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Sample records for eukaryotic thermophile alvinella

  1. Deep transcriptome-sequencing and proteome analysis of the hydrothermal vent annelid Alvinella pompejana identifies the CvP-bias as a robust measure of eukaryotic thermostability

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    Holder Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alvinella pompejana is an annelid worm that inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean. Living at a depth of approximately 2500 meters, these worms experience extreme environmental conditions, including high temperature and pressure as well as high levels of sulfide and heavy metals. A. pompejana is one of the most thermotolerant metazoans, making this animal a subject of great interest for studies of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Results In order to complement existing EST resources we performed deep sequencing of the A. pompejana transcriptome. We identified several thousand novel protein-coding transcripts, nearly doubling the sequence data for this annelid. We then performed an extensive survey of previously established prokaryotic thermoadaptation measures to search for global signals of thermoadaptation in A. pompejana in comparison with mesophilic eukaryotes. In an orthologous set of 457 proteins, we found that the best indicator of thermoadaptation was the difference in frequency of charged versus polar residues (CvP-bias, which was highest in A. pompejana. CvP-bias robustly distinguished prokaryotic thermophiles from prokaryotic mesophiles, as well as the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum from mesophilic eukaryotes. Experimental values for thermophilic proteins supported higher CvP-bias as a measure of thermal stability when compared to their mesophilic orthologs. Proteome-wide mean CvP-bias also correlated with the body temperatures of homeothermic birds and mammals. Conclusions Our work extends the transcriptome resources for A. pompejana and identifies the CvP-bias as a robust and widely applicable measure of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Reviewer This article was reviewed by Sándor Pongor, L. Aravind and Anthony M. Poole.

  2. Insight into structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex by utilizing the genome of a eukaryotic thermophile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amlacher, Stefan; Sarges, Phillip; Flemming, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is composed of ~30 nucleoporins (Nups), remain elusive. Here, we report the genome of the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum (ct) and identify the complete repertoire of Nups therein. The the...... of a thermophilic eukaryote for studying complex molecular machines....

  3. Interaction network of the ribosome assembly machinery from a eukaryotic thermophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baßler, Jochen; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Kallas, Martina; Kornprobst, Markus; Calviño, Fabiola R; Gnädig, Marén; Thoms, Matthias; Stier, Gunter; Ismail, Sherif; Kharde, Satyavati; Castillo, Nestor; Griesel, Sabine; Bastuck, Sonja; Bradatsch, Bettina; Thomson, Emma; Flemming, Dirk; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed

    2017-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in eukaryotic cells is a highly dynamic and complex process innately linked to cell proliferation. The assembly of ribosomes is driven by a myriad of biogenesis factors that shape pre-ribosomal particles by processing and folding the ribosomal RNA and incorporating ribosomal proteins. Biochemical approaches allowed the isolation and characterization of pre-ribosomal particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which lead to a spatiotemporal map of biogenesis intermediates along the path from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. Here, we cloned almost the entire set (∼180) of ribosome biogenesis factors from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum in order to perform an in-depth analysis of their protein-protein interaction network as well as exploring the suitability of these thermostable proteins for structural studies. First, we performed a systematic screen, testing about 80 factors for crystallization and structure determination. Next, we performed a yeast 2-hybrid analysis and tested about 32,000 binary combinations, which identified more than 1000 protein-protein contacts between the thermophilic ribosome assembly factors. To exemplary verify several of these interactions, we performed biochemical reconstitution with the focus on the interaction network between 90S pre-ribosome factors forming the ctUTP-A and ctUTP-B modules, and the Brix-domain containing assembly factors of the pre-60S subunit. Our work provides a rich resource for biochemical reconstitution and structural analyses of the conserved ribosome assembly machinery from a eukaryotic thermophile. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Insights into metazoan evolution from alvinella pompejana cDNAs

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    Thierry Jean-Claude

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alvinella pompejana is a representative of Annelids, a key phylum for evo-devo studies that is still poorly studied at the sequence level. A. pompejana inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vents and is currently known as one of the most thermotolerant Eukaryotes in marine environments, withstanding the largest known chemical and thermal ranges (from 5 to 105°C. This tube-dwelling worm forms dense colonies on the surface of hydrothermal chimneys and can withstand long periods of hypo/anoxia and long phases of exposure to hydrogen sulphides. A. pompejana specifically inhabits chimney walls of hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise. To survive, Alvinella has developed numerous adaptations at the physiological and molecular levels, such as an increase in the thermostability of proteins and protein complexes. It represents an outstanding model organism for studying adaptation to harsh physicochemical conditions and for isolating stable macromolecules resistant to high temperatures. Results We have constructed four full length enriched cDNA libraries to investigate the biology and evolution of this intriguing animal. Analysis of more than 75,000 high quality reads led to the identification of 15,858 transcripts and 9,221 putative protein sequences. Our annotation reveals a good coverage of most animal pathways and networks with a prevalence of transcripts involved in oxidative stress resistance, detoxification, anti-bacterial defence, and heat shock protection. Alvinella proteins seem to show a slow evolutionary rate and a higher similarity with proteins from Vertebrates compared to proteins from Arthropods or Nematodes. Their composition shows enrichment in positively charged amino acids that might contribute to their thermostability. The gene content of Alvinella reveals that an important pool of genes previously considered to be specific to Deuterostomes were in fact already present in the last common ancestor of the Bilaterian

  5. Physical-chemical properties of C-phycocyanin isolated from an acido-thermophilic eukaryote, Cyanidium caldarium.

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    Kao, O H; Edwards, M R; Berns, D S

    1975-01-01

    C-Phycocyanin from an acido-thermophilic eukaryotic alga, Cyanidium caldarium, was characterized with respect to subunit structure, absorption spectrum and fluorescence properties and was found to be similar to C-phycocyanins from mesophilic sources. The pH-dependence of fluorescence polarization and the changes in sedimentation velocity as a function of pH, concentration and temperature indicate the presence of extremely large amounts of unusually stable 19S aggregates. It was not possible to disaggregate this phycocyanin completely to monomer under normal conditions. The amino acid composition is similar to that of phycocyanins from other thermophilic and halophilic sources. The isoelectric point of this C-phycocyanin was 5.11, an unusually high value. The properties of this C-phycocyanin suggest an increase in protein stability as its mode of adaptation to the environmental stress of high temperature. Images Fig. 7. PMID:239703

  6. An integrated approach for genome annotation of the eukaryotic thermophile Chaetomium thermophilum

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    Bock, Thomas; Chen, Wei-Hua; Ori, Alessandro; Malik, Nayab; Silva-Martin, Noella; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Powell, Sean T.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Smyshlyaev, Georgy; Vonkova, Ivana; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Doerks, Tobias; Nesme, Leo; Baßler, Jochen; Kos, Martin; Hurt, Ed; Carlomagno, Teresa; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Barabas, Orsolya; Müller, Christoph W.; van Noort, Vera; Beck, Martin; Bork, Peer

    2014-01-01

    The thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum holds great promise for structural biology. To increase the efficiency of its biochemical and structural characterization and to explore its thermophilic properties beyond those of individual proteins, we obtained transcriptomics and proteomics data, and integrated them with computational annotation methods and a multitude of biochemical experiments conducted by the structural biology community. We considerably improved the genome annotation of Chaetomium thermophilum and characterized the transcripts and expression of thousands of genes. We furthermore show that the composition and structure of the expressed proteome of Chaetomium thermophilum is similar to its mesophilic relatives. Data were deposited in a publicly available repository and provide a rich source to the structural biology community. PMID:25398899

  7. Characterization and function of the first antibiotic isolated from a vent organism: the extremophile metazoan Alvinella pompejana.

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    Aurélie Tasiemski

    Full Text Available The emblematic hydrothermal worm Alvinella pompejana is one of the most thermo tolerant animal known on Earth. It relies on a symbiotic association offering a unique opportunity to discover biochemical adaptations that allow animals to thrive in such a hostile habitat. Here, by studying the Pompeii worm, we report on the discovery of the first antibiotic peptide from a deep-sea organism, namely alvinellacin. After purification and peptide sequencing, both the gene and the peptide tertiary structures were elucidated. As epibionts are not cultivated so far and because of lethal decompression effects upon Alvinella sampling, we developed shipboard biological assays to demonstrate that in addition to act in the first line of defense against microbial invasion, alvinellacin shapes and controls the worm's epibiotic microflora. Our results provide insights into the nature of an abyssal antimicrobial peptide (AMP and into the manner in which an extremophile eukaryote uses it to interact with the particular microbial community of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem. Unlike earlier studies done on hydrothermal vents that all focused on the microbial side of the symbiosis, our work gives a view of this interaction from the host side.

  8. Characterization and Function of the First Antibiotic Isolated from a Vent Organism: The Extremophile Metazoan Alvinella pompejana

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    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Jung, Sascha; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Jollivet, Didier; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Pradillon, Florence; Vetriani, Costantino; Hecht, Oliver; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Gelhaus, Christoph; Hung, Chien-Wen; Tholey, Andreas; Leippe, Matthias; Grötzinger, Joachim; Gaill, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The emblematic hydrothermal worm Alvinella pompejana is one of the most thermo tolerant animal known on Earth. It relies on a symbiotic association offering a unique opportunity to discover biochemical adaptations that allow animals to thrive in such a hostile habitat. Here, by studying the Pompeii worm, we report on the discovery of the first antibiotic peptide from a deep-sea organism, namely alvinellacin. After purification and peptide sequencing, both the gene and the peptide tertiary structures were elucidated. As epibionts are not cultivated so far and because of lethal decompression effects upon Alvinella sampling, we developed shipboard biological assays to demonstrate that in addition to act in the first line of defense against microbial invasion, alvinellacin shapes and controls the worm's epibiotic microflora. Our results provide insights into the nature of an abyssal antimicrobial peptide (AMP) and into the manner in which an extremophile eukaryote uses it to interact with the particular microbial community of the hydrothermal vent ecosystem. Unlike earlier studies done on hydrothermal vents that all focused on the microbial side of the symbiosis, our work gives a view of this interaction from the host side. PMID:24776651

  9. Thermophilic cellobiohydrolase

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    Sapra, Rajat; Park, Joshua I.; Datta, Supratim; Simmons, Blake A.

    2017-04-18

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a polypeptide comprising a first amino acid sequence having at least 70% identity with the amino acid sequence of Csac GH5 wherein said first amino acid sequence has a thermostable or thermophilic cellobiohydrolase (CBH) or exoglucanase activity.

  10. Anaerobic Thermophiles

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    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  11. Consistent mutational paths predict eukaryotic thermostability

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    van Noort Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomes of thermophilic prokaryotes have been instrumental in structural biology and successfully exploited in biotechnology, however many proteins required for eukaryotic cell function are absent from bacteria or archaea. With Chaetomium thermophilum, Thielavia terrestris and Thielavia heterothallica three genome sequences of thermophilic eukaryotes have been published. Results Studying the genomes and proteomes of these thermophilic fungi, we found common strategies of thermal adaptation across the different kingdoms of Life, including amino acid biases and a reduced genome size. A phylogenetics-guided comparison of thermophilic proteomes with those of other, mesophilic Sordariomycetes revealed consistent amino acid substitutions associated to thermophily that were also present in an independent lineage of thermophilic fungi. The most consistent pattern is the substitution of lysine by arginine, which we could find in almost all lineages but has not been extensively used in protein stability engineering. By exploiting mutational paths towards the thermophiles, we could predict particular amino acid residues in individual proteins that contribute to thermostability and validated some of them experimentally. By determining the three-dimensional structure of an exemplar protein from C. thermophilum (Arx1, we could also characterise the molecular consequences of some of these mutations. Conclusions The comparative analysis of these three genomes not only enhances our understanding of the evolution of thermophily, but also provides new ways to engineer protein stability.

  12. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Alvinella pompejana Cys-Loop Receptor Homologues.

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    Eveline Wijckmans

    Full Text Available Cys-loop receptors are membrane spanning ligand-gated ion channels involved in fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Three-dimensional structures of these ion channels, determined by X-ray crystallography or electron microscopy, have revealed valuable information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand recognition, channel gating and ion conductance. To extend and validate the current insights, we here present promising candidates for further structural studies. We report the biochemical and functional characterization of Cys-loop receptor homologues identified in the proteome of Alvinella pompejana, an extremophilic, polychaete annelid found in hydrothermal vents at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Seven homologues were selected, named Alpo1-7. Five of them, Alpo2-6, were unidentified prior to this study. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments revealed that wild type Alpo5 and Alpo6, both sharing remarkably high sequence identity with human glycine receptor α subunits, are anion-selective channels that can be activated by glycine, GABA and taurine. Furthermore, upon expression in insect cells fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography experiments indicated that four homologues, Alpo1, Alpo4, Alpo6 and Alpo7, can be extracted out of the membrane by a wide variety of detergents while maintaining their oligomeric state. Finally, large-scale purification efforts of Alpo1, Alpo4 and Alpo6 resulted in milligram amounts of biochemically stable and monodisperse protein. Overall, our results establish the evolutionary conservation of glycine receptors in annelids and pave the way for future structural studies.

  13. Cellulolytic potential of thermophilic species from four fungal orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of fungal biomass degradation is important for understanding the turnover of biological materials in nature and has important implications for industrial biomass conversion. In recent years there has been an increasing interest in elucidating the biological role of thermophilic fungi...... and in characterization of their industrially useful enzymes. In the present study we investigated the cellulolytic potential of 16 thermophilic fungi from the three ascomycete orders Sordariales, Eurotiales and Onygenales and from the zygomycete order Mucorales thus covering all fungal orders that include thermophiles....... Thermophilic fungi are the only described eukaryotes that can grow at temperatures above 45 ºC. All 16 fungi were able to grow on crystalline cellulose but their secreted enzymes showed widely different cellulolytic activities, pH optima and thermostabilities. Interestingly, in contrast to previous reports, we...

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of the thermophilic biomass-degrading fungi Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Grimwood, Jane; Reid, Ian; Ishmael, Nadeeza; John, Tricia; Darmond, Corinne; Moisan, Marie-Claude; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Lombard, Vincent; Natvig, Donald O.; Lindquist, Erika; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lucas, Susan; Harris, Paul; Powlowski, Justin; Bellemare, Annie; Taylor, David; Butler, Gregory; de Vries, Ronald P.; Allijn, Iris E.; van den Brink, Joost; Ushinsky, Sophia; Storms, Reginald; Powell, Amy J.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Baker, Scott E.; Magnuson, Jon; LaBoissiere, Sylvie; Clutterbuck, A. John; Martinez, Diego; Wogulis, Mark; de Leon, Alfredo Lopez; Rey, Michael W.; Tsang, Adrian

    2011-10-02

    Thermostable enzymes and thermophilic cell factories may afford economic advantages in the production of many chemicals and biomass-based fuels. Here we describe and compare the genomes of two thermophilic fungi, Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris. To our knowledge, these genomes are the first described for thermophilic eukaryotes and the first complete telomere-to-telomere genomes for filamentous fungi. Genome analyses and experimental data suggest that both thermophiles are capable of hydrolyzing all major polysaccharides found in biomass. Examination of transcriptome data and secreted proteins suggests that the two fungi use shared approaches in the hydrolysis of cellulose and xylan but distinct mechanisms in pectin degradation. Characterization of the biomass-hydrolyzing activity of recombinant enzymes suggests that these organisms are highly efficient in biomass decomposition at both moderate and high temperatures. Furthermore, we present evidence suggesting that aside from representing a potential reservoir of thermostable enzymes, thermophilic fungi are amenable to manipulation using classical and molecular genetics.

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of the thermophilic biomass-degrading fungi Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Grimwood, Jane; Reid, Ian; Ishmael, Nadeeza; John, Tricia; Darmond, Corinne; Moisan, Marie-Claude; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Lombard, Vincent; Natvig, Donald O.; Lindquist, Erika; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lucas, Susan; Harris, Paul; Powlowski, Justin; Bellemare, Annie; Taylor, David; Butler, Gregory; de Vries, Ronald P.; Allijn, Iris E.; van den Brink, Joost; Ushinsky, Sophia; Storms, Reginald; Powell, Amy J.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Baker, Scott. E.; Magnuson, Jon; LaBoissiere, Sylvie; Clutterbuck, A. John; Martinez, Diego; Wogulis, Mark; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael W.; Tsang, Adrian

    2011-05-16

    Thermostable enzymes and thermophilic cell factories may afford economic advantages in the production of many chemicals and biomass-based fuels. Here we describe and compare the genomes of two thermophilic fungi, Myceliophthora thermophila and Thielavia terrestris. To our knowledge, these genomes are the first described for thermophilic eukaryotes and the first complete telomere-to-telomere genomes for filamentous fungi. Genome analyses and experimental data suggest that both thermophiles are capable of hydrolyzing all major polysaccharides found in biomass. Examination of transcriptome data and secreted proteins suggests that the two fungi use shared approaches in the hydrolysis of cellulose and xylan but distinct mechanisms in pectin degradation. Characterization of the biomass-hydrolyzing activity of recombinant enzymes suggests that these organisms are highly efficient in biomass decomposition at both moderate and high temperatures. Furthermore, we present evidence suggesting that aside from representing a potential reservoir of thermostable enzymes, thermophilic fungi are amenable to manipulation using classical and molecular genetics.

