothèques publiques dans dix systèmes provinciaux, 25 bibliothèques postsecondaires, 755 bibliothèques scolaires, plusieurs bibliothèques spéciales, et d’autres fournisseurs d’informations. Les étapes importantes du MLB comprennent, à aider à éliminer les taxes de vente provinciale sur les abonnements aux bibliothèques, à établir un plan provincial de numérisation, et à créer un programme de licence

  3. Developing a typology for local cattle breed farmers in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soini, K.; Diaz, C.; Gandini, G.; Haas, de Y.; Lilja, T.; Martin-Collado, D.; Pizzi, F.; Hiemstra, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing cultural diversity among local breed farmers is crucial for the successful development and implementation of farm animal genetic resources FAnGr conservation policies and programmes. In this study based on survey data collected in the EUropean REgional CAttle breeds project from six

  4. Green electricity market development: Lessons from Europe and the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Lin; Eskeland, Gunnar S.; Kolshus, Hans H.

    2007-01-01

    This study compares the development and implementation of green electricity policies in Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States, a set of countries applying a range of policy instruments to encourage electricity from renewable energy sources. A general tendency is identified that policies shift emphasis from R and D stimulation towards dissemination and market application of renewable energy technologies. We argue that in light of the long term nature of policy goals on energy security, mitigation of climate change, and environmental protection, the applied range of policy instruments may be lacking in providing incentives for the long term development of new technologies. Clarifying policy objectives would allow careful selection of policy instruments, including support for R and D. Improved capacity building for policy implementation is also important

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF E-COMMERCE IN EUROPE

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao , Ziyan

    2017-01-01

    E-commerce provides an immediate global marketplace and business transactions, which can occur seamlessly and very quickly from opposite sides of the world. From a regional perspective, the European region has become the world's largest cross-border E-commerce market. This thesis introduced the current situation of the European E-commerce market and the situation of the E-commerce developed countries through a large number of statistical data. By a variety of data comparison, this paper analy...

  6. Results from ITER Vacuum Vessel Sector Manufacturing Development in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.

    2006-01-01

    Significant results have been achieved since the previous SOFT conference, when the manufacturing development work required to prepare for the ITER Vacuum Vessel Sector was described. The contract for the manufacture of a full-size, 20 Ton poloidal part of the inboard section, fabricated according to the ITER reference manufacturing route, including bracing fixtures, welding applications, restraint effects, and fit-up aspects is approaching completion. Since the main aim of the work is to establish the practicability of achieving the tight dimensional tolerances, an accompanying SYSWELD analysis programme has been validation by instrumented welding coupons, and then used for predicting the distortion of the actual construction. A local machining tool has been developed to allow the requirement for machining of the cylindrical features at a late stage of manufacture. Experimental and analytical work has also been carried out to establish the possibility of 3-D cold-forming large sections of walls of the VV. A manufacturing programme to validate an alternative method of fabricating parts of the double-walled VV, utilising e-beam welding only and avoiding the quality issues of the one-sided access and inspection of the closing welds is presented. This paper describes the results of the manufacturing development programme and the future activities. (author)

  7. Working towards coordination of detector development in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    AIDA-2020 collaboration

    2015-01-01

    AIDA-2020, the largest EU-funded detector R&D project, kicked off at the beginning of June with a meeting at CERN (see here). The aim of the project is to advance detector technologies beyond current limits by sharing the high-quality infrastructure provided by 52 partners from 19 countries.   Knowledge exchange between the various groups who are involved in developing innovative technological solutions for the next generation of detectors is the emphasis of the AIDA-2020 EU-funded project, which started on 1 May and will run for four years. AIDA-2020 is the successor to AIDA, a four-year EU-funded programme that concluded at the end of January 2015, which successfully coordinated a joint European effort in detector R&D and significantly improved various key European research infrastructures, enabling advanced detector development for the high-energy physics community. Highlights of AIDA’s networking activities were the development of generic toolkits for detector description ...

  8. The ethics of conducting a co-operative inquiry with vulnerable people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen R; Lathlean, Judith A

    2004-09-01

    Mental health services users have been calling for greater participation in clinical research. Participation in this context means research 'with' rather than 'on' groups of people. Conducting a co-operative inquiry involving the participation of vulnerable individuals as co-researchers, in particular those with a history of mental health problems, places an obligation on researchers to articulate and justify sound ethical procedures. The aim of this paper is to consider how the ethical issues encountered when conducting participative research with vulnerable people can be addressed in the implementation of a co-operative inquiry with users of mental health services. The study was based on personal reflection and a critical review of associated literature obtained from a database search using Boolean logic. The findings, presented under the headings of the four prima facie moral principles, suggest the need for researchers using participative approaches to demonstrate the humanistic attributes required for engaging and working with people over a period of time. These include building and maintaining trusting relationships, assessing competence to participate, managing interpersonal and group dynamics and making complex collaborative decisions about participants' continued participation in a study. When using a co-operative inquiry approach involving vulnerable individuals, researchers need to demonstrate clearly how a balance between autonomy and paternalism will be achieved, how risks will be anticipated and managed and how fairness will be maintained throughout all procedures. Researchers using participative approaches need to have developed a level of personal insight and self-awareness through access to supervision which focuses on sources of unintended manipulation and interpersonal dynamics that may arise at the inception of a study and throughout its course. Researchers and ethics committees have a shared responsibility to ensure that vulnerable people are

  9. Franchise Business as a Generator of Development in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Baresa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The franchise in the global marketplace enables many globally known brands. With its business concept, it enables integration, learning and acceptance of various cultural, historical, religious and other customs and habits. Consumers prefer a proven and expected standard product quality and services, no matter where they are, they expect and want the same quality provided by franchise companies (shops, restaurants, hotels, and others of well-known brands in different places. It can be concluded that the franchise enables the transfer of business knowledge, experience and technology to an unlimited space. Franchise is largely present as a way of doing business in the world and it has an impact on national economies. Companies can use it as a strategic growth model, as a model for launching a whole new business. Since Croatia has enough potential to develop franchise business that is not sufficiently exploited, that potential could be largely exploited in addition to overcome certain problems. Conducting a systematic analysis of franchise business and development would contribute to this. This paper deals with basic concepts related to the franchise business, features and characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of franchise business, the impact it has on the national economy (US example, and a comparative analysis of the franchise business in Croatia compared to other Central European countries.

  10. Application of a recently developed geotechnical carbon calculator in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rios

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research regarding soil stabilization has been increasingly concerned with environmental performance. The present paper applies the newly developed CO2(eq geotechnical calculator, created by the European Federation of Foundation Contractors and the The Deep Foundations Institute, to assess the behavior of three different binders used in the construction of cutter-soil mixing columns, which formed an embankment/bridge transition wedge. The binders were based on ordinary Portland cement, on a blast furnace slag and cement blend and alkali activated fly ash. Results show that the last two binders are significabtly more effective, in terms of environmental performance, than the more traditional cement-based binder. Although the blast furnace slag cement, at this early stage of the geopolymeric binders, appears as the most interesting option, the fact that the CO2/cost ratio of both options is very similar stands out.

  11. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1986. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    major role in Agency training activities. Close to one fifth of these activities depended on this type of assistance in 1986. From 1980 to 1986, the total volume of the technical assistance delivered by the Agency increased by 112.3%; during the same period, the staff of the Department of Technical Co-operation engaged in technical co-operation activities grew by 12.2%. The views of Member States expressed during the 1986 Policy Review Seminar and subsequent discussions will guide the future programme. Major emphasis will be placed on project quality. In its efforts to ensure that technical co-operation projects are consonant with Member States' development priorities, the Agency will seek to strengthen its co-operation with UNDP and other organizations of the United Nations system, particularly as regards programming and project formulation

  12. Radiation Oncology in the Developing Economies of Central and Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esiashvili, Natia

    2017-04-01

    Eastern Europe is represented by 22 countries of significant variability in population density and degree of economic development. They have been affected by past geopolitical isolation due to their association with the "Soviet Block." Currently, all Eastern European countries except Slovenia are low- or middle-income level and 10 of them are part of European Union. Health care systems in Central and Eastern Europe have been influenced by the legacy of centralized soviet-era governance; however, most countries, particularly in European Union zone, have gone through health care reforms directed toward modernizing infrastructure and staffing. The level of health financing available through health insurance has increased in the region, although still lags behind the Western European levels. After adjusting for differing population age structures, overall incidence rates in both sexes are lower in Eastern and Central Europe compared with the Northern and Western European countries; however, mortality remains higher. There is an ongoing shortage of oncology services in Eastern Europe, including radiotherapy equipment and personnel. Eastern European radiotherapy field is highly diverse with large differences among countries regarding staffing structure, training, accreditation, and defined roles and responsibilities. The rapid diffusion of technological innovations has been identified as one of the most important factors driving the escalating health care expenses, and the need for better cost-effective solutions applicable to the local health care systems and levels of economic development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear power development. South-Eastern Europe 3E Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: 1.Assessments of the incremental costs to the energy system of different “development”and “closure”scenarios. 2.Evaluation of scenarios of the national electricity and centralized heat systems focusing on the economic feasibility of new nuclear power plant(s). General findings: The energy future of Bulgaria depends strongly on the development of the nuclear power sectorThe environmental commitments of Bulgaria drive the energy system towards a roadmap of increased use of renewable energy and maintaining or even strengthening virtually non-emitting hydro and nuclear power. Specific findings: The early closure of KNPP Units 3&4 (SHUTDOWN scenario) increased the system costs. The undiscounted difference in system costs estimated between €734 to €1,095 Million for the essential period 2007 to 2014 -a direct loss to the Bulgarian energy sector; Electricity exports and associated revenues are the key to the Bulgarian system even at revenues of €27.50 per MWh because exports drive rehabilitation schedules; exports affect the ability to finance new construction; exports allow for efficient capacity management and more optimaltiming of properly sized capacity investments; lower exports increase system costs; No net exports after 2007 results in substantial system loss

  14. Development of the Concept of Agroecology in Europe: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Gallardo-López

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Agroecology is still not widely discussed in European countries. Therefore, the aim of this review is to present a qualitative and quantitative mixed analysis of this conceptualization based on research papers to provide initial answers to the following questions: How has the agroecology been used in terms of social movement, science and agricultural practice in the European countries? At which scales has it been applied? Which factors have influenced its application? Speech analysis and multivariable techniques are applied to systematized information. According to found results, the concept of agroecology is mainly conceived as science, then as practice and to a lesser degree as a social movement. There is a predominance of studies at plot level, with a tendency to include physical-biological factors; and at agroecosystem, regional and agri-food system levels, including designers, landscapes and consumers. There is a conceptual evolution in extensive quantitative and intensive qualitative standings when the agroecology incorporates more factors, such as economic, social, and, to a lesser extent, cultural and political, and becomes more transdisciplinary as a response to more complex phenomena that support the genesis and development of this concept. In this regard, a greater balance between its conceptions (science, practice and social movement is recommended to achieve a better dialogue between abstract and empirical levels.

  15. Performance Measurement Using Balanced Scorecard Concept On Co-Operatives Implication In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to apply the concept of balanced scorecards in measurement of co-operatives performance based on vision and mission. So far the assessment of co-operative performance in Indonesia is not take into account the social hold co-operative while co-operatives carrying a dual mission. Research conducted in in North Sumatera Province in Indonesia. The sample consisting of one hundred co-operatives that are still active run annual members meeting. Co-operative performance was assessed based on its fourth perspective i.e. membership financial internal process and learning amp growth. The indicator key of cooperative performance was determined by taking into account the performance assessment on co-operatives as articulated of State Minister for Co-operatives and SMEs No.129KEPMKUMKMXI2002 and the regulations of the State Minister for Co-operatives and SME No.06PerM.KUKMV2006. Therefore this research were contributed a method in assessing co-operative performance using Balanced Scorecard concept with the four perspective namely membership perspective financial perspective internal process perspective and learning amp growth perspective.

  16. Superficiary Right of Building: Origin and Development in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic has been dealing for the last four years with a legal revolution in the field of private law. A new Civil Code was adopted in 2012 and many new and forgotten legal figures were restored in the text of the code. An interesting example of forgotten legal figures is the superficiary right of building, which has again entered the legal order of the Czech Republic after a long one hundred years. Unlike the Act on the Superficiary Right of Building of 1912, the new Civil Code extends the scope of persons that may create the superficiary right of building to their land. This should eliminate the obstacle that has substantially limited its wider use. The superficiary right of building is not likely to become a legal concept very frequently seen in public registers. The aim of this paper is, therefore, a reflection on divided ownership and the purpose and genesis of the superficiary right of building in relation to its origins, as well as a prediction of future developments of this legal concept in the real estate market. To analyse the concept, the paper employs formal and legal methods (logical, grammatical and historical method. A comparative study is conducted in the spirit of the comparative method. The superficiary right of building is a suitable complement to the range of options of property rights offered by the new Civil Code. The author concludes that the use of the superficiary right of building, although not limited in comparison with the 1912 Act, will likely be less frequent and focused on longer-term projects.

  17. A voice from the high wire: Public involvement in a co-operative siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, D.J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The author is a public consultation and communications consultant to the Siting Task Force (STF), Low level Radioactive Waste Management. The STF is a Canadian government-appointed yet independent body implementing a voluntary, co-operative siting process for a long term storage or disposal facility for 1 million cubic metres of LLRW. The presentation will document the experiences of and lessons learned by the author during her role developing and implementing a public involvement program for the process. The Co-operative Siting Process is a new approach to siting controversial facilities. It is based on the belief that communities should accept such a facility in their backyard and not be forced against their will on technical or political grounds. A formal 'ground rules-up-front' process was developed and is now being carried out, with completion slated for April, 1995. Putting these rules and theories into practice has resulted in significant changes being made to the work plan for technical activities, and in a sober second look at the intricacies involved in planning and carrying out a thorough and efficient public involvement program that remain practical and cost-effective. There is a delicate balancing act between meaningful public participation that lays the foundation for trust, confidence and consensus, and public involvement that can result in the process being side-tracked and legitimate solutions and technical activities becoming mired in political and personal agendas

  18. Ekspertyza dokumentu „Skills Development and Employability in Europe: The New Skills Agenda”

    OpenAIRE

    Przyszczypkowski, Kazimierz; Cytlak, Izabela; Jarmużek, Joanna; Pawłowski, Roman; Szafran, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    This article is a critical analysis of the "Skills Development and Employability in Europe: The New Skills Agenda" document. The purpose of the discussion is to analyze the 10 problem areas identified and formulated in the document, paying particular attention to the perception and implementation of these issues from the perspective of European countries. The recommendations presented for each of the issues may provide important guidance for developing a vision of vocational education targeti...

