WorldWideScience

Sample records for eunice emakakaelavhi trhma

  1. A new species of Eunice (Polychaeta: Eunicidae) from Hainan Island, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuwen; Sun, Ruiping; Liu, Ruiyu

    2013-01-01

    A taxonomic survey of benthic marine animals from coastal regions of Hainan Island, South China Sea, revealed specimens of a new species of Eunice (Polychaeta: Eunicida: Eunicidae), Eunice uschakovi n. sp., collected from the intertidal zone. The species belongs to the group of Eunice that has yellow tridentate subacicular hooks and branchiae scattered over an extensive region of the body. It resembles E. miurai and E. havaica in having both bidentate and tridentate falcigers, but can be readily distinguished by branchial features. Comparisons between E. uschakovi and the two related species are presented.

  2. 77 FR 64815 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of... conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, including..., Scientific Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH...

  3. 77 FR 34394 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group, Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Biology... of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...

  4. 77 FR 27468 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Topics in Development, Signaling... Review, OD, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  5. 77 FR 37424 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the... Children's Study, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH... National Children's Study Advisory Committee. The meeting will be open to the public, with attendance...

  6. 77 FR 21789 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the... Person: Ralph M. Nitkin, Ph.D., Director, B.S.C.D., Biological Sciences and Career Development, NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS, 6100...

  7. 75 FR 7485 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Amended Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special...

  8. 76 FR 12125 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Corpus Luteal Contribution to...., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  9. 77 FR 34393 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d...: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Biobehavioral and Behavioral... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute o Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  10. 77 FR 26020 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Nature and Acquisition of Speech... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  11. 76 FR 67469 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Molecular and Cellular Controls of... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  12. 77 FR 19677 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, ZHD1... of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...

  13. 76 FR 61721 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Special Emphasis Panel, Neuroplasticity and the Maternal... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  14. 78 FR 12767 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Population Sciences Subcommittee. Date...., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute, of Child...

  15. 78 FR 18997 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Social-Cognitive Skill Intervention..., Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  16. 75 FR 7485 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Health, Behavior, and Context... Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute For Child Health & Development, 6100 Executive...

  17. 77 FR 73036 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel. NICHD T32 Teleconference Review... of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development...

  18. 76 FR 5594 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group, Developmental Biology Subcommittee... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  19. 76 FR 8372 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Risk Genes and Environment... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  20. 75 FR 63498 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd...

  1. 76 FR 5593 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Prenatal Events-Postnatal... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  2. 77 FR 16845 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the... Study, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100... National Children's Study Advisory Committee. The meeting will be open to the public, with attendance...

  3. 77 FR 27471 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Pediatrics Subcommittee Date: June 14..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd...

  4. 77 FR 27468 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel Congenital Defects Topics. Date: May..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd...

  5. 77 FR 66076 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Environmental and Biological..., Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  6. 75 FR 20853 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the.... Contact Person: Ralph M Nitkin, PhD, Director, B.S.C.D., Biological Sciences and Career Development, NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, NIH, DHHS, 6100 Executive...

  7. 77 FR 64818 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Pregnancy Adaptation and Maternal... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  8. 76 FR 43334 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Special Emphasis Panel, FES Controller for Upper Limb... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd...

  9. 76 FR 6146 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Special Emphasis Panel, Maternal Fetal Medicine Units... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  10. Influence of Eunice norvegica on feeding and calcification in the coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. E.; van Oevelen, D.; Middelburg, J. J.; Lundälv, T.

    2012-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the main framework building cold-water coral in the North Atlantic. It forms complex reef structures, extending up to several km in length and several meters in hight. Many species are attracted by the coral frame work, forming a highly diverse community within the reef. Although most work has focused on the corals, the functioning of the system also depends on interactions between corals and associated species. A particular example is the Polychaete Eunice norvegica that lives in close association with the coral host. The Polychaete builds a thin texture-tube between living coral branches and stimulates the coral to calcify the tube. This process strengthens the reef framwork by thickening and connecting coral brances and thereby acts as a positive feedback on the development of large reef structures. This comes however at an metabolic cost for the coral due to the enhanced calcificationrates. Another negative feedback for cold-water coral may be food related, since aquaria observations have shown that Eunice occasionally steels food from its host coral. In this study we investigated the interactions between the coral and polychaete related to calcification and food partitioning for two food types (algae and Artemia). The uptake of 13C and 15N labeled food sources by the worm and the coral was studied in chambers with only corals, only the polychaete and both species present. After 7 days, corals and worms were analyzed for isotope incorporation in bulk tissue and skeleton samples and specific fatty acids (13C) using GC-c-IRMS (gas-chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry). Corals that were kept in the presence of Eunice indeed showed a higher calcification rates of 7.4 ug C (day* g dw coral)-1, evidencing the stimulation of calcification by Eunice. Interestingly, food uptake of algae and Artemia was higher in the coral-worm treatment for both species as compared to the single species treatments. These results shed new light on

  11. 75 FR 36431 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of..., Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd... Contact Person listed below in advance of the meeting. Name of Committee: National Children's Study...

  12. 77 FR 5029 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Perinatal HIV-Infected Youth. Date...., Scientific Review Officer Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  13. 75 FR 39698 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel Craniofacial Synostosis: Critical... Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100...

  14. 75 FR 36431 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel--Assays of Biological Specimens in..., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  15. 78 FR 69857 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... Sciences and Career Development, NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute, of Child Health and... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of... research opportunities and needs; Renewing research infrastructure network program. Place: Hyatt Regency...

  16. 78 FR 48179 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ...., Biological Sciences and Career Development, NCMRR, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of.... Individuals planning to attend the teleconference may do so by calling the toll-free number, 866-692-3158 and...

  17. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Pediatric Formulation Initiative: selected reports from working groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoia, George P; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Mattison, Donald

    2008-11-01

    The Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) is a project of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The PFI was established to address the issue of the lack of appropriate formulations in children and to use this activity as a means to improve pediatric formulations, as mandated by the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act of 2002 and 2007. The PFI began in 2005 with the formation of 3 working groups-Scientific, Economics, and Taste and Flavor. These groups began the process of identifying issues, gathering needed information, and considering possible ways to overcome barriers to the development of pediatric drug formulations. The purpose of this supplement was to provide details of the working groups' activities through presentation of full-length articles. Also presented is an article that discusses the 2007 European Union (EU) regulation on medicinal products for pediatric use. Information for this article was gathered from the proceedings of a PFI workshop, sponsored by the NICHD, that was held in Bethesda, Maryland, on December 6 and 7, 2005, as well as postworkshop discussions of the different working groups. The increased awareness that the majority of medications used today have not been labeled for use in children, and have not been tested to define safety, efficacy, and appropriate dosing, has led to the passage of legislation in the United States and in the EU to create incentives to stimulate the testing of drugs in this special population. It is imperative that the problems associated with the compounding and use of extemporaneous formulations as described in this supplement be addressed. Regulatory barriers to the availability of commercially developed pediatric formulations in different countries will need to be minimized or removed. New drug delivery systems will need to be tested and made available to pediatric patients. Further research in the mediators of bitter taste and study of taste blockers

  18. Antenatal testing-a reevaluation: executive summary of a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Caroline; Freeman, Roger K; Spong, Catherine Y

    2009-03-01

    In August 2007, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Academy of Pediatrics cosponsored a 2-day workshop to reassess the body of evidence supporting antepartum assessment of fetal well-being, identify key gaps in the evidence, and formulate recommendations for further research. Participants included experts in obstetrics and fetal physiology and representatives from relevant stakeholder groups and organizations. This article is a summary of the discussions at the workshop, including synopses of oral presentations on the epidemiology of stillbirth and fetal neurological injury, fetal physiology, techniques for antenatal monitoring, and maternal and fetal indications for monitoring. Finally, a synthesis of recommendations for further research compiled from three breakout workgroups is presented.

  19. Placental Origins of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Potential Molecular Targets- An Executive Workshop Summary of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilekis, John V.; Tsilou, Ekaterini; Fisher, Susan; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Soares, Michael J.; Cross, James C.; Zamudio, Stacy; Illsley, Nicholas P.; Myatt, Leslie; Colvis, Christine; Costantine, Maged M.; Haas, David M.; Sadovsky, Yoel; Weiner, Carl; Rytting, Erik; Bidwell, Gene

    2016-01-01

    Although much progress is being made in understanding the molecular pathways in the placenta involved in the pathophysiology of pregnancy related disorders, a significant gap exists in utilizing this information for developing new drug therapies to improve pregnancy outcome. On March 5–6, 2015, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health sponsored a two day workshop titled Placental Origins of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: Potential Molecular Targets to begin to address this gap. Particular emphasis was given in the identification of important molecular pathways that could serve as drug targets and the advantages and disadvantages of targeting these particular pathways. This article is a summary of the proceedings of this workshop. A broad number of topics were covered ranging from basic placental biology to clinical trials. This included research in the basic biology of placentation, such as trophoblast migration and spiral artery remodeling, and trophoblast sensing and response to infectious and non-infectious agents. Research findings in these areas will be critical for formulating developing future treatments and developing therapies for the prevention of a number of pregnancy disorders of placental origin including preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and uterine inflammation. Research was also presented summarizing ongoing clinical efforts in the U.S. and in Europe testing novel interventions for preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction, including agents such as oral arginine supplementation, sildenafil, pravastatin, gene therapy using virally-delivered vascular endothelial growth factor, and oxygen supplementation therapy. Strategies were also proposed to improve fetal growth by enhancing nutrient transport to the fetus by modulating their placental transporters, as well as targeting placental mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress to improve placental health. The roles

  20. Biogeochemical analysis of the calcification patterns of cold-water corals Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa along contact surfaces with calcified tubes of the symbiotic polychaete Eunice norvegica: Evaluation of a 'mucus' calcification hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppelt, Alexandra; López Correa, Matthias; Rocha, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    The scleractinian cold-water corals (CWCs), including the species Madrepora oculata and especially Lophelia pertusa, have been studied extensively in an attempt to decipher environmental signals recorded during biomineralisation in order to extract environmental chronologies. However, understanding the mechanisms of carbonate precipitation is a prerequisite to interpret variations in geochemical signatures locked into the skeleton during coral growth; to date results are still inconclusive. Here a novel approach, comparing the calcification patterns within the coral microstructure of species L. pertusa and M. oculata and the geochemistry along the contact surfaces with calcified polychaete tubes is undertaken to provide additional information on the mechanisms of biomineralisation in colonial corals. The fact that no significant difference in microstructures, variations in growth rate, or geochemical composition between the corallite theca and the calcified polychaete tube was detectable leads to the conclusion that both have been deposited by the coral tissue in L. pertusa and M. oculata. Based on prior knowledge on the symbiotic relationship between CWCs and the polychaete Eunice norvegica, an involvement of mucus in the calcification of the parchment tubes had been suspected. However, we found only evidence for aragonite precipitated by coral tissue, without evidence for an involvement of mucus in the calcification.

  1. Preventing the first cesarean delivery: summary of a joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Catherine Y; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D; Mercer, Brian M; Saade, George R

    2012-11-01

    With more than one third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean delivery. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and nonmedical factors leading to the first cesarean delivery was reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean delivery on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean delivery rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for nonmedical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of "failed induction" should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery are facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean delivery with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health.

  2. Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

    2012-01-01

    With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health. PMID:23090537

  3. Opioid Use in Pregnancy, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, and Childhood Outcomes: Executive Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Academy of Pediatrics, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the March of Dimes Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Uma M; Davis, Jonathan M; Ren, Zhaoxia; Greene, Michael F

    2017-07-01

    In April 2016, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development invited experts to a workshop to address numerous knowledge gaps and to review the evidence for the screening and management of opioid use in pregnancy and neonatal abstinence syndrome. The rising prevalence of opioid use in pregnancy has led to a concomitant dramatic fivefold increase in neonatal abstinence syndrome over the past decade. Experts from diverse disciplines addressed research gaps in the following areas: 1) optimal screening for opioid use in pregnancy; 2) complications of pregnancy associated with opioid use; 3) appropriate treatments for pregnant women with opioid use disorders; 4) the best approaches for detecting, treating, and managing newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome; and 5) the long-term effects of prenatal opioid exposure on children. Workshop participants identified key scientific opportunities to advance the understanding of opioid use disorders in pregnancy and to improve outcomes for affected women, their children, and their families. This article provides a summary of the workshop presentations and discussions.

  4. 77 FR 28888 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Function, Integration, and...

  5. 75 FR 10293 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Initial Review Group, Function, Integration, and...

  6. 76 FR 30732 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Function, Integration, and...

  7. 76 FR 9586 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Function, Integration, and...

  8. 77 FR 61418 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group Function, Integration, and...

  9. 78 FR 29375 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Group; Function, Integration, and Rehabilitation Sciences Subcommittee. Date: June 3, 2013. Time: 8:30 a...

  10. 76 FR 64092 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group, Function, Integration, and...

  11. 77 FR 12599 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Function, Integration, and...

  12. 75 FR 56118 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Function, Integration and...

  13. 75 FR 18217 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Gene Therapy for Urea Disorders... prior to the meeting due to the timing limitations imposed by the review and funding cycle. (Catalogue...

  14. 75 FR 19980 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Gene Therapy for Urea Cycle Disorders. Date: April 30, 2010. Time: 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications... prior to the meeting due to the timing limitations imposed by the review and funding cycle. (Catalogue...

  15. 76 FR 65517 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-21

    ...) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the... Suites Hotel, 4300 Military Road, Washington, DC 20015. Date: November 3, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Embassy Suites Hotel, 4300 Military Road...

  16. 76 FR 69746 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the..., 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: The Dupont Hotel.... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: The Dupont Hotel, 1500 New Hampshire Avenue NW...

  17. 76 FR 52671 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the contract proposals... Supervised Practice Driving on Driving Performance Among Newly Licensed Teen Drivers. Date: September 15...

  18. 78 FR 11660 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Prevention of Cardiovascular Birth Defects. Date: March 12, 2013. Time: 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To... Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Peter Zelazowski, Ph.D...

  19. 76 FR 76169 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    .... Date: December 14, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To provide concept review of proposed concept review. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone...

  20. 77 FR 5036 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    .... Date: February 15, 2012. Time: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To evaluate concept review. Place: National... provisions set forth in sections 552b(c)(4) and 552b(c)(6), Title 5 U.S.C., as amended. The concept review... patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the concept review, the...

  1. Old and New Generation Music and Musicians Exemplified Eunice U. I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    pointers to nation's identity, revenue generators, social and health promoters, moral ... sanitize, soothe, heal, exorcize, criticize, and acculturate, they among other things ... Nzewi, (2007) stresses that, ... Making musical sense, which is an intellectual .... meant to be given out in marriage, a treasure that would eventually go to ...

  2. 77 FR 76057 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to space available. A portion of this meeting... attendance at the open session of Council, additional seating will be available in the meeting overflow rooms...: December 18, 2012. Michelle Trout, Program Analyst, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc...

  3. 78 FR 27408 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to space available. A portion of this meeting... attendance at the open session of Council, additional seating will be available in the meeting overflow rooms...). Dated: May 3, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program Analyst, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR...

  4. 78 FR 18998 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 DSR-H MR 1. Date: April 23... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  5. 75 FR 7484 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d...: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Changing Parental Relationships and Child Well-Being. Date: March 5, 2010. Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

  6. 77 FR 37421 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; PMTCT. Date: July 17-18, 2012. Time... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5b01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  7. 77 FR 33473 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 DSR-W 90. Date: June 26, 2012... Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01...

  8. 77 FR 5031 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Developmental... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01-G, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  9. 75 FR 49500 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Pediatrics Subcommittee. Date: October... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  10. 75 FR 36100 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel National Childrens Study. Date: July..., Scientific Review Administrator, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  11. 75 FR 26761 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Asymmetric Robotic Gait Training and... Review Administrator, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  12. 76 FR 61719 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group, Developmental Biology Subcommittee... Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01-G, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-435...