  16. Thermophilic Biohydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    Dark fermentative hydrogen production at thermophilic conditions is attractive process for biofuel production. From thermodynamic point of view, higher temperatures favor biohydrogen production. Highest hydrogen yields are always associated with acetate, or with mixed acetate- butyrate type...... fermentation. On the contrary the hydrogen yield decreases, with increasing concentrations of lactate, ethanol or propionate. Major factors affecting dark fermentative biohydrogen production are organic loading rate (OLR), pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT), dissolved hydrogen and dissolved carbon dioxide...... concentrations, and soluble metabolic profile (SMP). A number of thermophilic and extreme thermophilic cultures (pure and mixed) have been studied for biohydrogen production from different feedstocks - pure substrates and waste/wastewaters. Variety of process technologies (operational conditions...

  17. ENDOSPORES OF THERMOPHILIC FERMENTATIVE BACTERIA

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    Volpi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    solely based on endospores of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which presumably constitute only a small fraction of the total thermophilic endospore community reaching cold environments. My PhD project developed an experimental framework for using thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) to trace...

  18. Hydrogen Production by Thermophilic Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Willquist, K.; Zeidan, A.A.; Vrije, de T.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the many ways hydrogen can be produced, this chapter focuses on biological hydrogen production by thermophilic bacteria and archaea in dark fermentations. The thermophiles are held as promising candidates for a cost-effective fermentation process, because of their relatively high yields and broad

  19. Anaerobic thermophilic biogas process

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    Angelidaki, I.

    1992-06-01

    Investigations into several important aspects concerning thermophilic, anaerobic treatment of livestock wastes and other types of wastes in Denmark was carried out. Lipids, typically found in industrial organic waste, could be effectively degraded during anaerobic treatment with a high biogas yield. Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) could also inhibit the biogas process at relatively low concentrations. Lipid-containing waste should be introduced gradually and fed continuously to the biogas process in order to permit adaptation. Fed-bacth cultivation was shown to be a successful method for enriching bacteria which are exposed to substrate inhibition. The end product of the degradation were methane and carbon dioxide. Ammonia concentrations at or above 4 g-N/l were shown to inhibit thermophilic digestion of cattle manure, but if the ammonia concentration was gradually increased, adaptation of the process occurred. It was found that addition of bentonite or the waste product bentonite-bound oil counteracted to some extent the inhibitory effect of ammonia. The effect was observed only when the ammonia concentration was increased gradually. When the ammonia load was high, reduction of the temperature below 55 Deg. C was shown to have a positive effect on process performance, while at ammonia non-inhibitory concentrations a temperature of 55 deg. C was found to be the optimal temperature. A mathematical model of the biogas process was formulated with main emphasis on free ammonia inhibition, pH simulation and temperature effects. (au) (140 refs.).

  20. Thermophilic degradation of cellulosic biomass

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    Ng, T.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1982-12-01

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass to chemical feedstocks and fuel by microbial fermentation is an important objective of developing biotechnology. Direct fermentation of cellulosic derivatives to ethanol by thermophilic bacteria offers a promising approach to this goal. Fermentations at elevated temperatures lowers the energy demand for cooling and also facilitates the recovery of volatile products. In addition, thermophilic microorganisms possess enzymes with greater stability than those from mesophilic microorganisms. Three anaerobic thermophilic cocultures that ferment cellulosic substrate mainly to ethanol have been described: Clostridium thermocellum/Clostriidium thermohydrosulfuricum, C. thermocellum/Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum, and C. thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus sp. nov. The growth characteristics and metabolic features of these cocultures are reviewed.

  1. Autophagy in unicellular eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiel, J.A.K.W.

    2010-01-01

    Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components

  2. Methanogenesis in Thermophilic Biogas Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    Methanogenesis in thermophilic biogas reactors fed with different wastes is examined. The specific methanogenic activity with acetate or hydrogen as substrate reflected the organic loading of the specific reactor examined. Increasing the loading of thermophilic reactors stabilized the process...... as indicated by a lower concentration of volatile fatty acids in the effluent from the reactors. The specific methanogenic activity in a thermophilic pilot-plant biogas reactor fed with a mixture of cow and pig manure reflected the stability of the reactor. The numbers of methanogens counted by the most...... against Methanothrix soehngenii or Methanothrix CALS-I in any of the thermophilic biogas reactors examined. Studies using 2-14C-labeled acetate showed that at high concentrations (more than approx. 1 mM) acetate was metabolized via the aceticlastic pathway, transforming the methyl-group of acetate...

  3. Structural disorder in eukaryotes.

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    Rita Pancsa

    Full Text Available Based on early bioinformatic studies on a handful of species, the frequency of structural disorder of proteins is generally thought to be much higher in eukaryotes than in prokaryotes. To refine this view, we present here a comparative prediction study and analysis of 194 fully described eukaryotic proteomes and 87 reference prokaryotes for structural disorder. We found that structural disorder does distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes, but its frequency spans a very wide range in the two superkingdoms that largely overlap. The number of disordered binding regions and different Pfam domain types also contribute to distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes. Unexpectedly, the highest levels--and highest variability--of predicted disorder is found in protists, i.e. single-celled eukaryotes, often surpassing more complex eukaryote organisms, plants and animals. This trend contrasts with that of the number of domain types, which increases rather monotonously toward more complex organisms. The level of structural disorder appears to be strongly correlated with lifestyle, because some obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts have the lowest levels, whereas host-changing parasites have the highest level of predicted disorder. We conclude that protists have been the evolutionary hot-bed of experimentation with structural disorder, in a period when structural disorder was actively invented and the major functional classes of disordered proteins established.

  4. Thermophilic molds: Biology and applications.

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    Singh, Bijender; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J; Johri, B N; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-11-01

    Thermophilic molds thrive in a variety of natural habitats including soils, composts, wood chip piles, nesting materials of birds and other animals, municipal refuse and others, and ubiquitous in their distribution. These molds grow in simple media containing carbon and nitrogen sources and mineral salts. Polyamines are synthesized in these molds and the composition of lipids varies considerably, predominantly containing palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids with low levels of lauric, palmiotoleic and stearic acids. Thermophilic molds are capable of efficiently degrading organic materials by secreting thermostable enzymes, which are useful in the bioremediation of industrial wastes and effluents that are rich in oil, heavy metals, anti-nutritional factors such as phytic acid and polysaccharides. Thermophilic molds synthesize several antimicrobial substances and biotechnologically useful miscellaneous enzymes. The analysis of genomes of thermophilic molds reveals high G:C contents, shorter introns and intergenic regions with lesser repetitive sequences, and further confirms their ability to degrade agro-residues efficiently. Genetic engineering has aided in ameliorating the characteristics of the enzymes of thermophilic molds. This review is aimed at focusing on the biology of thermophilic molds with emphasis on recent developments in the analysis of genomes, genetic engineering and potential applications.

  5. Comparative genomics of Eukaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, Vera van

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on developing comparative genomics methods in eukaryotes, with an emphasis on applications for gene function prediction and regulatory element detection. In the past, methods have been developed to predict functional associations between gene pairs in prokaryotes. The challenge

  6. Were the original eubacteria thermophiles?

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    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Gupta, R.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.; Johnson, P. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Thermotoga maritima is one of the more unusual eubacteria: It is highly thermophilic, growing at temperatures higher than any other eubacterium; its cell wall appears to have a unique structure and its lipids a unique composition; and the organism is surrounded by a loose-fitting sheath of unknown function. Its phenotypic uniqueness is matched by its phylogenetic position; Thermotoga maritima represents the deepest known branching in the eubacterial line of descent, as measured by ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons. T. maritima also represents the most slowly evolving of eubacterial lineages. The fact that the two deepest branchings in the eubacterial line of descent (the other, the green non-sulfur bacteria and relatives, i.e. Chloroflexus, Thermomicrobium, etc.) are both basically thermophilic and slowly evolving, strongly suggests that all eubacteria have ultimately arisen from a thermophilic ancestor.

  7. Precambrian Skeletonized Microbial Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Jere H.

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal heterotrophic eukaryotes are mostly absent from the Precambrian, although algal eukaryotes appear about 2.2 billion years ago. Tintinnids, radiolaria and foraminifera have molecular origins well back into the Precambrian yet no representatives of these groups are known with certainty in that time. These data infer times of the last common ancestors, not the appearance of true representatives of these groups which may well have diversified or not been preserved since those splits. Previous reports of these groups in the Precambrian are misinterpretations of other objects in the fossil record. Reported tintinnids at 1600 mya from China are metamorphic shards or mineral artifacts, the many specimens from 635-715 mya in Mongolia may be eukaryotes but they are not tintinnids, and the putative tintinnids at 580 mya in the Doushantou formation of China are diagenetic alterations of well-known acritarchs. The oldest supposed foraminiferan is Titanotheca from 550 to 565 mya rocks in South America and Africa is based on the occurrence of rutile in the tests and in a few modern agglutinated foraminifera, as well as the agglutinated tests. Neither of these nor the morphology are characteristic of foraminifera; hence these fossils remain as indeterminate microfossils. Platysolenites, an agglutinated tube identical to the modern foraminiferan Bathysiphon, occurs in the latest Neoproterozoic in Russia, Canada, and the USA (California). Some of the larger fossils occurring in typical Ediacaran (late Neoproterozoic) assemblages may be xenophyophorids (very large foraminifera), but the comparison is disputed and flawed. Radiolaria, on occasion, have been reported in the Precambrian, but the earliest known clearly identifiable ones are in the Cambrian. The only certain Precambrian heterotrophic skeletal eukaryotes (thecamoebians) occur in fresh-water rocks at about 750 mya. Skeletonized radiolaria and foraminifera appear sparsely in the Cambrian and radiate in the Ordovician

  8. amylase producing thermophile Bacillus sphaericus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on the -amylase-producing thermophilic bacterium isolated and identified from a hot spring in Jordan and designated as Bacillus sphaericus were carried out in a laboratory scale fermenter. The growth and enzyme production optimum conditions were pH 7 and 50oC. The kinetic study of cellular growth indicates ...

  9. Monitoring of thermophilic organism in evaporation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Válková, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Study deals with the determination of thermophilic and heat-resistant microorganisms in samples of skim milk. Furthermore, the problems of determining the thermophilic microorganisms in samples of whey. The most important microorganisms causing spoilage of milk and dairy products include certain species of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium. Thermophilic microorganisms have optimum growth temperature between 55 and 60 ° C. Removed material (skimmed milk and whey) was plated onto agar GTK and...

  10. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-09-26

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F.; Garg, Sriram; Zimorski, Verena

    2015-01-01

    For over 100 years, endosymbiotic theories have figured in thoughts about the differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. More than 20 different versions of endosymbiotic theory have been presented in the literature to explain the origin of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. Very few of those models account for eukaryotic anaerobes. The role of energy and the energetic constraints that prokaryotic cell organization placed on evolutionary innovation in cell history has recently come to bear on endosymbiotic theory. Only cells that possessed mitochondria had the bioenergetic means to attain eukaryotic cell complexity, which is why there are no true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Current versions of endosymbiotic theory have it that the host was an archaeon (an archaebacterium), not a eukaryote. Hence the evolutionary history and biology of archaea increasingly comes to bear on eukaryotic origins, more than ever before. Here, we have compiled a survey of endosymbiotic theories for the origin of eukaryotes and mitochondria, and for the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus, summarizing the essentials of each and contrasting some of their predictions to the observations. A new aspect of endosymbiosis in eukaryote evolution comes into focus from these considerations: the host for the origin of plastids was a facultative anaerobe. PMID:26323761

  12. Thermophilic membrane bioreactors: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Josh; Bokhary, Alnour; Fatehi, Pedram; Kong, Fangong; Lin, Hongjun; Liao, Baoqiang

    2017-11-01

    This study undertakes a state-of-the-art review on thermophilic membrane bioreactors (ThMBRs). Thermophilic aerobic membrane bioreactors (ThAeMBR) and thermophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactors (ThAnMBR) have been widely tested for various high-temperature industrial wastewater treatments at lab- and pilot-scale studies and full-scale applications. The biological and membrane performances of the ThAeMBRs and ThAnMBRs could be better, comparable or poorer, as compared to the mesophilic ones. In general, sludge yield was much lower, biodegradation kinetic was higher, and microbial community was less diversity in the ThAeMBR and ThAnMBR systems. The results from the literature show that ThMBR technology has demonstrated many advantages and is a promising technology for industrial wastewater treatment and sludge digestion. Furthermore, challenges and opportunities of various ThMBRs for industrial applications are identified and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  14. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2017-02-28

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Status on Science and Application of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic processes are often regarded as less stable than mesophilic processes. In the paper this postulate is examined and disproved based on real operational data from of full-scale mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants. The start-up produce for the thermophilic plants was...... for thermophilic digestion along with the implications for the methanogenic bacteria active at these temperatures....

  17. Endosymbiosis and Eukaryotic Cell Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, John M

    2015-10-05

    Understanding the evolution of eukaryotic cellular complexity is one of the grand challenges of modern biology. It has now been firmly established that mitochondria and plastids, the classical membrane-bound organelles of eukaryotic cells, evolved from bacteria by endosymbiosis. In the case of mitochondria, evidence points very clearly to an endosymbiont of α-proteobacterial ancestry. The precise nature of the host cell that partnered with this endosymbiont is, however, very much an open question. And while the host for the cyanobacterial progenitor of the plastid was undoubtedly a fully-fledged eukaryote, how - and how often - plastids moved from one eukaryote to another during algal diversification is vigorously debated. In this article I frame modern views on endosymbiotic theory in a historical context, highlighting the transformative role DNA sequencing played in solving early problems in eukaryotic cell evolution, and posing key unanswered questions emerging from the age of comparative genomics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aerobic thermophile biodegradation of BTEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.I.; Taylor, R.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In the aftermath of heat-driven subsurface remediation efforts such as steam stripping or Joule heating for cleaning up fuel spills, there will be a time during which the entire underground environment remains at temperatures significantly higher than ambient. The possible use of thermophilic bacteria capable of degrading select fuel hydrocarbons would take advantage of these higher underground temperatures to enhance the removal of low levels of residual regulated fuel contaminants. Twenty six thermophilic bacteria strains from the American Type Culture Collection were screened and two aerobes, Thermus aquaticus (ATCC 25104) and Thermus sp. (ATCC 27978), were found to degrade BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), common contaminants from gasoline storage-tank leakages. T. aquaticus and Thermus sp. were grown in a modified ATCC medium at 70{degrees}C and 61{degrees}C, respectively, and resting cell suspensions were used to study BTEX biodegradation at the same corresponding temperatures. The degradation of BTEX by these cell suspensions in sealed culture bottles was measured against controls that also displayed significant abiotic removals of BTEX under such high temperature conditions. Raising the BTEX concentration lowered the extent of biodegradation. The biodegradations of both benzene and toluene were enhanced when T. aquaticus and Thermus sp. were pregrown on catechol and o-cresol, respectively, as carbon sources. Use of [U-{sup 14}C]benzene and [U-{sup 14}C]toluene verified that a small fraction of these two compounds were metabolized to water-soluble products and CO{sup 2} by these non-growing cell suspensions within 7 days. This study represents the first time members of the naturally occurring, common thermophilic genus Thermus have been shown to have a co-metabolic potential for contaminant VOC degradation.

  19. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  20. Cytokinesis in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, David A; Trautmann, Susanne; McCollum, Dannel

    2002-06-01

    Cytokinesis is the final event of the cell division cycle, and its completion results in irreversible partition of a mother cell into two daughter cells. Cytokinesis was one of the first cell cycle events observed by simple cell biological techniques; however, molecular characterization of cytokinesis has been slowed by its particular resistance to in vitro biochemical approaches. In recent years, the use of genetic model organisms has greatly advanced our molecular understanding of cytokinesis. While the outcome of cytokinesis is conserved in all dividing organisms, the mechanism of division varies across the major eukaryotic kingdoms. Yeasts and animals, for instance, use a contractile ring that ingresses to the cell middle in order to divide, while plant cells build new cell wall outward to the cortex. As would be expected, there is considerable conservation of molecules involved in cytokinesis between yeast and animal cells, while at first glance, plant cells seem quite different. However, in recent years, it has become clear that some aspects of division are conserved between plant, yeast, and animal cells. In this review we discuss the major recent advances in defining cytokinesis, focusing on deciding where to divide, building the division apparatus, and dividing. In addition, we discuss the complex problem of coordinating the division cycle with the nuclear cycle, which has recently become an area of intense research. In conclusion, we discuss how certain cells have utilized cytokinesis to direct development.

