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Sample records for eular evidence-based recommendations

  1. 2016 updated EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richette, P; Doherty, M; Pascual, E; Barskova, V; Becce, F; Castañeda-Sanabria, J; Coyfish, M; Guillo, S; Jansen, T L; Janssens, H; Lioté, F; Mallen, C; Nuki, G; Perez-Ruiz, F; Pimentao, J; Punzi, L; Pywell, T; So, A; Tausche, A K; Uhlig, T; Zavada, J; Zhang, W; Tubach, F; Bardin, T

    2017-01-01

    New drugs and new evidence concerning the use of established treatments have become available since the publication of the first European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of gout, in 2006. This situation has prompted a systematic review and update of the 2006 recommendations. The EULAR task force consisted of 15 rheumatologists, 1 radiologist, 2 general practitioners, 1 research fellow, 2 patients and 3 experts in epidemiology/methodology from 12 European countries. A systematic review of the literature concerning all aspects of gout treatments was performed. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated by use of a Delphi consensus approach. Three overarching principles and 11 key recommendations were generated. For the treatment of flare, colchicine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral or intra-articular steroids or a combination are recommended. In patients with frequent flare and contraindications to colchicine, NSAIDs and corticosteroids, an interleukin-1 blocker should be considered. In addition to education and a non-pharmacological management approach, urate-lowering therapy (ULT) should be considered from the first presentation of the disease, and serum uric acid (SUA) levels should be maintained atgout. Allopurinol is recommended as first-line ULT and its dosage should be adjusted according to renal function. If the SUA target cannot be achieved with allopurinol, then febuxostat, a uricosuric or combining a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with a uricosuric should be considered. For patients with refractory gout, pegloticase is recommended. These recommendations aim to inform physicians and patients about the non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments for gout and to provide the best strategies to achieve the predefined urate target to cure the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carville, S.F.; Arendt-Nielsen, S.; Bliddal, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome. Methods: A multidisciplinary task force was formed representing 11 European countries. The design of the study, including search strategy, participants, interventions, outcome measures, data collection...... and analytical method, was defined at the outset. A systematic review was undertaken with the keywords "fibromyalgia'', "treatment or management'' and "trial''. Studies were excluded if they did not utilise the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, were not clinical trials, or included...... patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis. Primary outcome measures were change in pain assessed by visual analogue scale and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire. The quality of the studies was categorised based on randomisation, blinding and allocation concealment. Only the highest...

  3. Immunization of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (the EULAR recommendations)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Assen, S.; Bijl, M.

    The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) have been recently published. These evidence-based recommendations were based on existing literature in combination with expert opinion. Although

  4. EULAR recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus. Report of a task force of the EULAR standing committee for international clinical studies including therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsias, G.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Boletis, J.; Bombardieri, S.; Cervera, R.; Dostal, C.; Font, J.; Gilboe, I. M.; Houssiau, F.; Huizinga, T.; Isenberg, D.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Khamashta, M.; Piette, J. C.; Schneider, M.; Smolen, J.; Sturfelt, G.; Tincani, A.; van Vollenhoven, R.; Gordon, C.; Boumpas, D. T.

    Objective: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with variable presentations, course and prognosis. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations addressing the major issues in the management of SLE. Methods: The EULAR Task Force on SLE comprised 19 specialists and a clinical

  5. Educational recommendations for the conduct, content and format of EULAR musculoskeletal ultrasound Teaching the Teachers Courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iagnocco, A; Terslev, Lene; Backhaus, M

    2015-01-01

    and place of the course; Faculty members; Content of the course; Evaluation of the teaching skills; TTT competency assessment) was distributed among a group of experts involved in MSUS teaching, in addition to an advisory educational expert being present. Consensus for each recommendation was considered...... to the development of guidelines for the conduct, content and format of teaching at the EULAR MSUS TTT Courses that are organised annually, with the aim of training future teachers of EULAR MSUS Courses, EULAR Endorsed MSUS Courses, as well as national and local MSUS Courses. The presented work gives indications...

  6. EULAR recommendations for patient education for people with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangi, Heidi A; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Adams, Jo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The task force aimed to: (1) develop evidence-based recommendations for patient education (PE) for people with inflammatory arthritis, (2) identify the need for further research on PE and (3) determine health professionals' educational needs in order to provide evidence-based PE....... METHODS: A multidisciplinary task force, representing 10 European countries, formulated a definition for PE and 10 research questions that guided a systematic literature review (SLR). The results from the SLR were discussed and used as a basis for developing the recommendations, a research agenda...... and an educational agenda. The recommendations were categorised according to level and strength of evidence graded from A (highest) to D (lowest). Task force members rated their agreement with each recommendation from 0 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). RESULTS: Based on the SLR and expert opinions...

  7. ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochling, J; van der Heijde, D; Burgos‐Vargas, R; Collantes, E; Davis, J C; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Géher, P; Inman, R D; Khan, M A; Kvien, T K; Leirisalo‐Repo, M; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stucki, G; Sturrock, R D; van der Linden, S; Wendling, D; Böhm, H; van Royen, B J; Braun, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as a combined effort of the ‘ASsessment in AS' international working group and the European League Against Rheumatism. Methods Each of the 22 participants was asked to contribute up to 15 propositions describing key clinical aspects of AS management. A Delphi process was used to select 10 final propositions. A systematic literature search was then performed to obtain scientific evidence for each proposition. Outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. The effect size, relative risk, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated. On the basis of the search results, 10 major recommendations for the management of AS were constructed. The strength of recommendation was assessed based on the strength of the literature evidence, risk‐benefit trade‐off, and clinical expertise. Results The final recommendations considered the use of non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (conventional NSAIDs, coxibs, and co‐prescription of gastroprotective agents), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, treatments with biological agents, simple analgesics, local and systemic steroids, non‐pharmacological treatment (including education, exercise, and physiotherapy), and surgical interventions. Three general recommendations were also included. Research evidence (categories I–IV) supported 11 interventions in the treatment of AS. Strength of recommendation varied, depending on the category of evidence and expert opinion. Conclusion Ten key recommendations for the treatment of AS were developed and assessed using a combination of research based evidence and expert consensus. Regular updating will be carried out to keep abreast of new developments in the management of AS. PMID:16126791

  8. Italian consensus on Eular 2003 recommendations for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Patrignani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recommendations for the management of osteoarthritis (OA of the knee firstly proposed by the EULAR in 2000, have been updated in 2003. One of the most important objectives of the expert charged to provide these recommendations was their dissemination. Thus, the information generated may be used by each individual country to produce their own set of management guidelines and algorithms for treatment in primary care. The Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR and the Italian League against Rheumatism (LIMAR have organised a Consensus on the EULAR recommendations 2003 with the aim to analyse their acceptability and the applicability according to our own experience and local situations in the Italy. The results of this Consensus have demonstrated that a large majority of the EULAR recommendations are endorsed by the Italian experts. Furthermore, the final document of the Italian Consensus clearly indicated the need that the specialists involved in the management of knee OA strongly encourage the dissemination of the EULAR 2003 recommendations also in Italy.

  9. Educational recommendations for the conduct, content and format of EULAR musculoskeletal ultrasound Teaching the Teachers Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iagnocco, A; Terslev, L; Backhaus, M; Balint, P; Bruyn, G A W; Damjanov, N; Filippucci, E; Hammer, H B; Jousse-Joulin, S; Kane, D; Koski, J M; Mandl, P; Möller, I; Peetrons, P; Schmidt, W; Szkudlarek, M; Vojinovic, J; Wakefield, R J; Hofer, M; D'Agostino, M A; Naredo, E

    2015-01-01

    To produce educational guidelines for the conduct, content and format of theoretical and practical teaching at EULAR musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) Teaching the Teachers (TTT) Courses. A Delphi-based procedure with 24 recommendations covering five main areas (Duration and place of the course; Faculty members; Content of the course; Evaluation of the teaching skills; TTT competency assessment) was distributed among a group of experts involved in MSUS teaching, in addition to an advisory educational expert being present. Consensus for each recommendation was considered achieved when the percentage of agreement was >75%. 21 of 24 invited participants responded to the first Delphi questionnaire (88% response rate). All 21 participants also responded to the second round. Agreement on 19 statements was obtained after two rounds. This project has led to the development of guidelines for the conduct, content and format of teaching at the EULAR MSUS TTT Courses that are organised annually, with the aim of training future teachers of EULAR MSUS Courses, EULAR Endorsed MSUS Courses, as well as national and local MSUS Courses. The presented work gives indications on how to homogenise the teaching at the MSUS TTT Courses, thus resolving current discrepancies in the field.

  10. 2016 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Bernard; Landewe, Robert; Daien, Claire I; Hua, Charlotte; Aletaha, Daniel; Álvaro-Gracia, Jose María; Bakkers, Margôt; Brodin, Nina; Burmester, Gerd R; Codreanu, Catalin; Conway, Richard; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Fonseca, Joao; Raza, Karim; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Smolen, Josef S; Skingle, Diana; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Kvien, Tore K; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Since the 2007 recommendations for the management of early arthritis have been presented, considerable research has been published in the field of early arthritis, mandating an update of the 2007 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for management of early arthritis. In accordance with the 2014 EULAR Standardised Operating Procedures, the expert committee pursued an approach that was based on evidence in the literature and on expert opinion. The committee involved 20 rheumatologists, 2 patients and 1 healthcare professional representing 12 European countries. The group defined the focus of the expert committee and target population, formulated a definition of 'management' and selected the research questions. A systematic literature research (SLR) was performed by two fellows with the help of a skilled librarian. A set of draft recommendations was proposed on the basis of the research questions and the results of the SLR. For each recommendation, the categories of evidence were identified, the strength of recommendations was derived and the level of agreement was determined through a voting process. The updated recommendations comprise 3 overarching principles and 12 recommendations for managing early arthritis. The selected statements involve the recognition of arthritis, referral, diagnosis, prognostication, treatment (information, education, pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions), monitoring and strategy. Eighteen items were identified as relevant for future research. These recommendations provide rheumatologists, general practitioners, healthcare professionals, patients and other stakeholders with an updated EULAR consensus on the entire management of early arthritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. EULAR revised recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macfarlane, G J; Kronisch, C; Dean, L E

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The original European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for managing fibromyalgia assessed evidence up to 2005. The paucity of studies meant that most recommendations were 'expert opinion'. METHODS: A multidisciplinary group from 12 countries assessed evidence with a focus...... on systematic reviews and meta-analyses concerned with pharmacological/non-pharmacological management for fibromyalgia. A review, in May 2015, identified eligible publications and key outcomes assessed were pain, fatigue, sleep and daily functioning. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development...

  12. Quality of treatment in gouty patients considering EULAR recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radak-Perović Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There are 12 recommendations for gout treatment, based on evidence and opinion of experts. Objective. To assess the quality of therapy in patients with gout analyzing adherence to four selected recommendations. Methods. Retrospective cross sectional study of 111 patients with gouty flare was conducted. Adherence to selected recommendation was defined as odds ratio between the number of patients whose therapy adhered to treatment recommendation and the number of patients eligible for the relevant recommendation. These recommendations refer to indications for allopurinol treatment (R1, prophylaxis of induced gouty flares in the first month of allopurinol treatment (R2, treatment goals (R3, and treatment monitoring regime (R4. Results. Out of 111 patients with gout, 25 with tophi, 87 with frequent gouty flares and 46 with CUA or X-ray erosions were indicated for allopurinol treatment. The adherence to R1 was 76% for tophi patients, 54% for patients with frequent gouty flares, and 63% for patients with CUA. None of the patients starting allopurinol was either recruited for gouty prophylaxis or monitored properly; adherence to R2 as well as to R4 was 0%. Target serum uric acid (SUc rating below 360 µmol/L was achieved in 13/50 patients treated with allopurinol, while the adherence to R3 was 26%. Therapeutic monitoring in accordance with P4 was not done in any of the patients on allopurinol. There were no differences in mean levels of the SUc between allopurinol users and non-users: 471.3±164.4 vs. 460.0±103.5 µmol/L (p=0.067. Therefore, almost every second patient with gouty flares was on allopurinol therapy (50/111. Conclusion. The degree of deviation in relation to the key principles of correct treatment in patients with gout ranged from a relatively high (24% to that of absolute digression (100%.

  13. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA).Methods. A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process......, 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR...... practice.Results. A total of 49¿242 references were identified, from which 167 studies were included in the systematic reviews. One clinical question regarding different comorbidities was divided into two separate reviews, resulting in 11 recommendations in total. Oxford levels of evidence were applied...

  14. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA).Methods. A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process......, 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR...... practice.Results. A total of 49 242 references were identified, from which 167 studies were included in the systematic reviews. One clinical question regarding different comorbidities was divided into two separate reviews, resulting in 11 recommendations in total. Oxford levels of evidence were applied...

  15. Raising the quality of rheumatology management recommendations: lessons from the EULAR process 10 years after provision of standard operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch-Bourn, Alexandra N; Conaghan, Philip G; Arden, Nigel K; Cooper, Cyrus; Dougados, Maxime; Edwards, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    To increase understanding of how to raise the quality of rheumatology guidelines by reviewing European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) management recommendations, using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, 10 years after publication of the EULAR standardized operating procedures (SOP) for the production of recommendations. It was hoped that this work could help inform improvements in guideline development by other societies and organizations. The SOP were published in 2004 to ensure the quality of EULAR-endorsed recommendations. We reviewed 27 published EULAR recommendations for management using the AGREE II tool. This provides a framework to assess the quality of guidelines across six broad domains using 23 specific questions. Overall the EULAR recommendations reviewed have been performed to a high standard. There are particular strengths in the methodology and presentation of the guidelines; however, the results indicate areas for development in future recommendations: in particular, stakeholder involvement and applicability of the recommendations. Improvements in quality were evident in recent years, with patient representation in 9 of 15 (60.0%) recommendations published 2010-14 compared with 4 of 12 (33.3%) published 2000-09. In the last 10 years the overall quality of recommendations was good, with standards improving over the decade following publication of the SOP. However, this review process has identified potential areas for improvement, especially in patient representation and provision of implementation tools. The lessons from this work can be applied to the development of rheumatology guidelines by other societies and organizations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Applicability of the EULAR recommendations on the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal Applicability of the EULAR recommendations on the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa, L.; Ramiro, S.; Santos, M. J.; Canas da Silva, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the level of agreement and applicability of the EULAR recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis in Portugal. Methods: Nurses from all Portuguese rheumatology centers were invited to fill-in a questionnaire addressing the

  17. Evidence-based recommendation on toothpaste use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Aparecido Cury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toothpaste can be used as a vehicle for substances to improve the oral health of individuals and populations. Therefore, it should be recommended based on the best scientific evidence available, and not on the opinion of authorities or specialists. Fluoride is the most important therapeutic substance used in toothpastes, adding to the effect of mechanical toothbrushing on dental caries control. The use of fluoride toothpaste to reduce caries in children and adults is strongly based on evidence, and is dependent on the concentration (minimum of 1000 ppm F and frequency of fluoride toothpaste use (2'/day or higher. The risk of dental fluorosis due to toothpaste ingestion by children has been overestimated, since there is no evidence that: 1 fluoride toothpaste use should be postponed until the age of 3-4 or older, 2 low-fluoride toothpaste avoids fluorosis and 3 fluorosis has a detrimental effect on the quality of life of individuals exposed to fluoridated water and toothpaste. Among other therapeutic substances used in toothpastes, there is evidence that triclosan/copolymer reduce dental biofilm, gingivitis, periodontitis, calculus and halitosis, and that toothpastes containing stannous fluoride reduce biofilm and gingivitis.

  18. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: Evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O'Connor, Alec B.; Backonja, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NP) are challenging to manage and evidence-based clinical recommendations for pharmacologic management are needed. Systematic literature reviews, randomized clinical trials, and existing guidelines were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications were considered...

  19. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S; Heslinga, M; McInnes, I B; Peters, M J L; Kvien, T K; Dougados, M; Radner, H; Atzeni, F; Primdahl, J; Södergren, A; Wallberg Jonsson, S; van Rompay, J; Zabalan, C; Pedersen, T R; Jacobsson, L; de Vlam, K; Gonzalez-Gay, M A; Semb, A G; Kitas, G D; Smulders, Y M; Szekanecz, Z; Sattar, N; Symmons, D P M; Nurmohamed, M T

    2017-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  20. Foot and ankle tendoscopy: evidence-based recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cychosz, Chris C.; Phisitkul, Phinit; Barg, Alexej; Nickisch, Florian; van Dijk, C. Niek; Glazebrook, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on tendoscopy of the foot and ankle and assign an evidence-based grade of recommendation for or against intervention. A comprehensive review of the literature was performed on May 26, 2013, using the PubMed,

  1. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  2. Developing evidence-based immunization recommendations and GRADE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, P; Durrheim, D N; Reingold, A L; Bhutta, Z A; Vannice, K; Rees, H

    2012-12-17

    The Strategic Group of Advisory Experts (SAGE) on immunization is an independent advisory committee with a mandate to advise the World Health Organization (WHO) on the development of vaccine and immunization related policies. SAGE working groups are established on a time-limited basis to review and provide evidence-based recommendations, together with their implications, for open deliberation and decision-making by SAGE. In making its recommendations, SAGE takes into consideration: the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the disease; vaccine and immunization characteristics; economic analysis; health system considerations; the existence of and interaction with other intervention and control strategies; costing and social impacts; and legal and ethical concerns. Since 1998, WHO has produced evidence-based vaccine position papers for use primarily by national public health officials and immunization programme managers. Since April 2006 all new or updated position papers have been based on SAGE recommendations. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach has been adopted by WHO and, since 2008, GRADE tables that rate the quality of evidence have been produced in support of key recommendations. SAGE previously expressed concern that GRADE was not ideally suited to many immunization-specific issues such as the vaccine population level effect and the inclusion of surveillance system data, particularly for vaccine safety. Extensive productive interactions with various advisory groups including the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the European Centres for Disease Control, the German Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO), WHO's Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety and the GRADE working group resulted in key enhancements to accommodate vaccine-relevant evidence. This facilitated integration and acceptability of the GRADE approach in the development of immunization related SAGE and WHO

  3. Recommendations for the content and conduct of European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) musculoskeletal ultrasound courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, E.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Conaghan, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    rheumatologists who comprised the faculty of the 14th EULAR ultrasound course (June 2007). The first questionnaire encompassed the following issues: type of MSUS educational model; course timing; course curriculum; course duration; number of participants per teacher in practical sessions; time spent on hands......: The response rate was 82.7% from the first questionnaire and 87.5% from the second questionnaire. The respondents were from 11 European countries. The group consensus on guidelines and curriculum was for a three-level education model (basic, intermediate and advanced) with timing and location related...... to the annual EULAR Congresses. The topics and pathologies to be included in each course were agreed. The course duration will be 20 h. There will be a maximum of six participants per teacher and 50-60% of total time will be spent on practical sessions. There was also agreement on prerequisite experience before...

  4. Recommendations for the content and conduct of EULAR Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; Bijlsma, Johannes Wj; Conaghan, Philip G

    2008-01-01

    of the 14th EULAR ultrasound course (June 2007). The first questionnaire encompassed the following issues: type of MSUS educational model; course timing; course curriculum; course duration; number of participants per teacher in practical sessions; time spent on hands-on sessions; and the requirements and...... questionnaire and 87.5% from the second questionnaire. The respondents were from 11 European countries. The group consensus on guidelines and curriculum was for a three level education model (basic, intermediate and advanced) with timing and location related to the annual EULAR Congresses. The topics...... and pathologies to be included in each course were agreed. The course duration will be 20 hours. There will be a maximum of 6 participants per teacher and 50-60% of total time will be spent on practical sessions. There was also agreement on pre-requisite experience before attending the intermediate and advanced...

  5. EULAR recommendations for the non-pharmacological core management of hip and knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Linda; Hagen, Kåre B; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Andreassen, Oyvor; Christensen, Pia; Conaghan, Philip G; Doherty, Michael; Geenen, Rinie; Hammond, Alison; Kjeken, Ingvild; Lohmander, L Stefan; Lund, Hans; Mallen, Christian D; Nava, Tiziana; Oliver, Susan; Pavelka, Karel; Pitsillidou, Irene; da Silva, José Antonio; de la Torre, Jenny; Zanoli, Gustavo; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M

    2013-07-01

    The objective was to develop evidence -based recommendations and a research and educational agenda for the non-pharmacological management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). The multidisciplinary task force comprised 21 experts: nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons, general practitioner, psychologist, dietician, clinical epidemiologist and patient representatives. After a preliminary literature review, a first task force meeting and five Delphi rounds, provisional recommendations were formulated in order to perform a systematic review. A literature search of Medline and eight other databases was performed up to February 2012. Evidence was graded in categories I-IV and agreement with the recommendations was determined through scores from 0 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). Eleven evidence-based recommendations for the non-pharmacological core management of hip and knee OA were developed, concerning the following nine topics: assessment, general approach, patient information and education, lifestyle changes, exercise, weight loss, assistive technology and adaptations, footwear and work. The average level of agreement ranged between 8.0 and 9.1. The proposed research agenda included an overall need for more research into non-pharmacological interventions for hip OA, moderators to optimise individualised treatment, healthy lifestyle with economic evaluation and long-term follow-up, and the prevention and reduction of work disability. Proposed educational activities included the required skills to teach, initiate and establish lifestyle changes. The 11 recommendations provide guidance on the delivery of non-pharmacological interventions to people with hip or knee OA. More research and educational activities are needed, particularly in the area of lifestyle changes.

  6. EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch, Alexandra N; Edwards, Christopher John; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  7. Australian and New Zealand evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in adult patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bethan L; Whittle, Samuel; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Barrett, Claire; Lynch, Nora; Major, Gabor; Littlejohn, Geoffrey; Taylor, Andrew; Zochling, Jane

    2014-09-01

    To develop Australian and New Zealand evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in adult patients with optimally treated inflammatory arthritis (IA). Four hundred and fifty-three rheumatologists from 17 countries including 46 rheumatologists from Australia and New Zealand participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process, rheumatologists from 15 national scientific committees selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 EULAR/ACR abstracts. Relevant studies were retrieved for data extraction and risk of bias assessment. Rheumatologists from Australia and New Zealand used the evidence to develop a set of national recommendations. These recommendations were then formulated and assessed for agreement and the potential impact on clinical practice. The Oxford Levels of Evidence and Grade of Recommendation were applied to each recommendation. The systematic reviews identified 49 242 references, from which 167 studies which met the pre-specified inclusion criteria. Combining this evidence with expert opinion led to the development of 10 final Australian and New Zealand recommendations. The recommendations relate to pain measurement, and the use of analgesic medications in patients with and without co-morbidities and during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations reflect the clinical practice of the majority of the participating rheumatologists (mean level of agreement 7.24-9.65). Ten Australian and New Zealand evidence-based recommendations regarding the management of pain by pharmacotherapy in adults with optimally treated IA were developed. They are supported by a large panel of rheumatologists, thus enhancing their utility in everyday clinical practice. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley

  8. EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: 2013 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Landewé, Robert; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Buch, Maya; Burmester, Gerd; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Gossec, Laure; Nam, Jackie; Ramiro, Sofia; Winthrop, Kevin; de Wit, Maarten; Aletaha, Daniel; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Boers, Maarten; Buttgereit, Frank; Combe, Bernard; Cutolo, Maurizio; Damjanov, Nemanja; Hazes, Johanna M W; Kouloumas, Marios; Kvien, Tore K; Mariette, Xavier; Pavelka, Karel; van Riel, Piet L C M; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Scott, David L; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Wong, John B; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the 2010 European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs and bDMARDs, respectively) have been updated. The 2013 update has been developed by an international task force, which based its decisions mostly on evidence from three systematic literature reviews (one each on sDMARDs, including glucocorticoids, bDMARDs and safety aspects of DMARD therapy); treatment strategies were also covered by the searches. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) were determined. Fourteen recommendations were developed (instead of 15 in 2010). Some of the 2010 recommendations were deleted, and others were amended or split. The recommendations cover general aspects, such as attainment of remission or low disease activity using a treat-to-target approach, and the need for shared decision-making between rheumatologists and patients. The more specific items relate to starting DMARD therapy using a conventional sDMARD (csDMARD) strategy in combination with glucocorticoids, followed by the addition of a bDMARD or another csDMARD strategy (after stratification by presence or absence of adverse risk factors) if the treatment target is not reached within 6 months (or improvement not seen at 3 months). Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, biosimilars), abatacept, tocilizumab and, under certain circumstances, rituximab are essentially considered to have similar efficacy and safety. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD may be used. The recommendations also address tofacitinib as a targeted sDMARD (tsDMARD), which is recommended, where licensed, after use of at least

  9. EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colebatch, Alexandra N.; Edwards, Christopher John; Østergaard, Mikkel; van der Heijde, Désirée; Balint, Peter V.; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Forslind, Kristina; Grassi, Walter; Haavardsholm, Espen A.; Haugeberg, Glenn; Jurik, Anne-Grethe; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Naredo, Esperanza; O'Connor, Philip J.; Ostendorf, Ben; Potocki, Kristina; Schmidt, Wolfgang A.; Smolen, Josef S.; Sokolovic, Sekib; Watt, Iain; Conaghan, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging of the joints in the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The task force comprised an expert group of rheumatologists, radiologists, methodologists and experienced rheumatology practitioners from 13 countries. Thirteen key

  10. Helping Patients to Make Informed Decisions : The PARE Guide to Disseminate EULAR Recommendations Among Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.; Bakker, M.; van Bodegom-Vos, L.; Buch, M.; Caeyers, N.; Carluccio, A.; Geenen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087017571; Greiff, R.; Glüsing, B.; Gossec, L.; Kent, A.; Poldema, I.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Wiek, D.; Schipper, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Accurate patient information is necessary to make informed health decisions. However, the traditional, scientific wording of professional recommendations is often difficult to understand for lay people. OBJECTIVES To develop a practical guide for patient organizations and health

  11. EULAR recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; van Tubergen, Astrid; Boström, Carina; Braychenko, Elena; Buss, Beate; Felix, José; Firth, Jill; Hammond, Alison; Harston, Benny; Hernandez, Cristina; Huzjak, Masa; Korandová, Jana; Kukkurainen, Marja Leena; Landewé, Robert; Mezieres, Maryse; Milincovic, Marijana; Moretti, Antonella; Oliver, Susan; Primdahl, Jette; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Waite-Jones, Jennifer; Westhovens, Rene; Zangi, Heidi Andersen; Heiberg, Turid; Hill, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The authors aim to develop European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis, to identify a research agenda and to determine an educational agenda. Methods A task force made up of a

  12. Development of EULAR recommendations for the reporting of clinical trial extension studies in rheumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Maya H; Silva-Fernandez, Lucia; Carmona, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    analysis (agreement mean (SD) scores ranging between 7.9 (0.84) and 9.0 (2.16)) and reporting of results as well as ethical issues. Key recommendations included reporting of absolute numbers at each stage from the RCT to TES with reasons given for drop-out at each stage, and inclusion of a flowchart...

  13. New evidence-based diabetes nutrition recommendations: correcting myths and updating practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Linda C

    2003-04-01

    This article summarizes the evidence-based nutrition recommendations for diabetes published first in 2002 by the ADA, and identifies diet information that now should be recognized as misconception or myth. Home care clinicians must become cognizant of evidence-based guidelines and update clinical practices, care paths, and teaching materials accordingly.

  14. EULAR recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus with neuropsychiatric manifestations : report of a task force of the EULAR standing committee for clinical affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsias, G. K.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Aringer, M.; Bollen, E.; Bombardieri, S.; Bruce, I. N.; Cervera, R.; Dalakas, M.; Doria, A.; Hanly, J. G.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Isenberg, D.; Kallenberg, C.; Piette, J. C.; Schneider, M.; Scolding, N.; Smolen, J.; Stara, A.; Tassiulas, I.; Tektonidou, M.; Tincani, A.; van Buchem, M. A.; van Vollenhoven, R.; Ward, M.; Gordon, C.; Boumpas, D. T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) manifestations. Methods The authors compiled questions on prevalence and risk factors, diagnosis and monitoring, therapy and prognosis of NPSLE. A systematic

  15. Evidence-based review, grade of recommendation, and suggested treatment recommendations for melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melasma is known to be less satisfactory, often incomplete, and relapse is frequent. Although many treatment options are available, they are either known to be unsafe on long-term use or their long-term safety profile is unknown. Patients often use various drugs, even topical steroid-based preparation without any medical supervision for long period of time, making the skin unsuitable for many of the drugs available. Thus, there has been gross disparity among the treating physician about what drugs and what regimen are best suitable for various categories of melasma patients and in different situations. With this background, numerous newer drugs, mostly combinations of some proprietary molecules or even unknown plant extracts, have flooded the market for the management of melasma. Information on efficacy or safety of these products are almost unknown. Studies on Asian people, especially Indian population, are far less commonly available. Therapeutic guideline for use on Indian patients with melasma is almost missing. Extrapolation of data from Caucasian people for use on Asian people may not be scientifically justifiable because Caucasian and Asian people are known to have inherent difference in their response as well as tolerance to the drugs used for melasma. With this background, we have extensively evaluated, following a strict, scientifically designed protocol, all the available studies on melasma management till May 2016 and prepared this document on level of evidence, grade of recommendation and suggested therapeutic guideline for melasma as per the method proposed by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine. Various ethical, social, logical, regional, and economic issues in the context of Indian and similar populations were given due importance while preparing the suggested therapeutic recommendation.

  16. Evidence-based recommendations to facilitate professional collaboration between allopathic and traditional health practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. (Dalena van Rooyen

    2017-10-01

    Purpose of the research: To develop evidence-based recommendations aimed at facilitating professional collaboration between allopathic and traditional health practitioners for the benefit of patients. Methodology: Descriptive evidence-based recommendations to enhance professional collaboration between both groups of health practitioners were developed based on focus group interviews with allopathic practitioners (n = 10 and individual interviews with traditional health practitioners (n = 18 (traditional health practitioners (n = 14 and traditional healers who are also allopathic health practitioners (n = 4 practising in the Amathole District in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Dickoff et al.'s (1968 Survey List wasused as a conceptual framework. Results: Collaboration was hampered by allopathic practitioners demonstrating negative attitudes by not referring patients to traditional practitioners based on lack of knowledge and mutual understanding of each other's practices. Suggestions for collaboration made by both groups resulted in the development of two distinct sets of evidence-based recommendations.The first set of recommendations aims to enhance professional collaboration between both groups of health practitioners. This is done through facilitating mutual understanding based on respect and acceptance between the different practitioners. The second set of recommendations aims to enhance professional collaboration through facilitating open communication between different practitioners. Conclusion: These evidence-based recommendations can be used to facilitate professional collaboration between allopathic and traditional health practitioners resulting in mutual understanding and open communication, enhancing team work in a multi-professional environment, and ultimately leading to improved patient care.

  17. Evidence-based analysis of physical therapy in Parkinson's disease with recommendations for practice and research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.; Bloem, B.R.; Hendriks, E.J.M.; Bredero-Cohen, A.B.; Munneke, M.

    2007-01-01

    Physical therapy is often prescribed in Parkinson's disease. To facilitate the uniformity and efficacy of this intervention, we analyzed current evidence and developed practice recommendations. We carried out an evidence-based literature review. The results were supplemented with clinical expertise

  18. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  19. Management of Behçet disease: a systematic literature review for the European League Against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations for the management of Behçet disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, G; Silman, A; Bang, D; Bodaghi, B; Chamberlain, A M; Gul, A; Houman, M H; Kötter, I; Olivieri, I; Salvarani, C; Sfikakis, P P; Siva, A; Stanford, M R; Stübiger, N; Yurdakul, S; Yazici, H

    2009-10-01

    To present and analyse the literature sources regarding the management of Behçet disease (BD) identified during the systematic literature research, which formed the basis for the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) evidence-based recommendations for the management of BD. Problem areas and related keywords regarding the management of BD were determined by the multidisciplinary expert committee commissioned by EULAR for developing the recommendations. A systematic literature research was performed using MedLine and Cochrane Library resources through to December 2006. Meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials (RCTs), open studies, observational studies, case control studies and case series' involving > or = 5 patients were included. For each intervention the effect size and number needed to treat were calculated for efficacy. Odds ratios and numbers needed to harm were calculated for safety issues of different treatment modalities where possible. The literature research yielded 137 articles that met the inclusion criteria; 20 of these were RCTs. There was good evidence supporting the use of azathioprine and cyclosporin A in eye involvement and interferon (IFN)alpha in mucocutaneous involvement. There were no RCTs with IFNalpha or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha antagonists in eye involvement. Similarly controlled data for the management of vascular, gastrointestinal and neurological involvement is lacking. Properly designed, controlled studies (new and confirmatory) are still needed to guide us in managing BD.

  20. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivera, Francisca; Andrés, Mariano; Carmona, Loreto

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to develop evidence-based multinational recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout. Using a formal voting process, a panel of 78 international rheumatologists developed 10 key clinical questions pertinent to the diagnosis and management of gout. Each question was investigated...... of evidence. Agreement and potential impact on clinical practice were assessed. Combining evidence and clinical expertise, 10 recommendations were produced. One recommendation referred to the diagnosis of gout, two referred to cardiovascular and renal comorbidities, six focused on different aspects...... of the management of gout (including drug treatment and monitoring), and the last recommendation referred to the management of asymptomatic hyperuricaemia. The level of agreement with the recommendations ranged from 8.1 to 9.2 (mean 8.7) on a 1-10 scale, with 10 representing full agreement. Ten recommendations...

  1. Can facts trump unconditional trust? Evidence-based information halves the influence of physicians' non-evidence-based cancer screening recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwarth, Odette; Wagner, Gert G; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Informed decision making in medicine, defined as basing one's decision on the best current medical evidence, requires both informed physicians and informed patients. In cancer screening, however, studies document that these prerequisites are not yet met. Many physicians do not know or understand the medical evidence behind screening tests, do not adequately counsel (asymptomatic) people on screening, and make recommendations that conflict with existing guidelines on informed choice. Consistent with this situation, nation-wide studies showed that the general public misperceives the contribution of cancer screening but that understanding considerably improves when evidence-based information is provided. However, can evidence-based patient information about cancer screening make people also less likely to simply follow a physician's non-evidence-based advice? A national sample of 897 German citizens, surveyed in face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews, received either evidence-based (e.g., absolute risks on benefits and harms; n = 451) or non-evidence-based (e.g., relative risks on benefits only; n = 446) patient information about a cancer screening test and were then asked to make their initial cancer screening choice. Thereafter, participants received a hypothetical physician's recommendation, which was non-evidence-based in terms of existing guidelines on informed decision making (i.e., reporting either benefits or harms but not both; no provision of numbers). When provided with non-evidence-based patient information (n = 446), a mean of 33.1% of 235 participants whose initial screening choice contradicted the hypothetical physician's non-evidence-based recommendation adjusted their choice in deference to that recommendation (95% CI: 27.4 to 39.4%), whereas with evidence-based patient information (n = 451), only half as many, a mean of 16.0% of 225 (95% CI: 11.8 to 21.4%), modified their choice. Thus, evidence-based patient information makes people less

  2. Can facts trump unconditional trust? Evidence-based information halves the influence of physicians' non-evidence-based cancer screening recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Wegwarth

    Full Text Available Informed decision making in medicine, defined as basing one's decision on the best current medical evidence, requires both informed physicians and informed patients. In cancer screening, however, studies document that these prerequisites are not yet met. Many physicians do not know or understand the medical evidence behind screening tests, do not adequately counsel (asymptomatic people on screening, and make recommendations that conflict with existing guidelines on informed choice. Consistent with this situation, nation-wide studies showed that the general public misperceives the contribution of cancer screening but that understanding considerably improves when evidence-based information is provided. However, can evidence-based patient information about cancer screening make people also less likely to simply follow a physician's non-evidence-based advice? A national sample of 897 German citizens, surveyed in face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews, received either evidence-based (e.g., absolute risks on benefits and harms; n = 451 or non-evidence-based (e.g., relative risks on benefits only; n = 446 patient information about a cancer screening test and were then asked to make their initial cancer screening choice. Thereafter, participants received a hypothetical physician's recommendation, which was non-evidence-based in terms of existing guidelines on informed decision making (i.e., reporting either benefits or harms but not both; no provision of numbers. When provided with non-evidence-based patient information (n = 446, a mean of 33.1% of 235 participants whose initial screening choice contradicted the hypothetical physician's non-evidence-based recommendation adjusted their choice in deference to that recommendation (95% CI: 27.4 to 39.4%, whereas with evidence-based patient information (n = 451, only half as many, a mean of 16.0% of 225 (95% CI: 11.8 to 21.4%, modified their choice. Thus, evidence-based patient information makes

  3. FORM: an Australian method for formulating and grading recommendations in evidence-based clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; Grimmer-Somers, Karen; Merlin, Tracy; Middleton, Philippa; Salisbury, Janet; Tooher, Rebecca; Weston, Adele

    2011-02-28

    Clinical practice guidelines are an important element of evidence-based practice. Considering an often complicated body of evidence can be problematic for guideline developers, who in the past may have resorted to using levels of evidence of individual studies as a quasi-indicator for the strength of a recommendation. This paper reports on the production and trial of a methodology and associated processes to assist Australian guideline developers in considering a body of evidence and grading the resulting guideline recommendations. In recognition of the complexities of clinical guidelines and the multiple factors that influence choice in health care, a working group of experienced guideline consultants was formed under the auspices of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) to produce and pilot a framework to formulate and grade guideline recommendations. Consultation with national and international experts and extensive piloting informed the process. The FORM framework consists of five components (evidence base, consistency, clinical impact, generalisability and applicability) which are used by guideline developers to structure their decisions on how to convey the strength of a recommendation through wording and grading via a considered judgement form. In parallel (but separate from the grading process) guideline developers are asked to consider implementation implications for each recommendation. The framework has now been widely adopted by Australian guideline developers who find it to be a logical and intuitive way to formulate and grade recommendations in clinical practice guidelines.

  4. FORM: An Australian method for formulating and grading recommendations in evidence-based clinical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salisbury Janet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical practice guidelines are an important element of evidence-based practice. Considering an often complicated body of evidence can be problematic for guideline developers, who in the past may have resorted to using levels of evidence of individual studies as a quasi-indicator for the strength of a recommendation. This paper reports on the production and trial of a methodology and associated processes to assist Australian guideline developers in considering a body of evidence and grading the resulting guideline recommendations. Methods In recognition of the complexities of clinical guidelines and the multiple factors that influence choice in health care, a working group of experienced guideline consultants was formed under the auspices of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC to produce and pilot a framework to formulate and grade guideline recommendations. Consultation with national and international experts and extensive piloting informed the process. Results The FORM framework consists of five components (evidence base, consistency, clinical impact, generalisability and applicability which are used by guideline developers to structure their decisions on how to convey the strength of a recommendation through wording and grading via a considered judgement form. In parallel (but separate from the grading process guideline developers are asked to consider implementation implications for each recommendation. Conclusions The framework has now been widely adopted by Australian guideline developers who find it to be a logical and intuitive way to formulate and grade recommendations in clinical practice guidelines.

  5. Are the Contraceptive Recommendations of Family Medicine Educators Evidence-Based? A CERA Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Justine P; Gundersen, Daniel A; Pickle, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Our study aims were to: (1) describe the scope of contraceptive methods provided by US family medicine educators and (2) assess the extent to which US family medicine educators' recommendations regarding eligibility criteria for contraceptive methods are consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. We contributed survey items as part of the 2014 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) omnibus survey, which is distributed annually to a national cohort of US family medicine educators. We created two summary scales, comprised of clinical scenarios, to assess the extent to which provider recommendations regarding eligibility criteria for oral contraceptive pills (OCPs, six scenarios) and the intrauterine device (IUD, eight scenarios) were consistent with CDC guidelines. Among the 1,054 respondents (33% response rate), 98% prescribe OCPs and 66% insert IUDs. The OCP scale mean was 4.6 ± SD 1.6 (range 0-6), and the IUD scale mean was 4.8 SD ± 2.3 (range 0-8). These scores reflect that 23% of providers' OCP recommendations and 40% of their IUD recommendations were inconsistent with CDC guidelines. The contraceptive recommendations of this cohort of family medicine educators only partially reflected evidence-based guidelines. More misconceptions were noted regarding eligibility criteria for the IUD than for OCPs. To avoid denying safe and effective contraception to otherwise appropriate candidates and putting women at risk of unintended pregnancy, evidence-based contraceptive recommendations must be improved among family medicine educators.

  6. EULAR recommendations for terminology and research in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis: report from the Study Group for Risk Factors for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlag, Danielle M; Raza, Karim; van Baarsen, Lisa G M; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Buckley, Christopher D; Burmester, Gerd R; Gabay, Cem; Catrina, Anca I; Cope, Andrew P; Cornelis, François; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Emery, Paul; Eyre, Stephen; Finckh, Axel; Gay, Steffen; Hazes, Johanna M; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; Huizinga, Tom W J; Klareskog, Lars; Kvien, Tore K; Lewis, Cathryn; Machold, Klaus P; Rönnelid, Johan; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Schett, Georg; Smolen, Josef S; Thomas, Sue; Worthington, Jane; Tak, Paul P

    2012-01-01

    The Study Group for Risk Factors for Rheumatoid Arthritis was established by the EULAR Standing Committee on Investigative Rheumatology to facilitate research into the preclinical and earliest clinically apparent phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This report describes the recommendation for terminology to be used to define specific subgroups during different phases of disease, and defines the priorities for research in this area. Terminology was discussed by way of a three-stage structured process: A provisional list of descriptors for each of the possible phases preceding the diagnosis of RA were circulated to members of the study group for review and feedback. Anonymised comments from the members on this list were fed back to participants before a 2-day meeting. 18 participants met to discuss these data, agree terminologies and prioritise important research questions. The study group recommended that, in prospective studies, individuals without RA are described as having: genetic risk factors for RA; environmental risk factors for RA; systemic autoimmunity associated with RA; symptoms without clinical arthritis; unclassified arthritis; which may be used in a combinatorial manner. It was recommended that the prefix ‘pre-RA with:’ could be used before any/any combination of the five points above but only to describe retrospectively a phase that an individual had progressed through once it was known that they have developed RA. An approach to dating disease onset was recommended. In addition, important areas for research were proposed, including research of other tissues in which an adaptive immune response may be initiated, and the identification of additional risk factors and biomarkers for the development of RA, its progression and the development of extra-articular features. These recommendations provide guidance on approaches to describe phases before the development of RA that will facilitate communication between researchers and comparisons between

  7. Mental Health Smartphone Apps: Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations for Future Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, David; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Rickwood, Debra; Rickard, Nikki

    2016-03-01

    The number of mental health apps (MHapps) developed and now available to smartphone users has increased in recent years. MHapps and other technology-based solutions have the potential to play an important part in the future of mental health care; however, there is no single guide for the development of evidence-based MHapps. Many currently available MHapps lack features that would greatly improve their functionality, or include features that are not optimized. Furthermore, MHapp developers rarely conduct or publish trial-based experimental validation of their apps. Indeed, a previous systematic review revealed a complete lack of trial-based evidence for many of the hundreds of MHapps available. To guide future MHapp development, a set of clear, practical, evidence-based recommendations is presented for MHapp developers to create better, more rigorous apps. A literature review was conducted, scrutinizing research across diverse fields, including mental health interventions, preventative health, mobile health, and mobile app design. Sixteen recommendations were formulated. Evidence for each recommendation is discussed, and guidance on how these recommendations might be integrated into the overall design of an MHapp is offered. Each recommendation is rated on the basis of the strength of associated evidence. It is important to design an MHapp using a behavioral plan and interactive framework that encourages the user to engage with the app; thus, it may not be possible to incorporate all 16 recommendations into a single MHapp. Randomized controlled trials are required to validate future MHapps and the principles upon which they are designed, and to further investigate the recommendations presented in this review. Effective MHapps are required to help prevent mental health problems and to ease the burden on health systems.

  8. Are recommendations about routine antenatal care in Australia consistent and evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jennifer M; Lumley, Judith

    2002-03-18

    To describe the variability and evidence base of recommendations in Australian protocols and national policies about six aspects of routine antenatal care. Comparison of recommendations from local protocols, national guidelines and research about number of visits, screening for gestational diabetes (GDM), syphilis, hepatitis C (HCV), and HIV, and advice on smoking cessation. Australian public hospitals with more than 200 births/year, some smaller hospitals in each State and Territory, and all Divisions of General Practice were contacted in 1999 and 2000. We reviewed 107 protocols, which included 80% of those requested from hospitals and 92% of those requested from Divisions. Frequency and consistency of recommendations. Recommendations about syphilis testing were notable in demonstrating consistency between local protocols, national policies and research evidence. Most protocols recommended screening for GDM, despite lack of good evidence of its effectiveness in improving outcomes. Specific approaches to screening for GDM varied widely. Coverage and specific recommendations about testing for HIV and HCV were also highly variable. Smoking-cessation information and advice was rarely included, despite good evidence of the effectiveness of interventions in improving outcomes. No national policies about the number of routine visits and smoking cessation could be identified. There were inconsistent national policies for both HIV and GDM screening. Antenatal care recommended in protocols used in Australia varies, and is not always consistent with national policies or research evidence. Producing and disseminating systematic reviews of research evidence and national guidelines might reduce this variability and improve the quality of Australian antenatal care.

  9. Classification and Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Fitzcharles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS, characterized by subjective complaints without physical or biomarker abnormality, courts controversy. Recommendations in recent guidelines addressing classification and diagnosis were examined for consistencies or differences. Methods. Systematic searches from January 2008 to February 2013 of the US-American National Guideline Clearing House, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, Guidelines International Network, and Medline for evidence-based guidelines for the management of FMS were conducted. Results. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines, independently developed in Canada, Germany, and Israel, recommended that FMS can be clinically diagnosed by a typical cluster of symptoms following a defined evaluation including history, physical examination, and selected laboratory tests, to exclude another somatic disease. Specialist referral is only recommended when some other physical or mental illness is reasonably suspected. The diagnosis can be based on the (modified preliminary American College of Rheumatology (ACR 2010 diagnostic criteria. Discussion. Guidelines from three continents showed remarkable consistency regarding the clinical concept of FMS, acknowledging that FMS is neither a distinct rheumatic nor mental disorder, but rather a cluster of symptoms, not explained by another somatic disease. While FMS remains an integral part of rheumatology, it is not an exclusive rheumatic condition and spans a broad range of medical disciplines.

  10. Evidence base on outpatient behavioral treatments for adolescent substance use: updates and recommendations 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E; Ozechowski, Timothy J; Robbins, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    This article updates the evidence base on outpatient behavioral treatments for adolescent substance use (ASU) since publication of the previous review completed for this journal by Waldron and Turner ( 2008 ). It first summarizes the Waldron and Turner findings as well as those from more recent literature reviews and meta-analytic studies of ASU treatment. It then presents study design and methods criteria used to select 19 comparative studies subjected to Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology level of support evaluation. These 19 studies are grouped by study category (efficacy or effectiveness) and described for sample characteristics, methodological quality, and substance use outcomes. Cumulative level of support designations are then made for each identified treatment approach: ecological family-based treatment, group cognitive-behavioral therapy, and individual cognitive-behavioral therapy are deemed Well Established; behavioral family-based treatment and motivational interviewing are deemed Probably Efficacious; drug counseling is deemed Possibly Efficacious; and four integrated treatment models combining more than one approach are deemed Well Established or Probably Efficacious. The remainder of the article (a) articulates fidelity, mediator, and moderator effects reported for evidence-based approaches since 2008 and (b) recommends four enhancements to the prevailing business model of ASU outpatient services to accelerate penetration of evidence-based approaches into the underserved consumer base: pursue partnerships with influential governmental systems, utilize web-based technology to extend reach and control costs, adapt effective methods for linking services across sectors of care, and promote uptake and sustainability by emphasizing return on investment.

  11. Evidence-based recommendations for the prescription of exercise for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethorst, Chad D; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2013-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a source of great disease burden, due in part to the limited accessibility and effectiveness of current treatments. Although current treatments are efficacious in a segment of the population with MDD, there is a clear need for alternative and augmentation treatment strategies. Exercise is one such alternative treatment option. Research has shown exercise to be efficacious as both a stand-alone and an augmentation therapy. As a result, exercise is now included in the American Psychiatric Association's treatment recommendations. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with a knowledge base to prescribe exercise to their patients. The authors describe the evidence supporting the use of exercise in the treatment of MDD, provide evidence-based recommendations for prescribing exercise, and address practical considerations related to prescribing exercise in real-world treatment settings.

  12. Bone Health in Patients with Breast Cancer: Recommendations from an Evidence-Based Canadian Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. G. Paterson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss is common in patients with breast cancer. Bone modifying agents (BMAs, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, have been shown to reverse or stabilize bone loss and may be useful in the primary and metastatic settings. The purpose of this review is to provide clear evidence-based strategies for the management of bone loss and its symptoms in breast cancer. A systematic review of clinical trials and meta-analyses published between 1996 and 2012 was conducted of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Reference lists were hand-searched for additional publications. Recommendations were developed based on the best available evidence. Zoledronate, pamidronate, clodronate, and denosumab are recommended for metastatic breast cancer patients; however, no one agent can be recommended over another. Zoledronate or any oral bisphosphonate and denosumab should be considered in primary breast cancer patients who are postmenopausal on aromatase inhibitor therapy and have a high risk of fracture and/or a low bone mineral density and in premenopausal primary breast cancer patients who become amenorrheic after therapy. No one agent can be recommended over another. BMAs are not currently recommended as adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer for the purpose of improving survival, although a major Early Breast Cancer Cooperative Trialists’ Group meta-analysis is underway which may impact future practice. Adverse events can be managed with appropriate supportive care.