  13. 77 FR 61419 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel. Date: October 30, 2012. Time: 3:00 p... Institute Of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  14. 76 FR 61720 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, PAR-10-194, PAR10-203, PAR-11- 183... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01-G, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  15. 78 FR 18996 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Alexander Disease; Mechanisms... Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, 6100...

  16. 76 FR 76169 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Mentored Training in Executive... Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD...

  17. 76 FR 5595 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d...: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group, Biobehavioral and Behavioral... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  18. 77 FR 37422 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 DSR-Z 41 2. Date: July 19, 2012... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01...

  19. 77 FR 61421 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Pediatrics Subcommittee. Date: October... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  20. 78 FR 19498 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Biobehavioral and Behavioral Sciences... Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01...

  1. 77 FR 33474 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Academic-Community Partnership... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  2. 78 FR 18998 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Diet, Obesity.... Kandasamy, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child...

  3. 77 FR 61420 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Population Sciences Subcommittee. Date... National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01...

  4. 77 FR 19676 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 RRG-K 52 1, Rehabilitation Research Career Development Programs. Date: April 17, 2012. Time: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and...

  5. 77 FR 64817 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 DSR-Y 41 1. Date: November 15... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health And Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  6. 78 FR 12765 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Pediatrics Subcommittee. Date: March... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of, Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  7. 75 FR 36101 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel Slack and Slick Channels. Date: July..., PhD, Scientific Review Administrator, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child...

  8. 76 FR 67468 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Hypoxia in Development: Injury and Adaptation Mechanisms. Date: November 22, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To...

  9. 77 FR 5035 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child...

  10. 77 FR 64815 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 DSR-Z. Date: November 13, 2012... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01...

  11. 75 FR 16151 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(a) of the... Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 3A01, Bethesda, MD 20892, (301) 451... the meeting. Name of Committee: National Children's Study Advisory Committee. Date: April 27, 2010...

  12. 76 FR 43334 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Children in Rural Poverty. Date... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  13. 78 FR 50425 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ...: September 19, 2013, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: The agenda will include: 1) Update on program issues; 2... of the interested person. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxis, hotel, and airport shuttles, will be...

  14. 75 FR 54891 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ..., data management, and informatics systems; and continued discussions regarding qualification and... business or professional affiliation of the interested person. For additional information about the Federal... security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles...

  15. 75 FR 81283 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Support for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Update. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31... closed to the public. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.864, Population Research; 93.865, Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209...

  16. 78 FR 70311 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... of Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Male..., Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program, National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: November 19...

  17. 78 FR 66752 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Special Emphasis Panel; Preserving Male Fertility After Cancer Therapy by Kyle E. Orwig. Date: November 14....929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment...

  18. 77 FR 52337 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Network (Male Studies) September. Date: September 27, 2012. Time: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and....929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment...

  19. 77 FR 58855 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Male Germline. Date: October 17..., Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program...

  20. 75 FR 29774 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group Function, Integration, and Rehabilitation Sciences Subcommittee; Function, Integration and Rehabilitation Sciences Subcommittee. Date: June...

  1. 76 FR 35902 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... will be privacy and participant data, a revised sampling strategy, and a high-level discussion of the... applicable, the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. For additional information...

  2. 76 FR 35226 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... will be privacy and participant data, a revised sampling strategy, and a high-level discussion of the... applicable, the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. For additional information...

  3. 77 FR 43096 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Reading Comprehension, Math Problem Solving and Working Memory. Date: August 15, 2012. Time: 2:00 p.m. to... Nos. 93.864, Population Research; 93.865, Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for...

  4. 76 FR 40737 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... Following Spinal Cord Injury. Dates: July 18, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... Assistance Program Nos. 93.864, Population Research; 93.865, Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929...

  5. 78 FR 13359 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Science AIDS Research (R24). Date: March 21-22, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.864, Population Research; 93.865, Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment...

  6. 76 FR 37133 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Group; Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room...

  7. 76 FR 26736 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Systematic Review of Neonatal Medicine. Date: May 23, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications...

  8. 75 FR 64734 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Maternal Fetal Medicine Units... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... 64735

  9. 76 FR 53686 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... Development Council; NACHHD Subcommittee on Planning and Policy. Date: September 6, 2011. Closed: 9 a.m. to 10... National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council. The meeting will be closed to the public in... Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and...

  10. 78 FR 47328 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Asthma Cohort Support Contract. Date... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d..., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20892...

  11. 76 FR 71985 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Group, Research on Children in Military Families: The Impact of Parental Military Deployment and Reintegration on Child and Family Functioning... National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d...

  12. 78 FR 60294 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Vanguard Study and will discuss general data collection methods and retention strategy and methods. Place... the name, address, telephone number and when applicable, the business or professional affiliation of... visit. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.864, Population Research; 93.865...

  13. 75 FR 71449 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the disclosure of... 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate personal qualifications and performance, and competence of... include the name, address, telephone number and, when applicable, the business or professional affiliation...

  14. 76 FR 20694 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the disclosure of... 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate personal qualifications and performance, and competence of..., the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. In the interest of security, NIH...

  15. Old and New Generation Music and Musicians Exemplified Eunice U. I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    status, economic development, political system, cultural awareness, social integration, security ... messages of body movements” (36) therefore any music that lacks such ..... female child is as beneficial and productive as the male in the family.

  16. 78 FR 13363 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group; Function, Integration, and...

  17. 75 FR 39030 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel, Diabetes Risk Across Women's... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room...

  18. 77 FR 43344 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Boulevard, Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Child...

  19. 75 FR 26761 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Asymmetric Robotic Gait Training and... Review Administrator, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  20. 77 FR 16247 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; ZHD1 DSR-L 55 2. Date: April 10... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  1. 75 FR 36429 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Initial Review Group Obstetrics and Maternal-Fetal Biology... Institute of Child, Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  2. 75 FR 36100 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d...: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Geisha. Date: July 13... Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  3. 78 FR 12069 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Demographic/Behavioral Population... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd., Room 5B01, Bethesda...

  4. 78 FR 56240 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of... Committee: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Further...., Scientific Review Officer, Division of Scientific Review, National Institute of Child Health and Human...

  5. 77 FR 9674 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ..., ``Male Reproduction.'' Date: March 14, 2012. Time: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant..., Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program...

  6. 77 FR 14024 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... sections 552b(c)(4) and 552b(c)(6), Title 5 U.S.C., as amended. The contract proposals and the discussions... personal information concerning individuals associated with the contract proposals, the disclosure of which...- Stimulating Hormone Receptor Agonist for Thyroid Cancer (SBIR Contract) Date: March 28, 2012. Time: 3 p.m. to...

  7. 75 FR 37453 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel ``STEM CELLS''. Date: July 20, 2010... Nos. 93.864, Population Research; 93.865, Research for Mothers and Children; 93.929, Center for...

  8. 77 FR 296 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... the review and funding cycle. In the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxis, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  9. 75 FR 34462 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; Adolescent Medicine Trials Network... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d..., National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, 6100 Executive Blvd. Room 5b01, Bethesda, MD...

  10. 75 FR 4828 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d... Institute of Child Health and Human Development Special Emphasis Panel; The Ontogeny of Infant Detection of Inauthentic Emotion/Emotional Memories in Children: Combining Behavior and ERP. Date: February 25, 2010. Time...

  11. 78 FR 63518 - Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-3103; NRC-2010-0264] Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services, National Enrichment Facility, Eunice, New Mexico... Louisiana Energy Services (LES), LLC, National Enrichment Facility in Eunice, New Mexico, and has authorized...

  12. 77 FR 18272 - Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Facility Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-3103; NRC-2010-0264] Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Facility Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services LLC, National Enrichment Facility, Eunice... Louisiana Energy Services (LES), LLC, National enrichment Facility in Eunice, New Mexico, and has verified...

  13. 78 FR 23312 - Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services, National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-3103; NRC-2010-0264] Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services, National Enrichment Facility, Eunice, New Mexico..., National Enrichment Facility in Eunice, New Mexico, and has authorized the introduction of uranium...

  14. 77 FR 65729 - Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Facility Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 70-3103; NRC-2010-0264] Uranium Enrichment Fuel Cycle Facility Inspection Reports Regarding Louisiana Energy Services LLC, National Enrichment Facility, Eunice... Services (LES), LLC, National Enrichment Facility in Eunice, New Mexico, and has verified that cascades...

  15. Patterns of gestational weight gain and birthweight outcomes in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Fetal Growth Studies-Singletons: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Sarah J; Albert, Paul S; Kim, Sungduk; Grobman, William; Hinkle, Stefanie N; Newman, Roger B; Wing, Deborah A; Grantz, Katherine L

    2017-09-01

    Inadequate or excessive total gestational weight gain is associated with increased risks of small- and large-for-gestational-age births, respectively, but evidence is sparse regarding overall and trimester-specific patterns of gestational weight gain in relation to these risks. Characterizing the interrelationship between patterns of gestational weight gain across trimesters can reveal whether the trajectory of gestational weight gain in the first trimester sets the path for gestational weight gain in subsequent trimesters, thereby serving as an early marker for at-risk pregnancies. We sought to describe overall trajectories of gestational weight gain across gestation and assess the risk of adverse birthweight outcomes associated with the overall trajectory and whether the timing of gestational weight gain (first vs second/third trimester) is differentially associated with adverse outcomes. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of 2802 singleton pregnancies from 12 US prenatal centers (2009 through 2013). Small and large for gestational age were calculated using sex-specific birthweight references gain and separate first- and second-/third-trimester trajectories to assess tracking. Robust Poisson regression was used to estimate the relative risk of small- and large-for-gestational-age outcomes by the probability of trajectory membership. We tested whether relationships were modified by prepregnancy body mass index. There were 2779 women with a mean of 15 (SD 5) weights measured across gestation. Four distinct gestational weight gain trajectories were identified based on the lowest Bayesian information criterion value, classifying 10.0%, 41.8%, 39.2%, and 9.0% of the population from lowest to highest weight gain trajectories, with an inflection at 14 weeks. The average rate in each trajectory group from lowest to highest for 0-gaining trajectory resembled the Institute of Medicine recommendations and was designated as the reference with the other trajectories classified as low, moderate-high, or high. Accuracy of assignment was assessed and found to be high (median posterior probability 0.99, interquartile range 0.99-1.00). Compared with the referent trajectory, a low overall trajectory, but not other trajectories, was associated with a 1.55-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.25) and 1.58-fold (95% confidence interval, 0.88-2.82) increased risk of small-for-gestational-age gain tracked with later (≥14 weeks) gestational weight gain, only 49% (n = 127) of women in the low first-trimester trajectory group continued as low in the second/third trimester, and had a 1.59-fold increased risk of small for gestational age; for the other 51% (n = 129) of women without a subsequently low second-/third-trimester gestational weight gain trajectory, there was no increased risk of small for gestational age (relative risk, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-1.38). Prepregnancy body mass index did not modify the association between gestational weight gain trajectory and small for gestational age (P = 0.52) or large for gestational age (P = .69). Our findings are reassuring for women who experience weight loss or excessive weight gain in the first trimester; however, the risk of small or large for gestational age is significantly increased if women gain weight below or above the reference trajectory in the second/third trimester. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Dependable and Adaptable Networks and Services - Proceedings of the 13th Open European Summer School and IFIP TC6.6 Workshop, EUNICE 2007, Enschede, The Netherlands, July 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pras, Aiko; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed many developments in networking. Among others, wireless network technologies have become an important and constantly growing part of the Internet infrastructure, and increasingly smaller and more powerful computing devices with flexible connectivity have

  17. NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stephanie Dailey Senior Public Affairs Specialist Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute on Aging Meredith Daly Senior Media Relations Officer Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child ...

  18. 77 FR 59625 - NIH Evidence-Based Methodology Workshop on Polycystic Ovary; Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. Obesity also appears to worsen the condition. Costs to... Prevention and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. A...

  19. Balance Food and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Cancer ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  1. Newborn Screening: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more articles Reference Desk Glossary (National Center for Biotechnology Information) Find an Expert Eunice Kennedy Shriver National ... other than English on Newborn Screening NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns Screening Newborns' Hearing Now ...

  2. Reasons for discontinuation of implanon among users in Buffalo City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons for discontinuation of implanon among users in Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality, South Africa: a cross-sectional study. Khungelwa Patricia Mrwebi, Daniel Ter Goon, Eyitayo Omolara Owolabi, Oladele Vincent Adeniyi, Eunice Seekoe, Anthony Idowu Ajayi ...

  3. NIH NeuroBioBank

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH NeuroBioBank (NBB), supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Eunice Kennedy...

  4. Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences - Vol 15, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality evaluation of cassava-pigeon pea composite flour and the cookies · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Austin Ihemeje, Genevieve Chioma Uneanya, Nkiru Euphresia Odimegwu, Eunice Ogechi Echefu, 43-53 ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: McCune-Albright syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while other cells have the mutated version. This phenomenon is called mosaicism . The severity of this disorder ... 1 link) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difference in gene activation is caused by a phenomenon called genomic imprinting. When genomic imprinting reduces the ... 2 links) Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: Adrenal Gland Disorders National ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  8. Progress report: baseline monitoring of indicator species (butterflies) at tallgrass prairie restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Larry; Vidrine, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    This project provides baseline data of butterfly populations at two coastal prairie restoration sites in Louisiana, the Duralde Unit of Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge (hereafter, the Duralde site) and the Cajun Prairie Restoration Project in Eunice (hereafter, the Eunice site). In all, four distinct habitat types representing different planting methods were sampled. These data will be used to assess biodiversity and health of native grasslands and also provide a basis for adaptive management.

  9. Afrika Statistika - Vol 12, No 3 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Kumaraswamy G Exponentiated Gumbel type-2 distribution · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Idika E. Okorie, Anthony C. Akpanta, Johnson Ohakwe, David C. Chikezie, Eunice O. Obi, 1367-1396 ...

  10. 76 FR 55398 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... precision requirements or power calculations that justify the proposed sample size, the expected response... Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver...): ``Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery '' to OMB for...

  11. 76 FR 30731 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    .... Investigators at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development have... Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Section on Cellular Neurobiology, is...-Glucosidase Chaperones and Inhibitors for Treatment of Pompe Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Description of...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  13. Infant-Mother Attachment and Children's Friendship Quality: Maternal Mental-State Talk as an Intervening Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Nancy L.; Booth-Laforce, Cathryn; Wu, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing data from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we investigated mothers' talk about mental states during play with their 24-month-old children as a mechanism though which infant-mother attachment was associated with children's later…

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as preterm ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  16. Book Reviews

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994 and the rise to power of the African National Congress (ANC), led by the ... politics, economics and development, as well as gender mainstreaming. ... whether it has simply ushered in a black middle class whose socio-economic ... Debie Lebeau and Eunice Lipinge detail the role of women in Namibia's struggle.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  18. What Are the Factors That Put a Pregnancy at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of transmission to 2%. 11 Age Teen pregnancy. Pregnant teens are more likely to develop high blood pressure ... from https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/teen/dating-sex/Pages/Teenage-Pregnancy.aspx Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child ...

  19. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 15, No 18 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Luma Castro de Souza, Mara Regina Moitinho, Risely Ferraz de Almeida, Ellen Gleyce da Silva Lima, Leane Castro de Souza, Myriam Galvão Neves, Cândido Ferreira de Oliveira Neto, Glauco André dos Santos Nogueira, Maria Eunice Lima Rocha, Mayra Taniely Ribeiro Abade, Marlison Tavares Ávila, 731-739 ...