  19. Comparison of evaluated data for chromium-52, iron-56 and nickel-58 - International Evaluation Co-operation Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, C.Y.; Larson, Duane C.; Hetrick, David M.; Vonach, Herbert; Maino, G.; Menapace, Enzo; Mengoni, I.; Asami, T.; Chiba, Satoshi; Shibata, Keiichi Kanagawa; Iijima, S.; Yamamuro, N.; Kopecky, J.

    1992-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report is issued by a Subgroup investigating discrepancies in different evaluations of the major structural materials. The isotopes selected are Chromium-52, Iron-56 and Nickel-58. Graphical overlay comparisons between cross-sections, and also energy-angle correlated particle distributions, in different evaluated libraries was performed. Benefits from these comparisons include information useful for improving structural material evaluations in individual data libraries, for assessing differences associated with present-day evaluation techniques and for development of techniques for graphical representation of the energy-angle correlated data

  20. Institutionalising co-operation : a study of the Elysée treaty and Franco-German co-operation 1963-1993

    OpenAIRE

    Sverdrup, Bjørn Otto

    1994-01-01

    "INSTITUTIONALISING CO-OPERATION. A STUDY OF THE ELYSÉE TREATY AND FRANCO-GERMAN CO-OPERATION 1963-93" In 1963, France and Germany completed 'The Franco-German Treaty on Organization and Principles of Co-operation', the so-called Elysée Treaty. The Elysée Treaty, and its protocols, are in this study viewed as a political institution, hence the Elysée Treaty will be referred to as the Franco-German institution. This study seeks to answer the question of how the Franco-German institution has...

  1. Overcoming decommissioning challenges through client/laboratory co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, Mike; Gray, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Accelerated decommissioning projects of the type underway at the former gaseous diffusion plant at BNG Capenhurst, UK, involve characterisation and radiochemical fingerprinting of a variety of unusual materials derived from legacy wastes. The project management and technical challenges that can occur during such a program can be successfully surmounted if a close working relationship between the client and the analytical laboratory is achieved. The Capenhurst Integrated Decommissioning Program (IDP) is an example of how such co-operation can reduce costs and time scales by providing the analytical laboratory with key sample and technical information prior to the shipping of the samples to the lab. This ensures that challenges associated with unusual sample matrices can be anticipated and dealt with at an early stage in the project. Gamma spectrometry is the most common analytical technique when analysing samples for radioactive content as it is non-destructive, relatively inexpensive and fast. However, accurate measurement generally requires samples of a known density to be counted in calibrated geometries. This becomes a challenge as many legacy wastes comprise materials of uneven geometry and/or varying density, as has been the case during the Capenhurst IDP. Liaising with the client to ensure a representative sub-sample of the material is taken on-site, and a series of additional checks when analysing the sample ensure that accurate results are obtained even for non-routine materials. Often it is only one or two radionuclides that dominate the radioactive inventory for legacy wastes. (authors)

  2. Military Training and Education: an Opportunity for V4 Co-Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan ŠUPLATA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visegrad Group needs success stories if its defence co-operation is to develop. The recent differences between Poland and the rest of the region, as well as the closing window of opportunity to improve interoperability through the ISAF mission, make the hunger for concrete examples of co-operation even more urgent. Education and training projects are not only comparatively easily to implement in terms of time and money, but also represent a way of bringing the region’s civilian and military leaders closer together in terms of strategic thinking. Regional defence collaboration is also one of the ways to materialize NATO’s Smart Defence agenda. For the whole region, the way to keep Visegrad defence cooperation alive is not straightforward and certain, but it is likely to prove rewarding in the long term. It presents not only a chance to keep the whole region better prepared militarily, but also to build a more cohesive strategic awareness, thanks to intensive communication at all levels.

  3. Outcomes from the regional Co-operation in the Area of the Safety Analysis Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Mavko, B.; Prosek, A.; Debrecin, N.; Bajs, T.

    2000-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out the Co-ordinated Research Program (CRP) ON V alidation of Accident and Safety Analysis Methodology'' in the period between 1995 and 1998. Three areas of interest identified by the participants referred to the pressurised water reactors of Western and Eastern type (PWR and WWER type). The specific areas of attention were: system behaviour of the primary and secondary loops (PS area), the containment response (CO area) and the severe accidents (SA area). During the CRP it became clear that the technology advancements, the available tools (i.e. codes) and the experimental databases in the above areas are quite different. At the conclusion of the CRP, all objectives of the program have been reached. This paper presents the summary of the regional co-operation in this framework. The CRP activities focused on the codes and expertise available at the participating organisations. This overview therefore summarises their experience related to the state-of-the-art in the field of computational accident analysis. In addition, the paper proposes the recommendations for future activities related to the code usage, the user effects and code development. In pursuing of these goals special attention is given to the importance of the international co-operation. (author)

  4. PlanetLab Europe as Geographically-Distributed Testbed for Software Development and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Komosny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyse the use of PlanetLab Europe for development and evaluation of geographically-oriented Internet services. PlanetLab is a global research network with the main purpose to support development of new Internet services and protocols. PlanetLab is divided into several branches; one of them is PlanetLab Europe. PlanetLab Europe consists of about 350 nodes at 150 geographically different sites. The nodes are accessible by remote login, and the users can run their software on the nodes. In the paper, we study the PlanetLab's properties that are significant for its use as a geographically distributed testbed. This includes node position accuracy, services availability and stability. We find a considerable number of location inaccuracies and a number of services that cannot be considered as reliable. Based on the results we propose a simple approach to nodes selection in testbeds for geographically-oriented Internet services development and evaluation.

  5. The decommissioning of WWER type nuclear power plants. Final report on an IAEA regional technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Numerous WWER-440 nuclear power plants are in operation in central and eastern Europe and a small number have already been shut down. In addition to reactors already shut down, many other reactors will reach the end of their design lifetime in a few years and become candidates for decommissioning. It is unfortunate that little consideration was devoted to decommissioning of WWER-440 reactors at the plant design and construction stage, and little emphasis was placed on planning for decommissioning. It is within this context that the IAEA launched a regional technical co-operation project in 1994 with the aim of providing guidance on planning and management of decommissioning for WWERs. The project, which had a duration of four years (1995-1998), included the organization of workshops and scientific visits to countries having WWERs and other countries where active decommissioning projects were under way. Eventually, participants suggested the consolidation of expert guidance and collective opinions into a TECDOC, which was drafted by both designated participants from project recipient countries and invited experts. The TECDOC has the aim of serving as a stimulus for all concerned parties in central and eastern European countries to initiate concrete decommissioning planning, including assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of decommissioning plans. In addition, the regional technical co-operation project has managed to bring together in this TECDOC a number of good practices that could be useful in WWER-440 decommissioning

  6. Comparative study on membership legislation in Canadian and Chinese agricultural co-operative laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Zhihong; GUO Xiangyu

    2007-01-01

    For centuries, groups of people desiring to supply themselves with goods, to market their products, or to obtain services of various kinds on a co-operative basis, have made increasing use of co-operative associations to achieve these purposes. During the period, legislation designed especially for the incorporation and conduct of such associations has been enacted by different counties.Since a co-operative is established and carried on by and for the use of its members, this essay makes a comparison between Canadian and Chinese co-operative laws in terms of membership in the aspects of qualifications, rights and obligations and withdrawal of membership, so as to probe the function of co-operative legislation and find some enlightment from it.

  7. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper draws on British Nuclear Fuels' (BNFL) wide experience of international collaboration in nuclear fuel process activities to examine the pros and cons of international agreements. Initially, the factors that influence the need to co-operate, the extent of possible co-operation and the alternative types of agreement, are reviewed. Next, the benefits, problems and risks associated with each function, such as management, financial R and D, marketing and operations that could be covered within the scope of an international agreement, are examined in detail. The paper continues by calling upon specific experience obtained by BNFL in the co-operation with other organizations over several years in both major and much smaller agreements, illustrating the rationale behind the co-operation, the resolution of 'teething' troubles and the present status of these organizations. In conclusion, the paper comments upon the effectiveness of collaboration agreements and identifies several requirements for international co-operation to succeed. (author)

  8. Co-operation and economic relationship as determinants for competitiveness in the food sector: the Spanish wheat to bread chain

    OpenAIRE

    de Magistris, Tiziana; Gracia, Azucena

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the impact of co-operation amongst stakeholders of the food chain on enterprise competitiveness. The analysis focuses on the Spanish wheat to bread chain. A theoretical model is developed which covers the main components that define competitiveness (profitability, turnover, market share, customer loyalty and product quality), quality supply chain relationship (trust, commitment and satisfaction) and the main factors explaining supply chain relation...

  9. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Kenya, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With almost $3.9 million of Agency support received, Kenya ranks 39th among all recipients of technical assistance during the period 1958-1991. Almost half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of the equipment (44%), followed by training (33%) and expert services (23%). Two-thirds of the funds available were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (66%), while extra-budgetary contributions accounted for 18%, in-kind contributions for 14%, and UNDP for 2% of the resources. With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the four major areas have been general atomic energy development (30%), agriculture (22%), nuclear medicine and nuclear safety (13% each)

  10. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Niger, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With some $1.5 million of Agency support received, Niger ranks 65th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. About two-thirds of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (62%), complemented by expert services (26%) and training (12%). Almost the entire resources utilized were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (96%), with only a small share made available through assistance in kind (4%). With regard to project disbursements by sector, the four major areas have been agriculture (34%), general atomic energy development (31%), hydrology (18%) and nuclear safety (12%)

  11. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Sierra Leone, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $1.1 million of Agency support received, Sierra Leone ranks 70th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. Almost equal shares of the assistance during the past ten years have been provided in the form of equipment (40%) and expert services (37%), while the share of the training component was 23%. The best part of the resources was provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (96%), the remaining 4% was made available through assistance in kind. During the past ten years, project activities - and disbursements - have concentrated exclusively on three major areas: nuclear medicine (52%), general atomic energy development (25%) and agriculture (23%)

  12. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Zambia, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $5.5 million of Agency support received, Zambia ranks 33rd among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (61%), followed by expert services (25%) and training (14%). Almost all of the resources made available came from the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (93%), with only very small shares provided through extrabudgetary contributions (4%) and assistance in kind (3%). With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the largest areas have been agriculture (33%) and general atomic energy development (23%), followed by industry and hydrology (19%), nuclear raw materials (13%) and nuclear safety (6%)

  13. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Guatemala, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $3 million of Agency support received, Guatemala ranks 46th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. Almost three quarters of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (72%), followed by training (15%) and expert services (13%). Seventy-eight per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, the rest was made available through extrabudgetary contributions (21%) and assistance in kind (1%). With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been nuclear physics and chemistry (37%), agriculture (28%), nuclear medicine (16%) and hydrology (8%). The remaining 11% were shared by general atomic energy development, nuclear raw materials, nuclear engineering and technology, and nuclear safety

  14. Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures in Africa: Towards Establishing Effective and Sustainable Co-operations and Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The third African IRPA 2010 conference on Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures in Africa: Towards Establishing Effective and Sustainable Co-operations and Networks. IAEA's role in radiation protection with focus in Africa. The controlling of exposure to indoor Radon. And Measure of activities and calculation of effective dose of indoor 222 Rn in some dwelling and enclosed areas in Africa - capacity building for radiation protection. It had also address Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy, challenges for advancing medical physic globally, Heath effects and medical applications of non-ionizing radiation, nuclear safety and radiation protection consideration in the design of research and development. The International radiation protection association (IRPA) 2010-2011 strategic plan that address among other issues educations and training activities (2000-2020) and the current UNSCLEAR activities

  15. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Uruguay, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $4.2 million of Agency support received, Uruguay ranks 37th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (67%), followed by expert services (19%) and training (14%). Seventy-three per cent of the resources were provided through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 24% were made available through extrabudgetary contributions. The remaining 3% were provided through assistance in kind, with only an insignificant contribution by UNDP. With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been nuclear medicine (35%), agriculture (23%), general atomic energy development (17%), followed by nuclear physics and chemistry (11%) and industry and hydrology (7%)

  16. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Zaire, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $3.9 million of Agency support received, Zaire ranks 38th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (60%), followed by training (24%) and expert services (16%). With a share of 76%, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund has provided more than three quarters of the total resources available, while only small shares were made available through UNDP (11%), extrabudgetary contributions (4%) and assistance in kind (9%). With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the largest area has been general atomic energy development (26%), followed by agriculture (18%), nuclear safety (18%), nuclear techniques in industry and hydrology (13%), and nuclear physics and chemistry (11%)

  17. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Senegal, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $2.2 million of Agency support received, Senegal ranks 56th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. More than one-third of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (67%), followed by expert services (21%) and training (12%). Eighty per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 16% were made available by UNDP and about 2% each through extrabudgetary contributions and assistance in kind. With regard to project disbursement by sector, by far the largest area has been agriculture (43%). Smaller shares have gone to general atomic energy development (15%), nuclear physics and chemistry (13%), nuclear medicine and hydrology (11% each), and nuclear safety (7%)

  18. Latin-American Co-operation in Biotechnology Programme: Industrial penicillin amidase for 6 amino penicillanic acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Montoya C.

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates technological and economic transference related to the Production of Penicillin Amidase for use in 6 Amine Penicillanic acid (6-APA Production Project, wich is a part of the United Nations1 Regional Biotechnology Programme for Latin America and the Caribbean. This paper analyses the evolution of international cooperation by looking at the project's development. The methodology used includes analysis of: the project's development; participant and budgetary goals; results; copyright; project conditions; and sale of biocatalyst and 6-APA. All technical objectives were achieved; international co-operation, as well as co-operation between Industry and University were successful. Technological transference to the pilot plant was effective; many students involved in the project were simultaneously taking M.Sc. and Ph.D's courses. Nevertheless, neither the technology necessary for the biocatalyst's manufacture nor the biocatalyst itself were used. Analysis of the project has provided some orientation concerning those internal and external problems which arose during the development and sale of biotechnology in our countries and has tried to propose some alternatives for taking advantage of international co-operation.

  19. An example of nuclear co-operation: The Republic of Korea and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, G.