  1. The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD)

    OpenAIRE

    Perier, R. C.; Praz, V; Junier, T; Bonnard, C.; Bucher, P

    2000-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) is an annotated non-redundant collection of eukaryotic POL II promoters for which the transcription start site has been determined experimentally. Access to promoter sequences is provided by pointers to positions in nucleotide sequence entries. The annotation part of an entry includes a description of the initiation site mapping data, exhaustive cross-references to the EMBL nucleotide sequence database, SWISS-PROT, TRANSFAC and other databases, as well a...

  2. Consolidated bioprocessing method using thermophilic microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2016-02-02

    The present invention is directed to a method of converting biomass to biofuel, and particularly to a consolidated bioprocessing method using a co-culture of thermophilic and extremely thermophilic microorganisms which collectively can ferment the hexose and pentose sugars produced by degradation of cellulose and hemicelluloses at high substrate conversion rates. A culture medium therefor is also provided as well as use of the methods to produce and recover cellulosic ethanol.

  3. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion for waste and wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegant, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with thermophilic anaerobic waste and wastewater treatment. A literature survey is presented, in which the thermophilic treatment processes are evaluated with respect to the loading rates and treatment efficiencies, and some relevant theoretical considerations concerning

  4. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  5. Eukaryotic organisms in Proterozoic oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, A H; Javaux, E J; Hewitt, D; Cohen, P

    2006-06-29

    The geological record of protists begins well before the Ediacaran and Cambrian diversification of animals, but the antiquity of that history, its reliability as a chronicle of evolution and the causal inferences that can be drawn from it remain subjects of debate. Well-preserved protists are known from a relatively small number of Proterozoic formations, but taphonomic considerations suggest that they capture at least broad aspects of early eukaryotic evolution. A modest diversity of problematic, possibly stem group protists occurs in ca 1800-1300 Myr old rocks. 1300-720 Myr fossils document the divergence of major eukaryotic clades, but only with the Ediacaran-Cambrian radiation of animals did diversity increase within most clades with fossilizable members. While taxonomic placement of many Proterozoic eukaryotes may be arguable, the presence of characters used for that placement is not. Focus on character evolution permits inferences about the innovations in cell biology and development that underpin the taxonomic and morphological diversification of eukaryotic organisms.

  6. Eukaryotic vs. cyanobacterial oxygenic photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schmelling, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Slides of my talk about the differences between eukaryotic and cyanobacterial oxygenic photosynthesis.  The talk is a more generell overview about the differences of the two systems. Slides and Figures are my own. For comments, questions and suggestions please contact me via twitter @derschmelling or via mail

  7. [Thermophilic and thermotolerant bacteria that assimilate methane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashenko, Iu R; Romanovskaia, V A; Bogachenko, V N; Shved, A D

    1975-01-01

    Microorganisms assimilating methane at temperatures above 40 degrees C were isolated from various natural sources: ooze, mud, waste water of coal pits. The bacteria are obligate methylotrophs and are represented by two groups: (a) thermotolerant, growing at 37 to 45 degrees C; and (b) thermophilic, growing at 50 to 62 degrees C. The selective factor used to isolate various physiological forms of methylotrophs is corresponding temperatures of growth which allow to isolate from the same substrate meso-, thermotolerant, and thermophilic forms. Morphological and physiological properties of the strains are described. The thermotolerant cultures of methylotrophs are similar to Methylobacter vinelandii, though differ from it by some characteristics. The thermophilic microorganisms should be classed as a separate species Methylococcus thermophilus.

  8. Bioprospecting thermophiles for cellulase production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Somen; Chaudhary, Anita

    2012-07-01

    Most of the potential bioprospecting is currently related to the study of the extremophiles and their potential use in industrial processes. Recently microbial cellulases find applications in various industries and constitute a major group of industrial enzymes. Considerable amount of work has been done on microbial cellulases, especially with resurgence of interest in biomass ethanol production employing cellulases and use of cellulases in textile and paper industry. Most efficient method of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis is through enzymatic saccharification using cellulases. Significant information has also been gained about the physiology of thermophilic cellulases producers and process development for enzyme production and biomass saccharification. The review discusses the current knowledge on cellulase producing thermophilic microorganisms, their physiological adaptations and control of cellulase gene expression. It discusses the industrial applications of thermophilic cellulases, their cost of production and challenges in cellulase research especially in the area of improving process economics of enzyme production.

  9. Bioprospecting thermophiles for cellulase production: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen Acharya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the potential bioprospecting is currently related to the study of the extremophiles and their potential use in industrial processes. Recently microbial cellulases find applications in various industries and constitute a major group of industrial enzymes. Considerable amount of work has been done on microbial cellulases, especially with resurgence of interest in biomass ethanol production employing cellulases and use of cellulases in textile and paper industry. Most efficient method of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis is through enzymatic saccharification using cellulases. Significant information has also been gained about the physiology of thermophilic cellulases producers and process development for enzyme production and biomass saccharification. The review discusses the current knowledge on cellulase producing thermophilic microorganisms, their physiological adaptations and control of cellulase gene expression. It discusses the industrial applications of thermophilic cellulases, their cost of production and challenges in cellulase research especially in the area of improving process economics of enzyme production.

  10. Gonococcal attachment to eukaryotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, J.F.; Lammel, C.J.; Draper, D.L.; Brown, D.A.; Sweet, R.L.; Brooks, G.F.

    The attachment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to eukaryotic cells grown in tissue culture was analyzed by use of light and electron microscopy and by labeling of the bacteria with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)adenine. Isogenic piliated and nonpiliated N. gonorrhoeae from opaque and transparent colonies were studied. The results of light microscopy studies showed that the gonococci attached to cells of human origin, including Flow 2000, HeLa 229, and HEp 2. Studies using radiolabeled gonococci gave comparable results. Piliated N. gonorrhoeae usually attached in larger numbers than nonpiliated organisms, and those from opaque colonies attached more often than isogenic variants from transparent colonies. Day-to-day variation in rate of attachment was observed. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the gonococcal attachment to be specific for microvilli of the host cells. It is concluded that more N. gonorrhoeae from opaque colonies, as compared with isogenic variants from transparent colonies, attach to eukaryotic cells grown in tissue culture.

  11. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been the focus of intense research towards the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantæ and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity and citotoxicity are also reviewed.

  12. The eukaryotic promoter database (EPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périer, R C; Praz, V; Junier, T; Bonnard, C; Bucher, P

    2000-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) is an annotated non-redundant collection of eukaryotic POL II promoters for which the transcription start site has been determined experimentally. Access to promoter sequences is provided by pointers to positions in nucleotide sequence entries. The annotation part of an entry includes a description of the initiation site mapping data, exhaustive cross-references to the EMBL nucleotide sequence database, SWISS-PROT, TRANSFAC and other databases, as well as bibliographic references. EPD is structured in a way that facilitates dynamic extraction of biologically meaningful promoter subsets for comparative sequence analysis. WWW-based interfaces have been developed that enable the user to view EPD entries in different formats, to select and extract promoter sequences according to a variety of criteria, and to navigate to related databases exploiting different cross-references. The EPD web site also features yearly updated base frequency matrices for major eukaryotic promoter elements. EPD can be accessed at http://www.epd.isb-sib.ch

  13. Effectiveness of combined thermophilic composting and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermophilic composting is commonly used for the treatment of organic wastes or for production of organic/natural fertilizers. Vermicomposting (V) is also increasingly becoming popular. These two techniques have their inherent advantages and disadvantages. In this study, vermicomposting and a combination of ...

  14. Prevalence of Thermophilic Campylobacter species in carcasses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. namely, Campylobacter jejuni and coli cause acute diarrheal diseases in humans worldwide; although these species are known to occur in the intestinal tract of a wide variety of domestic and wild animals. Objective: Little is known about the presence of these bacteria in ...

  15. Effectiveness of combined thermophilic composting and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... Thermophilic composting is commonly used for the treatment of organic wastes or for production of organic/natural fertilizers. Vermicomposting (V) is also increasingly becoming popular. These two techniques have their inherent advantages and disadvantages. In this study, vermicomposting and a.

  16. Molecular characterization of thermophilic Campylobacter species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We identified two species of thermophilic Campylobacter in companion dogs in Jos. Majority of C. jejuni were isolated from mucoid faeces while mixed infections of the two species were more common among diarrhoeic dogs. Pet owners should observe strict hand hygiene especially after handling dogs or their faeces to ...

  17. Prevalence of Thermophilic Campylobacter species in carcasses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Abstract. Background: Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. namely, Campylobacter jejuni and coli cause acute diarrheal diseases in humans ... Objective: Little is known about the presence of these bacteria in various food animals as possible sources of infection to humans in .... The preventive measures for reducing bacterial ...

  18. Efficient utilization of xylanase and lipase producing thermophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficient utilization of xylanase and lipase producing thermophilic marine actinomycetes ( Streptomyces albus and Streptomyces hygroscopicus ) in the production of ecofriendly alternative energy from waste.

  19. Open questions on the origin of eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress, the origin of the eukaryotic cell remains enigmatic. It is now known that the last eukaryotic common ancestor was complex and that endosymbiosis played a crucial role in eukaryogenesis at least via the acquisition of the alphaproteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria. However, the nature of the mitochondrial host is controversial, although the recent discovery of an archaeal lineage phylogenetically close to eukaryotes reinforces models proposing archaea-derived hosts. We argue that, in addition to improved phylogenomic analyses with more comprehensive taxon sampling to pinpoint the closest prokaryotic relatives of eukaryotes, determining plausible mechanisms and selective forces at the origin of key eukaryotic features, such as the nucleus or the bacterial-like eukaryotic membrane system, is essential to constrain existing models. PMID:26455774

  20. Discrimination of thermophilic and mesophilic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaisman Iosif I

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a considerable literature on the source of the thermostability of proteins from thermophilic organisms. Understanding the mechanisms for this thermostability would provide insights into proteins generally and permit the design of synthetic hyperstable biocatalysts. Results We have systematically tested a large number of sequence and structure derived quantities for their ability to discriminate thermostable proteins from their non-thermostable orthologs using sets of mesophile-thermophile ortholog pairs. Most of the quantities tested correspond to properties previously reported to be associated with thermostability. Many of the structure related properties were derived from the Delaunay tessellation of protein structures. Conclusions Carefully selected sequence based indices discriminate better than purely structure based indices. Combined sequence and structure based indices improve performance somewhat further. Based on our analysis, the strongest contributors to thermostability are an increase in ion pairs on the protein surface and a more strongly hydrophobic interior.

  1. Thermophilic biohydrogen production: how far are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sudhanshu S; van Niel, Ed W J

    2013-09-01

    Apart from being applied as an energy carrier, hydrogen is in increasing demand as a commodity. Currently, the majority of hydrogen (H2) is produced from fossil fuels, but from an environmental perspective, sustainable H2 production should be considered. One of the possible ways of hydrogen production is through fermentation, in particular, at elevated temperature, i.e. thermophilic biohydrogen production. This short review recapitulates the current status in thermophilic biohydrogen production through fermentation of commercially viable substrates produced from readily available renewable resources, such as agricultural residues. The route to commercially viable biohydrogen production is a multidisciplinary enterprise. Microbiological studies have pointed out certain desirable physiological characteristics in H2-producing microorganisms. More process-oriented research has identified best applicable reactor types and cultivation conditions. Techno-economic and life cycle analyses have identified key process bottlenecks with respect to economic feasibility and its environmental impact. The review has further identified current limitations and gaps in the knowledge, and also deliberates directions for future research and development of thermophilic biohydrogen production.

  2. Metabolic symbiosis at the origin of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garćia, P; Moreira, D

    1999-03-01

    Thirty years after Margulis revived the endosymbiosis theory for the origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts, two novel symbiosis hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes have been put forward. Both propose that eukaryotes arose through metabolic symbiosis (syntrophy) between eubacteria and methanogenic Archaea. They also propose that this was mediated by interspecies hydrogen transfer and that, initially, mitochondria were anaerobic. These hypotheses explain the mosaic character of eukaryotes (i.e. an archaeal-like genetic machinery and a eubacterial-like metabolism), as well as distinct eukaryotic characteristics (which are proposed to be products of symbiosis). Combined data from comparative genomics, microbial ecology and the fossil record should help to test their validity.

  3. ENERGY TRANSDUCTION AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN THERMOPHILIC BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KONINGS, WN; TOLNER, B; SPEELMANS, G; ELFERINK, MGL; DEWIT, JG; DRIESSEN, AJM; Elferink, Marieke G.L.

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial growth at the extremes of temperature has remained a fascinating aspect in the study of membrane function and structure. The stability of the integral membrane proteins of thermophiles make them particularly amenable to study. Respiratory enzymes of thermophiles appear to be functionally

  4. Purification and characterization of a protease from Thermophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purification and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Thermophilic bacillus strain HS08, originally isolated from a soil sample collected from the Tulufan Crater of China, is presented in this paper. The purification steps included ammonium sulfate precipitation, with columns of DEAE-Sepharose anion ...

  5. Diversity of thermophilic and non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota at 80 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Thomas; Mengewein, Anett; Manzei, Stefanie; Ahring, Birgitte K; Westermann, Peter

    2005-03-01

    A hot spring in the solfataric field of Pisciarelli (Naples-Italy) was analysed for Archaeal diversity. Total DNA was extracted from the environment, archaeal 16S rRNA genes were amplified with Archaea specific primers, and a clone library consisting of 201 clones was established. The clones were grouped in 10 different groups each representing a specific band pattern using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Members of all 10 groups were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Surprisingly, a high abundance of clones belonging to non-thermophilic Crenarchaeal clusters were detected together with the thermophilic archaeon Acidianus infernus in this thermophilic environment. Neither Sulfolobus species nor other hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota were detected in the clone library. The relative abundance of the sequenced clones was confirmed by terminal restriction fragment analyses. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes from Archaea transferred from the surrounding environment was considered negligible because DNA from non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota incubated under conditions similar to the solfatara could not be PCR amplified after 5 min.

  6. Thermal adaptation of mesophilic and thermophilic FtsZ assembly by modulation of the critical concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Concha-Marambio

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis is the last stage in the cell cycle. In prokaryotes, the protein FtsZ guides cell constriction by assembling into a contractile ring-shaped structure termed the Z-ring. Constriction of the Z-ring is driven by the GTPase activity of FtsZ that overcomes the energetic barrier between two protein conformations having different propensities to assemble into polymers. FtsZ is found in psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic organisms thereby functioning at temperatures ranging from subzero to >100°C. To gain insight into the functional adaptations enabling assembly of FtsZ in distinct environmental conditions, we analyzed the energetics of FtsZ function from mesophilic Escherichia coli in comparison with FtsZ from thermophilic Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Presumably, the assembly may be similarly modulated by temperature for both FtsZ orthologs. The temperature dependence of the first-order rates of nucleotide hydrolysis and of polymer disassembly, indicated an entropy-driven destabilization of the FtsZ-GTP intermediate. This destabilization was true for both mesophilic and thermophilic FtsZ, reflecting a conserved mechanism of disassembly. From the temperature dependence of the critical concentrations for polymerization, we detected a change of opposite sign in the heat capacity, that was partially explained by the specific changes in the solvent-accessible surface area between the free and polymerized states of FtsZ. At the physiological temperature, the assembly of both FtsZ orthologs was found to be driven by a small positive entropy. In contrast, the assembly occurred with a negative enthalpy for mesophilic FtsZ and with a positive enthalpy for thermophilic FtsZ. Notably, the assembly of both FtsZ orthologs is characterized by a critical concentration of similar value (1-2 μM at the environmental temperatures of their host organisms. These findings suggest a simple but robust mechanism of adaptation of FtsZ, previously shown

  7. Thermophile bacteria in permafrost: model for astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilichinsky, D.; Rivkina, E.; Shcherbakova, V.; Laurinavichius, K.; Kholodov, A.; Abramov, A.