  20. Influence of composition of functional additives and deformation modes on flow behavior of polymer composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoprienko, N. N.; Rahimbaev, Sh M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the results of the influence of composition of functional water-soluble polymers and viscosity of domestic and foreign one-percent water solution polymer on flow parameters of cement and polymer test. It also gives the results of rheogoniometry of Eunice Granit tile adhesive used for large-size plates from natural stone and ceramic granite.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  4. 76 FR 76764 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... reached age 15 by December 31 of the survey year (the Young Adults) were interviewed about their work experiences, training, schooling, health, fertility, self-esteem, and other topics. Funding for the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult surveys is provided by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child...

  5. Placental Vascular Tree as Biomarker of Autism/ASD Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    use the fact that the same biochemistry that controls the branching of nerves also controls branching of blood vessels. Unlike the nerve networks in...Mercer BM, Thorp JM Jr, Malone FD, Harper M, Iams JD, Anderson GD. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  6. Researching College- and Career Ready Standards to Improve Student Outcomes: Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, August 19-20, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In August, IES worked with the National Science Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to convene a technical working group to discuss research objectives related to college- and career-ready standards in English language arts and mathematics. Forty people (including researchers,…

  7. Description of Lutzomyia bianchigalatiae n. sp. A sand fly within the subgenus Pintomyia Costa Lima 1932 (Diptera; Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade Filho, J D; Aguiar, G M; Dias, E S; Falcão, A L

    1999-01-01

    A new sand fly species is described based on males collected in Bananal, municipality of Mariana and the female from Sabará city, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Taxonomic remarks, geographic distribution and the description of new species are presented. The name Lutzomyia (Pintomyia) bianchigalatiae is in honour of Dr Eunice Aparecida Bianchi Galati, friend and researcher at the Faculdade de Saúde Pública, Universidade de São Paulo.

  8. The psychological toll of slum living—an assessment of mental health, disability, and slum-related adversities in Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ramnath Subbaraman, MD

    2014-05-01

    Funding: The Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program at Vanderbilt (R24 TW007988, Harvard T32 post-doctoral clinical research fellowship (NIAID AI 007433, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (5R24HD047879, the National Institutes of Health (5T32HD007163, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

  9. St. John Health integrating new corporate identity, brand. Brand/logo to be rolled out over two-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    St. John Health, Warren, Mich., is integrating a new corporate identity and brand strategy for its network of nine wholly-owned and two affiliated hospital, along with more than 100 physician offices and specialty centers in southeast Michigan. "A new identity is a great rallying cry. It automatically says. 'We have a new mission. We have a new system. We are reaching new people,'" said Eunice O'Loughlan, VP, corporate communications for St. John Health.

  10. Quezada-Lazaro et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rodrígo Quezada-Lázaro,1 Eunice A. Fernández-Zuñiga,1 Abraham García,1. Elvira Garza-González,2 Laura Alvarez,3 María del ..... Camacho-Corona, M. R., Ramírez-Cabrera, M. A., González-Santiago, O., Garza-González, E.; de Paz Palacios, I., Luna-Herrera, J. (2008). Activity against drug resistant-tuberculosis strains ...

  11. Monoclonal Antibody Fragments for Targeting Therapeutics to Growth Plate Cartilage | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have discovered monoclonal antibodies that bind to matrilin-3, a protein specifically expressed in cartilage tissue, that could be used for treating or inhibiting growth plate disorders, such as a skeletal dysplasia or short stature. The monoclonal antibodies can also be used to target therapeutic agents, such as anti-arthritis agents, to cartilage tissue. NICHD seeks statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize treatment of skeletal disorders using targeting antibodies.

  12. Plasmonic Bowtie Antenna Nanolaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-06

    OL.36.002447 Kang Ding, Zhicheng Liu, Leijun Yin, Hua Wang, Ruibin Liu, Martin T. Hill, Milan J. H. Marell, Peter J. van Veldhoven, Richard No?tzel, C...Eunice S. P. Leong, Barry Smalbrugge, Youcai Zhu, Minghua Sun, Peter J. van Veldhoven, Erik Jan Geluk, Fouad Karouta, Yok-Siang Oei, Richard ...lasers,” Nature Photonics, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 395–399, Apr. 2010. [8] A. V. Krishnamoorthy, K. W. Goossen , W. Jan, X. Zheng, R. Ho, G. Li, R. Rozier, F

  13. Antenatal Testing – A Reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Caroline; Freeman, Roger K.; Spong, Catherine Y.

    2009-01-01

    In August 2007, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Academy of Pediatrics cosponsored a 2-day workshop to reassess the body of evidence supporting antepartum assessment of fetal well-being, identify key gaps in the evidence, and formulate recommendations for further research. Participants included experts in obstetrics and fetal physiology, and representatives from relevant stakeholder groups and organizations. This article is a summary of the discussions at the workshop, including synopses of oral presentations on the epidemiology of stillbirth and fetal neurological injury, fetal physiology, techniques for antenatal monitoring, and maternal and fetal indications for monitoring. Finally, a synthesis of recommendations for further research compiled from three breakout workgroups is presented. PMID:19300336

  14. Inspiring Lecturers: Sharing E-Learning Practice through European Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Sarah; Godsk, Mikkel; Andersen, Majbrit Vandsø

    2009-01-01

    Sharing best practice in e-learning, when undertaken as an active process, can provide valuable insights, with a real capacity to inspire. This has been our experience in collecting European university e-learning case studies. How this was achieved is the focus of this paper, which discusses...... collaboration, using a database and a weblog (EUNIC, 2008). Some examples of the case studies are provided, with suggestions of ways to develop this process further....... a consistent approach to transferring knowledge that might be followed and developed by others. We will outline a methodology for sharing best practices of e-learning. We will explain how these cases, rather like short stories, were identified, gathered and communicated by the EUNIS ELearning Task Force...

  15. Novel mobbing strategies of a fish population against a sessile annelid predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, Jose; Haag-Wackernagel, Daniel

    2016-09-12

    When searching for food, foraging fishes expose themselves to hidden predators. The strategies that maximize the survival of foraging fishes are not well understood. Here, we describe a novel type of mobbing behaviour displayed by foraging Scolopsis affinis. The fish direct sharp water jets towards the hidden sessile annelid predator Eunice aphroditois (Bobbit worm). We recognized two different behavioural roles for mobbers (i.e., initiator and subsequent participants). The first individual to exhibit behaviour indicating the discovery of the Bobbit directed, absolutely and per time unit, more water jets than the subsequent individuals that joined the mobbing. We found evidence that the mobbing impacted the behaviour of the Bobbit, e.g., by inducing retraction. S. affinis individuals either mob alone or form mobbing groups. We speculate that this behaviour may provide social benefits for its conspecifics by securing foraging territories for S. affinis. Our results reveal a sophisticated and complex behavioural strategy to protect against a hidden predator.

  16. Um palpite sobre a imigração nas Ciências Sociais de São Paulo: três décadas, duas perspectivas e uma cisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas de Toledo Piza

    2012-06-01

    ainda preocupada com a mudança cultural, mas rejeitando a teoria da aculturação. Essa visão alternativa e crítica surge na Universidade de São Paulo, pelas mãos de Eunice Durham. O artigo advoga que essa ruptura é semelhante (e na verdade guarda causas em comum à ruptura sofrida pelos “estudos de comunidade”, também introduzidos por Willems, mas contrastados com um modelo alternativo, por alunos de Florestan Fernandes, preocupados com o desenvolvimento da sociedade capitalista no Brasil e com a formação da sociedade de classes

  17. On-Line Enrichment Monitor (OLEM) Phase II Final Report Techniques and Equipment for Safeguards at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younkin, James R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garner, James R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Over the last five years, OLEM has been a collaborative development effort involving the IAEA, LANL, ORNL, URENCO, and the NNSA. The collective team has completed the following: design and modelling, software development, hardware integration, testing with the ORNL UF6 Flow Loop, a field trial at the Urenco facility in Almelo, the Netherlands, and a Demonstration at the Urenco USA facility in Eunice, New Mexico. This combined effort culminated in the deployment of several OLEM collection nodes in Iran. These OLEM units are one unattended monitoring system component of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action allowing the International Atomic Energy Agency to verify Iran’s compliance with the enrichment production aspects of the agreement.

  18. Obesity Is in the Eye of the Beholder: BMI and Socioeconomic Outcomes across Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Maralani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997, and also data from Add Health, a program project directed by Kathleen Mullan Harris and designed by J. Richard Udry, Peter S. Bearman, and Kathleen Mullan Harris at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and funded by grant P01-HD31921 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations. Special acknowledgment is due Ronald R. Rindfuss and Barbara Entwisle for assistance in the original design. Information on how to obtain the Add Health data files is available on the Add Health website (http://www.cpc.unc.edu/addhealth. No direct support was received from grant P01-HD31921 for this analysis.

  19. A aparição do demônio no Catulé The demon's apparition in Catulé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Castaldi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Castaldi faz uma "descrição densa" da tragédia ocorrida no município de Malacacheta, em Minas Gerais, na Fazenda São João da Mata, no ano de 1955. Em abril desse ano, quatro crianças foram assassinadas por um grupo de parceiros convertidos à Igreja Adventista da Promessa, por estarem, segundo acreditavam, possuídas pelo diabo. Em seguida ao fato, por iniciativa conjunta da revista Anhembi, do Instituto Nacional de Estudos Pedagógicos e do Departamento de Sociologia da Faculdade de Filosofia da USP, o sociólogo, a antropóloga Eunice Ribeiro (depois Durham e a psicóloga Carolina Martuscelli seguiram para o local com o objetivo de explicar o ocorrido, ali permanecendo entre 11 de julho e 8 de agosto. O texto relaciona o fato às mudanças sociais que teriam desestruturado o grupo, dialogando diretamente com a tese Os parceiros do Rio Bonito, defendida por Antonio Candido em 1954.Carlos Castaldi provides a 'dense description' of the tragedy that took place in the municipality of Malacacheta, in Minas Gerais, on the São João da Mata Farm in 1955. In April of that year, four children were murdered by a group of sharecroppers converted to the Adventist Church of the Promise, believing that the children had become possessed by the devil. After the incident, a joint initiative of the magazine Anhembi, the National Institute of Pedagogical Studies and the Department of Sociology of the São Paulo University Faculty of Philosophy led to the visit of a team formed by sociologist Carlos Castaldi, anthropologist Eunice Ribeiro (later Durham and psychologist Carolina Martuscelli, who stayed at the locale from July 11th to August 8th with the aim of discovering the reasons behind the event. The text relates the incident to the social changes that had led to the destructuring of the group, dialoguing closely with the doctoral thesis The sharecroppers of the Bonito River, completed by Antonio Candido in 1954.

  20. What we have learned about scheduling elective repeat cesarean delivery at term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tita, Alan T N

    2016-08-01

    The optimal timing of delivery in the setting of various clinical conditions and scenarios remains one of the most common questions for obstetric providers. Over the past 5-10 years, the optimal timing of delivery at term, particularly for elective repeat cesareans, has been the subject of considerable investigation and discussion. There is an increasing consensus that when women opt for an elective repeat cesarean delivery, it should be performed at term rather than preterm. The recent redefinition of the "term" period into early term (37-38 weeks), full-term (39-40 weeks), late term (41 weeks), and post term designations (≥42 weeks) underscores observed heterogeneity in outcomes following delivery at term. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists currently recommends that elective repeat cesarean delivery be performed at full-term. Herein, the available data to support this recommendation regarding timing of elective repeat cesarean delivery are reviewed, including contributions from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Debbie S; Kirkendall, Eric S; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Shedding Light on the Mechanisms Underlying Health Disparities Through Community Participatory Methods: The Stress Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Schafer, Peter; Lanzi, Robin Gaines; Clark-Kauffman, Elizabeth; Raju, Tonse N. K.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2015-01-01

    Health disparities are large and persistent gaps in the rates of disease and death between racial/ethnic and socioeconomic status subgroups in the population. Stress is a major pathway hypothesized to explain such disparities. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development formed a community/research collaborative—the Community Child Health Network—to investigate disparities in maternal and child health in five high-risk communities. Using community participation methods, we enrolled a large cohort of African American/Black, Latino/Hispanic, and non-Hispanic/White mothers and fathers of newborns at the time of birth and followed them over 2 years. A majority had household incomes near or below the federal poverty level. Home interviews yielded detailed information regarding multiple types of stress such as major life events and many forms of chronic stress including racism. Several forms of stress varied markedly by racial/ethnic group and income, with decreasing stress as income increased among Caucasians but not among African Americans; other forms of stress varied by race/ethnicity or poverty alone. We conclude that greater sophistication in studying the many forms of stress and community partnership is necessary to uncover the mechanisms underlying health disparities in poor and ethnic-minority families and to implement community health interventions. PMID:26173227

  3. Failure to Thrive in the Context of Carney Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amit; Auerbach, Adi; Bonella, Belen; Zavras, Phaedon D; Belyavskaya, Elena; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Meir, Karen; Weiss, Ram; Daum, Hagit; Lodish, Maya B; Gillis, David; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a rare syndrome associated with multiple tumors and several other unique manifestations. We describe the clinical, genetic, and laboratory findings in a cohort of patients with CNC and failure to thrive (FTT). A retrospective case series of pediatric patients with CNC presenting with FTT. We describe a patient with infantile Cushing syndrome (CS) who presented with severe FTT and liver disease; the patient was subsequently diagnosed with CNC. This led to the realization that at least 10 other patients with CNC and FTT have been investigated in the last 22 years at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Four of those had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), 2 had cardiac myxomas, and 3 had liver disease. Pediatric patients with CNC may present with FTT whose primary cause is variable and includes CS due to PPNAD, hepatic involvement, and other manifestations of CNC. FTT due to liver disease and/or other causes is a unique new presentation of this rare syndrome with which clinicians need to be familiar. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Association of bleeding and thrombosis with outcome in Extracorporeal Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Heidi J.; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Holubkov, Richard; Moler, Frank W.; Shanley, Thomas; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathy; Berg, Robert A.; Berger, John; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher; Harrison, Richard; Doctor, Allan; Rycus, Peter; Dean, J Michael; Jenkins, Tammara; Nicholson, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective Changes in technology and increased reports of successful extracorporeal life support (ECLS) use in patient populations such as influenza, cardiac arrest and adults are leading to expansion of ECLS. Major limitations to ECLS expansion remain bleeding and thrombosis. These complications are the most frequent causes of death and morbidity. As a pilot project to provide baseline data for a detailed evaluation of bleeding and thrombosis in the current era, ECLS patients were analyzed from eight centers in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). Study design Retrospective analysis of patients (50 mg/dL) (10%; n=177). Among patients with CDH, bleeding and thrombosis occurred in, respectively, 45% (n=118) and 60% (n=159), Bleeding events were associated with reduced survival (RR 0.62; 95%CI: 0.46, 0.86) although thrombotic events were not (RR 0.92; 95%CI: 0.67, 1.26). Conclusions Bleeding and thrombosis remain common complications in patients undergoing ECLS. Further research to reduce or eliminate bleeding and thrombosis is indicated to help improve patient outcome. PMID:25647124

  5. Pipeline for Contraceptive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blithe, Diana L.

    2016-01-01

    The high rates of unplanned pregnancy reflect unmet need for effective contraceptive methods for women, especially for individuals with health risks such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions that may contraindicate use of an estrogen-containing product. Improvements in safety, user convenience, acceptability and availability of products remain important goals of the contraceptive development program. Another important goal is to minimize the impact of the products on the environment. Development of new methods for male contraception has the potential to address many of these issues with regard to safety for women who have contraindications to effective contraceptive methods but want to protect against pregnancy. It also will address a huge unmet need for men who want to control their fertility. Products under development for men would not introduce eco-toxic hormones in the waste water. Investment in contraceptive research to identify new products for women has been limited in the pharmaceutical industry relative to investment in drug development for other indications. Pharmaceutical R&D for male contraception was active in the 1990’s but was abandoned over a decade ago. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) has supported a contraceptive development program since 1969. Through a variety of programs including research grants and contracts, NICHD has developed a pipeline of new targets/products for male and female contraception. A number of lead candidates are under evaluation in the NICHD Contraceptive Clinical Trials Network (CCTN) (1–3). PMID:27523300