    1983-01-01

    France and the Republic of Korea are pursuing the same objectives: they have decided to meet a large part of their electricity needs with nuclear power, and thereby increase their independence in energy matters. Both began ambitious national nuclear programmes some years ago, and it is natural that they should whish to co-operate. In November 1980, the Korean Electric Company (KEPCO) signed two contracts with French industry: one with Framatome for the supply of two nuclear islands and two 900 MW(e) PWR units (KNU 9 and 10); and one with Cogema for the supply of enriched uranium. These contracts were supplemented in February 1982 by a third contract, signed with Alsthom-Atlantique for the supply of two conventional islands. The three contracts are enabling the Republic of Korea to diversify its sources of supply and to have access to French experience. Under these projects the envisaged collaboration, which will entail the presence of some hundreds of French engineers in the Republic of Korea and also citizens of the latter in France and thereby forge firm and beneficial links, will apply to the following fields: project organization and management; nuclear engineering proper; manufacture of equipment; and training of staff of the Republic of Korea. However, it is hoped that nuclear co-operation between these two countries will extend much further. The competent French authorities are ready to work with the Republic of Korea to provide in full the setting needed for the development of an ambitious nuclear programme, in particular in aspects such as the adoption of codes and standards, safety authorities, the fuel cycle, and research and development. Finally, French industry is prepared to join the industrial efforts which the Republic of Korea wishes to undertake in order to set up a modern and efficient national industry. (author)

  20. Processing covariance data for the resonance region - International Evaluation Co-operation, V. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, M.; Leal, L.C.; Wiarda, D.; Jacqmin, R.; Kodeli, I.; ); Chiba, G.; Shibata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Oh, S.; Nikolaev, M.; Kahler, A.C. Jr.; Kawano, T.; Arcilla, R.

    2014-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The working party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are ENDF (United States), JEF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Cooperation with evaluation projects of non- OECD countries is organized through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the work performed by WPEC Subgroup 28 (SG28) on issues pertinent to the methodology used to process covariance data in the resonance region. Specifically, SG28 has developed the requisite processing methods needed to process resonance parameter covariance data, generate cross-section covariance data files and demonstrate the use of covariance data in radiation transport analyses. The work performed by SG28 and documented in this report addresses the following tasks: - Produce resonance parameter covariance evaluation for 235 U; - Develop resonance parameter covariance processing methods in widely used processing systems (e.g., NJOY, AMPX, etc.); - Use the updated cross-section processing systems to generate covariance data files for use in radiation transport analyses. In addition, use sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analyses to demonstrate the propagation of the covariance data in specific radiation transport applications

  1. International co-operation in safety matters within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinck, W.; Balz, W.; Essler, W.; Tolley, B.; Gabolde, J.

    1981-01-01

    European Community (EC) countries realize that their energy demand cannot be met without a nuclear component, which is almost a necessity owing to its major economic advantages. Two typical areas where the Commission has stimulated intense international co-operation are as follows: The first broad area deals with efforts towards a gradual harmonization of regulatory health and safety practices and requirements for reactors of an industrially developed type, more specifically (light) water-cooled reactors. The second area concerns joint research programmes and co-ordination activities in research on nuclear safety (LWRs and LMFBRs). These two broad areas are closely interconnected. Information is also given on the existing network of bilateral and multilateral arrangements for the exchange of information of interest to the EC. In conclusion, some problems are highlighted where improvements could be made or where it seems crucial that increased international co-operation and especially agreement should come about. (author)

  2. Present trends in radioactive waste management policies in OECD countries, and related international co-operative efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years, waste management has received increased attention at the national level and also internationally, to harmonize to some extent the policies and practices to be followed and to continue to achieve a high safety standard. In particular, discussions are taking place between OECD Member countries on the definition of objectives, concepts and strategies for radioactive waste management with a view to presenting coherent overall systems, covering not only the treatment and storage aspects for the short-term but also the longer-term problems of disposal in the context of a rapidly developing nuclear fuel cycle. The technical, administrative, legal and financial aspects of the waste management problems are being discussed and various approaches are envisaged for the future. In addition, a significant effort is also being initiated on research and development. The disposal problem has been given priority, particularly regarding high-level waste and alpha-bearing wastes. Close international co-operation has been initiated in this sector as well as on the conditioning of high-level radioactive waste. Increased co-operation is also taking place concerning other waste management problems such as the management of gaseous waste, alpha waste and cladding hulls and the question of dismantling and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The paper describes the results achieved so far through this co-operation between OECD Member countries and presents current plans for future activities. (author)

  3. The development of academic family medicine in central and eastern Europe since 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krztoń-Królewiecka, Anna; Švab, Igor; Oleszczyk, Marek; Seifert, Bohumil; Smithson, W Henry; Windak, Adam

    2013-03-19

    Since the early 1990s former communist countries have been reforming their health care systems, emphasizing the key role of primary care and recognizing family medicine as a specialty and an academic discipline. This study assesses the level of academic development of the discipline characterised by education and research in central and eastern European (CEE) countries. A key informants study, using a questionnaire developed on the basis of a systematic literature review and panel discussions, conducted in 11 central and eastern European countries and Russia. Family medicine in CEE countries is now formally recognized as a medical specialty and successfully introduced into medical training at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Almost all universities have FM/GP departments, but only a few of them are led by general practitioners. The specialist training programmes in all countries except Russia fulfil the recommendations of the European Parliament. Structured support for research in FM/GP is not always available. However specific scientific organisations function in almost all countries except Russia. Scientific conferences are regularly organised in all the countries, but peer-reviewed journals are published in only half of them. Family medicine has a relatively strong position in medical education in central and eastern Europe, but research in family practice is less developed. Although the position of the discipline at the universities is not very strong, most of the CEE countries can serve as an example of successful academic development for countries southern Europe, where family medicine is still not fully recognised.

  4. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kox, H.L.M.; Van der Tak, C.M. [Economics Department, Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-10-01

    The increased awareness of the transboundary pollution problems resulted in a number of international treaties, such as the Montreal protocol on ozone-depleting substances (1987), and the Basel Convention on hazardous waste (1989). Most authors writing on efficient environmental instruments make a sharp distinction between domestic and transboundary environmental problems. While the former should be abated by domestic environmental instruments, an efficient treatment of the latter requires international instruments. The underlying logic is that in case of non-transboundary pollution both the costs and benefits of environmental policies are strictly domestic, the trade-off between benefits and costs of abatement should also be a strictly domestic issue. In contrast, with transboundary pollution the trade-off between abatement costs and benefits becomes an international issue. In this paper we analyse four cases where international environmental co-ordination is required to achieve an efficient outcome, even though the environmental externality is non-transboundary in nature. Section two sketches the standard view on efficient intervention levels with regard to transborder and non-transborder pollution. In the third section we deal with cases where environmental policy is used in a trade-strategic way. The section pays attention to the motives for using domestic environmental policy as a disguise for trade policies. It will be argued that the resulting allocative efficiency can be improved upon by international co-operation. Sections 4-6 analyse three cases where international co-operation may improve the international outcome on the basis of non-coordinated domestic allocation decisions. These cases refer in particular to the situation of developing countries, when there is a high export dependency on the polluting good in combination with the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs of environment-friendly technologies, and the existence of increasing

  5. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, H.L.M.; Van der Tak, C.M.

    1995-10-01

    The increased awareness of the transboundary pollution problems resulted in a number of international treaties, such as the Montreal protocol on ozone-depleting substances (1987), and the Basel Convention on hazardous waste (1989). Most authors writing on efficient environmental instruments make a sharp distinction between domestic and transboundary environmental problems. While the former should be abated by domestic environmental instruments, an efficient treatment of the latter requires international instruments. The underlying logic is that in case of non-transboundary pollution both the costs and benefits of environmental policies are strictly domestic, the trade-off between benefits and costs of abatement should also be a strictly domestic issue. In contrast, with transboundary pollution the trade-off between abatement costs and benefits becomes an international issue. In this paper we analyse four cases where international environmental co-ordination is required to achieve an efficient outcome, even though the environmental externality is non-transboundary in nature. Section two sketches the standard view on efficient intervention levels with regard to transborder and non-transborder pollution. In the third section we deal with cases where environmental policy is used in a trade-strategic way. The section pays attention to the motives for using domestic environmental policy as a disguise for trade policies. It will be argued that the resulting allocative efficiency can be improved upon by international co-operation. Sections 4-6 analyse three cases where international co-operation may improve the international outcome on the basis of non-coordinated domestic allocation decisions. These cases refer in particular to the situation of developing countries, when there is a high export dependency on the polluting good in combination with the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs of environment-friendly technologies, and the existence of increasing

  6. 8 December 1953 - 8 December 1963. Atomic co-operation in the United Nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Full text: Ten years ago, on 8 December 1953, President Eisenhower proposed to the General Assembly of the United Nations measures to build 'a new avenue to peace'. This was the beginning of the idea that international understanding can be fostered through peaceful atomic co-operation in an international organization. Re-reading the President's statement ten years later, one is impressed by the continued urgency of his message. What he said in fact was that the nations of the world were living in the shadow of an overwhelming atomic threat and that steps were necessary, even though modest and untried, to break the impasse between the East and the West in the very field which caused the most profound concern - atomic energy. The International Atomic Energy Agency became an institutional reality in 1957, when the first General Conference met with 56 members. It now has 83 members, and a further five nations will become members as soon as statutory formalities are completed. The activity on the part of the Agency during these six years has gradually expanded, although it has fallen short of earlier hopes in certain areas. Time and patience, however, have been required and 1963 foreshadows further progress. Ten years after the proposal of the idea, scientists and statesmen can look back and be gratified that a contribution has been made to international understanding. Scientists and statesmen can look ahead, hopefully, to a future of increasing activity in this special agency to develop co-operation and agreement in the field of atomic energy. (author)

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Development of high-current high-field conductors in Europe for fusion application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, J.-L.; Spadoni, M.; Salpietro, E.; Ciazynski, D.; Ricci, M.; Libeyre, P.; della Corte, A.

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of the preparation for the realization of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), the construction and test of relevant models of seven different parts of the reactor was decided. Two of them are related to the superconducting coils: the toroidal field model coil (TFMC) and the central solenoid model coil (CSMC). For these superconducting coils, due to the expected high values of the current (≥60 kA) and voltage (≥5 kV with respect to the ground) the adopted technology was that of cable in conduit conductor (CICC). Until recently, little experience of this technology existed. Therefore, an extensive research and development programme has been carried out, in the last 10 years, by the ITER partners and particularly in Europe, to design, industrialize and test these large conductors and their joints. The EURATOM associations CEA and ENEA played a leading part in this phase. The CICC concept is described and the results of the developments are presented. About 7 km of conductors were manufactured in the industry and for that more than 10 tonnes of Nb3Sn strands were produced in Europe. In this large programme, Europe is particularly in charge of the TFMC, which will be tested this summer at Forschung Zentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). In the framework of this programme, three full size conductors and joint samples were tested at the European Sultan test facility (Centre de Recherches de Physique des Plasmas, Villigen, Switzerland), to validate the technological choices and check that the ITER specifications were met. The results of these tests are presented in detail. Starting from the strand critical properties, the conductors made of about 1000 strands did reach their expected performance. The joints of these large conductors are very special and delicate components. Their behaviour was quite successful and the joint resistance of these samples (of the order of 1 nΩ) was well within the specifications.

  8. Development of healthcare quality indicators for rheumatoid arthritis in Europe: the eumusc.net project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Ingemar F; Strömbeck, Britta; Andersen, Lene; Cimmino, Marco; Greiff, Rolf; Loza, Estibaliz; Sciré, Carlo; Stamm, Tanja; Stoffer, Michaela; Uhlig, Till; Woolf, Anthony D; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M

    2014-05-01

    Eumusc.net (http://www.eumusc.net) is a European project supported by the EU and European League Against Rheumatism to improve musculoskeletal care in Europe. To develop patient-centred healthcare quality indicators (HCQIs) for healthcare provision for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Based on a systematic literature search, existing HCQIs for RA were identified and their contents analysed and categorised referring to a list of 16 standards of care developed within the eumusc.net. An international expert panel comprising 14 healthcare providers and two patient representatives added topics and during repeated Delphi processes by email ranked the topics and rephrased suggested HCQIs with the preliminary set being established during a second expert group meeting. After an audit process by rheumatology units (including academic centres) in six countries (The Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Italy, Austria and Sweden), a final version of the HCQIs was established. 56 possible topics for HCQIs were processed resulting in a final set of HCQIs for RA (n=14) including two for structure (patient information and calculation of composite scores), 11 for process (eg, access to care, assessments, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments) and one for outcome (effect of treatment on disease activity). They included definitions to be used in clinical practice and also by patients. Further, the numerators and the denominators for each HCQI were defined. A set of 14 patient-centred HCQIs for RA was developed to be used in quality improvement and bench marking in countries across Europe.

  9. Developing intra-curricular photonics educational material for secondary schools in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Fischer, Robert; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-07-01

    There is an imminent shortage of skilled workforce facing Europe's hi-tech industries mainly due to the declining interest of young people in science and engineering careers. To avert this trend the European Union funded the development of the `Photonics Explorer' - an intra-curricular educational kit designed to engage, excite and educate students about the fascination of working with optics hands-on, in their own classrooms! Each kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental components provided within a supporting didactic framework based on guided inquiry based learning techniques. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into the curriculum and enhance and complement the teaching and learning of science in the classroom. The kits are provided free of charge to teachers, in conjunction with teacher training courses. The main challenge of this program was the development of educational material that seamlessly integrates into the various national curricula across Europe. To achieve this, the development process included a preparatory EU wide curricula survey and a special `Review and Revise' process bringing together the expertise of over 35 teachers and pedagogic experts. This paper reports on the results of the preparatory study which identified two specific age groups at secondary schools for photonics educational material, the didactic content of the Photonics Explorer kit resulting from a pan-European collaboration of key stakeholders, EU wide dissemination and sustainability of the program.

  10. Proceedings of International Symposium on Energy Co-operation in North East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This proceedings are for the International Symposium on Energy Co-operation in North-East Asia, organized by Korea Energy Economics Institute, Institute of Energy Economics, Japan, and United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, held on June 2001 at Sheraton Walker Hill Hotel in Seoul, Korea. The major themes discussed are following: 1.Energy Profile, Outlook and Perspectives on Regional Co-operation in Northeast Asia 2.Future Challenges in the Energy Sector in Northeast Asia 3.Perspectives of Energy Co-operation in Northeast Asia.

  11. Success and failure of firms' innovation co-operations: The role of intermediaries and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, U.; Meder, A.; Wolf, T.

    2011-01-01

    attempts to fill this gap by investigating the possible presence of two problems in co-operation: the lack of intermediation and of reciprocity. Based on data gathered for firms in two German regions and one French region, we find that the success of co-operation projects depends on the perceived...... importance, rather than on the perceived quality, of intermediate actors. Hence, the major problem for intermediating suitable partners is more related to communication than it is a programmatic issue. Trust and reciprocity in co-operation between firms is found to be relevant ex-post in the sense of being...