  13. Topical therapies in the management of chronic rhinosinusitis: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Hoy, Monica; Schlosser, Rodney J; Harvey, Richard J; Welch, Kevin C; Lund, Valerie; Smith, Timothy L

    2013-04-01

    Topical therapies have become an integral component in the management plan for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Several topical therapy strategies have been evaluated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the utilization of topical therapies in the management of CRS. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria were: adult population >18 years old; chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) based on published diagnostic criteria; and clearly defined primary clinical end-point. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2b or higher), but reported on lower-level studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. We excluded drug-eluting spacer and stent therapy from this review. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 5 topical therapy strategies for CRS: saline irrigation, topical steroid, topical antibiotic, topical antifungal, and topical alternatives (surfactant, manuka honey, and xylitol irrigations). Based on the available evidence, sinonasal saline irrigation and standard topical nasal steroid therapy are recommended in the topical treatment of CRS. Nonstandard (off-label) topical sinonasal steroid therapies can be an option for managing CRS. The evidence recommends against the use of topical antifungal therapy and topical antibiotic therapy delivered using nebulized and spray techniques in routine cases of CRS. There is insufficient clinical research to provide recommendations for alternative therapies or topical antibiotic therapy delivered using other delivery methods (eg, irrigations). © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. Early postoperative care following endoscopic sinus surgery: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Soler, Zachary M; Orlandi, Richard R; Stewart, Michael G; Bhattacharyya, Neil; Kennedy, David W; Smith, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Early postoperative care following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has been suggested to minimize avoidable complications and optimize long-term outcomes. Several postoperative care strategies have been proposed but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach to early postoperative care following ESS. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the Clinical Practice Guideline Manual, Conference on Guideline Standardization (COGS), and the Appraisal of Guidelines and Research Evaluation (AGREE) instrument recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria were: adult population >18 years old; chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) based on published diagnostic criteria; ESS following failed medical therapy; primary study objective was to evaluate an ESS early postoperative care strategy; and clearly defined primary clinical end-point. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 7 early postoperative care strategies following ESS: saline irrigations, sinus cavity debridements, systemic steroids, topical steroids, oral antibiotics, topical decongestants, and drug-eluting spacers/stents. Based on the available evidence, use of nasal saline irrigation, sinus cavity debridement, and standard topical nasal steroid spray are recommended early postoperative care interventions. Postoperative antibiotic, systemic steroid, nonstandard topical nasal steroid solution, and/or drug-eluting spacers/stents are options in postoperative management. These evidence-based recommendations should not necessarily be applied to all postoperative patients and clinical judgment, in addition to evidence, is critical to determining the most appropriate care. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  15. EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Landewé, Robert; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Gaujoux-Viala, Cecile; Gorter, Simone; Knevel, Rachel; Nam, Jackie; Schoels, Monika; Aletaha, Daniel; Buch, Maya; Gossec, Laure; Huizinga, Tom; Bijlsma, Johannes W J W; Burmester, Gerd; Combe, Bernard; Cutolo, Maurizio; Gabay, Cem; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Kouloumas, Marios; Kvien, Tore K; Martin-Mola, Emilio; McInnes, Iain; Pavelka, Karel; van Riel, Piet; Scholte, Marieke; Scott, David L; Sokka, Tuulikki; Valesini, Guido; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Winthrop, Kevin L; Wong, John; Zink, Angela; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may differ among rheumatologists and currently, clear and consensual international recommendations on RA treatment are not available. In this paper recommendations for the treatment of RA with synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and glucocorticoids (GCs) that also account for strategic algorithms and deal with economic aspects, are described. The recommendations are based on evidence from five systematic literature reviews (SLRs) performed for synthetic DMARDs, biological DMARDs, GCs, treatment strategies and economic issues. The SLR-derived evidence was discussed and summarised as an expert opinion in the course of a Delphi-like process. Levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Fifteen recommendations were developed covering an area from general aspects such as remission/low disease activity as treatment aim via the preference for methotrexate monotherapy with or without GCs vis-à-vis combination of synthetic DMARDs to the use of biological agents mainly in patients for whom synthetic DMARDs and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors had failed. Cost effectiveness of the treatments was additionally examined. These recommendations are intended to inform rheumatologists, patients and other stakeholders about a European consensus on the management of RA with DMARDs and GCs as well as strategies to reach optimal outcomes of RA, based on evidence and expert opinion. PMID:20444750

  16. EULAR/PReS standards and recommendations for the transitional care of young people with juvenile-onset rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Helen E; Minden, Kirsten; Clemente, Daniel; Leon, Leticia; McDonagh, Janet E; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Berggren, Karin; van Pelt, Philomine; Wouters, Carine; Waite-Jones, Jennifer; Tattersall, Rachel; Wyllie, Ruth; Stones, Simon R; Martini, Alberto; Constantin, Tamas; Schalm, Susanne; Fidanci, Berna; Erer, Burak; Dermikaya, Erkan; Ozen, Seza; Carmona, Loreto

    2017-04-01

    To develop standards and recommendations for transitional care for young people (YP) with juvenile-onset rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (jRMD). The consensus process involved the following: (1) establishing an international expert panel to include patients and representatives from multidisciplinary teams in adult and paediatric rheumatology; (2) a systematic review of published models of transitional care in jRMDs, potential standards and recommendations, strategies for implementation and tools to evaluate services and outcomes; (3) setting the framework, developing the process map and generating a first draft of standards and recommendations; (4) further iteration of recommendations; (5) establishing consensus recommendations with Delphi methodology and (6) establishing standards and quality indicators. The final consensus derived 12 specific recommendations for YP with jRMD focused on transitional care. These included: high-quality, multidisciplinary care starting in early adolescence; the integral role of a transition co-ordinator; transition policies and protocols; efficient communications; transfer documentation; an open electronic-based platform to access resources; appropriate training for paediatric and adult healthcare teams; secure funding to continue treatments and services into adult rheumatology and the need for increased evidence to inform best practice. These consensus-based recommendations inform strategies to reach optimal outcomes in transitional care for YP with jRMD based on available evidence and expert opinion. They need to be implemented in the context of individual countries, healthcare systems and regulatory frameworks. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Nursing-led management of side effects of radiation: evidence-based recommendations for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poirier P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patricia PoirierUniversity of Maine School of Nursing, Orono, ME, USAAbstract: It has been estimated that 50%–60% of patients diagnosed with cancer will receive radiation therapy at some point in their treatment. Although radiation therapy can play a significant role in the cure or control of cancer, and the palliation of symptoms, it also has side effects. Side effects of radiation therapy can interfere with patient quality of life and daily functioning. Severe side effects can lead to delays in treatment, potentially affecting the outcome of treatment. All patients receiving radiation therapy are at risk of fatigue and skin reactions in the area of the body being treated. Other side effects of radiation therapy are specific to the part of the body being treated. Radiation therapy to the head and neck area may cause oral mucositis, dryness, and nutritional deficiencies. Radiation therapy to the chest or lung area may lead to difficulty in swallowing and eating. Radiation therapy to the pelvis frequently causes diarrhea. There are many nursing interventions available to manage the side effects of treatment based on best available evidence and expert opinion. Nurses in all settings are essential in helping patients manage the side effects of treatment and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this review is to provide nurses with evidence-based recommendations and suggestions for managing common acute side effects of radiation therapy.Keywords: evidence-based practice, radiation therapy, side effects, nursing management

  18. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossec, L; Smolen, J S; Ramiro, S; de Wit, M; Cutolo, M; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Landewé, R; Oliver, S; Aletaha, D; Betteridge, N; Braun, J; Burmester, G; Cañete, J D; Damjanov, N; FitzGerald, O; Haglund, E; Helliwell, P; Kvien, T K; Lories, R; Luger, T; Maccarone, M; Marzo-Ortega, H; McGonagle, D; McInnes, I B; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Schett, G; Sieper, J; van den Bosch, F; Veale, D J; Wollenhaupt, J; Zink, A; van der Heijde, D

    2016-03-01

    Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  19. Core components for effective infection prevention and control programmes: new WHO evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storr, Julie; Twyman, Anthony; Zingg, Walter; Damani, Nizam; Kilpatrick, Claire; Reilly, Jacqui; Price, Lesley; Egger, Matthias; Grayson, M Lindsay; Kelley, Edward; Allegranzi, Benedetta

    2017-01-01

    Health care-associated infections (HAI) are a major public health problem with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. They represent also an important economic burden to health systems worldwide. However, a large proportion of HAI are preventable through effective infection prevention and control (IPC) measures. Improvements in IPC at the national and facility level are critical for the successful containment of antimicrobial resistance and the prevention of HAI, including outbreaks of highly transmissible diseases through high quality care within the context of universal health coverage. Given the limited availability of IPC evidence-based guidance and standards, the World Health Organization (WHO) decided to prioritize the development of global recommendations on the core components of effective IPC programmes both at the national and acute health care facility level, based on systematic literature reviews and expert consensus. The aim of the guideline development process was to identify the evidence and evaluate its quality, consider patient values and preferences, resource implications, and the feasibility and acceptability of the recommendations. As a result, 11 recommendations and three good practice statements are presented here, including a summary of the supporting evidence, and form the substance of a new WHO IPC guideline.

  20. Core components for effective infection prevention and control programmes: new WHO evidence-based recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Storr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health care-associated infections (HAI are a major public health problem with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. They represent also an important economic burden to health systems worldwide. However, a large proportion of HAI are preventable through effective infection prevention and control (IPC measures. Improvements in IPC at the national and facility level are critical for the successful containment of antimicrobial resistance and the prevention of HAI, including outbreaks of highly transmissible diseases through high quality care within the context of universal health coverage. Given the limited availability of IPC evidence-based guidance and standards, the World Health Organization (WHO decided to prioritize the development of global recommendations on the core components of effective IPC programmes both at the national and acute health care facility level, based on systematic literature reviews and expert consensus. The aim of the guideline development process was to identify the evidence and evaluate its quality, consider patient values and preferences, resource implications, and the feasibility and acceptability of the recommendations. As a result, 11 recommendations and three good practice statements are presented here, including a summary of the supporting evidence, and form the substance of a new WHO IPC guideline.

  1. EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of spondyloarthritis in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Navarro-Compán, V; Terslev, L

    2015-01-01

    process, from which 158 studies were included in the systematic review. Ten recommendations were produced using research-based evidence and expert opinion encompassing the role of imaging in making a diagnosis of axial SpA or peripheral SpA, monitoring inflammation and damage, predicting outcome, response...

  2. "Clinical approach to fibromyalgia: Synthesis of Evidence-based recommendations, a systematic review".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángel García, Daniel; Martínez Nicolás, Ismael; Saturno Hernández, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Efforts have been made to standardise evidence-based practice, but clinical practice guidelines do not always follow strict development methods. The objective of this review is to identify the current guidelines, analyse the variability of its recommendations and make a synthesis for clinical practice. A systematic review of clinical practice guidelines was made in electronic databases and guidelines databases; using "fibromyalgia" AND ["guideline" OR "Clinical Practice guideline"] as terms, from January for 2003 to July of 2013. Guidelines were selected according to the following criteria: a) aimed to fibromyalgia treatment in adults; b) based on scientific evidence, systematically searched; c) evidence levels and strength of recommendation included; d) written in English or Spanish. From 249 initial results, six guides fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Clinical practice guidelines analysed in this review show great variability both in the presence and level of evidence and in the strength of recommendation of many treatments. Physical exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy are first-line treatments, showing high level of evidence. Amitriptyline, used for short periods of time for pain control, is the pharmacologic treatment with the most solid evidence. The multimodal approach reported better results than the isolated application of any treatment. Final recommendations in this review identify optimal treatments, facilitating the translation of evidence into practice and enabling more efficient and effective quality care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence-based practice recommendations for hydration in children and adolescents with cancer receiving intravenous cyclophosphamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Deborah; Schulz, Ginny; Langley, Rachel; Donze, Kevin; Winchester, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a known complication of cyclophosphamide, an anti-neoplastic agent used to treat a variety of oncologic diseases in children. Hydration can prevent hemorrhagic cystitis; however, use varies in clinical practice. A team was assembled to develop evidence-based practice recommendations to address the following question: in a population of children with cancer, what is the appropriate pre and post hydration for the administration of different dose levels of intravenous cyclophosphamide to prevent bladder toxicity? The purpose was to identify the appropriate rate, duration and route of hydration to prevent bladder toxicity with low, intermediate and high dose cyclophosphamide. After a systematic search of the literature, 15 pieces of evidence were evaluated and used. There is a moderate level of quality evidence related to hydration for high dose cyclophosphamide and very low quality evidence related to intermediate or low dose cyclophosphamide. Three general recommendations were made for hydration associated with cyclophosphamide. There is a need for further research related to the prevention of bladder toxicity in children with cancer receiving cyclophosphamide. PMID:24799445

  4. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis: integrating systematic literature research and expert opinion of a broad panel of rheumatologists in the 3e Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Samuel L; Colebatch, Alexandra N; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Edwards, Christopher J; Adams, Karen; Englbrecht, Matthias; Hazlewood, Glen; Marks, Jonathan L; Radner, Helga; Ramiro, Sofia; Richards, Bethan L; Tarner, Ingo H; Aletaha, Daniel; Bombardier, Claire; Landewé, Robert B; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Branco, Jaime C; Bykerk, Vivian P; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; Catrina, Anca I; Hannonen, Pekka; Kiely, Patrick; Leeb, Burkhard; Lie, Elisabeth; Martinez-Osuna, Píndaro; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Westhovens, Rene; Zochling, Jane; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2012-08-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process, 89 rheumatologists representing all 17 countries selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/ACR abstracts. Relevant studies were retrieved for data extraction and quality assessment. Rheumatologists from each country used this evidence to develop a set of national recommendations. Multinational recommendations were then formulated and assessed for agreement and the potential impact on clinical practice. A total of 49,242 references were identified, from which 167 studies were included in the systematic reviews. One clinical question regarding different comorbidities was divided into two separate reviews, resulting in 11 recommendations in total. Oxford levels of evidence were applied to each recommendation. The recommendations related to the efficacy and safety of various analgesic medications, pain measurement scales and pain management in the pre-conception period, pregnancy and lactation. Finally, an algorithm for the pharmacological management of pain in IA was developed. Twenty per cent of rheumatologists reported that the algorithm would change their practice, and 75% felt the algorithm was in accordance with their current practice. Eleven evidence-based recommendations on the management of pain by pharmacotherapy in IA were developed. They are supported by a large panel of rheumatologists from 17 countries, thus enhancing their utility in clinical practice.

  5. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Optimizing Light in Day-to-Day Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Leveton, Lauren; Barger, Laura; Clark, Toni; Bollweg, Laura; Ohnesorge, Kristine; Brainard, George

    2015-01-01

    NASA Behavioral Health and Performance Element (BHP) personnel have previously reported on efforts to transition evidence-based recommendations for a flexible lighting system on the International Space Station (ISS). Based on these recommendations, beginning in 2016 the ISS will replace the current fluorescent-based lights with an LED-based system to optimize visual performance, facilitate circadian alignment, promote sleep, and hasten schedule shifting. Additional efforts related to lighting countermeasures in spaceflight operations have also been underway. As an example, a recent BHP research study led by investigators at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, evaluated the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of blue-enriched light exposure during exercise breaks for flight controllers working the overnight shift in the Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA Johnson Space Center. This effort, along with published laboratory studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of appropriately timed light for promoting alertness, served as an impetus for new light options, and educational protocols for flight controllers. In addition, a separate set of guidelines related to the light emitted from electronic devices, were provided to the Astronaut Office this past year. These guidelines were based on an assessment led by NASA's Lighting Environment Test Facility that included measuring the spectral power distribution, irradiance, and radiance of light emitted from ISS-grade laptops and I-Pads, as well as Android devices. Evaluations were conducted with and without the use of off-the-shelf screen filters as well as a software application that touts minimizing the short-wave length of the visible light spectrum. This presentation will focus on the transition for operations process related to lighting countermeasures in the MCC, as well as the evidence to support recommendations for optimal use of laptops, I-Pads, and Android devices during all

  6. Secondary Prevention Beyond Hospital Discharge for Acute Coronary Syndrome: Evidence-Based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, David H; Goodman, Shaun G; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lin, Peter; Welsh, Robert; Stone, James; Grégoire, Jean; Mcfarlane, Philip; Langer, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In the past 3 decades, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease has resulted in innovations in the treatment and prevention of its clinical manifestations such as death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. After an acute coronary syndrome there are short- and long-term risks of subsequent cardiovascular events. This leads to opportunities to initiate strategies to reduce complications resulting from myocardial injury (cardiac protection) and to prevent recurrent acute coronary events (vascular protection). The results from clinical trials inform best practice and guidelines for patient management. Despite clear and consistent guidelines, an important number of patients are not receiving these treatments. Moreover, many others do not receive treatment that follows the strategy proven in the clinical trial and this is associated with a significant loss of opportunities to improve outcomes. The Canadian Heart Research Centre has therefore assembled a panel of experts to provide a review of available data and distill it to specific evidence-based recommendations that can be used by specialists and primary care physicians as a platform for secondary prevention. The therapeutic recommendations are conveniently divided into vascular protection (dual antiplatelet therapy, lipid-lowering, and renin angiotensin system inhibition) which should be considered in all patients; cardiac protection (addition of β-blocker therapy) in patients with left ventricular dysfunction including consideration for management of heart failure; and continuing management of risk factors and comorbid conditions on the basis of the specific patient profile. These recommendations are intended as a decision support tool and a quick reference for Canadian physicians. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: established cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott G; Goodman, Jack M; Burr, Jamie F

    2011-07-01

    Physical activity is an effective lifestyle therapy for patients at risk for, or with, documented cardiovascular disease (CVD). Current screening tools--the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) and the Physical Activity Readiness Medical Evaluation (PARmed-X)--require updating to align with risk/benefit evidence. We provide evidence-based recommendations to identify individuals with CVD at lower risk, intermediate risk, or higher risk of adverse events when participating in physical activity. Forms of exercise and the settings that will appropriately manage the risks are identified. A computer-assisted search of electronic databases, using search terms for CVD and physical activity risks and benefits, was employed. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation were applied to assess the evidence and assign a strength of evidence rating. A strength rating for the physical activity participation clearance recommendation was assigned on the basis of the evidence. Recommendations for physical activity clearance were made for specific CVD groups. Evidence indicates that those who are medically stable, who are involved with physical activity, and who have adequate physical ability can participate in physical activity of lower to moderate risk. Patients at higher risk can exercise in medically supervised programs. Systematic evaluation of evidence indicates that clinically stable individuals with CVD may participate in physical activity with little risk of adverse events. Therefore, changes in the PAR-Q should be undertaken and a process of assessment and consultation to replace the PARmed-X should be developed. Patients at lower risk may exercise at low to moderate intensities with minimal supervision. Those at intermediate risk should exercise with guidance from a qualified exercise professional. Patients at higher risk should exercise in medically supervised programs.

  8. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence-based Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Eric C.; Sporer, Karl A.; Lemieux, Justin M.; Brown, John F.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.; Gilbert, Greg H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in California. Methods We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33) of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33) for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33) have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33) of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33) have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33) allow benzodiazepines to be administered

  9. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence Based Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Silverman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS agencies in California. Methods: We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results: Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33 of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33 for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33 have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33 of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33 have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33 allow benzodiazepines to be

  10. Creating the Future of Evidence-Based Nutrition Recommendations: Case Studies from Lipid Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Johanna T; Rubin, Kristin H; Fritsche, Kevin L; Psota, Tricia L; Liska, DeAnn J; Harris, William S; Montain, Scott J; Lyle, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    Strategic translational research is designed to address research gaps that answer specific guidance questions. It provides translational value with respect to nutrition guidance and regulatory and public policy. The relevance and the quality of evidence both matter in translational research. For example, design decisions regarding population, intervention, comparator, and outcome criteria affect whether or not high-quality studies are considered relevant to specific guidance questions and are therefore included as evidence within the context of systematic review frameworks used by authoritative food and health organizations. The process used in systematic reviews, developed by the USDA for its Nutrition Evidence Library, is described. An eating pattern and cardiovascular disease (CVD) evidence review is provided as an example, and factors that differentiated the studies considered relevant and included in that evidence base from those that were excluded are noted. Case studies on ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) and industrial trans-FAs illustrate key factors vital to relevance and translational impact, including choice of a relevant population (e.g., healthy, at risk, or diseased subjects; general population or high-performance soldiers); dose and form of the intervention (e.g., food or supplement); use of relevant comparators (e.g., technically feasible and realistic); and measures for both exposure and outcomes (e.g., inflammatory markers or CVD endpoints). Specific recommendations are provided to help increase the impact of nutrition research on future dietary guidance, policy, and regulatory issues, particularly in the area of lipids. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming 2.3-3.1 g/kg of lean body mass per day of protein, 15-30% of calories from fat, and the reminder of calories from carbohydrate. Eating three to six meals per day with a meal containing 0.4-0.5 g/kg bodyweight of protein prior and subsequent to resistance training likely maximizes any theoretical benefits of nutrient timing and frequency. However, alterations in nutrient timing and frequency appear to have little effect on fat loss or lean mass retention. Among popular supplements, creatine monohydrate, caffeine and beta-alanine appear to have beneficial effects relevant to contest preparation, however others do not or warrant further study. The practice of dehydration and electrolyte manipulation in the final days and hours prior to competition can be dangerous, and may not improve appearance. Increasing carbohydrate intake at the end of preparation has a theoretical rationale to improve appearance, however it is understudied. Thus, if carbohydrate loading is pursued it should be practiced prior to competition and its benefit assessed individually. Finally, competitors should be aware of the increased risk of developing eating and body image disorders in aesthetic sport and therefore should have access to the appropriate mental health professionals. PMID:24864135

  12. Evidence-based recommendations for natural bodybuilding contest preparation: nutrition and supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Eric R; Aragon, Alan A; Fitschen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming 2.3-3.1 g/kg of lean body mass per day of protein, 15-30% of calories from fat, and the reminder of calories from carbohydrate. Eating three to six meals per day with a meal containing 0.4-0.5 g/kg bodyweight of protein prior and subsequent to resistance training likely maximizes any theoretical benefits of nutrient timing and frequency. However, alterations in nutrient timing and frequency appear to have little effect on fat loss or lean mass retention. Among popular supplements, creatine monohydrate, caffeine and beta-alanine appear to have beneficial effects relevant to contest preparation, however others do not or warrant further study. The practice of dehydration and electrolyte manipulation in the final days and hours prior to competition can be dangerous, and may not improve appearance. Increasing carbohydrate intake at the end of preparation has a theoretical rationale to improve appearance, however it is understudied. Thus, if carbohydrate loading is pursued it should be practiced prior to competition and its benefit assessed individually. Finally, competitors should be aware of the increased risk of developing eating and body image disorders in aesthetic sport and therefore should have access to the appropriate mental health professionals.

  13. Multinational evidence-based recommendations on how to investigate and follow-up undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, P; Castrejon, I; Katchamart, W

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence-based recommendations on how to investigate and follow-up undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis (UPIA). METHODS: 697 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative of 2008-9 consisting of three separate......, of which 250 were systematically reviewed. Ten multinational key recommendations about the investigation and follow-up of UPIA were formulated. One recommendation addressed differential diagnosis and investigations prior to establishing the operational diagnosis of UPIA, seven recommendations related......) and the final recommendation addressed monitoring of clinical disease activity in UPIA. CONCLUSIONS: Ten recommendations on how to investigate and follow-up UPIA in the clinical setting were developed. They are evidence-based and supported by a large panel of rheumatologists, thus enhancing their validity...

  14. Assessment of USDA-NRCS rangeland conservation programs: recommendation for an evidence-based conservation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briske, D D; Bestelmeyer, B T; Brown, J R; Brunson, M W; Thurow, T L; Tanaka, J A

    2017-01-01

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) was created in response to a request from the Office of Management and Budget that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) document the societal benefits anticipated to accrue from a major increase in conservation funding authorized by the 2002 Farm Bill. A comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of rangeland conservation practices cost-shared with private landowners was unable to evaluate conservation benefits because outcomes were seldom documented. Four interrelated suppositions are presented to examine the causes underlying minimal documentation of conservations outcomes. These suppositions are (1) the benefits of conservation practices are considered a certainty so that documentation in not required, (2) there is minimal knowledge exchange between the USDA-NRCS and research organizations, (3) and a paucity of conservation-relevant science, as well as (4) inadequate technical support for land owners following implementation of conservation practices. We then follow with recommendations to overcome potential barriers to documentation of conservation outcomes identified for each supposition. Collectively, this assessment indicates that the existing conservation practice standards are insufficient to effectively administer large conservation investments on rangelands and that modification of these standards alone will not achieve the goals explicitly stated by CEAP. We recommend that USDA-NRCS modify its conservation programs around a more comprehensive and integrative platform that is capable of implementing evidence-based conservation. Collaborative monitoring organized around landowner-agency-scientist partnerships would represent the focal point of a Conservation Program Assessment Network (CPAN). The primary network objective would be to establish missing information feedback loops between conservation practices and their agricultural and environmental outcomes

  15. Italian Society for Rheumatology recommendations for the management of hand osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hand osteoarthritis (OA is a common and potentially disabling disease, with different features from hip and knee OA so that a specific therapeutic approach is required. Evidence based recommendations for the management of hand OA were developed by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR in 2006. The Italian Society for Rheumatology (SIR aimed to update, adapt to national contest and disseminate the EULAR recommendations for the management of hand OA. The multidisciplinary group of experts included specialists involved in the management of patients with hand OA. In order to maintain consistency with EULAR recommendations, a similar methodology was utilized by the Italian group. The original propositions were reformulated in terms of a search query and for every recommendation a systematic search was conducted updating EULAR recommendations’ review. The propositions were translated in Italian and reformulated basing on collected evidences and expert opinion. The strength of recommendation was measured for each proposition with the EULAR ordinal and visual analogue scales. The original 11 propositions of EULAR recommendations were translated and adapted to Italian context. Further evidences were collected about non-pharmacological therapies, local treatments, intra-articular injection with SYSADOA and corticosteroids, and surgery. The SIR has developed updated recommendations for the management of hand OA adapted to the Italian healthcare system. Their implementation in clinical practice is expected to improve the management of patients with hand OA.

  16. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, K; Katchamart, W; Loza, E

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop evidence-based recommendations for the use of methotrexate in daily clinical practice in rheumatic disorders. METHODS: 751 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative of 2007-8 consisting of three separate rounds of di...

  17. Framework of policy recommendations for implementation of evidence-based practice: a systematic scoping review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Evidence-based practice (EBP) may help improve healthcare quality. However, not all healthcare professionals and managers use EBP in their daily practice. We systematically reviewed the literature to summarise self-reported appreciation of EBP and organisational infrastructure solutions

  18. Generalizability of Evidence-Based Assessment Recommendations for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is frequently clinically diagnosed in youths who do not actually satisfy Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text revision; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria, yet cases that would satisfy full DSM-IV-TR criteria are often undetected clinically. Evidence-based assessment methods…

  19. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  20. Evaluation and treatment of functional constipation in infants and children: evidence-based recommendations from ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbers, M M; DiLorenzo, C; Berger, M Y; Faure, C; Langendam, M W; Nurko, S; Staiano, A; Vandenplas, Y; Benninga, M A

    2014-02-01

    Constipation is a pediatric problem commonly encountered by many health care workers in primary, secondary, and tertiary care. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with functional constipation, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition were charged with the task of developing a uniform document of evidence-based guidelines. Nine clinical questions addressing diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic topics were formulated. A systematic literature search was performed from inception to October 2011 using Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and PsychInfo databases. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was applied to evaluate outcomes. For therapeutic questions, quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system. Grading the quality of evidence for the other questions was performed according to the classification system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. During 3 consensus meetings, all recommendations were discussed and finalized. The group members voted on each recommendation, using the nominal voting technique. Expert opinion was used where no randomized controlled trials were available to support the recommendation. This evidence-based guideline provides recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of children with functional constipation to standardize and improve their quality of care. In addition, 2 algorithms were developed, one for the infants children. This document is intended to be used in daily practice and as a basis for further clinical research. Large well-designed clinical trials are necessary with regard to diagnostic evaluation and treatment.

  1. Physiotherapy in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based, expert driven, practical statement and rehabilitation recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Juultje; Engelbert, Raoul HH; Dettling-Ihnenfeldt, Daniela; Gosselink, Rik; Spronk, Peter E; Nollet, Frans; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence-based recommendations for effective and safe diagnostic assessment and intervention strategies for the physiotherapy treatment of patients in intensive care units. Methods: We used the EBRO method, as recommended by the ‘Dutch Evidence Based Guideline Development Platform’ to develop an ‘evidence statement for physiotherapy in the intensive care unit’. This method consists of the identification of clinically relevant questions, followed by a systematic literature search, and summary of the evidence with final recommendations being moderated by feedback from experts. Results: Three relevant clinical domains were identified by experts: criteria to initiate treatment; measures to assess patients; evidence for effectiveness of treatments. In a systematic literature search, 129 relevant studies were identified and assessed for methodological quality and classified according to the level of evidence. The final evidence statement consisted of recommendations on eight absolute and four relative contra-indications to mobilization; a core set of nine specific instruments to assess impairments and activity restrictions; and six passive and four active effective interventions, with advice on (a) physiological measures to observe during treatment (with stopping criteria) and (b) what to record after the treatment. Conclusions: These recommendations form a protocol for treating people in an intensive care unit, based on best available evidence in mid-2014. PMID:25681407

  2. Physiotherapy in the intensive care unit: an evidence-based, expert driven, practical statement and rehabilitation recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Juultje; Engelbert, Raoul H H; Dettling-Ihnenfeldt, Daniela; Gosselink, Rik; Spronk, Peter E; Nollet, Frans; van der Schaaf, Marike

    2015-11-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations for effective and safe diagnostic assessment and intervention strategies for the physiotherapy treatment of patients in intensive care units. We used the EBRO method, as recommended by the 'Dutch Evidence Based Guideline Development Platform' to develop an 'evidence statement for physiotherapy in the intensive care unit'. This method consists of the identification of clinically relevant questions, followed by a systematic literature search, and summary of the evidence with final recommendations being moderated by feedback from experts. Three relevant clinical domains were identified by experts: criteria to initiate treatment; measures to assess patients; evidence for effectiveness of treatments. In a systematic literature search, 129 relevant studies were identified and assessed for methodological quality and classified according to the level of evidence. The final evidence statement consisted of recommendations on eight absolute and four relative contra-indications to mobilization; a core set of nine specific instruments to assess impairments and activity restrictions; and six passive and four active effective interventions, with advice on (a) physiological measures to observe during treatment (with stopping criteria) and (b) what to record after the treatment. These recommendations form a protocol for treating people in an intensive care unit, based on best available evidence in mid-2014. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Evidence-based dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    We review the scientific evidence behind current dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes and examine the effects of various dietary interventions on glycemic control, serum lipids, and inflammation in individuals with diabetes. Attention is focused on dietary fiber, glycemic index, dietary protein, omega-3 fatty acids, chromium, magnesium, and vitamin E. Practical dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes are highlighted.

  4. Limitations of the evidence base used to set recommended nutrient intakes for infants and lactating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reported values for the concentrations of micronutrients in human milk form the basis of the majority of micronutrient intake recommendations for infants and the additional maternal requirements for lactation. The infant recommendations may also be extrapolated to provide estimates for young childre...

  5. Participatory and evidence-based recommendations for urban redevelopment following natural disasters: older adults as policy advisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael; Keeling, Sally; Wilkinson, Tim

    2014-03-01

    To develop community-generated recommendations to inform urban environmental remediation following earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand, and share these with local decision-makers during a participatory action research process. This study employed three focus group discussions to critique mixed-methods and multiphase results and develop evidence-based recommendations. Participants included 30 volunteers and 8 knowledgeable advisers aged 65 years and older. Participant recommendations addressed the remediation of earthquake-affected suburbs, access to transportation, age-friendly design, safer communities, resilient support agencies, and restoration of resources for social and cultural activities. Older collaborators identified salient barriers to active ageing and options for post-earthquake redevelopment that had not previously been considered in research or policy. Independently living older adults are well placed to work with researchers to develop recommendations to improve the urban environment following natural disasters as well as in times of relative stability. © 2013 ACOTA.

  6. Evidence-based recommendations for treatment with methotrexate in rheumatic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek; Faurschou, Mikkel; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) recommendations (RCs) on the use of methotrexate in rheumatic disorders and to assess the agreement among Danish rheumatologists....

  7. Current concepts on microscopic colitis: evidence-based statements and recommendations of the Spanish Microscopic Colitis Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bañares, F; Casanova, M J; Arguedas, Y; Beltrán, B; Busquets, D; Fernández, J M; Fernández-Salazar, L; García-Planella, E; Guagnozzi, D; Lucendo, A J; Manceñido, N; Marín-Jiménez, I; Montoro, M; Piqueras, M; Robles, V; Ruiz-Cerulla, A; Gisbert, J P

    2016-02-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an underdiagnosed inflammatory bowel disease. To develop an evidence-based clinical practice guide on MC current concepts. Literature search was done on the Cochrane Library, EMBASE and MEDLINE electronic databases, which were consulted covering the period up until March 2015. Work groups were selected for each of the reviewed topics, with the purpose of drafting the initial statements and recommendations. They subsequently underwent a voting process based on the Delphi method. Each statement/recommendation was accompanied by the result of the vote the level of evidence, and discussion of the corresponding evidence. The grade of recommendation (GR) using the GRADE approach was established for diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Some key statements and recommendations are: advancing age increases the risk of developing MC, mainly in females. The symptoms of MC and IBS-D may be similar. If MC is suspected, colonoscopy taking biopsies is mandatory. Treatment with oral budesonide is recommended to induce clinical remission in patients with MC. Oral mesalazine is not recommended in patients with collagenous colitis for the induction of clinical remission. The use of anti-TNF-alpha drugs (infliximab, adalimumab) is recommended for the induction of remission in severe cases of MC that fail to respond to corticosteroids or immunomodulators, as an alternative to colectomy. This is the first consensus paper on MC based on GRADE methodology. This initiative may help physicians involved in care of these patients in taking decisions based on evidence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. EULAR recommendations for women's health and the management of family planning, assisted reproduction, pregnancy and menopause in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and/or antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, L; Bertsias, G K; Agmon-Levin, N; Brown, S; Cervera, R; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Doria, A; Fischer-Betz, R; Forger, F; Moraes-Fontes, M F; Khamashta, M; King, J; Lojacono, A; Marchiori, F; Meroni, P L; Mosca, M; Motta, M; Ostensen, M; Pamfil, C; Raio, L; Schneider, M; Svenungsson, E; Tektonidou, M; Yavuz, S; Boumpas, D; Tincani, A

    2017-03-01

    Develop recommendations for women's health issues and family planning in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and/or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Systematic review of evidence followed by modified Delphi method to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. Family planning should be discussed as early as possible after diagnosis. Most women can have successful pregnancies and measures can be taken to reduce the risks of adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Risk stratification includes disease activity, autoantibody profile, previous vascular and pregnancy morbidity, hypertension and the use of drugs (emphasis on benefits from hydroxychloroquine and antiplatelets/anticoagulants). Hormonal contraception and menopause replacement therapy can be used in patients with stable/inactive disease and low risk of thrombosis. Fertility preservation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues should be considered prior to the use of alkylating agents. Assisted reproduction techniques can be safely used in patients with stable/inactive disease; patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/APS should receive anticoagulation and/or low-dose aspirin. Assessment of disease activity, renal function and serological markers is important for diagnosing disease flares and monitoring for obstetrical adverse outcomes. Fetal monitoring includes Doppler ultrasonography and fetal biometry, particularly in the third trimester, to screen for placental insufficiency and small for gestational age fetuses. Screening for gynaecological malignancies is similar to the general population, with increased vigilance for cervical premalignant lesions if exposed to immunosuppressive drugs. Human papillomavirus immunisation can be used in women with stable/inactive disease. Recommendations for women's health issues in SLE and/or APS were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  9. EULAR recommendations for women's health and the management of family planning, assisted reproduction, pregnancy and menopause in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and/or antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsias, G K; Agmon-Levin, N; Brown, S; Cervera, R; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Doria, A; Fischer-Betz, R; Forger, F; Moraes-Fontes, M F; Khamashta, M; King, J; Lojacono, A; Marchiori, F; Meroni, P L; Mosca, M; Motta, M; Ostensen, M; Pamfil, C; Raio, L; Schneider, M; Svenungsson, E; Tektonidou, M; Yavuz, S; Boumpas, D; Tincani, A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Develop recommendations for women's health issues and family planning in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and/or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods Systematic review of evidence followed by modified Delphi method to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. Results Family planning should be discussed as early as possible after diagnosis. Most women can have successful pregnancies and measures can be taken to reduce the risks of adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. Risk stratification includes disease activity, autoantibody profile, previous vascular and pregnancy morbidity, hypertension and the use of drugs (emphasis on benefits from hydroxychloroquine and antiplatelets/anticoagulants). Hormonal contraception and menopause replacement therapy can be used in patients with stable/inactive disease and low risk of thrombosis. Fertility preservation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues should be considered prior to the use of alkylating agents. Assisted reproduction techniques can be safely used in patients with stable/inactive disease; patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/APS should receive anticoagulation and/or low-dose aspirin. Assessment of disease activity, renal function and serological markers is important for diagnosing disease flares and monitoring for obstetrical adverse outcomes. Fetal monitoring includes Doppler ultrasonography and fetal biometry, particularly in the third trimester, to screen for placental insufficiency and small for gestational age fetuses. Screening for gynaecological malignancies is similar to the general population, with increased vigilance for cervical premalignant lesions if exposed to immunosuppressive drugs. Human papillomavirus immunisation can be used in women with stable/inactive disease. Conclusions Recommendations for women's health issues in SLE and/or APS were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus. PMID:27457513

  10. Optimal blood pressure targets in 2014 - Does the guideline recommendation match the evidence base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviar, C L; Bangalore, S; Messerli, F H

    2015-01-01

    Various scientific societies have recently published practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of arterial hypertension with no clear consensus on a blood pressure target. This article reviews those recommendations and critically examines if they are based on sound evidence. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: diabetes mellitus and related comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Michael C; Burr, Jamie

    2011-07-01

    Physical activity (PA) is one of the most powerful treatment options for persons with prediabetes or diabetes. However, some elevation in risk occurs with increased PA, at least initially, and certain precautions need to be made to lower these risks, particularly if these persons are unaccustomed to exercise. We conducted a standardized search of all adverse events associated with increased PA in persons with prediabetes or diabetes (type 1 or type 2) and provided evidence-based guidelines on PA screening in these apparently high-risk individuals. A systematic literature review was performed of all studies reporting on adverse events in persons with prediabetes or diabetes. Studies included were from all designs (retrospective and prospective including randomized controlled trials) and were assessed according to evaluation criteria adapted by a consensus panel. A total of 47 studies, involving >8000 individuals, were deemed eligible. A number of these studies identified a range of mild to severe acute risks with exercise (musculoskeletal injury, hypoglycemia, foot ulceration, proliferative retinopathy, hypotension, sudden death) but the overall prevalence was low. Based on several randomized controlled trials and prospective studies in which prescribed exercise was performed at a wide range of intensities, it appears that increased PA is a relatively safe procedure with no evidence of a loss of life. Based on our assessment of the available literature, we provide a new PA risk algorithm for persons with prediabetes and diabetes and comment on the role of the patient, the qualified exercise professional, and the patient's physician in the risk screening process.

  12. A rule-based named-entity recognition method for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftimov, Tome; Koroušić Seljak, Barbara; Korošec, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based dietary information represented as unstructured text is a crucial information that needs to be accessed in order to help dietitians follow the new knowledge arrives daily with newly published scientific reports. Different named-entity recognition (NER) methods have been introduced previously to extract useful information from the biomedical literature. They are focused on, for example extracting gene mentions, proteins mentions, relationships between genes and proteins, chemical concepts and relationships between drugs and diseases. In this paper, we present a novel NER method, called drNER, for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary information. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt at extracting dietary concepts. DrNER is a rule-based NER that consists of two phases. The first one involves the detection and determination of the entities mention, and the second one involves the selection and extraction of the entities. We evaluate the method by using text corpora from heterogeneous sources, including text from several scientifically validated web sites and text from scientific publications. Evaluation of the method showed that drNER gives good results and can be used for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary recommendations.

  13. A rule-based named-entity recognition method for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based dietary information represented as unstructured text is a crucial information that needs to be accessed in order to help dietitians follow the new knowledge arrives daily with newly published scientific reports. Different named-entity recognition (NER) methods have been introduced previously to extract useful information from the biomedical literature. They are focused on, for example extracting gene mentions, proteins mentions, relationships between genes and proteins, chemical concepts and relationships between drugs and diseases. In this paper, we present a novel NER method, called drNER, for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary information. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt at extracting dietary concepts. DrNER is a rule-based NER that consists of two phases. The first one involves the detection and determination of the entities mention, and the second one involves the selection and extraction of the entities. We evaluate the method by using text corpora from heterogeneous sources, including text from several scientifically validated web sites and text from scientific publications. Evaluation of the method showed that drNER gives good results and can be used for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary recommendations. PMID:28644863

  14. A rule-based named-entity recognition method for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tome Eftimov

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dietary information represented as unstructured text is a crucial information that needs to be accessed in order to help dietitians follow the new knowledge arrives daily with newly published scientific reports. Different named-entity recognition (NER methods have been introduced previously to extract useful information from the biomedical literature. They are focused on, for example extracting gene mentions, proteins mentions, relationships between genes and proteins, chemical concepts and relationships between drugs and diseases. In this paper, we present a novel NER method, called drNER, for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary information. To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt at extracting dietary concepts. DrNER is a rule-based NER that consists of two phases. The first one involves the detection and determination of the entities mention, and the second one involves the selection and extraction of the entities. We evaluate the method by using text corpora from heterogeneous sources, including text from several scientifically validated web sites and text from scientific publications. Evaluation of the method showed that drNER gives good results and can be used for knowledge extraction of evidence-based dietary recommendations.

  15. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  16. Cosmetics for acne: indications and recommendations for an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'oglio, F; Tedeschi, A; Fabbrocini, G; Veraldi, S; Picardo, M; Micali, G

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate, by a thorough revision of the literature, the true efficacy of currently available topic and systemic cosmetic acne agents. The efficacy of currently available cosmetic acne agents has been retrospectively evaluated via thorough revision of the literature on matched electronic databases (PubMed). All retrieved studies, either randomized clinical trials or clinical trials, controlled or uncontrolled were considered. Scientific evidence suggests that most cosmetic products for acne may enhance the clinical outcome. Cleansers should be indicated to all acne patients; those containing benzoyl peroxide or azelaic/salicylic acid/triclosan show the best efficacy profile. Sebum-controlling agents containing nicotinamide or zinc acetate may minimize excessive sebum production. Cosmetics with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory substances such as, respectively, ethyl lactate or phytosphingosine and nicotinamide or resveratrol, may speed acne recovery. Topical corneolytics, including retinaldehyde/glycolic acid or lactic acid, induce a comedolytic effect and may also facilitate skin absorption of topical drugs. Finally, the use of specific moisturizers should be strongly recommended in all acne patients. Cosmetics, if correctly prescribed, may improve the performance of the therapy, whereas wrong procedures and/or inadequate cosmetics may worsen acne. Cosmetological recommendations may allow clinicians to make informed decisions about the role of various cosmetics and to indentify the appropriate indications and precautions. The choice of the most effective product should take into consideration the ongoing pharmacological therapy and acne type/severity as well.

  17. OnabotulinumtoxinA in overactive bladder: Evidence-based consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cidre, M A; Arlandis-Guzmán, S

    2016-04-01

    To offer a set of useful recommendations for urologists who are starting to provide treatment of overactive bladders with onabotulinumtoxinA. A literature search to December 2013 was conducted, as well as a subsequent critical reading of the selected publications. The coordinators prepared a document that was submitted for review by the members of the Spanish Group for the use of Botulinum Toxin in Urology. The expert group considered that onabotulinumtoxinA may be used for overactive bladder syndrome with urinary urge incontinence secondary to neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity for patients for whom conservative treatment and first-line medical treatment has failed, is not tolerated or is contraindicated. Treatment in most cases was performed with local intravesical anesthesia, although it can also be performed under epidural or general anesthesia. Patients must be informed of the possibility of requiring self-catheterization or temporary catheterization. Clinicians should ensure that the patients are capable of performing this catheterization before the treatment is conducted. Patients must also be informed of the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections. At least 2 follow-up visits are recommended: the first at days 7-14 after the injection and the second at 2-3 months. Reinjection is indicated when the effect of the treatment decreases. These guidelines can help clinicians in their daily decisions and limit the potential risks associated with the incorrect use of the drug. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence-based design recommendations for prevalence studies on multimorbidity: improving comparability of estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Barbara M; Siebenhuener, Klarissa; Bopp, Matthias; Minder, Christoph E

    2017-03-07

    In aging populations, multimorbidity causes a disease burden of growing importance and cost. However, estimates of the prevalence of multimorbidity (prevMM) vary widely across studies, impeding valid comparisons and interpretation of differences. With this study we pursued two research objectives: (1) to identify a set of study design and demographic factors related to prevMM, and (2) based on (1), to formulate design recommendations for future studies with improved comparability of prevalence estimates. Study data were obtained through systematic review of the literature. UsingPubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, BIOSIS, and Google Scholar, we looked for articles with the terms "multimorbidity," "comorbidity," "polymorbidity," and variations of these published in English or German in the years 1990 to 2011. We selected quantitative studies of the prevalence of multimorbidity (two or more chronic medical conditions) with a minimum sample size of 50 and a study population with a majority of Caucasians. Our database consisted of prevalence estimates in 108 age groups taken from 45 studies. To assess the effects of study design variables, we used meta regression models. In 58% of the studies, there was only one age group, i.e., no stratification by age. The number of persons per age group ranged from 136 to 5.6 million. Our analyses identified the following variables as highly significant: "mean age," "number of age groups", and "data reporting quality" (all p design recommendations. Our suggestions were guided by a pragmatic approach and aimed at facilitating the implementation of a uniform methodology. This should aid progress towards a more uniform operationalization of multimorbidity.