  6. Shedding Light on the Mechanisms Underlying Health Disparities Through Community Participatory Methods: The Stress Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel Schetter, Christine; Schafer, Peter; Lanzi, Robin Gaines; Clark-Kauffman, Elizabeth; Raju, Tonse N K; Hillemeier, Marianne M

    2013-11-01

    Health disparities are large and persistent gaps in the rates of disease and death between racial/ethnic and socioeconomic status subgroups in the population. Stress is a major pathway hypothesized to explain such disparities. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development formed a community/research collaborative-the Community Child Health Network-to investigate disparities in maternal and child health in five high-risk communities. Using community participation methods, we enrolled a large cohort of African American/Black, Latino/Hispanic, and non-Hispanic/White mothers and fathers of newborns at the time of birth and followed them over 2 years. A majority had household incomes near or below the federal poverty level. Home interviews yielded detailed information regarding multiple types of stress such as major life events and many forms of chronic stress including racism. Several forms of stress varied markedly by racial/ethnic group and income, with decreasing stress as income increased among Caucasians but not among African Americans; other forms of stress varied by race/ethnicity or poverty alone. We conclude that greater sophistication in studying the many forms of stress and community partnership is necessary to uncover the mechanisms underlying health disparities in poor and ethnic-minority families and to implement community health interventions. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Effect of handedness on auditory attentional performance in ADHD students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt SL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sergio L Schmidt,1,2 Ana Lucia Novais Carvaho,3 Eunice N Simoes2 1Department of Neurophysiology, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 2Neurology Department, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 3Department of Psychology, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, Brazil Abstract: The relationship between handedness and attentional performance is poorly understood. Continuous performance tests (CPTs using visual stimuli are commonly used to assess subjects suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, auditory CPTs are considered more useful than visual ones to evaluate classroom attentional problems. A previous study reported that there was a significant effect of handedness on students’ performance on a visual CPT. Here, we examined whether handedness would also affect CPT performance using only auditory stimuli. From an initial sample of 337 students, 11 matched pairs were selected. Repeated ANOVAs showed a significant effect of handedness on attentional performance that was exhibited even in the control group. Left-handers made more commission errors than right-handers. The results were interpreted considering that the association between ADHD and handedness reflects that consistent left-handers are less lateralized and have decreased interhemispheric connections. Auditory attentional data suggest that left-handers have problems in the impulsive/hyperactivity domain. In ADHD, clinical therapeutics and rehabilitation must take handedness into account because consistent sinistrals are more impulsive than dextrals. Keywords: attention, ADHD, consistent left-handers, auditory attention, continuous performance test

  8. Sexual function in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter A; Christman, Gregory M; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Schlaff, William; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2017-08-01

    While female sexual dysfunction is a frequent occurrence, characteristics in infertile women are not well delineated. Furthermore, the impact of infertility etiology on the characteristics in women with differing androgen levels observed in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility has not been assessed. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of sexual dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility. A secondary data analysis was performed on 2 of Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Cooperative Reproductive Medicine Networks clinical trials: Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Study II and Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations From Ovarian Stimulation. Both protocols assessed female sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory and the Female Sexual Distress Scale. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome had higher weight and body mass index than women with unexplained infertility (each P polycystic ovary syndrome. The mean Female Sexual Function Inventory total score increased slightly as the free androgen index increased, mainly as a result of the desire subscore. This association was more pronounced in the women with unexplained infertility. Reproductive-age women with infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility, despite phenotypic and biochemical differences in androgenic manifestations, do not manifest clinically significant differences in sexual function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Conference Proceedings: “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S.; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L.; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reeves, Roger H.; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F.; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Maddox, Yvonne T.

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks,” was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. PMID:21835664

  10. Down syndrome: national conference on patient registries, research databases, and biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Reeves, Roger H; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R B; Maddox, Yvonne T

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, "Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks," was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cushing's syndrome: epidemiology and developments in disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma ST

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Susmeeta T Sharma,1 Lynnette K Nieman,1 Richard A Feelders2 1Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Early diagnosis and treatment of Cushing’s syndrome is associated with a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Clinical presentation can be highly variable, and establishing the diagnosis can often be difficult. Surgery (resection of the pituitary or ectopic source of adrenocorticotropic hormone, or unilateral or bilateral adrenalectomy remains the optimal treatment in all forms of Cushing’s syndrome, but may not always lead to remission. Medical therapy (steroidogenesis inhibitors, agents that decrease adrenocorticotropic hormone levels or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists and pituitary radiotherapy may be needed as an adjunct. A multidisciplinary approach, long-term follow-up, and treatment modalities customized to each individual are essential for optimal control of hypercortisolemia and management of comorbidities. Keywords: Cushing’s syndrome, hypercortisolemia, treatment, epidemiology

  12. Propylthiouracil (PTU Hepatoxicity in Children and Recommendations for Discontinuation of Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Rivkees

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylthiouracil (PTU was introduced for clinical use in July 1947 for Graves' disease (GD treatment. Over the 60 years that this medication has been used, reports of PTU-related liver failure and death have accumulated. On October 28, 2008, an expert panel evaluated PTU drug safety in children at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD It is estimated that about 4000 pediatric patients per year with GD are being treated with antithyroid drugs (ATDs in the United States, and up to 30% of pediatric patients with GD are being treated with PTU. The risk of severe PTU-induced liver failure is estimated as 1 in 2000–4000 children. The number of children developing reversible PTU-induced liver injury is estimated to be at least 1 in 200. Routine biochemical surveillance of liver function and hepatocellular integrity is not useful in identifying children who will develop liver failure. Children appear to be at higher risk for PTU-induced liver injury than adults. PTU should not be used as first line therapy for the treatment of GD in children. Current PTU use in children taking this medication should be stopped in favor of alternate therapies.

  13. Samobójstwo estetyczne. Na marginesie Quo vadis Henryka Sienkiewicza (ESTHETICAL SUICIDE. ON THE MARGIN OF 'QUO VADIS?' BY H. SIENKIEWICZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Ziemiński

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the Petronius' suicide (as a character of 'Quo vadis?' in the context of ancient and Christian concept of death and dying. Petronius' death arranged as a piece of art (to realize the idea of beauty is an icon of the ancient Rome's passing culture. It is a theatre of death and that is why it can not be the pattern to follow or any resolving of human existential mortality problem. Better attitude to death is Eunice's suicide committed for love as absolute value. Petronius' conduct and way of living was dependent on philosophy of Stoics, Epicureans, and first of all Skeptics. In this context we can see weakness of ancient philosophy as 'meditatio mortis'. Esthetical suicide as a final act of life is only human and it does not point to any eternal value. On the contrary, the death of the Christian martyrs reduced to bloody performance on the arena, points to transcendent aspect of human life and dying. According to Petronius, the way of dying is the best value criterion of any religious or philosophical doctrine and you can die with dignity even if you do not believe in Christ or eternal life. He tried to demonstrate the best values of Rome but his theatric death was rather empty gesture than the evidence of death's majesty. Christians' martyr death for faith seems more authentic than Petronius' esthetical suicide.

  14. The impact of tobacco use on preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Robert L; Zhao, Yuan; Klebanoff, Mark A; Hauth, John C; Caritis, Steve N; Carey, J Christopher; Wapner, Ronald J; Iams, Jay D; Leveno, Kenneth J; Miodovnik, Menachem; Sibai, Baha; Van Dorsten, J Peter; Dombrowski, Mitchell P; O'Sullivan, Mary J; Langer, Oded

    2013-03-01

    To determine if tobacco use increases the incidence of preterm premature rupture of the membranes (pPROM) or alters perinatal outcomes after pPROM. This is a secondary analysis of the databases of three completed Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development-supported Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network studies. Self-reported tobacco exposure data was obtained. Its relationship with the incidence of pPROM and associated neonatal outcome measures were assessed. There was no difference in the incidence of pPROM when comparing nonsmokers to those using tobacco. Although a trend was seen between the incidence of pPROM and the amount smoked, this did not reach statistical significance. Among the patients with pPROM, the use of tobacco was not associated with an increase in perinatal morbidity. Our data do not support a significant relationship between tobacco use and pPROM. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. A Genetic Basis for Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronia, Lisa M.; Martin, Cecilia; Welt, Corrine K.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Quinton, Richard; Thambundit, Apisadaporn; Avbelj, Magdalena; Dhruvakumar, Sadhana; Plummer, Lacey; Hughes, Virginia A.; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Boepple, Paul A.; Sidis, Yisrael; Crowley, William F.; Martin, Kathryn A.; Hall, Janet E.; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea is a reversible form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency commonly triggered by stressors such as excessive exercise, nutritional deficits, or psychological distress. Women vary in their susceptibility to inhibition of the reproductive axis by such stressors, but it is unknown whether this variability reflects a genetic predisposition to hypothalamic amenorrhea. We hypothesized that mutations in genes involved in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a congenital form of GnRH deficiency, are associated with hypothalamic amenorrhea. METHODS We analyzed the coding sequence of genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in 55 women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and performed in vitro studies of the identified mutations. RESULTS Six heterozygous mutations were identified in 7 of the 55 patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea: two variants in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene FGFR1 (G260E and R756H), two in the prokineticin receptor 2 gene PROKR2 (R85H and L173R), one in the GnRH receptor gene GNRHR (R262Q), and one in the Kall-mann syndrome 1 sequence gene KAL1 (V371I). No mutations were found in a cohort of 422 controls with normal menstrual cycles. In vitro studies showed that FGFR1 G260E, FGFR1 R756H, and PROKR2 R85H are loss-of-function mutations, as has been previously shown for PROKR2 L173R and GNRHR R262Q. CONCLUSIONS Rare variants in genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are found in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, suggesting that these mutations may contribute to the variable susceptibility of women to the functional changes in GnRH secretion that characterize hypothalamic amenorrhea. Our observations provide evidence for the role of rare variants in common multifactorial disease. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00494169.) PMID:21247312

  16. Assessment of insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, Dale William; Bailey, Amelia Purser; Pastore, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    To analyze insulin resistance (IR) and determine the need for a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for the identification of IR and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in lean nondiabetic women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This was a cross-sectional analysis of treatment-naive women with PCOS who enrolled in a university-based clinical trial. Nondiabetic women with PCOS based on the Eunice Kennedy Shriven National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) definition, aged 18-43 years and weighing ≤113 kg, were evaluated. Glucose and insulin levels were assessed at times 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g glucose load. Lean was defined as body mass index (BMI) women was studied. The prevalence of IR was 0% among lean women vs. 21% among nonlean subjects based on fasting insulin I(0) and 40%-68% based on two different homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) cutoff points (p women with IR had a BMI ≥ 28. Controlling for age and race, BMI explained over 57% of the variation in insulin fasting (I(o)), glucose fasting/Io (G(o)/I(o)), the qualitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and HOMA and was a highly significant predictor of these outcomes (p lean PCOS women had IGT based on a 2-hour OGTT, and no lean subjects had IGT based on their fasting blood glucose. Diabetes mellitus, IGT, and IR are far less common in young lean women with PCOS compared with obese women with PCOS. These data imply that it is unnecessary to routinely perform either IR testing or 2-hour OGTT in lean women with PCOS; however, greater subject accumulation is needed to determine if OGTT is necessary in lean women with PCOS. BMI is highly predictive of both insulin and glucose levels in women with PCOS.

  17. Early working memory as a racially and ethnically neutral measure of outcome in extremely preterm children at 18-22 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Jean R; Duncan, Andrea Freeman; Bann, Carla M; Fuller, Janell; Hintz, Susan R; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D; Watterberg, Kristi L

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with executive function have been found in preterm children, resulting in difficulties with learning and school performance. This study evaluated the relationship of early working memory as measured by object permanence items to the cognitive and language scores on the Bayley Scales-III in a cohort of children born extremely preterm. Logistic regression models were conducted to compare object permanence scores derived from the Bayley Scales-III by race/ethnicity and maternal education, controlling for medical covariates. Extremely preterm toddlers (526), who were part of a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network's multi-center study, were evaluated at 18-22 months corrected age. Object permanence scores derived from the Bayley Developmental Scales were compared by race/ethnicity and maternal education, controlling for medical covariates. There were no significant differences in object permanence mastery and scores among the treatment groups after controlling for medical and social variables, including maternal education and race/ethnicity. Males and children with intraventricular hemorrhage, retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia were less likely to demonstrate object permanence mastery and had lower object permanence scores. Children who attained object permanence mastery had significantly higher Bayley Scales-III cognitive and language scores after controlling for medical and socio-economic factors. Our measure of object permanence is free of influence from race, ethnic and socio-economic factors. Adding this simple task to current clinical practice could help detect early executive function difficulties in young children. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Executive summary—Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development: Building a Consensus123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasté, Sorrel; Brabin, Bernard; Combs, Gerald; L'Abbe, Mary R; Wasantwisut, Emorn; Darnton-Hill, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The ability to develop evidence-based clinical guidance and effective programs and policies to achieve global health promotion and disease prevention goals depends on the availability of valid and reliable data. With specific regard to the role of food and nutrition in achieving those goals, relevant data are developed with the use of biomarkers that reflect nutrient exposure, status, and functional effect. A need exists to promote the discovery, development, and use of biomarkers across a range of applications. In addition, a process is needed to harmonize the global health community's decision making about what biomarkers are best suited for a given use under specific conditions and settings. To address these needs, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, organized a conference entitled “Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development: Building a Consensus,” which was hosted by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Partners included key multilateral, US agencies and public and private organizations. The assembly endorsed the utility of this initiative and the need for the BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) project to continue. A consensus was reached on the requirement to develop a process to inform the community about the relative strengths or weaknesses and specific applications of various biomarkers under defined conditions. The articles in this supplement summarize the deliberations of the 4 working groups: research, clinical, policy, and programmatic. Also described are content presentations on the harmonization processes, the evidence base for biomarkers for 5 case-study micronutrients, and new frontiers in science and technology. PMID:21733880

  19. Lutein and preterm infants with decreased concentrations of brain carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, Rohini; Kuchan, Matthew J; Sen, Sarbattama; Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2014-11-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are dietary carotenoids that may influence visual and cognitive development. The objective of this study was to provide the first data on distribution of carotenoids in the infant brain and compare concentrations in preterm and term infants. Voluntarily donated brain tissues from 30 infants who died during the first 1.5 years of life were obtained from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Brain and Tissue Bank. Tissues (hippocampus and prefrontal, frontal, auditory, and occipital cortices) were extracted using standard lipid extraction procedures and analyzed using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lutein, zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, and β-carotene were the major carotenoids found in the infant brain tissues. Lutein was the predominant carotenoid accounting for 59% of total carotenoids. Preterm infants (n = 8) had significantly lower concentrations of lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin in their brain compared with term infants (n = 22) despite similarity in postmenstrual age. Among formula-fed infants, preterm infants (n = 3) had lower concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin compared with term infants (n = 5). Brain lutein concentrations were not different between breast milk-fed (n = 3) and formula-fed (n = 5) term decedents. In contrast, term decedents with measurable brain cryptoxanthin, a carotenoid that is inherently low in formula, had higher brain lutein, suggesting that the type of feeding is an important determinant of brain lutein concentrations. These data reveal preferential accumulation and maintenance of lutein in the infant brain despite underrepresentation in the typical infant diet. Further investigation on the impact of lutein on neural development in preterm infants is warranted.