    2003-04-01

    According the NASA point of view, one way to have liquid water on Mars at shallow depths would be through subglacial volcanism. Such volcano-ice interactions could be going on beneath the polar caps of Mars today, or even within the adjacent permafrost around the margins of the ice caps. This is why one of the Earth's models, close to extraterrestrial environment, represented by active volcanoes in permafrost areas and the main question is - does such econishes as volcanoes and associated environment contain recently microbial communities? The first step of this study was carried out on volcano Stromboli (Italy), using the marine water samples extracted from the borehole near the island marine coast, surrounding the volcano. According the temperatures (45^oC), this thermal water has the hydraulic connection with volcano. Microscopy analyses of studied water shown the presence of different morphological types of microorganisms: small mobile roads, coccoid and sarcina-like organisms and long fixed roads, as well as rest forms (spores and cysts). To separate this community on marine and volcano microorganisms, the common mineral media with added CO_2, acetate or glucose-peptone as a source of carbon were used for culturing, and Fe3+, S^o, SO_42- were added as a electron acceptors. We attempt to isolate thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms of different metabolic groups - methanogens, acetogens, iron-, sulfur- and sulfate-reducers, and to test each group of microorganisms on the presence of halophilic forms. After 24 hours of incubation at temperatures varied 55 to 85^o, the grow relatively the control media was observed at CO_2+H_2 and glucose-peptone media. Microscopy study of preparations showed small coccus of irregular shape that was unable to reduce S^o or SO_42-. During the subsequent re-seeding were obtained the enrichment cultures of themophilic bacteria, genetically closed to genera Thermococcus: heterotrophic, growing up to 95^oC with the growth optimum at

  8. The eukaryotic fossil record in deep time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, N.

    2011-12-01

    Eukaryotic organisms are defining constituents of the Phanerozoic biosphere, but they also extend well back into the Proterozoic record, primarily in the form of microscopic body fossils. Criteria for identifying pre-Ediacaran eukaryotes include large cell size, morphologically complex cell walls and/or the recognition of diagnostically eukaryotic cell division patterns. The oldest unambiguous eukaryote currently on record is an acanthomorphic acritarch (Tappania) from the Palaeoproterozoic Semri Group of central India. Older candidate eukaryotes are difficult to distinguish from giant bacteria, prokaryotic colonies or diagenetic artefacts. In younger Meso- and Neoproterozoic strata, the challenge is to recognize particular grades and clades of eukaryotes, and to document their macro-evolutionary expression. Distinctive unicellular forms include mid-Neoproterozoic testate amoebae and phosphate biomineralizing 'scale-microfossils' comparable to an extant green alga. There is also a significant record of seaweeds, possible fungi and problematica from this interval, documenting multiple independent experiments in eukaryotic multicellularity. Taxonomically resolved forms include a bangiacean red alga and probable vaucheriacean chromalveolate algae from the late Mesoproterozoic, and populations of hydrodictyacean and siphonocladalean green algae of mid Neoproterozoic age. Despite this phylogenetic breadth, however, or arguments from molecular clocks, there is no convincing evidence for pre-Ediacaran metazoans or metaphytes. The conspicuously incomplete nature of the Proterozoic record makes it difficult to resolve larger-scale ecological and evolutionary patterns. Even so, both body fossils and biomarker data point to a pre-Ediacaran biosphere dominated overwhelming by prokaryotes. Contemporaneous eukaryotes appear to be limited to conspicuously shallow water environments, and exhibit fundamentally lower levels of morphological diversity and evolutionary turnover than

  9. Thermophilic slurry-phase treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaldi, F.J.; Bombaugh, K.J. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); McFarland, B. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chemoheterotrophic thermophilic bacteria were used to achieve enhanced hydrocarbon degradation during slurry-phase treatment of oily waste sludges from petroleum refinery operations. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were examined under thermophilic conditions to assess the effects of mode of metabolism on the potential for petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. The study determined that both aerobic and anaerobic thermophilic bacteria are capable of growth on petroleum hydrocarbons. Thermophilic methanogenesis is feasible during the degradation of hydrocarbons when a strict anaerobic condition is achieved in a slurry bioreactor. Aerobic thermophilic bacteria achieved the largest apparent reduction in chemical oxygen demand, freon extractable oil, total and volatile solid,s and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when treating oily waste sludges. The observed shift with time in the molecular weight distribution of hydrocarbon material was more pronounced under aerobic metabolic conditions than under strict anaerobic conditions. The changes in the hydrocarbon molecular weight distribution, infrared spectra, and PAH concentrations during slurry-phase treatment indicate that the aerobic thermophilic bioslurry achieved a higher degree of hydrocarbon degradation than the anaerobic thermophilic bioslurry during the same time period.

  10. Viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Etten, J L; Lane, L C; Meints, R H

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there was little interest or information on viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae. However, this situation is changing. In the past decade many large double-stranded DNA-containing viruses that infect two culturable, unicellular, eukaryotic green algae have been discovered. These viruses can be produced in large quantities, assayed by plaque formation, and analyzed by standard bacteriophage techniques. The viruses are structurally similar to animal iridoviruses, t...

  11. Metabolic Constraints on the Eukaryotic Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2009-04-01

    Mutualism, obligate mutualism, symbiosis, and the eukaryotic ‘fusion’ of Serial Endosymbiosis Theory represent progressively more rapid and less distorted real-time communication between biological structures instantiating information sources. Such progression in accurate information transmission requires, in turn, progressively greater channel capacity that, through the homology between information source uncertainty and free energy density, requires ever more energetic metabolism. The eukaryotic transition, according to this model, may have been entrained by an ecosystem resilience shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism.

  12. Biology and ecology of the ``Pompeii worm'' (Alvinella pompejana Desbruyères and Laubier), a normal dweller of an extreme deep-sea environment: A synthesis of current knowledge and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbruyères, D.; Chevaldonné, P.; Alayse, A.-M.; Jollivet, D.; Lallier, F. H.; Jouin-Toulmond, C.; Zal, F.; Sarradin, P.-M.; Cosson, R.; Caprais, J.-C.; Arndt, C.; O'Brien, J.; Guezennec, J.; Hourdez, S.; Riso, R.; Gaill, F.; Laubier, L.; Toulmond, A.

    1998-01-01

    Alvinella pompejana, the "Pompeii worm" lives on active hydrothermal edifices at deep-sea vents of the East Pacific Rise. The physical and chemical patterns of its microhabitat were determined from temperature probe measurements, temperature time series, and on-board and shore-based chemical analyses based on discrete sampling (pH, H 2S, CO 2, CH 4, S 2O 2-3, Ca, Mg, Cu, Cd, Zn). The microhabitat is characterised by high temporal and microscale spatial variability, with temperature values in the range of 20°-45°C at the immediate periphery of tubes but reaching higher, still undetermined, values inside the tubes. The difference observed between in vitro temperature limits for the stability of biomolecules and metabolic rates, and suggested in situ conditions seems to indicate a significant protective role of biological interfaces (tubes and cuticle). Temporal instability possibly also plays an important role in the ability for these worms to colonise such an extreme habitat. The functional role of dominant epibiotic bacteria is discussed in the light of recent biochemical and molecular data: the tube-worm-bacteria system can be considered as a symbiotic entity where carbon is probably metabolised and recycled. Sulphide detoxification occurs by oxidation at the gill level and possibly at the intracellular haemoglobin level. Heavy metals, ingested or absorbed, are trapped in spherocrystals and bound to metallothionein-like proteins. Anatomical, physiological and molecular adaptations to hypoxia allow the worm to successfully colonise the chimneys. A. pompejana lives in an ephemeral environment and must reproduce and disperse accordingly. It is a gonochoric species that displays a pseucopulatory behaviour allowing transfer of sperm to female spermathecae, thus avoiding dispersion of the gametes. The size of the oocytes suggests a lecithotrophic or benthic development. The population size structure is polymodal, indicating discontinuous recruitment. Population

  13. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Lacroix

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen, Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium, or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer.

  14. Thermophilic fermentation of hydrolysates: the effect of inhibitors on growth of thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasser, Christiane; Danner, Herbert; Neureiter, Markus; Saidi, Bamusi; Braun, Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has great potential as a cheap feedstock in biological processes to produce biofuels or chemicals; however, dilute acid pretreatment at high temperatures produces undesirable compounds. Toxicity tests were done with inhibitors in standard media, to predict the growth-limiting effects on thermophilic strains. The 22 inhibitors included furfural, levulinic acid, acetic acid, and cinnamaldehyde. Neutralizing reagents and additional treatment steps have been tested.

  15. Thermophilic, lignocellulolytic bacteria for ethanol production: current state and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Yao, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass contains a variety of carbohydrates, and their conversion into ethanol by fermentation requires an efficient microbial platform to achieve high yield, productivity, and final titer of ethanol. In recent years, growing attention has been devoted to the development...... of cellulolytic and saccharolytic thermophilic bacteria for lignocellulosic ethanol production because of their unique properties. First of all, thermophilic bacteria possess unique cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic systems and are considered as potential sources of highly active and thermostable enzymes......, in particular with emphasis on improving ethanol yield, and this facilitates their employment for ethanol production. Finally, different processes for second-generation ethanol production based on thermophilic bacteria have been proposed with the aim to achieve cost-competitive processes. However, thermophilic...

  16. Glucoamylase isoform (GAII) purified from a thermophilic fungus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glucoamylase isoform (GAII) purified from a thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum 15.8 with biotechnological potential. M Cereia, LHS Guimarães, SC Peixoto-Nogueira, JA Jorge, HF Terenzi, LJ Greene, M de Lourdes, TM Polizeli ...

  17. Global association between thermophilicity and vancomycin susceptibility in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chayan eRoy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of the aquatic microbiota of several circum-neutral (6.0-8.5 pH mid-temperature (55-85 OC springs revealed rich diversities of phylogenetic relatives of mesophilic bacteria, which surpassed the diversity of the truly-thermophilic taxa. To gain insight into the potentially-thermophilic adaptations of the phylogenetic relatives of Gram-negative mesophilic bacteria detected in culture-independent investigations we attempted pure-culture isolation by supplementing the enrichment media with 50 µg ml-1 vancomycin. Surprisingly, this Gram-positive-specific antibiotic eliminated the entire culturable-diversity of chemoorganotrophic and sulfur-chemolithotrophic bacteria present in the tested hot water inocula. Moreover, it also killed all the Gram-negative hot-spring isolates that were obtained in vancomycin-free media. Concurrent literature search for the description of Gram-negative thermophilic bacteria revealed that at least 16 of them were reportedly vancomycin-susceptible. While these data suggested that vancomycin-susceptibility could be a global trait of thermophilic bacteria (irrespective of their taxonomy, biogeography and Gram-character, MALDI Mass Spectroscopy of the peptidoglycans of a few Gram-negative thermophilic bacteria revealed that tandem alanines were present in the fourth and fifth positions of their muropeptide precursors (MPPs. Subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed a close affinity between the D-alanine-D-alanine ligases (Ddl of taxonomically-diverse Gram-negative thermophiles and the thermostable Ddl protein of Thermotoga maritima, which is well-known for its high specificity for alanine over other amino acids. The Ddl tree further illustrated a divergence between the homologs of Gram-negative thermophiles and mesophiles, which broadly coincided with vancomycin-susceptibility and vancomycin-resistance respectively. It was thus hypothesized that thermophilic Ddls have been evolutionarily selected to favor a D

  18. Microbiological aspects of aerobic thermophilic treatment of swine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, R; Gagnon, C; Bisaillon, J G; Ishaque, M

    1990-04-01

    A thermophilic strain (D2) identified as a Bacillus sp. was isolated from an aerobic digestor of swine waste after several months of operation at 55 degrees C. Aerobic thermophilic batch treatment of swine waste inoculated with strain D2 was studied in a 4-liter fixed-bed reactor. Stabilization of the waste was achieved in less than 30 h when the original chemical oxygen demand (COD) was between 15 and 20 g/liter or in less than 48 h when the COD was around 35 g/liter. When the COD was higher than 30 g/liter, the pH of the waste reached 9.2 to 9.5 during the treatment, and periodic adjustment of the pH to 8.5 was necessary to maintain the activity of the biofilm. In this reactor, ammoniacal nitrogen was completely eliminated by desorption in less than 72 h of incubation. The different packing materials used resulted in similar rates of degradation of organic matter. The thermophilic treatment was also efficient in the 75-liter digestor, and stabilization was achieved in approximately 50 h. A bank of 22 thermophilic bacterial strains originating from different environments and adapted to the thermophilic treatment of swine waste was established. This thermophilic treatment allows, in one step, rapid stabilization of the waste, elimination of the bad smell, and complete elimination of ammonia nitrogen by stripping.

  19. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable.

  20. Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipidbiosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios

    2006-12-01

    Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes produce diverse molecular structures and are often present in multiple forms encoded by different genes. This work utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for exploring the distribution, structure and evolution of phospholipid biosynthetic genes and pathways in 26 eukaryotic genomes. Although the basic structure of the pathways was formed early in eukaryotic evolution, the emerging picture indicates that individual enzyme families followed unique evolutionary courses. For example, choline and ethanolamine kinases and cytidylyltransferases emerged in ancestral eukaryotes, whereas, multiple forms of the corresponding phosphatidyltransferases evolved mainly in a lineage specific manner. Furthermore, several unicellular eukaryotes maintain bacterial-type enzymes and reactions for the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. Also, base-exchange phosphatidylserine synthases are widespread and ancestral enzymes. The multiplicity of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes has been largely generated by gene expansion in a lineage specific manner. Thus, these observations suggest that phospholipid biosynthesis has been an actively evolving system. Finally, comparative genomic analysis indicates the existence of novel phosphatidyltransferases and provides a candidate for the uncharacterized eukaryotic phosphatidylglycerol phosphate phosphatase.

  1. Communities of microbial eukaryotes in the mammalian gut within the context of environmental eukaryotic diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Walters, William A.; Lauber, Christian L.; Clemente, Jose C.; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Teiling, Clotilde; Kodira, Chinnappa; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Brunelle, Julie; Driscoll, Mark; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A.; Knight, Rob

    2014-06-19

    Eukaryotic microbes (protists) residing in the vertebrate gut influence host health and disease, but their diversity and distribution in healthy hosts is poorly understood. Protists found in the gut are typically considered parasites, but many are commensal and some are beneficial. Further, the hygiene hypothesis predicts that association with our co-evolved microbial symbionts may be important to overall health. It is therefore imperative that we understand the normal diversity of our eukaryotic gut microbiota to test for such effects and avoid eliminating commensal organisms. We assembled a dataset of healthy individuals from two populations, one with traditional, agrarian lifestyles and a second with modern, westernized lifestyles, and characterized the human eukaryotic microbiota via high-throughput sequencing. To place the human gut microbiota within a broader context our dataset also includes gut samples from diverse mammals and samples from other aquatic and terrestrial environments. We curated the SILVA ribosomal database to reflect current knowledge of eukaryotic taxonomy and employ it as a phylogenetic framework to compare eukaryotic diversity across environment. We show that adults from the non-western population harbor a diverse community of protists, and diversity in the human gut is comparable to that in other mammals. However, the eukaryotic microbiota of the western population appears depauperate. The distribution of symbionts found in mammals reflects both host phylogeny and diet. Eukaryotic microbiota in the gut are less diverse and more patchily distributed than bacteria. More broadly, we show that eukaryotic communities in the gut are less diverse than in aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and few taxa are shared across habitat types, and diversity patterns of eukaryotes are correlated with those observed for bacteria. These results outline the distribution and diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in the mammalian gut and across

  2. Mitochondrion-related organelles in eukaryotic protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiflett, April M; Johnson, Patricia J

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of mitochondrion-type genes in organisms thought to lack mitochondria led to the demonstration that hydrogenosomes share a common ancestry with mitochondria, as well as the discovery of mitosomes in multiple eukaryotic lineages. No examples of examined eukaryotes lacking a mitochondrion-related organelle exist, implying that the endosymbiont that gave rise to the mitochondrion was present in the first eukaryote. These organelles, known as hydrogenosomes, mitosomes, or mitochondrion-like organelles, are typically reduced, both structurally and biochemically, relative to classical mitochondria. However, despite their diversification and adaptation to different niches, all appear to play a role in Fe-S cluster assembly, as observed for mitochondria. Although evidence supports the use of common protein targeting mechanisms in the biogenesis of these diverse organelles, divergent features are also apparent. This review examines the metabolism and biogenesis of these organelles in divergent unicellular microbes, with a focus on parasitic protists.

  3. Reproduction, symbiosis, and the eukaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a conceptual framework for addressing questions about reproduction, individuality, and the units of selection in symbiotic associations, with special attention to the origin of the eukaryotic cell. Three kinds of reproduction are distinguished, and a possible evolutionary sequence giving rise to a mitochondrion-containing eukaryotic cell from an endosymbiotic partnership is analyzed as a series of transitions between each of the three forms of reproduction. The sequence of changes seen in this “egalitarian” evolutionary transition is compared with those that apply in “fraternal” transitions, such as the evolution of multicellularity in animals. PMID:26286983

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, Elise A.; Rowe, Kenneth T.; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K.; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M.; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain.