  19. Persuasive Interventions for Controversial Cancer Screening Recommendations: Testing a Novel Approach to Help Patients Make Evidence-Based Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Barry G; Mazor, Kathleen M; Luckmann, Roger; Cutrona, Sarah L; Hayes, Marcela; Gorodetsky, Tatyana; Esparza, Nancy; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate novel decision aids designed to help patients trust and accept the controversial, evidence-based, US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations about prostate cancer screening (from 2012) and mammography screening for women aged 40 to 49 years (from 2009). We created recorded vignettes of physician-patient discussions about prostate cancer screening and mammography, accompanied by illustrative slides, based on principles derived from preceding qualitative work and behavioral science literature. We conducted a randomized crossover study with repeated measures with 27 men aged 50 to 74 years and 35 women aged 40 to 49 years. All participants saw a video intervention and a more traditional, paper-based decision aid intervention in random order. At entry and after seeing each intervention, they were surveyed about screening intentions, perceptions of benefits and harm, and decisional conflict. Changes in screening intentions were analyzed without regard to order of intervention after an initial analyses showed no evidence of an order effect. At baseline, 69% of men and 86% of women reported wanting screening, with 31% and 6%, respectively, unsure. Mean change on a 3-point, yes, unsure, no scale was -0.93 (P = persuasive video interventions significantly changed the screening intentions of substantial proportions of viewers. Our approach needs further testing but may provide a model for helping patients to consider and accept evidence-based, counterintuitive recommendations. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  20. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  1. An evidence-based recommendation to increase the dosing frequency of buprenorphine during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caritis, Steve N; Bastian, Jaime R; Zhang, Hongfei; Kalluri, Hari; English, Dennis; England, Michael; Bobby, Stephanie; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2017-10-01

    Dose-adjusted plasma concentrations of buprenorphine are significantly decreased during pregnancy compared with the nonpregnant state. This observation suggests that pregnant women may need a higher dose of buprenorphine than nonpregnant individuals to maintain similar drug exposure (plasma concentrations over time after a dose). The current dosing recommendations for buprenorphine during pregnancy address the total daily dose of buprenorphine to be administered, but the frequency of dosing is not clearly addressed. Based on buprenorphine's long terminal half-life, once-daily or twice-daily dosing has generally been suggested. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of dosing frequency on buprenorphine plasma concentration time course during pregnancy. We utilized 3 data sources to determine an optimal frequency for dosing of buprenorphine during pregnancy: data from a pharmacokinetic study of 14 pregnant and postpartum women on maintenance buprenorphine in a supervised clinical setting; data from pregnant women attending a buprenorphine clinic; and data from a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of buprenorphine pharmacokinetics in nonpregnant subjects. Among the 14 women participating in the pharmacokinetic study during and after pregnancy, plasma concentrations of buprenorphine were <1 ng/mL (the theoretical concentration required to prevent withdrawal symptoms) for 50-80% of the 12 hour dosing interval while at steady state. Among 62 women followed up in a opioid agonist treatment program, in which dosing frequency is determined in part by patient preference, 10 (16%) were on once-daily dosing, 10 (16%) were on twice-daily dosing, 28 (45%) were on thrice-daily dosing, and 14 (23%) were on four-times-daily dosing. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in nonpregnant subjects demonstrated that dosing frequency has an impact on the duration over which the plasma concentrations are below a specified plasma concentration threshold. A

  2. Evidence-based recommendations on storing and handling specimens for analyses of insect microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Jacob C.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Research on insect microbiota has greatly expanded over the past decade, along with a growing appreciation of the microbial contributions to insect ecology and evolution. Many of these studies use DNA sequencing to characterize the diversity and composition of insect-associated microbial communities. The choice of strategies used for specimen collection, storage, and handling could introduce biases in molecular assessments of insect microbiota, but such potential influences have not been systematically evaluated. Likewise, although it is common practice to surface sterilize insects prior to DNA extraction, it is not known if this time-consuming step has any effect on microbial community analyses. To resolve these methodological unknowns, we conducted an experiment wherein replicate individual insects of four species were stored intact for two months using five different methods—freezing, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), and room-temperature storage without preservative—and then subjected to whole-specimen 16S rRNA gene sequencing to assess whether the structure of the insect-associated bacterial communities was impacted by these different storage strategies. Overall, different insect species harbored markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern that was highly robust to the method used to store samples. Storage method had little to no effect on assessments of microbiota composition, and the magnitude of the effect differed among the insect species examined. No single method emerged as “best,” i.e., one consistently having the highest similarity in community structure to control specimens, which were not stored prior to homogenization and DNA sequencing. We also found that surface sterilization did not change bacterial community structure as compared to unsterilized insects, presumably due to the vastly greater microbial biomass inside the insect body relative to its surface. We therefore recommend that researchers can

  3. Evidence-based recommendations on storing and handling specimens for analyses of insect microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Tobin J; Dickerson, Jacob C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Research on insect microbiota has greatly expanded over the past decade, along with a growing appreciation of the microbial contributions to insect ecology and evolution. Many of these studies use DNA sequencing to characterize the diversity and composition of insect-associated microbial communities. The choice of strategies used for specimen collection, storage, and handling could introduce biases in molecular assessments of insect microbiota, but such potential influences have not been systematically evaluated. Likewise, although it is common practice to surface sterilize insects prior to DNA extraction, it is not known if this time-consuming step has any effect on microbial community analyses. To resolve these methodological unknowns, we conducted an experiment wherein replicate individual insects of four species were stored intact for two months using five different methods-freezing, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), and room-temperature storage without preservative-and then subjected to whole-specimen 16S rRNA gene sequencing to assess whether the structure of the insect-associated bacterial communities was impacted by these different storage strategies. Overall, different insect species harbored markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern that was highly robust to the method used to store samples. Storage method had little to no effect on assessments of microbiota composition, and the magnitude of the effect differed among the insect species examined. No single method emerged as "best," i.e., one consistently having the highest similarity in community structure to control specimens, which were not stored prior to homogenization and DNA sequencing. We also found that surface sterilization did not change bacterial community structure as compared to unsterilized insects, presumably due to the vastly greater microbial biomass inside the insect body relative to its surface. We therefore recommend that researchers can use any of

  4. Evidence-based recommendations on storing and handling specimens for analyses of insect microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobin J. Hammer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research on insect microbiota has greatly expanded over the past decade, along with a growing appreciation of the microbial contributions to insect ecology and evolution. Many of these studies use DNA sequencing to characterize the diversity and composition of insect-associated microbial communities. The choice of strategies used for specimen collection, storage, and handling could introduce biases in molecular assessments of insect microbiota, but such potential influences have not been systematically evaluated. Likewise, although it is common practice to surface sterilize insects prior to DNA extraction, it is not known if this time-consuming step has any effect on microbial community analyses. To resolve these methodological unknowns, we conducted an experiment wherein replicate individual insects of four species were stored intact for two months using five different methods—freezing, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, cetrimonium bromide (CTAB, and room-temperature storage without preservative—and then subjected to whole-specimen 16S rRNA gene sequencing to assess whether the structure of the insect-associated bacterial communities was impacted by these different storage strategies. Overall, different insect species harbored markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern that was highly robust to the method used to store samples. Storage method had little to no effect on assessments of microbiota composition, and the magnitude of the effect differed among the insect species examined. No single method emerged as “best,” i.e., one consistently having the highest similarity in community structure to control specimens, which were not stored prior to homogenization and DNA sequencing. We also found that surface sterilization did not change bacterial community structure as compared to unsterilized insects, presumably due to the vastly greater microbial biomass inside the insect body relative to its surface. We therefore recommend that

  5. Metamizole/dipyrone for the relief of cancer pain: A systematic review and evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Jan; Stamer, Ulrike M; Remi, Constanze; Voltz, Raymond; Bausewein, Claudia; Sabatowski, Rainer; Wirz, Stefan; Müller-Mundt, Gabriele; Simon, Steffen T; Pralong, Anne; Nauck, Friedemann; Follmann, Markus; Radbruch, Lukas; Meißner, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Dipyrone (metamizole) is one of the most widely used non-opioid analgesics for the treatment of cancer pain. Because evidence-based recommendations are not yet available, a systematic review was conducted for the German Guideline Program in Oncology to provide recommendations for the use of dipyrone in cancer pain. First, a systematic review for clinical trials assessing dipyrone in adult patients with cancer pain was conducted. Endpoints were pain intensity, opioid-sparing effects, safety, and quality of life. The search was performed in MedLine, Embase (via Ovid), and the Cochrane Library (1948-2013) and additional hand search was conducted. Finally, recommendations were developed and agreed in a formal structured consensus process by 53 representatives of scientific medical societies and 49 experts. Of 177 retrieved studies, 4 could be included (3 randomized controlled trials and 1 cohort study, n = 252 patients): dipyrone significantly decreased pain intensity compared to placebo, even if low doses (1.5-2 g/day) were used. Higher doses (3 × 2 g/day) were more effective than low doses (3 × 1 g/day), but equally effective as 60 mg oral morphine/day. Pain reduction of dipyrone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not differ significantly. Compared to placebo, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and morphine, the incidence of adverse effects was not increased. Dipyrone can be recommended for the treatment of cancer pain as an alternative to other non-opioids either alone or in combination with opioids. It can be preferred over non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs due to the presumably favorable side effect profile in long-term use, but comparative studies are not available for long-term use.

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer: Evidence-based recommendations in initial staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresia Aroztegui, Ana Paula; García Vicente, Ana María; Alvarez Ruiz, Soledad; Delgado Bolton, Roberto Carlos; Orcajo Rincon, Javier; Garcia Garzon, Jose Ramon; de Arcocha Torres, Maria; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose

    2017-10-01

    Current guidelines do not systematically recommend 18F-FDG PET/CT for breast cancer staging; and the recommendations and level of evidence supporting its use in different groups of patients vary among guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence about the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging and the therapeutic and prognostic impact accumulated in the last decade. Other related aspects, such as the association of metabolic information with biology and prognosis are considered and evidence-based recommendations for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging are offered. We systematically searched MEDLINE for articles reporting studies with at least 30 patients related to clinical questions following the Problem/Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome framework. We critically reviewed the selected articles and elaborated evidence tables structuring the summarized information into methodology, results, and limitations. The level of evidence and the grades of recommendation for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in different contexts are summarized. Level III evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a weak recommendation in this population. In patients with locally advanced breast cancer, level II evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a strong recommendation in this population. In patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer, the metabolic information from baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT is associated with tumor biology and has prognostic implications, supported by level II evidence. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT is not recommended for staging all patients with early breast cancer, although evidence of improved regional and systemic staging supports its use in locally advanced

  7. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers’ websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  8. Joint European League Against Rheumatism and European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (EULAR/ERA-EDTA) recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsias, George K; Tektonidou, Maria; Amoura, Zahir; Aringer, Martin; Bajema, Ingeborg; Berden, Jo H M; Boletis, John; Cervera, Ricard; Dörner, Thomas; Doria, Andrea; Ferrario, Franco; Floege, Jürgen; Houssiau, Frederic A; Ioannidis, John P A; Isenberg, David A; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Lightstone, Liz; Marks, Stephen D; Martini, Alberto; Moroni, Gabriela; Neumann, Irmgard; Praga, Manuel; Schneider, Matthias; Starra, Argyre; Tesar, Vladimir; Vasconcelos, Carlos; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Zakharova, Helena; Haubitz, Marion; Gordon, Caroline; Jayne, David; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2012-11-01

    To develop recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis (LN). The available evidence was systematically reviewed using the PubMed database. A modified Delphi method was used to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. Immunosuppressive treatment should be guided by renal biopsy, and aiming for complete renal response (proteinuria management of LN should differ in children versus adults. Recommendations for the management of LN were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus.

  9. Bibliotherapy and information prescriptions: a summary of the published evidence-base and recommendations from past and ongoing Books on Prescription projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, D; Heaps, D; Robert, I

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the published evidence and reports from ongoing and completed projects that used Bibliotherapy and Information Prescription to deliver patient care. A literature search was conducted and relevant papers were summarized into: type of study, type of Bibliotherapy, client group and recommendations. In total, 65 papers were considered with 57 reviewed. A survey was also sent to Library Authorities subscribing to national survey standards asking for details about delivery of Information Prescription projects. There were 21 returned surveys. The experiences and recommendations were then summarized. The aim of the paper is to collate the evidence-base of written research and the experience and recommendations of projects into an easy format so that practitioners interested in using Bibliotherapy/Information Prescription/Books on Prescription have an understanding what they are, the extent of the evidence-base to inform practice, and highlight gaps in the research.

  10. Using pedagogical approaches to influence evidence-based practice integration - processes and recommendations: findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This article focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness. However, literature suggests that there are limited studies available focusing on pedagogical approaches in evidence-based practice education. A constructivist grounded theory methodology, informed by Charmaz was used for this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 23 nurse academics across Australian universities through semi-structured interviews. Additionally, nine were observed during teaching of undergraduate students. Twenty subject outlines were also analysed following Charmaz's approach of data analysis. 'Influencing EBP integration' describes the pedagogical approaches employed by academics to incorporate EBP knowledge and skills into undergraduate curricula. With the use of various teaching and learning strategies, academics attempted to contextualize EBP by engaging students with activities aiming to link evidence to practice and with the EBP process. Although, some strategies appeared to be engaging, others were traditional and seemed to be disengaging for students due to the challenges experienced by participants that impeded the use of the most effective teaching methods. Study findings offer valuable insights into the teaching practices and identify some key challenges that require the adoption of appropriate strategies to ensure future nurses are well prepared in the paradigm of evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Evidence Base for 2016 Updated Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Rachel Y

    2016-11-01

    Approximately 3500 infants die annually in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), ill-defined deaths, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. After an initial decrease in the 1990s, the overall sleep-related infant death rate has not declined in more recent years. Many of the modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths are strikingly similar. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a safe sleep environment that can reduce the risk of all sleep-related infant deaths. Recommendations for a safe sleep environment include supine positioning, use of a firm sleep surface, room-sharing without bed-sharing, and avoidance of soft bedding and overheating. Additional recommendations for SIDS risk reduction include avoidance of exposure to smoke, alcohol, and illicit drugs; breastfeeding; routine immunization; and use of a pacifier. New evidence and rationale for recommendations are presented for skin-to-skin care for newborn infants, bedside and in-bed sleepers, sleeping on couches/armchairs and in sitting devices, and use of soft bedding after 4 months of age. In addition, expanded recommendations for infant sleep location are included. The recommendations and strength of evidence for each recommendation are published in the accompanying policy statement, "SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Updated 2016 Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment," which is included in this issue. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Joint European League Against Rheumatism and European Renal Association–European Dialysis and Transplant Association (EULAR/ERA-EDTA) recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsias, George K; Tektonidou, Maria; Amoura, Zahir; Aringer, Martin; Bajema, Ingeborg; Berden, Jo H M; Boletis, John; Cervera, Ricard; Dörner, Thomas; Doria, Andrea; Ferrario, Franco; Floege, Jürgen; Houssiau, Frederic A; Ioannidis, John P A; Isenberg, David A; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Lightstone, Liz; Marks, Stephen D; Martini, Alberto; Moroni, Gabriela; Neumann, Irmgard; Praga, Manuel; Schneider, Matthias; Starra, Argyre; Tesar, Vladimir; Vasconcelos, Carlos; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Zakharova, Helena; Haubitz, Marion; Gordon, Caroline; Jayne, David; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis (LN). Methods The available evidence was systematically reviewed using the PubMed database. A modified Delphi method was used to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. Results Immunosuppressive treatment should be guided by renal biopsy, and aiming for complete renal response (proteinuria <0.5 g/24 h with normal or near-normal renal function). Hydroxychloroquine is recommended for all patients with LN. Because of a more favourable efficacy/toxicity ratio, as initial treatment for patients with class III–IVA or A/C (±V) LN according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 classification, mycophenolic acid (MPA) or low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (CY) in combination with glucocorticoids is recommended. In patients with adverse clinical or histological features, CY can be prescribed at higher doses, while azathioprine is an alternative for milder cases. For pure class V LN with nephrotic-range proteinuria, MPA in combination with oral glucocorticoids is recommended as initial treatment. In patients improving after initial treatment, subsequent immunosuppression with MPA or azathioprine is recommended for at least 3 years; in such cases, initial treatment with MPA should be followed by MPA. For MPA or CY failures, switching to the other agent, or to rituximab, is the suggested course of action. In anticipation of pregnancy, patients should be switched to appropriate medications without reducing the intensity of treatment. There is no evidence to suggest that management of LN should differ in children versus adults. Conclusions Recommendations for the management of LN were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus. PMID:22851469

  13. Considering health equity when moving from evidence-based guideline recommendations to implementation: a case study from an upper-middle income country on the GRADE approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Mosquera, Paola; Alzate, Juan Pablo; Pottie, Kevin; Welch, Vivian; Akl, Elie A; Jull, Janet; Lang, Eddy; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Morton, Rachel; Thabane, Lehana; Shea, Bev; Stein, Airton T; Singh, Jasvinder; Florez, Ivan D; Guyatt, Gordon; Schünemann, Holger; Tugwell, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The availability of evidence-based guidelines does not ensure their implementation and use in clinical practice or policy making. Inequities in health have been defined as those inequalities within or between populations that are avoidable, unnecessary and also unjust and unfair. Evidence-based clinical practice and public health guidelines ('guidelines') can be used to target health inequities experienced by disadvantaged populations, although guidelines may unintentionally increase health inequities. For this reason, there is a need for evidence-based clinical practice and public health guidelines to intentionally target health inequities experienced by disadvantaged populations. Current guideline development processes do not include steps for planned implementation of equity-focused guidelines. This article describes nine steps that provide guidance for consideration of equity during guideline implementation. A critical appraisal of the literature followed by a process to build expert consensus was undertaken to define how to include consideration of equity issues during the specific GRADE guideline development process. Using a case study from Colombia we describe nine steps that were used to implement equity-focused GRADE recommendations: (1) identification of disadvantaged groups, (2) quantification of current health inequities, (3) development of equity-sensitive recommendations, (4) identification of key actors for implementation of equity-focused recommendations, (5) identification of barriers and facilitators to the implementation of equity-focused recommendations, (6) development of an equity strategy to be included in the implementation plan, (7) assessment of resources and incentives, (8) development of a communication strategy to support an equity focus and (9) development of monitoring and evaluation strategies. This case study can be used as model for implementing clinical practice guidelines, taking into account equity issues during guideline

  14. European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the inclusion of patient representatives in scientific projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.T.; Berlo, S.E.; Aanerud, G.J.; Aletaha, D.; Bijlsma, J.W.; Croucher, L.; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Glusing, B.; Gossec, L.; Hewlett, S.; Jongkees, M.; Magnusson, D.; Scholte-Voshaar, M.; Richards, P.; Ziegler, C.; Abma, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To develop recommendations to enable successful inclusion of the patient perspective in European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)-funded scientific research projects. Methods: The EULAR standardised operational procedures for guideline development were followed. A systematic literature

  15. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders : recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, DS; Anderson, IM; Nutt, DJ; Bandelow, B; Bond, A; Davidson, JRT; den Boer, JA; Fineberg, NA; Knapp, M; Scott, J; Wittchen, HU

    2005-01-01

    These British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines cover the range and aims of treatment for anxiety disorders. They are based explicitly on the available evidence and are presented as recommendations to aid clinical decision making in primary and secondary medical care. They may also serve

  16. Teens and the Misuse of Prescription Drugs: Evidence-Based Recommendations to Curb a Growing Societal Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C.; Holtz, Kristen D.

    2008-01-01

    The misuse of prescription drugs by teens in the United States is a growing public health problem. This article provides a systematic synthesis of multiple strands of literature to recommend effective prevention methods. Using a social-ecological framework, we review the scope of the problem of prescription drug use among teens. Then, we analyze…

  17. Evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT studies using wide area-detector scanners: a phantom study with cadaveric correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Formery, Anne-Sophie; Blum, Alain [CHRU-Nancy Hopital Central, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Hossu, Gabriela [Universite de Lorraine, IADI U947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CIC-IT 1433, Nancy (France); Winninger, Daniel [IDCmem, Nancy (France); Batch, Toufik [Hopital de Mercy, Service de Radiologie, Metz (France); Gervaise, Alban [Legouest Military Instruction Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Metz (France)

    2017-02-15

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT on wide area-detector CT. In order to assess factors influencing image quality in kinematic CT studies, a phantom consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate rotating disk with round wells of different sizes was imaged with various acquisition protocols. Cadaveric acquisitions were performed on the ankle joint during motion in two different axes and at different speeds to allow validation of phantom data. Images were acquired with a 320 detector-row CT scanner and were evaluated by two readers. Motion artefacts were significantly correlated with various parameters (movement axis, distance to centre, rotation speed and volume acquisition speed) (p < 0.0001). The relation between motion artefacts and distance to motion fulcrum was exponential (R{sup 2} 0.99). Half reconstruction led to a 23 % increase in image noise and a 40 % decrease in motion artefacts. Cadaveric acquisitions confirmed phantom data. Based on these findings, high tube rotation speed and half reconstruction are recommended for kinematic CT. The axis of motion significantly influences image artefacts and should be considered in patient training and evaluation of acquisition protocol suitability. This study provides evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT. (orig.)

  18. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder: revised third edition Recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.M.; Haddad, P. M.; Ferrier, I.N.; Aronson, J.K.; Barnes, T.R.H.; Cipriani, A.; Coghill, D.R.; Fazel, S.; Geddes, J.R.; Grunze, H.; Holmes, E.A.; Howes, O.; Hudson, S.; Hunt, N.; Jones, I.; Macmillan, I.C.; McAllister-Williams, H.; Miklowitz, D.M.; Morriss, R.; Munafò, M.; Paton, C.; Saharkian, B.J.; Saunders, K.E.A.; Sinclair, J.M.A.; Taylor, D.; Vieta, E.; Young, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    The British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines specify the scope and targets of treatment for bipolar disorder. The third version is based explicitly on the available evidence and presented, like previous Clinical Practice Guidelines, as recommendations to aid clinical decision making for practitioners: it may also serve as a source of information for patients and carers, and assist audit. The recommendations are presented together with a more detailed review of the corresponding evidence. A consensus meeting, involving experts in bipolar disorder and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from these participants. The best evidence from randomized controlled trials and, where available, observational studies employing quasi-experimental designs was used to evaluate treatment options. The strength of recommendations has been described using the GRADE approach. The guidelines cover the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, clinical management, and strategies for the use of medicines: in short-term treatment of episodes, relapse prevention and stopping treatment. The use of medication is integrated with a coherent approach to psychoeducation and behaviour change. PMID:26979387

  19. Lying Down after Premature Rupture of the Membranes in Term Singleton Pregnancies: An Evidence-Based Recommendation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, S; Schmidt, M; Weitz, M

    2016-10-01

    Objectives: In many countries pregnant women in term singleton pregnancies are advised by obstetricians and midwives to lie down immediately after rupture of membranes until engagement of the foetal head is confirmed. The horizontal positioning aims to prevent the prolapse of the umbilical cord. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effects of the maternal lying down measure in term singleton pregnancies. Search methods: We searched the databases of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE/Ovid and CENTRAL (Issue 10, 2015) from their inception until September 30th, 2015. Additionally, we searched selected trial registers, the reference lists of potentially relevant studies and national and international obstetrical clinical guidelines. All types of studies without language restriction were selected. Main results: One retrospective study was found. Only one woman with a term singleton pregnancy had the event of an umbilical cord prolapse following premature rupture of membranes (0.008%). The study did not report on the presence of an engaged foetal head in this woman. Conclusions and implications: Recommendations cannot be made in favour or against the lying down positioning based solely on the single identified study. For that reason, the widespread recommendation given by obstetricians and midwives should be critically reassessed. Also, induction of maternal anxiety and increased costs to the healthcare system following transportation to the delivery unit have to be considered in the light of the given minimal risk of umbilical cord prolapse in conjuncture with lacking evidence for the utility of the common recommendation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Recommendations on the use of prescribed burning practices in grassland conservation - An evidence-based study from Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóthmérész, Béla; Valkó, Orsolya; Török, Péter; Végvári, Zsolt; Deák, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    burning can have positive impacts from a nature conservation point of view by supporting several endangered species, reducing accumulated litter and maintaining open landscapes. Given the fact that due to land use changes and global warming the frequency of fire events are expected to increase in the next future, it is crucial to summarize evidence-based knowledge on fire in a European level and to design prescribed burning experiments in which the effects of fire could be studied in a controlled way.

  1. Italian Society of Rheumatology recommendations for the management of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, M; Bortoluzzi, A; Favero, M; Prevete, I; Scirè, C A; Bianchi, G; Borghi, C; Cimmino, M A; D'Avola, G M; Desideri, G; Di Giacinto, G; Govoni, M; Grassi, W; Lombardi, A; Marangella, M; Matucci Cerinic, M; Medea, G; Ramonda, R; Spadaro, A; Punzi, L; Minisola, G

    2013-03-28

    Gout is the most common arthritis in adults. Despite the availability of valid therapeutic options, the management of patients with gout is still suboptimal. The Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR) aimed to update, adapt to national contest and disseminate the 2006 EULAR recommendations for the management of gout. The multidisciplinary group of experts included rheumatologists, general practitioners, internists, geriatricians, nephrologists, cardiologists and evidence-based medicine experts. To maintain consistency with EULAR recommendations, a similar methodology was utilized by the Italian group. The original propositions were translated in Italian and priority research queries were identified through a Delphi consensus approach. A systematic search was conducted for selected queries. Efficacy and safety data on drugs reported in RCTs were combined in a meta-analysis where feasible. The strength of recommendation was measured by utilising the EULAR ordinal and visual analogue scales. The original 12 propositions were translated and adapted to Italian context. Further evidences were collected about the role of diet in the non-pharmacological treatment of gout and the efficacy of oral corticosteroids and low-dose colchicine in the management of acute attacks. Statements concerning uricosuric treatments were withdrawn and replaced with a proposition focused on a new urate lowering agent, febuxostat. A research agenda was developed to identify topics still not adequately investigated concerning the management of gout. The SIR has developed updated recommendations for the management of gout adapted to the Italian healthcare system. Their implementation in clinical practice is expected to improve the management of patients with gout.

  2. Interdisciplinary evidence-based recommendations for the follow-up of early stage seminomatous testicular germ cell cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hartmann, Michael [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Krege, Susanne [Krankenhaus Maria-Hilf GmbH, Krefeld (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Lorch, Anja [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Mayer, Frank [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Santis, Maria de [KFJ-Spital, ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP and LBI-ACR VIEnna-CTO, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Oncology; Gillessen, Silke [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Beyer, Joerg [Vivantes Klinikum am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Cathomas, Richard [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland). Medical Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To provide guidance regarding follow-up procedures after initial treatment of early stage testicular seminoma (clinical stages (CS) I-II A/B) based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Material: An interdisciplinary, multinational working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists analyzed the published evidence regarding follow-up procedures in various stages of seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular cancers. Focusing on radiooncological aspects, the recommendations contained herein are restricted to early stage seminoma (with radiotherapy being a standard treatment option). In particular, extent, frequency, and duration of imaging at follow-up were analyzed concerning relapse patterns, risk factors, and mode of relapse detection. Results: Active surveillance, adjuvant carboplatin or radiotherapy are equally accepted options for CS I seminoma but they result in different relapse rates and patterns. Usually relapses occur within the first 2(-6) years. Routinely performed follow-up using computerized tomography (CT) after adjuvant treatment yield only low detection rates of recurrences. Therefore, there is no evidence to maintain routine examinations every 3-4 months. After treatment of stage IIA/B, detection rates of relapses or progression identified solely by routinely performed CT during follow-up are low. Conclusion: Considering lifelong cure rates of up to 99% for patients treated for seminoma CS I-IIA/B, the negative impact of unnecessary ionizing radiation exposure has to be considered. The presented recommendations for various follow-up scenarios for early stage seminoma strongly promote the restrictive use of imaging procedures that utilize ionizing radiation (especially CT), due to its potential to induce secondary malignancies. (orig.)

  3. Evidence-based recommendations on the role of dermatologists in the diagnosis and management of psoriatic arthritis: systematic review and expert opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, M-A; Barnetche, T; Rouzaud, M; Sevrain, M; Villani, A P; Aractingi, S; Aubin, F; Beylot-Barry, M; Joly, P; Jullien, D; Le Maître, M; Misery, L; Ortonne, J-P; Cantagrel, A; Paul, C

    2014-08-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can develop at any time during the course of psoriasis. The aims of these practical recommendations are to help dermatologists identify patients at risk of PsA, to diagnose PsA in collaboration with rheumatologists and to gain a better understanding of initial PsA management. A scientific committee consisting of 10 dermatologists and a rheumatologist selected clinically relevant questions to be addressed by evidence-based recommendations using the DELPHI method. For each question, a systematic literature review was performed in Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases. The levels of evidence of all selected and reviewed articles were appraised according to the Oxford levels of evidence. An expert board of 30 dermatologists reviewed and analysed the evidence and developed recommendations for the selected questions. Agreement among participants was assessed on a 10-point scale, and the potential impact of the recommendations on clinical practice was evaluated. Among the 6960 references identified, 190 relevant articles were included in the reviews. Three recommendations regarding risk factors for PsA and one regarding PsA prevalence were issued. The mean agreement score between participants varied from 7.8 to 9.6. Three recommendations on PsA screening tools that can be used by dermatologists were issued. The mean agreement score between participants varied from 7.7 to 9.4. Initial PsA treatment options according to published guidelines were critically appraised for axial and peripheral involvement and enthesitis/dactylitis. Three recommendations were issued. The mean agreement score between participants varied from 7.6 to 8.7. The systematic literature research and meta-analyses did not provide high-quality evidence to support recommendations regarding PsA screening. Conversely, PsA treatment options were supported by strong evidence. Cooperation between dermatologists and rheumatologists should be emphasized to better identify

  4. Medical follow-up of workers exposed to lung carcinogens: French evidence-based and pragmatic recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur Delva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to establish recommendations for the medical follow-up of workers currently or previously exposed to lung carcinogens. Methods A critical synthesis of the literature was conducted. Occupational lung carcinogenic substances were listed and classified according to their level of lung cancer risk. A targeted screening protocol was defined. Results A clinical trial, National Lung Screnning Trial (NLST, showed the efficacy of chest CAT scan (CT screening for populations of smokers aged 55–74 years with over 30 pack-years of exposure who had stopped smoking for less than 15 years. To propose screening in accordance with NLST criteria, and to account for occupational risk factors, screening among smokers and former smokers needs to consider the types of occupational exposure for which the risk level is at least equivalent to the risk of the subjects included in the NLST. The working group proposes an algorithm that estimates the relative risk of each occupational lung carcinogen, taking into account exposure to tobacco, based on available data from the literature. Conclusion Given the lack of data on bronchopulmonary cancer (BPC screening in occupationally exposed workers, the working group proposed implementing a screening experiment for bronchopulmonary cancer in subjects occupationally exposed or having been occupationally exposed to lung carcinogens who are confirmed as having high risk factors for BPC. A specific algorithm is proposed to determine the level of risk of BPC, taking into account the different occupational lung carcinogens and tobacco smoking at the individual level.

  5. A narrative review of evidence-based recommendations for the physical examination of the lumbar spine, sacroiliac and hip joint complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C K; Johnson, E K

    2012-09-01

    Non-specific low back pain is a frequent complaint in primary care, but the differential diagnosis for low back pain can be complex. Despite advances in diagnostic imaging, a specific pathoanatomical source of low back pain can remain elusive in up to 85% of individuals. Best practice guidelines recommend that clinicians conduct a focused physical examination to help to identify patients with non-specific low back pain and an evidence-based course of clinical management. The use of sensitive and specific clinical methods to assess the lumbar spine, sacroiliac and hip joints is critical for effective physical examination. Psychosocial factors also play an important role in the evaluation of individuals with low back pain, but are not included in this narrative review of physical examination methods. Physical examination of the lumbar spine, sacroiliac and hip joints is presented, organized around patient position for efficient and effective clinical assessment. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. From Systematic Reviews to Clinical Recommendations for Evidence-Based Health Care: Validation of Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (R-AMSTAR) for Grading of Clinical Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Jason; Chiappelli, Francesco; Cajulis, Olivia O; Avezova, Raisa; Kossan, George; Chew, Laura; Maida, Carl A

    2010-07-16

    Research synthesis seeks to gather, examine and evaluate systematically research reports that converge toward answering a carefully crafted research question, which states the problem patient population, the intervention under consideration, and the clinical outcome of interest. The product of the process of systematically reviewing the research literature pertinent to the research question thusly stated is the "systematic review".The objective and transparent approach of the systematic review aims to minimize bias. Most systematic reviews yield quantitative analyses of measurable data (e.g., acceptable sampling analysis, meta-analysis). Systematic reviews may also be qualitative, while adhering to accepted standards for gathering, evaluating, and reporting evidence. Systematic reviews provide highly rated recommendations for evidence-based health care; but, systematic reviews are not equally reliable and successful in minimizing bias.Several instruments are available to evaluate the quality of systematic reviews. The 'assessment of multiple systematic reviews' (AMSTAR) was derived from factor analysis of the most relevant items among them. AMSTAR consists of eleven items with good face and content validity for measuring the methodological quality of systematic reviews, has been widely accepted and utilized, and has gained in reliability, reproducibility. AMSTAR does not produce quantifiable assessments of systematic review quality and clinical relevance. In this study, we have revised the AMSTAR instrument, detracting nothing from its content and construct validity, and utilizing the very criteria employed in the development of the original tool, with the aim of yielding an instrument that can quantify the quality of systematic reviews. We present validation data of the revised AMSTAR (R-AMSTAR), and discuss its implications and application in evidence-based health care.

  7. SIMPLE: implementation of recommendations from international evidence-based guidelines on caesarean sections in the Netherlands. Protocol for a controlled before and after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melman Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caesarean section (CS rates are rising worldwide. In the Netherlands, the most significant rise is observed in healthy women with a singleton in vertex position between 37 and 42 weeks gestation, whereas it is doubtful whether an improved outcome for the mother or her child was obtained. It can be hypothesized that evidence-based guidelines on CS are not implemented sufficiently. Therefore, the present study has the following objectives: to develop quality indicators on the decision to perform a CS based on key recommendations from national and international guidelines; to use the quality indicators in order to gain insight into actual adherence of Dutch gynaecologists to guideline recommendations on the performance of a CS; to explore barriers and facilitators that have a direct effect on guideline application regarding CS; and to develop, execute, and evaluate a strategy in order to reduce the CS incidence for a similar neonatal outcome (based on the information gathered in the second and third objectives. Methods An independent expert panel of Dutch gynaecologists and midwives will develop a set of quality indicators on the decision to perform a CS. These indicators will be used to measure current care in 20 hospitals with a population of 1,000 women who delivered by CS, and a random selection of 1,000 women who delivered vaginally in the same period. Furthermore, by interviewing healthcare professionals and patients, the barriers and facilitators that may influence the decision to perform a CS will be measured. Based on the results, a tailor-made implementation strategy will be developed and tested in a controlled before-and-after study in 12 hospitals (six intervention, six control hospitals with regard to effectiveness, experiences, and costs. Discussion This study will offer insight into the current CS care and into the hindering and facilitating factors influencing obstetrical policy on CS. Furthermore, it will allow

  8. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout: integrating systematic literature review and expert opinion of a broad panel of rheumatologists in the 3e initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivera, Francisca; Andrés, Mariano; Carmona, Loreto; Kydd, Alison S. R.; Moi, John; Seth, Rakhi; Sriranganathan, Melonie; van Durme, Caroline; van Echteld, Irene; Vinik, Ophir; Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Aletaha, Daniel; Bombardier, Claire; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Edwards, Christopher J.; Landewé, Robert B.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.; Branco, Jaime C.; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Catrina, Anca I.; Elewaut, Dirk; Ferrari, Antonio J. L.; Kiely, Patrick; Leeb, Burkhard F.; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Zochling, Jane; Falzon, Louise; van der Heijde, Désirée M.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to develop evidence-based multinational recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout. Using a formal voting process, a panel of 78 international rheumatologists developed 10 key clinical questions pertinent to the diagnosis and management of gout. Each question was investigated

  9. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in inflammatory arthritis: integrating systematic literature research and expert opinion of a broad panel of rheumatologists in the 3e Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittle, Samuel L.; Colebatch, Alexandra N.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Edwards, Christopher J.; Adams, Karen; Englbrecht, Matthias; Hazlewood, Glen; Marks, Jonathan L.; Radner, Helga; Ramiro, Sofia; Richards, Bethan L.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Aletaha, Daniel; Bombardier, Claire; Landewé, Robert B.; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; Branco, Jaime C.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; Catrina, Anca I.; Hannonen, Pekka; Kiely, Patrick; Leeb, Burkhard; Lie, Elisabeth; Martinez-Osuna, Píndaro; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Westhovens, Rene; Zochling, Jane; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2012-01-01

    To develop evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). A total of 453 rheumatologists from 17 countries participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process, 89 rheumatologists

  10. Contemporary use of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndrome : insights from Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlen, Anders; Varenhorst, Christoph; Lagerqvist, Bo; Renlund, Henrik; Wallentin, Lars; James, Stefan K.; Jernberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The platelet inhibitor ticagrelor is strongly recommended during 12 months post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in European guidelines. We analysed clinical characteristics of patients given ticagrelor for ACS in the real world. We studied the use of ticagrelor in patients admitted for ACS in Sweden between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 who were enrolled in the Swedish Web system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended The...

  11. Multinational evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout: integrating systematic literature review and expert opinion of a broad panel of rheumatologists in the 3e initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivera, Francisca; Andrés, Mariano; Carmona, Loreto; Kydd, Alison S R; Moi, John; Seth, Rakhi; Sriranganathan, Melonie; van Durme, Caroline; van Echteld, Irene; Vinik, Ophir; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Aletaha, Daniel; Bombardier, Claire; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Edwards, Christopher J; Landewé, Robert B; Bijlsma, Johannes W; Branco, Jaime C; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Catrina, Anca I; Elewaut, Dirk; Ferrari, Antonio J L; Kiely, Patrick; Leeb, Burkhard F; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Zochling, Jane; Falzon, Louise; van der Heijde, Désirée M

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to develop evidence-based multinational recommendations for the diagnosis and management of gout. Using a formal voting process, a panel of 78 international rheumatologists developed 10 key clinical questions pertinent to the diagnosis and management of gout. Each question was investigated with a systematic literature review. Medline, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL and abstracts from 2010-2011 European League Against Rheumatism and American College of Rheumatology meetings were searched in each review. Relevant studies were independently reviewed by two individuals for data extraction and synthesis and risk of bias assessment. Using this evidence, rheumatologists from 14 countries (Europe, South America and Australasia) developed national recommendations. After rounds of discussion and voting, multinational recommendations were formulated. Each recommendation was graded according to the level of evidence. Agreement and potential impact on clinical practice were assessed. Combining evidence and clinical expertise, 10 recommendations were produced. One recommendation referred to the diagnosis of gout, two referred to cardiovascular and renal comorbidities, six focused on different aspects of the management of gout (including drug treatment and monitoring), and the last recommendation referred to the management of asymptomatic hyperuricaemia. The level of agreement with the recommendations ranged from 8.1 to 9.2 (mean 8.7) on a 1-10 scale, with 10 representing full agreement. Ten recommendations on the diagnosis and management of gout were established. They are evidence-based and supported by a large panel of rheumatologists from 14 countries, enhancing their utility in clinical practice.

  12. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis: systematic literature search of the 3E Initiative in Rheumatology involving a broad panel of experts and practising rheumatologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidiropoulos, P.I.; Hatemi, G.; Song, I.H.

    2008-01-01

    of enthesitis. The compiled agreement among experts ranged from 72% to 93%. CONCLUSION: Recommendations for the management of AS were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert/physician consensus with high level of agreement. Involvement of a larger and more representative group......OBJECTIVE: Recommendations and/or guidelines represent a popular way of integrating evidence-based medicine into clinical practice. The 3E Initiatives is a multi-national effort to develop recommendations for the management of rheumatic diseases, which involves a large number of experts combined...... with practising rheumatologists addressing specific questions relevant to clinical practice. METHODS: Ten countries participated in three rounds of discussions and votes concerning the management of AS. A set of nine questions was formulated in the domains of diagnosis, monitoring and treatment, after a Delphi...

  13. Italian Society of Rheumatology recommendations for the management of gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gout is the most common arthritis in adults. Despite the availability of valid therapeutic options, the management of patients with gout is still suboptimal. The Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR aimed to update, adapt to national contest and disseminate the 2006 EULAR recommendations for the management of gout. Methods: The multidisciplinary group of experts included rheumatologists, general practitioners, internists, geriatricians, nephrologists, cardiologists and evidence-based medicine experts. To maintain consistency with EULAR recommendations, a similar methodology was utilized by the Italian group. The original propositions were translated in Italian and priority research queries were identified through a Delphi consensus approach. A systematic search was conducted for selected queries. Efficacy and safety data on drugs reported in RCTs were combined in a meta-analysis where feasible. The strength of recommendation was measured by utilising the EULAR ordinal and visual analogue scales. Results: The original 12 propositions were translated and adapted to Italian context. Further evidences were collected about the role of diet in the non-pharmacological treatment of gout and the efficacy of oral corticosteroids and low-dose colchicine in the management of acute attacks. Statements concerning uricosuric treatments were withdrawn and replaced with a proposition focused on a new urate lowering agent, febuxostat. A research agenda was developed to identify topics still not adequately investigated concerning the management of gout. Conclusions: The SIR has developed updated recommendations for the management of gout adapted to the Italian healthcare system. Their implementation in clinical practice is expected to improve the management of patients with gout.

  14. National survey on the non-pharmacological modalities prescribed by French general practitioners in the treatment of lower limb (knee and hip) osteoarthritis. Adherence to the EULAR recommendations and factors influencing adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrozier, T; Marre, J P; Payen-Champenois, C; Vignon, E

    2008-01-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of lower limb osteoarthritis (LLOA) include non-pharmacological (NPM) and pharmacological modalities (PM). In France, general practitioners (GPs) are the main prescribers of pharmacological treatment for LLOA but little is known about the non-pharmacological modalities they usually prescribe. To determine how French GPs prescribe non-pharmacological modalities of LLOA treatment in daily practice. A four-point questionnaire (systematically, frequently, rarely, never) was built to assess the French GPs' opinion regarding the NPM of LLOA treatment (10 questions). The questionnaire was given between April and June 2005 to 3000 GPs, all over the French regions. The percentage reported in this abstract are those of the systematic and frequent responses. 59.2% of the questionnaires (n=1775) could be retrieved. Weight reduction recommendations (76%), joint sparing (71.7%), physical activity development (61.7%), rehabilitation (57.8%), self-exercise (46%) were the more frequently prescribed NPM. Sticks (36%), insoles (35.6%), bed relief (25.4%) and knee bracing (10.5%) were far less regularly proposed. However weight reduction and physical activity development appeared to be the patients less-well observed NPM. The main means used to improve the efficacy of the diet were the support of a nutritionist (74.5%) and the support of the GPs (70.7%) far beyond the support group and familial intervention (both 36,6%). The large majority of GPs considered that a good physical activity was essential (51.7%) or useful (43.3%) to the success of the weight reduction programme. The main recommended physical activities were walking (84.3%), swimming (74.3%), cycling (47%) and water-gymnastics (40.4%). To improve the success of the physical activity development, analgesics were recommended by 93% of GPs, settling up through rehabilitation by 57.4%, support through GPs appointments by 50%. Lastly, 68.4% of GPs recommended a systematic analgesic consumption

  15. Treating an Established Episode of Delirium in Palliative Care: Expert Opinion and Review of the Current Evidence Base With Recommendations for Future Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José L.; Davis, Daniel H.J.; Currow, David C.; Meagher, David; Rabheru, Kiran; Wright, David; Bruera, Eduardo; Hartwick, Michael; Gagnon, Pierre R.; Gagnon, Bruno; Breitbart, William; Regnier, Laura; Lawlor, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium is a highly prevalent complication in patients in palliative care settings, especially in the end-of-life context. Objectives To review the current evidence base for treating episodes of delirium in palliative care settings and propose a framework for future development. Methods We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other purposely selected stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. This was supplemented by a literature search of multiple databases and relevant reference lists to identify studies regarding therapeutic interventions for delirium. Results The context of delirium management in palliative care is highly variable. The standard management of a delirium episode includes the investigation of precipitating and aggravating factors followed by symptomatic treatment with drug therapy. However, the intensity of this management depends on illness trajectory and goals of care in addition to the local availability of both investigative modalities and therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologically, haloperidol remains the practice standard by consensus for symptomatic control. Dosing schedules are derived from expert opinion and various clinical practice guidelines as evidence-based data from palliative care settings are limited. The commonly used pharmacologic interventions for delirium in this population warrant evaluation in clinical trials to examine dosing and titration regimens, different routes of administration, and safety and efficacy compared with placebo. Conclusion Delirium treatment is multidimensional and includes the identification of precipitating and aggravating factors. For symptomatic management, haloperidol remains the practice standard. Further high-quality collaborative research investigating the appropriate treatment of this complex syndrome is needed. PMID:24480529

  16. Treating an established episode of delirium in palliative care: expert opinion and review of the current evidence base with recommendations for future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Shirley H; Kanji, Salmaan; Pereira, José L; Davis, Daniel H J; Currow, David C; Meagher, David; Rabheru, Kiran; Wright, David; Bruera, Eduardo; Hartwick, Michael; Gagnon, Pierre R; Gagnon, Bruno; Breitbart, William; Regnier, Laura; Lawlor, Peter G

    2014-08-01

    Delirium is a highly prevalent complication in patients in palliative care settings, especially in the end-of-life context. To review the current evidence base for treating episodes of delirium in palliative care settings and propose a framework for future development. We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other purposely selected stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. This was supplemented by a literature search of multiple databases and relevant reference lists to identify studies regarding therapeutic interventions for delirium. The context of delirium management in palliative care is highly variable. The standard management of a delirium episode includes the investigation of precipitating and aggravating factors followed by symptomatic treatment with drug therapy. However, the intensity of this management depends on illness trajectory and goals of care in addition to the local availability of both investigative modalities and therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologically, haloperidol remains the practice standard by consensus for symptomatic control. Dosing schedules are derived from expert opinion and various clinical practice guidelines as evidence-based data from palliative care settings are limited. The commonly used pharmacologic interventions for delirium in this population warrant evaluation in clinical trials to examine dosing and titration regimens, different routes of administration, and safety and efficacy compared with placebo. Delirium treatment is multidimensional and includes the identification of precipitating and aggravating factors. For symptomatic management, haloperidol remains the practice standard. Further high-quality collaborative research investigating the appropriate treatment of this complex syndrome is needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. A systematic review of chiropractic management of adults with Whiplash-Associated Disorders: recommendations for advancing evidence-based practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Lynn; Descarreaux, Martin; Bryans, Roland; Duranleau, Mireille; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Watkin, Robert; White, Eleanor

    2010-01-01

    The literature relevant to the treatment of Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD) is extensive and heterogeneous. A Participatory Action Research (PAR) approach was used to engage a chiropractic community of practice and stakeholders in a systematic review to address a general question: 'Does chiropractic management of WAD clients have an effect on improving health status?' A systematic review of the empirical studies relevant to WAD interventions was conducted followed by a review of the evidence. The initial search identified 1,155 articles. Ninety-two of the articles were retrieved, and 27 articles consistent with specific criteria of WAD intervention were analyzed in-depth. The best evidence supporting the chiropractic management of clients with WAD is reported. Further review identified ways to overcome gaps needed to inform clinical practice and culminated in the development of a proposed care model: the WAD-Plus Model. There is a baseline of evidence that suggests chiropractic care improves cervical range of motion (cROM) and pain in the management of WAD. However, the level of this evidence relevant to clinical practice remains low or draws on clinical consensus at this time. The WAD-Plus Model has implications for use by chiropractors and interdisciplinary professionals in the assessment and management of acute, subacute and chronic pain due to WAD. Furthermore, the WAD-Plus Model can be used in the future study of interventions and outcomes to advance evidence-based care in the management of WAD.

  18. Answering medical questions at the point of care: a cross-sectional study comparing rapid decisions based on PubMed and Epistemonikos searches with evidence-based recommendations developed with the GRADE approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcovich, Ariel; Criniti, Juan Martín; Popoff, Federico; Ragusa, Martín Alberto; Gigler, Cristel; Gonzalez Malla, Carlos; Clavijo, Manuela; Manzotti, Matias; Diaz, Martín; Catalano, Hugo Norberto; Neumann, Ignacio; Guyatt, Gordon

    2017-08-07

    Using the best current evidence to inform clinical decisions remains a challenge for clinicians. Given the scarcity of trustworthy clinical practice guidelines providing recommendations to answer clinicians' daily questions, clinical decision support systems (ie, assistance in question identification and answering) emerge as an attractive alternative. The trustworthiness of the recommendations achieved by such systems is unknown. To evaluate the trustworthiness of a question identification and answering system that delivers timely recommendations. Cross-sectional study. We compared the responses to 100 clinical questions related to inpatient management provided by two rapid response methods with 'Gold Standard' recommendations. One of the rapid methods was based on PubMed and the other on Epistemonikos database. We defined our 'Gold Standard' as trustworthy published evidence-based recommendations or, when unavailable, recommendations developed locally by a panel of six clinicians following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Recommendations provided by the rapid strategies were classified as potentially misleading or reasonable. We also determined if the potentially misleading recommendations could have been avoided with the appropriate implementation of searching and evidence summary tools. We were able to answer all of the 100 questions with both rapid methods. Of the 200 recommendations obtained, 6.5% (95% CI 3% to 9.9%) were classified as potentially misleading and 93.5% (95% CI 90% to 96.9%) as reasonable. 6 of the 13 potentially misleading recommendations could have been avoided by the appropriate usage of the Epistemonikos matrix tool or by constructing summary of findings tables. No significant differences were observed between the evaluated rapid response methods. A question answering service based on the GRADE approach proved feasible to implement and provided appropriate guidance for most identified

  19. Systematic review of the literature and evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis in trauma: results from an Italian consensus of experts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Poole

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis is frequently administered in severe trauma. However, the risk of selecting resistant bacteria, a major issue especially in critical care environments, has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of the present study was to provide guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis for four different trauma-related clinical conditions, taking into account the risks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria selection, thus innovating previous guidelines in the field.The MEDLINE database was searched for studies comparing antibiotic prophylaxis to controls (placebo or no antibiotic administration in four clinical traumatic conditions that were selected on the basis of the traumatic event frequency and/or infection severity. The selected studies focused on the prevention of early ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP in comatose patients with traumatic brain injury, of meningitis in severe basilar skull fractures, of wound infections in long-bone open fractures. Since no placebo-controlled study was available for deep surgical site-infections prevention in abdominal trauma with enteric contamination, we compared 24-hour and 5-day antibiotic prophylaxis policies. A separate specific research focused on the question of antibiotic-resistant bacteria selection caused by antibiotic prophylaxis, an issue not adequately investigated by the selected studies. Randomised trials, reviews, meta-analyses, observational studies were included. Data extraction was carried out by one author according to a predefined protocol, using an electronic form. The strength of evidence was stratified and recommendations were given according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE criteria.Uncertain evidence deserving further studies was found for two-dose antibiotic prophylaxis for early VAP prevention in comatose patients. In the other cases the risk of resistant-bacteria selection caused by antibiotic administration for 48 hours

  20. Evidence-based recommendations for addressing malnutrition in health care: an updated strategy from the feedM.E. Global Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, M Isabel T D; Hegazi, Refaat A; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Reddy, B Ravinder; Tappenden, Kelly A; Uyar, Mehmet; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition ranges up to 50% among patients in hospitals worldwide, and disease-related malnutrition is all too common in long-term and other health care settings as well. Regrettably, the numbers have not improved over the past decade. The consequences of malnutrition are serious, including increased complications (pressure ulcers, infections, falls), longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, increased costs of care, and higher risk of mortality. Yet disease-related malnutrition still goes unrecognized and undertreated. To help improve nutrition care around the world, the feedM.E. (Medical Education) Global Study Group, including members from Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and North and South America, defines a Nutrition Care Pathway that is simple and can be tailored for use in varied health care settings. The Pathway recommends screen, intervene, and supervene: screen patients' nutrition status on admission or initiation of care, intervene promptly when needed, and supervene or follow-up routinely with adjustment and reinforcement of nutrition care plans. This article is a call-to-action for health caregivers worldwide to increase attention to nutrition care. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Australian and New Zealand national evidence-based recommendations for the investigation and follow-up of undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis: an integration of systematic literature research and rheumatological expert opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Claire; Bird, Paul; Major, Gabor; Romas, Evange; Portek, Ian; Taylor, Andrew; Zochling, Jane

    2013-12-01

    To develop Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) recommendations for the investigation and follow-up of undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis (UPIA) using an evidence-based approach. Ten questions pertaining to the investigation and follow-up of patients with UPIA in daily rheumatological practice were defined by clinicians using a modified Delphi approach. A systematic literature search was conducted for each of the final questions. The results were presented to a workshop of 54 ANZ rheumatologists in May 2009. Discussions were held to develop consensus statements for each question, based on published evidence and clinical experience/expertise. Ten recommendations were made on diagnostic value of clinical features in the patient's history and examination, predictors of poor prognosis and persistence, synovial fluid analysis, serology, imaging and human leukocyte antigen B27 testing. The lack of specific research to inform recommendations presented a challenge. Dynamic discussion groups outlined individual experience in areas without good quality clinical trial evidence. The median strength of support for the final set of recommendations was 7/10 (interquartile range 6-8), ranging from 6 to 9 for individual statements. Ten ANZ recommendations for the investigation and follow-up of UPIA were formulated, based on available evidence and extensive clinical experience. The systematic literature review was of limited value while animated discussion of individual experience, with subsequent information exchange, highlighted the importance of merging clinical expertise with published literature to establish practical recommendations that can improve quality of care in rheumatology. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...