  20. Estimating Gestational Age From Ultrasound Fetal Biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupski, Daniel W; Owen, John; Kim, Sungduk; Fuchs, Karin M; Albert, Paul S; Grantz, Katherine L

    2017-08-01

    To compare the accuracy of a new formula with one developed in 1984 (and still in common use) and to develop and compare racial and ethnic-specific and racial and ethnic-neutral formulas. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Fetal Growth Studies-Singletons was a prospective cohort study that recruited women in four self-reported racial-ethnic groups-non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and Asian-with singleton gestations from 12 U.S. centers (2009-2013). Women with a certain last menstrual period confirmed by first-trimester ultrasonogram had longitudinal fetal measurements by credentialed study ultrasonographers blinded to the gestational age at their five follow-up visits. Regression analyses were performed with linear mixed models to develop gestational age estimating formulas. Repeated cross-validation was used for validation. The estimation error was defined as the mean squared difference between the estimated and observed gestational age and was used to compare the formulas' accuracy. The new formula estimated the gestational age (±2 SD) within ±7 days from 14 to 20 weeks of gestation, ±10 days from 21 to 27 weeks of gestation, and ±17 days from 28 to 40 weeks of gestation. The new formula performed significantly better than a formula developed in 1984 with an estimation error of 10.4 compared with 11.2 days from 21 to 27 weeks of gestation and 17.0 compared with 19.8 days at 28-40 weeks of gestation, respectively. Racial and ethnic-specific formulas did not outperform the racial and ethnic-neutral formula. The NICHD gestational age estimation formula is associated with smaller errors than a well-established historical formula. Racial and ethnic-specific formulas are not superior to a racial-ethnic-neutral one.

  1. Neonatal Glycemia and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Alsweiler, Jane M; Ansell, Judith M; Anstice, Nicola S; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gamble, Gregory D; Harris, Deborah L; Jacobs, Robert J; Jiang, Yannan; Paudel, Nabin; Signal, Matthew; Thompson, Benjamin; Wouldes, Trecia A; Yu, Tzu-Ying; Harding, Jane E

    2015-10-15

    Neonatal hypoglycemia is common and can cause neurologic impairment, but evidence supporting thresholds for intervention is limited. We performed a prospective cohort study involving 528 neonates with a gestational age of at least 35 weeks who were considered to be at risk for hypoglycemia; all were treated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of at least 47 mg per deciliter (2.6 mmol per liter). We intermittently measured blood glucose for up to 7 days. We continuously monitored interstitial glucose concentrations, which were masked to clinical staff. Assessment at 2 years included Bayley Scales of Infant Development III and tests of executive and visual function. Of 614 children, 528 were eligible, and 404 (77% of eligible children) were assessed; 216 children (53%) had neonatal hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, Hypoglycemia, when treated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of at least 47 mg per deciliter, was not associated with an increased risk of the primary outcomes of neurosensory impairment (risk ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 1.20; P=0.67) and processing difficulty, defined as an executive-function score or motion coherence threshold that was more than 1.5 SD from the mean (risk ratio, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.51; P=0.74). Risks were not increased among children with unrecognized hypoglycemia (a low interstitial glucose concentration only). The lowest blood glucose concentration, number of hypoglycemic episodes and events, and negative interstitial increment (area above the interstitial glucose concentration curve and below 47 mg per deciliter) also did not predict the outcome. In this cohort, neonatal hypoglycemia was not associated with an adverse neurologic outcome when treatment was provided to maintain a blood glucose concentration of at least 47 mg per deciliter. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.).

  2. Intranasal carbetocin reduces hyperphagia in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M; Miller, Jennifer; Angulo, Moris; Roof, Elizabeth; Reidy, Michael; Hatoum, Hind T; Willey, Richard; Bolton, Guy; Korner, Paul

    2018-06-21

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder of life-threatening hyperphagia, obesity, intellectual deficits, compulsivity, and other behavioral problems. The efficacy and safety of i.n. carbetocin, an oxytocin analog, was evaluated in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded trial in adolescents with PWS. Eligible patients aged 10-18 years with genetically confirmed PWS were randomized (1:1) to i.n. carbetocin or placebo 3 times daily for 14 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in parent/caregiver-rated Hyperphagia in PWS Questionnaire-Responsiveness (HPWSQ-R) total score. Secondary efficacy endpoints included HPWSQ-R behavior, drive, and severity domains; clinician-rated HPWSQ; Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Severity Scale; food domain of the Reiss Profile; and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale. Endpoints were assessed using analysis of covariance. Relationship between primary and secondary endpoints was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients. Safety was assessed throughout the study. Demographics and clinical characteristics were similar between treatment groups (carbetocin, n = 17; placebo, n = 20). Patients receiving carbetocin had statistically significant reductions in HPWSQ-R total score at study end (-15.6) versus patients receiving placebo (-8.9; P = 0.029); several secondary efficacy endpoints also demonstrated significant differences (P primary and secondary endpoints were highly correlated (P ≤ 0.0001). Incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar between treatment groups. I.n. carbetocin was well tolerated and improved hyperphagia and behavioral symptoms of PWS. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01968187FUNDING. The study was funded by Ferring Pharmaceuticals. Recruitment was aided by ongoing work in PWS performed through Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development grant U54 HD083211.

  3. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. van Emst

    1973-10-01

    Full Text Available - S.L. van der Wal, Eunice Thio, British policy in the Malay Peninsula 1880-1910. Volume I, The Southern and Central states, University of Malaya Press, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur 1969. - D.K. Bassett, C.M. Turnbull, The Straits Settlements 1826-67: Indian Presidency to Crown Colony. The Athlone Press, London 1972. pp. x, 428. - L. Sluimers, B.R. O’G. Anderson, Java in a time of revolution: Occupation and resistance 1944-1946. Ithaca enz., Cornell University Press, 1972. - C. van Dijk, Margo L. Lyon, Bases of conflict in rural Java. Research Monograph Series, Center for South and Southeast Asia Studies. University of California, Berkeley, California, December 1970. 79 p. - Brian L. Foster, H.L. Shorto, A dictionary of the Mon inscriptions from the sixth to the sixteenth centuries. London: Oxford University Press (London Oriental Series. Volume 24, 1971. 406 p. - E. Jansen Schoonhoven, Philip van Akkeren, Sri and Christ. A study of the indigenous church in East Java. Lutterworth Press, London 1970. 229 p. - P. van Emst, S.H. Udy, Work in traditional and modern society. Modernization of traditional societies series. Prentice Hall, Inc. Engelwood Cliffs, N.J., 1970. Pp. IX & 134, tables, figs. - J. van Baal, Marilyn Strathern, Women in between. Female roles in a male world: Mount Hagen, New Guinea. Seminar Press, London & New York 1972, 372 p. - P. van Emst, David Lewis, We, the navigators. The ancient art of landfinding in the Pacific. Australian National University Press, Canberra 1972. XVIII & 345 pp., 63 figs., 13 plates, 7 maps.

  4. Bridging Knowledge Gaps to Understand How Zika Virus Exposure and Infection Affect Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapogiannis, Bill G; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Hazra, Rohan; Spong, Catherine Y

    2017-05-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic has profoundly affected the lives of children and families across the Americas. As the number of children born with ZIKV-related complications continues to grow, the long-term developmental trajectory for these children and the effect on their families remains largely unknown. In September 2016, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and partner National Institutes of Health institutes convened a workshop to develop a research agenda to improve the evaluation, monitoring, and management of neonates, infants, or children affected by ZIKV and its complications. The agenda also aims to optimally address the prospective effect of ZIKV exposure on the developing child. The full clinical spectrum of congenital ZIKV syndrome has yet to be elucidated. In addition to the well-described anatomic and neurologic manifestations, clinicians are now describing infants with exaggerated primitive reflexes, epilepsy, acquired hydrocephalus and microcephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, gastrointestinal motility problems, and respiratory complications, such as pneumonia. While we are still learning more about the myriad clinical presentations in these severely affected children, it is also paramount to address the larger proportion of ZIKV-exposed infants who are asymptomatic at birth but, we assume, may develop problems later in life. The available evidence for neurologic, neurodevelopmental, neurobehavioral, auditory, and vision assessments and management for infants with congenital ZIKV syndrome was critically evaluated. Lessons from other congenital infections provide valuable clues about the complexities of management and the optimal approaches for evaluating, treating, and caring for the children, which include engaging and involving parents and caregivers in their treatment. Rigorous research is key to improving the identification of ZIKV-infected mothers and babies. Research also is critical to

  5. [No remedy for AIDS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M M

    1993-01-01

    Vila Mimosa, a site of street prostitution in Rio de Janeiro since the 1930s, is the place of work for over 2000 prostitution who charge an average of $3-4 per client. Several years ago the Association of Prostitutes of Rio de Janeiro (APRJ) was founded by Eunice Coelho Reis. APRJ membership has increased steadily and its list of accomplishments is impressive. A state hospital performs free medical examinations of APRJ members, and the Brazilian family planning association BEMFAM provides 180,000 condoms each month. AIDS control projects have also been successful, and no APRJ members have contracted HIV infection. In the country with the 4th highest rate of infection, the rigid norm of condom use adopted by the prostitutes of Vila Mimosa has led to effective prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. The prostitutes report however that a large proportion of their clients resist condom use, sometimes violently. The proportion of seropositive individuals who are women has been rising steadily. Family Health International estimates that the proportion of new cases among women has risen from 25% in 1990 to 40% at present. AIDS prevention campaigns are attempting to persuade women to "negotiate" condom use during sex. But power relations between the sexes place women at a disadvantage. Men often make the sexual decisions. Socialization patterns of females in Latin America are oriented to maternity. Passive sexual behavior has become a primary obstacle to adoption of safer sex practices. The World Health Organization estimates that currently 9-11 million persons are latent carriers of the HIV virus. Prostitution originating in poverty and unemployment, the vulnerability of adolescents who begin their sexual lives with little knowledge of contraception or sexually transmitted diseases, and the lack of sex education that transcends the biological to consider interpersonal relations are all factors that hinder AIDS prevention.

  6. Gigantism and acromegaly due to Xq26 microduplications and GPR101 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Giampaolo; Daly, Adrian F; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Larco, Darwin O; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Szarek, Eva; Leal, Letícia F; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Castermans, Emilie; Villa, Chiara; Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Chittiboina, Prashant; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Shah, Nalini; Metzger, Daniel; Lysy, Philippe A; Ferrante, Emanuele; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Lodish, Maya; Horvath, Anelia; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Manning, Allison D; Levy, Isaac; Keil, Margaret F; Sierra, Maria de la Luz; Palmeira, Leonor; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Naves, Luciana A; Jamar, Mauricette; Bours, Vincent; Wu, T John; Choong, Catherine S; Bertherat, Jerome; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter; Farrell, William E; Barlier, Anne; Quezado, Martha; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S; Wess, Jurgen; Costanzi, Stefano; Liu, Pengfei; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-12-18

    Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. We performed clinical and genetic studies of samples obtained from 43 patients with gigantism and then sequenced an implicated gene in samples from 248 patients with acromegaly. We observed microduplication on chromosome Xq26.3 in samples from 13 patients with gigantism; of these samples, 4 were obtained from members of two unrelated kindreds, and 9 were from patients with sporadic cases. All the patients had disease onset during early childhood. Of the patients with gigantism who did not carry an Xq26.3 microduplication, none presented before the age of 5 years. Genomic characterization of the Xq26.3 region suggests that the microduplications are generated during chromosome replication and that they contain four protein-coding genes. Only one of these genes, GPR101, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor, was overexpressed in patients' pituitary lesions. We identified a recurrent GPR101 mutation (p.E308D) in 11 of 248 patients with acromegaly, with the mutation found mostly in tumors. When the mutation was transfected into rat GH3 cells, it led to increased release of growth hormone and proliferation of growth hormone-producing cells. We describe a pediatric disorder (which we have termed X-linked acrogigantism [X-LAG]) that is caused by an Xq26.3 genomic duplication and is characterized by early-onset gigantism resulting from an excess of growth hormone. Duplication of GPR101 probably causes X-LAG. We also found a recurrent mutation in GPR101 in some adults with acromegaly. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.).

  7. A genetic basis for functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronia, Lisa M; Martin, Cecilia; Welt, Corrine K; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Quinton, Richard; Thambundit, Apisadaporn; Avbelj, Magdalena; Dhruvakumar, Sadhana; Plummer, Lacey; Hughes, Virginia A; Seminara, Stephanie B; Boepple, Paul A; Sidis, Yisrael; Crowley, William F; Martin, Kathryn A; Hall, Janet E; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2011-01-20

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea is a reversible form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency commonly triggered by stressors such as excessive exercise, nutritional deficits, or psychological distress. Women vary in their susceptibility to inhibition of the reproductive axis by such stressors, but it is unknown whether this variability reflects a genetic predisposition to hypothalamic amenorrhea. We hypothesized that mutations in genes involved in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a congenital form of GnRH deficiency, are associated with hypothalamic amenorrhea. We analyzed the coding sequence of genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in 55 women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and performed in vitro studies of the identified mutations. Six heterozygous mutations were identified in 7 of the 55 patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea: two variants in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene FGFR1 (G260E and R756H), two in the prokineticin receptor 2 gene PROKR2 (R85H and L173R), one in the GnRH receptor gene GNRHR (R262Q), and one in the Kallmann syndrome 1 sequence gene KAL1 (V371I). No mutations were found in a cohort of 422 controls with normal menstrual cycles. In vitro studies showed that FGFR1 G260E, FGFR1 R756H, and PROKR2 R85H are loss-of-function mutations, as has been previously shown for PROKR2 L173R and GNRHR R262Q. Rare variants in genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are found in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, suggesting that these mutations may contribute to the variable susceptibility of women to the functional changes in GnRH secretion that characterize hypothalamic amenorrhea. Our observations provide evidence for the role of rare variants in common multifactorial disease. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00494169.).