  5. Interaction of triclosan with eukaryotic membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygre, Henning; Moe, Grete; Skålevik, Rita; Holmsen, Holm

    2003-06-01

    The possibility that triclosan and PVM/MA (polyvinylmethyl ether/maleic acid) copolymer, additives to dentrifrices, could interact with eukaryotic membrane lipids was studied by two methods: first, by determining the pressure/molecular area isotherms at 37 degrees C of glycerophospholipid monolayers, using the Langmuir technique; and second, by phase-transition parameters in liposomes of the same lipids, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Triclosan interacted, in a concentration-independent manner, with monolayers of saturated phosphatidylcholines (PC; i.e. markers of the outer membrane leaflet of eukaryotic cells). Triclosan and PVM/MA copolymer mixtures were shown to clearly interact in a concentration-dependent manner with PC. Triclosan was found to interact with liposomes of saturated and unsaturated phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylserines (PS; i.e. markers of the inner membrane leaflet of eukaryotic cells), and saturated ethanolamines (PE; i.e. markers of the inner membrane leaflet of eukaryotic cells), resulting in a decrease of the lipid melting temperature (Tm). PVM/MA copolymer changed the Tm of PS, PC, and PE in different manners. By adding PVM/MA or triclosan-PVM/MA copolymer mixtures to 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (SOPS) no lipid transitions were detected. A biphasic change of the PC transition temperature resulted when triclosan or triclosan PVM/MA copolymer mixtures were added, indicating domain formation and change of the lipid polymorphism.

  6. The Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, John L; Aceti, David J; Bingman, Craig A; Fox, Brian G; Frederick, Ronnie O; Makino, Shin-ichi; Nichols, Karl W; Phillips, George N; Primm, John G; Sahu, Sarata C; Vojtik, Frank C; Volkman, Brian F; Wrobel, Russell L; Zolnai, Zsolt

    2009-04-01

    The Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) is a "specialized" or "technology development" center supported by the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). CESG's mission is to develop improved methods for the high-throughput solution of structures from eukaryotic proteins, with a very strong weighting toward human proteins of biomedical relevance. During the first three years of PSI-2, CESG selected targets representing 601 proteins from Homo sapiens, 33 from mouse, 10 from rat, 139 from Galdieria sulphuraria, 35 from Arabidopsis thaliana, 96 from Cyanidioschyzon merolae, 80 from Plasmodium falciparum, 24 from yeast, and about 25 from other eukaryotes. Notably, 30% of all structures of human proteins solved by the PSI Centers were determined at CESG. Whereas eukaryotic proteins generally are considered to be much more challenging targets than prokaryotic proteins, the technology now in place at CESG yields success rates that are comparable to those of the large production centers that work primarily on prokaryotic proteins. We describe here the technological innovations that underlie CESG's platforms for bioinformatics and laboratory information management, target selection, protein production, and structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological, metabolic and biotechnological features of extremely thermophilic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, James A; Zeldes, Benjamin M; Lee, Laura L; Straub, Christopher T; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2017-05-01

    The current upper thermal limit for life as we know it is approximately 120°C. Microorganisms that grow optimally at temperatures of 75°C and above are usually referred to as 'extreme thermophiles' and include both bacteria and archaea. For over a century, there has been great scientific curiosity in the basic tenets that support life in thermal biotopes on earth and potentially on other solar bodies. Extreme thermophiles can be aerobes, anaerobes, autotrophs, heterotrophs, or chemolithotrophs, and are found in diverse environments including shallow marine fissures, deep sea hydrothermal vents, terrestrial hot springs-basically, anywhere there is hot water. Initial efforts to study extreme thermophiles faced challenges with their isolation from difficult to access locales, problems with their cultivation in laboratories, and lack of molecular tools. Fortunately, because of their relatively small genomes, many extreme thermophiles were among the first organisms to be sequenced, thereby opening up the application of systems biology-based methods to probe their unique physiological, metabolic and biotechnological features. The bacterial genera Caldicellulosiruptor, Thermotoga and Thermus, and the archaea belonging to the orders Thermococcales and Sulfolobales, are among the most studied extreme thermophiles to date. The recent emergence of genetic tools for many of these organisms provides the opportunity to move beyond basic discovery and manipulation to biotechnologically relevant applications of metabolic engineering. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1377. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1377 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ecology and biotechnological potential of the thermophilic fermentative Coprothermobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, M C; Braguglia, C M; Petruccioli, M; Rossetti, S

    2015-05-01

    Thermophilic bacteria have been isolated from several terrestrial, marine and industrial environments. Anaerobic digesters treating organic wastes are often an important source of these microorganisms, which catalyze a wide array of metabolic processes. Moreover, organic wastes are primarily composed of proteins, whose degradation is often incomplete. Coprothermobacter spp. are proteolytic anaerobic thermophilic microbes identified in several studies focused on the analysis of the microbial community structure in anaerobic thermophilic reactors. They are currently classified in the phylum Firmicutes; nevertheless, several authors showed that the Coprothermobacter group is most closely related to the phyla Dictyoglomi and Thermotoga. Since only a few proteolytic anaerobic thermophiles have been characterized so far, this microorganism has attracted the attention of researchers for its potential applications with high-temperature environments. In addition to proteolysis, Coprothermobacter spp. showed several metabolic abilities and may have a biotechnological application either as source of thermostable enzymes or as inoculum in anaerobic processes. Moreover, they can improve protein degradation by establishing a syntrophy with hydrogenotrophic archaea. To gain a better understanding of the phylogenesis, metabolic capabilities and adaptations of these microorganisms, it is of importance to better define the role in thermophilic environments and to disclose properties not yet investigated. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Protease Production by Different Thermophilic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchione, Mariana M.; Merheb, Carolina W.; Gomes, Eleni; da Silva, Roberto

    A comparative study was carried out to evaluate protease production in solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF) by nine different thermophilic fungi — Thermoascus aurantiacus Miehe, Thermomyces lanuginosus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, Aspergillus flavus 1.2, Aspergillus sp. 13.33, Aspergillus sp. 13.34, Aspergillus sp. 13.35, Rhizomucor pusillus 13.36 and Rhizomucor sp. 13.37 — using substrates containing proteins to induce enzyme secretion. Soybean extract (soybean milk), soybean flour, milk powder, rice, and wheat bran were tested. The most satisfactory results were obtained when using wheat bran in SSF. The fungi that stood out in SSF were T. lanuginosus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, Aspergillus sp. 13.34, Aspergillus sp. 13.35, and Rhizomucor sp. 13.37, and those in SmF were T. aurantiacus, T. lanuginosus TO.03, and 13.37. In both fermentation systems, A. flavus 1.2 and R. pusillus 13.36 presented the lowest levels of proteolytic activity.

  11. Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Cold Marine Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ISAKSEN, MF; BAK, F.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    Sulfate reduction was measured with the (SO42-)-S-35-tracer technique in slurries of sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, where seasonal temperatures range from 0 degrees to 15 degrees C. The incubations were made at temperatures from 0 degrees C to 80 degrees C in temperature increments of 2 degrees...... C to search for presence of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Detectable activity was initially only in the mesophilic range, but after a lag phase sulfate reduction by thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. No distinct activity of psychrophilic...... sulfate-reducing bacteria was detected. Time course experiments showed constant sulfate reduction rates at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C, whereas the activity at 60 degrees C increased exponentially after a lag period of one day. Thermophilic, endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria, designated strain...

  12. Thermophilic bacilli and their importance in dairy processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Sara A; Lindsay, Denise; Flint, Steve H

    2010-12-15

    The thermophilic bacilli, such as Anoxybacillus flavithermus and Geobacillus spp., are an important group of contaminants in the dairy industry. Although these bacilli are generally not pathogenic, their presence in dairy products is an indicator of poor hygiene and high numbers are unacceptable to customers. In addition, their growth may result in milk product defects caused by the production of acids or enzymes, potentially leading to off-flavours. Dairy thermophiles are usually selected for by the conditions during dairy manufacture. These bacteria are able to grow in sections of dairy manufacturing plants where temperatures reach 40-65°C. Furthermore, because they are spore formers, they are difficult to eliminate. In addition, they exhibit a wide temperature growth range, exhibit a fast growth rate (generation time of approximately 15-20 min) and tend to readily form biofilms. Many strategies have been tested to remove, prevent and/or delay the formation of thermophilic bacilli biofilms in dairy manufacture, but with limited success. This is, in part, because little is known about the structure and composition of thermophilic bacilli biofilms in general and, more specifically, in milk processing environments. Therefore, new cleaning regimes often do not target the problem optimally. A greater understanding of the structure of thermophilic biofilms within the context of the milk processing environment and their link with spore formation is needed to develop better control measures. This review discusses the characteristics and food spoilage potential, enumeration and identification methods for the thermophilic bacilli, as well as their importance to dairy manufacture, with an emphasis on biofilm development and spore formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards New Antifolates Targeting Eukaryotic Opportunistic Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Bolstad, E; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Trimethoprim, an antifolate commonly prescribed in combination with sulfamethoxazole, potently inhibits several prokaryotic species of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). However, several eukaryotic pathogenic organisms are resistant to trimethoprim, preventing its effective use as a therapeutic for those infections. We have been building a program to reengineer trimethoprim to more potently and selectively inhibit eukaryotic species of DHFR as a viable strategy for new drug discovery targeting several opportunistic pathogens. We have developed a series of compounds that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of DHFR from the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma as well as the fungus Candida glabrata. A comparison of the structures of DHFR from the fungal species Candida glabrata and Pneumocystis suggests that the compounds may also potently inhibit Pneumocystis DHFR.

  14. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  15. The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD): recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périer, R C; Junier, T; Bonnard, C; Bucher, P

    1999-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) is an annotated non-redundant collection of eukaryotic POL II promoters, for which the transcription start site has been determined experimentally. Access to promoter sequences is provided by pointers to positions in nucleotide sequence entries. The annotation part of an entry includes description of the initiation site mapping data, cross-references to other databases, and bibliographic references. EPD is structured in a way that facilitates dynamic extraction of biologically meaningful promoter subsets for comparative sequence analysis. Recent efforts have focused on exhaustive cross-referencing to the EMBL nucleotide sequence database, and on the improvement of the WWW-based user interfaces and data retrieval mechanisms. EPD can be accessed at http://www.epd.isb-sib.ch

  16. The Future of Multiplexed Eukaryotic Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David B; Aboulhouda, Soufiane; Hysolli, Eriona; Smith, Cory J; Wang, Stan; Castanon, Oscar; Church, George M

    2017-12-28

    Multiplex genome editing is the simultaneous introduction of multiple distinct modifications to a given genome. Though in its infancy, maturation of this field will facilitate powerful new biomedical research approaches and will enable a host of far-reaching biological engineering applications, including new therapeutic modalities and industrial applications, as well as "genome writing" and de-extinction efforts. In this Perspective, we focus on multiplex editing of large eukaryotic genomes. We describe the current state of multiplexed genome editing, the current limits of our ability to multiplex edits, and provide perspective on the many applications that fully realized multiplex editing technologies would enable in higher eukaryotic genomes. We offer a broad look at future directions, covering emergent CRISPR-based technologies, advances in intracellular delivery, and new DNA assembly approaches that may enable future genome editing on a massively multiplexed scale.

  17. Release of hyaluronate from eukaryotic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Prehm, P

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of hyaluronate shedding from eukaryotic cell lines was analysed. All cell lines shed identical sizes of hyaluronate as were retained on the surface. They differed in the amount of hyaluronate synthesized and in the proportions of hyaluronate which were released and retained. A method was developed which could discriminate between shedding due to intramolecular degradation and that due to dissociation as intact macromolecules. This method was applied to B6 and SV3T3 cells in orde...

  18. Eukaryotic plankton diversity in the sunlit ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Colomban de; Audic, Stéphane; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Mahé, Frédéric; Logares, Ramiro; Lara, Enrique; Berney, Cédric; Le Bescot, Noan; Probert, Ian; Carmichael, Margaux; Poulain, Julie; Romac, Sarah; Colin, Sébastien; Aury, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Marine plankton support global biological and geochemical processes. Surveys of their biodiversity have hitherto been geographically restricted and have not accounted for the full range of plankton size. We assessed eukaryotic diversity from 334 size-fractionated photic-zone plankton communities collected across tropical and temperate oceans during the circumglobal Tara Oceans expedition. We analyzed 18S ribosomal DNA sequences across the intermediate plankton-size spectrum from the smallest ...

  19. THERMOPHILE ENDOSPORES HAVE RESPONSIVE EXOSPORIUM FOR ATTACHMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.T.; WARREN,J.; SABATINI,R.

    1999-08-01

    Recently studies examining the colonization of Clostridial pathogens on agar and human tissue culture cells, demonstrated that (C. sporogenes ATCC 3584, C. difficile ATCC 43594 [patient isolate], C. difficile ATCC 9689 [non-clinical], C. clostridioforme [patient isolate]) bacterial spores (endospores) of the genus Clostridia have an outer membrane that becomes responsive at activation and exhibits extensions of the exosporial membrane that facilitate and maintain spore attachment to a nutritive substrate during germination and initial outgrowth of the newly developed bacterial cell. Therefore this attachment phenomenon plays an important role in insuring bacterial colonization of a surface and the initial stages of the infective process. To see if other non-clinical members of this genus also have this ability to attach to a substrate or food-source during spore germination, and how this attachment process in environmental thermophiles compares to the clinical paradigm (in relation to time sequence, exosporial membrane structure, type of attachment structures, composition of the membrane etc...), sediment samples were collected in sterile transport containers at 4 geothermal sites at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Because spore forming bacteria will produce spores when conditions are unfavorable for growth, the samples were sealed and stored at 4 C. After 8 months the samples were screened for the presence of spores by light microscope examination using malachite green/safranin, and traditional endospores were identified in significant quantities from the Terrace Spring site (a 46 C lake with bacterial mats and a rapidly moving run-off channel leading to a traditional hot spring). The highest spore population was found in the top sediment and benthic water of the run-off channel, pH 8.1.

  20. Arsenic and Antimony Transporters in Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Wawrzycka, Donata; Wysocki, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids, naturally present in the environment and all organisms have developed pathways for their detoxification. The most effective metalloid tolerance systems in eukaryotes include downregulation of metalloid uptake, efflux out of the cell, and complexation with phytochelatin or glutathione followed by sequestration into the vacuole. Understanding of arsenic and antimony transport system is of high importance due to the increasing usage of arsenic-based drugs in the treatment of certain types of cancer and diseases caused by protozoan parasites as well as for the development of bio- and phytoremediation strategies for metalloid polluted areas. However, in contrast to prokaryotes, the knowledge about specific transporters of arsenic and antimony and the mechanisms of metalloid transport in eukaryotes has been very limited for a long time. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding of arsenic and antimony transport pathways in eukaryotes, including a dual role of aquaglyceroporins in uptake and efflux of metalloids, elucidation of arsenic transport mechanism by the yeast Acr3 transporter and its role in arsenic hyperaccumulation in ferns, identification of vacuolar transporters of arsenic-phytochelatin complexes in plants and forms of arsenic substrates recognized by mammalian ABC transporters. PMID:22489166

  1. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  2. Arsenic and antimony transporters in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Wawrzycka, Donata; Wysocki, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids, naturally present in the environment and all organisms have developed pathways for their detoxification. The most effective metalloid tolerance systems in eukaryotes include downregulation of metalloid uptake, efflux out of the cell, and complexation with phytochelatin or glutathione followed by sequestration into the vacuole. Understanding of arsenic and antimony transport system is of high importance due to the increasing usage of arsenic-based drugs in the treatment of certain types of cancer and diseases caused by protozoan parasites as well as for the development of bio- and phytoremediation strategies for metalloid polluted areas. However, in contrast to prokaryotes, the knowledge about specific transporters of arsenic and antimony and the mechanisms of metalloid transport in eukaryotes has been very limited for a long time. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding of arsenic and antimony transport pathways in eukaryotes, including a dual role of aquaglyceroporins in uptake and efflux of metalloids, elucidation of arsenic transport mechanism by the yeast Acr3 transporter and its role in arsenic hyperaccumulation in ferns, identification of vacuolar transporters of arsenic-phytochelatin complexes in plants and forms of arsenic substrates recognized by mammalian ABC transporters.