  3. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now i...

  4. The EULAR Study Group for Registers and Observational Drug Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kearsley-Fleet, Lianne; Závada, Jakub; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), a study group of investigators representing European biologic DMARD (bDMARD) registers was convened. The purpose of this initial assessment was to collect and compare a cross section of patient characteristics...

  5. Evidence-based dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chi Chi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM has become a hot topic in medical practice, education, and research. However, a large number of senior doctors did not have an opportunity to learn EBM in medical schools. Firstly, this article addresses the history of EBM and the principle of practicing EBM, i.e., asking, acquiring, appraisal, application, and auditing. Secondly, this article also provides a brief introduction to evidence-based dermatology and compares the introduction of clinical practice guidelines between Europe, the UK, and the US. Finally, this article addresses the present condition and future perspective of evidence-based dermatology in Taiwan.

  6. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... and electronic patient records for diabetes patients, this paper reports research in progress regarding the prospects and pitfalls of evidence-based development....

  7. Recommendations for the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Ingrid; Loza, Estibaliz; Uson, Jacqueline; Acebes, Carlos; Andreu, Jose Luis; Batlle, Enrique; Bueno, Ángel; Collado, Paz; Fernández-Gallardo, Juan Manuel; González, Carlos; Jiménez Palop, Mercedes; Lisbona, María Pilar; Macarrón, Pilar; Maymó, Joan; Narváez, Jose Antonio; Navarro-Compán, Victoria; Sanz, Jesús; Rosario, M Piedad; Vicente, Esther; Naredo, Esperanza

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recommendations were generated following a nominal group technique. A panel of experts, consisting of 15 rheumatologists and 3 radiologists, was established in the first panel meeting to define the scope and purpose of the consensus document, as well as chapters, potential recommendations and systematic literature reviews (we used and updated those from previous EULAR documents). A first draft of recommendations and text was generated. Then, an electronic Delphi process (2 rounds) was carried out. Recommendations were voted from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). We defined agreement if at least 70% of experts voted ≥7. The level of evidence and grade or recommendation was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The full text was circulated and reviewed by the panel. The consensus was coordinated by an expert methodologist. A total of 20 recommendations were proposed. They include the validity of US and MRI regarding inflammation and damage detection, diagnosis, prediction (structural damage progression, flare, treatment response, etc.), monitoring and the use of US guided injections/biopsies. These recommendations will help clinicians use US and MRI in RA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafslund, Bjorg [Institute of Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, P.O. Box 7030, N-5020 Bergen (Norway)], E-mail: bhaf@hib.no; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica [Centre for Evidence Based Practice, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen (Norway)

    2008-11-15

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain.

  9. Evidence-Based Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Stephens, Martin

    Evidence-based toxicology (EBT) was introduced independently by two groups in 2005, in the context of toxicological risk assessment and causation as well as based on parallels between the evaluation of test methods in toxicology and evidence-based assessment of diagnostics tests in medicine. The role model of evidence-based medicine (EBM) motivated both proposals and guided the evolution of EBT, whereas especially systematic reviews and evidence quality assessment attract considerable attention in toxicology.Regarding test assessment, in the search of solutions for various problems related to validation, such as the imperfectness of the reference standard or the challenge to comprehensively evaluate tests, the field of Diagnostic Test Assessment (DTA) was identified as a potential resource. DTA being an EBM discipline, test method assessment/validation therefore became one of the main drivers spurring the development of EBT.In the context of pathway-based toxicology, EBT approaches, given their objectivity, transparency and consistency, have been proposed to be used for carrying out a (retrospective) mechanistic validation.In summary, implementation of more evidence-based approaches may provide the tools necessary to adapt the assessment/validation of toxicological test methods and testing strategies to face the challenges of toxicology in the twenty first century.

  10. [Evidence-based TEP technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köckerling, F

    2017-04-01

    The guidelines of all international hernia societies recommend as procedures of choice the laparoendoscopic techniques total extraperitoneal patch plasty (TEP) and transabdominal preperitoneal patch plasty (TAPP) as well as the open Lichtenstein operation for elective inguinal hernia repair. The learning curve associated with the laparoendoscopic techniques, in particular TEP, is longer than that for the open Lichtenstein technique due to the complexity of the procedures. Accordingly, for laparoendoscopic techniques it is particularly important that the operations are conducted in a standardized manner in compliance with the evidence-based recommendations given for the technical details. When procedures are carried out in strict compliance with the guidelines of the international hernia societies, low rates of perioperative complications, complication-related reoperations, recurrences and chronic pain can be expected for TEP. Compliance with the guidelines can also positively impact mastery of the learning curve for TEP. The technical guidelines on TEP are based on study results and on the experiences of numerous experts; therefore, it is imperative that they are implemented in routine surgical practice.

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  12. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: Evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, A. J.; Meader, N.; Davies, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. Methods: We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer...... as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Conclusions: Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon...... unassisted clinical recognition. In clinical practice, all tools should form part of an integrated approach involving further follow-up, clinical assessment and evidence based therapy. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Evidence-Based Medicine: Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew K; Most, Sam P

    2015-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine has become increasingly prominent in the climate of modern day healthcare. The practice of evidence-based medicine involves the integration of the best available evidence with clinical experience and expertise to help guide clinical decision-making. The essential tenets of evidence-based medicine can be applied to both functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. Current outcome measures in functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty, including objective, subjective, and clinician-reported measures, is summarized and the current data is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence based practice: perspectives of Iranian urologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Sadeghi-Ghyassi, Fatemeh; Olfati, Nahid; Dastgiri, Saeed; Maghbouli, Leili

    2014-01-04

    To determine the attitudes and beliefs of Iranian urologists toward Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and investigation of the barriers of evidence based practice (EBP). A self- administrated, Likert scale questionnaire designed in Persian and filled up by censuses selected urologist from Iranian Urology Association (IUA). Data were entered to Predictive Analytics Soft Ware version 18.0 and descriptive statistics were obtained for all parts of the questionnaire. A total of 111 out of 500 Iranian urologists who attended in IUA annual meeting, responded to the questionnaires. Mean attitude score of respondents was 30.4 (SD: 5.7, range 16-40). Attitude score showed statistically significant association to previous participation in EBM workshops (P = .01). Of participants 96% believed EBP will improve patient care and 76.2% of them appreciated the impact of use of research utilization and application of evidence based guidelines on clinical decision making and the outcome of surgery. The main barriers to EBP stated as lack of time (64.8%), facilities (53.4%), and training in EBM (29.4%). The urologists have positive attitudes towards EBP. However, regarding lack of time, pre-appraised databases or EBP guidelines can be helpful. Evidence based workshops and familiarity with evidence databases is recommended for Iranian urologists. In addition, health care system and policy makers could play a major role to provide a culture of EBP.

  15. Evidence-based cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinagare, Atul B.; Khorasani, Ramin [Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    With the advances in the field of oncology, imaging is increasingly used in the follow-up of cancer patients, leading to concerns about over-utilization. Therefore, it has become imperative to make imaging more evidence-based, efficient, cost-effective and equitable. This review explores the strategies and tools to make diagnostic imaging more evidence-based, mainly in the context of follow-up of cancer patients.

  16. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tony [Senior Lecturer in Medical Radiation Science, University Department of Rural Health, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Locked Bag 9783 NEMSC, Tamworth, NSW 2348 (Australia)], E-mail: tony.smith@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

    2008-08-15

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services.

  17. Validation of the ACR/EULAR classification criteria for systemic sclerosis in patients with early scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Farley Carvalho; Camargo, Cíntia Zumstein; Kayser, Cristiane

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the 2013 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc) in patients with SSc, including patients with early SSc. Fifty-six consecutive patients with early SSc (2001 LeRoy and Medsger criteria), 122 patients with established SSc (1980 ACR classification criteria), and 141 patients with SSc-like disorders were included in this cross-sectional study. The diagnostic performance of the 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria was compared with the 1980 ACR criteria in several subsets of patients. The performance of individual variables was also obtained. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and optimal cut-off values were computed. The sensitivity and specificity in the whole cohort of 178 SSc patients were 77.6 and 98.5%, respectively, using the 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria and 68.5 and 100%, respectively, using the 1980 ACR criteria. Twenty-eight percent of the patients with early SSc met the 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria. Among the patients with early SSc, 53% of those who had Raynaud's phenomenon, abnormal capillaroscopy and positive SSc-related antibodies met the 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria. The area under the ROC curve was 0.975 (95% confidence interval 0.962-0.987). The best cut-off value for the total score was ≥8 (sensitivity 82%; specificity 97.9%). The individual variables with the highest specificity values were proximal skin thickening, sclerodactyly (specificity 100%), telangiectasia and SSc-related antibodies (specificity 98.6%). Raynaud's phenomenon had the best sensitivity (99.4%) but had low specificity (4.2%). In conclusion, the 2013 ACR/EULAR classification criteria showed high accuracy and increased sensitivity in the classification of patients with early SSc.

  18. How to understand and conduct evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions regarding the care of individual patients. This concept has gained popularity recently, and its applications have been steadily expanding. Nowadays, the term "evidence-based" is used in numerous situations and conditions, such as evidence-based medicine, evidence-based practice, evidence-based health care, evidence-based social work, evidence-based policy, and evidence-based education. However, many anesthesiologists and their colleagues have not previously been accustomed to utilizing EBM, and they have experienced difficulty in understanding and applying the techniques of EBM to their practice. In this article, the author discusses the brief history, definition, methods, and limitations of EBM. As EBM also involves making use of the best available information to answer questions in clinical practice, the author emphasizes the process of performing evidence-based medicine: generate the clinical question, find the best evidence, perform critical appraisal, apply the evidence, and then evaluate. Levels of evidence and strength of recommendation were also explained. The author expects that this article may be of assistance to readers in understanding, conducting, and evaluating EBM.

  19. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Unita di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Hunink, Myriam G. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Harvard School of Public Health, Program for Health Decision Science, Boston, MA (United States); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Krestin, Gabriel P. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  20. PROSPECT: evidence-based, procedure-specific postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Wilkinson, Roseanne C; Fischer, H Barrie J; Camu, Frederic

    2007-03-01

    Existing general guidelines for perioperative pain management do not consider procedure-specific differences in analgesic efficacy or applicability of a given analgesic technique. For the clinician, an evidence-based, procedure-specific guideline for perioperative pain management is therefore desirable. This chapter reviews the methodology and results of a public web site (www.postoppain.org) which provides information and recommendations for evidence-based procedure-specific postoperative pain management.

  1. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration...... medicine. Thus, evidence-based guidelines do change practice patterns unless they are counteracted by the reimbursement system....... likely to prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory eye drops and to not prescribe topical antibiotic eye drops after the guideline was published. Other parameters, most notably the use of toric IOLs and use of postoperative examinations were more guided by reimbursement standards than by evidence-based...

  2. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI) : a user guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier; Asmussen, Karsten; Jacobsen, Soren; Bartoloni, Elena; Gerli, Roberto; Bijlsma, Johannes Wj; Kruize, Aike A; Bombardieri, Stefano; Bookman, Arthur; Kallenberg, Cees; Meiners, Petra; Brun, Johan G; Jonsson, Roland; Caporali, Roberto; Carsons, Steven; De Vita, Salvatore; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Devauchelle, Valerie; Saraux, Alain; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Sibilia, Jean; Hachulla, Eric; Illei, Gabor; Isenberg, David; Jones, Adrian; Manoussakis, Menelaos; Mandl, Thomas; Jacobsson, Lennart; Demoulins, Frederic; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nishiyama, Sumusu; Omdal, Roald; Parke, Ann; Praprotnik, Sonja; Tomsic, Matjia; Price, Elizabeth; Scofield, Hal; L Sivils, Kathy; Smolen, Josef; Laqué, Roser Solans; Steinfeld, Serge; Sutcliffe, Nurhan; Sumida, Takayuki; Valesini, Guido; Valim, Valeria; Vivino, Frederick B; Vollenweider, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in

  3. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the metacarpophalangeal joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, P; Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint magnetic resonance images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. The illustrations include synovitis in the MCP joints (OMERACT RA magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (RAMRIS), grades 0-3), bone oedema...

  4. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis...

  5. Evidence-based management reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovner, Anthony R; Rundall, Thomas G

    2006-01-01

    Reports of medical mistakes have splashed across newspapers and magazines in the United States. At the same time, instances of overuse, underuse, and misuse of management tactics and strategies receive far less attention. The sense of urgency associated with improving the quality of medical care does not exist with respect to improving the quality of management decision making. A more evidence-based approach would improve the competence of the decision-makers and their motivation to use more scientific methods when making a decision. The authors of this article consider a study of 68 U.S. health services managers that found a low level of evidence-based management behaviors. From the findings, four strategies are suggested to increase health systems managers' use of research evidence to improve decision making: focusing evidence-based decision making on strategically important issues, developing committees and other structures to diffuse management research throughout the organization, building a management culture that values research, and training managers in the competencies required to apply research evidence to health services management decisions. To aid the manager in understanding and applying an evidenced-based approach to decision making, the article provides practical tools, techniques, and resources for immediate use.

  6. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix 1. The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhys Williams, William Herman, Ann-Louise Kinmonth...

  7. Evidence-based playground design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refshauge, Anne Dahl; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.; Lamm, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops, explores and evaluates an evidence-based approach to playground design, with a public park playground (playlab Cph) in Copenhagen as a case study. In the increasingly urbanised world, park playgrounds are valuable places that support healthy child development by providing...... opportunities for play, nature exploration and sensory stimulation. As it is increasingly expected that designers base their decisions on research evidence, there is a need to develop approaches to facilitate this, which also applies to playground design. The design of PlayLab Cph was based on relevant evidence...

  8. Validation of the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis: slight improvement over the 1987 ACR criteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Britsemmer, K.; Ursum, J.; Gerritsen, M.; Tuyl, L. van; Schaardenburg, D. van

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Background Recently, an American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) collaboration developed new classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective:To evaluate the diagnostic and discriminative ability of these new criteria compared with

  9. Recommendations for the Use of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Spondyloarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis, and Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uson, Jacqueline; Loza, Estibaliz; Möller, Ingrid; Acebes, Carlos; Andreu, Jose Luis; Batlle, Enrique; Bueno, Ángel; Collado, Paz; Fernández-Gallardo, Juan Manuel; González, Carlos; Jiménez Palop, Mercedes; Lisbona, María Pilar; Macarrón, Pilar; Maymó, Joan; Narváez, Jose Antonio; Navarro-Compán, Victoria; Sanz, Jesús; Rosario, M Piedad; Vicente, Esther; Naredo, Esperanza

    2016-10-27

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis, including psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Recommendations were generated following a nominal group technique. A panel of experts (15 rheumatologists and 3 radiologists) was established in the first panel meeting to define the scope and purpose of the consensus document, as well as chapters, potential recommendations and systematic literature reviews (we used and updated those from previous EULAR documents). A first draft of recommendations and text was generated. Then, an electronic Delphi process (2 rounds) was carried out. Recommendations were voted from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). We defined agreement if at least 70% of participants voted≥7. The level of evidence and grade or recommendation was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence. The full text was circulated and reviewed by the panel. The consensus was coordinated by an expert methodologist. A total of 12 recommendations were proposed for each disease. They include, along with explanations of the validity of US and magnetic resonance imaging regarding inflammation and damage detection, diagnosis, prediction (structural damage progression, flare, treatment response, etc.), monitoring and the use of US guided injections/biopsies. These recommendations will help clinicians use US and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency contraception review: evidence-based recommendations for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Kelly; Raymond, Elizabeth G.; Westley, Elizabeth; Trussell, James

    2014-01-01

    Several options for emergency contraception are available in the United States. This article describes each method, including efficacy, mode of action, safety, side effect profile and availability. The most effective emergency contraceptive is the copper IUD, followed by ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel pills. Levonorgestrel is available for sale without restrictions, while ulipristal acetate is available with prescription only, and the copper IUD must be inserted by a clinician. Although EC pills have not been shown to reduce pregnancy or abortion rates at the population level, they are an important option for individual women seeking to prevent pregnancy after sex. PMID:25254919

  11. Sports specialization in young athletes: evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Neeru; Pinkham, Courtney; Dugas, Lara; Patrick, Brittany; Labella, Cynthia

    2013-05-01

    Sports specialization is intense training in 1 sport while excluding others. Sports specialization in early to middle childhood has become increasingly common. While most experts agree that some degree of sports specialization is necessary to achieve elite levels, there is some debate as to whether such intense practice time must begin during early childhood and to the exclusion of other sports to maximize potential for success. There is a concern that sports specialization before adolescence may be deleterious to a young athlete. PubMed and OVID were searched for English-language articles from 1990 to 2011 discussing sports specialization, expert athletes, or elite versus novice athletes, including original research articles, consensus opinions, and position statements. For most sports, there is no evidence that intense training and specialization before puberty are necessary to achieve elite status. Risks of early sports specialization include higher rates of injury, increased psychological stress, and quitting sports at a young age. Sports specialization occurs along a continuum. Survey tools are being developed to identify where athletes fall along the spectrum of specialization. Some degree of sports specialization is necessary to develop elite-level skill development. However, for most sports, such intense training in a single sport to the exclusion of others should be delayed until late adolescence to optimize success while minimizing injury, psychological stress, and burnout.

  12. Evidence-based policymaking: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nortje

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of facilitating the uptake of evidence, for example, scientific research findings, into the policymaking process is multifaceted and thus complex. It is therefore important for scientists to understand this process in order to influence it more effectively. Similarly, policymakers need to understand the complexities of the scientific process to improve their interaction with the scientific sphere. This literature review addresses those factors that influence the uptake of scientific evidence into policymaking, the barriers to using science in policymaking, as well as recommendations for improved science–policymaking interaction. A visual diagram of the gears of a car is used to convey the message of the complexities around the engagement between science and policymaking. It is concluded that the issue of evidence-based policymaking remains unresolved and questions for future research on the science–policy interface are raised.

  13. Evidence-based management of recurrent miscarriages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadava B Jeve

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent miscarriages are postimplantation failures in natural conception; they are also termed as habitual abortions or recurrent pregnancy losses. Recurrent pregnancy loss is disheartening to the couple and to the treating clinician. There has been a wide range of research from aetiology to management of recurrent pregnancy loss. It is one of the most debated topic among clinicians and academics. The ideal management is unanswered. This review is aimed to produce an evidence-based guidance on clinical management of recurrent miscarriage. The review is structured to be clinically relevant. We have searched electronic databases (PubMed and Embase using different key words. We have combined the searches and arranged them with the hierarchy of evidences. We have critically appraised the evidence to produce a concise answer for clinical practice. We have graded the evidence from level I to V on which these recommendations are based.

  14. EULAR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE USE OF IMAGING IN SPONDYLOARTHRITIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Navarro-Compán, V; Terslev, L

    2014-01-01

    in the clinical management of SpA were developed using research-based evidence and expert opinion. Disclosure of Interest: P. Mandl: None declared, V. Navarro-Compán: None declared, L. Terslev: None declared, P. Aegerter: None declared, D. van der Heijde: None declared, M.-A. d'Agostino: None declared, X...

  15. EULAR recommendations for the non-pharmacological core management of hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Hagen, Kare B.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.J.

    2013-01-01

    -pharmacological core management of hip and knee OA were developed, concerning the following nine topics: assessment, general approach, patient information and education, lifestyle changes, exercise, weight loss, assistive technology and adaptations, footwear and work. The average level of agreement ranged between 8...

  16. Corroborating evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebius, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Proponents of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have argued convincingly for applying this scientific method to medicine. However, the current methodological framework of the EBM movement has recently been called into question, especially in epidemiology and the philosophy of science. The debate has focused on whether the methodology of randomized controlled trials provides the best evidence available. This paper attempts to shift the focus of the debate by arguing that clinical reasoning involves a patchwork of evidential approaches and that the emphasis on evidence hierarchies of methodology fails to lend credence to the common practice of corroboration in medicine. I argue that the strength of evidence lies in the evidence itself, and not the methodology used to obtain that evidence. Ultimately, when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of medical interventions, it is the evidence obtained from the methodology rather than the methodology that should establish the strength of the evidence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Evidence-based Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, D.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will describe a concrete strategy for bridging the gap between the *science* of science communication and the practice of it. In recent years, social scientists have made substantial progress in identifying the psychological influences that shape public receptivity to scientific information relating to climate change and other public policy issues. That work, however, has consisted nearly entirely of laboratory experiments and public opinion surveys; these methods identify general mechanisms of information processing but do not yield concrete prescriptions for communication in field settings. In order to integrate the findings of the science of science communication with the practice of it, field communication must now be made into a meaningful site of science communication research. "Evidence-based science communication" will involve collaborative work between social scientists and practitioners aimed at formulating and testing scientifically informed communication strategies in real-world contexts.

  18. An introduction to the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Edmonds, J; McQueen, F

    2005-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of the development and characteristics of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), followed by an introduction to the use of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. With this atlas, MRIs of wrist...... and metacarpophalangeal joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis can be scored for synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosion, guided by standard reference images...

  19. Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The evidence-based practice movement has become an important feature of health care systems and health care policy. Within this context, the APA 2005 Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice defines and discusses evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP). In an integration of science and practice, the Task Force's report describes…

  20. [Portuguese recommendations on "How to diagnose, monitor, and treat undifferentiated peripheral arthritis": systematic review of the literature and the experts' opinion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana; Machado, Pedro; Ramiro, Sofia; Duarte, C; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Bogas, M; Costa, L; Bernardes, Miguel; Santos, Maria Josã; Fonseca, J Eurico; Silva, J A; Canhão, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The 3E (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative is a multinational effort of rheumatologists aimed at developing evidence-based recommendations addressing specific questions relevant to clinical practice. The objective of the Portuguese contribution for the 3E Initiative was to develop evidence-based recommendations on how to investigate, follow-up and treat undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis (UPIA) adapted to local reality and develop additional recommendations considered relevant in the national context. An international scientific committee from 17 countries selected a set of questions concerning the diagnosis and monitoring of UPIA using a Delphi procedure. Evidence-based answers to each question were sought by a systematic literature search, performed in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library and ACR/EULAR 2007-2009 meeting abstracts. Relevant articles were reviewed for quality assessment, data extraction and synthesis. In a national meeting, a panel of 63 Portuguese rheumatologists used the evidence which was gathered to develop recommendations, and filled the gaps in the evidence with their expert opinion. Finally, national recommendations were formulated and agreement among the participants was assessed. A total of 54754 references were identified, of which 267 were systematically reviewed. Thirteen national key recommendations about the investigation, follow-up and treatment of UPIA were formulated. One recommendation addressed differential diagnosis and investigations prior to the established operational diagnosis of UPIA, eight recommendations were related to the diagnostic and prognostic value of clinical and laboratory assessments in established UPIA (history and physical examination, acute phase reactants, serologies, autoantibodies, radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, genetic markers and synovial biopsy), one recommendation highlighted predictors of persistence (chronicity), one addressed monitoring of clinical

  1. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Evidence-based cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Heini; Tekay, Aydin; Mäkikallio, Kaarin

    2015-01-01

    Cesarean delivery is the most frequent major surgery in Finland: in 2013 over 16% of the deliveries were via cesarean route. 27% of the mothers are estimated to face complications. Optimal surgical techniques and other operation-related measures aim to reduce the incidence of complications. Recommendations favor preoperative antibiotics, vaginal preparation, transversal skin incision, non-development of bladder flap, blunt cephalo-caudad uterine extension, spontaneous placental removal, late cord clamping, continuous sutures for uterine closure and subcutaneous skin sutures. Optimal measures will not only reduce complications in cesarean deliveries but bring cost savings and unify the clinical routines and training in specialization programs.

  3. What is the evidence based public health?

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández F., Luis J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence based Public Health is the execution and evaluation of the efficiency of interventions, plans, programs, projects and politics in public health through the application of the scientific principles of reasoning, including the systematic use of information and information systems. Evidence based public health involves the use of methodologies similar to those applied in evidence-based clinical medicine, but differs in its contents. In public health two types of evidence are described. ...

  4. Toward More Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Childbirth educators are responsible for providing expectant parents with evidence-based information. In this column, the author suggests resources where educators can find evidence-based research for best practices. Additionally, the author describes techniques for childbirth educators to use in presenting research-based information in their classes. A sample of Web sites and books that offer evidence-based resources for expectant parents is provided.

  5. An Evidence-based Guideline for prehospital analgesia in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Brown, Kathleen M; Oliver, Zoë J; Sasson, Comilla; Dayan, Peter S; Eschmann, Nicholas M; Weik, Tasmeen S; Lawner, Benjamin J; Sahni, Ritu; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Wright, Joseph L; Todd, Knox; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    The management of acute traumatic pain is a crucial component of prehospital care and yet the assessment and administration of analgesia is highly variable, frequently suboptimal, and often determined by consensus-based regional protocols. To develop an evidence-based guideline (EBG) for the clinical management of acute traumatic pain in adults and children by advanced life support (ALS) providers in the prehospital setting. Methods. We recruited a multi-stakeholder panel with expertise in acute pain management, guideline development, health informatics, and emergency medical services (EMS) outcomes research. Representatives of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (sponsoring agency) and a major children's research center (investigative team) also contributed to the process. The panel used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to guide the process of question formulation, evidence retrieval, appraisal/synthesis, and formulation of recommendations. The process also adhered to the National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guideline (EBG) model process approved by the Federal Interagency Council for EMS and the National EMS Advisory Council. Four strong and three weak recommendations emerged from the process; two of the strong recommendations were linked to high- and moderate-quality evidence, respectively. The panel recommended that all patients be considered candidates for analgesia, regardless of transport interval, and that opioid medications should be considered for patients in moderate to severe pain. The panel also recommended that all patients should be reassessed at frequent intervals using a standardized pain scale and that patients should be re-dosed if pain persists. The panel suggested the use of specific age-appropriate pain scales. GRADE methodology was used to develop an evidence-based guideline for prehospital analgesia in trauma. The panel issued four strong recommendations regarding patient

  6. [Interpretation and judgment formation influence evidence based guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Paul L P

    2012-01-01

    A critical step in the development of evidence based guidelines is the interpretation and weighing-up of the epidemiological evidence. According to the model of human dynamic judgement formation, the personal views, convictions, and choices of the experts developing the guidelines play a part in determining this process. If such views, convictions, and choices are stated explicitly (as is recommended in the GRADE methodology for developing guidelines), physicians are more likely to really follow the guidelines.

  7. Evidence-based practice: a trainee clinical psychologist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is now the dominant model in health care; its aim is to increase the use of research evidence to inform clinical decision making. Clinical practice guidelines are the predominant method by which research is distilled into practice recommendations. Clinical psychology has its own model which promotes the integration of research evidence with clinical expertise, the scientist practitioner model (SPM). Recent developments within the United Kingdom health service, su...

  8. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  9. Towards Evidence Based Usability in Health Informatics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcilly, Romaric; Peute, Linda W.; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Jaspers, Monique W.

    2015-01-01

    In a Health Information Technology (HIT) regulatory context in which the usability of this technology is more and more a critical issue, there is an increasing need for evidence based usability practice. However, a clear definition of evidence based usability practice and how to achieve it is still

  10. Anticoagulation strategies in continuous renal replacement therapy: can the choice be evidence based?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudemans-van Straaten, H. M.; Wester, J. P. J.; de Pont, A. C. J. M.; Schetz, M. R. C.

    2006-01-01

    Critical illness increases the tendency to both coagulation and bleeding, complicating anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). We analyzed strategies for anticoagulation in CRRT concerning implementation, efficacy and safety to provide evidence-based recommendations for

  11. Evidence-based policy as reflexive practice. : What can we learn from evidence-based medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe call for evidence-based policy is often accompanied by rather uncritical references to the success of evidence-based medicine, leading to often unsuccessful translation attempts. In this paper, I reflect on the practice of evidence-based medicine in an attempt to sketch a more

  12. Prevalence of Systemic Sclerosis in Primary Biliary Cholangitis Using the New ACR/EULAR Classification Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Boyang; Vincent, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Koenig, Martial; Joyal, France

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a well-established disease associated with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). However, the original 1980 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria have poor sensitivity, especially for the detection of earlier SSc in previous studies. The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of SSc in patients with PBC using more sensitive 2001 LeRoy and Medsger criteria and the 2013 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria. The secondary objective was to evaluate the frequency of individual clinical features. One hundred consecutive patients with PBC without previously diagnosed SSc were recruited between 2005 and 2007 from a tertiary care gastroenterology clinic. All patients underwent a complete clinical examination, determination of SSc-specific antibodies, and a nailfold capillary microscopy. Fulfillment of the 3 different criteria sets was analyzed, along with individual disease features. Of 100 patients with PBC, 1% met the ACR 1980 criteria, 22% met the 2001 LeRoy and Medsger criteria for early SSc, and 17% the 2013 ACR/EULAR criteria. Raynaud phenomenon, SSc-related antibodies, and SSc capillaroscopic patterns were the most prevalent findings, with the highest sensitivities to help guide future screening. Our data show a high prevalence of SSc in patients with PBC with probable underestimation by previous studies using the original ACR criteria. Comorbid SSc should be actively searched for based on newly described criteria to improve detection and increase benefits of earlier treatment.

  13. The EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas: the wrist joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F; Lassere, M

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis are illustr......This paper presents the wrist joint MR images of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. Reference images for scoring synovitis, bone oedema, and bone erosions according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) system are provided. All grades (0-3) of synovitis...... are illustrated in each of the three wrist joint areas defined in the scoring system-that is, the distal radioulnar joint, the radiocarpal joint, and the intercarpal-carpometacarpal joints. For reasons of feasibility, examples of bone abnormalities are limited to five selected bones: the radius, scaphoid, lunate......, capitate, and a metacarpal base. In these bones, grades 0-3 of bone oedema are illustrated, and for bone erosion, grades 0-3 and examples of higher grades are presented. The presented reference images can be used to guide scoring of wrist joints according to the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system...

  14. Validation of the EULAR definition of arthralgia suspicious for progression to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Leonie E; Siljehult, Filip; Ten Brinck, Robin M; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Landewé, Robert B M; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2017-12-01

    Recently a EULAR-taskforce defined arthralgia suspicious for progression to RA, in order to allow inclusion of homogeneous sets of arthralgia patients in clinical studies. This longitudinal study aimed (i) to validate this definition in arthralgia patients in whom rheumatologists felt that imminent RA was more likely than other arthralgias [clinically suspect arthralgia (CSA)], that is, the target population fulfilling the entry criterion, and (ii) to explore the performance in arthralgia patients who were referred to secondary care prior to rheumatological evaluation, hence ignoring the entry criterion. The definition was assessed in 241 Dutch patients identified with CSA by rheumatologists and 113 patients referred to the Umeå university hospital with recent-onset arthralgia in small joints. The external reference was arthritis development definition (⩾3/7 parameters present) had an increased risk for developing arthritis compared with definition-negative CSA patients (hazard ratio = 2.1, 95% CI: 0.9, 4.7). The sensitivity was 84% and the positive predictive value 30%. In arthralgia patients in whom the definition was applied before rheumatological evaluation, a positive definition was neither sensitive (10%) nor predictive (positive predictive value 3%). The EULAR definition of arthralgia suspicious for progression to RA is sensitive when used to support the rheumatologist's opinion on imminent RA. This validation study shows that the definition, when used as designed, further homogenizes patients that rheumatologists consider at risk for RA. To arrive at a high specificity, the clinical definition needs to be combined with biomarkers.

  15. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  16. History of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger L Sur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay reviews the historical circumstances surrounding the introduction and evolution of evidence-based medicine. Criticisms of the approach are also considered. Weaknesses of existing standards of clinical practice and efforts to bring more certainty to clinical decision making were the foundation for evidence-based medicine, which integrates epidemiology and medical research. Because of its utility in designing randomized clinical trials, assessing the quality of the literature, and applying medical research at the bedside, evidence-based medicine will continue to have a strong influence on everyday clinical practice.

  17. Performance of the 2015 ACR-EULAR classification criteria for gout in a primary care population presenting with monoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, H.J.E.M.; Fransen, J.; Janssen, M.; Neogi, T.; Schumacher, H.R.; Jansen, T.L; Dalbeth, N.; Taylor, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the performance of the 2015 ACR-EULAR gout classification criteria against presence of SF MSU crystals in a primary healthcare population. Methods: The criteria were applied to an existing dataset of consecutive patients with monoarthritis presenting to Dutch family physicians;

  18. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. Evidence-Based Definition and Classification: A Commentary . . . . . . Steve O'Rahilly 37 PART II: PREVENTION OF DIABETES 4. Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes...

  19. Evidence based policy-making: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, FW

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available the engagement between science and policymaking. It is concluded that the issue of evidence-based policymaking remains unresolved and questions for future research on the science–policy interface are raised....

  20. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Everyday Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudray, Kiran; Walmsley, Anthony Damien

    2016-12-01

    This article informs readers of a method of implementing evidence-based dentistry in practice. Following these steps, practitioners should be able to use this skill in an efficient manner. The importance of evidence-based dentistry and its relevance to situations encountered in everyday practice is also highlighted. Clinical relevance: This article highlights a series of steps to be followed by practitioners to ensure that treatment provided is supported by the most recent, good quality evidence.

  1. American Dental Association's Resources to Support Evidence-Based Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudhan, K; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie

    2009-09-01

    Time and access have often been cited as barriers to implementing Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD). This paper describes a new web-based resource launched by the American Dental Association to enable practitioners to incorporate evidence into treatment planning. The website offers a database of systematic reviews, critical summaries of systematic reviews, evidence-based clinical recommendations and links to external resources to enable practitioners to access evidence at the point of care. In addition the site offers an online space for clinicians to suggest clinical scenarios where evidence is lacking. This could potentially be a source of topics to drive future research. With the explosion in the use of information technology within a dental office, this web-site will serve as the one-stop resource for credible scientific information for practitioners.

  2. Evidence-Based Assessment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Amy M.; Bergman, R. Lindsay; Piacentini, John; McGuire, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric illness that often develops in childhood, affects 1%–2% of the population, and causes significant impairment across the lifespan. The first step in identifying and treating OCD is a thorough evidence-based assessment. This paper reviews the administration pragmatics, psychometric properties, and limitations of commonly used assessment measures for adults and youths with OCD. This includes diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom severity scales, self-report measures, and parent/child measures. Additionally, adjunctive measures that assess important related factors (ie, impairment, family accommodation, and insight) are also discussed. This paper concludes with recommendations for an evidence-based assessment based on individualized assessment goals that include generating an OCD diagnosis, determining symptom severity, and monitoring treatment progress. PMID:27594793

  3. Evidence-Based Assessment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Rapp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is a neuropsychiatric illness that often develops in childhood, affects 1%–2% of the population, and causes significant impairment across the lifespan. The first step in identifying and treating OCD is a thorough evidence-based assessment. This paper reviews the administration pragmatics, psychometric properties, and limitations of commonly used assessment measures for adults and youths with OCD. This includes diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom severity scales, self-report measures, and parent/child measures. Additionally, adjunctive measures that assess important related factors (ie, impairment, family accommodation, and insight are also discussed. This paper concludes with recommendations for an evidence-based assessment based on individualized assessment goals that include generating an OCD diagnosis, determining symptom severity, and monitoring treatment progress.

  4. Factors that influence effective evidence-based medicine instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) as a health care practice is being incorporated into education programs across the spectrum of medical education to develop lifelong learning skills and to enhance the practice of evidence-based health care. Since improving the quality of patient care is the ultimate goal of EBM, EBM learning must be integrated with clinical application, and resulted outcomes must be reflected in learning transfer (or EBM practice) within the context of solving patient problems. Different factors may constitute the context or environment in which EBM is learned, practiced, and sustained. However, these contextual factors are seldom considered and examined in the development, implementation, and evaluation of EBM instruction for learners at different levels. This article will introduce several contextual factors as tips and strategies that affect EBM learning and transfer. Also included in the article are recommended practices for designing effective EBM instruction that would contribute to a sustainable change in learner behavior.

  5. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Points to consider for reporting, screening for and preventing selected comorbidities in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases in daily practice : a EULAR initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baillet, Athan; Gossec, Laure; Carmona, Loreto; de Wit, Maarten; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Bertheussen, Heidi; Alison, Kent; Toft, Mette; Kouloumas, Marios; Ferreira, Ricardo J. O.; Oliver, Susan; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; van Assen, Sander; Dixon, William G.; Finckh, Axel; Zink, Angela; Kremer, Joel; Kvien, Tore K.; Nurmohamed, Michael; van der Heijde, Desiree; Dougados, Maxime

    In chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases and infections are suboptimally prevented, screened for and managed. The objective of this European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) initiative was to propose points to consider to collect comorbidities in

  7. Evidence-based policy as reflexive practice. What can we learn from evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The call for evidence-based policy is often accompanied by rather uncritical references to the success of evidence-based medicine, leading to often unsuccessful translation attempts. In this paper, I reflect on the practice of evidence-based medicine in an attempt to sketch a more productive approach to translating evidence into the practice of policy making. Discussing three episodes in the history of evidence-based medicine - clinical trials, and the production and use of clinical guidelines - I conclude that the success of evidence-based medicine is based on the creation of reflexive practices in which evidence and practice can be combined productively. In the conclusion, I discuss the prospects of such a practice for evidence-based policy.

  8. Evidence-based periodontal therapy: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Anitha, V.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Sudhakar, Uma

    2008-01-01

    Dentists need to make clinical decisions based on limited scientific evidence. In clinical practice, a clinician must weigh a myriad of evidences every day. The goal of evidence-based dentistry is to help practitioners provide their patients with optimal care. This is achieved by integrating sound research evidence with personal clinical expertise and patient values to determine the best course of treatment. Periodontology has a rich background of research and scholarship. Therefore, efficient use of this wealth of research data needs to be a part of periodontal practice. Evidence-based periodontology aims to facilitate such an approach and it offers a bridge from science to clinical practice. The clinician must integrate the evidence with patient preference, scientific knowledge, and personal experience. Most important, it allows us to care for our patients. Therefore, evidence-based periodontology is a tool to support decision-making and integrating the best evidence available with clinical practice. PMID:20142947

  9. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  10. The religion of evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine...... practice as health, education, and social services tighten their belts and the demand on their resources grows, there is increasing interest in the value of music for health and wellbeing, despite even less ‘hard’ evidence that it is effective against illness and disability....

  11. The evidence base for professional and self-care prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this conference paper was to examine the evidence base for primary and secondary prevention of dental caries, erosions and dentin hypersensitivity through professional and self-care measures. METHODS: A mapping of systematic reviews (SR) of literature was carried out in Pub...... and preventive dentistry that must be addressed and bridged through clinical research of good quality....... review articles of potential interest. Meta-analyses, guidelines and treatment recommendations were considered only when SR's were lacking. In the event of updates or multiple systematic reviews covering the same topic, only the most recent article was included. No quality assessment of the systematic...

  12. Evidence-based medicine Training: Kazakhstan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalbekova, G; Kalieva, M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine is of vital importance for improving quality of care, promoting public health and health system development. Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine allows using the most powerful information source, which have ever existed in medicine. To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching Evidence-Based Medicine, including long-term outcomes of training. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Astana, where the Scientific and Educational Center of Evidence-Based Medicine was established in 2010 with the help of the corresponding project of the World Bank. The participants of the study were the faculty trained in Evidence-Based Medicine at the workshop "Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine" for the period of 2010-2015 years. There were a total of 16 workshops during the period, and 323 employees were trained. All participants were asked to complete our questionnaire two times: before the training - pre-training (to determine the initial level of a listener) and after the training - post-training (to determine the acquired level and get the feedback). Questionnaires were prepared in such a way, that the majority of questions before and after training were identical. Thus, it provided a clear picture of the effectiveness of training. Questions in the survey were open-ended so that the respondents had the opportunity to freely and fully express their views. The main part of the questionnaires included the following questions: "Do you understand what evidence-based medicine is", "how do you understand what the study design means", "what is randomization", "how research is classified", "do you know the steps of decision-making according to Evidence-Based Medicine, list them", "what literature do you prefer to use when searching for information (print, electronic, etc.)", "what resources on the Internet do you prefer to use". Only 30-35% of respondents gave correct answers to the questions on

  13. Evidence-based medicine in metastatic spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Nicolas; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-06-01

    Treatment modalities for metastatic spine disease have significantly expanded over the last two decades. This expansion occurred in many different fields. Improvement in surgical techniques and instrumentation now allow the oncologic spine surgeons to effectively circumferentially decompress the neural elements without compromising stability. Percutaneous techniques, both vertebral augmentation and pre-operative endovascular embolization procedures, also greatly benefit patients suffering from spinal column metastasis. Imaging technology advances has contributed to better pre-operative planning and the development of highly conformational radiation techniques, thus permitting the delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors, while avoiding radiotoxicity to the spinal cord and other vital structures. These new developments, combined with evidence-based stability and disease-specific quality of life scores now allow not only better treatment, but also a solid foundation for high-quality research. Spine oncology literature currently suffers from a lack of high-quality evidence due to low prevalence of the disease and complex methodological issues. However, when following evidence-based medicine principles, which incorporate best available evidence, clinical expertise and patient preference, sound, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding the abovementioned treatment modalities.

  14. [Acute bronchiolitis: evaluation of evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, F; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Martinón Sánchez, J M

    2001-10-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and produces significant morbidity. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of this disease and, in many cases, the therapy employed is controversial and mainly based on general recommendations and not on evidence-based strategies. This report uses evidence-based methodology to provide a critical review of the data available on the treatment of acute bronchiolitis (understood as the first episode of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in a previously healthy infant). After this analysis, we conclude that the only justifiable therapeutic interventions in these patients are supportive treatment, nebulized epinephrine and mechanical ventilation. Other therapies such us physiotherapy, nebulization, heliox, anticholinergics or exogenous surfactant, among others, require further randomized controlled trials to determine their utility. No evidence supports the routine use of corticosteroids, beta-adrenergic drugs, antibiotics, immunoglobulins, interferon, vitamin A or ribavirin in these patients. Finally, we consider that a national consensus review for the implementation of evidence-based clinical practical guidelines on the management of acute bronchiolitis would be of great interest.

  15. Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Birgitta; Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  16. Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Fredric M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and…

  17. Evidence-based care and the curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winning, T.; Needleman, I.; Rohlin, M.; Carrassi, A.; Chadwick, B.; Eaton, K.; Hardwick, K.; Ivancakova, R.; Jallaludin, R.L.; Johnsen, D.; Kim, J.G.; Lekkas, D.; Li, D.; Onisei, D.; Pissiotis, A.; Reynolds, P.; Tonni, I.; Vanobbergen, J.; Vassileva, R.; Virtanen, J.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wilson, N.

    2008-01-01

    An evidence-based (EB) approach has been a significant driver in reforming healthcare over the past two decades. This change has extended across a broad range of health professions, including oral healthcare. A key element in achieving an EB approach to oral healthcare is educating our

  18. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Spek; M. Wieringa-de Waard; C. Lucas; N. van Dijk

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to

  19. Theory- and evidence-based Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a model for assessment and intervention is presented. This model explains how to perform theory- and evidence-based as well as practice-based assessment and intervention. The assessment model applies a holistic approach to treatment planning which includes recognition...

  20. Evidence-Based Practices and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as "evidence-based practice" in psychology and "scientifically-based research" in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special…

  1. Evidence-based therapy of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerle, S; Kroll, P

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is often misunderstood as 'cookbook medicine with standard recipes' that does not take clinical experience into account. It is, however, supposed to be a basis for decision making in caring for individual patients under consideration of patients' preferences. This seems to be very important, since diabetic retinopathy continues to be the most frequent cause of vision loss in working age adults with negative consequences for patients' quality of life and for health economics. The most important evidence-based therapy for diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy is laser coagulation. Vitrectomy for proliferative stages has also been proven effective by clinical studies. For more recent treatment options like triamcinolone injection and vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema there is a lower level of evidence so far. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study was the first to show the effectiveness of panfundus laser coagulation for a larger group of patients. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study in turn serves as a basis for laser coagulation of retinopathy and maculopathy. The Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study could show the advantages of timely vitrectomy. Both the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study could show the value of intensive blood glucose control. Evidence-based medicine on the basis of the studies mentioned above is practiced quite self-evidently in ophthalmo-diabetology. It should be regarded as a helpful tool for special therapeutic situations which still leaves room for one's personal clinical experience to be included. It is somewhat problematic that the term evidence-based medicine seems to be restricted to the results of large randomized studies, because even special problems and very individual, difficult therapeutic questions can be placed on an evidence-based foundation, although at a lower level of evidence, using today's modern means of literature research. Copyright (c

  2. Part 1: Evidence-based facility design using Transforming Care at the Bedside principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Deborah A; Wenger, Barb; Krugman, Mary; Zwink, Jennifer E; Shiskowsky, Kaycee; Hagman, Jan; Limon, Shelly; Sanders, Carolyn; Reeves, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    An academic hospital used Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) principles as the framework for generating evidence-based recommendations for the design of an expansion of the current hospital. The interdisciplinary team used the table of evidence-based data to advocate for a patient- and family-centered, safe, and positive work environment. A nurse project manager acted as liaison between the TCAB design team, architects, and facilities and design consultants. Part 2 of this series describes project evaluation outcomes.

  3. Evidence-Based Cancer Survivorship Activities for Comprehensive Cancer Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, J Michael; Lakhani, Naheed; Finifrock, DeAnna; Pinkerton, Beth; Johnson, Krystal L; Mallory, Sharon H; Migliore Santiago, Patricia; Stewart, Sherri L

    2015-12-01

    One of six priorities of CDC's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is to address the needs of cancer survivors within the local population served by individually funded states, tribes, and territories. This report examines cancer survivorship activities implemented in five NCCCP grantees, which have initiated evidence-based activities outlined in A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship: Advancing Public Health Strategies (NAP). NCCCP action plans, submitted annually to CDC, from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed in February 2015 to assess implementation of cancer survivorship activities and recommended strategies consistent with the NAP. Four state-level and one tribal grantee with specific activities related to one of each of the four NAP strategies were chosen for inclusion. Brief case reports describing the initiation and impact of implemented activities were developed in collaboration with each grantee program director. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa programs each implemented activities in surveillance and applied research; communication, education, and training; programs, policies, and infrastructure; and access to quality care and services. This report provides examples for incorporating cancer survivorship activities within Comprehensive Cancer Control programs of various sizes, demographic makeup, and resource capacity. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band developed creative cancer survivorship activities that meet CDC recommendations. NCCCP grantees can follow these examples by implementing evidence-based survivorship interventions that meet the needs of their specific populations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The features of the synovium in early rheumatoid arthritis according to the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen G H van de Sande

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It has been shown in early arthritis cohorts that the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA enable an earlier diagnosis, perhaps at the cost of a somewhat more heterogeneous patient population. We describe the features of synovial inflammation in RA patients classified according to these new criteria. METHODS: At baseline, synovial tissue biopsy samples were obtained from disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD-naïve early RA patients (clinical signs and symptoms <1 year. Synovial tissue was analyzed for cell infiltration, vascularity, and expression of adhesion molecules. Stained sections were evaluated by digital image analysis. Patients were classified according to the two different sets of classification criteria, autoantibody status, and outcome. FINDINGS: Synovial tissue of 69 RA patients according to 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria was analyzed: 56 patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA at baseline and 13 who were initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis but fulfilled criteria for RA upon follow up. The synovium at baseline was infiltrated by plasma cells, macrophages, and T cells as well as other cells, and findings were comparable to those when patients were selected based on the 1987 ACR criteria for RA. There was no clear cut difference in the characteristics of the synovium between RA patients initially diagnosed as undifferentiated arthritis and those who already fulfilled classification criteria at baseline. CONCLUSION: The features of synovial inflammation are similar when the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria are used compared to the 1987 ACR criteria.

  5. Evidence Based Education: un quadro storico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Vivanet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nel corso dell’ultimo decennio, nel pensiero pedagogico anglosassone, si è affermata una cultura dell’evidenza cui ci si riferisce con l’espressione “evidence based education” (EBE. Secondo tale prospettiva, le decisioni in ambito educativo dovrebbero essere assunte sulla base delle conoscenze che la ricerca empirica offre in merito alla minore o maggiore efficacia delle differenti opzioni didattiche. Si tratta di un approccio (denominato “evidence based practice” che ha origine in ambito medico e che in seguito ha trovato applicazione in differenti domini delle scienze sociali. L’autore presenta un quadro introduttivo all’EBE, dando conto delle sue origini e dei differenti significati di cui è portatrice.

  6. Creative teaching an evidence-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sale, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This book contains an evidence-based pedagogic guide to enable any motivated teaching/training professional to be able to teach effectively and creatively. It firstly summarises the extensive research field on human psychological functioning relating to learning and how this can be fully utilised in the design and facilitation of quality learning experiences. It then demonstrates what creativity actually 'looks like' in terms of teaching practices, modelling the underpinning processes of creative learning design and how to apply these in lesson planning. The book, having established an evidence-based and pedagogically driven approach to creative learning design, extensively focuses on key challenges facing teaching professionals today. These include utilising information technologies in blended learning formats, differentiating instruction, and developing self-directed learners who can think well. The main purpose of the book is to demystify what it means to teach creatively, explicitly demonstrating the pr...

  7. The fallacy of evidence based policy

    CERN Document Server

    Saltelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of science for policy is at the core of a perfect storm generated by the insurgence of several concurrent crises: of science, of trust, of sustainability. The modern positivistic model of science for policy, known as evidence based policy, is based on dramatic simplifications and compressions of available perceptions of the state of affairs and possible explanations (hypocognition). This model can result in flawed prescriptions. The flaws become more evident when dealing with complex issues characterized by concomitant uncertainties in the normative, descriptive and ethical domains. In this situation evidence-based policy may concur to the fragility of the social system. Science plays an important role in reducing the feeling of vulnerability of humans by projecting a promise of protection against uncertainties. In many applications quantitative science is used to remove uncertainty by transforming it into probability, so that mathematical modelling can play the ritual role of haruspices. This epistem...