  8. Strategic Planning for Research in Pediatric Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburro, Robert F; Jenkins, Tammara L; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2016-11-01

    To summarize the scientific priorities and potential future research directions for pediatric critical care research discussed by a panel of experts at the inaugural Strategic Planning Conference of the Pediatric Trauma and Critical Illness Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Expert opinion expressed during the Strategic Planning Conference. Not applicable. Chaired by an experienced expert from the field, issues relevant to the conduct of pediatric critical care research were discussed and debated by the invited participants. Common themes and suggested priorities were identified and coalesced. Of the many pathophysiologic conditions discussed, the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome emerged as a topic in need of more study that is most relevant to the field. Additionally, the experts offered that the interrelationship and impact of critical illness on child development and family functioning are important research priorities. Consequently, long-term outcomes research was encouraged. The expert group also suggested that multidisciplinary conferences are needed to help identify key knowledge gaps to advance and direct research in the field. The Pediatric Critical Care and Trauma Scientist Development National K12 Program and the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network were recognized as successful and important programs supported by the branch. The development of core data resources including biorepositories with robust phenotypic data using common data elements was also suggested to foster data sharing among investigators and to enhance disease diagnosis and discovery. Multicenter clinical trials and innovative study designs to address understudied and poorly understood conditions were considered important for field advancement. Finally, the growth of the pediatric critical care research workforce was offered as a priority that could be spawned in many ways including by expanded

  9. Preconceptional antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, but not thyroid-stimulating hormone, are associated with decreased live birth rates in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seungdamrong, Aimee; Steiner, Anne Z; Gracia, Clarisa R; Legro, Richard S; Diamond, Michael P; Coutifaris, Christos; Schlaff, William D; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory M; Robinson, Randal D; Huang, Hao; Alvero, Ruben; Hansen, Karl R; Jin, Susan; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping; Santoro, Nanette

    2017-10-25

    To study whether preconceptual thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and antithyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are associated with poor reproductive outcomes in infertile women. Secondary analysis of data from two multicenter, randomized, controlled trials conducted by the Reproductive Medicine Network of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between preconceptual TSH levels and anti-TPO antibodies. Not applicable. Serum samples from 1,468 infertile women were utilized. None. Cumulative conception, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth rates were calculated. Conception, clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, and live birth rates did not differ between patients with TSH ≥2.5 mIU/L vs. TSH < 2.5 mIU/L. Women with anti-TPO antibodies had similar conception rates (33.3% vs. 36.3%) but higher miscarriage rates (43.9% vs. 25.3%) and lower live birth rates (17.1% vs. 25.4%) than those without anti-TPO antibodies. Adjusted, multivariable logistic regression models confirmed elevated odds of miscarriage (odds ratio 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.12-4.22) and lower odds of live birth (oddr ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.96) in patients with anti-TPO antibodies. In infertile women, preconceptional TSH ≥2.5 mIU/L is not associated with adverse reproductive outcomes; however, anti-TPO antibodies are associated with increased risk of miscarriage and decreased probability of live birth. PPCOS II NCT00719186; AMIGOS NCT01044862. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Genetic variants associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, M Elizabeth; Morrison, Margaux A; Smith, Silvia; Yanovitch, Tammy L; Young, Terri L; Colaizy, Tarah; Momany, Allison; Dagle, John; Carlo, Waldemar A; Clark, Erin A S; Page, Grier; Murray, Jeff; DeAngelis, Margaret M; Cotten, C Michael

    2014-08-12

    To determine genetic variants associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a candidate gene cohort study of US preterm infants. Preterm infants in the discovery cohort were enrolled through the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network, and those in the replication cohort were from the University of Iowa. All infants were phenotyped for ROP severity. Because of differences in the durations of enrollment between cohorts, severe ROP was defined as threshold disease in the discovery cohort and as threshold disease or type 1 ROP in the replication cohort. Whole genome amplified DNA from stored blood spot samples from the Neonatal Research Network biorepository was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate platform for candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involving angiogenic, developmental, inflammatory, and oxidative pathways. Three analyses were performed to determine significant epidemiologic variables and SNPs associated with levels of ROP severity. Analyses controlled for multiple comparisons, ancestral eigenvalues, family relatedness, and significant epidemiologic variables. Single nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with ROP severity from the discovery cohort were analyzed in the replication cohort and in meta-analysis. Eight hundred seventeen infants in the discovery cohort and 543 in the replication cohort were analyzed. Severe ROP occurred in 126 infants in the discovery and in 14 in the replication cohort. In both cohorts, ventilation days and seizure occurrence were associated with severe ROP. After controlling for significant factors and multiple comparisons, two intronic SNPs in the gene BDNF (rs7934165 and rs2049046, P large candidate gene study of infants with threshold ROP. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. Social relationships and the sleep-health nexus in adolescence: evidence from a comprehensive model with bi-directional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maume, David J

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the bi-directional effects of sleep and health (body mass index [BMI], depression, and substance use) among adolescents in the presence of comprehensive controls for social relationships and daily stressors and supports. Longitudinal survey. Data were obtained from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, a longitudinal survey designed and administered by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. At total of 974 adolescents ages 12-15; 50% girls. Total sleep time was derived from difference between usual bedtime and arise time; youths self-reported the frequency of using alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, and most of the predictors of sleep-health (e.g., parental monitoring, school and peer attachment); youth's body mass index and physical development (i.e., Tanner stage score) were assessed in clinics. Teen sleep duration declined and health deteriorated from age 12-15, but results from a 2-stage least squares analysis showed and that sleep duration was among the strongest predictors of teen health; by contrast, BMI, depression, and substance use had no effect on sleep duration. Youth sleep and health were both determined by changes in family structure, income, parental monitoring, school and peer attachment, time spent in homework and on the computer, and physical development (health only). The constellation of teens' social ties and daily stressors affects the sleep-health nexus, and future studies should account for this complexity and diversity of teens' lives. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Women's career priority is associated with attitudes towards family planning and ethical acceptance of reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Michael K; Mu, Lin; Collins, Stephen C

    2017-10-01

    Do women who place high importance on career success have different perceptions of pregnancy planning, delayed reproduction, and the ethical acceptability of ART than women with less emphasis on their career? Career-focused women place more importance on pregnancy planning, have greater confidence in delayed childbearing, and are more ethically accepting of donor gamete ART than women who do not place as much importance on career success. Women in high-professional careers are more likely to delay childbearing while simultaneously possessing a stronger desire for motherhood. The underlying values which enable these competing desires have not been elucidated. This cross-sectional study utilized data from the National Survey of Fertility Barriers (NSFB), a nationally representative telephone survey of US women aged 25-45. Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the NSFB surveyed 4712 women from 2004 to 2007. In addition to demographic data, the NSFB obtained information about the reproductive history and personal values of participants. Weighted multivariate regression analysis was used to assess reproductive values in career-focused women. In total, 48.8% of women considered success in work very important, while 17.3% considered it somewhat or not important. Women who placed less value on career success were less likely to consider pregnancy planning important and were less optimistic about the success of delayed childbearing than their work-centric counterparts. Women less focused on their careers were also more likely to have serious ethical concerns about donor gametes, but less likely to have ethical concerns about IUI or IVF, when compared to career-focused women. Intention to bear children could not be evaluated in the setting of career intentions due to a lack of data on when the participant intended on pursuing motherhood. Political preferences on reproductive health were also not evaluated. The validity

  13. Treatment of Subclinical Hypothyroidism or Hypothyroxinemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Brian M; Thom, Elizabeth A; Peaceman, Alan M; Varner, Michael W; Sorokin, Yoram; Hirtz, Deborah G; Reddy, Uma M; Wapner, Ronald J; Thorp, John M; Saade, George; Tita, Alan T N; Rouse, Dwight J; Sibai, Baha; Iams, Jay D; Mercer, Brian M; Tolosa, Jorge; Caritis, Steve N; VanDorsten, J Peter

    2017-03-02

    Subclinical thyroid disease during pregnancy may be associated with adverse outcomes, including a lower-than-normal IQ in offspring. It is unknown whether levothyroxine treatment of women who are identified as having subclinical hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia during pregnancy improves cognitive function in their children. We screened women with a singleton pregnancy before 20 weeks of gestation for subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as a thyrotropin level of 4.00 mU or more per liter and a normal free thyroxine (T 4 ) level (0.86 to 1.90 ng per deciliter [11 to 24 pmol per liter]), and for hypothyroxinemia, defined as a normal thyrotropin level (0.08 to 3.99 mU per liter) and a low free T 4 level (hypothyroidism underwent randomization at a mean of 16.7 weeks of gestation, and 526 with hypothyroxinemia at a mean of 17.8 weeks of gestation. In the subclinical hypothyroidism trial, the median IQ score of the children was 97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 94 to 99) in the levothyroxine group and 94 (95% CI, 92 to 96) in the placebo group (P=0.71). In the hypothyroxinemia trial, the median IQ score was 94 (95% CI, 91 to 95) in the levothyroxine group and 91 (95% CI, 89 to 93) in the placebo group (P=0.30). In each trial, IQ scores were missing for 4% of the children. There were no significant between-group differences in either trial in any other neurocognitive or pregnancy outcomes or in the incidence of adverse events, which was low in both groups. Treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia beginning between 8 and 20 weeks of gestation did not result in significantly better cognitive outcomes in children through 5 years of age than no treatment for those conditions. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00388297 .).

  14. Neurodevelopmental and Behavioral Outcomes in Extremely Premature Neonates With Ventriculomegaly in the Absence of Periventricular-Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Athina; Adams-Chapman, Ira; Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A; Stoll, Barbara J; Laptook, Abbot R; Carlo, Waldemar A; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Hintz, Susan R; Carlson, Martha D; Brumbaugh, Jane E; Walsh, Michele C; Wyckoff, Myra H; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2018-01-01

    Studies of cranial ultrasonography and early childhood outcomes among cohorts of extremely preterm neonates have linked periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage and cystic periventricular leukomalacia with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, the association between nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly and neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes is not fully understood. To characterize the outcomes of extremely preterm neonates younger than 27 weeks' gestational age who experienced nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly that was detected prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. This longitudinal observational study was conducted at 16 centers of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. Infants born prior to 27 weeks' gestational age in any network facility between July 1, 2006, and June 30, 2011, were included if they had a cranial ultrasonogram performed prior to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. Comparisons were made between those with ventriculomegaly and those with normal cranial sonograms. Data analysis was completed from August 2013 to August 2017. The main outcome was neurodevelopmental impairment, defined as a Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III cognitive score less than 70, moderate/severe cerebral palsy, a Gross Motor Function Classification System score of level 2 or more, vision impairment, or hearing impairment. Secondary outcomes included Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III subscores, components of neurodevelopmental impairment, behavioral outcomes, and death/neurodevelopmental impairment. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of ventriculomegaly with adverse outcomes while controlling for potentially confounding variables and center differences as a random effect. Linear regression was used similarly for continuous outcomes. Of 4193 neonates with ultrasonography data, 300 had nonhemorrhagic ventriculomegaly (7%); 3045 had normal cranial

  15. Nosocomial infections: knowledge and source of information among clinical health care students in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello AI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajediran I Bello1, Eunice N Asiedu1, Babatunde OA Adegoke2, Jonathan NA Quartey1, Kwadwo O Appiah-Kubi1, Bertha Owusu-Ansah11Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaBackground: This study determined and compared the knowledge of nosocomial infections among clinical health care students at the College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana.Methods: Two hundred undergraduate health care students from four academic programs participated in the study. The study sample was drawn from each academic program by a simple random sampling technique using the class directory from each course. The Infection Control Standardized Questionnaire (ICSQ was used to assess the knowledge of students about three main domains, ie, hand hygiene, nosocomial infections, and standard precautions. A maximum score of 50 was obtainable, and respondents with scores ≥70% were classified as having a satisfactory knowledge. The response on each item was coded numerically to generate data for statistical analysis. Comparison of knowledge on the domains among categories of students was assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, while associations between courses of study and knowledge about nosocomial infections were determined using the Chi-square test. All statistical tests had a significant level of 5% (P < 0.05Results: Overall mean percentage score of the participants on ICSQ was 65.4 ± 2.58, with medical, physiotherapy, radiography, and nursing students recording mean percentage scores of 70.58 ± 0.62, 65.02 ± 2.00, 64.74 ± 1.19, and 61.31 ± 2.35, respectively. The main source of information about the prevention of nosocomial infections as cited by participants was their routine formal training in class. There was no significant association (P > 0.05 between course of study and knowledge of

  16. Uptake and loss of dissolved 109Cd and 75Se in estuarine macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquezar, Ralph; Markich, Scott J; Twining, John R

    2007-04-01

    Semaphore crabs (Heloecius cordiformis), soldier crabs (Mictyris platycheles), ghost shrimps (Trypaea australiensis), pygmy mussels (Xenostrobus securis), and polychaetes (Eunice sp.), key benthic prey items of predatory fish commonly found in estuaries throughout southeastern Australia, were exposed to dissolved (109)Cd and (75)Se for 385 h at 30 k Bq/l (uptake phase), followed by exposure to radionuclide-free water for 189 h (loss phase). The whole body uptake rates of (75)Se by pygmy mussels, semaphore crabs and soldier crabs were 1.9, 2.4 and 4.1 times higher than (109)Cd, respectively. There were no significant (P>0.05) differences between the uptake rates of (75)Se and (109)Cd for ghost shrimps and polychaetes. The uptake rates of (109)Cd and (75)Se were highest in pygmy mussels; about six times higher than in soldier crabs for (109)Cd and in polychaetes for (75)Se - the organisms with the lowest uptake rates. The loss rates of (109)Cd and (75)Se were highest in semaphore crabs; about four times higher than in polychaetes for (109)Cd and nine times higher than in ghost shrimps for (75)Se - the organisms with the lowest loss rates. The loss of (109)Cd and (75)Se in all organisms was best described by a two (i.e. short and a longer-lived) compartment model. In the short-lived, or rapidly exchanging, compartment, the biological half-lives of (75)Se (16-39 h) were about three times greater than those of (109)Cd (5-12h). In contrast, the biological half-lives of (109)Cd in the longer-lived, or slowly exchanging compartment(s), were typically greater (1370-5950 h) than those of (75)Se (161-1500 h). Semaphore crabs had the shortest biological half-lives of both radionuclides in the long-lived compartment, whereas polychaetes had the greatest biological half-life for (109)Cd (5950 h), and ghost shrimps had the greatest biological half-life for (75)Se (1500 h). This study provides the first reported data for the biological half-lives of Se in estuarine decapod

  17. Abordagens do amor romântico: aspectos históricos, sociais e literários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Grasiela Schonarth

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo vincula-se ao projeto de pesquisa Narrativas e conhecimentos: especificidades teóricas e constituição de sentido, coordenado pela Prof.ª Dra. Eunice Terezinha Piazza Gai. Considerando os caminhos cursados no desenvolvimento da pesquisa, utilizamos o tema do amor para refletir sobre os possíveis conhecimentos que o processo narrativo propicia, os aspectos históricos e sociais nos quais a temática foi abordada na literatura, assim como um resgate de informações acerca das origens do tema e personagens consolidados nos romances românticos. Nessa perspectiva, delimitamos o estudo entre os amores irrealizados, os impasses responsáveis pelos impedimentos amorosos, bem como os conflitos entre a paixão e o casamento nas narrativas românticas. Para bem fundamentar esta pesquisa, tomamos o mito considerado matriz das histórias de amor, o próprio nascimento da paixão na literatura ocidental: Tristão e Isolda. O mito apresenta a visão do amor cortês e as contradições que se manifestaram desde a segunda metade do século XII entre a regra cavalheiresca e os costumes feudais. Diante da teoria do amor, abstraída do mito do amor romântico, partimos para a literatura do século XIX, considerando a presença dos amores não correspondidos. Nesta etapa, analisamos o romance de Balzac, Eugênia Grandet, que se torna exemplo da irrealização amorosa na literatura, vivida de modo mais contundente pela personagem que intitula a obra. A escolha dessa narrativa, para a análise do amor-paixão, deve-se ao fato de que o casamento é tratado como mero interesse financeiro, desconsiderando todo e qualquer envolvimento amoroso entre o casal em questão: Eugênia e Charles. Tratamos, pois, desta pluralidade significativa, deste amplo caminho trilhado não só pela literatura, mas por todos aqueles que se deixam despertar pela eternidade e fascínio dos romances românticos.