  12. Education and Worker Co-operatives. Some Perspectives of the Australian TAFE Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Denis

    The workers' cooperative movement has grown in many countries of Europe, where it is often state-sanctioned and supported. In Australia, however, the movement is just beginning. The government organization of what are called cooperative development programs is the dominant new feature on the Australian worker cooperative scene. However, funding is…

  13. European Commission and IAEA Celebrate 30 Years Co-operation on Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    reprocessing plant in Japan and is now being installed in other facilities in Europe - Secure Sealing: During the last 30 years, the Seal and Identification Laboratory (SILab) of the JRC developed and produced ultrasonic bolt seals requested by the IAEA in order to seal underwater nuclear spent fuel assemblies. In 2011, after a training session at JRC in Ispra, Italy, a joint team of inspectors from the IAEA and EURATOM Safeguards and the European Commission's Directorate-General for Energy successfully sealed the first nuclear fuel bundles produced by the Cernavoda II reactor in Romania. Joint Research Centre (JRC): The JRC is the European Commission's in-house science service. Its mission is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of European Union policies. The JRC serves the common interest of the Member States, while being independent of special interests, whether private or national. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA): The IAEA serves as the world's foremost intergovernmental forum for scientific and technical co-operation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology. Established as an autonomous organization under the United Nations (UN) in 1957, the IAEA carries out programmes to maximize the useful contribution of nuclear technology to society while verifying its peaceful use. (IAEA)

  14. Public private co-operation in urban regeneration investment planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    development. However, we believe that municipalities can become much better at attracting private investors and developers, partly because there is knowledge about the motives and backgrounds for the developers' engagement in the urban regeneration. Based on data from a number of case studies and interviews......Increasing renovation costs and ever more limited public funding for urban regeneration in combination with a political desire to stimulate the development of a sense of ownership in urban regeneration neighbourhoods has brought about a growing interest in attracting private sector funding...... with developers we argue that developers own networks are more likely to lead them to the urban regeneration areas, than knowledge of the urban regeneration itself. Also, the study reveals a mutual knowledge-gap between the municipal planners and developers; planners have limited knowledge of developers...

  15. Strengthening international health co-operation in Africa through the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    ), as ... Introduction. The New Partnership for Africa's Development. (NEPAD) is ... are: better harmonization of the health policies of member ... cultural development, and the integration of .... promote regional public goods and combat regional.

  16. Soltherm Europe Initiative: Joining forces to expand solar markets, fast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leun, K. van der

    2001-01-01

    The article describes the partnership formed by the European Commission and the Europe-wide Soltherm Europe Initiative. The Initiative was formed in response to the Commission's aims to extend the use of solar energy. Ten countries and two international bodies make-up membership of the Initiative. For the Commission's target of 100 million square metres of solar collectors to be installed by 2010, a rapid growth in the market will need to occur. The potential savings in energy and carbon dioxide (through solar water heaters) are discussed, and figures given. The market development options for achieving the short-term goal of 15 million square metres of collector surface by 2004, and the longer-term aim of 100 million square metres by 2010 are discussed. The Initiative aims to be a platform for integration and promoting co-operation between all parties with an interest in achieving the Commission's solar objectives. Interested parties are invited to join the Initiative

  17. ANALYSIS OF WINE SECTOR: DEVELOPMENTS AND PROSPECTS THE WORLD AND IN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan MATEI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Except unwelcoming and unfriendly area of agriculture, in general, Antarctica, all continents meet grape-vine, which is plant trees with the largest expansion around the globe. Wine, the wine produced extremely complex (the composition of the entering over 300 different chemical compounds has a great importance both rational human nutrition as well as increase the national income of a country cultivators, shown standing figures showing growing share while the global economy horticulture and viticulture crops in agricultural production. Thus, we can appreciate the importance of wine products both from a social and economic one. This study aims to develop a blueprint for the wine sector and to capture its evolution both globally and especially in Europe. We believe that an incursion in the analysis of wine-growing in the world and in Europe leaning on the development of wine production and consumption is particularly useful in our proof is the importance of wine in contemporary society. The study is part of a broader analysis is investigating the applicability of the marketing mix in the wine industry.

  18. Development, operational experience and implications for future design of fast reactors in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Broomfield, A.M.; Saitcevsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the partners now collaborating in Europe on fast-reactor development have taken the technology from a theoretical possibility to an engineering reality. In that time there has been a progression from experimental zero-energy facilities followed by small power-producing engineering test reactors, to prototype reactors and a large commercial-size reactor. The paper describes the highlights of the reactor programmes in the partner countries and by example illustrates the experience gained from reactor operation and some of the principal activities in the supporting development programme. These include such topics as fuel performance, fast-neutron physics, liquid-metal thermal hydraulics, sodium chemistry, instrumentation and safety aspects. The paper concludes by summarizing some of the main objectives of the current development programme, which is directed to the support of the European Fast Reactor design being prepared by the European design and construction companies. (author)

  19. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  20. The Texts of the Agency's Co-operation Agreements with Regional Intergovernmental Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The text of the Agency's agreement for co-operation with the Organization of African Unity (OAU) is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The agreement entered into force on 26 March 1969

  1. A study of personality of leader and style of his co-operation in sporting command

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolar I.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The personality features of leader of sporting command and style of his co-operation are considered. The problems of adjusting and optimization of co-operation of leader and other players of command are selected in achievement of the set team purpose. 37 skilled sportsmen-handballers took part in research. An informal structure is exposed in commands, leaders and followers are certain. The quantitative indexes of personality features of leader, follower of sporting command are certain. Style of co-operation of leader and follower (prevailing and goodwill and quality is exposed personalities which will be realized by them in a sporting command. It is set that in interpersonality co-operation a leader will realize dominant style, and follower equal will realize dominant and benevolent styles.

  2. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, Henk L.M.; Van der Tak, Casper M.

    1996-01-01

    The standard view is that situations where no transborder environmental externalities occur are most efficiently dealt with by national environmental policies rather than by international co-operation. Though this may be the general case, non-coordinated national policies do not always produce the most efficient international allocation. This paper presents four cases in which the allocative outcome of non-coordinated domestic policy choices can be improved upon by international environmental co-operation. The first case refers to the use of environmental policy as a strategic trade instrument. The other cases refer to the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs and increasing returns to scale. The form of international environmental co-operation should be adapted to the situation. Formal international agreements between countries are characterised by high transaction costs and may not always be the most efficient form of co-operation

  3. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Kai

    2004-01-01

    observed. Different national frameworks, in particular with respect to financing and organisation, systemic development, professionalisation and professional cultures, basic societal values (family ethics), and political approaches have to be taken into account during the second phase of PROCARE during which transversal and transnational analysis will be undertaken based on an in-depth analysis of two model ways of working in each country. Far from a European vision concerning integrated care, national health and social care systems remain-at best-loosely coupled systems that are facing increasing difficulties, given the current challenges, in particular in long-term care for older persons: increasing marketisation, lack of managerial knowledge (co-operation, co-ordination), shortage of care workers and a general trend towards down-sizing of social care services continue to hamper the first tentative pathways towards integrated care systems.

  4. When a business isn’t a business: law and the political in the history of the United Kingdom’s co-operative movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Mulqueen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary efforts to develop and promote co-operatives and the social economy confront a tension in the competing and often conflicting aims to achieve commercial sustainability in a capitalist market while also promoting social transformation. Through a review of the historical experience of institutionalization in the Co-operative Movement in the United Kingdom, this article attempts to generate insights into these tensions. Despite being seen as unpolitical, co-operatives can be understood as political at the level of re-shaping sociality through co-operative practice. Although the similarity between co-operatives and joint-stock companies produces ambiguities within the movement, this does not in itself detract from the co-operative project. It is argued that the codification of co-operatives in law as bodies corporate constitutes the closure of the political aspect of co-operation and reinforces and gives consequence to the misconception of co-operatives as primarily commercial entities. Los esfuerzos por desarrollar y promover las cooperativas y la economía social se enfrentan a un conflicto entre los objetivos contrapuestos de lograr la sostenibilidad comercial en un mercado capitalista, a la vez que se promueve una transformación de la sociedad. Realizando una revisión de la experiencia histórica de la institucionalización del movimiento cooperativista en el Reino Unido, este artículo pretende analizar estas tensiones. A pesar de ser apolíticas, las cooperativas se pueden entender como un elemento político por su intento de reformular la sociedad. Aunque la similitud entre cooperativas y sociedades anónimas produce ambigüedades dentro del movimiento cooperativista, esto no va, por sí mismo, en detrimento del proyecto de cooperación. Se argumenta que, al contemplar en la legislación a las cooperativas como personas jurídicas, se acaba con el aspecto político de las cooperativas. A su vez, esto refuerza y termina con la

  5. [Structure of Relationships Formed by Occupational Health Nurses for Co-operating with Managers to Support Workers with Mental Health Concerns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Junko; Takasaki, Masako; Hatanaka, Michiyo

    2018-05-31

    burden the manager. Such support promoted the "creation of systems for clear roles" of managers in supporting the subordinate with mental health concerns. Relationships that occupational health nurses form with their managers were the structure which formed emotional human relationships from the front or back necessity of co-operation causes and developing confidence in relationships with the foundation of emotional human relationships.

  6. Co-operative & virtual engineering: a multi-stakeholder roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossenaerts, J.B.M.; Brecher, C.; Possel-Dölken, F.; Popplewell, K.; Taisch, M.; Thoben, K.-D.

    2005-01-01

    The virtualisation and the distribution of product development activities have lead to new challenges for organisation and technology in European companies. Global competitiveness can only be assured by the development of effective and lasting strategies for creating and managing innovation. The

  7. Team Learning: Through the Relational Dynamics of Co-operation and Rivalry in Team Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Lotz, Maja

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I explore the constructive links between co-operation, rivalry, and learning within the structure of team communities. Drawing upon social learning theory, the main purpose of this paper is to argue that both co-operation and rivalry are important triggers for mobilizing learning processes within and between teams. However, social learning theory tends to disregard the positive aspects of rivalry. Consequently, this paper will argue for the need to extend social learning theory ...

  8. Case Writing Projects in Co-Operation with Companies and Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtsson, Lars; Asplund, Carl-Johan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the process and evaluation of case writing projects in co-operation with companies and organizations in a course for engineering students. The case writing projects could provide an illustration and example framework for working with companies in constructing cases. Normally cases are constructed for teaching purposes in higher education. However, in order to get closer co-operation and more interest from the companies the authors encouraged the student...

  9. Regional co-operation in radioactive waste management from an IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is intended to be a lead in to a Round Table discussion on Regional Co-operation in Radioactive Waste Management at the International Conference on N uclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids , which will be held from 19 to 22 June 2000 in Dubrovnik, Croatia. The Round Table discussion will focus on international co-operation in the Eastern European region

  10. Regional seminar on approaches and practices in strengthening radiation protection and waste management infrastructure in countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR. Programme, book of extended synopses, list of participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains 30 extended synopses of presentations given by the participants of the seminar. The scope of the presentations included development of radiation protection laws, radioactive waste management technologies, radiation protection infrastructure and constitution of national regulatory bodies. Recent developments in these areas in a number of Eastern Europe and former USSR countries were presented. The role of international co-operation in development of safe radioactive waste management technologies and in establishing legislative and regulatory frameworks was shown

  11. Labour Mobility in Nowadays Europe and Its Role in Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana ALBU

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available “Worker mobility is a key instrument for an efficiently functioning single market and is essential for allowing more people to find better employment, a key objective of the Lisbon Strategy”, as it is stipulated by the Communication from the Commission to the EP, the Council, the ECOSOC and CoR in Mobility, an instrument for more and better jobs: The European Job Mobility Action Plan (2007-2010. Job mobility has been significantly affected by technological change, by changes in education patterns, and by structural unemployment. The mobility of labour force in EU member states is hardly moving. ‘Creating jobs to people’* has been the focus of attention and debate within politicians, economists, experts in the field and policy- makers in the EU of 27, in order to contribute to a more even economic development at the level of regions, given the disparities between poorer regions of Europe and richer ones. Overcoming barriers, such as the cultural and language barrier, in the way of the free movement of people and especially the work force and creating an improved standard of living, diminishing income differences and regional differences in Europe does pose a real challenge for the EU of 27.

  12. The development of dairying in Europe: potential evidence from food residues on ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver E. Craig

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Providing evidence of dairying is crucial to the understanding of the development and intensification of Neolithic farming practices in Europe, beyond the early stages of domestication. Until recently, research in this field had been limited to traditional archaeological methods, such as the study of pottery styles, faunal remains and specialised material artefacts. Although suggestive, these methods are unable to provide direct evidence of dairying. Advances in biomolecular methods now allow the identification of remnants of dairy products on ceramic vessels and the application of these methods to Neolithic ceramic assemblages across Europe is underway. There is no doubt that these new methods offer much scope for investigating hypotheses such as the ‘secondary products revolution’, but there are limitations. The cost of analyses prohibits indiscriminate sampling and differential survival is likely to prevent direct comparison of samples from different sites. Only by incorporating these techniques within the wider frameworks of archaeological research may theories be properly tested. Approaches to achieve this goal are discussed.