  8. Organizational readiness for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Barbara Van Patter; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2009-02-01

    This study explored factors that affect the adoption or rejection of evidence-based practice (EBP) changes and differences in nurse manager and staff nurse perceptions about those factors. Roger's Diffusion of Innovations Theory explains relevant organizational strategies for guiding practice change. The primary author developed the Evidence-Based Practice Changes Survey consisting of 12 items, completed by 92 nurses at a level 1 trauma center. Top barriers to EBP were insufficient time, lack of staff, and not having the right equipment and supplies. Top reasons to adopt EBP were having personal interest in the practice change, avoiding risk of negative consequences to the patient, and personally valuing the evidence. Several statistically significant differences emerged for demographic variables. Planning for EBP change must address barriers and facilitators to practice change and emphasize the benefit for patients and value of the practice change to nurses.

  9. Professionalism and evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    The idea of evidence- based practice is influential in public welfare services, including education. The idea is controversial, however, not least because it involves a poten tial redefinition of the relation ship between knowledge, authority and professionalism. This is discussed based on a study...... of evidence- based methods in Danish pre-school education and care. The management sees the use of these methods as strengthening pre- school teacher professionalism, but the actual practices in the day-careinstitutions are ambiguous. In some cases, using the methods becomes an end in itself and tends...... to displace important educational objectives. In other cases, the methods are reflectively adjusted to a given context. Used in this way only, evid ence-based practice and methodology is a valuable resource for professional practice in education. From such a perspective, at least some types of research based...

  10. [Looking for evidence-based medical informatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    e-Health is experiencing a difficult time. On the one side, the forecast is for a bright digital health future created by precision medicine and smart devices. On the other hand, most large scale e-health projects struggle to make a difference and are often controversial. Both futures fail because they are not evidence-based. Medical informatics should follow the example of evidence-based medicine, i.e. conduct rigorous research that gives us evidence to solve real world problems, synthesise that evidence and then apply it strictly. We already have the tools for creating a different universe. What we need is evidence, will, a culture of learning, and hard work.

  11. Evidence-based hypnotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive hypnotherapy (CH) is a comprehensive evidence-based hypnotherapy for clinical depression. This article describes the major components of CH, which integrate hypnosis with cognitive-behavior therapy as the latter provides an effective host theory for the assimilation of empirically supported treatment techniques derived from various theoretical models of psychotherapy and psychopathology. CH meets criteria for an assimilative model of psychotherapy, which is considered to be an efficacious model of psychotherapy integration. The major components of CH for depression are described in sufficient detail to allow replication, verification, and validation of the techniques delineated. CH for depression provides a template that clinicians and investigators can utilize to study the additive effects of hypnosis in the management of other psychological or medical disorders. Evidence-based hypnotherapy and research are encouraged; such a movement is necessary if clinical hypnosis is to integrate into mainstream psychotherapy.

  12. What's Wrong with Evidence-Based Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Medicine in the last decades of the twentieth century was ripe for a data sweep that would bring systematic analysis to treatment strategies that seemingly had stood the test of time but were actually unvalidated. Coalescing under the banner of evidence-based medicine, this process has helped to standardize care, minimize error, and promote patient safety. But with this advancement, something of the art of medicine has been lost. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  13. Case studies and evidence based nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical nutrition case study is a neglected area of activity and publication. This may be in part because it is not regarded as a serious contributor to evidence-based nutrition (EBN). Yet it can play a valuable part in hypothesis formulation and in the cross-checking of evidence. Most of all, it is usually a point at which the operationalisation of nutrition evidence is granted best current practice status.

  14. The Evidence Base of Czech Health Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Klusáček; Marie Klusáčková

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the evidence base of health policy in the Czech Republic. It focuses on articles published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals. It builds on a quantitative analysis of articles published between 2005 and 2010 in scholarly journals in the fields of social science, management and administration, public health and other relevant fields. The main finding is that almost half of the 161 articles with potential use for health policy were published in a single journal, Zdravotn...

  15. Evidence-based librarianship: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-10-01

    To demonstrate how the core characteristics of both evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based health care (EBHC) can be adapted to health sciences librarianship. Narrative review essay involving development of a conceptual framework. The author describes the central features of EBM and EBHC. Following each description of a central feature, the author then suggests ways that this feature applies to health sciences librarianship. First, the decision-making processes of EBM and EBHC are compatible with health sciences librarianship. Second, the EBM and EBHC values of favoring rigorously produced scientific evidence in decision making are congruent with the core values of librarianship. Third, the hierarchical levels of evidence can be applied to librarianship with some modifications. Library researchers currently favor descriptive-survey and case-study methods over systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or other higher levels of evidence. The library literature nevertheless contains diverse examples of randomized controlled trials, controlled-comparison studies, and cohort studies conducted by health sciences librarians. Health sciences librarians are confronted with making many practical decisions. Evidence-based librarianship offers a decision-making framework, which integrates the best available research evidence. By employing this framework and the higher levels of research evidence it promotes, health sciences librarians can lay the foundation for more collaborative and scientific endeavors.

  16. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  17. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between scholars, and a paper by Gilliland in our Using Evidence in Practice section, detailing a library’s Open Access Day preparations.Kroth, Philips and Eldredge note that “The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence-based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, hopefully, form new coalitions to address this topic at a local and national level.” (p 108. This conference focused on translational medicine, and looked at how to promote new methods of scholarly communication, partially through the inclusion of research papers at the conference.The inclusion of these articles and the evidence based focus of the EBSCC conference, made me ask myself, can scholarly communication be evidence based? At its core, scholarly communication is anything but a scientific issue. It is charged with emotion; from authors, publishers, librarians and others involved in the business of publishing. The recent shift to look at new models of scholarly communication has been a threat to many of the established models and sparked much debate in the academic world, especially in relation to open access. In her 2006 EBLIP commentary on evidence based practice and open access, Morrison notes, “Open Access and evidence based librarianship are a natural combination” (p. 49, and outlines her perspective on many of the reasons why. Debate continues to rage, however, regarding how authors should

  18. Evidence-based guides in tracheostomy use in critical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, N; Vial, M R; Calleja, J; Quintero, A; Cortés Alban, A; Celis, E; Pacheco, C; Ugarte, S; Añón, J M; Hernández, G; Vidal, E; Chiappero, G; Ríos, F; Castilleja, F; Matos, A; Rodriguez, E; Antoniazzi, P; Teles, J M; Dueñas, C; Sinclair, J; Martínez, L; Von der Osten, I; Vergara, J; Jiménez, E; Arroyo, M; Rodriguez, C; Torres, J; Fernandez-Bussy, S; Nates, J L

    2017-03-01

    Provide evidence based guidelines for tracheostomy in critically ill adult patients and identify areas needing further research. A task force composed of representatives of 10 member countries of the Pan-American and Iberic Federation of Societies of Critical and Intensive Therapy Medicine and of the Latin American Critical Care Trial Investigators Network developed recommendations based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. The group identified 23 relevant questions among 87 issues that were initially identified. In the initial search, 333 relevant publications were identified of which 226 publications were chosen. The task force generated a total of 19 recommendations: 10 positive (1B=3, 2C=3, 2D=4) and 9 negative (1B=8, 2C=1). A recommendation was not possible in six questions. Percutaneous techniques are associated with a lower risk of infections compared to surgical tracheostomy. Early tracheostomy only seems to reduce the duration of ventilator use but not the incidence of pneumonia, the length of stay, or the long-term mortality rate. The evidence does not support the use of routine bronchoscopy guidance or laryngeal masks during the procedure. Finally, proper prior training is as important or even a more significant factor in reducing complications than the technique used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence Based Practice: Science? Or Art? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP is a strategy to bridge research and practice. Generally EBLIP is seen as a movement to encourage and give practitioners the means to incorporate research into their practice, where it previously may have been lacking. The widely accepted definition of EBLIP (Booth, 2000 stresses three aspects that contribute to a practice that is evidence based: 1 "the best available evidence;" 2 "moderated by user needs and preferences;" 3 "applied to improve the quality of professional judgements." The area that the EBLIP movement has focused on is how to create and understand the best available research evidence. CE courses, critical appraisal checklists, and many articles have been written to address a need for librarian education in this area, and it seems that strides have been made.But very little in the EBLIP literature talks about how we make professional judgements, or moderate evidence based on our user needs and preferences. Likewise, how do we make good evidence based decisions when our evidence base is weak. These things seem to be elements we just take for granted or can’t translate into words. It is in keeping with tacit knowledge that librarians just seem to have or acquire skills with education and on the job experience. Tacit knowledge is "knowledge that is not easily articulated, and frequently involves knowledge of how to do things. We can infer its existence only by observing behaviour and determining that this sort of knowledge is a precondition for effective performance" (Patel, Arocha, & Kaufman, 1999, p.78. It is something that is difficult to translate into an article or guideline for how we work. I think of this area as the "art" of evidence based practice. And the art is crucial to being an evidence based practitioner.Science = systematized knowledge, explicit research, methodological examination, investigation, dataArt = professional knowledge of your craft, intuition

  20. Evidence-based clinical management and utilization of new technology in European neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Clemens; Jakola, Asgeir S; Gulati, Sasha; Nygaard, Oystein P; Solheim, Ole

    2013-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become one of the pillars of modern patient care. However, neurosurgery has always been an experience-based and technology-driven discipline, and it remains unknown to which extent European neurosurgeons follow high-level evidence-based recommendations. We conducted a Web-based survey with a 15-item questionnaire about evidence-based clinical management and utilization of new technology among European neurosurgeons. Two different sum scores were calculated from the questions concerning clinical practice; evidence-based treatment score and new technology score. A high evidence-based treatment score means that more clinical conditions (i.e., study questions) were managed in compliance with the available highest levels of evidence from published clinical trials. A high new technology score reflects the use of a high number of modern tools in neurosurgical practice. A total of 239 neurosurgeons from 30 different European countries answered the questionnaire. There were large variations among European neurosurgeons in providing evidence-based care and in utilization of various modern tools. There were significant regional differences in evidence-based treatment scores and modern technology scores with higher scores in northern and western Europe. High-volume institutions were not associated with better evidence-based treatment scores, but had significantly higher new technology scores. There were significantly higher new technology scores at university hospitals and a trend towards higher evidence-based treatment scores compared to other hospitals. Clinical management in neurosurgery does not always comply with the best available evidence and there are large regional differences in clinical management and in utilization of various modern tools. The position of evidence-based medicine in European neurosurgery seems weak and this may be a threat to the quality of care.

  1. Queer challenges to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay; Grant, Alec

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to queer evidence-based practice by troubling the concepts of evidence, knowledge and mental illness. The evidence-based narrative that emerged within biomedicine has dominated health care. The biomedical notion of 'evidence' has been critiqued extensively and is seen as exclusive and limiting, and even though the social constructionist paradigm attempts to challenge the authority of biomedicine to legitimate what constitutes acceptable evidence or knowledge for those experiencing mental illness, biomedical notions of evidence appear to remain relatively intact. Queer theory offers theoretical tools to disrupt biomedical norms and challenges biomedical normativity to indicate how marginalisation occurs when normative truths about mental health classify those who differ from the norm as 'ill' or 'disordered'. Queer theory's emphasis on normativity serves the political aim to subvert marginalisation and bring about radical social and material change. Reference will be made to mental health subjects within each discourse by indicating how the body acts as a vehicle for knowing. Deleuzian notions of the rhizome are used as metaphor to suggest a relational approach to knowledge that does away with either/or positions in either biomedical, or queer knowledge to arrive at a both/and position where the biomedical, constructionist and queer are interrelated and entangled in needing the other for their own evolution. However, queer does not ask for assimilation but celebrates difference by remaining outside to disrupt that which is easily overlooked, assumed to be natural or represented as the norm. The task of queer knowledge is to do justice to the lives lived in the name of evidence-based practice and demands that we consider the relations of power where knowledge is produced. This pursuit creates different knowledge spaces where we identify new intersections that allow for socially just understandings of knowing or evidence to emerge. © 2013 John Wiley

  2. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI): a user guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier; Asmussen, Karsten; Jacobsen, Soren; Bartoloni, Elena; Gerli, Roberto; Bijlsma, Johannes Wj; Kruize, Aike A; Bombardieri, Stefano; Bookman, Arthur; Kallenberg, Cees; Meiners, Petra; Brun, Johan G; Jonsson, Roland; Caporali, Roberto; Carsons, Steven; De Vita, Salvatore; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Devauchelle, Valerie; Saraux, Alain; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Sibilia, Jean; Hachulla, Eric; Illei, Gabor; Isenberg, David; Jones, Adrian; Manoussakis, Menelaos; Mandl, Thomas; Jacobsson, Lennart; Demoulins, Frederic; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nishiyama, Sumusu; Omdal, Roald; Parke, Ann; Praprotnik, Sonja; Tomsic, Matjia; Price, Elizabeth; Scofield, Hal; L Sivils, Kathy; Smolen, Josef; Laqué, Roser Solans; Steinfeld, Serge; Sutcliffe, Nurhan; Sumida, Takayuki; Valesini, Guido; Valim, Valeria; Vivino, Frederick B; Vollenweider, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in use as a gold standard to measure disease activity in clinical studies, and as an outcome measure, even a primary outcome measure, in current randomised clinical trials. Therefore, ensuring an accurate and reproducible rating of each domain, by providing a more detailed definition of each domain, has emerged as an urgent need. The purpose of the present article is to provide a user guide for the ESSDAI. This guide provides definitions and precisions on the rating of each domain. It also includes some minor improvement of the score to integrate advance in knowledge of disease manifestations. This user guide may help clinicians to use the ESSDAI, and increase the reliability of rating and consequently of the ability to detect true changes over time. This better appraisal of ESSDAI items, along with the recent definition of disease activity levels and minimal clinically important change, will improve the assessment of patients with primary SS and facilitate the demonstration of effectiveness of treatment for patients with primary SS.

  3. Leading change: evidence-based transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brennan; Allen, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a framework for evidence-based transition of patient populations within an acute care pediatric institution. Transition within a hospital is foreseeable, given the ever-changing needs of the patients within an evolving healthcare system. These changes include moving patient populations because of expansion, renovation, or cohorting similar patient diagnoses to provide care across a continuum. Over the past 1 to 2 years, Children's Health Children's Medical Center Dallas has experienced a wide variety of transition. To provide a smooth transition for patients and families into new care areas resulting in a healthy work environment for all team members. The planning phase for patient population moves, and transition should address key aspects to include physical location and care flow, supplies and equipment, staffing model and human resources (HR), education and orientation, change process and integrating teams, and family preparation. It is imperative to consider these aspects in order for transitions within a healthcare system to be successful. During a time of such transitions, the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is a highly valuable team member offering a unique perspective and methodological approach, which is central to the new initiative's overall success. The themes addressed in this article on evidence-based transition are organized according to the CNS spheres of influence: system/organization, patient/family, and nursing. An evidence-based transition plan was developed and implemented successfully with the support from the CNS for 3 patient populations. Organizational leadership gained an increased awareness of the CNS role at the conclusion of each successful transition. The CNS plays a pivotal role as clinical experts and proponents of evidence-based practice and effects change in the system/organization, nursing, and patient/family spheres of influence. While transitions can be a source of stress for leaders

  4. Evidence-based dentistry and esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, B W

    2000-01-01

    Separating hype from the truth in dental marketing can be frustrating and it is difficult at best for the average dentist to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new products and techniques. Keynote clinicians are presenting information and influencing other dentists without the scientific evidence to support their claims. For the benefit of our patients, the system needs to change. It will not come soon, but until more evidence-based testing is commonplace and made readily available to the practicing dentist, most dentists will continue tradition-based practices.

  5. Evidence-Based Advances in Rodent Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2017-09-01

    The number of exotic companion pet rodents seen in veterinary practices is growing very rapidly. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association's surveys, more than 2,093,000 pet rodents were kept in US households in 2007 and in 2012 it was more than 2,349,000 animals. This article summarizes the most important evidence-based knowledge in exotic pet rodents (diagnostics of the hyperadrenocorticism in guinea pigs, pituitary tumors in rats, urolithiasis in guinea pigs, use of itopride as prokinetics, use of deslorelin acetate in rodents, cause of dental disease, and prevention of mammary gland tumors in rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence-Based Medicine in Facial Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, William M; Christophel, John Jared; Park, Stephen S

    2017-11-01

    This article provides the reader with a comprehensive review of high-level evidence-based medicine in facial trauma and highlights areas devoid of high-level evidence. The article is organized in the order one might approach a clinical problem: starting with the workup, followed by treatment considerations, operative decisions, and postoperative treatments. Individual injuries are discussed within each section, with an overview of the available high-level clinical evidence. This article not only provides a quick reference for the facial traumatologist, but also allows the reader to identify areas that lack high-level evidence, perhaps motivating future endeavors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Observation, Sherlock Holmes, and Evidence Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John

    2002-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh between 1876 and 1881 under Doctor Joseph Bell who emphasised in his teaching the importance of observation, deduction and evidence. Sherlock Holmes was modelled on Joseph Bell. The modern notions of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) are not new. A very brief indication of some of the history of EBM is presented including a discussion of the important and usually overlooked contribution of statisticians to the Popperian philosophy of EBM.

  8. Evidence-based practice within nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laville, Martine; Segrestin, Berenice; Alligier, Maud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical research poses special barriers in the field of nutrition. The present review summarises the main barriers to research in the field of nutrition that are not common to all randomised clinical trials or trials on rare diseases and highlights opportunities...... as patient-centred outcomes may occur decennia into the future. The methodologies and regulations for drug trials are, however, applicable to nutrition trials. CONCLUSIONS: Research on clinical nutrition should start by collecting clinical data systematically in databases and registries. Measurable patient...

  9. Evidence-Based Medicine: Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the key decisions in patient evaluation for cosmetic breast augmentation. 2. Cite key decisions in preoperative planning. 3. Discuss the risks and complications, and key patient education points in breast augmentation. Breast augmentation remains one of the most popular procedures in plastic surgery. The integral information necessary for proper patient selection, preoperative assessment, and surgical approaches are discussed. Current data regarding long term safety and complications are presented to guide the plastic surgeon to an evidence-based approach to the patient seeking breast enhancement to obtain optimal results.

  10. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S

    2017-01-01

    was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist...

  13. Managing Scalp Psoriasis: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-02-01

    Scalp psoriasis is commonly the initial presentation of psoriasis, and almost 80 % of patients with psoriasis will eventually experience it. Although several systematic reviews and guidelines exist, an up-to-date evidence-based review including more recent progress on the use of biologics and new oral small molecules was timely. Of the 475 studies initially retrieved from PubMed and the 845 from Embase (up to May 2016), this review includes 27 clinical trials, four papers reporting pooled analyses of other clinical trials, ten open-label trials, one case series, and two case reports after excluding non-English literature. To our knowledge, few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conducted specifically in scalp psoriasis. Topical corticosteroids provide good effects and are usually recommended as first-line treatment. Calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate is well tolerated and more effective than either of its individual components. Localized phototherapy is better than generalized phototherapy on hair-bearing areas. Methotrexate, cyclosporine, fumaric acid esters, and acitretin are well-recognized agents in the treatment of psoriasis, but we found no published RCTs evaluating these agents specifically in scalp psoriasis. Biologics and new small-molecule agents show excellent effects on scalp psoriasis, but the high cost of these treatments mean they may be limited to use in extensive scalp psoriasis. More controlled studies are needed for an evidence-based approach to scalp psoriasis.

  14. Adaptation of evidence-based surgical wound care algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Yeon; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to adapt a surgical wound care algorithm that is used to provide evidence-based surgical wound care in a critical care unit. This study used, the 'ADAPTE process', an international clinical practice guideline development method. The 'Bonnie Sue wound care algorithm' was used as a draft for the new algorithm. A content validity index (CVI) targeting 135 critical care nurses was conducted. A 5-point Likert scale was applied to the CVI test using a statistical criterion of .75. A surgical wound care algorithm comprised 9 components: wound assessment, infection control, necrotic tissue management, wound classification by exudates and depths, dressing selection, consideration of systemic factors, wound expected outcome, reevaluate non-healing wounds, and special treatment for non-healing wounds. All of the CVI tests were ≥.75. Compared to existing wound care guidelines, the new wound care algorithm provides precise wound assessment, reliabilities of wound care, expands applicability of wound care to critically ill patients, and provides evidence and strength of recommendations. The new surgical wound care algorithm will contribute to the advancement of evidence-based nursing care, and its use is expected as a nursing intervention in critical care.

  15. A systematic review of the evidence base for Schema Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masley, Samantha A; Gillanders, David T; Simpson, Susan G; Taylor, Morag A

    2012-01-01

    Schema Therapy is becoming an increasingly popular psychological model for working with individuals who have a variety of mental health and personality difficulties. The aim of this review is to look at the current evidence base for Schema Therapy and highlight directions for further research. A systematic search of the literature was conducted up until January 2011. All studies that had clinically tested the efficacy of Schema Therapy as described by Jeffrey Young (1994 and 2003) were considered. These studies underwent detailed quality assessments based on Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN-50) culminating in 12 studies being included in the review. The culminative message (both from the popularity of this model and the medium-to-large effect sizes) is of a theory that has already demonstrated clinically effective outcomes in a small number of studies and that would benefit from ongoing research and development with complex client groups. It is imperative that psychological practice be guided by high-quality research that demonstrates efficacious, evidence-based interventions. It is therefore recommended that researchers and clinicians working with Schema Therapy seek to build on these positive outcomes and further demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of this model through ongoing research.

  16. [Acupressure and Evidence-Based Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Li; Lin, Jun-Dai

    2015-12-01

    Acupressure is a traditional Chinese medicine approach to disease prevention and treatment that may be operated by nurses independently. Therefore, acupressure is being increasingly applied in clinical nursing practice and research. Recently, the implementation of evidence-based nursing (EBN) in clinical practice has been encouraged to promote nursing quality. Evidence-based nursing is a method-ology and process of implementation that applies the best-available evidence to clinical practice, which is acquired through the use of empirical nursing research. Therefore, in this paper, we address the topic of acupressure within the context of empirical nursing practice. We first introduce the current status of acupressure research and provide the locations of common acupoints in order to guide future empirical nursing research and to help nurses use these acupoints in clinical practice. Finally, we describe the steps that are necessary to apply the current empirical information on acupressure as well as provide suggestions to promote safety and efficacy in order to guide nurses in the accurate application of acupressure in nursing practice.

  17. Evidence-Based Parenting Interventions to Promote Secure Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Edginton, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Various interventions are used in clinical practice to address insecure or disorganized attachment patterns and attachment disorders. The most common of these are parenting interventions, but not all have a robust empirical evidence base. We undertook a systematic review of randomized trials comparing a parenting intervention with a control, where these used a validated attachment instrument, in order to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions aiming to improve attachment in children with severe attachment problems (mean age parenting interventions included in our systematic review that were clinically effective in promoting secure attachment. For completeness, we also briefly discuss other interventions without randomized controlled trial evidence, identified in Patient Public Involvement workshops and expert groups at the point our review was completed as being used or recommended. We outline the key implications of our findings for clinical practice and future research. PMID:27583298

  18. Progress in evidence-based medicine: a quarter century on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-07-22

    In response to limitations in the understanding and use of published evidence, evidence-based medicine (EBM) began as a movement in the early 1990s. EBM's initial focus was on educating clinicians in the understanding and use of published literature to optimise clinical care, including the science of systematic reviews. EBM progressed to recognise limitations of evidence alone, and has increasingly stressed the need to combine critical appraisal of the evidence with patient's values and preferences through shared decision making. In another progress, EBM incorporated and further developed the science of producing trustworthy clinical practice guidelines pioneered by investigators in the 1980s. EBM's enduring contributions to clinical medicine include placing the practice of medicine on a solid scientific basis, the development of more sophisticated hierarchies of evidence, the recognition of the crucial role of patient values and preferences in clinical decision making, and the development of the methodology for generating trustworthy recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence-Based Parenting Interventions to Promote Secure Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Wright MD, FRCPsych

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Various interventions are used in clinical practice to address insecure or disorganized attachment patterns and attachment disorders. The most common of these are parenting interventions, but not all have a robust empirical evidence base. We undertook a systematic review of randomized trials comparing a parenting intervention with a control, where these used a validated attachment instrument, in order to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions aiming to improve attachment in children with severe attachment problems (mean age <13 years. This article aims to inform clinicians about the parenting interventions included in our systematic review that were clinically effective in promoting secure attachment. For completeness, we also briefly discuss other interventions without randomized controlled trial evidence, identified in Patient Public Involvement workshops and expert groups at the point our review was completed as being used or recommended. We outline the key implications of our findings for clinical practice and future research.

  20. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  1. Evidence-based guidelines for fall prevention in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Il; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Dae Yul; Ha, Yong-Chan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Won, Chang Won; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are common in older populations and have negative effects on quality of life and independence. Falling is also associated with increased morbidity, mortality, nursing home admission, and medical costs. Korea has experienced an extreme demographic shift with its population aging at the fastest pace among developed countries, so it is important to assess fall risks and develop interventions for high-risk populations. Guidelines for the prevention of falls were first developed by the Korean Association of Internal Medicine and the Korean Geriatrics Society. These guidelines were developed through an adaptation process as an evidence-based method; four guidelines were retrieved via systematic review and the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II process, and seven recommendations were developed based on the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation framework. Because falls are the result of various factors, the guidelines include a multidimensional assessment and multimodal strategy. The guidelines were developed for primary physicians as well as patients and the general population. They provide detailed recommendations and concrete measures to assess risk and prevent falls among older people. PMID:28049285

  2. Evidence-based guideline update: Treatment of essential tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, T.A.; Elble, R.J.; Louis, E.D.; Gronseth, G.S.; Ondo, W.G.; Dewey, R.B.; Okun, M.S.; Sullivan, K.L.; Weiner, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This evidence-based guideline is an update of the 2005 American Academy of Neurology practice parameter on the treatment of essential tremor (ET). Methods: A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and CINAHL was performed to identify clinical trials in patients with ET published between 2004 and April 2010. Results and Recommendations: Conclusions and recommendations for the use of propranolol, primidone (Level A, established as effective); alprazolam, atenolol, gabapentin (monotherapy), sotalol, topiramate (Level B, probably effective); nadolol, nimodipine, clonazepam, botulinum toxin A, deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy (Level C, possibly effective); and gamma knife thalamotomy (Level U, insufficient evidence) are unchanged from the previous guideline. Changes to conclusions and recommendations from the previous guideline include the following: 1) levetiracetam and 3,4-diaminopyridine probably do not reduce limb tremor in ET and should not be considered (Level B); 2) flunarizine possibly has no effect in treating limb tremor in ET and may not be considered (Level C); and 3) there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of pregabalin, zonisamide, or clozapine as treatment for ET (Level U). PMID:22013182

  3. Clinicians adopting evidence based guidelines: a case study with thromboprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous Thromboembolism (VTE is a cause of hospital mortality and managing its morbidity is associated with significant expenditure. Uptake of evidenced based guideline recommendations intended to prevent VTE in hospital settings is sub-optimal. This study was conducted to explore clinicians' attitudes and the clinical environment in which they work to understand their reluctance to adopt VTE prophylaxis guidelines. Methods Between February and November 2009, 40 hospital employed doctors from 2 Australian metropolitan hospitals were interviewed in depth. Qualitative data were analysed according to thematic methodology. Results Analysis of interviews revealed that barriers to evidence based practice include i the fragmented system of care delivery where multiple members of teams and multiple teams are responsible for each patient's care, and in the case of VTE, where everyone shares responsibility and no-one in particular is responsible; ii the culture of practice where team practice is tailored to that of the team head, and where medicine is considered an 'art' in which guidelines should be adapted to each patient rather than applied universally. Interviewees recommend clear allocation of responsibility and reminders to counteract VTE risk assessment being overlooked. Conclusions Senior clinicians are the key enablers for practice change. They will need to be convinced that guideline compliance adds value to their patient care. Then with the support of systems in the organisation designed to minimize the effects of care fragmentation, they will drive practice changes in their teams. We believe that evidence based practice is only possible with a coordinated program that addresses individual, cultural and organisational constraints.

  4. School food research: building the evidence base for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael; Breda, João

    2013-06-01

    Following an international workshop on developing the evidence base for policy relating to school food held in London, UK, in January 2012, the objectives of the present paper were (i) to outline a rationale for school food research, monitoring and evaluation in relation to policy and (ii) to identify ways forward for future working. The authors analysed presentations, summaries of evidence, and notes from discussions held at the international workshop in London in 2012 to distil common themes and make recommendations for the development of coherent research programmes relating to food and nutrition in schools. International, with an emphasis on middle- and high-income countries. Overviews of existing school food and nutrition programmes from the UK, Hungary, Sweden, the USA, Australia, Brazil, China, Mexico and other countries were presented, along with information on monitoring, evaluation and other research to demonstrate the impact of school feeding on health, attainment, food sourcing, procurement and finances, in the context of interactions between the evidence base and policy decisions. This provided the material which, together with summaries and notes of discussions, was used to develop recommendations for the development and dissemination of robust approaches to sustainable and effective school food and nutrition programmes in middle- and high-income countries, including policy guidelines, standards, cost-effectiveness measures and the terms of political engagement. School food and nutrition can provide a cohesive core for health, education and agricultural improvement provided: (i) policy is appropriately framed and includes robust monitoring and evaluation; and (ii) all stakeholders are adequately engaged in the process. International exchange of information will be used to develop a comprehensive guide to the assessment of the impact of school food and nutrition policy and supporting infrastructure.

  5. Underdetermination in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin H

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the philosophical implications of evidence-based medicine's (EBM's) epistemology in terms of the problem of underdetermination of theory by evidence as expounded by the Duhem-Quine thesis. EBM hierarchies of evidence privilege clinical research over basic science, exacerbating the problem of underdetermination. Because of severe underdetermination, EBM is unable to meaningfully test core medical beliefs that form the basis of our understanding of disease and therapeutics. As a result, EBM adopts an epistemic attitude that is sceptical of explanations from the basic biological sciences, and is relegated to a view of disease at a population level. EBM's epistemic attitude provides a limited research heuristic by preventing the development of a theoretical framework required for understanding disease mechanism and integrating knowledge to develop new therapies. Medical epistemology should remain pluralistic and include complementary approaches of basic science and clinical research, thus avoiding the limited epistemic attitude entailed by EBM hierarchies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Evidence-Based Medicine: Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Brent B; Hollier, Larry H

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Explain the epidemiology of mandible fractures. 2. Discuss preoperative evaluation of the patient with a mandible fracture. 3. Compare the various modalities of fracture fixation. 4. Identify common complications after fracture repair. In this Maintenance of Certification/Continuing Medical Education article, the reader is provided with a review of the epidemiology, preoperative evaluation, perioperative management, and surgical outcomes of mandible fractures. The objective of this series is to present a review of the literature so that the practicing physician can remain up-to-date on key evidence-based guidelines to enhance management and improve outcomes. The physician can also seek further in-depth study of the topic through the references provided.

  7. [Evidence based surgery. A necessary tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Vega, Héctor César

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based surgery is a tool that has been adopted worldwide by surgeons. As all decisions must be current and have a scientific basis, the approach for performing it must be standardised. Five important steps are required to perform surgery based on evidence. Convert the need for information into a question that can be answered, finding the best information to answer that question, critical evaluation of the evidence, and its validity, impact and applicability, integrating the evidence with your own experience, and with the evaluation of the patients. This should take into account their biology, values and specific circumstances, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the execution of steps 1-4 and propose how to improve them. This article presents the main tools to perform surgery properly based on evidence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. [Communication problems in evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Lisbeth

    2002-02-21

    From a humanistic, social scientific perspective, the most complex task in evidence-based medicine lies in the communication of specialized medical knowledge to non-professionals. Information is never simply the neutral transmission of facts, not even when dealing with scientific knowledge and research. It is always interpreted and evaluated from a particular perspective in a specific context. That information can be neutral is thus a myth. In all medical consultations the process of communication is not just a matter of transmitting information from one who knows to one who does not. Knowledge created and formulated in a scientific context is thus recontextualised first in a clinical situation and then as an interpreted version in people's real lives. Furthermore there are difficulties when practice must be based on current research, in a situation in which no prior clinical experience exists and in which results are interpreted and used regardless of the relative certainty of current evidence.

  9. Evidence Base Update for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tristram; Iadarola, Suzannah

    2015-01-01

    This evidence base update examines the level of empirical support for interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) younger than 5 years old. It focuses on research published since a previous review in this journal (Rogers & Vismara, 2008 ). We identified psychological or behavioral interventions that had been manualized and evaluated in either (a) experimental or quasi-experimental group studies or (b) systematic reviews of single-subject studies. We extracted data from all studies that met these criteria and were published after the previous review. Interventions were categorized across two dimensions. First, primary theoretical principles included applied behavior analysis (ABA), developmental social-pragmatic (DSP), or both. Second, practice elements included scope (comprehensive or focused), modality (individual intervention with the child, parent training, or classrooms), and intervention targets (e.g., spoken language or alternative and augmentative communication). We classified two interventions as well-established (individual, comprehensive ABA and teacher-implemented, focused ABA + DSP), 3 as probably efficacious (individual, focused ABA for augmentative and alternative communication; individual, focused ABA + DSP; and focused DSP parent training), and 5 as possibly efficacious (individual, comprehensive ABA + DSP; comprehensive ABA classrooms; focused ABA for spoken communication; focused ABA parent training; and teacher-implemented, focused DSP). The evidence base for ASD interventions has grown substantially since 2008. An increasing number of interventions have some empirical support; others are emerging as potentially efficacious. Priorities for future research include improving outcome measures, developing interventions for understudied ASD symptoms (e.g., repetitive behaviors), pinpointing mechanisms of action in interventions, and adapting interventions for implementation with fidelity by community providers.

  10. The German evidence-based guidelines for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Aspects for radiation oncologists

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    Eich, H.T.; Kriz, J. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schmidberger, H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Boell, B.; Klimm, B.; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). First Dept. of Internal Medicine; Rancea, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Cochrane Haematological Malignancies Group; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-06-15

    This report reviews aspects of the German evidence-based guidelines for Hodgkin's lymphoma relevant to radiation oncologists. Stage-adapted treatment is discussed with the focus on radiotherapy. Up-to-date literature citations provide an overview of current recommendations. (orig.)

  11. Evidence-based tailored conservative treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis: between knowing and doing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, G.F.; Broeder, A. den; Riel, P.L. van; Straten, V.H.; Man, F.H. de; Hoogen, F.H. Van den; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insufficient data are available on the efficacy of combined conservative interventions recommended by treatment guidelines for knee/hip osteoarthritis (OA). The aims of this observational cohort study were (i) to estimate the results of an evidence-based 12-week tailored multimodal

  12. Supporting Evidence-Based Practice in Schools with an Online Database of Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Joelle D.; Bowen, Natasha K.; Bowen, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of multidisciplinary recommendations to use evidence-based interventions in schools and a growing knowledge base of such practices, most schools are not using empirically supported interventions. On the basis of a careful analysis of barriers to the implementation of the best researched programs, an online, free, and publicly available…

  13. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    religious acts of the prehistoric era to empirical-rational decisions of the Egyptian civilization, to modern day evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine requires that clinical decisions and health policies on the prevention, diagnosis and ...

  14. Barriers to compliance with evidence-based care in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Kudyakov, Rustam; Ballard, David; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-03-01

    We have preciously demonstrated that trauma patients receive less than two-thirds of the care recommended by evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this study was to identify patients least likely to receive optimal care. Records of a random sample of 774 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center (2006-2008) with moderate to severe injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3) were reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific processes of care (T-POC) endorsed by Advanced Trauma Life Support, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Brain Trauma Foundation, Surgical Care Improvement Project, and the Glue Grant Consortium based on evidence or consensus. These encompassed all aspects of trauma care, including initial evaluation, resuscitation, operative care, critical care, rehabilitation, and injury prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify patients likely to receive recommended care. Study patients were eligible for a total of 2,603 T-POC, of which only 1,515 (58%) were provided to the patient. Compliance was highest for T-POC involving resuscitation (83%) and was lowest for neurosurgical interventions (17%). Increasing severity of head injuries was associated with lower compliance, while intensive care unit stay was associated with higher compliance. There was no relationship between compliance and patient demographics, socioeconomic status, overall injury severity, or daily volume of trauma admissions. Little over half of recommended care was delivered to trauma patients with moderate to severe injuries. Patients with increasing severity of traumatic brain injuries were least likely to receive optimal care. However, differences among patient subgroups are small in relation to the overall gap between observed and recommended care. II.

  15. Evidence-based interventions in pediatric psychology: progress over the decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M

    2014-09-01

    This introduction to the special issue on Evidence-Based Interventions in Pediatric Psychology provides background on the process used to develop the special issue, a summary of the key findings from the series of reviews, and discussion of the implications for evidence-based practice. Authors followed a three-phase approach to develop their systematic reviews using rigorous systematic review methodology drawn heavily from the Cochrane Collaboration. The strength of the evidence for each pediatric psychology intervention was evaluated using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. The introduction discusses the progress that has been made in the evidence base for pediatric psychology interventions since the first special series published in 1999. Recommendations to stimulate further research and expand and strengthen the quality of the evidence base are described. The introduction concludes with implications from the special issue for pediatric psychology training in evidence-based practice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Evidence-based treatment of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the current treatments and possible adverse reactions of metabolic myopathy, and to develop the best solution for evidence-based treatment.  Methods Taking metabolic myopathy, mitochondrial myopathy, lipid storage myopathy, glycogen storage diseases, endocrine myopathy, drug toxicity myopathy and treatment as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, ClinicalKey database, National Science and Technology Library (NSTL, in order to collect the relevant literature database including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews (SR, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis and case study. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-eight related articles were selected, including 6 clinical guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, 10 randomized controlled trials and 7 clinical controlled trials. According to Jadad Scale, 23 articles were evaluated as high-quality literature (≥ 4, and the remaining 5 were evaluated as low-quality literature (< 4. Treatment principles of these clinical trials, efficacy of different therapies and drug safety evaluation suggest that: 1 Acid α-glycosidase (GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is the main treatment for glycogen storage diseases, with taking a high-protein diet, exercising before taking a small amount of fructose orally and reducing the patient's physical activity gradually. 2 Carnitine supplementation is used in the treatment of lipid storage myopathy, with carbohydrate and low fat diet provided before exercise or sports. 3 Patients with mitochondrial myopathy can take coenzyme Q10, vitamin B, vitamin K, vitamin C, etc. Proper aerobic exercise combined with strength training is safe, and it can also enhance the exercise tolerance of patients effectively. 4 The first choice to treat the endocrine myopathy is treating primary affection. 5 Myopathies due to drugs and toxins should

  17. THE MAIN RESULTS OF COOPERATION BETWEEN THE V.A. NASONOVA RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF RHEUMATOLOGY AND RESEARCH CENTERS OF EUROPE WITHIN THE EUSTAR (EULAR SCLERODERMA TRIALS AND RESEARCH GROUP IN SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Ananyeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major goals of the EUSTAR (EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research group are to coordinate and centralize systemic sclerosis (SS researches in Europe, to reach a consensus in the standards of evidence-based medicine for patient management, to enhance treatment efficacy, and to improve quality of life in patients and prognosis. Under the aegis of the EUSTAR, more than 100 centers have combined their efforts to solve basic research problems, to study the clinical aspects of the disease, and to conduct clinical trials. The major task of their activities has been to follow-up and timely treat SS patients examined according to a standard protocol, and to accumulate information in the unified European database that includes more than 10,000 patients now. The V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology has formed a cohort of 220 patients with SS, of whom 90–100 persons are annually followed up.The main joint projects implemented have shown the present-day course of SS, studied the causes of death, and characteristics of patient subgroups (juvenile scleroderma, SS in the elderly, damage of the lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract, etc.. New diagnostic criteria for SS and an algorithm for its very early, preclinical diagnosis have been proposed. An analysis of the first 3656 patents with SS has revealed the major clinical characteristics of its diffuse and limited forms at the present stage. Pooled patient data have been used in international multicenter projects whose results are given in joint publications. The results of EUSTAR projects with the participation of the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology are covered in 28 articles. Analysis of the results of EULAR/EUSTAR researches gives grounds to hold that the early diagnosis and timely detection of visceral injuries and the use of current therapy standards may assist in improving the quality of life of patients as well as in reducing the severity of SS and its

  18. Empirical methods for systematic reviews and evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enst, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-Based Medicine is the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Systematic reviews have become the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, which is reflected in the position systematic reviews have in the pyramid of evidence-based medicine. Systematic

  19. Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted…

  20. Evidence-Based Medicine in the Education of Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihari, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evidence-based medicine has an important place in the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Attempts to teach evidence-based medicine skills can be weakened by conceptual confusions feeding a false polarization between traditional clinical skills and evidence-based medicine. Methods: The author develops a broader conception of clinical…

  1. E-Learning and Evidence Based Practice in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quong, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    JCTIC has used open source software to develop a unique school online environment that has made evidence based practice viable in their school. In this paper the proposition is made that eLearning enables evidence based practice which in turn leads to improved student outcomes. Much has been written about evidence based practice in schools, but…

  2. Information provision in medical libraries: An evidence based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined information provision in special libraries such as medical libraries. It provides an overview of evidence based practice as a concept for information provision by librarians. It specifically proffers meaning to the term evidence as used in evidence based practice and to evidence based medicine from where ...

  3. Evidence-based medicine in general practice specialty training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwolsman, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Aio’s huisartsgeneeskunde hebben adequate kennis ten aanzien van evidence-based medicine (geneeskunde op basis van bewijs). In de huisartspraktijk is evidence-based gedrag vaak niet direct zichtbaar, maar artsen kunnen wel aangeven op welk aspect van evidence-based medicine de voorgeschreven

  4. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part I. Formulating Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This first of three articles on evidence-based dental practice discusses the historical background of evidence-based medicine/evidence-based dentistry, how to formulate clear clinical questions and how to track down (search) the available evidence in the literature databases. Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine ...

  5. Developing expert medical teams: toward an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rosemarie; Vozenilek, John A; Hegarty, Cullen B; Motola, Ivette; Reznek, Martin; Phrampus, Paul E; Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2008-11-01

    Current health care literature cites communication breakdown and teamwork failures as primary threats to patient safety. The unique, dynamic environment of the emergency department (ED) and the complexity of patient care necessitate the development of strong interdisciplinary team skills among emergency personnel. As part of the 2008 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on "The Science of Simulation in Healthcare," our workshop group identified key theory and evidence-based recommendations for the design and implementation of team training programs. The authors then conducted an extensive review of the team training literature within the domains of organizational psychology, aviation, military, management, and health care. This review, in combination with the workshop session, formed the basis for recommendations and need for further research in six key areas: 1) developing and refining core competencies for emergency medicine (EM) teams; 2) leadership training for emergency physicians (EPs); 3) conducting comprehensive needs analyses at the organizational, personnel, and task levels; 4) development of training platforms to maximize knowledge transfer; 5) debriefing and provision of feedback; and 6) proper implementation of simulation technology. The authors believe that these six areas should form an EM team training research platform to advance the EM literature, while leveraging the unique team structures present in EM to expand team training theory and research.

  6. Rural Doctors’ Views on and Experiences with Evidence-Based Medicine: The FrEEDoM Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Ranita; Liew, Su May; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Mohd Nor, Kamaliah; Osman, Iskandar Firzada; Ho, Gah Juan; Hamzah, Nurazira; Glasziou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise, best external evidence and patient values which was introduced more than two decades ago. Yet, primary care physicians in Malaysia face unique barriers in accessing scientific literature and applying it to their clinical practice. Aim This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of rural doctors’ about evidence-based medicine in their daily clinical practice in a rural primary care setting. Methods Qualitative methodology was used. The interviews were conducted in June 2013 in two rural health clinics in Malaysia. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. Four focus group discussions with 15 medical officers and three individual in-depth interviews with family medicine specialists were carried out. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analyzed using a thematic approach. Results Key themes identified were: (1) doctors viewed evidence-based medicine mainly as statistics, research and guidelines, (2) reactions to evidence-based medicine were largely negative, (3) doctors relied on specialists, peers, guidelines and non-evidence based internet sources for information, (4) information sources were accessed using novel methods such as mobile applications and (5) there are several barriers to evidence-based practice, including doctor-, evidence-based medicine-, patient- and system-related factors. These included inadequacies in knowledge, attitude, management support, time and access to evidence-based information sources. Participants recommended the use of online services to support evidence-based practice in the rural settings. Conclusion The level of evidence-based practice is low in the rural setting due to poor awareness, knowledge, attitude and resources. Doctors use non-evidence based sources and access them through new methods such as messaging applications. Further research is

  7. Rural Doctors' Views on and Experiences with Evidence-Based Medicine: The FrEEDoM Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Ranita; Liew, Su May; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Mohd Nor, Kamaliah; Osman, Iskandar Firzada; Ho, Gah Juan; Hamzah, Nurazira; Glasziou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise, best external evidence and patient values which was introduced more than two decades ago. Yet, primary care physicians in Malaysia face unique barriers in accessing scientific literature and applying it to their clinical practice. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of rural doctors' about evidence-based medicine in their daily clinical practice in a rural primary care setting. Qualitative methodology was used. The interviews were conducted in June 2013 in two rural health clinics in Malaysia. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. Four focus group discussions with 15 medical officers and three individual in-depth interviews with family medicine specialists were carried out. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analyzed using a thematic approach. Key themes identified were: (1) doctors viewed evidence-based medicine mainly as statistics, research and guidelines, (2) reactions to evidence-based medicine were largely negative, (3) doctors relied on specialists, peers, guidelines and non-evidence based internet sources for information, (4) information sources were accessed using novel methods such as mobile applications and (5) there are several barriers to evidence-based practice, including doctor-, evidence-based medicine-, patient- and system-related factors. These included inadequacies in knowledge, attitude, management support, time and access to evidence-based information sources. Participants recommended the use of online services to support evidence-based practice in the rural settings. The level of evidence-based practice is low in the rural setting due to poor awareness, knowledge, attitude and resources. Doctors use non-evidence based sources and access them through new methods such as messaging applications. Further research is recommended to develop and evaluate

  8. Rural Doctors' Views on and Experiences with Evidence-Based Medicine: The FrEEDoM Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranita Hisham

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise, best external evidence and patient values which was introduced more than two decades ago. Yet, primary care physicians in Malaysia face unique barriers in accessing scientific literature and applying it to their clinical practice.This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of rural doctors' about evidence-based medicine in their daily clinical practice in a rural primary care setting.Qualitative methodology was used. The interviews were conducted in June 2013 in two rural health clinics in Malaysia. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. Four focus group discussions with 15 medical officers and three individual in-depth interviews with family medicine specialists were carried out. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analyzed using a thematic approach.Key themes identified were: (1 doctors viewed evidence-based medicine mainly as statistics, research and guidelines, (2 reactions to evidence-based medicine were largely negative, (3 doctors relied on specialists, peers, guidelines and non-evidence based internet sources for information, (4 information sources were accessed using novel methods such as mobile applications and (5 there are several barriers to evidence-based practice, including doctor-, evidence-based medicine-, patient- and system-related factors. These included inadequacies in knowledge, attitude, management support, time and access to evidence-based information sources. Participants recommended the use of online services to support evidence-based practice in the rural settings.The level of evidence-based practice is low in the rural setting due to poor awareness, knowledge, attitude and resources. Doctors use non-evidence based sources and access them through new methods such as messaging applications. Further research is recommended to develop and evaluate

  9. [THE FOUNDATIONS OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasleau, F

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) are the clinical experience, the application of best evidences from research and the consideration of patient expectations. It enabled significant progresses in the management of diseases with a low or multifactorial causality. But it has also led to unintended negative consequences, partly related to conflicts of interest. The objective of this article is to bring the attention back to the scientific rigor that must sustain the medical practice, namely in the occurrence : 1) formulating a question that addresses all the elements of an individual clinical situation; 2) exploring the literature systematically; 3) estimating the degree of confidence in the conclusions of clinical trials. EBM provides intuitive tools to address some uncomfortable concepts of biostatistics and to identify the biases and the embellished data that invalidate many studies. However, it is difficult to decide of the care of a single patient from observations issued from the comparison of'heterogeneous groups. Personalized medicine should help to overcome this difficulty and should facilitate clinical decision making by targeting the patients who are most likely to benefit from an intervention without much inconvenience.

  10. Evidence-Based Interactive Management of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Fleischmann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based interactive management of change means hands-on experience of modified work processes, given evidence of change. For this kind of pro-active organizational development support we use an organisational process memory and a communication-based representation technique for role-specific and task-oriented process execution. Both are effective means for organizations becoming agile through interactively modelling the business at the process level and re-constructing or re-arranging process representations according to various needs. The tool allows experiencing role-specific workflows, as the communication-based refinement of work models allows for executable process specifications. When presenting the interactive processes to individuals involved in the business processes, changes can be explored interactively in a context-sensitive way before re-implementing business processes and information systems. The tool is based on a service-oriented architecture and a flexible representation scheme comprising the exchange of message between actors, business objects and actors (roles. The interactive execution of workflows does not only enable the individual reorganization of work but also changes at the level of the entire organization due to the represented interactions.