  18. Time-varying cycle average and daily variation in ambient air pollution and fecundability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Carrie J; Schisterman, Enrique F; Ha, Sandie; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Sherman, Seth; Mendola, Pauline

    2018-01-01

    fecundability, warranting further investigation. This work was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment study contract nos. #N01-HD-3-3355, NO1-HD-#-3356, N01-HD-3-3358 and the Air Quality and Reproductive Health Study Contract No. HHSN275200800002I, Task Order No. HHSN27500008). We declare no conflict of interest. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Five-year tracking of Plasmodium falciparum allele frequencies in a holoendemic area with indistinct seasonal transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akala HM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hoseah M Akala, Angela O Achieng, Fredrick L Eyase, Dennis W Juma, Luiser Ingasia, Agnes C Cheruiyot, Charles Okello, Duke Omariba, Eunice A Owiti, Catherine Muriuki, Redemptah Yeda, Ben Andagalu, Jacob D Johnson, Edwin Kamau Global Emerging Infections Surveillance Program, United States Army Medical Research Unit-Kenya, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Walter Reed Project, Kisumu and Nairobi, Kenya Background: The renewed malaria eradication efforts require an understanding of the seasonal patterns of frequency of polymorphic variants in order to focus limited funds productively. Although cross-sectional studies in holoendemic areas spanning a single year could be useful in describing parasite genotype status at a given point, such information is inadequate in describing temporal trends in genotype polymorphisms. For Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Kisumu District Hospital, Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt-K76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (PfMDR1-N86Y, were analyzed for polymorphisms and parasitemia changes in the 53 months from March 2008 to August 2012. Observations were compared with prevailing climatic factors, including humidity, rainfall, and temperature. Methods: Parasitemia (the percentage of infected red blood cells per total red blood cells was established by microscopy for P. falciparum malaria-positive samples. P. falciparum DNA was extracted from whole blood using a Qiagen DNA Blood Mini Kit. Single nucleotide polymorphism identification at positions Pfcrt-K76T and PfMDR1-N86Y was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and/or sequencing. Data on climatic variables were obtained from http://www.tutiempo.net/en/. Results: A total of 895 field isolates from 2008 (n=169, 2009 (n=161, 2010 (n=216, 2011 (n=223, and 2012 (n=126 showed large variations in monthly frequency of PfMDR1-N86Y and Pfcrt-K76T as the mutant genotypes decreased from 68.4%±15% and 38.1%±13% to

  20. Health care resource use and costs associated with possible side effects of high oral corticosteroid use in asthma: a claims-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luskin AT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Allan T Luskin,1 Evgeniya N Antonova,2 Michael S Broder,3 Eunice Y Chang,3 Theodore A Omachi,2 Dennis K Ledford4 1HealthyAirways, Madison, WI, 2Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, 3Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Beverly Hills, CA, 4Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA Background: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of possible oral corticosteroid (OCS-related side effects and health care resource use and costs in patients with asthma.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, matched-cohort, retrospective study using a commercial claims database. Adults with asthma diagnosis codes and evidence of asthma medication use were studied. Patients with high OCS use (≥30 days of OCS annually were divided into those who did versus those who did not experience OCS-related possible side effects. Their health care resource use and costs were compared using linear regression or negative binomial regression models, adjusting for age, sex, geographic region, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease status.Results: After adjustment, high OCS users with possible side effects were more likely to have office visits (23.0 vs 19.6; P<0.001 and hospitalizations (0.44 vs 0.22; P<0.001 than those without possible side effects. Emergency department visits were similar between the groups. High OCS users with possible side effects had higher adjusted total annual mean health care costs ($25,168 than those without such side effects ($21,882; P=0.009.Conclusion: Among high OCS users, patients with possible OCS-related side effects are more likely to use health care services than those without such side effects. Although OCS may help control asthma and manage exacerbations, OCS side effects may result in additional health care resource use and costs, highlighting the need

  1. Multisite Semiautomated Clinical Data Repository for Duplication 15q Syndrome: Study Protocol and Early Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oluwaseun Jessica; Smith, Ebony Jeannae; Viangteeravat, Teeradache; Huang, Eunice Y; Nagisetty, Naga Satya V Rao; Urraca, Nora; Lusk, Laina; Finucane, Brenda; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Young, Jennifer; Jeste, Shafali; Thibert, Ronald; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2017-10-18

    , Eunice Y Huang, Naga Satya V Rao Nagisetty, Nora Urraca, Laina Lusk, Brenda Finucane, Dimitrios Arkilo, Jennifer Young, Shafali Jeste, Ronald Thibert, The Dup15q Alliance, Lawrence T Reiter. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 18.10.2017.

  2. The influence of sporadic anovulation on hormone levels in ovulatory cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambridge, H.L.; Mumford, S.L.; Mattison, D.R.; Ye, A.; Pollack, A.Z.; Bloom, M.S.; Mendola, P.; Lynch, K.L.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Schisterman, E.F.

    2013-01-01

    at least five visits per cycle (94% had seven or more per cycle). WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS These results suggest a possible underlying cause of anovulation, such as a longer-term subclinical follicular, ovarian or hypothalamic/pituitary dysfunction, even among healthy, regularly menstruating women. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS This work was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (Contract no. HHSN275200403394C). The authors have no potential competing interests. PMID:23589536

  3. Summary of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development-best pharmaceuticals for Children Act Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Amidon, Gordon L; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A; Knipp, Gregory T

    2012-11-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community to be an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement, and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric-based classification system. Because there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability, and potentially biorelevant solubilities at different ages, the PBCS Working Group focused on identifying age-specific issues that need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. We summarized the findings of the PBCS Working Group and provided insights into considerations required for the development of a PBCS. Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative Workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS Working Group considered several high-level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS Working Group identified a number of knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to develop a rigorous PBCS. It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it needs to be broken down into several different age groups that account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal (GI) transit. Several critical knowledge gaps were identified, including (1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the GI tract, in the liver, and in the kidney; (2) an incomplete understanding of age-based changes in the GI, liver, and kidney physiology; (3) a clear need to better understand

  4. A Group of 500 Women Whose Health May Depart Notably From the Norm: Protocol for a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Christoph; Minford, Eunice J; McHardy, Vanessa; Keep, Jane

    2017-11-23

    respondents and UM participants will be compared, using unweighted regression or regression weighted or normalized by age, education, and interest in alternative treatments (to increase comparability), as appropriate. Analyses will determine whether UM-related variables (being a UM participant, length of UM participation, number of UM events attended) are associated with: differences in the number of major health events and health symptoms experienced; SF-36 physical and mental health scores; body mass index; and consumption of alcohol, tobacco, sugar, salt, caffeine, and dairy. If women in the UM cohort are truly in substantially better health than the norm, further investigations may be worthwhile to see whether UM plays a causal role, and whether the women's practices are generalizable. ©Christoph Schnelle, Eunice J Minford, Vanessa McHardy, Jane Keep. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 23.11.2017.

  5. Associations between urinary phthalate concentrations and semen quality parameters in a general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, M.S.; Whitcomb, B.W.; Chen, Z.; Ye, A.; Kannan, K.; Buck Louis, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    CAUTION While adverse associations were observed, the implications of the findings for couple fecundity and fertility remain to be established. Cautious interpretation is needed in light of reliance on a single measurement of phthalate measure and no correction for multiple comparisons. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This study was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (N01-HD-3-3355, N01-HD-3-3356 and NOH-HD-3-3358). The authors declare they have no actual or potential competing financial interests. PMID:26350610

  6. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition as a potential new therapeutic target in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensterle, Mojca; Kocjan, Tomaz; Janez, Andrej

    2014-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, including members of PDE4, have been investigated in the regulation of endocrine and reproductive functions of ovaries. In addition, selective inhibition of PDE4 enzyme has recently been implicated in the regulation of metabolism with positive effects on glucose homeostasis and weight reduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the PDE4 inhibitor roflumilast affects body weight and hormonal and metabolic status in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Design/Participants/Main Outcome Measures: A 12-week prospective randomized open-label study was conducted with 36 obese women with PCOS diagnosed by the National Eunice Kennedy Shriver Institute of Child Health and Human Development criteria that had been pretreated with metformin (MET). They were randomized to MET 1000 mg twice a day or combined treatment (COM) with MET 1000 mg twice a day and roflumilast 500 μg every day. The primary outcome was change in anthropometric measures of obesity. Thirty-one patients (aged 33.8 ± 7.4 y, twice a day 36.4 ± 5.1 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) completed the study: 16 on MET and 15 on COM. Subjects treated with COM lost on average 4.2 ± 2.8 kg compared with a 0.9 ± 2.5 kg weight gain in the MET group (P = .025). Body mass index decreased for 1.6 ± 1.1 kg/m(2) in COM arm compared with increase for 0.9 ± 2.4 kg/m(2) in the MET arm (P = .046). Visceral adipose tissue area as assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry decreased from 136.7 ± 37.8 to 121.2 ± 36.2 cm(2) in the COM arm compared with an increase from 155.3 ± 61.9 to 166.7 ± 67.2 cm(2) in the MET arm (P = .02). From baseline to study end, both treatment interventions resulted in a significant reduction of androstenedione (P = .013), free T (P = .002), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance score (P = .027) and a significant increase in SHBG (P = .024), although the between-treatment differences of the changes have not been statistically

  7. Associations among body size across the life course, adult height and endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farland, L V; Missmer, S A; Bijon, A; Gusto, G; Gelot, A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Mesrine, S; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Kvaskoff, M

    2017-08-01

    epidemiology from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the National Cancer Institute (3R25CA057711) National Institutes of Health. M.K. was supported by a Marie Curie Fellowship within the seventh European Community Framework Programme (#PIOF-GA-2011-302078). The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. The impact of time of delivery on gestations complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes: daytime versus nighttime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Hind; Hosseini Nasab, Susan; Fournie, David; Ontiveros, Alejandra; Alkawas, Rim; Chauhan, Suneet; Blackwell, Sean; Sibai, Baha

    2018-04-09

    Perinatal death, in particular intrapartum stillbirth and short-term neonatal death, as well as neonatal short term and long term morbidity have been associated with the time of day that the birth occurs. Indeed, evening and nighttime deliveries were associated with an increased risk of an adverse perinatal outcome when compared to similar daytime deliveries. Impact of shift change, as well as time of day delivery have been extensively studied in the context of maternal and neonatal complications of cesarean delivery, however, no studies were previously performed on timing of delivery and its effect on the outcome of pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes. Our objective was to compare obstetric, neonatal as well as long-term outcomes between women delivered in the daytime versus nighttime, in singleton gestations whose pregnancies were complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes. This was a secondary analysis of a trial of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network "A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Beneficial Effects of Antenatal Magnesium Sulfate for the Prevention of Cerebral Palsy". For this analysis, the time of delivery was divided into the daytime, from 07:01 to 19:00, and the nighttime, from 19:01 to 07:00. Epidemiological, obstetric characteristics as well as neonatal and long-term outcomes were compared between deliveries occurring during the daytime versus the nighttime periods. Inclusion criteria consisted of singleton gestations diagnosed with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Multifetal gestations and pregnancies with preterm labor without preterm premature rupture of membranes were excluded. A total of 1752 patients met inclusion criteria, 881 delivering during the daytime, while 871 during the nighttime. There were no differences in demographic maternal variables. There were no differences in the number of patients

  9. Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes With Early Compared With Delayed Pushing Among Nulliparous Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Lynn M; Sandoval, Grecio; Bailit, Jennifer; Reddy, Uma M; Wapner, Ronald J; Varner, Michael W; Caritis, Steve N; Prasad, Mona; Tita, Alan T N; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram; Rouse, Dwight J; Blackwell, Sean C; Tolosa, Jorge E

    2016-11-01

    To describe factors associated with delayed pushing and evaluate the relationship between delayed pushing and perinatal outcomes in nulliparous women with singleton term gestations. This was a secondary analysis of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Assessment of Perinatal Excellence cohort of 115,502 women and their neonates born in 25 U.S. hospitals from 2008 to 2011. Nulliparous women with singleton, cephalic, nonanomalous term births who achieved 10-cm cervical dilation were included. Women in whom pushing was delayed by 60 minutes or greater (delayed group) were compared with those who initiated pushing within 30 minutes (early group). Multivariable regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of delayed pushing with mode of delivery, length of the second stage, and other maternal and perinatal outcomes (significance defined as Ppushing was delayed in 18.4% (n=3,870). Women who were older, privately insured, or non-Hispanic white as well as those who had induction or augmentation of labor, diabetes, or epidural analgesia were more likely to have delayed pushing. Delayed pushing was more common when the second stage began during daytime hours or in hospitals with dedicated 24-hour obstetric anesthesia, although differences were small. After adjusting for differences in baseline and labor characteristics including center, women in the delayed group had longer mean durations of the second stage (191 compared with 84 minutes, Ppushing (86 compared with 76 minutes, Ppushing was associated with greater rates of cesarean delivery (11.2% compared with 5.1%; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.63-2.12), operative vaginal delivery (adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.14-1.40), postpartum hemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.05-1.95), and blood transfusion (adjusted OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.17). Delayed pushing was not associated with increased odds of adverse neonatal outcomes

  10. Summary of the NICHD-BPCA Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Amidon, Gordon L.; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A.; Knipp, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community as an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) working group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric based classification system. Since there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability and potentially biorelevant solubilities at the different ages, the PBCS working group focused on identifying age specific issues that would need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. Objective To summarize the findings of the PBCS working group and provide insights into considerations required for the development of a pediatric based biopharmaceutics classification system. Methods Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development (NICHD)-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS working group considered several high level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS working group identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be addressed in order to develop a rigorous PBCS. Results It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it would need to be broken down into several different age groups that would account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal transit. Several critical knowledge gaps where identified including: 1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, in the liver and in the kidney; 2

  11. A new customized fetal growth standard for African American women: the PRB/NICHD Detroit Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarca, Adi L.; Romero, Roberto; Gudicha, Dereje W.; Erez, Offer; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Bhatti, Gaurav; Pacora, Percy; Maymon, Eli; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2018-01-01

    Background The assessment of fetal growth disorders requires a standard. Current nomograms for the assessment of fetal growth in African American women have been derived either from neonatal (rather than fetal) biometry data or have not been customized for maternal ethnicity, weight, height, parity, and fetal sex. Objective We sought to 1) develop a new customized fetal growth standard for African American mothers; and 2) compare such a standard to three existing standards for the classification of fetuses as small (SGA) or large (LGA) for gestational age. Study Design A retrospective cohort study included 4,183 women (4,001 African American and 182 Caucasian) from the Detroit metropolitan area who underwent ultrasound examinations between 14 and 40 weeks of gestation (the median number of scans per pregnancy was 5, interquartile range 3-7) and for whom relevant covariate data were available. Longitudinal quantile regression was used to build models defining the “normal” estimated fetal weight (EFW) centiles for gestational age in African American women, adjusted for maternal height, weight, parity, and fetal sex, and excluding pathologic factors with a significant effect on fetal weight. The resulting Perinatology Research Branch/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (hereinafter, PRB/NICHD) growth standard was compared to 3 other existing standards—the customized gestation-related optimal weight (GROW) standard; the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (hereinafter, NICHD) African American standard; and the multinational World Health Organization (WHO) standard—utilized to screen fetuses for SGA (90th centile) based on the last available ultrasound examination for each pregnancy. Results 1) First, the mean birthweight at 40 weeks was 133g higher for neonates born to Caucasian than to African American mothers and 150g higher for male than female neonates; maternal weight

  12. Han Chinese polycystic ovary syndrome risk variants in women of European ancestry: relationship to FSH levels and glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R; Georgopoulos, N A; Braaten, T J; Bjonnes, A C; Koika, V; Panidis, D; Welt, C K

    2015-06-01

    associated with insulin (-0.16 ± 0.05, P = 0.0029) and glucose levels (-0.20 ± 0.05, P = 0.0002) 120 min after an oral glucose test. The study was large and contained replication cohorts, but was limited by a small number of controls in the Greek cohort and a small number of cases in the second Boston cohort. The second Boston group was identified using electronic medical record review, but was validated for the cardinal features of PCOS. This study demonstrates a cross-ethnic PCOS risk locus in FSHR in women of European ancestry with PCOS. The variant may influence FSH receptor responsiveness as suggested by the associated change in FSH levels. The relationship between a variant near RAB5B and SUOX and glucose stimulated insulin and glucose levels suggests an influence of one of these genes on glucose tolerance, but the absence of a relationship with PCOS points to potential differences in the international PCOS patient populations. The project was supported by Award Number R01HD065029 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development, Award Number 1 UL1 RR025758, Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center, from the National Center for Research Resources, award 1-10-CT-57 from the American Diabetes Association and the Partners Healthcare Center for Personalized Genetics Project Grant. C.K.W. is a consultant for Takeda Pharmaceuticals. NCT00166569. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Ectopic pregnancy morbidity and mortality in low-income women, 2004-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, D B; Cain, L; Dahlquist, I H; Lauderdale, D S