  13. Advanced reprocessing developments in Europe contribution of European projects ACSEPT and ACTINET-I3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, S.; Poinssot, C. [CEA DEN, Nuclear Energy Div., RadioChemistry and Processes Dept., F-30207Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Geist, A. [KIT-INE (Germany); Cassayre, L. [CIEMAT (Spain); Rhodes, C. [NNL-UK (United Kingdom); Ekberg, C. [CHALMERS (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear energy has more than ever to demonstrate that it can contribute safely and on a sustainable way to answer the international increase in energy needs. Actually, in addition to an increased safety of the reactors themselves, its acceptance is still closely associated to our capability to reduce the lifetime of the nuclear waste, to manage them safely and to propose options for a better use of the natural resources. Spent fuel reprocessing can help to reach these objectives. But this cannot be achieved only by optimizing industrial processes through engineering studies. It is of a primary importance to increase our fundamental knowledge in actinide sciences in order to build the future of nuclear energy on reliable and scientifically-founded results, and therefore meet the needs of the future fuel cycles in terms of fabrication and performance of fuels, reprocessing and waste management. At the European level, both the collaborative project ACSEPT and the Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3 work together to improve our knowledge in actinides chemistry and therefore develop advanced separation processes. These tools are complementary and work in close connection on some specific issues such as the understanding of the selectivity of extracting organic ligands. By offering trans-national access to the main nuclear research facility in Europe, ACTINET-I3 aims at increasing the knowledge in actinide sciences by gathering all the expertise available in European nuclear research institutes or university and giving them the opportunity to come and work in hot-labs (ITU, Atalante...) or beamlines (ESFR, ANKA, PSI) ACSEPT is focused on the development of advanced separation processes, both aqueous and pyrochemical. Head-end steps, fuel re-fabrication, solvent treatment, waste management are also taken into account. In aqueous process development, the SANEX and innovative SANEX flowsheets demonstration were successfully achieved. Chemical systems were

  14. The NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning. A Decade of Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Co-operative Programme for the Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information Concerning Nuclear Installation Decommissioning (CPD) is a joint undertaking according to Article 5 of the Statute of the NEA. Concluded in 1985, the Agreement of the 23 participating organisations constituting the CPD has been continuously extended with the current programme period lasting until 2009. This report provides information about the participants, structure and achievements of the Co-operative Programme. The objective of the CPD is to acquire information and share operational experience from the conduct of 42 current decommissioning projects, such as project description and design, data resulting from the execution of decommissioning projects, and associated research and development results. The information generated in the project is protected by confidentiality provisions, which allow for a frank and open exchange of experiences, on a 'give and take' basis. The information exchange also ensures that the best internationally available experience is available and that safe, environmentally friendly and cost effective methods are employed in all decommissioning projects. The Co-operative Programme is implemented by a Management Board (MB) representing the participating organisations and a Technical Advisory Group (TAG) for the information exchange between the individual decommissioning projects. The latter benefits from the support of a Programme Co-ordinator financed by the Programme. The projects in the Programme have a broad range of characteristics and cover various types of reactors and fuel facilities. The Programme now covers 26 reactors, 8 reprocessing plants and 8 fuel facility projects, representing a wide selection of facility types in each category. Also, all three stages of decommissioning - from active dismantling to safe-store and to completed decommissioning back to 'green field conditions' - are represented. Over the 20 years of experience of the Co-operative

  15. Quality control in diagnostic radiology. Historical development and present status in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Moores, B.

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Quality control is now an accepted activity within the overall radiation protection framework for diagnostic radiology. Indeed it is now a legal requirement within Member States specified in EC Directives that establish the basic requirements for radiation protection in medicine. This was not always the case and its historical development can be considered in three parts: 1) The development of test procedures and standardisation of practices; 2) Harmonisation of initiatives and the creation of a European dimension in such practices; 3) Its role and function in a changing and evolving technological environment - current status and future needs. The development of tests methods for diagnostic X-ray equipment was initially intimately related to the development of a scientific basis for the X-ray imaging process. Knowledge of the physical basis for image production in film-screen and fluoroscopic processes required the definition and specification and measurement of particular parameters within the image forming chain. The development of test methods and the necessary measuring equipment involved ongoing research and development by physical scientists throughout Europe and North America. However, the many different approaches employed meant that results of measurements could not always be compared. However, once acceptable test methods and equipment had been developed it was possible to standardise practices through the development of test protocols. In 1980 a foundation for collective European actions was established through the EC radiation protection research and development programme. This helped to establish a European wide forum for actions in the field of medical radiation protection including quality control. These initiatives were driven by EC Directives, which were concerned with protection of the worker, general public and patients from medical practices that utilised ionising radiation. Multi national research

  16. COBALT CoOperative Blending of Autonomous Landing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M. III; Restrepo, Carolina I.; Robertson, Edward A.; Seubert, Carl R.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2016-01-01

    COBALT is a terrestrial test platform for development and maturation of GN&C (Guidance, Navigation and Control) technologies for PL&HA (Precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance). The project is developing a third generation, Langley Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) for ultra-precise velocity and range measurements, which will be integrated and tested with the JPL Lander Vision System (LVS) for Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) position estimates. These technologies together provide navigation that enables controlled precision landing. The COBALT hardware will be integrated in 2017 into the GN&C subsystem of the Xodiac rocket-propulsive Vertical Test Bed (VTB) developed by Masten Space Systems (MSS), and two terrestrial flight campaigns will be conducted: one open-loop (i.e., passive) and one closed-loop (i.e., active).

  17. International Co-operation: Industrialized and Industrializing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib, H.

    1996-01-01

    Industrializing Countries are becoming increasingly important in the fossil fuels market. In their endeavour for development these countries need to be assisted by the industrialized countries in various problems of provision of capital, capacity building, technology transfer and protection to the environment. (author)

  18. DSSNET, a network of users and developers of decision support systems for emergency response in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salfeld, H.C.; Raskob, W.

    2002-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, computerised systems for off-site management and response in case of a nuclear accident were developed and installed in many European countries. Some of the systems are in use in only one country, whereas other systems have found broader application in Europe. Examples of these systems are IMIS (D), ARGOS (DK), running in Denmark, Lithuania and Poland and RODOS, a real-time on-line decision support system for nuclear emergency management in Europe, which is now installed for operational or test-operational use in many European countries. During the development and installation phases of these decision support systems the necessity emerged, that there is a need for an intensive feedback between developers and users. Therefore, under the 5. Framework Programme of the European Commission a network has been installed to intensify the communication and increase the understanding between the operational community and the many and diverse disciplines involved in RD for improvement, extension and integration of operational decision support systems for nuclear emergency management, called DSSNET. This poster demonstrates how the network is organised, namely with different work groups, exercises and meetings. Each working group addresses one of seven work packages: - Preparation and conduct of exercises (WP1), - User interfaces, results and interaction with decision makers (WP2), - Exchange of data information relevant for decision-making (WP3), System functions, networks and processing of on-line data (WP4), European database (WP5), Coordination of the network (WP6), Hydrological modelling (WP7). Main focus is given to WP4, in which information of on-line monitoring from more than 10 European counties is collected. Information was collated with the help of questionnaires which are send out on a regular basis. The evaluation of the various questionnaires summarises the different systems in use for stack monitoring, retrieving on

  19. Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC), NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; Danon, Yaron; Dunn, Mike; Herman, Mike; Kahler, Albert; Fischer, Ulrich; Jacqmin, Robert; Koning, Arjan; Plompen, Arjan; Fukahori, Tokio; Harada, Hideo; Igashira, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Golashvili, Tengiz; Ignatiev, Victor; Ignatyuk, Anatoly; Oleynik, Dimitry S.; Sinitsa, Valentin; Ge, Zhigang; Trkov, Andrej; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Kawano, Toshihiko; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Mills, Robert; Mcnabb, Dennis; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Cabellos, Oscar; ); Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Do Heon; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document brings together the available documents and presentations relative to this meeting: the agenda, the Summary record of the previous meeting held on May 2014, the Reports (slides) on experimental activities from Europe, Japan, USA, Russia and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL), the presentation from Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files) and from Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections). The document ends with a preliminary proposal for a New Subgroup 42 (Thermal Scattering Kernel S(α,β): Measurement, Evaluation and Application)

  20. CODP Co operative design process - from urban strategy to detail

    OpenAIRE

    Thunberg, Pär; Philipson, Olof

    2012-01-01

    This project investigates the cooperation between architect and engineer. The context of the investigation is the design of buildings for a sustainable society. The goal of the project is to further the development of the sustainable built society by increasing the knowledge of the interdisciplinary cooperation between these two fields. The focus is a close cooperation already from the start of a project. By involving both fields in the early design stages it is thought that the knowledge and...

  1. Nuclear weapons research in Sweden. The co-operation between civilian and military research, 1947 - 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonter, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear weapons research began as early as 1945, shortly after the first atomic bombs fell over Japan. The assignment to look into the new weapon of mass destruction went to the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). Admittedly, the main aim of the research initiated at that time was to find out how Sweden could best protect itself against a nuclear weapon attack. However, from the outset FOA was interested in investigating the possibilities of manufacturing what was then called an atomic bomb. A co-operation between FOA and AB Atomenergi (AE), which was created in 1947 in order to be responsible for the industrial development of civilian nuclear energy, was initiated. AE made several technical investigations within this co-operation regarding choice of reactors and preconditions for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. The first purpose of this report is therefore to investigate how this co-operation emerged and what consequences it had for the project to produce basic information for the Swedish manufacture of nuclear weapons. In general terms, the finding of this report is that FOA was responsible for the overall nuclear weapons research. For this reason, FOA was in charge of the construction of the nuclear device and the studies of its effects. Additionally, AE should deliver basic information of a possible production of weapons-grade plutonium and investigate the possibilities of a production or a procurement of inspection-free heavy water (i.e. without inspections by the supplying country). AE should also build a reprocessing plant and manufacture fuel elements to be used in the reactors for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise that both FOA and AE conducted plutonium research. The reason why FOA conducted this research was that the plutonium had to be in metallic form in order to be used in a nuclear weapons device. Therefore, FOA carried out research with the purpose of producing

  2. Nuclear weapons research in Sweden. The co-operation between civilian and military research, 1947 - 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonter, Thomas [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History

    2002-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear weapons research began as early as 1945, shortly after the first atomic bombs fell over Japan. The assignment to look into the new weapon of mass destruction went to the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). Admittedly, the main aim of the research initiated at that time was to find out how Sweden could best protect itself against a nuclear weapon attack. However, from the outset FOA was interested in investigating the possibilities of manufacturing what was then called an atomic bomb. A co-operation between FOA and AB Atomenergi (AE), which was created in 1947 in order to be responsible for the industrial development of civilian nuclear energy, was initiated. AE made several technical investigations within this co-operation regarding choice of reactors and preconditions for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. The first purpose of this report is therefore to investigate how this co-operation emerged and what consequences it had for the project to produce basic information for the Swedish manufacture of nuclear weapons. In general terms, the finding of this report is that FOA was responsible for the overall nuclear weapons research. For this reason, FOA was in charge of the construction of the nuclear device and the studies of its effects. Additionally, AE should deliver basic information of a possible production of weapons-grade plutonium and investigate the possibilities of a production or a procurement of inspection-free heavy water (i.e. without inspections by the supplying country). AE should also build a reprocessing plant and manufacture fuel elements to be used in the reactors for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise that both FOA and AE conducted plutonium research. The reason why FOA conducted this research was that the plutonium had to be in metallic form in order to be used in a nuclear weapons device. Therefore, FOA carried out research with the purpose of producing

  3. The Impact of the Development of Shale Gas in the United States on Europe's Petrochemical Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    . Downstream production is being redirected towards products in which European demand is growing strongly: innovative products, with high value-added and hi-technology, which are European strong points. The redirection is also shifting to products whose costs are less dependent on energy and raw material prices, which is the weak point of Europe's industry, as its energy costs are three times as high as US costs. These products are also more environmentally friendly, meeting the imperatives of sustainable development. This is another strength of Europe's petrochemical industry, which is leading in research in biochemistry and bio-plastics. Lastly, just as they are investing in high-growth regions (in Asia and especially China), and in low energy cost regions (the Middle East), so too Europe's major industrial groups are investing in the United States, in order to benefit from the shale gas bonanza and cheaper production

  4. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuguid, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    During the period 1970-1974 the IAEA provided country programme assistance (expert services, equipment and supplies, and fellowship training) to 17 countries in the geographic region designated as 'Asia and the Pacific' by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), namely, to Afghanistan; Bangladesh; Burma; Cambodia; China, Republic of; Hong Kong; India; Indonesia; Iran; Korea, Republic of; Malaysia; Pakistan; the Philippines; Republic of South Viet-Nam; Singapore and Thailand. In addition, representatives of Laos and Nepal have attended Agency-organized short-term training projects, such as seminars and training courses. (author)

  5. Pedagogical co-operation in the country of childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonchar O.V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here both the general principles of the concept of "childhood" are revealed and the general features of the childhood period, teaching child development criteria are outlined. It is paid special attention to the essence of humanistic ideas of V. Sukhomlynsky of a teacher and student pedagogical mutual relations which resonated both in contemporaries and subsequent teacher generations work, dominant tasks of Ukrainian schools of different levels were outlined by an outstanding Ukrainian teacher as well. It is marked that a leading place in pedagogical mutual relations is occupied by principles of humanizing, socialization, nationality and self-perfection.

  6. Opportunities and threats of WTO membership of Ukraine in foreign trade of high-technology products under conditions of co-operation with EU countries and Customs Union of Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyzym Mykola O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of consequences of membership in the World Trade Organisation (WTO for Ukraine in foreign trade of high-technology products under conditions of co-operation with EU countries and the Customs Union of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia (CU. The article shows that after Ukraine joined WTO there were some rather significant reductions of tariff rates for Ukrainian products and liberalisation of access to the world markets, at the same time the internal Ukrainian market became more open for imported products. The article studies specific features and changes in the high-technology products market after Ukraine joined WTO. It analyses dynamics of volumes and specific weight of the world export-import of high-technology products and the structure of the world export and import of high technology products, including by individual countries and groups. The article makes a conclusion about a weak high-technology component of the Ukrainian export. It studies the structure of export of high-technology products of EU, CU and Ukraine. It shows that in order to develop the high-technology products market Ukraine needs to develop foreign trade with EU countries and also to continue co-operation with CU countries, in particular, with Russia. The article shows that the aerospace industry products takes the biggest specific weight in the export of high-technology products of Ukraine. It considers prospects of development of civil aircraft production in the world and Ukraine under the modern conditions. It analyses strengths and weaknesses of the aircraft construction industry and also threats and opportunities for aircraft construction of Ukraine due to external environment influence. The article shows that Ukraine cannot keep national aircraft building on its own, that is why it is necessary to develop close co-operation both with Russian enterprises and with the countries of the Western Europe. It offers recommendations on

  7. Developing a strategy for improving efficiency in the heating sector in central and eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.S. [World Bank, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heating is a vital energy service in Central and Eastern Europe, but the current delivery mechanisms are riddled with problems. District heating (DH) in its present technical form and with the present management structures is an inefficient system which produces expensive heat. Customers cannot control it and react to overheating by opening windows, even in winter. DH facilities together with other forms of individual heating are responsible for air pollution, causing severe impacts on the health of urban residents. The issues relating to DH are discussed, the first World Bank activities and experiences with projects in Poland are analyzed, and the cornerstones of a strategy to support future World Bank financing and the development of sound heating policies in CEE are presented.