  11. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Evidence Based Practice Outside the Box (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available I love food. I love cooking, baking, testing, and eating. I read about food preparation, food facts, and food service. Over the years I’ve developed my fair share of knowledge about cooking and I’m a decent cook, but I’m no chef. I guess I’m what you’d call a “foodie”. However, I have the good fortune to have a friend who is a chef and owns one of the best, and certainly the most innovative, restaurants in town. During this summer I hosted a cooking class in my home for my family with my chef friend as instructor. The Tex-Mex barbecue theme was a big hit (you can contact me for recipes, if you like, but much more fascinating was the explanation of the science behind the cooking. It turns out that there is a term for this: molecular gastronomy. Another term, and hence the genesis of my “Eureka!” moment of the summer, is evidence based cooking. Good cooking is not just following a recipe (not all of which are evidence based but at its best is the culmination of heaps of tested information regarding why and how chemical and environmental factors work together to result in a gastronomical delight. For example, will brining or marinating a pork chop make it moister? And, if brining, what temperature should the water be, how long should it soak, and how much salt is needed? Why does pounding meat increase its tenderness? What will keep guacamole from browning better – the pit or lime juice? What does baking soda do in a chocolate cake? Eggs or no eggs in fresh pasta? Like most librarians, I tend not to take information at face value. I want to know where information comes from and whether or not it is valid, based on specific factors. I’ve come to notice that evidence based, or evidence informed, practice is everywhere and has a tremendous impact on our lives. Why do you rotate the tires on your car? Evidence shows that the front tires wear more quickly (think about all those 3-pointturns, the braking, etc and therefore

  13. Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toklu HZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hale Zerrin Toklu Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Evidence-based medicine aims to optimize decision-making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. The concept of reliable evidence is essential, since the number of electronic information resources is increasing in parallel to the increasing number and type of drugs on the market. The decision-making process is a complex and requires an extensive evaluation as well as the interpretation of the data obtained. Different sources provide different levels of evidence for decision-making. Not all the data have the same value as the evidence. Rational use of medicine requires that the patients receive “medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community.” Pharmacists have a crucial role in the health system to maintain the rational use of medicine and provide pharmaceutical care to patients, because they are the drug experts who are academically trained for this purpose. The rational use of the pharmacist's workforce will improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy as well as decreasing the global health costs. Keywords: pharmacist, rational use of medicine, pharmacotherapy, pharmaceutical, outcome

  14. Knee surgery and its evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Hasan, K; Carter, A; Zaidi, R; Cro, S; Briggs, T; Goldberg, A

    2016-03-01

    Evidence driven orthopaedics is gaining prominence. It enables better management decisions and therefore better patient care. The aim of our study was to review a selection of the leading publications pertaining to knee surgery to assess changes in levels of evidence over a decade. Articles from the years 2000 and 2010 in The Knee, the Journal of Arthroplasty, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume) and the Bone and Joint Journal were analysed and ranked according to guidelines from the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The intervening years (2003, 2005 and 2007) were also analysed to further define the trend. The percentage of high level evidence (level I and II) studies increased albeit without reaching statistical significance. Following a significant downward trend, the latter part of the decade saw a major rise in levels of published evidence. The most frequent type of study was therapeutic. Although the rise in levels of evidence across the decade was not statistically significant, there was a significant drop and then rise in these levels in the interim. It is therefore important that a further study is performed to assess longer-term trends. Recent developments have made clear that high quality evidence will be having an ever increasing influence on future orthopaedic practice. We suggest that journals implement compulsory declaration of a published study's level of evidence and that authors consider their study designs carefully to enhance the quality of available evidence.

  15. [Searching for evidence-based data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, J-C; Mancini, J; Fieschi, M

    2009-08-01

    The foundation of evidence-based medicine is critical analysis and synthesis of the best data available concerning a given health problem. These factual data are accessible because of the availability on the Internet of web tools specialized in research for scientific publications. A bibliographic database is a collection of bibliographic references describing the documents indexed. Such a reference includes at least the title, summary (or abstract), a set of keywords, and the type of publication. To conduct a strategically effective search, it is necessary to formulate the question - clinical, diagnostic, prognostic, or related to treatment or prevention - in a form understandable by the research engine. Moreover, it is necessary to choose the specific database or databases, which may have particular specificity, and to analyze the results rapidly to refine the strategy. The search for information is facilitated by the knowledge of the standardized terms commonly used to describe the desired information. These come from a specific thesaurus devoted to document indexing. The most frequently used is MeSH (Medical Subject Heading). The principal bibliographic database whose references include a set of describers from the MeSH thesaurus is Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline), which has in turn become a subpart of a still more vast bibliography called PubMed, which indexes an additional 1.4 million references. Numerous other databases are maintained by national or international entities. These include the Cochrane Library, Embase, and the PASCAL and FRANCIS databases.

  16. Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice: Revisions and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Cullen, Laura; Hanrahan, Kirsten; Kleiber, Charmaine; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Rakel, Barbara; Steelman, Victoria; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Tucker, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    The Iowa Model is a widely used framework for the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). Changes in health care (e.g., emergence of implementation science, emphasis on patient engagement) prompted the re-evaluation, revision, and validation of the model. A systematic multi-step process was used capturing information from the literature and user feedback via an electronic survey and live work groups. The Iowa Model Collaborative critically assessed and synthesized information and recommendations before revising the model. Survey participants (n = 431) had requested access to the Model between years 2001 and 2013. Eighty-eight percent (n = 379) of participants reported using the Iowa Model and identified the most problematic steps as: topic priority, critique, pilot, and institute change. Users provided 587 comments with rich contextual rationale and insightful suggestions. The revised model was then evaluated by participants (n = 299) of the 22nd National EBP Conference in 2015. They validated the model as a practical tool for the EBP process across diverse settings. Specific changes in the model are discussed. This user driven revision differs from other frameworks in that it links practice changes within the system. Major model changes are expansion of piloting, implementation, patient engagement, and sustaining change. The Iowa Model-Revised remains an application-oriented guide for the EBP process. Intended users are point of care clinicians who ask questions and seek a systematic, EBP approach to promote excellence in health care. © 2017 University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Hip surgery and its evidence base: progress over a decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Kamrul; Shankar, Shivakumar; Sharma, Aadhar; Carter, Alison; Zaidi, Razi; Cro, Suzie; Skinner, John; Goldberg, Andy

    2016-12-01

    The burden of traumatic and elective hip surgery is set to grow. With an increasing number of techniques and implants against the background of an aging population, the emphasis on evidence-based treatment has never been greater. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in the levels of evidence in the hip literature over a decade. Articles pertaining to hip surgery from the years 2000 and 2010 in Hip International, Journal of Arthroplasty, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery and The Bone and Joint Journal were analysed. Articles were ranked by a five-point level of evidence scale and by type of study, according to guidelines from the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. 531 articles were analysed from 48 countries. The kappa value for the inter-observer reliability showed excellent agreement between the reviewers for study type (κ = 0.956, P < 0.01) and for levels of evidence (κ = 0.772, P < 0.01). Between 2000 and 2010, the overall percentage of high-level evidence (levels I and II) studies more than doubled (12 to 31 %, P < 0.001). The most frequent study type was therapeutic; the USA and UK were the largest producers of published work in these journals, with contributions from other countries increasing markedly over the decade. There has been a significant increase in high levels of evidence in hip surgery over a decade (P < 0.001). We recommend that all orthopaedic journals consider implementing compulsory declaration by authors of the level of evidence to help enhance quality of evidence. Level 2: economic and decision analysis.

  18. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  19. Evidence-based medicine: a commentary on common criticisms

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, Sharon E.; McAlister, Finlay A.

    2000-01-01

    Discussions about evidence-based medicine engender both negative and positive reactions from clinicians and academics. Ways to achieve evidence-based practice are reviewed here and the most common criticisms described. The latter can be classified as ”limitations universal to the practice of medicine,” ”limitations unique to evidence-based medicine” and ”misperceptions of evidence-based medicine.” Potential solutions to the true limitations of evidence-based medicine are discussed and areas f...

  20. Work at night and breast cancer--report on evidence-based options for preventive actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Hansen, Johnni; Kolstad, Henrik Albert

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified shift work involving circadian disruption as probably carcinogenic to humans (group 2A), primarily based on experimental and epidemiologic evidence for breast cancer. In order to examine options for evidence-based preventive...... by suppression of melatonin secretion. Work during the night is widespread worldwide. To provide additional evidence-based recommendations on prevention of diseases related to night shift work, large studies on the impact of various shift schedules and type of light on circadian rhythms need to be conducted...

  1. Therapist Attitudes Towards Evidence-Based Practice: A Joint Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alexandra M; Okamura, Kelsie H; Izmirian, Sonia C; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Shimabukuro, Scott; Nakamura, Brad J

    2017-07-01

    Despite the accumulated research support for the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) with youth, these treatment approaches remain underutilized in community settings. Therapist attitudes towards EBPs play a pivotal role in their adoption and implementation of these practices. The present investigation employs joint exploratory factor analysis to evaluate the structure of two measures of therapist attitudes, the Evidence-Based Practices Attitudes Scale and the Modified Practice Attitude Scale. Results suggest three factors including (a) importance of clinical experience over EBPs, (b) clinician openness to change, and (c) problems with EBPs. Recommendations are provided for future evaluation of therapist attitudes and associated characteristics.

  2. The EULAR Study Group for Registers and Observational Drug Studies: comparability of the patient case mix in the European biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kearsley-Fleet, L.; Zavada, J.; Hetland, M.L.; Nordstrom, D.C.; Aaltonen, K.J.; Listing, J.; Zink, A.; Gati, T.; Rojkovich, B.; Iannone, F.; Gremese, E.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Laar, M.A. van der; Lie, E.; Kvien, T.K.; Canhao, H.; Fonseca, J.E.; Rotar, Z.; Loza, E.; Carmona, L.; Askling, J.; Johansson, K.; Finckh, A.; Dixon, W.G.; Hyrich, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), a study group of investigators representing European biologic DMARD (bDMARD) registers was convened. The purpose of this initial assessment was to collect and compare a cross section of patient characteristics and

  3. Neonatal physical therapy. Part II: Practice frameworks and evidence-based practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Jane K; Heriza, Carolyn B; Blanchard, Yvette; Dusing, Stacey C

    2010-01-01

    (1) To outline frameworks for neonatal physical therapy based on 3 theoretical models, (2) to describe emerging literature supporting neonatal physical therapy practice, and (3) to identify evidence-based practice recommendations. Three models are presented as a framework for neonatal practice: (1) dynamic systems theory including synactive theory and the theory of neuronal group selection, (2) the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and (3) family-centered care. Literature is summarized to support neonatal physical therapists in the areas of examination, developmental care, intervention, and parent education. Practice recommendations are offered with levels of evidence identified. Neonatal physical therapy practice has a theoretical and evidence-based structure, and evidence is emerging for selected clinical procedures. Continued research to expand the science of neonatal physical therapy is critical to elevate the evidence and support practice recommendations.

  4. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kusano, Motoyasu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Joh, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Nakada, Koji; Nagahara, Akihito; Futagami, Seiji; Manabe, Noriaki; Inui, Akio; Haruma, Ken; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Yakabi, Koji; Hongo, Michio; Uemura, Naomi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-02-01

    General interest in functional gastrointestinal disorders is increasing among Japanese doctors as well as patients. This increase can be attributed to a number of factors, including recent increased interest in quality of life and advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease. Japan recently became the world's first country to list "functional dyspepsia" as a disease name for national insurance billing purposes. However, recognition and understanding of functional dyspepsia (FD) remain poor, and no standard treatment strategy has yet been established. Accordingly, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for FD, consisting of five sections: concept, definition, and epidemiology; pathophysiology; diagnosis; treatment; and prognosis and complications. This article summarizes the Japanese guideline, with particular focus on the treatment section. Once a patient is diagnosed with FD, the doctor should carefully explain the pathophysiology and benign nature of this condition, establish a good doctor-patient relationship, and then provide advice for daily living (diet and lifestyle modifications, explanations, and reassurance). The proposed pharmacological treatment is divided into two steps: initial treatment including an acid inhibitory drug (H2RA or PPI) or prokinetics, (strong recommendation); second-line treatment including anxiolytics, antidepressants, and Japanese traditional medicine (weak recommendation). H. pylori eradication, strongly recommended with a high evidence level, is positioned separately from other treatment flows. Conditions that do not respond to these treatment regimens are regarded as refractory FD. Patients will be further examined for other organic disorders or will be referred to specialists using other approaches such as psychosomatic treatment.

  5. How current are leading evidence-based medical textbooks? An analytic survey of four online textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Rebecca; Navarro, Tamara; Lokker, Cynthia; Haynes, R Brian; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Farjou, George

    2012-12-10

    The consistency of treatment recommendations of evidence-based medical textbooks with more recently published evidence has not been investigated to date. Inconsistencies could affect the quality of medical care. To determine the frequency with which topics in leading online evidence-based medical textbooks report treatment recommendations consistent with more recently published research evidence. Summarized treatment recommendations in 200 clinical topics (ie, disease states) covered in four evidence-based textbooks--UpToDate, Physicians' Information Education Resource (PIER), DynaMed, and Best Practice--were compared with articles identified in an evidence rating service (McMaster Premium Literature Service, PLUS) since the date of the most recent topic updates in each textbook. Textbook treatment recommendations were compared with article results to determine if the articles provided different, new conclusions. From these findings, the proportion of topics which potentially require updating in each textbook was calculated. 478 clinical topics were assessed for inclusion to find 200 topics that were addressed by all four textbooks. The proportion of topics for which there was 1 or more recently published articles found in PLUS with evidence that differed from the textbooks' treatment recommendations was 23% (95% CI 17-29%) for DynaMed, 52% (95% CI 45-59%) for UpToDate, 55% (95% CI 48-61%) for PIER, and 60% (95% CI 53-66%) for Best Practice (χ(2) (3)=65.3, P<.001). The time since the last update for each textbook averaged from 170 days (range 131-209) for DynaMed, to 488 days (range 423-554) for PIER (P<.001 across all textbooks). In online evidence-based textbooks, the proportion of topics with potentially outdated treatment recommendations varies substantially.

  6. An evidence-based clinical guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie L; Fernand, Robert; Matz, Paul G

    2013-10-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Spine Surgery provides evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions regarding the efficacy and the appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis protocol to prevent surgical site infections in patients undergoing spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of June 2011. Provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine surgeons in preventing surgical site infections. Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This guideline is a product of the Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Spine Surgery Work Group of NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group consisted of neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons who specialize in spine surgery and are trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE (PubMed), ACP Journal Club, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and Web of Science to identify articles published since the search performed for the original guideline. The relevant literature was then independently rated using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final recommendations to answer each clinical question were developed via work group discussion, and grades were assigned to the recommendations using standardized grades of recommendation. In the absence of Levels I to IV evidence, work group consensus statements have been developed using a modified nominal group technique, and these statements are clearly identified as such in the guideline. Sixteen clinical questions

  7. Evidence-based medicine - an appropriate tool for evidence-based health policy? A case study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Bjelland, Anne Karen; Elvbakken, Kari Tove

    2016-03-05

    Evidence-based policy (EBP), a concept modelled on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM), is widely used in different areas of policymaking. Systematic reviews (SRs) with meta-analyses gradually became the methods of choice for synthesizing research evidence about interventions and judgements about quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Critics have argued that the relation between research evidence and service policies is weak, and that the notion of EBP rests on a misunderstanding of policy processes. Having explored EBM standards and knowledge requirements for health policy decision-making, we present an empirical point of departure for discussing the relationship between EBM and EBP. In a case study exploring the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC), an independent government unit, we first searched for information about the background and development of the NOKC to establish a research context. We then identified, selected and organized official NOKC publications as an empirical sample of typical top-of-the-line knowledge delivery adhering to EBM standards. Finally, we explored conclusions in this type of publication, specifically addressing their potential as policy decision tools. From a total sample of 151 SRs published by the NOKC in the period 2004-2013, a purposive subsample from 2012 (14 publications) advised major caution about their conclusions because of the quality or relevance of the underlying documentation. Although the case study did not include a systematic investigation of uptake and policy consequences, SRs were found to be inappropriate as universal tools for health policy decision-making. The case study demonstrates that EBM is not necessarily suited to knowledge provision for every kind of policy decision-making. Our analysis raises the question of whether the evidence-based movement, represented here by an independent government organization, undertakes too broad a range of commissions using

  8. Biomarkers of good EULAR response to the B cell depletion therapy in all seropositive rheumatoid arthritis patients: clues for the pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Ferraccioli

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To find out whether a high number of auto-antibodies can increase the probability of a "good-EULAR response" and to identify the possible biomarkers of response in seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients undergoing the B cell depletion therapy (BCDT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and thirty-eight patients with long standing RA (LSRA, 75% non or poorly responsive to one or more TNFα blockers, all seropositive for at least one autoantibody (AAB (RF-IgM, RF-IgA, RF-IgG, anti-MCV, ACPA-IgG, ACPA-IgA, ACPA-IgM received one full course of BCDT. The major outcomes (moderate or good-EULAR response were assessed after 6 months of therapy. The IL6 and BAFF levels were also determined. RESULTS: At a 6-month follow-up, 33 (23.9% of the RA patients achieved a good EULAR response. Having up to 5-AABs positivity increased the chances for treatment response. After a logistic regression analysis, however, only 4 baseline factors arose as associated with a good-EULAR response: no steroid therapy (OR = 6.25, a lymphocyte count 52.1 IU/ml (OR = 8.37 and BAFF levels <1011 pg/ml (OR = 7.38. When all the AABs, except for RF-IgM and ACPA-IgG, were left in the analysis, the two final predictors were no-steroid therapy and low lymphocyte count. DISCUSSION: The number of AABs increased the chances of being a "good-EULAR" responder. The only predictors, however, at the baseline of a good response in this seropositive cohort of RA patients were 2 simple variables--no steroids and lymphocyte count--and two laboratory assays--IgG-RF and BAFF.

  9. Evidence-based acute bronchitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Kimberly L; Atkins, Aaron

    2012-12-01

    Acute bronchitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the large airways within the lung accompanied by a cough lasting from 1 to 3 weeks. The inflammation occurs as a result of an airway infection or environmental trigger, with viral infections accounting for an estimated 89% to 95% of cases. Symptomatic treatment of cough is primarily required for patients, though in most cases the condition is self-limiting. Therapy consists of both nonpharmacological and pharmacological options to include antibiotics and antivirals, antitussive agents, protussive agents, and beta-2-agonists. This article reviews the treatment options for acute bronchitis and recommends criteria for use.

  10. Integrating Science and Engineering to Implement Evidence-Based Practices in Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shinyi; Duan, Naihua; Wisdom, Jennifer P; Kravitz, Richard L; Owen, Richard R; Sullivan, J Greer; Wu, Albert W; Di Capua, Paul; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2015-09-01

    Integrating two distinct and complementary paradigms, science and engineering, may produce more effective outcomes for the implementation of evidence-based practices in health care settings. Science formalizes and tests innovations, whereas engineering customizes and optimizes how the innovation is applied tailoring to accommodate local conditions. Together they may accelerate the creation of an evidence-based healthcare system that works effectively in specific health care settings. We give examples of applying engineering methods for better quality, more efficient, and safer implementation of clinical practices, medical devices, and health services systems. A specific example was applying systems engineering design that orchestrated people, process, data, decision-making, and communication through a technology application to implement evidence-based depression care among low-income patients with diabetes. We recommend that leading journals recognize the fundamental role of engineering in implementation research, to improve understanding of design elements that create a better fit between program elements and local context.

  11. PET with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose for staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Evidence-based recommendations and cost-effectiveness; PET mit {sup 18}F-Fluordeoxyglukose in der Diagnostik des nicht kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms: evidenzbasierte Empfehlungen und Kosten/Nutzenabwaegungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.A.; Schwaiger, M. [Techn. Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Hellwig, D.; Kirsch, C.M. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2003-08-01

    Aims: To evaluate studies on the use of positron emission tomography with the glucose analog {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) for the preoperative staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) according to the criteria of evidence based medicine and to discuss the cost-effectiveness of the technique. Methods: Clinical studies published between 1995 and 2002 on the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer were used for this analysis. Studies that did not meet the criteria published by the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) were excluded. The validity of the studies was evaluated by a standardized rating system developed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR). Results: For the detection of mediastinal lymph node metastases the mean sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET on a patient basis is 85% and 87% (16 studies, 1355 patients). In studies that compared FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT) the mean sensitivity of CT was 66% at a specificity of 71%. In the detection of distant metastases FDG-PET correctly changed the tumor stage in 18% of the patients when compared to CT based staging (10 studies, 1073 patients). Five cost effectiveness analyses from the USA, Japan, and Germany concluded that FDG-PET improves the outcome of treatment at reduced or only slightly increased overall costs. Improvement of patient outcome was also demonstrated in a randomized trial, which found that the risk of a futile thoracotomy was reduced by 51% (p=0.003) when FDG-PET was added to the preoperative staging. Conclusion: According to the criteria of the AHCPR the use of FDG-PET for detection of mediastinal lymph node and distant metastases is documented at a level of evidence Ia and Ib, respectively. Since systematic analyses also indicate a favourable cost-effectiveness ratio FDG-PET has to be considered as 'strictly indicated' for the preoperative staging of a non-small cell lung cancer. (orig

  12. Evidence-based resources and the role of librarians in developing evidence-based practice curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Mary L; Weiss, Patricia M

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) requires acquisition and use of a complex set of skills, including the ability to locate and critically evaluate clinically relevant research literature. In this article, we discuss information resources and tools that may be of value to educators faced with the task of teaching students to search for and evaluate research-based evidence. In addition, we discuss how health sciences librarians, with the use of new models of information instruction and delivery, can work with nursing faculty in developing curricula for training students in EBP.

  13. Pharmaceutical counseling: Between evidence-based medicine and profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, S N; Akhmetova, T

    2015-01-01

    pharmaceutical counseling standards: Article 1.1 "Code of Ethics of the pharmaceutical worker of Russia" states: "The main task of the professional activity of the pharmaceutical worker - protection of human health", Article 1.3 states that a pharmaceutical worker must take professional decisions solely in the interests of a patient [1]. However, the pharmacy is a trade organization, thus as a retailer the pharmacy is directly interested in making profits and increasing sales of pharmaceutical products, including non-prescription medicines. Moreover, while the clinical medicine is monitored for unjustified prescribing and measures are being taken to prevent polypharmacy, for a pharmacist the growing sales of over-the-counter drugs, active promotion of dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines, medical devices, and, consequently, an increase of financial indicators (particularly "average purchase size") - all are characteristics of success [2].Rational use of over-the-counter medicines requires introduction of pharmaceutical counseling standards (pharmaceutical care) according to symptoms - major reasons to visit a pharmacy as part of responsible self-medication (cold, sore throat, headache, diarrhea, etc.). Standards of pharmaceutical counseling should be objective, reliable and up-to-date and contain recommendations for the rational use of over-the-counter drugs as well as indications requiring treatment to the doctor. Standardization of pharmaceutical counseling in terms of Evidence-based Pharmacy would enhance the efficiency, safety and cost-effectiveness of over-the-counter medicines.Currently, the lack of clinical component in the higher pharmaceutical education and the lack of approved standards of pharmaceutical counseling lead to the introduction of cross-selling technologies (which are broadly applied in other areas of trade, for example, the offer of a boot-polish during the sale of shoes) to the pharmaceutical practice [2, 3]. However, drugs belong to a special group

  14. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview of Evidence-Based Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Lancaster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a chronic psychological disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic event. This review summarizes the literature on the epidemiology, assessment, and treatment of PTSD. We provide a review of the characteristics of PTSD along with associated risk factors, and describe brief, evidence-based measures that can be used to screen for PTSD and monitor symptom changes over time. In regard to treatment, we highlight commonly used, evidence-based psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies for PTSD. Among psychotherapeutic approaches, evidence-based approaches include cognitive-behavioral therapies (e.g., Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. A wide variety of pharmacotherapies have received some level of research support for PTSD symptom alleviation, although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have the largest evidence base to date. However, relapse may occur after the discontinuation of pharmacotherapy, whereas PTSD symptoms typically remain stable or continue to improve after completion of evidence-based psychotherapy. After reviewing treatment recommendations, we conclude by describing critical areas for future research.

  15. Guidelines for revascularization: The evidence base matures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert O. Bonow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial revascularization procedures continue to represent important treatment options for patients with acute and chronic coronary artery disease (CAD and also represent a major source of health care expenditures. For the past decade, the indications for revascularization in patients with chronic CAD, and the indications for surgical versus percutaneous revascularization, have been the subject of considerable discussion, debate, and controversy. The guidelines from the American College of Cardiology Foundation / American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA and the European Society of Cardiology / European Association for Cardiothoracic S (ESC/EACTS have made major inroads in resolving these issues and have provided the standards for care for interventional cardiologists, surgeons, and the physicians who refer patients for these procedures. The transatlantic guidelines have also been remarkably concordant in their overall recommendations.

  16. Evidence-based medicine: Dupuytren contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Charles

    2014-05-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: (1) Describe features and clinical importance of Dupuytren diathesis. (2) Explain the difference between the new definition of recurrence used in collagenase studies compared with prior definitions of recurrence. (3) Compare and list the main advantage/main disadvantage of fasciectomy versus minimally invasive treatment (collagenase injection or needle aponeurotomy) of Dupuytren contracture. The large body of existing literature on Dupuytren disease is spread across many journals in many specialties. It is thus a daunting task for practitioners to follow trends and practice recommendations. It is also a testimony to the lack of an acceptable solution to this common problem. Recent publications provide evidence to highlight controversies and challenge some traditional teachings. Literature from 2010 to 2012 was reviewed with the intent of clarifying some of these issues.

  17. Evidence-Based Treatment of Delirium in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Alici, Yesne

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric complication seen in patients with cancer, and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Increased health care costs, prolonged hospital stays, and long-term cognitive decline are other well-recognized adverse outcomes of delirium. Improved recognition of delirium and early treatment are important in diminishing such morbidity. There has been an increasing number of studies published in the literature over the last 10 years regarding delirium treatment as well as prevention. Antipsychotics, cholinesterase inhibitors, and alpha-2 agonists are the three groups of medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials in different patient populations. In patients with cancer, the evidence is most clearly supportive of short-term, low-dose use of antipsychotics for controlling the symptoms of delirium, with close monitoring for possible adverse effects, especially in older patients with multiple medical comorbidities. Nonpharmacologic interventions also appear to have a beneficial role in the treatment of patients with cancer who have or are at risk for delirium. This article presents evidence-based recommendations based on the results of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies of the treatment and prevention of delirium. PMID:22412123

  18. Evidence-based guideline: Treatment of parenchymal neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Ruth Ann; Wiebe, Sam; Zunt, Joseph R.; Halperin, John J.; Gronseth, Gary; Roos, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence base for different treatment strategies in intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis in adults and children. Method: A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, LILACS, and the Cochrane Database from 1980 to 2008, updated in 2012, resulted in the identification of 10 Class I or Class II trials of cysticidal drugs administered with or without corticosteroids in the treatment of neurocysticercosis. Results: The available data demonstrate that albendazole therapy, administered with or without corticosteroids, is probably effective in decreasing both long-term seizure frequency and the number of cysts demonstrable radiologically in adults and children with neurocysticercosis, and is well-tolerated. There is insufficient information to assess the efficacy of praziquantel. Recommendations: Albendazole plus either dexamethasone or prednisolone should be considered for adults and children with neurocysticercosis, both to decrease the number of active lesions on brain imaging studies (Level B) and to reduce long-term seizure frequency (Level B). The evidence is insufficient to support or refute the use of steroid treatment alone in patients with intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis (Level U). PMID:23568997

  19. Evidence-based management of sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Michael; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Concussion is not only one of the most common injuries encountered by athletes participating in contact and collision sports, but also among the most complex injuries to manage in a sports medicine setting. Over the past two decades, we have made great progress in advancing the basic and clinical science of concussion. These advances have had enormous clinical translational value for developing evidence-based guidelines for management of concussion in sports. Applied clinical research has clarified the defining characteristics of sport-related concussion (SRC) that support new diagnostic criteria. At the same time, major advancements have been realized in the development and validation of clinical tools that allow a more objective and accurate assessment of concussion and performance-based measures of recovery. These tools provide clinicians with a more informed basis for determining an athlete's cognitive and physical fitness to return to competition after concussion. Standardized injury management protocols that systematically prescribe rest, graded activity, and return to play have been adopted in nearly all clinical settings. Herein, we briefly summarize the findings and recommendations from several national and international consensus guidelines and position statements on best practice in the evaluation and management of SRC. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the inclusion of patient representatives in scientific projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, M P T; Berlo, S E; Aanerud, G J; Aletaha, D; Bijlsma, J W; Croucher, L; Da Silva, J A P; Glüsing, B; Gossec, L; Hewlett, S; Jongkees, M; Magnusson, D; Scholte-Voshaar, M; Richards, P; Ziegler, C; Abma, T A

    2011-05-01

    To develop recommendations to enable successful inclusion of the patient perspective in European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)-funded scientific research projects. The EULAR standardised operational procedures for guideline development were followed. A systematic literature review was presented during a first task force meeting, including 3 rheumatologists, 1 rheumatologist/epidemiologist, 2 allied health professionals, 2 representatives of arthritis research organisations and 7 patient representatives, resulting in 38 statements. A Delphi method was carried out to reduce and refine the statements and agree on a set of eight. Next, a survey among a wider group of experts, professionals and patient representatives (n=42), was completed. Feedback from this wider group was discussed at the second meeting and integrated in the final wording of the recommendations. Subsequently, the level of agreement of the group of experts (n=81) was re-evaluated. The project resulted in a definition of patient research partner and agreement on a set of eight recommendations for their involvement in research projects. These recommendations provide practical guidance for organising patient participation, capturing (1) the role of patient research partners, (2) phase of involvement, (3) the recommended number, (4) recruitment, (5) selection, (6) support, (7) training and (8) acknowledgement. Collaboration between patients and professionals in research is relatively new. Trials or effectiveness studies are not yet available. Nevertheless, it is possible to define recommendations for the inclusion of patients in research following a solid expert opinion based consensus process.

  1. “Evidence of me” in evidence based medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Evidence based medicine provides independent, validated advice about treatment options, but does it take sufficient account of individual patients' values to provide them with an optimal health outcome?

  2. [Strategy for promoting evidence-based nursing practice in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Tang, Lee-Chun; Chou, Shin-Shang

    2013-10-01

    Evidence-based practice has been demonstrated to improve quality of care, increase patients' satisfaction, and reduce the costs of medical care. Therefore, evidence-based practice is now central to the clinical decision-making process and to achieving better quality of care. Today, it is one of the important indicators of core competences for healthcare providers and accreditation for healthcare and educational systems. Further, evidence-based practice encourages in-school and continuous education programs to integrate evidence-based elements and concepts into curricula. Healthcare facilities and professional organizations proactively host campaigns and encourage healthcare providers to participate in evidence-based related training courses. However, the clinical evidence-based practice progress is slow. The general lack of a model for organizational follow-up may be a key factor associated with the slow adoption phenomenon. The authors provide a brief introduction to the evidence-based practice model, then described how it may be successfully translated through a staged process into the evidence-based practices of organizational cultures. This article may be used as a reference by healthcare facilities to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

  3. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoper......The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care......, postoperative detection of delirium and management of delirious patients. The scope of this guideline is not to cover ICU delirium. Considering that many medical disciplines are involved in the treatment of surgical patients, a team-based approach should be implemented into daily practice. This guideline...

  4. Evidence-based management for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Menzies, Jennifer; Gilgoff, Sarah; Xie, Fang; Douglas, M Joanne; Sawchuck, Diane; Magee, Laura A

    2007-05-01

    This review reflects both the variable presentation and the systemic nature of preeclampsia. Recommendations for the comprehensive evaluation and management of organ dysfunction associated with pre-eclampsia are included. The main points in the review are that: (1) Preeclampsia is a systemic disorder that may affect many organ systems. (2) For preeclampsia remote from term (management improves perinatal outcomes, but requires obsessive surveillance to mitigate maternal risks and is a "package." (3) Initial assessment and ongoing surveillance of women with preeclampsia should include assessment of all vulnerable maternal organs as well as of the fetus. (4) Initiate antihypertensive drug treatment immediately if sBP >160 mmHg or dBP more than 110 mmHg, or if sBP 140-159 mmHg and/or dBP 85-109 mmHg (prepregnancy renal disease or diabetes). (5) The treatment of nonsevere pregnancy hypertension should include a treatment goal of dBP 80-105 mmHg (depending on practitioner preference), with one of the following agents, Methyldopa, Labetalol, Nifedipine, or, with special indications (renal or cardiac diseases), diuretics. (6) Drugs to avoid: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; angiotensin II receptor antagonists; and atenolol. (7) For the acute management of severe hypertension, initially reduce dBP by 10 mmHg and maintain the blood pressure at or below that level with either Nifedipine or Labetalol. (8) For both prophylaxis against and treatment of eclampsia, MgSO4 (4 g IV stat, then 1 g/hr). (9) For recurrent seizures, MgSO4 (2g IV stat, then increase to 1.5 g/hr). (10) Total fluid intake should not exceed 80 ml/hr; tolerate urine outputs as low as 10 ml/hr. (11) Early-onset and/or severe preeclampsia predict later cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; it would seem prudent to offer such women screening and lipid lowering interventions.

  5. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  6. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  7. Evidence-Based Treatment and Stuttering--Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, David; Ingham, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the way in which both fluency shaping (FS) and stuttering management (SM) treatments for developmental stuttering in adults are evidence based. Method: A brief review of the history and development of FS and SM is provided. It illustrates that both can be justified as evidence-based treatments, each treatment seeking…

  8. The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ross

    2008-01-01

    School Library Journal's 2007 Leadership Summit, "Where's the Evidence? Understanding the Impact of School Libraries," focused on the topic of evidence-based practice. Evidence-based school librarianship is a systematic approach that engages research-derived evidence, school librarian-observed evidence, and user-reported evidence in the processes…

  9. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders : International comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings: Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The

  10. Evidence-Based Practice in Education. Conducting Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Richard; Thomas, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The book begins with an explication of evidence-based practice. Some of the ideas of its proponents are discussed, including the Campbell Collaboration, and the application to education of Cochrane-style reviews and meta-analyses. The thinking behind evidence-based practice has been the subject of much criticism, particularly in education, and…

  11. The Evidence Missing from Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Richard B.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. Regrettably, the task force report was largely silent on three critical issues. As a consequence, it omitted much of the evidence necessary for a complete picture of evidence-based…

  12. Evidence based medicine and the plastic surgery literature in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The principles of evidence-based medicine places case reports in the lower level of the hierarchy of scientific evidence. With the increased advocacy of evidence-based medicine, the survival of the case report has been threatened, prompting several authors to call for its preservation. Materials and methods: ...

  13. Bariatric surgery: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m(2).() Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m(2) or at least 35 kg/m(2) with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m(2). An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999-2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the "normal" range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m(2) and extend into the "overweight" range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight

  14. [Forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun-Liang; Peng, Ming-Qi

    2013-12-01

    As an important component of judicial expertise, forensic science is broad and highly specialized. With development of network technology, increasement of information resources, and improvement of people's legal consciousness, forensic scientists encounter many new problems, and have been required to meet higher evidentiary standards in litigation. In view of this, evidence-based concept should be established in forensic medicine. We should find the most suitable method in forensic science field and other related area to solve specific problems in the evidence-based mode. Evidence-based practice can solve the problems in legal medical field, and it will play a great role in promoting the progress and development of forensic science. This article reviews the basic theory of evidence-based medicine and its effect, way, method, and evaluation in the forensic medicine in order to discuss the application value of forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks.

  15. Merging Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Lecomte

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial interventions are an essential part of the treatment for people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The criteria regarding what makes an intervention “evidence-based” along with a current list of evidence-based interventions are presented. Although many evidence-based interventions exist, implementation studies reveal that few, if any, are ever implemented in a given setting. Various theories and approaches have been developed to better understand and overcome implementation obstacles. Among these, merging two evidence-based interventions, or offering an evidence-based intervention within an evidence-based service, are increasingly being reported and studied in the literature. Five such merges are presented, along with their empirical support: cognitive behavior therapy (CBT with skills training; CBT and family psychoeducation; supported employment (SE and skills training; SE and cognitive remediation; and SE and CBT.

  16. Reversing the pipeline? Implementing public health evidence-based guidance in english local government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Lou; Kelly, Michael P; Littleford, Clare; Leng, Gillian; Michie, Susan

    2017-05-12

    In the UK, responsibility for many public health functions was transferred in 2013 from the National Health Service (NHS) to local government; a very different political context and one without the NHS history of policy and practice being informed by evidence-based guidelines. A problem this move presented was whether evidence-based guidelines would be seen as relevant, useful and implementable within local government. This study investigates three aspects of implementing national evidence-based recommendations for public health within a local government context: influences on implementation, how useful guidelines are perceived to be and whether the linear evidence-guidelines-practice model is considered relevant. Thirty-one councillors, public health directors and deputy directors and officers and other local government employees were interviewed about their experiences implementing evidence-based guidelines. Interviews were informed and analysed using a theoretical model of behaviour (COM-B; Capability, Opportunity, Motivation-Behaviour). Contextual issues such as budget, capacity and political influence were important influences on implementation. Guidelines were perceived to be of limited use, with concerns expressed about recommendations being presented in the abstract, lacking specificity and not addressing the complexity of situations or local variations. Local evidence was seen as the best starting point, rather than evidence-based guidance produced by the traditional linear 'evidence-guidelines-practice' model. Local evidence was used to not only provide context for recommendations but also replace recommendations when they conflicted with local evidence. Local government users do not necessarily consider national guidelines to be fit for purpose at local level, with the consequence that local evidence tends to trump evidence-based guidelines. There is thus a tension between the traditional model of guideline development and the needs of public health

  17. School Librarianship and Evidence Based Practice: Progress, Perspectives, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J. Todd

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This paper provides an overview of progress and developments surrounding evidence based practice in school librarianship, and seeks to provide a picture of current thinking about evidence based practice as it relates to the field. It addresses current issues and challenges facing the adoption of evidence based practice in school librarianship.Methods – The paper is based on a narrative review of a small but growing body of literature on evidence based practice in school librarianship, set within a broader perspective of evidence based education. In addition, it presents the outcomes of a collaborative process of input from 200 school libraries leaders collected at a School Library summit in 2007 specifically to address the emerging arena of evidence based practice in this field.Results – A holistic model of evidence based practice for school libraries is presented, centering on three integrated dimensions of evidence: evidence for practice, evidence in practice, and evidence of practice.Conclusion – The paper identifies key challenges ahead if evidence based school librarianship is to develop further. These include: building research credibility within the broader educational environment; the need for ongoing review and evaluation of the diverse body of research in education, librarianship and allied fields to make quality evidence available in ways that can enable practicing school librarians to build a culture of evidence based practice; development of tools, strategies, and exemplars to use to facilitate evidence based decision-making; and, ensuring that the many and diverse advances in education and librarianship become part of the practice of school librarianship.

  18. Barriers to and Facilitators of Evidence-Based Decision Making at the Point of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann S. O’Malley MD, MPH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians vary widely in how they treat some health conditions, despite strong evidence favoring certain treatments over others. We examined physicians’ perspectives on factors that support or hinder evidence-based decisions and the implications for delivery systems, payers, and policymakers. Methods: We used Choosing Wisely ® recommendations to create four clinical vignettes for common types of decisions. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 36 specialists to identify factors that support or hinder evidence-based decisions. We examined these factors using a conceptual framework that includes six levels: patients, physicians, practice sites, organizations, networks and hospital affiliations, and the local market. In this model, population characteristics and payer and regulatory factors interact to influence decisions. Results: Patient openness to behavior modification and expectations, facilitated and hindered physicians in making evidence-based recommendations. Physicians’ communication skills were the most commonly mentioned facilitator. Practice site, organization, and hospital system barriers included measures of emergency department throughput, the order in which test options are listed in electronic health records (EHR, lack of relevant decision support in EHRs, and payment incentives that maximize billing and encourage procedures rather than medical management or counseling patients on behavior change. Factors from different levels interacted to undermine evidence-based care. Most physicians received billing feedback, but quality metrics on evidence-based service use were nonexistent for the four decisions in this study. Conclusions and Implications: Additional research and quality improvement may help to modify delivery systems to overcome barriers at multiple levels. Enhancing provider communication skills, improving decision support in EHRs, modifying workflows, and refining the design and interpretation of

  19. Through the steps of history: a report from the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) (June 16-19, 2010 - Rome, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X

    2010-10-01

    Rome is an open book to human history, and traveling from the city center to the Nuova Fiera da Roma, as most of this year's attendees to EULAR had to do to reach the congress site, is a voyage from the remains of the Roman Empire throughout the middle ages and across most of human history to the modern architecture that characterizes the new exposition facilities next to the airport of Fiumicino. EULAR offers a yearly development on therapies for diseases with a clear, direct negative impact on physical functioning of the sufferers, and this report will review most of the therapeutic novelties discussed this year. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  20. An Evidence-based Guideline for Pediatric Prehospital Seizure Management Using GRADE Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manish I; Macias, Charles G; Dayan, Peter S; Weik, Tasmeen S; Brown, Kathleen M; Fuchs, Susan M; Fallat, Mary E; Wright, Joseph L; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this guideline is to recommend evidence-based practices for timely prehospital pediatric seizure cessation while avoiding respiratory depression and seizure recurrence. A multidisciplinary panel was chosen based on expertise in pediatric emergency medicine, prehospital medicine, and/or evidence-based guideline development. The panel followed the National Prehospital EBG Model using the GRADE methodology to formulate questions, retrieve evidence, appraise the evidence, and formulate recommendations. The panel members initially searched the literature in 2009 and updated their searches in 2012. The panel finalized a draft of a patient care algorithm in 2012 that was presented to stakeholder organizations to gather feedback for necessary revisions. Five strong and ten weak recommendations emerged from the process; all but one was supported by low or very low quality evidence. The panel sought to ensure that the recommendations promoted timely seizure cessation while avoiding respiratory depression and seizure recurrence. The panel recommended that all patients in an active seizure have capillary blood glucose checked and be treated with intravenous (IV) dextrose or intramuscular (IM) glucagon if intranasal) of benzodiazepines (0.2 mg/kg) be used as first-line therapy for status epilepticus, rather than the rectal route. Using GRADE methodology, we have developed a pediatric seizure guideline that emphasizes the role of capillary blood glucometry and the use of buccal, IM, or intranasal benzodiazepines over IV or rectal routes. Future research is needed to compare the effectiveness and safety of these medication routes.

  1. Evidence-based guidelines for the nutritional management of adult kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Maria; Patwardhan, Aditi; Ryan, Catherine; Trevillian, Paul; Chadban, Steven; Westgarth, Fidye; Fry, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The present article summarizes the key recommendations of the evidence-based guidelines developed for the nutritional management of adult kidney transplant recipients. Nutrition interventions play an important role in preventing and managing common health problems associated with renal transplantation such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Two sets of guidelines were developed by a working group of renal dietitians and nephrologists. They were subject to expert panel review, and public consultation by renal clinicians and consumers before final endorsement by 2 authorities in Australia--Caring for Australasians with Renal Impairment (CARI) and Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA). Protocol and rigor of guideline development were previously described and published in the Journal of Renal Nutrition, 2009. These guidelines address 13 priority topics identified by the renal community and complement each other with different emphasis, from research translation to day to day clinical practice recommendations. The published guidelines are available to the public through web-access of CARI and DAA, and journal publications. Information includes the guidelines themselves with level of evidence stated, grading of recommendations, suggestions for clinical care, search strategy, background and summary of evidence, recommendations of other guidelines, practice recommendations, appendices of useful tools, and suggestions for audits and future research. Two sets of comprehensive evidence-based nutrition guidelines from CARI and DAA are now available to help improve health outcomes of adult kidney transplant recipients. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence-based guideline update: Plasmapheresis in neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, I.; Chaudhry, V.; So, Y.T.; Cantor, F.; Cornblath, D.R.; Rae-Grant, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To reassess the role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Methods: We evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review for relevant articles from 1995 through September 2009. In addition, due to revision of the definitions of classification of evidence since the publication of the previous American Academy of Neurology assessment in 1996, the evidence cited in that manuscript was reviewed and reclassified. Results and Recommendations: Plasmapheresis is established as effective and should be offered in severe acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP)/Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and in the short-term management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is established as ineffective and should not be offered for chronic or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is probably effective and should be considered for mild AIDP/GBS, as second-line treatment of steroid-resistant exacerbations in relapsing forms of MS, and for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin A or immunoglobulin G gammopathy, based on at least one Class I or 2 Class II studies (Level B). Plasmapheresis is probably not effective and should not be considered for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin M gammopathy, based on one Class I study (Level B). Plasmapheresis is possibly effective and may be considered for acute fulminant demyelinating CNS disease (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of plasmapheresis for myasthenia gravis, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infection, and Sydenham chorea (Class III evidence, Level U). PMID:21242498

  3. The development of evidence-based prehospital guidelines using a GRADE-based methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen M; Macias, Charles G; Dayan, Peter S; Shah, Manish I; Weik, Tasmeen S; Wright, Joseph L; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    The burgeoning literature in prehospital care creates an opportunity to improve care through evidence-based guidelines (EBGs). Previously, an established process for the creation of such guidelines and adoption and implementation at the local level was lacking. This has led to great variability in the content of prehospital protocols in different jurisdictions across the globe. Recently the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) and the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC) approved a National Prehospital Evidence-based Guideline Model Process for the development, implementation, and evaluation of EBGs. The Model Process recommends the use of established guideline development tools such as Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Objective. To describe the process of development of three prehospital EBGs using the National Prehospital EBG Model Process (EBG Model Process) and the GRADE EBG development tool. We conducted three unique iterations of the EBG Model Process utilizing the GRADE EBG development tool. The process involved 6 distinct and essential steps, including 1) assembling the expert panel and providing GRADE training; 2) defining the evidence-based guideline (EBG) content area and establishing the specific clinical questions to address in patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) format; 3) prioritizing outcomes to facilitate systematic literature searches; 4) creating GRADE tables, or evidence profiles, for each PICO question; 5) vetting and endorsing GRADE evidence tables and drafting recommendations; and 6) synthesizing recommendations into an EMS protocol and visual algorithm. Feedback and suggestions for improvement were solicited from participants and relevant stakeholders in the process. We successfully used the process to create three separate prehospital evidence-based guidelines, formatted into decision tree algorithms with levels of evidence and graded

  4. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.

  5. Organizational change tactics: the evidence base in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Thomas; Shih, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Planned organizational change processes can be used to address the many challenges facing human service organizations (HSOs) and improve organizational outcomes. There is massive literature on organizational change, ranging from popular management books to academic research on specific aspects of change. Regarding HSOs, there is a growing literature, including increasing attention to implementation science and evidence-based practices. However, research which offers generalizable, evidence-based guidelines for implementing change is not common. The purpose of the authors was to assess the evidence base in this organizational change literature to lay the groundwork for more systematic knowledge development in this important field.

  6. Evidence-based health care: A roadmap for knowledge translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yu Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based health care informs clinicians of choices regarding the most effective care based on the best available research evidence. However, concepts or instruments of evidence-based medicine are still fragmented for most clinicians. Substantial gaps between evidence and clinical practice remain. A knowledge translation roadmap may help clinicians to improve the quality of care by integration of various concepts in evidence-based health care. Improving research transparency and accuracy, conducting an updated systematic review, and shared decision making are the key points to diminish the gaps between research and practice.

  7. The Outcomes Movement and Evidence Based Medicine in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Evan.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Evidence based medicine is analyzed from its inception. The authors take the reader through the early formation of ‘scientific medicine’ that has evolved into the multi-purpose tool it has become today. Early proponents and their intentions that sparked evidence base and outcomes are presented: the work of David Sackett, Brian Haynes, Peter Tugwell, and Victor Neufeld is discussed - how they perceived the need for better clinical outcomes that led to a more formalized evidence based practice. The fundamentals are discussed objectively in detail and potential flaws are presented that guide the reader to deeper comprehension. PMID:23506764

  8. Integration of evidence-based knowledge management in microsystems: a tele-ICU experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Teresa A

    2012-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's proposed 6 aims to improve health care are timely, safe, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered care. Unfortunately, it also asserts that improvements in these 6 dimensions cannot be achieved within the existing framework of care systems. These systems are based on unrealistic expectations on human cognition and vigilance, and demonstrate a lack of dependence on computerized systems to support care processes and put information at the point of use. Knowledge-based care and evidence-based clinical decision-making need to replace the unscientific care that is being delivered in health care. Building care practices on evidence within an information technology platform is needed to support sound clinical decision-making and to influence organizational adoption of evidence-based practice in health care. Despite medical advances and evidence-based recommendations for treatment of severe sepsis, it remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. It is a complex disease state that has proven difficult to define, diagnose, and treat. Supporting bedside teams with real-time knowledge and expertise to target early identification of severe sepsis and compliance to Surviving Sepsis Campaign, evidence-based practice bundles are important to improving outcomes. Using a centralized, remote team of expert nurses and an open-source software application to advance clinical decision-making and execution of the severe sepsis bundle will be examined.