    2016-03-01

    women. The ectopic pregnancy mortality ratio was 0.48 per 100 000 live births, similar to that reported in previous US surveillance. This is a secondary analysis of insurance claims. Among women at higher baseline risk of pregnancy complications due to their economic status, women from racial/ethnic minority groups face an additional risk of ectopic pregnancy adverse outcomes compared with whites. Systematic changes to reduce racial disparities are an essential part of improving maternal health in the USA. The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (1 K08 HD060663 to D.B.S.). The authors report no conflict of interest. Not applicable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Serum uric acid in relation to endogenous reproductive hormones during the menstrual cycle: findings from the BioCycle study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Sunni L.; Dasharathy, Sonya S.; Pollack, Anna Z.; Perkins, Neil J.; Mattison, Donald R.; Cole, Stephen R.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2013-01-01

    (8.3%). Higher uric acid levels were associated with increased odds of anovulation (odds ratio 2.39, 95% CI: 1.25, 4.56). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The change in uric acid levels among this cohort of healthy women was modest, and analysis was limited to two menstrual cycles. The women in this study were healthy and regularly menstruating, and as such there were few women with high uric acid levels and anovulatory cycles. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS These findings demonstrate the importance of taking menstrual cycle phase into account when measuring uric acid in premenopausal women, and confirm the hypothesized beneficial lowering effects of endogenous E2 on uric acid levels. These findings suggest that there could be an underlying association affecting both sporadic anovulation and high uric acid levels among young, regularly menstruating women. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and elucidate the connection between uric acid and reproductive and later cardiovascular health. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This work was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health (contract # HHSN275200403394C). No competing interests declared. PMID:23562957

  15. Preventing preterm births: analysis of trends and potential reductions with interventions in 39 countries with very high human development index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hannah H; Larson, Jim; Blencowe, Hannah; Spong, Catherine Y; Howson, Christopher P; Cairns-Smith, Sarah; Lackritz, Eve M; Lee, Shoo K; Mason, Elizabeth; Serazin, Andrew C; Walani, Salimah; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Lawn, Joy E

    2013-01-19

    supplementation (0·01), and reduction of non-medically indicated labour induction or caesarean delivery (0·29). These findings translate to roughly 58,000 preterm births averted and total annual economic cost savings of about US$3 billion. We recommend a conservative target of a relative reduction in preterm birth rates of 5% by 2015. Our findings highlight the urgent need for research into underlying mechanisms of preterm births, and development of innovative interventions. Furthermore, the highest preterm birth rates occur in low-income settings where the causes of prematurity might differ and have simpler solutions such as birth spacing and treatment of infections in pregnancy than in high-income countries. Urgent focus on these settings is also crucial to reduce preterm births worldwide. March of Dimes, USA, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and National Institutes of Health, USA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary paracetamol and time-to-pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarr, Melissa M; Grantz, Katherine L; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Maisog, José M; Honda, Masato; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2016-09-01

    of paracetamol were lowest among females and males who achieved pregnancy and p-aminophenol concentrations were lowest among those not achieving pregnancy. Urinary paracetamol concentrations were higher among female than male partners (Median = 26.6 and 13.2 ng/ml, respectively; P paracetamol was associated with a longer TTP [FOR = 0.67; 95% CI = (0.47, 0.95)]. This association remained after adjustment for chronic health conditions, hypothyroidism and hypertension and female partner's urinary paracetamol concentration [FOR = 0.65; 95% CI = (0.45, 0.94)]. No associations were observed between female or male partners' urinary concentrations of paracetamol or of its metabolite p-aminophenol when urinary concentrations were modeled continuously. Only a single spot urine was available for analysis despite the short-lived nature of paracetamol. Additionally, participants were not asked to provide information on indication of use for paracetamol medications; any underlying conditions for the paracetamol use would have been potential confounders. If corroborated with more robust studies, findings from our exploratory analysis may have both clinical and public health relevance among reproductive aged individuals, including those trying for pregnancy, given the prevalent use of paracetamol/acetaminophen medications and the ubiquitous nature of paracetamol in the environment. This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, Intramural Research Program, and Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (contracts N01-HD-3-3355; N01-HD-3-3356; NOH-HD-3-3358; HHSN27500001/HHSN27500001). None of the authors have any conflicts to declare. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. The economics of pediatric formulation development for off-patent drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Christopher-Paul; Bruss, Jon B

    2008-11-01

    Many drugs currently used in children have never been adequately studied in rigorous scientific trials. Although these medications can still be prescribed in the pediatric setting, they are considered "off-label" because they are not specifically approved for use in children. The role of the Economics Working Group (EWG) within the Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is to identify economic barriers and to propose possible mechanisms to create cost-effective and appropriately formulated products for off-patent pediatric drugs and to ensure their distribution and availability. The purpose of this article was to briefly outline the EWG's considerations and recommendations on these topics. Information for this article was gathered from the proceedings of a PFI workshop sponsored by the NICHD, held December 6 and 7, 2005, in Bethesda, Maryland. Other information was based on: the authors' unpublished and published research as well as personal communication with members of the EWG; a comprehensive search of Web sites, publications, and publicly accessible databases of the European Medicines Agency, the US Food and Drug Administration, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the NICHD; and the databases and publications available from the Louis Lasagna Library of the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development (Boston, Massachusetts). The US Congress has attempted to remedy the lack of incentives to develop pediatric drugs by passing 2 key pieces of legislation. After >10 years, this US pediatric initiative has stimulated a great deal of pediatric drug research, and similar initiatives have been emulated in Europe and proposed in Japan. Although the initiative is generally considered successful in the United States, an incentive gap exists that still hinders pediatric drug development. It results from a series of factors, including: (1) a relatively small

  18. Fertility-related quality of life from two RCT cohorts with infertility: unexplained infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Trussell, J C; Craig, LaTasha B; Gracia, Clarisa; Huang, Hao; Alvero, Ruben; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory; Coutifaris, Christos; Diamond, Michael; Jin, Susan; Legro, Richard S; Robinson, Randal D; Schlaff, William D; Zhang, Heping

    2016-10-01

    scores than males with UI (84.9 ± 10.2 versus 83.3 ± 10.8; P = 0.003). Scores were not consistently associated with conception or pregnancy outcome. The use of multiple tests of association may have resulted in spurious statistically significant findings. Inherent sociodemographic differences between women with PCOS and those with UI largely account for the lower QOL in women with PCOS. Our study was unable to assess if changes in QOL affected pregnancy outcome as FertiQOL data were collected prior to treatment. Finally, the participants for both studies represent their local communities, but are not a population-based sample and thus firm conclusions about how representative these couples are to the general population must be made with caution. Women with PCOS with elevated BMI and hirsutism scores and with lower socioeconomic status may require more, targeted psychosocial support than those with other diagnoses. Possible attribution of infertility to the male partner appears to result in a lower QOL. There appears to be substantial national variation in FertiQOL scores, with US-based cohorts reporting overall higher QOL. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Grants U10 HD39005 (to M.D.), U10 HD38992 (to R.S.L.), (to C.C.), U10 HD38998 (to R.A.), U10 HD055942 (to R.D.R.), HD055944 (to P.C.), U10 HD055936 (to G.C.), U10HD055925 (to H.Z.); and U10 U54-HD29834 (to the University of Virginia Center for Research in Reproduction Ligand Assay and Analysis Core of the Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research). Most importantly, this research was made possible by the funding by American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. N.S., E.E., J.C.T., C.G., H.H., R.A., P.C., G.C., C.C., M.D., S.J., W.D.S. and H.Z. report no conflicts of interests/disclosures. L.B.C. reports research support from Ferring Pharmaceuticals and Roche Diagnostics

  19. Direct actions of androgen, estrogen and anti-Müllerian hormone on primate secondary follicle development in the absence of FSH in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, T; Ting, A Y; Tkachenko, O; Xu, J; Stouffer, R L

    2017-12-01

    remained similar in all groups. However, media concentrations of P4 and E2 at week 5 were lower (P DHT and AMH groups, compared to CTRL (P4 = 93 ± 10 ng/ml; E2 = 4 ± 1 ng/ml). In the second experiment, FSH depletion diminished follicle survival rate (66 ± 8% in control versus 45 ± 9% in no FSH, P = 0.034). E2 plus DHT (31.5 ± 11%) or DHT alone (69 ± 9%) restored follicle survival rate to the control (FSH) level as expected. Also, E2 plus DHT or DHT alone improved antrum formation rate. However, in the absence of FSH, E2 plus DHT or DHT alone did not support growth, in terms of follicle diameter, or steroid (P4 or E2) production after the antral stage. This study is limited to in vitro effects of E2, DHT and AMH during the interval from the secondary to small antral stage of macaque follicular development. In addition, the primate follicle pool is heterogeneous and differs between animals; therefore, even though only secondary follicles were selected, follicle growth and developmental outcomes might differ from one animal to another. This study provides novel information on the possible actions of estrogen and androgen during early follicular development in primates. Our results suggest that sequential exposure of preantral follicles to local factors, e.g. E2 and DHT, followed by gonadotropin once the follicle reaches the antral stage, may better mimic primate folliculogenesis in vivo. Research reported in this publication was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Center for Translational Research on Reproduction and Infertility 5P50HD071836, and the NIH Primate Centers Program 8P510D011092. There are no conflicts of interest. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Semi-automatized segmentation method using image-based flow cytometry to study sperm physiology: the case of capacitation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros-Volante, Arturo; Moreno-Irusta, Ayelen; Torres-Rodriguez, Paulina; Giojalas, Laura; Gervasi, María G; Visconti, Pablo E; Treviño, Claudia L

    2018-02-01

    the use of image-based flow cytometry is a very powerful tool to study sperm physiology. A large number of cells can be easily analyzed and information at the subcellular level can be obtained. As the segmentation process works with bright-field images, it can be extended to study expression of other proteins of interest using different antibodies or it can be used in living sperm to study intracellular parameters that can be followed using fluorescent dyes sensitive to the parameter of interest (e.g. pH, Ca2+). Therefore, this a versatile method that can be exploited to study several aspects of sperm physiology. This work was supported DGAPA (IN203116 to C. Treviño), Fronteras-CONACyT No. 71 and Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development NIH (RO1 HD38082) to P.E. Visconti and by a Lalor Foundation fellowship to M.G. Gervasi. A. Matamoros is a student of the Maestría en Ciencias Bioquímicas-UNAM program supported by CONACyT (416400) and DGAPA-UNAM. A. Moreno obtained a scholarship from Red MacroUniversidades and L. Giojalas obtained a schloarhip from CONICET and Universidad Nacional de Cordoba. The authors declare there are not conflicts of interest. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email:journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Obituary: Roy Henry Garstang (1925-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malville, J.

    2011-12-01

    Roy Henry Garstang 84 passed away on November 1, 2009 in Boulder Colorado. He was born in Southport, England in September of 1925 to Percy Brocklehurst and Eunice (Gledhill) Garstang. He won a scholarship to Caius College in Cambridge University. Because it was wartime, he could spend only two years at his studies. However, he managed to complete three years of required work during that time, and then spent 1945-46 as a Junior Scientific Officer at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. He received his BA in 1946 from Cambridge, his MA in 1950, and his PhD in Mathematics in 1954, with a thesis: "Atomic Transitions in Astrophysics," working under D. R. Hartree. He also received a ScD from Cambridge in Physics and Chemistry in 1983. He married Ann in August 1959. She and two daughters, Jennifer and Susan, survive him. While still pursuing his PhD, Roy Garstang served as a Research Associate at the Yerkes Observatory, from 1951-1952, working under Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. During that time he continued with his own calculations of atomic structure and transition probabilities, although these were not part of Chandra's research interests. After earning his PhD, he went to teach at the University of London, where he also served as the Assistant Director of the University of London Observatory (1959-1964). He was editor of "The Observatory" Magazine form 1953-1960. The continuing theme of this research was to help meet the needs of astrophysicists for atomic data. In 1964, he left England for the United States, where he joined the faculty at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he would remain for the rest of his professional career. It was entirely fitting, considering his interest in performing calculations of interest to astrophysicists, that soon after arriving in Boulder he was appointed Chairman of JILA - Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (1966-1967). He was Director of the Division of Physics and AstroGeophysics (1979-80), acting

  2. Adult air pollution exposure and risk of infertility in the Nurses' Health Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingaiah, S; Hart, J E; Laden, F; Farland, L V; Hewlett, M M; Chavarro, J; Aschengrau, A; Missmer, S A

    2016-03-01

    infertility diagnosis, we do not have the exact date of diagnosis or the exact timing of the start of attempting conception. As infertility status and subtypes of infertility were prospectively collected biennially, we were unable to tightly examine the timing of exposures on incidence of infertility. In terms of exposure quantification, we used ambient air pollution exposures as a proxy for personal exposures, potentially leading to exposure misclassification. However, several studies suggest that ambient measurements are an acceptable surrogate for individual level exposures in most populations. We observed an association between all size fractions of PM exposure, as well as traffic-related air pollution, and incidence of infertility. Of note, the strongest association was observed between cumulative average exposures over the course of follow-up and the risk of infertility, suggesting that chronic exposures may be of greater importance than short-term exposures. The work for this paper was supported by the following: S.M.: Reproductive Scientist Development Program HD000849, and the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health HD043444, the Boston University CTSI 1UL1TR001430, and a research grant from the Boston University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, S.A.M.: R01HD57210 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Environmental Health Sciences Translational Pilot Project Program, R01CA50385 from the National Cancer Institute, J.E.H. and F.L.: 5R01ES017017 from the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, 5 P42 ES007381 from the National Institute of Environmental Health at the National Institute of Health. L.V.F.: T32HD060454 in reproductive, perinatal, and pediatric epidemiology from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The Nurses' Health Study II is additionally supported by infrastructure grant UM1CA

  3. Fertility-related quality of life from two RCT cohorts with infertility: unexplained infertility and polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Trussell, J.C.; Craig, LaTasha B.; Gracia, Clarisa; Huang, Hao; Alvero, Ruben; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory; Coutifaris, Christos; Diamond, Michael; Jin, Susan; Legro, Richard S.; Robinson, Randal D.; Schlaff, William D.; Zhang, Heping

    2016-01-01

    CHANCE Women with PCOS had lower total FertiQOL scores (72.3 ± 14.8) than those with UI (77.1 ± 12.8; P infertility to the male partner appears to result in a lower QOL. There appears to be substantial national variation in FertiQOL scores, with US-based cohorts reporting overall higher QOL. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH)/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Grants U10 HD39005 (to M.D.), U10 HD38992 (to R.S.L.), (to C.C.), U10 HD38998 (to R.A.), U10 HD055942 (to R.D.R.), HD055944 (to P.C.), U10 HD055936 (to G.C.), U10HD055925 (to H.Z.); and U10 U54-HD29834 (to the University of Virginia Center for Research in Reproduction Ligand Assay and Analysis Core of the Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research). Most importantly, this research was made possible by the funding by American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. N.S., E.E., J.C.T., C.G., H.H., R.A., P.C., G.C., C.C., M.D., S.J., W.D.S. and H.Z. report no conflicts of interests/disclosures. L.B.C. reports research support from Ferring Pharmaceuticals and Roche Diagnostics; R.S.L. reports receipt of consulting fees from AstraZeneca, Euroscreen, Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Taken, Kindex, Clarus and Bayer, Inc., and research support from AstraZeneca and Ferring Pharmaceuticals. R.D.R. reports research support from AbbVie. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome II (PPCOS II), NCT00719186; Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations in Ovulation Stimulation (AMIGOS) NCT01044862, clinicaltrials.gov. TRIAL REGISTRATION DATE PPCOS II 17 July 2008; AMIGOS 7 January 2010. DATE OF FIRST PATIENT'S ENROLMENT PPCOS II 19 February 2009; AMIGOS 2 August 2010. PMID:27402910