  8. Developing consensus-based policy solutions for medicines adherence for Europe: a delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to prescribed medication is a pervasive problem that can incur serious effects on patients’ health outcomes and well-being, and the availability of resources in healthcare systems. This study aimed to develop practical consensus-based policy solutions to address medicines non-adherence for Europe. Methods A four-round Delphi study was conducted. The Delphi Expert Panel comprised 50 participants from 14 countries and was representative of: patient/carers organisations; healthcare providers and professionals; commissioners and policy makers; academics; and industry representatives. Participants engaged in the study remotely, anonymously and electronically. Participants were invited to respond to open questions about the causes, consequences and solutions to medicines non-adherence. Subsequent rounds refined responses, and sought ratings of the relative importance, and operational and political feasibility of each potential solution to medicines non-adherence. Feedback of individual and group responses was provided to participants after each round. Members of the Delphi Expert Panel and members of the research group participated in a consensus meeting upon completion of the Delphi study to discuss and further refine the proposed policy solutions. Results 43 separate policy solutions to medication non-adherence were agreed by the Panel. 25 policy solutions were prioritised based on composite scores for importance, and operational and political feasibility. Prioritised policy solutions focused on interventions for patients, training for healthcare professionals, and actions to support partnership between patients and healthcare professionals. Few solutions concerned actions by governments, healthcare commissioners, or interventions at the system level. Conclusions Consensus about practical actions necessary to address non-adherence to medicines has been developed for Europe. These actions are also applicable to other regions. Prioritised

  9. International co-operation for safe radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    As a specialised inter-governmental body, NEA pursues three main objectives for its radioactive waste management programme: - The promotion of studies to improve the data base available in support of national programmes. - The support of Research and Development through co-ordination of national activities and promotion of international projects. - An improvement in the general level of understanding of waste management issues and options, particularly in the field of waste disposal. The management of radioactive waste from nuclear activities covers several sequences of complex technical operations. However, as the ultimate objective of radioactive waste management is the disposal of the waste, the largest part of the work programme is directed towards the analysis of disposal options. In addition, NEA is active in various other areas of waste management, such as the treatment and conditioning of waste, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the institutional aspects of the long term management of radioactive waste

  10. International co-operation in the management of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Changsun [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The use of nuclear energy faces with the problem of radioactive waste disposal. The public simply abhors radioactive wastes without rightful cause. Hence, the immediate concern is to overcome this hostile preconception of the public, and to come up with safe and economic ways of disposal which are acceptable to the public. Without it, the public may not accept the idea of further use of nuclear energy. Some have concern about safeguards of fissile plutonium with respect to proliferation while others have concerns regarding protection beyond national borders related to movement of radioactive wastes for foreign disposal. Now, the disposal of radioactive waste is a global problem rather than a problem for individual nation. In this aspect, close international cooperation is recently being brought up more than ever in jointly: improving public acceptance, minimizing waste generation, eliminating the burden on future generations, developing internationally acceptable practices, exploring disposal concepts, and collaborating on R and D. (author)

  11. International co-operation in the management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Changsun

    1998-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy faces with the problem of radioactive waste disposal. The public simply abhors radioactive wastes without rightful cause. Hence, the immediate concern is to overcome this hostile preconception of the public, and to come up with safe and economic ways of disposal which are acceptable to the public. Without it, the public may not accept the idea of further use of nuclear energy. Some have concern about safeguards of fissile plutonium with respect to proliferation while others have concerns regarding protection beyond national borders related to movement of radioactive wastes for foreign disposal. Now, the disposal of radioactive waste is a global problem rather than a problem for individual nation. In this aspect, close international cooperation is recently being brought up more than ever in jointly: improving public acceptance, minimizing waste generation, eliminating the burden on future generations, developing internationally acceptable practices, exploring disposal concepts, and collaborating on R and D. (author)

  12. Feasibility analysis for a SolarShare co-operative in the City of Toronto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigham, M.; Gipe, P.

    2007-01-01

    This report provided details of a feasibility study conducted to assess a business model for a solar electric co-operative within the City of Toronto. The study focused on the development of a rooftop array of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels. A portfolio of potential partners and projects representing approximately 4 MW was identified. Economic and financial models were used to determine the viability of the SolarShare rooftop design. Various tariffs and subsidies currently available for the development of renewable energy projects were reviewed. Despite growing environmental awareness and enthusiasm for solar energy projects amongst Toronto inhabitants, the analysis demonstrated that rooftop PV projects in Ontario are not profitable without a reduction in the costs of $3,500 to $5000 kW, subsidies, or an increase in tariff payments under the province's standard offer contract program. Revenues derived from energy sales under the SolarShare program were approximately half of what was required to undertake a profitable investment in solar PV. Recommendations for building profitable PV systems using a staged approach were included. 27 refs., 16 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Emerging Administrations and Sustainable Development in South-Eastern Europe. Case study: Romania and Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Berceanu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years ago, Agenda 21, the United Nations' call to action for sustainable development, envisaged that the necessary harmonization and extension of existing policies and plans would occur through the adoption of an identifiable strategy for sustainable development. Since then, sustainable development is a widely used phrase and idea and it has many different meanings and therefore provokes many different responses. The aim of the article is to explore the role of the emerging South-Eastern administrations in the sustainable development under the changes and rules imposed by the European Union pressure. We will analyze both concepts, emerging administrations and sustainable development from the perspective of system theory and we will make the link with the concept of emergence, which is utilized to research and to analyze the nature of the changes in the public administration starting from the approach of the systemic theory. The research will be focused on the states form the south-eastern Europe, thus in the case study we will make a comparison between Romania and Bulgaria, as new member states of the European Union.

  14. Working under pressure: economic recession and third sector development in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pape, U.D.; Chaves-Ávila, R.; Pahl, J.B.; Petrella, F.; Pielinski, B.; Savall-Morera, T.

    2016-01-01

    The context conditions for third sector organizations (TSOs) in Europe have significantly changed as a result of the global economic crisis, including decreasing levels of public funding and changing modes of relations with the state. The effect of economic recession, however, varies across Europe.

  15. Co-operation and Phase Behavior under the Mixed Updating Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen; Li Yao-Sheng; Xu Chen

    2015-01-01

    We present a model by considering two updating rules when the agents play prisoner's dilemma on a square lattice. Agents can update their strategies by referencing one of his neighbors of higher payoffs under the imitation updating rule or directly replaced by one of his neighbors according to the death-birth updating rule. The frequency of co-operation is related to the probability q of occurrence of the imitation updating or the death-birth updating and the game parameter b. The death-birth updating rule favors the co-operation while the imitation updating rule favors the defection on the lattice, although both rules suppress the co-operation in the well-mixed population. Therefore a totally co-operative state may emerge when the death-birth updating is involved in the evolution when b is relatively small. We also obtain a phase diagram on the q-b plane. There are three phases on the plane with two pure phases of a totally co-operative state and a totally defective state and a mixing phase of mixed strategies. Based on the pair approximation, we theoretically analyze the phase behavior and obtain a quantitative agreement with the simulation results. (paper)

  16. The co-operative model as a means of stakeholder management: An exploratory qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Hammond

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The South African economy has for some time been characterised by high unemployment, income inequality and a skills mismatch, all of which have contributed to conflict between business, government and labour. The co-operative model of stakeholder management is examined as a possible mitigating organisational form in this high-conflict environment. International experience indicates some success with co-operative models but they are not easy to implement effectively and face severe obstacles. Trust and knowledge sharing are critical for enabling a co-operative model of stakeholder management, which requires strong governance and adherence to strict rules. The model must balance the tension between optimisation of governance structures and responsiveness to members' needs. Furthermore, support from social and political institutions is necessary. We find barriers to scalability which manifest in the lack of depth of business skills, negative perception of the co-operative model by external stakeholders, government ambivalence, and a lack of willingness on the part of workers to co-operate for mutual benefit.

  17. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper draws on B.N.F.L.'s wide experience of international collaboration in nuclear fuel process activities to examine the pros and cons of international agreements. Initially, the factors that influence the need to co-operate, the extent of possible co-operation and the alternative types of agreement are reviewed. Next, the benefits, problems and risks associated with each function, such as managmenet, financial, R and D, marketing and operations that could be covered within the scope of an international agreement, are examined in detail. The paper continues by calling upon specific experience obtained by B.N.F.L. in co-operation with other organisations over several years in operating both major and much smaller agreements illustrating the rationale behind the co-operation, the resolution of 'teething' troubles and the current status of these organisations. In conclusion, the paper comments upon the effectiveness of collaboration agreements and identifies several requirements for internation co-operation to succeed

  18. Implementing energy efficiency: Challenges and opportunities for rural electric co-operatives and small municipal utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elizabeth J.; Plummer, Joseph; Fischlein, Miriam; Smith, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    Challenges in implementing demand side management (DSM) programs in rural electric co-operatives and small municipal utilities are not well understood, yet these organizations sell roughly 15% of electricity in the US, many are more coal-intensive than investor-owned utilities (IOUs), and they are politically important-rural electric co-operatives cover about 75% of the US land area and municipal utilities are found in every state except Hawaii. We provide a background on rural co-operatives and municipal utilities in the context of the US electric sector and highlight the challenges and opportunities of implementing DSM programs in these institutions. Where past studies of utility DSM have mostly focused on IOUs or consisted of qualitative case studies of municipal utilities with exemplary DSM performance, this study makes a unique contribution to the DSM literature by systematically analyzing an entire co-operative and municipal utility population in Minnesota through the use of a survey. In doing so, we provide policy recommendations relevant to energy planners and policy makers to support DSM in rural electric co-operatives and municipal utilities

  19. Road safety development in Europe: a decade of changes (2001-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongjun; Hermans, Elke; Bao, Qiong; Brijs, Tom; Wets, Geert

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the road safety development of a country over time, the percentage change in the number of road fatalities is traditionally the main indicator. However, simply considering the reduction in the road fatalities may not correctly reflect the real improvement in road safety because the transport circumstances of a country underlying the road fatalities also change every year. In this study, we present a new way for measuring the road safety performance change over time, which is to use the technique of data envelopment analysis (DEA) and the Malmquist productivity index. In doing so, we can not only focus on the evolution of road safety final outcomes within a given period, but also take the changes of different measures of exposure in the same period into account. In the application, the DEA-based Malmquist productivity index (DEA-MI) is used to measure the extent to which the EU countries have improved their road safety performance over the period 2001-2010. More objective and insightful results are obtained compared to the ones based on the traditional indicator. The results show considerable road safety progress in most of the Member States during these ten years, and the fatality risk rather than the fatality number on Europe's roads has actually been reduced by approximately half. However, the situation differed considerably from country to country. The decomposition of the DEA-MI into 'efficiency change' and 'technical change' further reveals that the bulk of the improvement during the last decade was attained through the adoption of productivity-enhancing new technologies throughout the road transport sector in Europe, rather than through the relatively underperforming countries catching up with those best-performing ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Strategies for the co-operation between power generation facilities and power sales organisations in the European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bammert, U.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how the public utilities in Hannover, Germany, have developed a strategy for the operation of their power generation facilities and power distribution network as independent yet co-operating units. Three models that were examined are described: 'free-sailing', where generation and distribution were kept completely independent, the 'wedding' model, where they were closely tied together and 'Enercity', a mixture of both models. The various rules necessary and the degrees of freedom needed to implement the 'Enercity' model are discussed, as are the advantages it offers to both the power generation and the sales units

  1. Human-Capital based Governance Structure, Success Factors and Barriers to Effective Governance: Co-operatives in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohana Othman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-operatives comprise the crucial third engine of growth for the Malaysian economy after the public and private sectors. This study investigates the human capital based governance structure, success factors and barriers to effective governance of co-operatives in Malaysia. Questionnaires were distributed to the top 100 co-operatives listed in the Malaysian Co-operative Societies Commission website. Analysis of the responses to the questionnaires showed that human capital based co-operatives governance comprise members’ participation, independence of the board, depth of expertise and competencies of directors and other characteristics of the board. This study also identified branding as the most important success factor ahead of competitiveness and proximity. Malaysia’s economy is projected to continue relying significantly on the performance of co-operatives. Thus, it is incumbent for greater attention to be given towards an effective governance that results in successful co-operatives.

  2. O espaço da cooperativa "amigos do meio ambiente": cooperativa de trabalho ou cooperfraude? "Friends of the environment" co-operative: work co-operative or fraud co-operative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirla Patrícia Weber Sterchile

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é resultado de pesquisa acadêmica que tem como objeto de estudo-pesquisa "A forma de existir e de ser da Cooperativa dos Agentes Ambientais de Santa Helena 'Amigos do Meio Ambiente' e sua imbricação na Usina de Beneficiamento de Resíduos Sólidos do município de Santa Helena-PR". Verificando o cotidiano profissional, o descontentamento de trabalhadores catadores de matérias recicláveis, o incentivo do gestor municipal para a instalação da usina e a formação da cooperativa, aliado aos postulados do capitalismo, em sua fase tardia, propusemos desconstruir e reconstruir o movimento do objeto em questão a partir da pesquisa teórica e empírica. Para coletar os dados utilizando a técnica de gravação, recorremos à análise documental e à observação. Após esse processo descrevemos e analisamos os conteúdos presentes. Concluímos em nosso estudo-pesquisa, que a Cooperativa - "Amigos do Meio Ambiente", é uma "cooperfraude", legitimada pelo Estado, que suprime os princípios do cooperativismo e exime o capital da raiz da exploração da força de trabalhoThis article resulted from a research aiming at "The form of existence and being of the Co-operative of Environmental Agents from St. Helena - 'Friends of the Environment' - and its imbrication in the Processing Plant of Solid Waste in the city of Santa Helena-PR". Checking the professional practice, the dissatisfaction of workers who collect recycling materials and the City Hall's encouragement to install the plant and to form the Co-operative, together with the tenets of capitalism in its late stage, we proposed to deconstruct and reconstruct the motion of the object studied from the empirical research. After analyzing our data we concluded that the "Friends of the Environment" Co-operative is a "fraud co-operative" legitimized by the State, that suppressed the principles of co-operativism and exempted the capital from the root of exploitation of the workforce

  3. Employing Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Co-Operative Path Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdana Habib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we work to develop a path planning solution for a group of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs using a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP approach. Co-operation among team members not only helps reduce mission time, it makes the execution more robust in dynamic environments. However, the problem becomes more challenging as it requires optimal resource allocation and is NP-hard. Since UAVs may be lost or may suffer significant damage during the course of the mission, plans may need to be modified in real-time as the mission proceeds. Therefore, multiple UAVs have a better chance of completing a mission in the face of failures. Such military operations can be treated as a variant of the Multiple Depot Vehicle Routing Problem (MDVRP. The proposed solution must be such that m UAVs start from multiple source locations to visit n targets and return to a set of destination locations such that (1 each target is visited exactly by one of the chosen UAVs (2 the total distance travelled by the group is minimized and (3 the number of targets that each UAV visits may not be less than K or greater than L.