  9. An Evidence-Based Medicine Approach to Antihyperglycemic Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus to Overcome Overtreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makam, Anil N; Nguyen, Oanh K

    2017-01-10

    Overtreatment is pervasive in medicine and leads to potential patient harms and excessive costs in health care. Although evidence-based medicine is often derided as practice by rote algorithmic medicine, the appropriate application of key evidence-based medicine principles in clinical decision making is fundamental to preventing overtreatment and promoting high-value, individualized patient-centered care. Specifically, this article discusses the importance of (1) using absolute rather than relative estimates of benefits to inform treatment decisions; (2) considering the time horizon to benefit of treatments; (3) balancing potential harms and benefits; and (4) using shared decision making by physicians to incorporate the patient's values and preferences into treatment decisions. Here, we illustrate the application of these principles to considering the decision of whether or not to recommend intensive glycemic control to patients to minimize microvascular and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Through this lens, this example will illustrate how an evidence-based medicine approach can be used to individualize glycemic goals and prevent overtreatment, and can serve as a template for applying evidence-based medicine to inform treatment decisions for other conditions to optimize health and individualize patient care. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  11. Role of erosions typical of rheumatoid arthritis in the 2010 ACR/EULAR rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria: results from a very early arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Gina Hetland; Norli, Ellen S; Bøyesen, Pernille; van der Heijde, Désirée; Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Nygaard, Halvor; Bjørneboe, Olav; Thunem, Cathrine; Kvien, Tore K; Mjaavatten, Maria D; Lie, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    To determine how the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) definition of erosive disease (erosion criterion) contributes to the number of patients classified as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/EULAR RA classification criteria (2010 RA criteria) in an early arthritis cohort. Patients from the observational study Norwegian Very Early Arthritis Clinic with joint swelling ≤16 weeks, a clinical diagnosis of RA or undifferentiated arthritis, and radiographs of hands and feet were included. Erosive disease was defined according to the EULAR definition accompanying the 2010 RA criteria. We calculated the additional number of patients being classified as RA based on the erosion criteria at baseline and during follow-up. Of the 289 included patients, 120 (41.5%) fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria, whereas 15 (5.2%) fulfilled only the erosion criterion at baseline. 118 patients had radiographic follow-up at 2 years, of whom 6.8% fulfilled the 2010 RA criteria and only one patient fulfilled solely the erosion criterion during follow-up. Few patients with early arthritis were classified as RA based on solely the erosion criteria, and of those who did almost all did so at baseline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Variants of genes implicated in type 1 interferon pathway and B-cell activation modulate the EULAR response to rituximab at 24 weeks in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juge, Pierre-Antoine; Gazal, Steven; Constantin, Arnaud; Mariette, Xavier; Combe, Bernard; Tebib, Jacques; Dougados, Maxime; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loet, Xavier; Dieudé, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The type 1 interferon (IFN) pathway has been identified to potentially affect the response to rituximab (RTX) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which suggests the contribution of type 1 IFN pathway genes such as IFN regulatory factor 5 and 7 (IRF5 and IRF7), tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and osteopontin (SPP1). Our objective was to study functional variants of these IFN pathway genes as predictors of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response to RTX for RA at week 24 (W24). Logistic regression analysis with a stepwise multivariate model adjusted for sex, age and DAS28-CRP (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints with C reactive protein) in 115 patients from the SMART randomised studywas used to analyse the association between the candidate variants and W24 EULAR response. Because the variant TNFSF13B rs9514828 was previously found associated with RTX response in the same population, it was included in the analysis. The combination of IRF5 rs2004640, SPP1 rs9138 and TNFSF13B rs9514828 was strongly associated with good/moderate EULAR response to RTX at W24: p=9.34×10(-6), OR 11.37 (95% CI 4.03 to 35.28), positive predictive value 91% and negative predictive value 54%. Our results support the contribution of the IRF5, SPP1 and TNFSF13B genotypic combination in the response to RTX for RA at W24.

  13. An evidence-based guideline for children presenting with acute breathing difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhanpaul, M; MacFaul, R; Werneke, U; Armon, K; Hemingway, P; Stephenson, T

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an evidence-based guideline for use primarily by junior clinicians to assist with the management of children presenting to the hospital with an acute breathing difficulty. An overview of the literature provided a framework of clinical questions for the management of a child with an acute breathing difficulty on which to base a systematic literature review. Relevant articles were appraised by the research fellow and graded according to their quality. A national panel of 50 clinicians was provided, by post, with the clinical questions, research papers, appraisals and the grades of recommendations generated. They were asked to check the grades allocated to the recommendations and the accuracy of the language used. They were also provided with all the clinical questions for which there was insufficient evidence to reach a conclusion but for which a consensus recommendation was required. A Delphi method was used to formalise the consensus process. For all recommendations, panel members were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-9-point Likert scale. The results of the first round were fed back, and appropriate alterations to the recommendations made or additional recommendations included. The process of rating was repeated, and the final guideline was developed based on the consensus reached. Following two iterative rounds, the guideline was completed as a full technical document, with a series of key recommendations and an algorithm. It was based on 10 grade A (evidence from systematic review or meta-analyses), 5 grade B, 17 grade C and 31 grade D (consensus or expert opinion) recommendations. We have developed an evidence-based guideline that has subsequently been successfully implemented in the paediatric emergency departments and disseminated nationally. Results showing the effect of the guideline upon practice will be published separately.

  14. Cholecystectomy for uncomplicated gallbladder stones does not follow evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Benjamin; Ellebæk, Mark B.; Dorfelt, Allan

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy was followed by a steep increase in the cholecystectomy rate, which has remained on an unchanged, high level. The main indication for cholecystectomy in Denmark in cases with uncomplicated gallbladder stones is socially debilitating p...

  15. Bidirectional Glenn With Additional Pulmonary Blood Flow: Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdullah A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this report was to review the exiting literature to date to inform clinical decision-making regarding the additional pulmonary blood flow at the time of bidirectional Glenn procedure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 5 Evidence-Based Recommendations for Teaching Math to Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Children have a natural interest in math, and the "Teaching Math to Young Children" practice guide (ED544376) aims to help teachers capitalize on that interest to make children's preschool and school experience more engaging and beneficial. In this practice guide summary, readers will find: (1) An overview of the guide's five…

  17. Online information on complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients: evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Jutta; Senf, Bianca; Micke, Oliver; Muecke, Ralph; Stoll, Christoph; Prott, Franz J; Muenstedt, Karsten; Dennert, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Many cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Most websites offering online information on CAM are not helpful for them. We extracted decisive elements for online information on CAM by analyzing the literature on the information needs of cancer patients and on counseling cancer patients on CAM. Key issues for online information on CAM are the qualification of the authors, transparency and accountability of the information, description of the aims, a scientific approach, description of treatment alternatives, support for the patient-physician relationship, individualized information, a summary of the information, disclosure of funding, and the privacy policy. The communicative challenge will be to convey information without destroying hope and motivation. We suggest that CAM topics should be integrated into broader information provided on cancer (etiology, conventional treatment). By also providing information for physicians, such a website could promote shared decision-making. Online information will gain the status of independent expert knowledge if provided by a well-known scientific organization as, e.g., a national cancer society. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Supporting Evidence-Based Policy on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: Recommendations for Effective Policy Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balian, Estelle V.; Drius, Liza; Eggermont, Hilde; Livoreil, Barbara; Vandewalle, Marie; Vandewoestjine, Sofie; Wittmer, Heidi; Young, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge brokerage on biodiversity and ecosystem services can apply communication tools such as policy briefs to facilitate the dialogue between scientists and policymakers. There is currently considerable debate on how to go beyond the linear communication model, outdated in theoretical debate but still often implicitly leading interaction with…

  19. Evidence-Based Technology Design and Commercialisation: Recommendations Derived from Research in Education and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Watson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of mobile technologies and apps raises questions for researchers in the field of educational technology. Many apps are marketed as having impact on learning or therapeutic outcome in populations with additional support needs. This paper briefly outlines three possible academic responses to the rise of therapeutic technologies for…

  20. Promoting self-management and adherence during prophylaxis : evidence-based recommendations for haemophilia professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijvers, L. H.; Schuurmans, M. J.; Fischer, K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Throughout life, a patient with severe haemophilia is confronted with many treatment-related challenges. Insight into self-management and non-adherence could improve the quality of care for these patients. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the current evidence on

  1. Seeing better - Evidence based recommendations on optimizing colonoscopy adenoma detection rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Hernández, Javier; Hwang, Jason; Kandel, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the three most frequent causes of cancer deaths in men and women in Europe and North America. Diagnosis and resection of adenomas has convincingly demonstrated its utility in diminishing colorectal cancer incidence. Therefore, colonoscopy is now the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening. But it is also known that colonoscopy effectiveness varies among endoscopists. Among different quality indicators, the most used is the adenoma detection rate (ADR) which is the percentage of average-risk patients for colorectal cancer who are found to have at least one adenoma or adenocarcinoma during a screening colonoscopy. There is compelling evidence supporting an inverse correlation between ADR and interval colorectal cancer (cancer found after a screening colonoscopy). Many factors such as quality of precolonoscopy preparation, additional observers, manoeuvres with the endoscope (second view, retroflexion, water inflation rather than air), time spent during withdrawal, changes in patient position, fold-flattener devices, new imaging or endoscopic modalities and use of intravenous or through the scope sprayed drugs, have been studied and developed with the aim of increasing the ADR. This reviews discusses these factors, and the current evidence, to “see better” in the colon and optimize ADR. PMID:26855536

  2. Evidence-based recommendations on the use of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosselin, Sophie; Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Hoffman, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) was first used to treat life-threatening local anesthetic (LA) toxicity, its use has expanded to include both non-local anesthetic (non-LA) poisoning and less severe manifestations of toxicity. A collaborative workgroup appraised the literatur...

  3. Evidence-Based Assessment of Child Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Recommendations for Clinical Practice and Treatment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Adam B.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) presents heterogeneously and can be difficult to assess in youth. This review focuses on research-supported assessment approaches for OCD in childhood. Content areas include pre-visit screening, diagnostic establishment, differential diagnosis, assessment of comorbid psychiatric conditions, tracking symptom…

  4. EOD Warrior Athlete Working Group: Recommendations for an Evidence-Based, Forcewide, EOD Warrior Athlete Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-12

    screen scientifically evaluates sleep health via self-report, actigraphy, and/or new emerging mobile sleep monitoring technologies (e.g., smart ... textile shirt). In the short term, sleep disturbances leads to myriad negative cognitive and physiological consequences. Furthermore, long-term sleep

  5. Clinical Practice: evidence-Based Recommendations for the Treatment of Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; van den Dool, Joost; Balash, Yacov; Bhatia, Kailash; Giladi, Nir; Koelman, Johannes H.; Lokkegaard, Annemette; Marti, Maria J.; Postma, Miranda; Relja, Maja; Skorvanek, Matej; Speelman, Johannes D.; Zoons, Evelien; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; Vidailhet, Marie; Albanese, Alberto; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Cervical dystonia (CD) is the most frequent form of focal dystonia. Symptoms often result in pain and functional disability. Local injections of botulinum neurotoxin are currently the treatment of choice for CD. Although this treatment has proven effective and is widely applied worldwide, many

  6. Evidence-based clinical guidelines in Kyrgyz Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdinova, A A

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care in many countries is one of the priorities of health systems. At the same time one of the most important methods of improving quality of care is the widespread use of methods and principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) [1]. The implementation of EBM in public health practice provides for the optimization of quality of care in terms of safety, efficacy and cost, one way of which is the use of clinical guidelines. Clinical guidelines developed with the use of EBM, provide an opportunity to use the latest and accurate information to optimize or neutralize impact on physician decision-making of subjective factors such as intuition, expertise, opinion of respected colleagues, recommendations of popular manuals and handbooks, etc. To assess and analyze the developed clinical guidelines (CG) and protocols (CP) in the Kyrgyz Republic in the period from 2008 to 2014 and evaluate their implementation in practical healthcare. Retrospective analysis of the developed clinical guidelines and protocols according to the approved methodology, interviewing leaders, questioning doctors and patients for their implementation. All participants gave informed consent for voluntary participation in the study. Within the framework of the National Program "Manas Taalimi" "Strategy for development of evidence-based medicine in the Kyrgyz Republic for 2006-2010" (MOH Order №490 from 09.04.06) was developed and approved for use. Its main purpose was to create a sustainable system of development, deployment and monitoring of the CG and CP and further promotion of EBM into practical health care, education and science. As a result, a number of documents ("Expert Council for assessing the quality of clinical guidelines/protocols", "AGREE instrument to assess the methodological content of clinical guidelines" [2], "The methodology of development and adaptation of clinical guidelines based on evidence-based medicine") were approved by the Order of the Ministry of

  7. Principles of evidence-based dental practice (EBDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Hoda; Dechow, Paul C; Jones, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to improve patient care, there has been a growing trend across the nation and the world to embed the principles of evidence-based dentistry into mainstream care delivery by private practicing dentists. Evidence-based dentistry is an essential tool that is used to improve the quality of care and to reduce the gap between what we know, what is possible, and what we do. An evidence-based health care practice is one that includes the decision maker's ability to find, assess, and incorporate high-quality, valid information in diagnosis and treatment. The evidence is considered in conjunction with the clinician's experience and judgment, and the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances. This article introduces the basic skills of evidence-based dentistry. Their practice requires a discipline of lifelong learning in which recent and relevant scientific evidence are translated into practical clinical applications.

  8. 3. Neurological & Psychiatric Society of Zambia's Evidence-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ”. No evidence provided. Not evidence-based and impractical for a resource .... European Federation of. Neurological Sciences. Task Force[18]. Non-acute headache. EEG is not routinely indicated in the diagnostic evaluation of headache.

  9. Evidence-based Medicine Search: a customizable federated search engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bracke, Paul J; Howse, David K; Keim, Samuel M

    2008-01-01

    ...) health sciences programs and to the University Medical Center. Librarians at AHSL collaborated with UA College of Medicine faculty to create an innovative search engine, Evidence-based Medicine (EBM...

  10. Evidence-based Practice in libraries - Principles and discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2012-01-01

    The article examines problems concerning the introduction and future implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in libraries. It includes important conceptual distinctions and definitions, and it reviews the more controversial aspects of EBP, primarely based on experiences from Denmark...

  11. The ethical approach to evidence-based medicine | Kruger | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper will explore the role of evidence-based medicine in ethical practice of health care professionals. It will also address some of its limitations and potential for negative impact on health care.

  12. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based

  13. Evidence Searching for Evidence-based Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzon, Louise; Davidson, Karina W.; Bruns, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased awareness of evidence-based methodology among psychologists, but little exists in the literature about how to access the research. Moreover, the prohibitive cost of this information combined with limited time are barriers to the identification of evidence to answer clinical questions. This article presents an example of a question worked though in an evidence-based way. Methods are highlighted, including distinguishing background and foreground questions, breaking down questions into searchable statements, and adapting statements to suit both the question being asked and the resource being searched. A number of free, evidence-based resources are listed. Knowing how and where to access this information will enable practitioners to more easily use an evidence-based approach to their practice. PMID:21503266

  14. Mind the Gap: Looking for Evidence-Based Practice of Science Literacy for All in Science Teaching Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Susan L.; Yore, Larry D.

    2012-10-01

    Science literacy for all is the central goal of science education reforms, and there is a growing importance of the language arts in science. Furthermore, there are strong calls for teacher professionalism and self-directed professional learning that involve evidence-based best practices. This raises questions about whether science teaching journals' recommendations are anchored to high-quality evidence. We found that (a) most National Science Teacher Association journals' science literacy recommendations have weak or no evidence base and (b) those with evidence reference teaching journals, teacher resource books, and literacy education more often than science education research. We concluded that all participants in the knowledge production cycle and transfer process—authors, editors, and reviewers—need to encourage evidence-based practices anchored to ongoing reforms and to literacy and science education research.

  15. Evidence Based Nursing. A new perspective for Greek Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Ouzouni; Konstantinos Nakakis

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that nursing research has been developed in Greece, nevertheless the provision of nursing care is not based on current research findings, but rather on the knowledge gained by nurses during their undergraduate education. The transition of medicine in the last decade towards evidence based practice had definitely an impact on the nursing profession.The aim of this article is to briefly present evidence based nursing as a process and perspective to Greek nurses.Method: A litera...

  16. Evidence-based management of pain after haemorrhoidectomy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, G P; Neugebauer, E A M; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Haemorrhoidectomy is associated with intense postoperative pain, but optimal evidence-based pain therapy has not been described. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available literature on the management of pain after haemorrhoidal surgery.......Haemorrhoidectomy is associated with intense postoperative pain, but optimal evidence-based pain therapy has not been described. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available literature on the management of pain after haemorrhoidal surgery....

  17. Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Robin P; Dearholt, Sandi; Poe, Stephanie; Pugh, Linda C; White, Kathleen M

    2007-12-01

    Evidence-based practice, a crucial competency for healthcare providers and a basic force in Magnet hospitals, results in better patient outcomes. The authors describe the strategic approach to support the maturation of The Johns Hopkins Nursing evidence-based practice model through providing leadership, setting expectations, establishing structure, building skills, and allocating human and material resources as well as incorporating the model and tools into undergraduate and graduate education at the affiliated university.

  18. Evidence Based Medicine in Pediatric Practice: Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianifar, Hamid-Reza; Akhondian, Javad; Najafi-Sani, Mehri; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Practicing medicine according to the best evidence is gaining popularity in the medical societies. Although this concept, which is usually called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) has been explained in many resources, it has not been addressed enough in pediatrics. In this review, we briefly explained Evidence Based Medicine approach and its applications in pediatrics in order to help the pediatricians to efficiently integrate EBM into their daily practice. PMID:23056715

  19. Embedding trials in evidence-based clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Rengerink, K

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of research projects centred on ‘evidence-based medicine’. It consists of two parts. Part 1 focuses on improving recruitment of the necessary number of patients in clinical trials, as this is the major problem while evaluating the effectiveness of interventions in health care. To improve our understanding of patient recruitment we tried to identify obstacles and facilitators for successful recruitment. Part 2 focuses on improving integration of evidence-based dec...

  20. Evidence Searching for Evidence-based Psychology Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Falzon, Louise; Davidson, Karina W.; Bruns, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased awareness of evidence-based methodology among psychologists, but little exists in the literature about how to access the research. Moreover, the prohibitive cost of this information combined with limited time are barriers to the identification of evidence to answer clinical questions. This article presents an example of a question worked though in an evidence-based way. Methods are highlighted, including distinguishing background and foreground questions, breaking down q...

  1. Clarification and Elaboration on Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Goodheart, Carol D.; Levant, Ronald F.

    2007-01-01

    Responds to comments by D. C. Wendt and B. D. Slife (see record 2007-13085-019), P. H. Hunsberger (see record 2007-13085-020), and R. B. Stuart and S. O. Lilienfeld (see record 2007-13085-021) regarding the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in…

  2. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, D Scott; Hwang, Steven W; Easa, John E; Resnick, Daniel K; Baisden, Jamie L; Bess, Shay; Cho, Charles H; DePalma, Michael J; Dougherty, Paul; Fernand, Robert; Ghiselli, Gary; Hanna, Amgad S; Lamer, Tim; Lisi, Anthony J; Mazanec, Daniel J; Meagher, Richard J; Nucci, Robert C; Patel, Rakesh D; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Sharma, Anil K; Summers, Jeffrey T; Taleghani, Christopher K; Tontz, William L; Toton, John F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy is to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. The guideline is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of July 2011. The goals of the guideline recommendations are to assist in delivering optimum efficacious treatment and functional recovery from this spinal disorder. To provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists in the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This guideline is a product of the Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group consisted of multidisciplinary spine care specialists trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English-language references found in Medline, Embase (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional evidence-based databases to identify articles. The relevant literature was then independently rated using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final recommendations to answer each clinical question were developed via work group discussion, and grades were assigned to the recommendations using standardized grades of recommendation. In the absence of Level I to IV evidence, work group consensus statements have been developed using a modified nominal group technique, and these statements are clearly identified as such in the guideline

  3. Evidence-based programs registry: blueprints for Healthy Youth Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalic, Sharon F; Elliott, Delbert S

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing demand for evidence-based programs to promote healthy youth development, but this growth has been accompanied by confusion related to varying definitions of evidence-based and mixed messages regarding which programs can claim this designation. The registries that identify evidence-based programs, while intended to help users sift through the findings and claims regarding programs, has oftentimes led to more confusion with their differing standards and program ratings. The advantages of using evidence-based programs and the importance of adopting a high standard of evidence, especially when taking programs to scale,are described. One evidence-based registry is highlighted--Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development hosted at the University of Colorado Boulder. Unlike any previous initiative of its kind, Blueprints established unmatched standards for identifying evidence-based programs and has acted in a way similar to the FDA--evaluating evidence, data and research to determine which programs meet their high standard of proven efficacy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Is there consensus across international evidence-based guidelines for the management of bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G B; Graham, R K; Tavella, G

    2017-06-01

    To examine the level of agreement across professionally auspiced evidence-based guidelines for managing the bipolar disorders. A literature search in PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PsycInfo was undertaken using the search terms 'bipolar disorder' and 'guidelines', generating 11 evidence-based guidelines published by professional organisations over the 2002-2015 period. Each guideline was reviewed by two independent reviewers and key themes extracted via qualitative analyses. There was agreement on issues such as the first-line treatment of mania where mood-stabilising and/or an antipsychotic medication together with tapering or ceasing antidepressant medications was most commonly recommended. Differences included the extent to which (i) the different bipolar disorders were defined or not, (ii) there were separate recommendations for bipolar I and bipolar II disorders vs. non-differentiating general bipolar management strategies, (iii) 'general' vs. severity-based recommendations were made, and (iv) narrow vs. broad sets of candidate medications were nominated, while there was variable consideration of treatments such as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). While there was some consistency across guidelines on key recommendations, there was also substantial inconsistencies, limiting the generation of any 'meta-consensus' model for managing the bipolar disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Using the Dynamic Model to develop an evidence-based and theory-driven approach to school improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, B.P.M.; Kyriakides, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper refers to a dynamic perspective of educational effectiveness and improvement stressing the importance of using an evidence-based and theory-driven approach. Specifically, an approach to school improvement based on the dynamic model of educational effectiveness is offered. The recommended

  6. [Evidence-based medicine: can we trust the results of well-designed randomized trials?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, A; Benaglio, C

    2014-10-01

    Evidence based medicine assists in clinical decision-making by integrating critically appraised information with patient's values and preferences within an existing clinical context. A fundamental concept in this paradigm is the hierarchy of information. The randomized clinical trial is recognized as one of the designs that is less prone to bias and therefore of higher methodological quality. Clinical guidelines are one of the principal tools that evidence based medicine uses to transfer scientific information to clinical practice and many of their recommendations are based on these type of studies. In this review we present some of the limitations that the results can have, in even well designed and executed randomized clinical trials. We also discuss why valid results in these types of studies could not necessarily be extrapolated to the general population. Although the randomized clinical trial continues to be one of the best methodological designs, we suggest that the reader be careful when interpreting its results.

  7. Implementing evidence-based substance use prevention curricula with fidelity: the role of teacher training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Sean; Ringwalt, Chris; Vincus, Amy A; Ennett, Susan T; Bowling, J Michael; Haws, Susan W; Rohrbach, Louise A

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that teacher training affects the fidelity with which evidence-based substance use prevention curricula are implemented. We present the results of a 2005 survey of teachers from a nationally representative sample of 1721 public middle schools in the U.S. (78.1% response rate). We measured fidelity along two dimensions (adherence and dose) and also assessed the number of hours, recency, and perceived effectiveness of teachers' training, as well as the degree to which adherence was emphasized during training. Among teachers using evidence-based curricula, 35.3% reported following their curriculum guide very closely. The average proportion of lessons taught was 64.9%, and only 30.2% of teachers taught all the lessons in their curriculum. Analyses revealed that teachers whose training emphasized adherence were 5 times as likely to be more adherent. We present recommendations for training-related factors that may increase fidelity of implementation.

  8. Adaptive Practice: Next Generation Evidence-Based Practice in Digital Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice in nursing is considered foundational to safe, competent care. To date, rigid traditional perceptions of what constitutes 'evidence' have constrained the recognition and use of practice-based evidence and the exploitation of novel forms of evidence from data rich environments. Advancements such as the conceptualization of clinical intelligence, the prevalence of increasingly sophisticated digital health information systems, and the advancement of the Big Data phenomenon have converged to generate a new contemporary context. In today's dynamic data-rich environments, clinicians have new sources of valid evidence, and need a new paradigm supporting clinical practice that is adaptive to information generated by diverse electronic sources. This opinion paper presents adaptive practice as the next generation of evidence-based practice in contemporary evidence-rich environments and provides recommendations for the next phase of evolution.

  9. Parent ADHD and Evidence-Based Treatment for Their Children: Review and Directions for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Wang, Christine H; Woods, Kelsey E; Strickland, Jennifer; Stein, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    One fourth to one half of parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have ADHD themselves, complicating delivery of evidence-based child behavioral and pharmacological treatments. In this article, we review the literature examining the relation between parent ADHD and outcomes following behavioral and pharmacological treatments for children with ADHD. We also review research that has incorporated treatment of parent ADHD (either alone or in combination with child treatment) with the goal of improving parenting and child outcomes. Finally, we offer recommendations for future research on the relation between parent ADHD and evidence-based treatment outcomes for their children, with the purpose of advancing the science and informing clinical care of these families.

  10. A university and health care organization partnership to prepare nurses for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missal, Bernita; Schafer, Beth Kaiser; Halm, Margo A; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2010-08-01

    This article describes a partnership model between a university and health care organizations for teaching graduate nursing research from a framework of evidence-based practice. Nurses from health care organizations identified topics for graduate students to search the literature and synthesize evidence for guiding nursing practice. Nurse educators mentored graduate students in conducting critical appraisals of the literature. Students learned how to search for the evidence, summarize the existing research findings, and translate the findings into practice recommendations. Through presenting and discussing their findings with key stakeholders, students learned how nurses planned to integrate the evidence into practice. Nurses used the evidence-based results to improve their practice in the two partner hospitals. The partnership stimulated action for further inquiry into best practices.

  11. Twelve evidence-based principles for implementing self-management support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Malcolm; Von Korff, Michael; Schaefer, Judith; Davis, Connie; Ludman, Evette; Greene, Sarah M; Parkerton, Melissa; Wagner, Edward H

    2010-12-01

    Recommendations to improve self-management support and health outcomes for people with chronic conditions in primary care settings are provided on the basis of expert opinion supported by evidence for practices and processes. Practices and processes that could improve self-management support in primary care were identified through a nominal group process. In a targeted search strategy, reviews and meta-analyses were then identifed using terms from a wide range of chronic conditions and behavioral risk factors in combination with Self-Care, Self-Management, and Primary Care. On the basis of these reviews, evidence-based principles for self-management support were developed. The evidence is organized within the framework of the Chronic Care Model. Evidence-based principles in 12 areas were associated with improved patient self-management and/or health outcomes: (1) brief targeted assessment, (2) evidence-based information to guide shared decision-making, (3) use of a nonjudgmental approach, (4) collaborative priority and goal setting, (5) collaborative problem solving, (6) self-management support by diverse providers, (7) self-management interventions delivered by diverse formats, (8) patient self-efficacy, (9) active followup, (10) guideline-based case management for selected patients, (11) linkages to evidence-based community programs, and (12) multifaceted interventions. A framework is provided for implementing these principles in three phases of the primary care visit: enhanced previsit assessment, a focused clinical encounter, and expanded postvisit options. There is a growing evidence base for how self-management support for chronic conditions can be integrated into routine health care.

  12. Exploring the contribution of the Clinical Librarian to facilitating evidence-based nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, Angela M; Bond, Beverly; Leonard, Niamh; Gilsenan, Irene J; Palfreyman, Simon

    2007-04-01

    To examine the potential role of the Clinical Librarian in facilitating evidence-based practice of nurses in acute hospital settings and develop a model for the role. There is a growing policy and professional expectation that nurses will seek out and apply evidence in their clinical practice. Studies have demonstrated that nurses experience barriers in working with an evidence-based approach. The role of Clinical Librarian has been used in other countries and within medicine to overcome some of the barriers to evidence-based practice. There are limitations in the previous work in terms of rigour of evaluation, scope of the Clinical Librarian role and application to nursing in a UK setting. A qualitative consultation of 72 nurses in acute care settings. Six consultation group interviews of between 4-19 participants. Written records were recorded by the scribe. Content analysis was undertaken to identify the range and frequency of comments. Clinical questions currently go unanswered because of barriers of time, skills deficits and access to resources. Literature searching, skills training and evidence dissemination were the main areas of work the staff requested that a Clinical Librarian should undertake. It was anticipated that the Clinical Librarian could interact and work productively with nursing staff with a limited but regular presence on the ward. Interim communication could be via e-mail, phone and written suggestions and requests for work. It was seen to be vital that the Clinical Librarian worked in partnership with staff to build evidence-based practice capacity and ensure clinical relevance of the work. This study has generated the first model for the Clinical Librarian role with an emphasis on nursing. It is derived from the views of clinical nurses. Recommendations are made for the implementation and evaluation of such a role. The Clinical Librarian could be an invaluable support to promoting evidence-based nursing.

  13. Adapting HIV prevention evidence-based interventions in practice settings: an interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Uyen H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based interventions that are being delivered in real-world settings are adapted to enhance the external validity of these interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine multiple intervention adaptations made during pre-implementation, implementation, maintenance, and evolution phases of human immunodeficiency virus HIV prevention technology transfer. We examined two important categories of adaptations -- modifications to key characteristics, such as activities or delivery methods of interventions and reinvention of the interventions including addition and deletion of core elements. Methods Study participants were thirty-four community-based organization staff who were implementing evidence-based interventions in Los Angeles, California. Participants were interviewed twice and interviews were professionally transcribed. Transcriptions were coded by two coders with good inter-rater reliability (kappa coefficient = 0.73. Sixty-two open-ended codes for adaptation activities, which were linked to 229 transcript segments, were categorized as modifications of key characteristics or reinvention. Results Participants described activities considered modifications to key characteristics and reinvention of evidence-based interventions during pre-implementation, implementation, and maintenance phases. None of the participants reported accessing technical assistance or guidance when reinventing their interventions. Staff executed many of the recommended steps for sound adaptation of these interventions for new populations and settings. Conclusion Staff reported modifying and reinventing interventions when translating HIV prevention programs into practice. Targeted technical assistance for formative evaluation should be focused on the pre-implementation phase during which frequent modifications occur. Continuous or repeated measurements of fidelity are recommended. Increased technical assistance and guidance are needed to

  14. Adapting HIV prevention evidence-based interventions in practice settings: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veniegas, Rosemary C; Kao, Uyen H; Rosales, Ricki

    2009-11-23

    Evidence-based interventions that are being delivered in real-world settings are adapted to enhance the external validity of these interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine multiple intervention adaptations made during pre-implementation, implementation, maintenance, and evolution phases of human immunodeficiency virus HIV prevention technology transfer. We examined two important categories of adaptations -- modifications to key characteristics, such as activities or delivery methods of interventions and reinvention of the interventions including addition and deletion of core elements. Study participants were thirty-four community-based organization staff who were implementing evidence-based interventions in Los Angeles, California. Participants were interviewed twice and interviews were professionally transcribed. Transcriptions were coded by two coders with good inter-rater reliability (kappa coefficient = 0.73). Sixty-two open-ended codes for adaptation activities, which were linked to 229 transcript segments, were categorized as modifications of key characteristics or reinvention. Participants described activities considered modifications to key characteristics and reinvention of evidence-based interventions during pre-implementation, implementation, and maintenance phases. None of the participants reported accessing technical assistance or guidance when reinventing their interventions. Staff executed many of the recommended steps for sound adaptation of these interventions for new populations and settings. Staff reported modifying and reinventing interventions when translating HIV prevention programs into practice. Targeted technical assistance for formative evaluation should be focused on the pre-implementation phase during which frequent modifications occur. Continuous or repeated measurements of fidelity are recommended. Increased technical assistance and guidance are needed to ensure that reinventions are evaluated and consistent with the

  15. Peer-teaching of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot; Sinha, Yashashwi; Chitnis, Abhishek; Archer, James; Fotheringham, Victoria; Renwick, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Many medical schools teach the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) as part of their undergraduate curriculum. Medical students perceive that EBM is valuable to their undergraduate and postgraduate career. Students may experience barriers to applying EBM principles, especially when searching for evidence or identifying high-quality resources. The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Evidence Search is a service that enables access to authoritative clinical and non-clinical evidence and best practice through a web-based portal. Evidence-based medicine workshops were organised and delivered by fourth-year medical students, having first received training from NICE to become NICE student champions. The workshops covered the basic principles of EBM and focused on retrieving EBM resources for study through the NICE Evidence Search portal. The scheme was evaluated using a pre-workshop survey and an 8-12 week post-workshop survey. Self-reported confidence in searching for evidence-based resources increased from 29 per cent before the workshop to 87 per cent after the workshop. Only 1 per cent of students rated evidence-based resources as their first preference pre-workshop, compared with 31 per cent post-workshop. The results show that although many students were aware of evidence-based resources, they tended not to use them as their preferred resource. Despite appreciating the value of evidence-based resources, few students were confident in accessing and using such resources for pre-clinical study. A peer-taught workshop in EBM improved students' confidence with, and use of, evidence-based resources. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Guideline summary review: an evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, D Scott; Baisden, Jamie; Mazanec, Daniel J; Patel, Rakesh D; Bess, Robert S; Burton, Douglas; Chutkan, Norman B; Cohen, Bernard A; Crawford, Charles H; Ghiselli, Gary; Hanna, Amgad S; Hwang, Steven W; Kilincer, Cumhur; Myers, Mark E; Park, Paul; Rosolowski, Karie A; Sharma, Anil K; Taleghani, Christopher K; Trammell, Terry R; Vo, Andrew N; Williams, Keith D

    2016-12-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis features evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating adult patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis. The guideline is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of June 2013. NASS' guideline on this topic is the only guideline on adult isthmic spondylolisthesis accepted in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's National Guideline Clearinghouse. The purpose of the guideline is to provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists when making clinical decisions for adult patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis. This article provides a brief summary of the evidence-based guideline recommendations for diagnosing and treating patients with this condition. This is a guideline summary review. This guideline is the product of the Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline Development Committee. The methods used to develop this guideline are detailed in the complete guideline and technical report available on the NASS website. In brief, a multidisciplinary work group of spine care specialists convened to identify clinical questionsto address in the guideline. The literature search strategy was developed in consultation with medical librarians. Upon completion of the systematic literature search, evidence relevant to the clinical questions posed in the guideline was reviewed. Work group members utilized NASS evidentiary table templates to summarize study conclusions, identify study strengths and weaknesses, and assign levels of evidence. Work group members participated in webcasts and in-person recommendation meetings to update and formulate evidence-based recommendations and incorporate expert opinion when

  17. [An evidence based Iberic-Latin American guideline for acute gastroenteritis management in infants and prescholars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Castrellón, P; Polanco Allué, I; Salazar Lindo, E

    2010-03-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) morbidity and mortality rates in infants and prescholars continue to be high in developing countries. Authors want to develop an evidence-based document that supports decision making regarding AG therapy in infants and children younger than 5 y/o. A systematic review of the literature was performed (May, 2008). Evidence grading was established according to Oxford guidelines and Latin American experts submitted their opinions on the recommendations generated. Oral rehydration solutions are the threatment's keystone for children with AG, showing lesser complications due to therapy than IV fluids. AG is no contraindication of a normal diet. Racecadotril, zinc and smectite can contribute to AG treatment, as well as Lactobacillus GG and Saccharomycces boulardii. No other drugs are recommended. It is recommended to treat children presenting AG with oral rehydration solutions among racecadotril, zinc or smectite as well as some probiotics. 2010. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  18. Mentoring of young professionals in the field of rheumatology in Europe: results from an EMerging EUlar NETwork (EMEUNET) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Hatemi, Gulen; Ospelt, Caroline; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Mandl, Peter; Gossec, Laure; Buch, Maya H

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions of, participation in and satisfaction with mentoring programmes among young clinicians and researchers in rheumatology in Europe. To identify mentoring needs and expectations focusing on gender-specific differences. A survey on mentoring in rheumatology was distributed to young clinicians and researchers in rheumatology in Europe through the EMEUNET network. We received 248 responses from 30 European countries. Although 82% of respondents expressed the need for a formal mentoring scheme by EULAR, only 35% participated in mentoring programmes and merely 20% were very satisfied with mentoring. Respondents very satisfied with mentoring were more likely to participate in research, but not clinical mentoring programmes. Career mentoring was perceived as the most beneficial type of mentoring for career development by 46% of respondents, only 35% of respondents, however, declared the existence of career mentoring programmes in their country. There was no gender difference considering participation in mentoring programmes. Women, however, tended to be less satisfied than men with existing mentoring programmes and considered expectations from mentoring as more important for their career development, especially when pertaining to career planning, greater autonomy/responsibility and establishing new networks/collaborations. Career mentoring, especially in the clinical setting, was recognised as a major unmet need of existing mentoring programmes in rheumatology in Europe. Gender-specific differences were identified in the expectations from mentoring. Given this and the importance of mentoring for career prosperity of young physicians and scientists, our survey represents the first step towards developing and refining mentoring programmes in rheumatology in Europe.

  19. Barriers and facilitators in the implementation of recommendations for hand eczema prevention among healthcare workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, E.W. van der; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Dongen, D. van; Boot, C.R.; Anema, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based recommendations are available for the prevention of hand eczema among healthcare workers. However, the implementation of these recommendations is not always successful. OBJECTIVES: To identify barriers and facilitators in the implementation of recommendations for the

  20. Barriers to evidence-based medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has emerged as an effective strategy to improve health care quality. The aim of this study was to systematically review and carry out an analysis on the barriers to EBM. Different database searching methods and also manual search were employed in this study using the search words ('evidence-based' or 'evidence-based medicine' or 'evidence-based practice' or 'evidence-based guidelines' or 'research utilization') and (barrier* or challenge or hinder) in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane library, Pro Quest, Magiran, SID. Out of 2592 articles, 106 articles were finally identified for study. Research barriers, lack of resources, lack of time, inadequate skills, and inadequate access, lack of knowledge and financial barriers were found to be the most common barriers to EBM. Examples of these barriers were found in primary care, hospital/specialist care, rehabilitation care, medical education, management and decision making. The most common barriers to research utilization were research barriers, cooperation barriers and changing barriers. Lack of resources was the most common barrier to implementation of guidelines. The result of this study shows that there are many barriers to the implementation and use of EBM. Identifying barriers is just the first step to removing barriers to the use of EBM. Extra resources will be needed if these barriers are to be tackled. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Using Evidence-Based Design to Improve Pharmacy Department Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenroyd, Fraser L; Hayward, Rebecca; Price, Andrew; Demian, Peter; Sharma, Shrikant

    2016-10-01

    Using a case study of a pharmacy department rebuild in the South West of England, this article examines the use of evidence-based design to improve the efficiency and staff well-being with a new design. This article compares three designs, the current design, an anecdotal design, and an evidence-based design, to identify how evidence-based design can improve efficiency and staff well-being by reducing walking time and distance. Data were collected from the existing building and used to measure the efficiency of the department in its current state. These data were then mapped onto an anecdotal design, produced by architects from interviews and workshops with the end users, and an evidence-based design, produced by highlighting functions with high adjacencies. This changed the view on the working processes within the department, shifting away from a focus on the existing robotic dispensing system. Using evidence-based design was found to decrease the walking time and distance for staff by 24%, as opposed to the anecdotal design, which increased these parameters by 9%, and is predicted to save the department 248 min across 2 days in staff time spent walking. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Hospital readiness for undertaking evidence-based practice: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Ngoc Minh; Wilson, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Despite the fact that evidence-based practice has increasing emphasis in health care, organizations are not always prepared for its implementation. Identifying organizational preparedness for implementing evidence-based practice is desirable prior to application. A cross-sectional survey was developed to explore nurses' perception of organizational support for evidence-based practice and was implemented via a self-enumerated survey completed by 234 nurses. Data were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. Nurses reported that implementation of evidence-based practice is complex and fraught with challenges because of a lack of organizational support. A conceptual framework comprising three key factors: information resources, nursing leadership, and organizational infrastructure was proposed to assist health authorities in the implementation of evidence-based practice. Suggestions of how organizations can be more supportive of research utilization in practice include establishing a library, journal clubs/mentoring programs, nurses' involvement in decision-making at unit level, and a local nursing association. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumza Ntshotsho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Global acknowledgement of ecological restoration, as an important tool to complement conservation efforts, requires an effort to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions. Evidence-based practice is purported to promote effectiveness. A central tenet of this approach is decision making that is based on evidence, not intuition. Evidence can be generated experimentally and in practice but needs to be linked to baseline information collection, clear goals and monitoring of impact. In this paper, we report on a survey conducted to assess practitioners’ perceptions of the evidence generated in restoration practice in South Africa, as well as challenges encountered in building this evidence base. Contrary to a recent assessment of this evidence base which found weaknesses, respondents viewed it as adequate and cited few obstacles to its development. Obstacles cited were mostly associated with planning and resource availability. We suggest that the disparity between practitioners’ perceptions and observed weaknesses in the evidence base could be a challenge in advancing evidence-based restoration. We explore opportunities to overcome this disparity as well as the obstacles listed by practitioners. These opportunities involve a shift from practitioners as users of scientific knowledge and evidence, to practitioners involved in the co-production of evidence needed to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions.

  4. [Glocalization: the outlook for Taiwan evidence based health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiehfeng

    2014-12-01

    Public attention to evidence-based health care (EBHC) has increased significantly in recent years. Key problems related to applying EBHC in current healthcare practice include the timely update of up-to-date knowledge and skills and the methodology used to implement EBHC in clinical settings. EBHC has been introduced to the Taiwan healthcare system for the past two decades. The annual EBM (Evidence based medicine) National Competition is a unique and important EBHC activity in Taiwan. EBHC has been promoted widely in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health and other professions, and EBHC-related organizations such as the Taiwan Evidence Based Medicine Association (TEBMA), and Taiwan Evidence Based Nursing Association (TEBNA), have increased in number and grown in membership. In addition to domestic developments, Taiwan is also actively involved in global organizations, such as the Cochrane Collaboration, East Asian Cochrane Alliance (EACA), and the International Society for Evidence Based Health Care (ISEHC). In Taiwan, most medical professionals work cooperatively to promote EBHC, which facilitates the gradual improvement of healthcare quality.

  5. Comparison of Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Journal Club Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Packard, PharmD, MS, BCPS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPurpose: The objective of the study was to compare a traditionally structured journal club with an evidence based structured journal club during an advanced clinical pharmacy rotation and to determine the best utilization that aligns with recent changes to the pharmacy school accreditation standards.Methods: The study included 21 students who completed journal club utilizing the traditional journal club format and 24 students who utilized an evidence based journal club format. Background characteristics, student reported beliefs, and mean critical evaluation skills scores were evaluated and compared in each group.Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the two cohorts in mean overall percentage grade for the activity. Students in the traditional cohort received significantly higher grades for the Study Analysis and Critique section (90.97 + 12.18 versus 81.25 + 11.18, P=0.01 as well as for the Preparedness section (96.11 + 8.03 versus 85.0 + 17.13, P=0.002. Students in the evidence based cohort received statistically superior grades for the Presentation Skills section (96.43 + 6.39 versus 82.47 + 14.12, P=0.0004.Conclusion: An evidence based journal club is a reasonable and effective alternative to the traditionally structured journal club when the primary objective is to assist students in understanding evidence based concepts and to apply current literature to clinical practice.

  6. The EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research Group (EUSTAR): an international framework for accelerating scleroderma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Alan; Ladner, Ulf M; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Systemic sclerosis has a complex pathogenesis and a multifaceted clinical spectrum without a specific treatment. Under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism, the European League Against Rheumatism Scleroderma Trials And Research group (EUSTAR) has been founded in Europe to foster the study of systemic sclerosis with the aim of achieving equality of assessment and care of systemic sclerosis patients throughout the world according to evidence-based principles. EUSTAR created the minimal essential data set, a simple two-page form with basic demographics and mostly yes/no answers to clinical and laboratory parameters, to track patients throughout Europe. Currently, over 7000 patients are registered from 150 centres in four continents, and several articles have been published with the data generated by the minimal essential data set. A commitment of EUSTAR is also to teaching and educating, and for this reason there are two teaching courses and a third is planned for early in 2009. These courses have built international networks among young investigators improving the quality of multicentre clinical trials. EUSTAR has organized several rounds of 'teach the teachers' to further standardize the skin scoring. EUSTAR activities have extended beyond European borders, and EUSTAR now includes experts from several nations. The growth of data and biomaterial might ensure many further fruitful multicentre studies, but the financial sustainability of EUSTAR remains an issue that may jeopardize the existence of this group as well as that of other organizations in the world.

  7. [The forgotten capitulation of evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoemaker, Casper G; Smulders, Yvo M

    2015-01-01

    In 1992, the Canadian physician Gordon Guyatt wrote an article that is generally regarded as the starting point of evidence-based medicine (EBM). He described the ideas behind the McMaster residency programme for 'evidence-based practitioners', founded by David Sackett. Eight years later, in 2000, Guyatt concluded that this programme was too ambitious. In a new publication he described most doctors as 'evidence-users'. This editorial marks the transition from an individual to a collective form of EBM, emphasizing the use of evidence-based guidelines. The starting point of this collective form of EBM is not the well-known 1992 paper, but the forgotten editorial in 2000, which was described by Guyatt's colleagues as the capitulation of EBM.

  8. Evidence-Based Practice: Separating Science From Pseudoscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Catherine M; Hunsley, John

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires that clinicians be guided by the best available evidence. In this article, we address the impact of science and pseudoscience on psychotherapy in psychiatric practice. We describe the key principles of evidence-based intervention. We describe pseudoscience and provide illustrative examples of popular intervention practices that have not been abandoned, despite evidence that they are not efficacious and may be harmful. We distinguish efficacy from effectiveness, and describe modular approaches to treatment. Reasons for the persistence of practices that are not evidence based are examined at both the individual and the professional system level. Finally, we offer suggestions for the promotion of EBP through clinical practice guidelines, modelling of scientific decision making, and training in core skills.

  9. Evidence-Based Practice: Separating Science From Pseudoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Catherine M; Hunsley, John

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires that clinicians be guided by the best available evidence. In this article, we address the impact of science and pseudoscience on psychotherapy in psychiatric practice. We describe the key principles of evidence-based intervention. We describe pseudoscience and provide illustrative examples of popular intervention practices that have not been abandoned, despite evidence that they are not efficacious and may be harmful. We distinguish efficacy from effectiveness, and describe modular approaches to treatment. Reasons for the persistence of practices that are not evidence based are examined at both the individual and the professional system level. Finally, we offer suggestions for the promotion of EBP through clinical practice guidelines, modelling of scientific decision making, and training in core skills. PMID:26720821

  10. A review of evidence-based beta-blockers in special populations with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonarow, Gregg C

    2008-01-01

    Guidelines recommend 1 of 3 beta-blockers (bisoprolol, carvedilol, metoprolol succinate) for the treatment of systolic heart failure (HF). beta-Blockers have been established to be effective in reducing mortality in more than 20 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials involving more than 20,000 patients with HF. However, they are not utilized in a substantial portion of eligible HF patients, possibly because physicians are unsure of the safety and benefit of beta-blockers in special populations (women, the elderly, African Americans, patients with diabetes, and patients with atrial fibrillation). The current standard of care is to treat all heart failure (HF) patients according to the recommendations for the overall population. A review of the clinical trial data reveals that there is no evidence that one evidence-based beta-blocker is preferential over the others in women or in the elderly with HF. In contrast, carvedilol may confer greater benefit in HF patients with diabetes and atrial fibrillation as well as in African American patients. Further data are needed to provide evidence-based recommendations.

  11. Reduction of inequalities in health: assessing evidence-based tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea Beverley

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduction of health inequalities is a focus of many national and international health organisations. The need for pragmatic evidence-based approaches has led to the development of a number of evidence-based equity initiatives. This paper describes a new program that focuses upon evidence- based tools, which are useful for policy initiatives that reduce inequities. Methods This paper is based on a presentation that was given at the "Regional Consultation on Policy Tools: Equity in Population Health Reports," held in Toronto, Canada in June 2002. Results Five assessment tools were presented. 1. A database of systematic reviews on the effects of educational, legal, social, and health interventions to reduce unfair inequalities is being established through the Cochrane and Campbell Collaborations. 2 Decision aids and shared decision making can be facilitated in disadvantaged groups by 'health coaches' to help people become better decision makers, negotiators, and navigators of the health system; a pilot study in Chile has provided proof of this concept. 3. The CIET Cycle: Combining adapted cluster survey techniques with qualitative methods, CIET's population based applications support evidence-based decision making at local and national levels. The CIET map generates maps directly from survey or routine institutional data, to be used as evidence-based decisions aids. Complex data can be displayed attractively, providing an important tool for studying and comparing health indicators among and between different populations. 4. The Ottawa Equity Gauge is applying the Global Equity Gauge Alliance framework to an industrialised country setting. 5 The Needs-Based Health Assessment Toolkit, established to assemble information on which clinical and health policy decisions can be based, is being expanded to ensure a focus on distribution and average health indicators. Conclusion Evidence-based planning tools have much to offer the

  12. Clinical librarians as facilitators of nurses' evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Sylvia; Wallmyr, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and ward-based clinical librarians' reflections on ward-based clinical librarians as facilitators for nurses' use of evidences-based practice. Nurses' use of evidence-based practice is reported to be weak. Studies have suggested that clinical librarians may promote evidence-based practice. To date, little is known about clinical librarians participating nurses in the wards. A descriptive, qualitative design was adopted for the study. In 2007, 16 nurses who had been attended by a clinical librarian in the wards were interviewed in focus groups. Two clinical librarians were interviewed by individual interviews. In the analysis, a content analysis was used. Three themes were generated from the interviews with nurses: 'The grip of everyday work', 'To articulate clinical nursing issues' and 'The clinical librarians at a catalyst'. The nurses experienced the grip of everyday work as a hindrance and had difficulties to articulate and formulate relevant nursing issues. In such a state, the nurses found the clinical librarian presence in the ward as enhancing the awareness of and the use of evidence-based practice. Three themes emerged from the analysis with the librarians. They felt as outsiders, had new knowledge and acquired a new role as ward-based clinical librarians. Facilitation is needed if nurses' evidence-based practice is going to increase. The combined use of nurses and clinical librarians' knowledge and skills can be optimised. To achieve this, nurses' skills in consuming and implementing evidence ought to be strengthened. The fusion of the information and knowledge management skill of the ward-based clinical librarian and the clinical expertise of the nurses can be of value. With such a collaborative model, nurse and ward-based clinical librarian might join forces to increase the use of evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Visualization studies on evidence-based medicine domain knowledge (series 3): visualization for dissemination of evidence based medicine information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiantong; Yao, Leye; Li, Youping; Clarke, Mike; Gan, Qi; Li, Yifei; Fan, Yi; Gou, Yongchao; Wang, Li

    2011-05-01

    To identify patterns in information sharing between a series of Chinese evidence based medicine (EBM) journals and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, to determine key evidence dissemination areas for EBM and to provide a scientific basis for improving the dissemination of EBM research. Data were collected on citing and cited from the Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine (CJEBM), Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine (JEBMc), Chinese Journal of Evidence Based Pediatrics (CJEBP), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Relationships between citations were visualized. High-frequency key words from these sources were identified, to build a word co-occurrence matrix and to map research subjects. CDSR contains a large collection of information of relevance to EBM and its contents are widely cited across many journals, suggesting a well-developed citation environment. The content and citation of the Chinese journals have been increasing in recent years. However, their citation environments are much less developed, and there is a wide variation in the breadth and strength of their knowledge communication, with the ranking from highest to lowest being CJEBM, JEBMc and CJEBP. The content of CDSR is almost exclusively Cochrane intervention reviews examining the effects of healthcare interventions, so it's contribution to EBM is mostly in disease control and treatment. On the other hand, the Chinese journals on evidence-based medicine and practice focused more on areas such as education and research, design and quality of clinical trials, evidence based policymaking, evidence based clinical practice, tumor treatment, and pediatrics. Knowledge and findings of EBM are widely communicated and disseminated. However, citation environments and range of knowledge communication differ greatly between the journals examined in this study. This finds that Chinese EBM has focused mainly on clinical medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, pediatrics, tumor

  14. A constructivist model for teaching evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolloff, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has reported that it takes roughly 17 years for evidence generated through research to move into clinical practice. Bridging that gap is an urgent need and will require educators to rethink how nurses are prepared for evidence-based practice. The constructivist theory for learning--in which it is assumed that students construct knowledge and meaning for themselves as they learn--may provide a framework for a redesigned baccalaureate curriculum, one that supports evidence-based practice throughout a nursing student's education.