  3. Enzymes from Higher Eukaryotes for Industrial Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The industrial production of fine chemicals, feed and food ingredients, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and their respective intermediates relies on an increasing application of biocatalysis, i.e. on enzyme or whole-cell catalyzed conversions of molecules. Simple procedures for discovery, cloning and over-expression as well as fast growth favour fungi, yeasts and especially bacteria as sources of biocatalysts. Higher eukaryotes also harbour an almost unlimited number of potential biocatalysts, although to date the limited supply of enzymes, the high heterogeneity of enzyme preparations and the hazard of infectious contaminants keep some interesting candidates out of reach for industrial bioprocesses. In the past only a few animal and plant enzymes from agricultural waste materials were employed in food processing. The use of bacterial expression strains or non-conventional yeasts for the heterologous production of efficient eukaryotic enzymes can overcome the bottleneck in enzyme supply and provide sufficient amounts of homogenous enzyme preparations for reliable and economically feasible applications at large scale. Ideal enzymatic processes represent an environmentally friendly, »near-to-completion« conversion of (mostly non-natural substrates to pure products. Recent developments demonstrate the commercial feasibility of large-scale biocatalytic processes employing enzymes from higher eukaryotes (e.g. plants, animals and also their usefulness in some small-scale industrial applications.

  4. Isolation and survey of thermophilic moulds for extracellular phytase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    2012-07-24

    7H2O 0.5 pH 7.0 ± 0.2). The isolated fungi were maintained at 4°C on YpSs slops and -20°C in glycerol stocks. Qualitative screening. The isolated thermophilic moulds were screened for extracellular phytase production using ...

  5. Abiotic and Microbiotic Factors Controlling Biofilm Formation by Thermophilic Sporeformers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.M.; Metselaar, K.I.; Boer, P. de; Roeselers, G.; Moezelaar, R.; Groot, M.N.; Montijn, R.C.; Abee, T.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon

  6. Azo dye reduction by mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Madrid, de M.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.; Cervantes, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of the azo dye model compounds Reactive Red 2 (RR2) and Reactive Orange 14 (RO14) by mesophilic (30 C) and thermophilic (55 C) anaerobic consortia was studied in batch assays. The contribution of fermentative and methanogenic microorganisms in both temperatures was evaluated in the

  7. Abiotic and microbiotic factors controlling biofilm formation by thermophilic sporeformers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.M.; Metselaar, K.I.; Boer, de P.; Roeselers, G.; Moezelaar, R.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Montijn, R.C.; Abee, T.; Kort, R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon

  8. Diversity and ecophysiological features of thermophilic carboxydotrophic anaerobes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolova, T.G.; Henstra, A.M.; Sipma, J.; Parshina, S.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lebedinsky, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Both natural and anthropogenic hot environments contain appreciable levels of carbon monoxide (CO). Anaerobic microbial communities play an important role in CO conversion in such environments. CO is involved in a number of redox reactions. It is biotransformed by thermophilic methanogens,

  9. Thermophilic aerobic post treatment of anaerobically pretreated paper process water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, J.C.T.

    2002-01-01

    Thermophilic waste- or process water treatment increases in importance as industries shift from end-of-pipe treatment towards integrated process water treatment. The need for process water treatment becomes evident as the levels of pollutants in industrial water

  10. Isolation of soil thermophilic strains of actinomycetes for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... proportional to the amount of α-amylase enzyme produced by the strains. Extraction of α-amylase was done in liquid medium. The assay was observed by measuring the release of reducing sugar (RS) by 3,5- dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method and expressed in International Units (IU). The thermophilic ...

  11. Hydrophobic and Electrostatic Cell Surface Properties of Thermophilic Dairy Streptococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Mei, HC; de Vries, Jacob; Busscher, HJ

    1993-01-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) and microelectrophoresis were done in 10 mM potassium phosphate solutions to characterize the surfaces of thermophilic dairy streptococci, isolated from pasteurizers. Regardless of whether they were grown (in M17 broth) with lactose, sucrose, or glucose

  12. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotes: The weak-link model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    The significance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic evolution remains controversial. Although many eukaryotic genes are of bacterial origin, they are often interpreted as being derived from mitochondria or plastids. Because of their fixed gene pool and gene loss, however, mitochondria and plastids alone cannot adequately explain the presence of all, or even the majority, of bacterial genes in eukaryotes. Available data indicate that no insurmountable barrier to HGT exists, even in complex multicellular eukaryotes. In addition, the discovery of both recent and ancient HGT events in all major eukaryotic groups suggests that HGT has been a regular occurrence throughout the history of eukaryotic evolution. A model of HGT is proposed that suggests both unicellular and early developmental stages as likely entry points for foreign genes into multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:24037739

  13. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... indicated that lateral gene transfer does indeed affect eukaryotic genomes. However, the lack of common methodology and criteria in these studies makes it difficult to assess the general importance and influence of lateral gene transfer on eukaryotic genome evolution. RESULTS: We used a phylogenomic...... approach to systematically investigate lateral gene transfer affecting the proteomes of thirteen, mainly parasitic, microbial eukaryotes, representing four of the six eukaryotic super-groups. All of the genomes investigated have been significantly affected by prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers...

  14. Prokaryotes versus Eukaryotes: Who is hosting whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eTellez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms represent the largest component of biodiversity in our world. For millions of years, prokaryotic microorganisms have functioned as a major selective force shaping eukaryotic evolution. Microbes that live inside and on animals outnumber the animals’ actual somatic and germ cells by an estimated 10-fold. Collectively, the intestinal microbiome represents a ‘forgotten organ’, functioning as an organ inside another that can execute many physiological responsibilities. The nature of primitive eukaryotes was drastically changed due to the association with symbiotic prokaryotes facilitating mutual coevolution of host and microbe. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. From termites and honey bees to ruminants and mammals, depending on novel biochemistries provided by the prokaryotic microbiome, the association helps to metabolize several nutrients that the host cannot digest and converting these into useful end products (such as short chain fatty acids, a process which has huge impact on the biology and homeostasis of metazoans. More importantly, in a direct and/or indirect way, the intestinal microbiota influences the assembly of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, helps to educate immune system, affects the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, modulates proliferation and differentiation of its epithelial lineages, regulates angiogenesis, and modifies the activity of enteric as well as the central nervous system,. Despite these important effects, the mechanisms by which the gut microbial community influences the host’s biology remains almost entirely unknown. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification between prokaryotes and eukaryotes which encourage us to postulate: Who is

  15. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  16. Design and chemical synthesis of eukaryotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ze-Xiong; Liu, Duo; Li, Bing-Zhi; Zhao, Meng; Zeng, Bo-Xuan; Wu, Yi; Shen, Yue; Lin, Tao; Yang, Ping; Dai, Junbiao; Cai, Yizhi; Yang, Huanming; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2017-11-27

    Following the discovery of the DNA double helix structure and the advancement of genome sequencing, we have entered a promising stage with regard to genome writing. Recently, a milestone breakthrough was achieved in the chemical synthesis of designer yeast chromosomes. Here, we review the systematic approaches to the de novo synthesis of designer eukaryotic chromosomes, with an emphasis on technologies and methodologies that enable design, building, testing and debugging. The achievement of chemically synthesized genomes with customized genetic features offers an opportunity to rebuild genome organization, remold biological functions and promote life evolution, which will be of great benefit for application in medicine and industrial manufacturing.

  17. Performance and microbial community analysis of two-stage process with extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from hydrolysate in UASB reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    The two-stage process for extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Specific hydrogen and methane yields of 89ml-H2/g-VS (190ml-H2/g-sugars) and 307ml-CH4/g-VS, respectively were...

  18. A cobalt-containing eukaryotic nitrile hydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Salette; Yang, Xinhang; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2017-01-01

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase), an industrially important enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of nitriles to their corresponding amides, has only been characterized from prokaryotic microbes. The putative NHase from the eukaryotic unicellular choanoflagellate organism Monosiga brevicollis (MbNHase) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting enzyme expressed as a single polypeptide with fused α- and β-subunits linked by a seventeen-histidine region. Size-exclusion chromatography indicated that MbNHase exists primarily as an (αβ)2 homodimer in solution, analogous to the α2β2 homotetramer architecture observed for prokaryotic NHases. The NHase enzyme contained its full complement of Co(III) and was fully functional without the co-expression of an activator protein or E. coli GroES/EL molecular chaperones. The homology model of MbNHase was developed identifying Cys400, Cys403, and Cys405 as active site ligands. The results presented here provide the first experimental data for a mature and active eukaryotic NHase with fused subunits. Since this new member of the NHase family is expressed from a single gene without the requirement of an activator protein, it represents an alternative biocatalyst for industrial syntheses of important amide compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic Cytoskeletons: Structure and Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton is an assembly of filamentous proteins and a host of associated proteins that collectively serve functional needs ranging from spatial organization and transport to the production and transmission of forces. These systems can exhibit a wide variety of non-equilibrium, self-assembled phases depending on context and function. While much recent progress has been made in understanding the self-organization, rheology and nonlinear mechanical properties of such active systems, in this talk, we will concentrate on some emerging aspects of cytoskeletal physics that are promising. One such aspect is the influence of cytoskeletal network topology and its dynamics on both active and passive intracellular transport. Another aspect we will highlight is the interplay between chirality of filaments, their elasticity and their interactions with the membrane that can lead to novel conformational states with functional implications. Finally we will consider homologs of cytoskeletal proteins in bacteria, which are involved in templating cell growth, segregating genetic material and force production, which we will discuss with particular reference to contractile forces during cell division. These prokaryotic structures function in remarkably similar yet fascinatingly different ways from their eukaryotic counterparts and can enrich our understanding of cytoskeletal functioning as a whole.

  20. The Genome of Naegleria gruberi Illuminates Early Eukaryotic Versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Ginger, Michael L.; Dacks, Joel; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Field, Mark C.; Kuo, Alan; Paredez, Alex; Chapman, Jarrod; Pham, Jonathan; Shu, Shengqiang; Neupane, Rochak; Cipriano, Michael; Mancuso, Joel; Tu, Hank; Salamov, Asaf; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Cande, W. Zacheus; Fulton, Chandler; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2010-03-01

    Genome sequences of diverse free-living protists are essential for understanding eukaryotic evolution and molecular and cell biology. The free-living amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi belongs to a varied and ubiquitous protist clade (Heterolobosea) that diverged from other eukaryotic lineages over a billion years ago. Analysis of the 15,727 protein-coding genes encoded by Naegleria's 41 Mb nuclear genome indicates a capacity for both aerobic respiration and anaerobic metabolism with concomitant hydrogen production, with fundamental implications for the evolution of organelle metabolism. The Naegleria genome facilitates substantially broader phylogenomic comparisons of free-living eukaryotes than previously possible, allowing us to identify thousands of genes likely present in the pan-eukaryotic ancestor, with 40% likely eukaryotic inventions. Moreover, we construct a comprehensive catalog of amoeboid-motility genes. The Naegleria genome, analyzed in the context of other protists, reveals a remarkably complex ancestral eukaryote with a rich repertoire of cytoskeletal, sexual, signaling, and metabolic modules.

  1. Aerobic wastewater treatment under high and varying temperatures : thermophilic process performance and effluent quality

    OpenAIRE

    Suvilampi, Juhani

    2003-01-01

    Industries, such as the pulp and paper industry, generate high-temperature process waters and wastewaters. Biological treatment at high temperatures may be an attractive option for the treatment of hot or concentrated wastewaters. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of thermophilic aerobic wastewater treatment in laboratory experiments, in which thermophilic processes were compared with mesophilic processes. A combined thermophilic-mesophilic treatment was used to impr...

  2. Conservation of functional domain structure in bicarbonate-regulated “soluble” adenylyl cyclases in bacteria and eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionarily conserved bicarbonate sensor. In mammals, it is responsible for bicarbonate-induced, cAMP-dependent processes in sperm required for fertilization and postulated to be involved in other bicarbonate- and carbon dioxide-dependent functions throughout the body. Among eukaryotes, sAC-like cyclases have been detected in mammals and in the fungi Dictyostelium; these enzymes display extensive similarity extending through two cyclase catalytic domains and a long carboxy terminal extension. sAC-like cyclases are also found in a number of bacterial phyla (Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria), but these enzymes generally possess only a single catalytic domain and little, if any, homology with the remainder of the mammalian protein. Database mining through a number of recently sequenced genomes identified sAC orthologues in additional metazoan phyla (Arthropoda and Chordata) and additional bacterial phyla (Chloroflexi). Interestingly, the Chloroflexi sAC-like cyclases, a family of three enzymes from the thermophilic eubacterium, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, are more similar to eukaryotic sAC-like cyclases (i.e., mammalian sAC and Dictyostelium SgcA) than they are to other bacterial adenylyl cyclases (ACs) (i.e., from Cyanobacteria). The Chloroflexus sAC-like cyclases each possess two cyclase catalytic domains and extensive similarity with mammalian enzymes through their carboxy termini. We cloned one of the Chloroflexus sAC-like cyclases and confirmed it to be stimulated by bicarbonate. These data extend the family of organisms possessing bicarbonate-responsive ACs to numerous phyla within the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms. PMID:15322879

  3. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Enolase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus: Evidence for a Thermophilic Origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Boyd, Eric S; Posewitz, Matthew C; Zorin, Nikolay A; Peters, John W

    2015-01-01

    .... Here, we report the purification and biochemical and structural characterization of enolase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a thermophilic anoxygenic phototroph affiliated with the green non-sulfur bacteria...

  4. Startup and stability of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of OFMSW

    KAUST Repository

    El-Fadel, Mutasem E.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and more recently as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation measure. In this context, AD systems operating at thermophilic temperatures (55-60°C)-compared to mesophilic temperatures (35-40°C)-have the unique feature of producing hygienic soil conditioners with greater process efficiency, higher energy yield, and more GHG savings. Startup of AD systems is often constrained by the lack of acclimated seeds, leading to process instability and failure. The authors focus on strategies to startup thermophilic digesters treating OFMSW in the absence of acclimated seeds and examines constraints associated with process stability and ways to overcome them. Relevant gaps in the literature and future research needs are delineated. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  5. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of thermophilic microorganisms which convert acetic acid to CH[sub 4]. The previous funding period represents a departure from earlier research in this laboratory, which was more physiological and ecological. The present work is centered on the biochemistry of the thermophile Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. this organism presents a unique opportunity, with its purity and relatively rapid growth, to do comparative biochemical studies with the other major acetotrophic genus Methanosarcina. We previously found that Methanothrix is capable of using acetate at concentrations 100 fold lower than Methanosarcina. This finding suggests that there are significant differences in the pathways of methanogenesis from acetate in the two genera.

  6. Bacterial proteins pinpoint a single eukaryotic root

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Derelle, R.; Torruella, G.; Klimeš, V.; Brinkmann, H.; Kim, E.; Vlček, Čestmír; Lang, B.F.; Eliáš, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 7 (2015), E693-E699 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24983S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0100; Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Early Career Scientist Program(US) 55007424; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, European Molecular Biology Organization Young Investigator Program(ES) BFU2012-31329; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, "Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa" - European Regional Development Fund(ES) Sev-2012-0208, BES-2013-064004 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : eukaryote phylogeny * phylogenomics * Opimoda * Diphoda * LECA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  7. Posttranscriptional mechanisms in controlling eukaryotic circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Weng, Wenya; Guo, Jinhu

    2011-05-20

    The circadian clock is essential in almost all living organisms to synchronise biochemical, metabolic, physiological and behavioural cycles to daily changing environmental factors. In a highly conserved fashion, the circadian clock is primarily controlled by multiple positive and negative molecular circuitries that control gene expression. More recently, research in Neurospora and other eukaryotes has uncovered the involvement of additional regulatory components that operate at the posttranslational level to fine tune the circadian system. Though it remains poorly understood, a growing body of evidence has shown that posttranscriptional regulation controls the expression of both circadian oscillator and output gene transcripts at a number of different steps. This regulation is crucial for driving and maintaining robust circadian rhythms. Here we review recent advances in circadian rhythm research at the RNA level. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA Mismatch Repair in Eukaryotes and Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Fukui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA mismatch repair (MMR corrects mismatched base pairs mainly caused by DNA replication errors. The fundamental mechanisms and proteins involved in the early reactions of MMR are highly conserved in almost all organisms ranging from bacteria to human. The significance of this repair system is also indicated by the fact that defects in MMR cause human hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancers as well as sporadic tumors. To date, 2 types of MMRs are known: the human type and Escherichia coli type. The basic features of the former system are expected to be universal among the vast majority of organisms including most bacteria. Here, I review the molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic and bacterial MMR, emphasizing on the similarities between them.