  4. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Sudan, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $5.7 million of Agency support received, Sudan ranks 31st among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. Over the past ten years, almost equal shares of this assistance were provided in the form of equipment (46%) and training (42%), and only a small percentage was provided in the form of expert services (12%). The best part of the resources was made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (77%), while in-kind and extrabudgetary contributions account for 13% and 10% of the resources, respectively. With regard to project disbursement during the past ten years, by sector, the two largest areas have been general atomic energy development (37%) and agriculture (21%), followed by nuclear medicine (14%). Smaller shares (6% each) have gone to nuclear physics and chemistry, nuclear engineering and technology, hydrology, and nuclear safety

  5. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Peru, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $12.6 million of Agency support received, Peru ranks 4th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991, whereby it ranked as high as 2nd in each of the four years 1982 through 1985. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (59%), followed by expert services (29%) and training (12%). Forty-five per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 29% of the resources were made available through extrabudgetary contributions, and 21% by UNDP. The remaining 5% were provided in kind. With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been agriculture (27%), general atomic energy development (17%), nuclear raw materials (14%), nuclear medicine (12%) and industry and hydrology (11%). Nuclear safety, nuclear engineering and technology, and nuclear physics and chemistry have each received less than ten per cent of the assistance provided

  6. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Brazil, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $17 million of Agency support received, Brazil ranks 2nd among all recipients of technical assistance during the period 1958 through 1991. Over half of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (51%), complemented by expert services (34%) and training (15%). Almost two-thirds of the funds were made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (63%), the rest was provided through extrabudgetary contributions (30%), assistance in kind (4%) and UNDP (3%). With regard to total disbursements - by sector - under those projects that were operational during the period 1982 through November 1992, the three major areas have been: general atomic energy development (47%), nuclear safety (22%) and agriculture (13%). During the same period, the country has provided experts and training course lectures for a total of 405 assignments, and has hosted 178 fellowships and scientific visits as well as 46 regional and interregional training events with a total of 603 participants

  7. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Cuba, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With almost $8.2 million of Agency support received, Cuba ranks 19th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991, whereby it ranked as high as 3rd in 1982 and 4th in 1984. Over three quarters of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (81%), followed by expert services (10%) and training (9%). Seventy-one per cent of the resources were made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 28% of the resources were provided by UNDP. The remaining 1% was made available through extrabudgetary and in-kind contributions. With regard to project disbursements by sector, the largest areas have been general atomic energy development (36%), agriculture (20%), nuclear physics and chemistry (10%) and nuclear safety (10%). Industry and hydrology, nuclear engineering and technology, and nuclear medicine have each received less than ten per cent of the assistance provided

  8. [Does co-operation research provide approaches to explain the changes in the German hospital market?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, C; Leidl, R

    2004-11-01

    The German hospital market faces an extensive process of consolidation. In this change hospitals consider cooperation as one possibility to improve competitiveness. To investigate explanations of changes in the German hospital market by theoretical approaches of cooperation research. The aims and mechanism of the theories, their relevance in terms of contents and their potential for empirical tests were used as criteria to assess the approaches, with current and future trends in the German hospital market providing the framework. Based on literature review, six theoretical approaches were investigated: industrial organization, transaction cost theory, game theory, resource dependency, institutional theory, and co-operative investment and finance theory. In addition, the data needed to empirically test the theories were specified. As a general problem, some of the theoretical approaches set a perfect market as a precondition. This precondition is not met by the heavily regulated German hospital market. Given the current regulations and the assessment criteria, industrial organization as well as resource-dependency and institutional theory approaches showed the highest potential to explain various aspects of the changes in the hospital market. So far, none of the approaches investigated provides a comprehensive and empirically tested explanation of the changes in the German hospital market. However, some of the approaches provide a theoretical background for part of the changes. As this dynamic market is economically of high significance, there is a need for further development and empirical testing of relevant theoretical approaches.

  9. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Egypt, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $22.2 million of Agency support received, Egypt ranks first among all recipients of technical assistance, not only for the period 1958 - 1991, but also held this rank in each of the five years 1982 through 1986 and in 1988. More than half of this assistance has been provided in the form of equipment (57%), followed by expert services (19%), training (17%) and sub-contracts (7%). With 42% and 43%, respectively, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund and extrabudgetary contributions hold almost equal shares in the total resources available, while in-kind assistance accounts for 9% and UNDP for 6% of the resources. With regard to project disbursement during the past ten years, by sector, the two largest areas have been nuclear safety (34%) and agriculture (33%), followed by nuclear engineering and technology (11%). Smaller shares - from 4% to 7% each-- have gone to industry and hydrology, nuclear medicine, nuclear physics and chemistry, and general atomic energy development

  10. Present trends in radioactive waste management policies in OECD countries and related international co-operative efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years waste management has received increased attention not only at the national level but also internationally in order to harmonise to some extent the policies and practices to be followed and to continue to achieve a high safety standard in this field. In particular, discussions are taking place between OECD Member countries on the definition of objectives, concepts and strategies for radioactive waste management with a view to presenting coherent overall systems covering not only the treatment and storage aspects for the short term but also the longer term problems of disposal in the context of a rapidly developing nuclear fuel cycle. The technical, administrative, legal and financial aspects of the waste management problems are being discussed and various approaches are envisaged for the future. In addition to the discussion of policies and practices, a significant effort is also being initiated on research and development. The disposal problem has been given priority particularly as far as high level waste and alpha bearing wastes are concerned. Close international co-operation has been initiated in this sector as well as on the conditioning of high level radioactive waste. As a result of these efforts an international R and D programme is being established at the site of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant on the incorporation of high level waste into metal matrices. Increased co-operation is also taking place concerning other waste management problems such as the management of gaseous waste, alpha waste and cladding hulls and the question of dismantling and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The paper describes in detail the results achieved so far through this co-operation between OECD Member countries and presents current plans for future activities [fr

  11. Development of a monthly to seasonal forecast framework tailored to inland waterway transport in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Dennis; Klein, Bastian; Ionita, Monica

    2017-12-01

    limitations on longer lead times in central Europe, this study reveals the existence of a valuable predictability of streamflow on monthly up to seasonal timescales along the Rhine, upper Danube and Elbe waterways, and the Elbe achieves the highest skill and economic value. (3) The more physically based and the statistical approach are able to improve the predictive skills and economic value compared to climatology and the ESP approach. The specific forecast skill highly depends on the forecast location, the lead time and the season. (4) Currently, the statistical approach seems to be most skilful for the three waterways investigated. The lagged relationship between the monthly and/or seasonal streamflow and the climatic and/or oceanic variables vary between 1 month (e.g. local precipitation, temperature and soil moisture) up to 6 months (e.g. sea surface temperature). Besides focusing on improving the forecast methodology, especially by combining the individual approaches, the focus is on developing useful forecast products on monthly to seasonal timescales for waterway transport and to operationalize the related forecasting service.

  12. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Leichsenring

    2004-09-01

    the state of service development, various approaches and instruments can be observed. Different national frameworks, in particular with respect to financing and organisation, systemic development, professionalisation and professional cultures, basic societal values (family ethics, and political approaches have to be taken into account during the second phase of PROCARE during which transversal and transnational analysis will be undertaken based on an in-depth analysis of two model ways of working in each country. Discussion: Far from a European vision concerning integrated care, national health and social care systems remain—at best—loosely coupled systems that are facing increasing difficulties, given the current challenges, in particular in long-term care for older persons: increasing marketisation, lack of managerial knowledge (co-operation, co-ordination, shortage of care workers and a general trend towards down-sizing of social care services continue to hamper the first tentative pathways towards integrated care systems.

  13. The prospects of development of the market of cogeneration in Europe; Les perspectives de developpement du marche de la cogeneration eu Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotard, E. [Association Europeenne de Promotion de la Cogeneration, COGEN Europe (Country unknown/Code not available)

    1999-01-01

    Cogeneration or Combined Heat and Power has a high overall efficiency and brings about important environmental advantages in particular in terms of CO{sub 2} emissions. This win-win position is crucial at a time of widespread liberalization in energy markets. However, as shown by the various development rates within the EU, cogeneration is not equally treated across Europe. These differences are not only due to local climates - the development difference can ba as high as over 30% for example between France and The Netherlands. Nevertheless some recent European legislation such as the Gas and the Electricity Directives attempt to harmonize through liberalization. Liberalization should have positive aspects for cogeneration, in particular industrial cogeneration, provided that it is well designed and implemented. (authors)

  14. Regional co-operation in the nuclear field: The Nordic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experience from 25 years of co-operation in the nuclear field between the Nordic countries is described. A pragmatic approach with a minimum of formalism is used. The co-operation takes place mainly through ''horizontal'' channels between corresponding bodies in the different countries - safety authorities, research institutions, electricity producers, etc. In addition, a ''vertical'' co-ordination between these different circles is accomplished through a Nordic Liaison Committee. The experience shows that valuable results can be obtained, mainly through rationalization and improved use of resources. Difficulties, which are inherent in international co-operation, can be reduced, provided that there is a strong political will, an efficient system to promote contacts, and a flexible financing scheme. Apart from the benefits obtained in each of the countries - whether or not it has its own nuclear power - particular advantages accrue when a ''Nordic group'' can present co-ordinated viewpoints on the international scene. (author)

  15. Development of integrative bioethics in the Mediterranean area of South-East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukoč, Mislav

    2012-11-01

    With regards to its origin, foundation and development, bioethics is a relatively new discipline, scientific and theoretical field, where different and even contradicting definition models and methodological patterns of its formation and application meet. In some philosophical orientations, bioethics is considered to be a sub-discipline of applied ethics as a traditional philosophical discipline. Yet in biomedical and other sciences, bioethics is designated as a specialist scientific discipline, or a sort of a new medical ethics. The concept of integrative bioethics as an interdisciplinary scholarly and pluriperspectivistic area goes beyond such one-sided determinations, both philosophical and scientistic, and intends to integrate the philosophical approach to bioethics with its particular scientific contents, as well as different cultural dimensions and perspectives. This concept of integrative bioethics has gradually developed at philosophical and interdisciplinary conferences and institutions on the "bioethical islands" of the Croatian Mediterranean. In this paper, the author follows the formation, development and prospects of integrative bioethics in the wider region of the Mediterranean and Southeast Europe.

  16. Comparison of Housing Construction Development in Selected Regions of Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorský, Ján; Petráková, Zora; Hollý, Ján

    2017-12-01

    In fast-growing countries, the economic growth, which came after the global financial crisis, ought to be manifested in the development of housing policy. The development of the region is directly related to the increase of the quality of living of its inhabitants. Housing construction and its relation with the availability of housing is a key issue for population overall. Comparison of its development in selected regions is important for experts in the field of construction, mayors of the regions, the state, but especially for the inhabitants themselves. The aim of the article is to compare the number of new dwellings with building permits and completed dwellings with final building approval between selected regions by using a mathematical statistics method - “Analysis of variance”. The article also uses the tools of descriptive statistics such as a point graph, a graph of deviations from the average, basic statistical characteristics of mean and variability. Qualitative factors influencing the construction of flats as well as the causes of quantitative differences in the number of started apartments under construction and completed apartments in selected regions of Central Europe are the subjects of the article’s conclusions.

  17. Towards an effective co-operation between companies and occupational safety and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Drift, Dorine Willy

    2002-01-01

    In the Dutch Working Conditions Act, every employer is required to organize preventive occupational safety and health services (OSH-Services). The OSH-Services need to have a certification that can be compared with ISO-9000. This article is focused on the question: How can companies and OSH-Services co-operate more effectively to obtain a better OSH management system inside the companies? To answer this question, TNO has developed an approach to support organisations in the health care branch to obtain a better service from their OSH-Service. TNO has chosen to focus on supporting the companies, because of the recognition that the effectiveness of OSH-Services has been found in effects on their customers, the companies. As a result of the research project a stepwise approach with several tools was developed. After the development phase, parts of the approach and the tools were used in several other consultancy projects. Evaluative studies have not been performed yet. However, from the development activities and several consultancy projects some remarkable evaluative findings can be given. The approach can be useful for companies and OSH-Services to make their goals and expectations more explicit. The approach also helps to make the management of companies clear that their own behaviour is relevant to the achievement of their goals in occupational health and safety policy, in addition to the services provided by the OSH-Service and their professionals. The approach cannot fulfil the possible need for qualification of OSH professionals. However, the approach can make the OSH professionals clear in what way they have qualification needs.

  18. Introduction: rural women in Europe: the impact of place and culture on gender mainstreaming the European Rural Development Programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shortall, S.; Bock, B.B.

    2015-01-01

    Gender relations are socially constructed. Space and culture are key factors in this process. We consider how women's identity is constructed in rural areas of Europe. In particular, we examine the ability of gender mainstreaming to advance gender equality through the EU Rural Development Programme

  19. The Development and Dissemination of Council of Europe Policy on Education about Religions and Non-Religious Convictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article, written from an insider perspective, and in a personal capacity (the author has been involved with the Council of Europe's work on religion and education since its inception in 2002), gives an account of the developing interest in the study of religions (and latterly non-religious convictions) in publicly funded schools by the…

  20. The development of the EU-Rotate_N and its use to test strategies for N use across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahn, C.R.; Zhang, K.; Lillywhite, R.

    2010-01-01

    A new model EU-ROTATE_N has been written which enables the assessment of the economic and environmental performance of nitrogen applied to crop rotations in either conventional or organic cropping for a wide range of crops and growing conditions in Europe. The model can simulate root development,...

  1. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Thailand 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Thailand carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  2. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Sri Lanka 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Sri Lanka carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  3. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bolivia 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bolivia carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  4. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Panama 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Panama carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  5. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bangladesh 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bangladesh carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  6. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Panama 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Panama carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  7. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Guatemala 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Guatemala carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  8. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Iceland 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Iceland carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  9. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bangladesh 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bangladesh carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  10. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Cyprus 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Cyprus carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  11. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Albania 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Albania carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  12. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Indonesia 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Indonesia carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  13. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Poland 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Poland carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  14. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Romania 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Romania carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  15. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Viet Nam 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Viet Nam carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  16. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the Philippines 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Philippines carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  17. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with The Philippines 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in The Philippines carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  18. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Greece 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Greece carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  19. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Dominican Republic 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Dominican Republic carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  20. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Nicaragua 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Nicaragua carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  1. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Afghanistan 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Afghanistan carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  2. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Jamaica 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Jamaica carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  3. Trust and the successful coordination of SME co-operation – an empirical study in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the role of trust and test the impact of trust on performance in the context of co-operation between small- and medium-sized enterprises (‘SMEs’ in a transition country. Based on a sample of 122 Slovenian SMEs, an analysis based on OLS regression reveals that trust does have a strong impact on performance. We thereby identify trust as a powerful co-ordinating mechanism for SME relationships involving co-operation in transition economies.