  15. Proposing an Evidence-Based Strategy for Software Requirements Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoerfer, Doris; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses an evidence-based approach to software requirements engineering. The approach is called evidence-based, since it uses publications on the specific problem as a surrogate for stakeholder interests, to formulate risks and testing experiences. This complements the idea that agile software development models are more relevant, in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing cross-functional teams. The strategy is exemplified and applied to the development of a Software Requirements list used to develop software systems for patient registries.

  16. Evidence-based librarianship: searching for the needed EBL evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges of finding evidence needed to implement Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL). Focusing first on database coverage for three health sciences librarianship journals, the article examines the information contents of different databases. Strategies are needed to search for relevant evidence in the library literature via these databases, and the problems associated with searching the grey literature of librarianship. Database coverage, plausible search strategies, and the grey literature of library science all pose challenges to finding the needed research evidence for practicing EBL. Health sciences librarians need to ensure that systems are designed that can track and provide access to needed research evidence to support Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL).

  17. Accreditation and certification for evidence-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2010-04-01

    The Evidence-Based Design Accreditation and Certification (EDAC) is a professional certification that validates that individuals have a core body of knowledge and experience necessary to lead and engage in an evidence-based design process for healthcare facilities. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the vision and mission of EDAC and specific content are shared to increase nurse leaders' awareness of the certification when interviewing prospective architectural firms or for nurse leaders who aspire to have a career in the healthcare design field.

  18. Lost in translation: bibliotherapy and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysart-Gale, Deborah

    2008-03-01

    Evidence-based medicine's (EBM) quantitative methodologies reflect medical science's long-standing mistrust of the imprecision and subjectivity of ordinary descriptive language. However, EBM's attempts to replace subjectivity with precise empirical methods are problematic when clinicians must negotiate between scientific medicine and patients' experience. This problem is evident in the case of bibliotherapy (patient reading as treatment modality), a practice widespread despite its reliance on anecdotal evidence. While EBM purports to replace such flawed practice with reliable evidence-based methods, this essay argues that its aversion to subjective language prevents EBM from effectively evaluating bibliotherapy or making it amenable to clinical and research governance.

  19. Evidence-based Medicine in Facial Plastic Surgery: Current State and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedhia, Raj; Hsieh, Tsung-Yen; Tollefson, Travis T; Ishii, Lisa E

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) encompasses the evaluation and application of best available evidence, incorporation of clinical experience, and emphasis on patient preference and values. Different scales are used to rate levels of evidence. Translating available data for interventions to clinical practice guidelines requires an assessment of both the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendation. Essential to the practice of EBM is evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention through outcome measures. This article discusses principles essential to EBM, resources commonly used in EBM practice, and the strengths and limitations of EBM in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  1. POSITIONS OF CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKER LERCANIDIPINE ACCORDING TO EVIDENCE BASED CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lukina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data of evidence based cardiology including results of international clinical trials on efficacy and safety of the modern calcium channel blocker (CCB, lercanidipine, are presented. Results of these trials show the firm position of lercanidipine in the modern cardiology and confirm that treatment with lercanidipine leads to significant reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP with no effect on heart rate (HR. Peripheral edema (the common side effect of CCBs occurs rarer with lercanidipine treatment than this with any other CCB treatment. Lercanidipine can be recommended to patients with concomitant diseases due to its additional features.

  2. Prosthetic joint infection development of an evidence-based diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhofer, Heinrich M L; Pohlig, Florian; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Lenze, Ulrich; Lenze, Florian; Toepfer, Andreas; Kelch, Sarah; Harrasser, Norbert; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Schauwecker, Johannes

    2017-03-09

    Increasing rates of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) have presented challenges for general practitioners, orthopedic surgeons and the health care system in the recent years. The diagnosis of PJI is complex; multiple diagnostic tools are used in the attempt to correctly diagnose PJI. Evidence-based algorithms can help to identify PJI using standardized diagnostic steps. We reviewed relevant publications between 1990 and 2015 using a systematic literature search in MEDLINE and PUBMED. The selected search results were then classified into levels of evidence. The keywords were prosthetic joint infection, biofilm, diagnosis, sonication, antibiotic treatment, implant-associated infection, Staph. aureus, rifampicin, implant retention, pcr, maldi-tof, serology, synovial fluid, c-reactive protein level, total hip arthroplasty (THA), total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and combinations of these terms. From an initial 768 publications, 156 publications were stringently reviewed. Publications with class I-III recommendations (EAST) were considered. We developed an algorithm for the diagnostic approach to display the complex diagnosis of PJI in a clear and logically structured process according to ISO 5807. The evidence-based standardized algorithm combines modern clinical requirements and evidence-based treatment principles. The algorithm provides a detailed transparent standard operating procedure (SOP) for diagnosing PJI. Thus, consistently high, examiner-independent process quality is assured to meet the demands of modern quality management in PJI diagnosis.

  3. Strategy for developing an evidence-based transdisciplinary vision rehabilitation team approach to treating vision impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Lori Latowski

    2008-04-01

    Many individuals with vision impairment experience significant loss of the ability to perform daily living activities, which often results in a further decline and loss of quality of life. Appropriate rehabilitation of the population with vision impairment has the potential to both improve individual abilities for health and personal management as well as maximize utilization of available health care resources. The case for an evidence-based model for the vision rehabilitation health care team as a medical rehabilitation program is presented. The recommended strategy has 3 main components: development of a consensus team clinical practice guideline leading to a future evidence-based team guideline for vision rehabilitation; evaluation and measurement of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the involved vision rehabilitation professionals before and after implementation of the new paradigm; and measurement of outcomes that estimate the effects of the proposed paradigm on patient care by measuring both the improvement in visual ability of the patient and the economic impact of the model on optometric practice. Development of a state-of-the-art evidence-based transdisciplinary team model guideline will facilitate improvement in the quality of life of individuals with diseases that result in chronic vision impairment.

  4. The use of a mobile app to motivate evidence-based oral hygiene behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, B; Birdsall, J; Kay, E

    2015-08-28

    Mobile apps are software programmes that run on smartphones and other mobile devices. Mobile health apps can help people manage their own health and wellness, promote healthy living and gain access to useful information when and where they need it. The Brush DJ oral health app was developed to use the opportunity mobile apps offer to motivate an evidence-based oral hygiene routine. A literature review has found no research investigating the use of a mobile app to motivate evidence-based oral hygiene behaviour. The objective of this preliminary investigation was to assess user perception of an oral health app to give a basis for future research and development of app technology in relation to oral health. A cross-sectional qualitative user perception questionnaire.RESULTS :One hundred and eighty-nine people responded to the questionnaire. Seventy percent (n = 113) of respondents reported that their teeth felt cleaner since using the app. Eighty-eight percent (n = 133) reported the app motivated them to brush their teeth for longer and 92.3% (n = 144) would recommend the app to their friends and family. Four broad themes relating to how the app helped toothbrushing were reported. These themes were motivation, education, compliance and perceived benefits. A mobile app is a promising tool to motivate an evidence-based oral hygiene routine.

  5. Shared decision making in chronic care in the context of evidence based practice in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen-Storms, Jolanda H H M; Bours, Gerrie J J W; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna J H M

    2015-01-01

    In the decision-making environment of evidence-based practice, the following three sources of information must be integrated: research evidence of the intervention, clinical expertise, and the patient's values. In reality, evidence-based practice usually focuses on research evidence (which may be translated into clinical practice guidelines) and clinical expertise without considering the individual patient's values. The shared decision-making model seems to be helpful in the integration of the individual patient's values in evidence-based practice. We aim to discuss the relevance of shared decision making in chronic care and to suggest how it can be integrated with evidence-based practice in nursing. We start by describing the following three possible approaches to guide the decision-making process: the paternalistic approach, the informed approach, and the shared decision-making approach. Implementation of shared decision making has gained considerable interest in cases lacking a strong best-treatment recommendation, and when the available treatment options are equivalent to some extent. We discuss that in chronic care it is important to always invite the patient to participate in the decision-making process. We delineate the following six attributes of health care interventions in chronic care that influence the degree of shared decision making: the level of research evidence, the number of available intervention options, the burden of side effects, the impact on lifestyle, the patient group values, and the impact on resources. Furthermore, the patient's willingness to participate in shared decision making, the clinical expertise of the nurse, and the context in which the decision making takes place affect the shared decision-making process. A knowledgeable and skilled nurse with a positive attitude towards shared decision making—integrated with evidence-based practice—can facilitate the shared decision-making process. We conclude that nurses as well as other

  6. Evidence-Based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embry, Dennis D.; Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior-influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of…

  7. Evidence-based medicine, meer dan evidence alleen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, Marlous|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357299817; Bartelink, Marie Louise|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100449069

    2017-01-01

    Aan de praktijk van evidence-based medicine (EBM) besteden we in de huisartsopleiding te weinig aandacht. Iedere huisarts die de adviezen uit een NHG-Standaard volgt, of ervan afwijkt, doet aan EBM: het wegen van beschikbare evidence met de eigen ervaring en met de voorkeuren van de patiënt.

  8. Integrating Evidence-based Decision Making into Allied Health Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Jane L.; Miller, Syrene A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence-based decision making (EBDM) was incorporated into an institute for 42 dental hygiene, occupational therapy, and physical therapy faculty. The 4-day sessions addressed active teaching techniques, formulation of good questions, critical appraisal of evidence, and application, feedback, and evaluation. Most participants felt prepared to…

  9. Evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN) permits the highest quality of care in meeting the multifaceted needs of clients using the best available evidence from research findings, expert ideas from specialists in the various health care sectors and feedback from clients. However, in many instances, various challenges need to be ...

  10. Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methadone maintenance therapy as evidence based drug abuse planning in developed countries: Can developing countries afford and learn from this experience? ... However, various studies and preventive approaches have been tried in the US on drug abusers in order to prevent the associated adverse health outcomes.

  11. Making Evidence Based Changes on the Labor Ward of Muhima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rwanda Journal Series F: Medicine and Health Sciences Vol. 2 No. 2, 2015. Making Evidence Based Changes on the Labor Ward of Muhima Hospital: Staff Teaching Staff. Jossette Umucyo1, Rondi Anderson1. 1Muhima Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda. Background. In January 2014 it was noted that Muhima hospital was lagging ...

  12. Concept and practice of evidence-based psychiatry and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concept and practice of evidence-based psychiatry and its application in Nigerian psychiatry: a critical review. PO Onifade, LO Oluwole. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Medicine Vol. 15(1) 2006: 16-19. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  13. Evidence-Based Youth Psychotherapy in the Mental Health Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, John R.; Ugueto, Ana M.; Cheron, Daniel M.; Herren, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Five decades of randomized trials research have produced dozens of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for youths. The EBPs produce respectable effects in traditional efficacy trials, but the effects shrink markedly when EBPs are tested in practice contexts with clinically referred youths and compared to usual clinical care. We considered why…

  14. Strengthening Research Capacity and Evidence-Based Policy ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project's three components include: -Build capacity for evidence-based public policy-making and analysis in all three countries through the university's Institute of Public Policy and Administration; -Support a group of regional researchers on issues of mountain economies and natural resource management through the ...

  15. The ethical approach to evidence-based medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based medicine has had a major impact on health care in the last 30 years. This approach has lead to the critical appraisal of therapeutic knowledge. Archie Cochrane, an epidemiologist, gave a series of lectures in 1972 regarding his reflections on the effectiveness and efficiency of health services.1 He ...

  16. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center.

  17. Advancing Evidence Based Policymaking and Regulation to Ensure ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    LIRNEasia seeks to build the capacity of local researchers and policymakers for evidence-based ICT-related interventions in the public policy process. To this end, it undertakes action research on institutional constraints to the effective use of ICTs. The first phase of LIRNEasia was funded under project 103017. The current ...

  18. Evidence-based ICT Policy for Development and Innovation | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Evidence-based ICT Policy for Development and Innovation. The cost of access to information and communication technologies (ITCs) in Africa remains the major impediment to the participation of Africans in the networked society. While Africa is the region with the fastest growing number of mobile phone subscribers in the ...

  19. Making the Case for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Joanne; McClure, Janelle; Spinks, Andy

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is the collection, interpretation, and use of data, such as collection statistics or assessment results, that measure the effectiveness of a library media program. In this article, the authors will present various forms of evidence and show that any library media specialist can use data to make informed decisions that…

  20. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine: A Regional Dissemination Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Wallace, Eleanor Z.; Smith, Lawrence G.; Sullivant, Jean; Dunn, Kathel; McGinn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Described and evaluated an interactive course designed to create a cadre of medical school faculty in New York who could integrate evidence-based medicine into their training programs. Findings for representatives of 30 internal medicine residency programs show the usefulness of the regional dissemination model used. (SLD)

  1. Teaching Evidence-based Medicine Using Literature for Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottonen, Merja; Tapanainen, Paivi; Nuutinen, Matti; Rantala, Heikki; Vainionpaa, Leena; Uhari, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine--the process of using research findings systematically as the basis for clinical decisions--can be taught using problem-solving teaching methods. Evaluates whether it was possible to motivate students to use the original literature by giving them selected patient problems to solve. (Author/ASK)

  2. The challenge of teaching undergraduates evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, R; Brennan, M; Ewers, R; Hudson, C; Daly, J M; Baillie, S; Eisler, M C; Place, E J; Brearley, J; Holmes, M; Handel, I; Shaw, D; McLauchlan, G; McBrearty, A; Cripps, P; Jones, P; Smith, R; Verheyen, K

    2017-09-16

    The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons now lists 'How to evaluate evidence' as a day one competence for newly qualified vets. In this article, representatives from each of the veterinary schools in the UK discuss how the challenge of delivering and assessing the concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine in a crowded undergraduate curriculum can be met. British Veterinary Association.

  3. Reforming European universities: Scope for an evidence-based process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugelers, R.; van der Ploeg, F.; Dewatripont, M.; Thys-Clément, F.; Wilkin, L.

    2008-01-01

    Universities are key players in the successful transition to a knowledge-based economy and society. However, this crucial sector of society needs restructuring if Europe is not to lose out in the global competition in education, research and innovation. To allow a more evidence based process of

  4. Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Making Effective Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Trina D.; Detrich, Ronnie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The research to practice gap in education has been a long-standing concern. The enactment of No Child Left Behind brought increased emphasis on the value of using scientifically based instructional practices to improve educational outcomes. It also brought education into the broader evidence-based practice movement that started in medicine and has…

  5. Developing evidence-based guidelines for referral for short stature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Dommelen, P. van; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.; Buuren, S. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish evidence based guidelines for growth monitoring on a population basis. Study design: Several auxological referral criteria were formulated and applied to longitudinal growth data from four different patient groups, as well as three samples from the general population.

  6. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Ferdon, Corinne; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence-base of psychosocial treatment outcome studies for depressed youth conducted since 1998 is examined. All studies for depressed children meet Nathan and Gorman's (2002) criteria for Type 2 studies whereas the adolescent protocols meet criteria for both Type 1 and Type 2 studies. Based on the Task Force on the Promotion and…

  7. Book Review: Deployment Psychology: Evidence-based strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review: Deployment Psychology: Evidence-based strategies to promote mental health in the Military. AB Adler, PD Bliese, CA Castro. Abstract. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association 2011 294 pages ISBN-13: 978-1-4338-0881-4. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  8. Adherence of Healthcare Professionals to Evidence-based Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The checklist included the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the HD vascular access, HD adequacy, anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD), nutrition, cardiovascular risk assessment, and hepatitis B and C virus infection control. Implementation of these guidelines was evaluated, and further graded using a ...

  9. Evidence-based treatment of acute otitis externa | Outhoff | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute otitis externa (AOE), or diffuse inflammation of the external ear canal, causes a range of symptoms, including otalgia, otorrhoea, hearing loss and itching. Despite AOE being common, with a 12-month prevalence of approximately 1%, there is a paucity of evidence-based treatment guidelines. This contributes to a wide ...

  10. Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 1.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 1. ... psychological literature, but these are only available on payment of a subscription. Most of ... 2. Component terms (keywords/phrases) children drug resistant malaria treatment. 3. Alternative terms (synonyms) child drug-resistant resistance multidrug.

  11. Evidence-based practice for information professionals a handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Examines to what extent the skills and techniques of evidence-based practice are transferable to the areas of professional practice of librarians and information professionals? Is it desirable for information professionals to integrate research findings into their day-to-day decision making?

  12. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  13. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may...

  14. Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of evidence based medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the awareness and attitude of hospital resident doctors towards evidence-based medicine (EBM) and their related educational needs. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on a randomly selected sample of 141 hospital resident ...

  15. Evidence based medicine, an innovative approach to an old practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a rapidly expanding subject. The aim of this editorial is to give an overview and address some of the practical issues relevant to the developing world. EBM may be defined as the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of ...

  16. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #833A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on dropout prevention has become focused on using evidence-based practice, and data-driven decisions, to mitigate students' dropping out of high school and instead, support and prepare students for career and college. Early warning systems or on-track indicators, in which readily available student-level data are used…

  17. Building a culture of evidence-based planning in Nigeria

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    into the evidence base. Data contributes to develop- ment. Health outcomes can be improved by investing in: □ 17,506 households. □ 203 health facilities. □ 15,606 pregnant women. Data on child health and immunization was gathered from: □ 13,220 households. □ 214 health facilities. □ 22,589 children under the.

  18. Evidence-Based Library Management: The Leadership Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakos, Amos

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an extension of the author's earlier work on developing management information services and creating a culture of assessment in libraries. The author will focus observations on the use of data in decision-making in libraries, specifically on the role of leadership in making evidence-based decision a reality, and will review new…

  19. Integrating evidence-based principles into the undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The research methodology module was reviewed as part of the overall revision of the undergraduate physiotherapy curriculum of Stellenbosch University. This created an ideal platform from which to assess how to align the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) with research methodology. Fostering the ...

  20. Advancing Counselor Education in Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Michael T.; Lee, Hsin-Hua; Bartoli, Eleonora; Gillem, Angela R.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a core priority in counselor education. This paper details one United States' counselor education program's self-assessment of its EBP curriculum. Faculty members collaborated to identify challenges and generate solutions to strengthen the EBP emphasis within the program. This paper is intended as a resource for…

  1. Evidence-based Paradigm In Orthodontics | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need to integrate the accrued scientific evidence into clinical orthodontic practice is amongst the challenges facing orthodontists in the 21st century. The evidence-based health care approach aims to improve patient care based upon informed decision-making. This article therefore highlights the importance and ...

  2. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to summarise the available evidence in the wound management of diabetic foot ulcers to promote cost-effective evidence-based practice. Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a.

  3. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to summarise the available evidence in the wound management of diabetic foot ulcers to promote cost-effective evidence-based practice. Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a ...

  4. Event Highlight: Nigeria Evidence-based Health System Initiative

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-06-01

    Jun 1, 2012 ... Since limited resources are available for life-saving health services in Nigeria, those who plan health programs need to know which interventions are most effective and how to prioritise them. An important objective of the Nigeria Evidence-based Health. System Initiative (NEHSI) is to build the capacity of.

  5. Embedding trials in evidence-based clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Rengerink, K.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of research projects centred on ‘evidence-based medicine’. It consists of two parts. Part 1 focuses on improving recruitment of the necessary number of patients in clinical trials, as this is the major problem while evaluating the effectiveness of interventions in

  6. Evidence Based Practice: Valuable and Successful Examples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While research is needed and necessary, promoting the value of evidence-based practice (EBP), quality improvement (QI) and project evaluation (PE) initiatives could rapidly and economically further the development of nursing and midwifery disciplines globally, perhaps especially in resource constrained settings.

  7. Evidence-Based Family-School Interventions with Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stacey L.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen studies of family-school interventions with preschool children conducted between 1980 and 2002, and published in peer-reviewed journals, were reviewed and evaluated according to the criteria developed by the Task Force on Evidence-Based Intervention in School Psychology (Division 16 and Society for the Study of School Psychology Task…

  8. Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Determining evidence-based practices is a complicated enterprise that requires analyzing the methodological quality and magnitude of the available research supporting specific practices. This article reviews criteria and procedures for identifying what works in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, and general education; and it…

  9. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

  10. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntshotsho, P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper, we report on a survey conducted to assess practitioners’ perceptions of the evidence generated in restoration practice in South Africa, as well as challenges encountered in building this evidence base. Contrary to a recent assessment...

  11. IAP/APA evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements in the management of acute pancreatitis since the publication of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) treatment guidelines in 2002. A collaboration of the IAP and the American Pancreatic Association (APA) was undertaken to revise these guidelines using an evidence-based approach. Twelve multidisciplinary review groups performed systematic literature reviews to answer 38 predefined clinical questions. Recommendations were graded using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The review groups presented their recommendations during the 2012 joint IAP/APA meeting. At this one-day, interactive conference, relevant remarks were voiced and overall agreement on each recommendation was quantified using plenary voting. The 38 recommendations covered 12 topics related to the clinical management of acute pancreatitis: A) diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and etiology, B) prognostication/predicting severity, C) imaging, D) fluid therapy, E) intensive care management, F) preventing infectious complications, G) nutritional support, H) biliary tract management, I) indications for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, J) timing of intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, K) intervention strategies in necrotizing pancreatitis, and L) timing of cholecystectomy. Using the GRADE system, 21 of the 38 (55%) recommendations, were rated as 'strong' and plenary voting revealed 'strong agreement' for 34 (89%) recommendations. The 2012 IAP/APA guidelines provide recommendations concerning key aspects of medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the currently available evidence. These recommendations should serve as a reference standard for current management and guide future clinical research on acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of Cluster Headache: The American Headache Society Evidence-Based Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Starling, Amaal J; Pringsheim, Tamara M; Becker, Werner J; Schwedt, Todd J

    2016-07-01

    Cluster headache (CH), the most common trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, is an extremely debilitating primary headache disorder that is often not optimally treated. New evidence-based treatment guidelines for CH will assist clinicians with identifying and choosing among current treatment options. In this systematic review we appraise the available evidence for the acute and prophylactic treatment of CH, and provide an update of the 2010 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) endorsed systematic review. Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched for double-blind, randomized controlled trials that investigated treatments of CH in adults. Exclusion and inclusion criteria were identical to those utilized in the 2010 AAN systematic review. For acute treatment, sumatriptan subcutaneous, zolmitriptan nasal spray, and high flow oxygen remain the treatments with a Level A recommendation. Since the 2010 review, a study of sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation was added to the current guideline and has been administered a Level B recommendation for acute treatment. For prophylactic therapy, previously there were no treatments that were administered a Level A recommendation. For the current guidelines, suboccipital steroid injections have emerged as the only treatment to receive a Level A recommendation with the addition of a second Class I study. Other newly evaluated treatments since the 2010 guidelines have been given a Level B recommendation (negative study: deep brain stimulation), a Level C recommendation (positive study: warfarin; negative studies: cimetidine/chlorpheniramine, candesartan), or a Level U recommendation (frovatriptan). This AHS guideline can be utilized for understanding which therapies have superiority to placebo or sham treatment in the management of CH. In clinical practice, these recommendations should be considered in concert with other variables including safety, side effects, patient preferences, clinician experience, cost, and the invasiveness

  13. Herbal traditional Chinese medicine and its evidence base in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Schulze, Johannes

    2015-04-21

    Herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat several ailments, but its efficiency is poorly documented and hence debated, as opposed to modern medicine commonly providing effective therapies. The aim of this review article is to present a practical reference guide on the role of herbal TCM in managing gastrointestinal disorders, supported by systematic reviews and evidence based trials. A literature search using herbal TCM combined with terms for gastrointestinal disorders in PubMed and the Cochrane database identified publications of herbal TCM trials. Results were analyzed for study type, inclusion criteria, and outcome parameters. Quality of placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials was poor, mostly neglecting stringent evidence based diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. Accordingly, appropriate Cochrane reviews and meta-analyses were limited and failed to support valid, clinically relevant evidence based efficiency of herbal TCM in gastrointestinal diseases, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastric or duodenal ulcer, dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease. In conclusion, the use of herbal TCM to treat various diseases has an interesting philosophical background with a long history, but it received increasing skepticism due to the lack of evidence based efficiency as shown by high quality trials; this has now been summarized for gastrointestinal disorders, with TCM not recommended for most gastrointestinal diseases. Future studies should focus on placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials, herbal product quality and standard criteria for diagnosis, treatment, outcome, and assessment of adverse herb reactions. This approach will provide figures of risk/benefit profiles that hopefully are positive for at least some treatment modalities of herbal TCM. Proponents of modern herbal TCM best face these promising challenges of pragmatic modern medicine by bridging the gap

  14. Are advertisements in dental journals supported by an appropriate evidence-base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnutt, Ivor G; Hardy, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Dental professionals are constantly exposed to advertisements in the dental literature. These promote products, either for use in the operatory or to recommend to patients. In an era of evidence-based practice, what references are provided to support claims made by the advertisers? This study aimed to determine if advertisements in four major dental journals, whose target audience is general dental practitioners, were supported by an appropriate evidence-base, readily accessible to readers. The 2010 printed volumes of the Australian Dental Journal, British Dental Journal, Dental Update and the Journal of the American Dental Association were hand searched to identify advertisements which made a claim of clinical benefit or superiority to competing products. Advertisements were categorized according to type of product being promoted and the availability, nature and number of any supporting references was recorded. Repeated advertisements were analyzed only once. A total of 390 advertisements were identified and 369 made a claim of benefit or superiority. When the 222 duplicates of the same advertisement were removed, 147 unique advertisements remained. Of these: 54 (37%) were advertisements related to dental devices for in-surgery use; 44 (30%) for dental materials, and 27 (18%) for dentifrices/medicaments. 113 (76.9%) advertisements offered no evidential support for claims made. Of the 34 advertisements that provided evidential support, only 20 provided a complete reference that could readily be sourced by an interested reader: 15 articles in refereed journals; 5 data on file; 3 in-house studies and combinations thereof. Four references were not accessible due to incomplete referencing. Two advertisements provided evidence that was not relevant to the product being advertised. The majority of advertisements in the dental literature do not provide an adequate evidence-base, readily available to readers, to support the claims being made. If evidence-based practice is

  15. Synthesizing evidence-based strategies and community-engaged research: a model to address social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lisa Jane; Bohan, Kyle David; Trotter, Robert Talbot

    2013-11-01

    Addressing social determinants of health (SDH) requires multileveled intervention designs. Increasingly, organizations and coalitions face pressure to use evidence-based strategies when seeking to address SDH. Evidence-based strategies, however, must be locally relevant and integrated into existing systems to function efficiently. We propose the incorporation of an effective rapid assessment technique, Rapid Assessment, Response, and Evaluation (RARE), with evidence-based strategies, findings, and recommendations embedded in community-engaged research to increase the likelihood of success in addressing SDH. Our RARE project--a partnership among a community health center, a nonprofit funding agency, and academic faculty researchers--resulted in community- and policy-level interventions for the prevention of childhood obesity in a Southwestern U.S. city.

  16. Educational Intervention for an Evidence-Based Nursing Practice of Skin-to-Skin Contact at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turenne, Jeanne Pigeon; Héon, Marjolaine; Aita, Marilyn; Faessler, Joanne; Doddridge, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article presents the development and evaluation of an educational intervention aiming at an evidence-based practice of skin-to-skin contact at birth among nurses of a maternity care unit. Based on the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care, four educational sessions were developed according to an active-learning pedagogy. Even if the nurses’ practice did not fully meet the recommendations for skin-to-skin contact, a pre- and postintervention evaluation showed some positive results, such as a longer duration of skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth, delivery of some routine care directly on mothers’ chest, and improved parent education. The educational intervention seems to have enacted some evidence-based nursing practice changes regarding skin-to-skin contact at birth. PMID:27445449

  17. School Psychology: A Public Health Framework: I. From Evidence-Based Practices to Evidence-Based Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagwood, Kimberly; Johnson, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Describes current perspectives on evidence-based practices in psychology, medicine, and education; discusses challenges in the implementation and dissemination of research-based findings into schools; describes differences between current models of organizational behavior as studied in children's mental health services and in education; and…

  18. How Comprehensively Is Evidence-Based Practice Represented in Australian Health Professional Accreditation Documents? A Systematic Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Maureen P; Crilly, Mike; Young, Taryn; Farrelly, Jane; Lewis, Lucy Kate

    2016-01-01

    PHENONENON: In many developed countries, accreditation documents, which reflect the practice standards of health professions, form the basis for evaluation of education programs for meeting the requirements for registration. The 2005 Sicily statement proposed a 5-step model of training in evidence-based practice (ask, access, appraise, apply, and assess). A key recommendation was that evidence-based practice should be incorporated into entry-level health professional training and registration. No previous research has assessed the extent to which this has occurred. We undertook a systematic audit of the accreditation documents for the registered health professions in Australia. The 11 health professional disciplines included in the audit were medicine, nursing and midwifery, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dentistry, psychology, occupational therapy, optometry, podiatry, osteopathy, and chiropractic. Two investigators independently identified the occurrence of the term evidence that related to "evidence-based practice" and the occurrences of terms related to the 5 steps in the accreditation documents. Occurrence of the term evidence as it relates specifically to "evidence-based practice" ranged from 0 (pharmacy, dentistry and occupational therapy) to 8 (physiotherapy) in the accreditation documents. Overall, there were 77 occasions when terms relating to any of the 5 steps of evidence-based practice were used across all 11 accreditation documents. All 5 steps were included in the physiotherapy and psychology documents; 4 steps in medicine and optometry; 3 steps in pharmacy; 2 steps each in documents for chiropractic, osteopathy, and podiatry; and 1 step for nursing. There was no inclusion of terms relating to any of the 5 steps in the dentistry and occupational therapy documents. Insights: Terminology relating explicitly to evidence-based practice and to the 5 steps of evidence-based practice appears to be lacking in the accreditation documents for health professions

  19. Promoting community practitioners' use of evidence-based approaches to increase breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Teal, Randall; Barrett, Nadine; Leighton, Ashely; Steckler, Allan

    2013-07-01

    Many women do not get mammography screenings at the intervals recommended for early detection and treatment of breast cancer. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide) recommends a range of evidence-based strategies to improve mammography rates. However, nurses and others working in community-based settings make only limited use of these strategies. We report on a dissemination intervention that partnered the University of North Carolina with the Susan G. Komen Triangle Affiliate to disseminate Community Guide breast cancer screening strategies to community organizations. The intervention was guided by social marketing and diffusion of innovation theory and was designed to provide evidence and support via Komen's existing relationships with grantee organizations. The present study reports the findings from a formative evaluation of the intervention, which included a content analysis of 46 grant applications pre- and post intervention and focus groups with 20 grant recipients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evidence-based guideline update: Pharmacologic treatment for episodic migraine prevention in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, S.D.; Holland, S.; Freitag, F.; Dodick, D.W.; Argoff, C.; Ashman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To provide updated evidence-based recommendations for the preventive treatment of migraine headache. The clinical question addressed was: What pharmacologic therapies are proven effective for migraine prevention? Methods: The authors analyzed published studies from June 1999 to May 2009 using a structured review process to classify the evidence relative to the efficacy of various medications available in the United States for migraine prevention. Results and Recommendations: The author panel reviewed 284 abstracts, which ultimately yielded 29 Class I or Class II articles that are reviewed herein. Divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, topiramate, metoprolol, propranolol, and timolol are effective for migraine prevention and should be offered to patients with migraine to reduce migraine attack frequency and severity (Level A). Frovatriptan is effective for prevention of menstrual migraine (Level A). Lamotrigine is ineffective for migraine prevention (Level A). PMID:22529202

  1. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Developing an evidence base of best practices for integrating computerized systems into the exam room: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal R; Vichich, Jennifer; Lang, Ian; Lin, Jessica; Zheng, Kai

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of health information technology systems, electronic health records in particular, is changing the nature of how clinicians interact with patients. Lack of knowledge remains on how best to integrate such systems in the exam room. The purpose of this systematic review was to (1) distill "best" behavioral and communication practices recommended in the literature for clinicians when interacting with patients in the presence of computerized systems during a clinical encounter, (2) weigh the evidence of each recommendation, and (3) rank evidence-based recommendations for electronic health record communication training initiatives for clinicians. We conducted a literature search of 6 databases, resulting in 52 articles included in the analysis. We extracted information such as study setting, research design, sample, findings, and implications. Recommendations were distilled based on consistent support for behavioral and communication practices across studies. Eight behavioral and communication practices received strong support of evidence in the literature and included specific aspects of using computerized systems to facilitate conversation and transparency in the exam room, such as spatial (re)organization of the exam room, maintaining nonverbal communication, and specific techniques that integrate the computerized system into the visit and engage the patient. Four practices, although patient-centered, have received insufficient evidence to date. We developed an evidence base of best practices for clinicians to maintain patient-centered communications in the presence of computerized systems in the exam room. Further work includes development and empirical evaluation of evidence-based guidelines to better integrate computerized systems into clinical care.

  3. Evidence-based guidelines for anxiety disorders: can they improve clinical outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S

    2006-10-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) enables clinicians to justify decision making, enhances the quality of medical practice, identifies unanswered research questions, and ensures the efficient practice of medicine. Implementation of evidence-based mental health programs requires education, time, and improved effort by administration, regulatory, and clinical professionals. Essential to these efforts are consistent incentives for change, effective training materials, and clear clinical guidelines. Guidelines exist within the framework of EBM. Good guidelines are simple, specific, and user friendly, focus on key clinical decisions, are based on research evidence, and present evidence and recommendations in a concise and accessible format. Potential limitations of guidelines to improve clinical outcomes in anxiety disorders are the widespread distribution of anxiety symptoms in primary care, health inequalities across patient groups, persistent misconceptions regarding psychotropic drugs, and low confidence in using simple psychological treatments. Clinical guidelines generally specify therapeutic areas covered and not covered, but often there is no mention of cost or cost effectiveness of treatment. Guidelines can inform clinical decision making, but administrators of drug formularies may regard themselves as being primarily responsible for limiting costs and access to certain medications, even if these decisions are at odds with guideline recommendations.

  4. Assessment: Botulinum neurotoxin for the treatment of movement disorders (an evidence-based review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D.M.; Blitzer, A.; Brashear, A.; Comella, C.; Dubinsky, R.; Hallett, M.; Jankovic, J.; Karp, B.; Ludlow, C.L.; Miyasaki, J.M.; Naumann, M.; So, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To perform an evidence-based review of the safety and efficacy of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in the treatment of movement disorders. Methods A literature search was performed including MEDLINE and Current Contents for therapeutic articles relevant to BoNT and selected movement disorders. Authors reviewed, abstracted, and classified articles based on American Academy of Neurology criteria (Class I–IV). Results The highest quality literature available for the respective indications was as follows: blepharospasm (two Class II studies); hemifacial spasm (one Class II and one Class III study); cervical dystonia (seven Class I studies); focal upper extremity dystonia (one Class I and three Class II studies); focal lower extremity dystonia (one Class II study); laryngeal dystonia (one Class I study); motor tics (one Class II study); and upper extremity essential tremor (two Class II studies). Recommendations Botulinum neurotoxin should be offered as a treatment option for the treatment of cervical dystonia (Level A), may be offered for blepharospasm, focal upper extremity dystonia, adductor laryngeal dystonia, and upper extremity essential tremor (Level B), and may be considered for hemifacial spasm, focal lower limb dystonia, and motor tics (Level C). While clinicians’ practice may suggest stronger recommendations in some of these indications, evidence-based conclusions are limited by the availability of data. PMID:18458230

  5. Improving evidence-based care in cystic fibrosis through quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Gary L; Weiland, Jeanne; Acton, James D; Ednick, Mathew; Chima, Amrita; VanDyke, Rhonda; Fenchel, Matthew C; Amin, Raouf S; Seid, Michael

    2010-10-01

    To increase clinician adherence to prescribing guidelines for pulmonary medications in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Quality improvement project with multiple time series design. The CF center at a tertiary care pediatric hospital in the United States. Children with CF who were eligible to receive oral azithromycin, nebulized dornase alfa, or inhaled tobramycin sulfate based on prescribing guidelines for CF lung disease. Evidence-based prescribing guidelines were designed by a local committee to reflect consensus recommendations from the CF Foundation. Clinicians and families were educated about guidelines. Adherence to prescribing guidelines was tracked using a local CF database and record reviews. Weekly meetings were used to highlight adherence failures and promote clinician accountability. The rate of clinician adherence to prescribing guidelines. One hundred seventy patients with CF were included. At the start of the project, the rate of clinician adherence to prescribing guidelines was 62%. After 3 months of the project, the rate of clinician adherence to prescribing guidelines was 87% (odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 3.0-7.0). The improvements in adherence to prescribing guidelines were sustained for 21 months of follow-up. Educating clinicians about prescribing guidelines, sharing guidelines with families, and monitoring clinician adherence improve prescribing adherence to evidence-based recommendations.

  6. Sicily statement on classification and development of evidence-based practice learning assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilson Julie K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the steps of evidence-based practice (EBP has become standard curriculum for health professions at both student and professional levels. Determining the best methods for evaluating EBP learning is hampered by a dearth of valid and practical assessment tools and by the absence of guidelines for classifying the purpose of those that exist. Conceived and developed by delegates of the Fifth International Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers, the aim of this statement is to provide guidance for purposeful classification and development of tools to assess EBP learning. Discussion This paper identifies key principles for designing EBP learning assessment tools, recommends a common taxonomy for new and existing tools, and presents the Classification Rubric for EBP Assessment Tools in Education (CREATE framework for classifying such tools. Recommendations are provided for developers of EBP learning assessments and priorities are suggested for the types of assessments that are needed. Examples place existing EBP assessments into the CREATE framework to demonstrate how a common taxonomy might facilitate purposeful development and use of EBP learning assessment tools. Summary The widespread adoption of EBP into professional education requires valid and reliable measures of learning. Limited tools exist with established psychometrics. This international consensus statement strives to provide direction for developers of new EBP learning assessment tools and a framework for classifying the purposes of such tools.

  7. The diagnosis and management of inhalation injury: An evidence based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, C J; Tan, A; Smailes, S; Dziewulski, P

    2018-02-01

    Smoke inhalation injury (II) is an independent risk factor for mortality in burns and its management is inherently complex. We aim to make recommendations for best practice in managing II and its sequelae by reviewing all available current evidence in order to provide an evidence-based approach. We conducted a systematic search of the Cochrane database and Embase using PRISMA guidelines with no patient population exclusion criteria. Published work was reviewed and evidence levels graded. We identified 521 abstracts for inclusion. Of the 84 articles identified for secondary review, 28 papers were excluded leaving 56 papers suitable for final inclusion. We are able to identify a number of strategies in both diagnosis and treatment of II that have support in the published literature, including the role of bronchoscopy, permissive hypercapnia, nebulized heparin and hydroxycobalamin. Other strategies have not been shown to be harmful, but their efficacy is also not firmly established, such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation and exogenous surfactant. Prophylactic antibiotics and corticosteroids are not recommended. In general, published evidence for II is mostly Level 3 or below, due to a noticeable lack of large-scale human studies. This represents a challenge for evidence-based burns practice as a whole. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Beyond too little, too late and too much, too soon: a pathway towards evidence-based, respectful maternity care worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Suellen; Abalos, Edgardo; Chamillard, Monica; Ciapponi, Agustin; Colaci, Daniela; Comandé, Daniel; Diaz, Virginia; Geller, Stacie; Hanson, Claudia; Langer, Ana; Manuelli, Victoria; Millar, Kathryn; Morhason-Bello, Imran; Castro, Cynthia Pileggi; Pileggi, Vicky Nogueira; Robinson, Nuriya; Skaer, Michelle; Souza, João Paulo; Vogel, Joshua P; Althabe, Fernando

    2016-10-29

    On the continuum of maternal health care, two extreme situations exist: too little, too late (TLTL) and too much, too soon (TMTS). TLTL describes care with inadequate resources, below evidence-based standards, or care withheld or unavailable until too late to help. TLTL is an underlying problem associated with high maternal mortality and morbidity. TMTS describes the routine over-medicalisation of normal pregnancy and birth. TMTS includes unnecessary use of non-evidence-based interventions, as well as use of interventions that can be life saving when used appropriately, but harmful when applied routinely or overused. As facility births increase, so does the recognition that TMTS causes harm and increases health costs, and often concentrates disrespect and abuse. Although TMTS is typically ascribed to high-income countries and TLTL to low-income and middle-income ones, social and health inequities mean these extremes coexist in many countries. A global approach to quality and equitable maternal health, supporting the implementation of respectful, evidence-based care for all, is urgently needed. We present a systematic review of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for routine antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal care, categorising them as recommended, recommended only for clinical indications, and not recommended. We also present prevalence data from middle-income countries for specific clinical practices, which demonstrate TLTL and increasing TMTS. Health-care providers and health systems need to ensure that all women receive high-quality, evidence-based, equitable and respectful care. The right amount of care needs to be offered at the right time, and delivered in a manner that respects, protects, and promotes human rights. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-subject experimental design for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byiers, Breanne J; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J

    2012-11-01

    Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. The authors discuss the requirements of each design, followed by advantages and disadvantages. The logic and methods for evaluating effects in SSED are reviewed as well as contemporary issues regarding data analysis with SSED data sets. Examples of challenges in executing SSEDs are included. Specific exemplars of how SSEDs have been used in speech-language pathology research are provided throughout. SSED studies provide a flexible alternative to traditional group designs in the development and identification of evidence-based practice in the field of communication sciences and disorders.

  10. An evidence-based approach to human dermatomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M W L; McPhee, R W; Stringer, M D

    2008-07-01

    The dermatome is a fundamental concept in human anatomy and of major importance in clinical practice. There are significant variations in current dermatome maps in standard anatomy texts. The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic literature review of the available evidence for the distribution of human dermatomes. Particular emphasis was placed on the technique of ascertainment, the location and extent of each dermatome, the number of subjects studied, and methodologic limitations. Our findings demonstrate that current dermatome maps are inaccurate and based on flawed studies. After selecting the best available evidence, a novel evidence-based dermatome map was constructed. This represents the most consistent tactile dermatomal areas for each spinal dorsal nerve root found in most individuals. In addition to highlighting the orderly arrangement, areas of consistency and clinical usefulness of dermatomes, their overlap and variability deserve greater emphasis. This review demonstrates the validity of an evidence-based approach to an anatomical concept.

  11. Criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani Arabshahi, SeyyedKamran; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Shams-Ardakani, MohammadReza; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2015-07-01

    The major difference between Iranian traditional medicine and allopathic medicine is in the application  of  evidence  and  documents.  In  this  study,  criteria  for  evidence-based  practice  in  Iranian traditional medicine and its rules of practice were studied. The experts' views were investigated through in- depth, semi-structured interviews and the results were categorized into four main categories including Designing clinical questions/clinical question-based search, critical appraisal, resource search criteria and clinical prescription appraisal. Although the application of evidence in Iranian traditional medicine follows Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) principles but it benefits from its own rules, regulations, and criteria that are compatible with EBM.

  12. Evidence-based health information and risk competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Albrecht, Martina; Steckelberg, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Consumers and patients want to be included in decisions regarding their own health and have an ethically justified claim on informed decisions. Therefore, sound information is required, but health information is often misleading and based on different interests. The risks of disease and the benefits of medical interventions tend to be overestimated, whereas harm is often underestimated. Evidence-based health information has to fulfil certain criteria, for instance, it should be evidence-based, independent, complete, true as well as understandable. The aim of a medical intervention has to be explained. The different therapeutic options including the option not to intervene have to be delineated. The probabilities for success, lack of success and unwanted side effects have to be communicated in a numerical and understandable manner. Patients have the right to reject medical interventions without any sanctions.

  13. How to teach evidence-based medicine to urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Mostafaie, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this article is to help develop, disseminate, and evaluate resources that can be used to practice and teach EBM for urology residents and continuing education of urologists to reduce the gap between research and clinical practice. Urology departments should build capacity for residents to shape the future of quality and safety in healthcare through translating evidence into practice. Cutting edge approaches require knowing how to teach Evidence-based urology, to make Bio-statistics easy to understanding and how to lead improvement at every level. The authors shared their experience about ‘what works’ in a surgical department to building an Evidence-based environment and high quality of cares. PMID:22279316

  14. Evidence-Based and Personalized Medicine. It's [AND] not [OR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, Sahar; Takkenberg, Johanna Jm; Treasure, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Good clinical practice is an amalgamation of personalized medicine with evidence-based medicine in the best interests of patient. Hence, our title uses Boolean operators to indicate that it is [AND] not [OR]. This is the syntax of formal searching for systematic reviews, ensuring that all the evidence is found. Comprehensive evidence-based guidance can thus be formulated. Many residents and fellows around the world, and their chiefs, are now exposed to consensus documents, white papers, levels of appropriateness, and guidelines and are in many jurisdictions expected to comply with them. However, they are the summation of many forms of evidence, each of which has its place, and we consider them in turn in this article. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A conceptual model for growing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vratny, Amy; Shriver, Deb

    2007-01-01

    Nursing administration at a small medical center is developing and implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) model of care to support a culture of quality care, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. The purpose of this article is to describe a conceptual model for EBP that addresses how to overcome barriers to implementation. Clinician expertise and values, experience, patient preference and expectation, and caring become grounded in a practice environment that must strive to become rooted in clinical research to evolve into a practice that is evidence-based. Education helps to nourish EBP, but leadership, enthusiasm, mentorship, clinical inquiry, and reflective practice make EBP thrive. The EBP ambassadors branch out to each department to grow journal clubs, EBP Web pages, EBP projects, research utilization projects, and staff-led practice reviews. The fruits are quality patient care and outcomes, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth.

  16. Validating evidence based decision making in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüssler, Emil Karl; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak

    Surgeons who perform prolapse surgeries face the dilemma of choosing to use mesh, with its assumed benefits, and the risks associated with mesh. In this paper, we examine whether decisions to use mesh is evidence based. Based on data of 30,398 patients from the Swedish National Quality Register...... of Gynecological Surgery we examine factors related to decisions to use mesh. Our results indicate that decisions to use mesh are not evidence based, and cannot be explained neither by FDA safety communications, nor by medical conditions usually assumed to predict its usage. Instead, decisions to use mesh...... are highly influenced by the geographical placement of surgeons. Therfore, decisions to use mesh are boundedly rationality, rather than rational....

  17. Creating the evidence base for quality improvement collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittman, Brian S

    2004-06-01

    Intensive efforts are under way to improve health care quality and safety throughout the United States and abroad. Many of these efforts use the quality improvement collaborative method, an approach emphasizing collaborative learning and exchange of insights and support among a set of health care organizations. Unfortunately, the widespread acceptance and reliance on this approach are based not on solid evidence but on shared beliefs and anecdotal affirmations that may overstate the actual effectiveness of the method. More effective use of the collaborative method will require a commitment by users, researchers, and other stakeholders to rigorous, objective evaluation and the creation of a valid, useful knowledge and evidence base. Development of this evidence base will require improved conceptions of the nature of quality problems, quality improvement processes, and the types of research needed to elucidate these processes. Researchers, journal editors, and funding agencies must also cooperate to ensure that published evaluations are relevant, comprehensive, and cumulative.

  18. Food & health forum meeting: evidence-based nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Helen L; Aggett, Peter J; Richardson, David P; Stowell, Julian D

    2011-01-01

    The present report summarises a meeting held by the Food & Health Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine, London, on 27 May 2010. The objective of the meeting was to review the problems associated with the use of evidence-based nutrition and to discuss what constitutes the efficacy for foods and food constituents and how the strength and consistency of the evidence can be assessed and adapted to circumstances in which health claims are to be used on food products. The meeting highlighted the limitations with the present evidence-based nutrition models with the prospect that this may have long-term consequences for nutrition science and ultimately the consumer who may not benefit from new science that could have an impact on health.

  19. [Evidence-based management of medical disposable materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai

    2009-03-01

    Evidence-based management of medical disposable materials pays attention to collect evidence comprehensively and systematically, accumulate and create evidence through its own work and also evaluate evidence strictly. This can be used as a function to guide out job. Medical disposable materials evidence system contains product register qualification, product quality certification, supplier's behavior, internal and external communication evidence. Managers can find different ways in creating and using evidence referring to specific inside and outside condition. Evidence-based management can help accelerating the development of management of medical disposable materials from traditional experience pattern to a systematic and scientific pattern. It also has the very important meaning to improve medical quality, control the unreasonable growth of medical expense and make purchase and supply chain be more efficient.

  20. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – I. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Čuk

    2003-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based medicine is a method that helps physicians find and critically evaluate evidences from the medical literature, and apply the evidences in clinical decision-making. In clinical practice the method supplements core medical skills, clinical experience and emphasizes the importance of clinical research evidence. Evidencebased medicine is characterised by two fundamental principles: first, the scientific evidences alone do not suffice for clinical decision-making, second...