  9. Arabinogalactan proteins have deep roots in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervé, Cécile; Siméon, Amandine; Jam, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly glycosylated, hydroxyproline-rich proteins found at the cell surface of plants, where they play key roles in developmental processes. Brown algae are marine, multicellular, photosynthetic eukaryotes. They belong to the phylum Stramenopiles, which...... is unrelated to land plants and green algae (Chloroplastida). Brown algae share common evolutionary features with other multicellular organisms, including a carbohydrate-rich cell wall. They differ markedly from plants in their cell wall composition, and AGPs have not been reported in brown algae. Here we...... glycan epitopes in a range of brown algal cell wall extracts. We demonstrated that these chimeric AGP-like core proteins are developmentally regulated in embryos of the order Fucales and showed that AGP loss of function seriously impairs the course of early embryogenesis. Our findings shine a new light...

  10. Protein splicing and its evolution in eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starokadomskyy P. L.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inteins, or protein introns, are parts of protein sequences that are post-translationally excised, their flanking regions (exteins being spliced together. This process was called protein splicing. Originally inteins were found in prokaryotic or unicellular eukaryotic organisms. But the general principles of post-translation protein rearrangement are evolving yielding different post-translation modification of proteins in multicellular organisms. For clarity, these non-intein mediated events call either protein rearrangements or protein editing. The most intriguing example of protein editing is proteasome-mediated splicing of antigens in vertebrates that may play important role in antigen presentation. Other examples of protein rearrangements are maturation of Hg-proteins (critical receptors in embryogenesis as well as maturation of several metabolic enzymes. Despite a lack of experimental data we try to analyze some intriguing examples of protein splicing evolution.

  11. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soanes, Darren; Richards, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer has been identified as a prevalent and pervasive phenomenon and an important source of genomic innovation in bacteria. The role of gene transfer in microbial eukaryotes seems to be of a reduced magnitude but in some cases can drive important evolutionary innovations, such as new functions that underpin the colonization of different niches. The aim of this review is to summarize published cases that support the hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a role in the evolution of phytopathogenic traits in fungi and oomycetes. Our survey of the literature identifies 46 proposed cases of transfer of genes that have a putative or experimentally demonstrable phytopathogenic function. When considering the life-cycle steps through which a pathogen must progress, the majority of the HGTs identified are associated with invading, degrading, and manipulating the host. Taken together, these data suggest HGT has played a role in shaping how fungi and oomycetes colonize plant hosts.

  12. How eukaryotic filamentous pathogens evade plant recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Valent, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes employ sophisticated mechanisms for evading host recognition. After host penetration, many fungi and oomycetes establish a biotrophic interaction. It is assumed that different strategies employed by these pathogens to avoid triggering host defence responses, including establishment of biotrophic interfacial layers between the pathogen and host, masking of invading hyphae and active suppression of host defence mechanisms, are essential for a biotrophic parasitic lifestyle. During the infection process, filamentous plant pathogens secrete various effectors, which are hypothesized to be involved in facilitating effective host infection. Live-cell imaging of fungi and oomycetes secreting fluorescently labeled effector proteins as well as functional characterization of the components of biotrophic interfaces have led to the recent progress in understanding how eukaryotic filamentous pathogens evade plant recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Soil eukaryotic functional diversity, a metatranscriptomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Julie; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Verner, Marie-Christine; Debaud, Jean-Claude; Lemaire, Marc; Wésolowski-Louvel, Micheline; Marmeisse, Roland

    2007-11-01

    To appreciate the functional diversity of communities of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms we evaluated an experimental approach based on the construction and screening of a cDNA library using polyadenylated mRNA extracted from a forest soil. Such a library contains genes that are expressed by each of the different organisms forming the community and represents its metatranscriptome. The diversity of the organisms that contributed to this library was evaluated by sequencing a portion of the 18S rDNA gene amplified from either soil DNA or reverse-transcribed RNA. More than 70% of the sequences were from fungi and unicellular eukaryotes (protists) while the other most represented group was the metazoa. Calculation of richness estimators suggested that more than 180 species could be present in the soil samples studied. Sequencing of 119 cDNA identified genes with no homologues in databases (32%) and genes coding proteins involved in different biochemical and cellular processes. Surprisingly, the taxonomic distribution of the cDNA and of the 18S rDNA genes did not coincide, with a marked under-representation of the protists among the cDNA. Specific genes from such an environmental cDNA library could be isolated by expression in a heterologous microbial host, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is illustrated by the functional complementation of a histidine auxotrophic yeast mutant by two cDNA originating possibly from an ascomycete and a basidiomycete fungal species. Study of the metatranscriptome has the potential to uncover adaptations of whole microbial communities to local environmental conditions. It also gives access to an abundant source of genes of biotechnological interest.

  14. Eukaryotic protein production in designed storage organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Margarita; Llompart, Blanca; Lasserre-Ramassamy, Sabine; Llop-Tous, Immaculada; Bastida, Miriam; Marzabal, Pau; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Saloheimo, Markku; Heifetz, Peter B; Ludevid, M Dolors

    2009-01-28

    Protein bodies (PBs) are natural endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or vacuole plant-derived organelles that stably accumulate large amounts of storage proteins in seeds. The proline-rich N-terminal domain derived from the maize storage protein gamma zein (Zera) is sufficient to induce PBs in non-seed tissues of Arabidopsis and tobacco. This Zera property opens up new routes for high-level accumulation of recombinant proteins by fusion of Zera with proteins of interest. In this work we extend the advantageous properties of plant seed PBs to recombinant protein production in useful non-plant eukaryotic hosts including cultured fungal, mammalian and insect cells. Various Zera fusions with fluorescent and therapeutic proteins accumulate in induced PB-like organelles in all eukaryotic systems tested: tobacco leaves, Trichoderma reesei, several mammalian cultured cells and Sf9 insect cells. This accumulation in membranous organelles insulates both recombinant protein and host from undesirable activities of either. Recombinant protein encapsulation in these PBs facilitates stable accumulation of proteins in a protected sub-cellular compartment which results in an enhancement of protein production without affecting the viability and development of stably transformed hosts. The induced PBs also retain the high-density properties of native seed PBs which facilitate the recovery and purification of the recombinant proteins they contain. The Zera sequence provides an efficient and universal means to produce recombinant proteins by accumulation in ER-derived organelles. The remarkable cross-kingdom conservation of PB formation and their biophysical properties should have broad application in the manufacture of non-secreted recombinant proteins and suggests the existence of universal ER pathways for protein insulation.

  15. Eukaryotic protein production in designed storage organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein bodies (PBs are natural endoplasmic reticulum (ER or vacuole plant-derived organelles that stably accumulate large amounts of storage proteins in seeds. The proline-rich N-terminal domain derived from the maize storage protein γ zein (Zera is sufficient to induce PBs in non-seed tissues of Arabidopsis and tobacco. This Zera property opens up new routes for high-level accumulation of recombinant proteins by fusion of Zera with proteins of interest. In this work we extend the advantageous properties of plant seed PBs to recombinant protein production in useful non-plant eukaryotic hosts including cultured fungal, mammalian and insect cells. Results Various Zera fusions with fluorescent and therapeutic proteins accumulate in induced PB-like organelles in all eukaryotic systems tested: tobacco leaves, Trichoderma reesei, several mammalian cultured cells and Sf9 insect cells. This accumulation in membranous organelles insulates both recombinant protein and host from undesirable activities of either. Recombinant protein encapsulation in these PBs facilitates stable accumulation of proteins in a protected sub-cellular compartment which results in an enhancement of protein production without affecting the viability and development of stably transformed hosts. The induced PBs also retain the high-density properties of native seed PBs which facilitate the recovery and purification of the recombinant proteins they contain. Conclusion The Zera sequence provides an efficient and universal means to produce recombinant proteins by accumulation in ER-derived organelles. The remarkable cross-kingdom conservation of PB formation and their biophysical properties should have broad application in the manufacture of non-secreted recombinant proteins and suggests the existence of universal ER pathways for protein insulation.

  16. An Evolutionary Network of Genes Present in the Eukaryote Common Ancestor Polls Genomes on Eukaryotic and Mitochondrial Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Schenk, Marc; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William F.

    2012-01-01

    To test the predictions of competing and mutually exclusive hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes, we identified from a sample of 27 sequenced eukaryotic and 994 sequenced prokaryotic genomes 571 genes that were present in the eukaryote common ancestor and that have homologues among eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. Maximum-likelihood trees identified the prokaryotic genomes that most frequently contained genes branching as the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear homologues. Among the archaebacteria, euryarchaeote genomes most frequently harbored the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear gene, whereas among eubacteria, the α-proteobacteria were most frequently represented within the sister group. Only 3 genes out of 571 gave a 3-domain tree. Homologues from α-proteobacterial genomes that branched as the sister to nuclear genes were found more frequently in genomes of facultatively anaerobic members of the rhiozobiales and rhodospirilliales than in obligate intracellular ricketttsial parasites. Following α-proteobacteria, the most frequent eubacterial sister lineages were γ-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, and firmicutes, which were also the prokaryote genomes least frequently found as monophyletic groups in our trees. Although all 22 higher prokaryotic taxa sampled (crenarchaeotes, γ-proteobacteria, spirochaetes, chlamydias, etc.) harbor genes that branch as the sister to homologues present in the eukaryotic common ancestor, that is not evidence of 22 different prokaryotic cells participating at eukaryote origins because prokaryotic “lineages” have laterally acquired genes for more than 1.5 billion years since eukaryote origins. The data underscore the archaebacterial (host) nature of the eukaryotic informational genes and the eubacterial (mitochondrial) nature of eukaryotic energy metabolism. The network linking genes of the eukaryote ancestor to contemporary homologues distributed across prokaryotic genomes elucidates eukaryote gene origins in a

  17. Potential and utilization of thermophiles and thermostable enzymes in biorefining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Eva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In today's world, there is an increasing trend towards the use of renewable, cheap and readily available biomass in the production of a wide variety of fine and bulk chemicals in different biorefineries. Biorefineries utilize the activities of microbial cells and their enzymes to convert biomass into target products. Many of these processes require enzymes which are operationally stable at high temperature thus allowing e.g. easy mixing, better substrate solubility, high mass transfer rate, and lowered risk of contamination. Thermophiles have often been proposed as sources of industrially relevant thermostable enzymes. Here we discuss existing and potential applications of thermophiles and thermostable enzymes with focus on conversion of carbohydrate containing raw materials. Their importance in biorefineries is explained using examples of lignocellulose and starch conversions to desired products. Strategies that enhance thermostablity of enzymes both in vivo and in vitro are also assessed. Moreover, this review deals with efforts made on developing vectors for expressing recombinant enzymes in thermophilic hosts.

  18. Detection of M. tuberculosis DNA using thermophilic strand displacement amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spargo, C A; Fraiser, M S; Van Cleve, M; Wright, D J; Nycz, C M; Spears, P A; Walker, G T

    1996-08-01

    Strand Displacement Amplification (SDA) is an isothermal, in vitro method of amplifying DNA that is based upon the combined action of a DNA polymerase and restriction enzyme. Previously, a form of SDA was developed which utilizes the exonuclease deficient Klenow fragment of E. coli polymerase I (exo Klenow) and the restriction enzyme HincII to achieve 10(8)-fold amplification in 2 h at 37 degrees C (Walker, G.T., 1993, PCR Methods and Applications 3; 1-6). A new thermophilic form of SDA is reported here which uses a restriction endonuclease from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BsoBI) and a 5'-->3' exonuclease deficient polymerase from Bacillus caldotenax (exo Bca). SDA was used to amplify DNA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An amplification factor of 10(10)-fold was achieved after 15 min of SDA at 60 degrees C. The new thermophilic system is much more specific than the previous mesophilic system as evidenced by a dramatic decrease in background amplification products. Thermophilic SDA was also optimized with dUTP substituted for TTP to enable amplicon decontamination using uracil-DNA glycosylase.

  19. The COG database: an updated version includes eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverdlov Alexander V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple, essentially complete genome sequences of prokaryotes and eukaryotes spurred both the demand and the opportunity for the construction of an evolutionary classification of genes from these genomes. Such a classification system based on orthologous relationships between genes appears to be a natural framework for comparative genomics and should facilitate both functional annotation of genomes and large-scale evolutionary studies. Results We describe here a major update of the previously developed system for delineation of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs from the sequenced genomes of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes and the construction of clusters of predicted orthologs for 7 eukaryotic genomes, which we named KOGs after eukaryotic orthologous groups. The COG collection currently consists of 138,458 proteins, which form 4873 COGs and comprise 75% of the 185,505 (predicted proteins encoded in 66 genomes of unicellular organisms. The eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOGs include proteins from 7 eukaryotic genomes: three animals (the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens, one plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, two fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the intracellular microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi. The current KOG set consists of 4852 clusters of orthologs, which include 59,838 proteins, or ~54% of the analyzed eukaryotic 110,655 gene products. Compared to the coverage of the prokaryotic genomes with COGs, a considerably smaller fraction of eukaryotic genes could be included into the KOGs; addition of new eukaryotic genomes is expected to result in substantial increase in the coverage of eukaryotic genomes with KOGs. Examination of the phyletic patterns of KOGs reveals a conserved core represented in all analyzed species and consisting of ~20% of the KOG set. This conserved portion of the

  20. The WYL domain of the PIF1 helicase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga elfii is an accessory single-stranded DNA binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andis, Nicholas M; Sausen, Christopher W; Alladin, Ashna; Bochman, Matthew

    2018-01-17

    PIF1 family helicases are conserved from bacteria to man. With the exception of the well-studied yeast PIF1 helicases (e.g., ScPif1 and ScRrm3), however, very little is known about how these enzymes help maintain genome stability. Indeed, we lack a basic understanding of the protein domains found N- and C-terminal to the characteristic central PIF1 helicase domain in these proteins. Here, using chimeric constructs, we show that the ScPif1 and ScRrm3 helicase domains are interchangeable and that the N-terminus of ScRrm3 is important for its function in vivo. This suggests that PIF1 family helicases evolved functional modules fused to a generic motor domain. To investigate this hypothesis, we characterized the biochemical activities of the PIF1 helicase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga elfii (TePif1), which contains a C-terminal WYL domain of unknown function. Like helicases from other thermophiles, recombinant TePif1 was easily prepared, thermostable in vitro, and displayed activities similar to its eukaryotic homologs. We also found that the WYL domain was necessary for high-affinity single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding and affected both ATPase and helicase activities. Deleting the WYL domain from TePif1 or mutating conserved residues in the predicted ssDNA binding site uncoupled ATPase activity and DNA unwinding, leading to higher rates of ATP hydrolysis but less efficient DNA helicase activity. Our findings suggest that the domains of unknown function found in eukaryotic PIF1 helicases may also confer functional specificity and additional activities to these enzymes, which should be investigated in future work.

  1. Purification and characterization of a type B feruloyl esterase (StFAE-A) from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topakas, E.; Stamatis, H.; Biely, P.

    2004-01-01

    . thermophile (a maximum of 34% total ferulic acid released after 1 h incubation). StFAE-A by itself could release FA, but at a level almost 47-fold lower than that obtained in the presence of xylanase. The potential of StFAE-A for the synthesis of various phenolic acid esters was tested using a ternary water......-organic mixture consisting of n-hexane, 1-butanol and water as a reaction system....

  2. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  3. Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1998-09-01

    The short term goals of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following tasks: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-O-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium.

  4. Hemicellulases from the ethanologenic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and related anaerobic thermophiles. Final report, September 1992--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1998-05-01

    The SHORT TERM GOALS of this application were to characterize hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles on the biochemical and molecular level to extend the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophilic bacteria. This objective includes the following TASKS: (1) Traditional purification and biochemical/biophysical characterization of xylanases from the newly isolated, slightly alkalitolerant strain NDF190, and the slightly acid-tolerant strain YS485, both with high xylanolytic activities, and of the 4-0-methyl glucuronidase and arabinosidase from strain NDF190 and the acetyl (xylan) esterase from T. ethanolicus. This also includes determining the N-terminal sequences and obtaining gene probes. (2) Elucidation of the regulation of hemicellulolytic enzymes in anaerobic thermophiles. (3) To clone into E. coli and identify the multiplicity of the enzymes involved in hemicellulose degradation by T. ethanolicus and other suitable organisms. (4) To purify and characterize the recombinant enzymes with the goal of identifying the best enzymes for cloning into the ethanologenic T. ethanolicus to obtain an optimized hemicellulose utilization by this bacterium (one of our long term goals).