  4. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Ecuador 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Ecuador carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  5. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with El Salvador 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in El Salvador carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  6. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Nigeria 1986-1996 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Nigeria carried out during 1986-1996. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  7. Quality assurance and the sub-contract interface: co-operative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, G.F.; Rippon, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The CEGB standard QA 42-1 quality assurance programme requires purchasers to establish supplier selection and assessment procedures either by previous continuous record of supplying identical or equivalent material satisfactorily, or by an evaluation of the sub-contractors quality system. In order to avoid the multiple evaluations that the latter would involve for projects such as nuclear power stations, which concern a hierarchy of organisations, the idea of co-operative evaluations was suggested. The requirements involved in establishing co-operative evaluations are discussed. Some potential difficulties which have been identified from experience are described. (U.K.)

  8. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bolivia 1986-1996 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bolivia carried out during 1986-1996. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  9. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Colombia 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Colombia carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  10. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Portugal 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Portugal carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  11. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Pakistan 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Pakistan carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  12. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Myanmar 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Myanmar carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  13. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Malaysia 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Malaysia carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  14. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Jordan 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Jordan carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  15. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Mongolia 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Mongolia carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  16. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Egypt 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Egypt carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  17. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Paraguay 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Paraguay carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  18. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Mexico 1986-1996 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Mexico carried out during 1986-1996. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  19. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Paraguay 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Paraguay carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  20. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Hungary 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Hungary carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  1. Public sector management as a development problem in the countries of Southeast Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimo Draskovic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the period of nearly three decades of post-socialist transition in the countries of Southeastern Europe (SEE, there were numerous synergistic, destructive and anti-developmental hindering institutional factors that directly caused the creation of social and economic insecurity. Many developmental problems, as well as social, economic and institutional deformations, have generated a lasting and deep crisis. This paper analyzes the basic deformations of public sector management, which has emerged as a driving force for all development problems in the SEE countries. It starts with two assumptions: first, weak and slow institutional changes were deliberately programmed by the nomenclature of government, in order to eliminate institutional competition and affirmation of the quasi-institutional monism of neoliberal type, which have enabled the substitutive development of the so-called alternative institutions; and second, highly interest-oriented motives of the government nomenclature have been the main cause of ignoring rational recommendations by representatives of non-institutional economic theories.

  2. EuCARD2: enhanced accelerator research and development in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. EuCARD2 is an European research project which will be realized during 2013-2017 inside the EC FP7 framework. The project concerns the development and coordination of European Accelerator Research and Development. The project is particularly important, to a number of domestic laboratories, due to some plans to build large accelerator infrastructure in Poland. Large accelerator infrastructure of fundamental and applied research character stimulates around it the development and industrial applications as well as biomedical of advanced accelerators, material research and engineering, cryo-technology, mechatronics, robotics, and in particular electronics - like networked measurement and control systems, sensors, computer systems, automation and control systems. The paper presents a digest of the European project EuCARD2 which is Enhanced European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of the research results and assumptions in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator R&D, and the kick-off meeting of the EuCARD2. There are debated a few basic groups of accelerator systems components like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution, high field magnets, superconducting cavities, novel beam collimators, etc. The paper bases on the following materials: Internet and Intranet documents combined with EuCARD2, Description of Work FP7 EuCARD-2 DoW-312453, 2013-02-13, and discussions and preparatory materials worked on by Eucard-2 initiators.

  3. MAIN TRENDS OF DERIVATIVES’ MARKET DEVELOPMENT IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostiantyn Vozianov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to examine the factors of formation and development of the derivatives market in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE, to analyze the features of the organization and functioning of these markets, as well as to identify modern trends of development of the derivatives markets of CEE. The methodological basis of the study are historical and logical and systematic approach to the analysis of economic phenomena and processes in national and global environment. The study was conducted using the methods: qualitative and quantitative comparison, factor and structural analysis. Results. The development of the CEE derivatives market is characterized by: rapid growth of derivatives trading for the past two decades; high concentration of trading volumes on the stock market; offering a wide range of derivative products allowing investors to effectively hedge risk or get exposure; exchange consolidation; tendency to increased use of modern telecommunication technologies etc. The key problems of CEE derivatives market are low liquidity and international profile of exchanges and the lack of domestic investors for achieving the desired depth of the market. Practical implications. Research of the derivatives market makes it possible to understand more about the mechanism of functioning of the modern financial sector. In our opinion, special attention should be paid to CEE countries, where the development of the derivatives market began in the 1990s. To date, they are understudied, although they have considerable growth potential and in the future can compete on equal terms with Western European and American markets. Moreover, the starting conditions of development of the derivatives market in the CEE countries are more similar to the market of Ukraine and could be useful in terms of adapting good practices.

  4. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajay Vedaraj, I. S.; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B. V. A.

    2014-07-01

    After industrial robots came into existence during 1960, the technology of robotics with the design and analysis of robots in various forms in industries as well as in domestic applications were developed. Nowadays, along with the automotive sector the robots are producing a great impact in the form of quality and production rate to register their existence reliable in various other sectors also. Robotic technology has undergone various phase translations from being tortured as humanoids to the present day manipulators. Depending upon the various forms of its existence, robot manipulators are designed as serial manipulators and parallel manipulators. Individually both types can be proved effective though both have various drawbacks in design and the kinematic analysis. The versatility of robots can be increased by making them work in an environment where the same work volume is shared by more than one manipulator. This work volume can be identified as co-operative work volume of those manipulators. Here the interference of manipulators in the work volume of other manipulators is possible and is made obstacle free. The main advantage of co-operative manipulators is that when a number of independent manipulators are put together in a cooperative work envelope the efficiency and ability to perform tasks is greatly enhanced. The main disadvantage of the co-operative manipulators lies in the complication of its design even for a simple application, in almost all fields. In this paper, a cooperative design of robot manipulators to work in co-operative work environment is done and analysed for its efficacy. In the industrial applications when robotic manipulators are put together in more numbers, the trajectory planning becomes the tough task in the work cell. Proper design can remove the design defects of the cooperative manipulators and can be utilized in a more efficient way. In the proposed research paper an analysis is made on such a type of cooperative manipulator

  5. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedaraj, I S Rajay; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B V A

    2014-01-01

    After industrial robots came into existence during 1960, the technology of robotics with the design and analysis of robots in various forms in industries as well as in domestic applications were developed. Nowadays, along with the automotive sector the robots are producing a great impact in the form of quality and production rate to register their existence reliable in various other sectors also. Robotic technology has undergone various phase translations from being tortured as humanoids to the present day manipulators. Depending upon the various forms of its existence, robot manipulators are designed as serial manipulators and parallel manipulators. Individually both types can be proved effective though both have various drawbacks in design and the kinematic analysis. The versatility of robots can be increased by making them work in an environment where the same work volume is shared by more than one manipulator. This work volume can be identified as co-operative work volume of those manipulators. Here the interference of manipulators in the work volume of other manipulators is possible and is made obstacle free. The main advantage of co-operative manipulators is that when a number of independent manipulators are put together in a cooperative work envelope the efficiency and ability to perform tasks is greatly enhanced. The main disadvantage of the co-operative manipulators lies in the complication of its design even for a simple application, in almost all fields. In this paper, a cooperative design of robot manipulators to work in co-operative work environment is done and analysed for its efficacy. In the industrial applications when robotic manipulators are put together in more numbers, the trajectory planning becomes the tough task in the work cell. Proper design can remove the design defects of the cooperative manipulators and can be utilized in a more efficient way. In the proposed research paper an analysis is made on such a type of cooperative manipulator

  6. The development of the IAEA transport regulations and its implementation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation protection principles are laid down in a binding from in IAEA SS No 9. Regulations of world-wide validity (and, hence, for Europe) are IMO/IMDG Code for sea-going traffic, and ICAO/Technical regulations or IATA/Hazardous goods transport regulations, resp. for air traffic. The regulations by the organizations ADR, RID, ADN, ADNR, and CMEA are valid as transfrontier regulations in Europe. (DG) [de

  7. Initiatives driving accelerated access to medicines in Europe: Review of recent concepts and developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Gannedahl

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving timely patient access to new medicines, particularly in areas with high unmet need, has been a healthcare priority during the past 5–10 years, with several new regulatory initiatives from the European Medicines Agency, as well as on national level within the European Union. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that medicines going through these regulatory initiatives experience variable reimbursement outcomes due to uncertainties in the clinical or economic evidence base. New initiatives, including the adaptive pathways concept, have therefore been introduced that embrace a holistic view of a medicine’s route to patient access. These involve expanded clusters of stakeholders working together to prospectively influence and design evidence generation strategies, including use of real-world evidence, to ensure that development plans meet the needs of multiple stakeholders including regulatory agencies and health technology assessment bodies. Multi-stakeholder dialogues, provided through scientific advice, are already available for medicines in Europe in various forms and are important tools for regulators, health technology assessment bodies and pharmaceutical companies to develop evidence generation plans optimised to support decision-making on marketing authorisation and reimbursement of new medicines. Multiple stakeholder groups have been actively engaged in advancing developments of initiatives driving timely access and it is likely to continue due to the need to balance this with affordability. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the latest, as well as a future perspective on, developments with respect to accelerated access of medicines in the European Union with a particular focus on procedures for formal scientific advice.

  8. Evaluation of experience and trends in international co-operation in nuclear safety and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadie, K.B.; Strohl, P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper traces the development of co-operation in nuclear safety technology between the OECD Member countries which began as early as 1965 and is now organised under the auspices of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The principal objective is to exchange and evaluate information on relevant R and D and hence broaden the technical basis for decision-making by licensing authorities in the different countries. The membership of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations combines expertise in nuclear safety R and D and in licensing questions so that licensing procedures in the different countries may be exposed continuously to the influence of overall technological progress. The Committee actively seeks to narrow the differences between administrative procedures and traditional legal practices in Member countries as these affect the licensing of nuclear installations, primarily by assessing and comparing the methods employed. The paper shows how the Committee's working arrangements provide for maximum flexibility: the various co-ordinated programmes are selected after in-depth evaluation of potential areas of priority and are implemented through ad hoc Working Groups, specialist meetings or task forces, or in the form of special studies involving all interested countries. The results, conclusions and recommendations emerging from each programme are reviewed by the Committee before dissemination. Hitherto the greater part of the Committee's activities has been concerned with the safety of light water reactors and related subjects, but more attention is now being given to other topics such as LMFBR safety technology and the safety of fuel cycle facilities, particularly those at the end of the process, the so-called ''back-end'' plants. The paper discusses certain problems and constraints encountered in implementing the programme, some of which stem from Member countries' different degrees of penetration

  9. A novel model for extending international co-operation in science and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.J.; Ji-zehn, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE (ISSN 1009-3095, Monthly) 2004 Vol. 5 No. 3 p.358-364 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------A novel model for extending international co-operation in science and educationDE BOER Sirp J.1, QIU Ji-zhen 2(1International

  10. Effects of a Co-operative Learning Strategy on Ninth-Graders' Understanding of Human Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyibo, Kola; Evans, Hermel G.

    2002-01-01

    Looks at the effect of teaching strategies on a group's attitude toward biology and understanding human nutrition. Used an experimental group that participated in co-operative learning and a control group taught using the lecture method. Involves ninth graders (n=156) from two high schools in Jamaica. (Author/YDS)

  11. Financial Instruments and Conflicts of Interest: Application to French Agricultural Co-operatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Declerck

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural co-operatives' governance and economic projects are often misunderstood by external financial investors. The risk of conflicts of interest plays a role in these misunderstandings in the way retained earnings, returns to agricultural products brought by co-op member and returns to equity capital. Such risks are identified and answers are proposed.

  12. The Texts of the Agency's Co-operation Agreements with Regional Intergovernmental Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-02-07

    The texts of the Agency's agreements for co-operation with the regional inter-governmental organizations listed below, together with the respective protocols authenticating them, are reproduced in this document in the order in which the agreements entered into force, for the information of all Members of the Agency.

  13. Evaluation of bilateral and multilateral defence co-operation and assistance / Najaf Gambarov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gambarov, Najaf

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Aserbaidžaani sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst välisriikide relvajõududega ja rahvusvaheliste organisatsioonidega 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  14. Evaluation of Georgian military co-operation with partner countries and institutions / George Manjgaladze

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Manjgaladze, George

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Gruusia sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst välisriikide relvajõudude ja rahvusvaheliste organisatsioonidega, sh NATO-ga 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  15. Evaluation of bilateral and multilateral defence co-operation and assistance / Arthur Aghabekyan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aghabekyan, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Armeenia sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst välisriikidega ja osalemisest rahvusvahelistes sõjalistes koostööprogrammides 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  16. Environmental Engineering Education (E3) in the Gulf Co-Operation Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Majeed; Coskuner, Gulnur

    2007-01-01

    The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Countries (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--are facing enormous environmental challenges associated with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, especially in the last three decades, due to its role as a global hydrocarbon energy centre. None of these…

  17. Architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust building automation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernier, F.; Ploennigs, J.; Pesch, D.; Lesecq, S.; Basten, T.; Boubekeur, M.; Denteneer, T.J.J.; Oltmanns, F.; Lehmann, M.; Mai, Linh Tuan; Mc Gibney, A.; Rea, S.; Pacull, F.; Guyon-Gardeux, C.; Ducreux, L.F.; Thior, S.; Hendriks, M.; Verriet, J.H.; Fedor, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust Building Automation Systems (BAS) proposed by the EC funded FP7 SCUBA1 project. We describe the current situation in monitoring and control systems and outline the typical stakeholders involved in the

  18. Architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust Building Automation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernier, F.; Ploennigs, J.; Pesch, D.; Lesecq, S.; Basten, T.; Boubekeur, M.; Denteneer, D.; Oltmanns, F.; Bonnard, F.; Lehmann, M.; Mai, T.L.; McGibney, A.; Rea, S.; Pacull, F.; Guyon-Gardeux, C.; Ducreux, L.F.; Thior, S.; Hendriks, M.; Verriet, J.; Fedor, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust Building Automation Systems (BAS) proposed by the EC funded FP7 SCUBA1 project. We describe the current situation in monitoring and control systems and outline the typical stakeholders involved in the

  19. Are University Co-Operative Education Students Safe? Perceptions of Risk to Students on Work Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhook, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    As students venture off campus for university-sponsored activities, are they at risk, given that universities are better able to control risk factors on campus than they can for their off-campus activities? Co-operative education is a formalized and longstanding academic program that often sees students spend upwards of a third of their time off…

  20. Experimental evaluation of a co-operative driving setup based on inter-vehicle communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallouzi, R.; Verdult, V.; Hellendoorn, H.; Ploeg, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a co-operative longitudinal controller for a cluster of vehicles with inter-vehicle communication (IVC). By applying IVC a smooth traffic flow can be realized. The proposed controller can actively control the throttle, the brake and the gears of the