  5. Molecular paleontology and complexity in the last eukaryotic common ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumandou, V Lila; Wickstead, Bill; Ginger, Michael L; van der Giezen, Mark; Dacks, Joel B; Field, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryogenesis, the origin of the eukaryotic cell, represents one of the fundamental evolutionary transitions in the history of life on earth. This event, which is estimated to have occurred over one billion years ago, remains rather poorly understood. While some well-validated examples of fossil microbial eukaryotes for this time frame have been described, these can provide only basic morphology and the molecular machinery present in these organisms has remained unknown. Complete and partial genomic information has begun to fill this gap, and is being used to trace proteins and cellular traits to their roots and to provide unprecedented levels of resolution of structures, metabolic pathways and capabilities of organisms at these earliest points within the eukaryotic lineage. This is essentially allowing a molecular paleontology. What has emerged from these studies is spectacular cellular complexity prior to expansion of the eukaryotic lineages. Multiple reconstructed cellular systems indicate a very sophisticated biology, which by implication arose following the initial eukaryogenesis event but prior to eukaryotic radiation and provides a challenge in terms of explaining how these early eukaryotes arose and in understanding how they lived. Here, we provide brief overviews of several cellular systems and the major emerging conclusions, together with predictions for subsequent directions in evolution leading to extant taxa. We also consider what these reconstructions suggest about the life styles and capabilities of these earliest eukaryotes and the period of evolution between the radiation of eukaryotes and the eukaryogenesis event itself.

  6. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A of wheat: Identification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Regulation of senescence by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A: implications for plant growth and development. Trends Plant Sci. 9: 174-179. Zhou et al. 2117. Tome ME, Fiser SM, Payne CM, Gerner EW (1997). Excess putrescine accumulation inhibits the formation of modified eukaryotic initiation.

  7. Causes and consequences of eukaryotization through mutualistic endosymbiosis and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, R.; Fedonkin, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews and extends ideas of eukaryotization by endosymbiosis. These ideas are put within an historical context of processes that may have led up to eukaryotization and those that seem to have resulted from this process. Our starting point for considering the emergence and development of

  8. Morphological and ecological complexity in early eukaryotic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, E J; Knoll, A H; Walter, M R

    2001-07-05

    Molecular phylogeny and biogeochemistry indicate that eukaryotes differentiated early in Earth history. Sequence comparisons of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes suggest a deep evolutionary divergence of Eukarya and Archaea; C27-C29 steranes (derived from sterols synthesized by eukaryotes) and strong depletion of 13C (a biogeochemical signature of methanogenic Archaea) in 2,700 Myr old kerogens independently place a minimum age on this split. Steranes, large spheroidal microfossils, and rare macrofossils of possible eukaryotic origin occur in Palaeoproterozoic rocks. Until now, however, evidence for morphological and taxonomic diversification within the domain has generally been restricted to very late Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic successions. Here we show that the cytoskeletal and ecological prerequisites for eukaryotic diversification were already established in eukaryotic microorganisms fossilized nearly 1,500 Myr ago in shales of the early Mesoproterozoic Roper Group in northern Australia.

  9. Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All complex life on Earth is eukaryotic. All eukaryotic cells share a common ancestor that arose just once in four billion years of evolution. Prokaryotes show no tendency to evolve greater morphological complexity, despite their metabolic virtuosity. Here I argue that the eukaryotic cell originated in a unique prokaryotic endosymbiosis, a singular event that transformed the selection pressures acting on both host and endosymbiont. Results The reductive evolution and specialisation of endosymbionts to mitochondria resulted in an extreme genomic asymmetry, in which the residual mitochondrial genomes enabled the expansion of bioenergetic membranes over several orders of magnitude, overcoming the energetic constraints on prokaryotic genome size, and permitting the host cell genome to expand (in principle) over 200,000-fold. This energetic transformation was permissive, not prescriptive; I suggest that the actual increase in early eukaryotic genome size was driven by a heavy early bombardment of genes and introns from the endosymbiont to the host cell, producing a high mutation rate. Unlike prokaryotes, with lower mutation rates and heavy selection pressure to lose genes, early eukaryotes without genome-size limitations could mask mutations by cell fusion and genome duplication, as in allopolyploidy, giving rise to a proto-sexual cell cycle. The side effect was that a large number of shared eukaryotic basal traits accumulated in the same population, a sexual eukaryotic common ancestor, radically different to any known prokaryote. Conclusions The combination of massive bioenergetic expansion, release from genome-size constraints, and high mutation rate favoured a protosexual cell cycle and the accumulation of eukaryotic traits. These factors explain the unique origin of eukaryotes, the absence of true evolutionary intermediates, and the evolution of sex in eukaryotes but not prokaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Eugene Koonin, William Martin

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Thermophile Clostridium clariflavum Strain 4-2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Elise A; Rowe, Kenneth T; Guseva, Anna; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James K; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor M; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R; Izquierdo, Javier A

    2015-07-23

    Clostridium clariflavum strain 4-2a, a novel strain isolated from a thermophilic biocompost pile, has demonstrated an extensive capability to utilize both cellulose and hemicellulose under thermophilic anaerobic conditions. Here, we report the draft genome of this strain. Copyright © 2015 Rooney et al.

  11. Efficient Genome Editing of a Facultative Thermophile Using Mesophilic spCas9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mougiakos, Ioannis; Bosma, Elleke F.; Weenink, Koen; Vossen, Eric; Goijvaerts, Kirsten; Oost, van der John; Kranenburg, van Richard

    2017-01-01

    Well-developed genetic tools for thermophilic microorganisms are scarce, despite their industrial and scientific relevance. Whereas highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing is on the rise in prokaryotes, it has never been employed in a thermophile. Here, we apply Streptococcus pyogenes

  12. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonin, Eugene V., E-mail: koonin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894 (United States); Dolja, Valerian V., E-mail: doljav@science.oregonstate.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Krupovic, Mart, E-mail: krupovic@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles, Department of Microbiology, Paris 75015 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  13. Rapid establishment of thermophilic anaerobic microbial community during the one-step startup of thermophilic anaerobic digestion from a mesophilic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yuyou; Chi, Yongzhi; Yang, Min

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how fast the thermophilic anaerobic microbial community could be established during the one-step startup of thermophilic anaerobic digestion from a mesophilic digester. Stable thermophilic anaerobic digestion was achieved within 20 days from a mesophilic digester treating sewage sludge by adopting the one-step startup strategy. The succession of archaeal and bacterial populations over a period of 60 days after the temperature increment was followed by using 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. After the increase of temperature, thermophilic methanogenic community was established within 11 days, which was characterized by the fast colonization of Methanosarcina thermophila and two hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanothermobacter spp. and Methanoculleus spp.). At the same time, the bacterial community was dominated by Fervidobacterium, whose relative abundance rapidly increased from 0 to 28.52 % in 18 days, followed by other potential thermophilic genera, such as Clostridium, Coprothermobacter, Anaerobaculum and EM3. The above result demonstrated that the one-step startup strategy could allow the rapid establishment of the thermophilic anaerobic microbial community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Abiotic and microbiotic factors controlling biofilm formation by thermophilic sporeformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Caspers, Martien P M; Metselaar, Karin I; de Boer, Paulo; Roeselers, Guus; Moezelaar, Roy; Nierop Groot, Masja; Montijn, Roy C; Abee, Tjakko; Kort, Remco

    2013-09-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon sequencing analysis was carried out on milk, final products, and fouling samples taken from dairy concentrate production lines. The analysis of these samples revealed the presence of DNA from a broad range of bacterial taxa, including a majority of mesophiles and a minority of (thermophilic) spore-forming bacteria. Enrichments of fouling samples at 55°C showed the accumulation of predominantly Brevibacillus and Bacillus, whereas enrichments at 65°C led to the accumulation of Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus species. Bacterial population analysis of biofilms grown using fouling samples as an inoculum indicated that both Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus preferentially form biofilms on surfaces at air-liquid interfaces rather than on submerged surfaces. Three of the most potent biofilm-forming strains isolated from the dairy factory industrial samples, including Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and Anoxybacillus flavithermus, have been characterized in detail with respect to their growth conditions and spore resistance. Strikingly, Geobacillus thermoglucosidans, which forms the most thermostable spores of these three species, is not able to grow in dairy intermediates as a pure culture but appears to be dependent for growth on other spoilage organisms present, probably as a result of their proteolytic activity. These results underscore the importance of abiotic and microbiotic factors in niche colonization in dairy factories, where the presence of thermophilic sporeformers can affect the quality of end products.

  15. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  16. Energetic and hydrogen limitations of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L. C.; Holden, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are a unique ecosystem, based ultimately not on photosynthesis but chemosynthetic primary production. This makes them an excellent analog environment for the early Earth, and for potential extraterrestrial habitable environments, such as those on Mars and Europa. The habitability of given vent systems for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes can be modeled energetically by estimating the available Gibbs energy for specific modes of chemoautotrophy, using geochemical data and mixing models for hydrothermal fluids and seawater (McCollom and Shock, 1997). However, modeling to date has largely not taken into account variation in organisms' energy demands in these environments. Controls on maintenance energies are widely assumed to be temperature-dependent, rising with increasing temperature optima (Tijhuis et al., 1993), and species-independent. The impacts of other environmental stressors and particular energy-gathering strategies on maintenance energies have not been investigated. We have undertaken culture-based studies of growth and maintenance energies in thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogenic (hydrogenotrophic) archaea from deep-sea hydrothermal vents to investigate potential controls on energy demands in hydrothermal vent microbes, and to quantify their growth and maintenance energies for future bioenergetic modeling. We have investigated trends in their growth energies over their full temperature range and a range of nitrogen concentrations, and in their maintenance energies at different hydrogen concentrations. Growth energies in these organisms appear to rise with temperature, but do not vary between hyperthermophilic and thermophilic methanogens. Nitrogen availability at tested levels (40μM - 9.4 mM) does not appear to affect growth energies in all but one tested organism. In continuous chemostat culture, specific methane production varied with hydrogen availability but was similar between a thermophilic and a hyperthermophilic

  17. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms and their polymer-hidrolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Carolina M.M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms are found as normal inhabitants of continental and submarine volcanic areas, geothermally heated sea-sediments and hydrothermal vents and thus are considered extremophiles. Several present or potential applications of extremophilic enzymes are reviewed, especially polymer-hydrolysing enzymes, such as amylolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes. The purpose of this review is to present the range of morphological and metabolic features among those microorganisms growing from 70oC to 100°C and to indicate potential opportunities for useful applications derived from these features.

  18. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Kruse, O.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments. Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms

  19. Conservation and Variability of Meiosis Across the Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loidl, Josef

    2016-11-23

    Comparisons among a variety of eukaryotes have revealed considerable variability in the structures and processes involved in their meiosis. Nevertheless, conventional forms of meiosis occur in all major groups of eukaryotes, including early-branching protists. This finding confirms that meiosis originated in the common ancestor of all eukaryotes and suggests that primordial meiosis may have had many characteristics in common with conventional extant meiosis. However, it is possible that the synaptonemal complex and the delicate crossover control related to its presence were later acquisitions. Later still, modifications to meiotic processes occurred within different groups of eukaryotes. Better knowledge on the spectrum of derived and uncommon forms of meiosis will improve our understanding of many still mysterious aspects of the meiotic process and help to explain the evolutionary basis of functional adaptations to the meiotic program.

  20. Hydrodynamics Versus Intracellular Coupling in the Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaranta, G.; Aubin, M.E.; Tam, D.S.W.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic forces on eukaryotic flagella synchronization is investigated by triggering phase locking between a controlled external flow and the flagella of C. reinhardtii. Hydrodynamic forces required for synchronization are over an order of magnitude larger than hydrodynamic

  1. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation.

  2. Massive expansion of the calpain gene family in unicellular eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Sen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calpains are Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases that participate in a range of crucial cellular processes. Dysfunction of these enzymes may cause, for instance, life-threatening diseases in humans, the loss of sex determination in nematodes and embryo lethality in plants. Although the calpain family is well characterized in animal and plant model organisms, there is a great lack of knowledge about these genes in unicellular eukaryote species (i.e. protists. Here, we study the distribution and evolution of calpain genes in a wide range of eukaryote genomes from major branches in the tree of life. Results Our investigations reveal 24 types of protein domains that are combined with the calpain-specific catalytic domain CysPc. In total we identify 41 different calpain domain architectures, 28 of these domain combinations have not been previously described. Based on our phylogenetic inferences, we propose that at least four calpain variants were established in the early evolution of eukaryotes, most likely before the radiation of all the major supergroups of eukaryotes. Many domains associated with eukaryotic calpain genes can be found among eubacteria or archaebacteria but never in combination with the CysPc domain. Conclusions The analyses presented here show that ancient modules present in prokaryotes, and a few de novo eukaryote domains, have been assembled into many novel domain combinations along the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. Some of the new calpain genes show a narrow distribution in a few branches in the tree of life, likely representing lineage-specific innovations. Hence, the functionally important classical calpain genes found among humans and vertebrates make up only a tiny fraction of the calpain family. In fact, a massive expansion of the calpain family occurred by domain shuffling among unicellular eukaryotes and contributed to a wealth of functionally different genes.

  3. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Anja eKamp; Signe eHøgslund; Nils eRisgaard-Petersen; Peter eStief

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players l...

  4. Biomass production and energy source of thermophiles in a Japanese alkaline geothermal pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Mori, Kousuke; Nashimoto, Hiroaki; Hattori, Shohei; Yamada, Keita; Koba, Keisuke; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kato, Kenji

    2010-02-01

    Microbial biomass production has been measured to investigate the contribution of planktonic bacteria to fluxations in dissolved organic matter in marine and freshwater environments, but little is known about biomass production of thermophiles inhabiting geothermal and hydrothermal regions. The biomass production of thermophiles inhabiting an 85 degrees C geothermal pool was measured by in situ cultivation using diffusion chambers. The thermophiles' growth rates ranged from 0.43 to 0.82 day(-1), similar to those of planktonic bacteria in marine and freshwater habitats. Biomass production was estimated based on cellular carbon content measured directly from the thermophiles inhabiting the geothermal pool, which ranged from 5.0 to 6.1 microg C l(-1) h(-1). This production was 2-75 times higher than that of planktonic bacteria in other habitats, because the cellular carbon content of the thermophiles was much higher. Quantitative PCR and phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that thermophilic H2-oxidizing bacteria closely related to Calderobacterium and Geothermobacterium were dominant in the geothermal pool. Chemical analysis showed the presence of H2 in gases bubbling from the bottom of the geothermal pool. These results strongly suggested that H2 plays an important role as a primary energy source of thermophiles in the geothermal pool.

  5. Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology for space agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, T.; Kanazawa, S.; Moriya, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hashimoto, H.; Yamashita, M.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    A material recycling is one of core issues in engineering for habitation on extraterrestrial bodies such as Mars A new composting system has been developed in Japan which utilizes some thermophilic bacteria to attain higher temperature than normally expected in the ordinary composting system Dead body of rat was found to be eaten up by the thermophilic bacteria under aerated condition and oxidized to carbon dioxide and few other inorganics within two hours Ecology of these composting bacteria is structured on the intensive symbiotic interactions among various species that participate in various reaction networks in a concert Complexity in the composting bacteria might be based on multiple interaction and interdependency among participating species and organisms Species identification and phylogeny of symbiotic bacteria and understanding of their ecology have been made Those bacterial systems are active and durable under temperature high in a range of 80 to 100 r C Biological combustion release heat and temperature goes up when air is fed through the reaction bed Since microbial activity decreases at exceeding temperature and release of heat decreases as well temperature in the reacting bed itself-regulated in the range Even though it should be verified composting bacteria themselves are presumed to be safe for human agricultural plant and animal species Their activity is restricted only to the condition under elevated temperature Their activities depend greatly on their symbiotic partners and extreme environment created by them The

  6. Thermophilic archaea activate butane via alkyl-coenzyme M formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laso-Pérez, Rafael; Wegener, Gunter; Knittel, Katrin; Widdel, Friedrich; Harding, Katie J; Krukenberg, Viola; Meier, Dimitri V; Richter, Michael; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Riedel, Dietmar; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Adrian, Lorenz; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J; Musat, Florin

    2016-11-17

    The anaerobic formation and oxidation of methane involve unique enzymatic mechanisms and cofactors, all of which are believed to be specific for C1-compounds. Here we show that an anaerobic thermophilic enrichment culture composed of dense consortia of archaea and bacteria apparently uses partly similar pathways to oxidize the C4 hydrocarbon butane. The archaea, proposed genus 'Candidatus Syntrophoarchaeum', show the characteristic autofluorescence of methanogens, and contain highly expressed genes encoding enzymes similar to methyl-coenzyme M reductase. We detect butyl-coenzyme M, indicating archaeal butane activation analogous to the first step in anaerobic methane oxidation. In addition, Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum expresses the genes encoding β-oxidation enzymes, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and reversible C1 methanogenesis enzymes. This allows for the complete oxidation of butane. Reducing equivalents are seemingly channelled to HotSeep-1, a thermophilic sulfate-reducing partner bacterium known from the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Genes encoding 16S rRNA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase similar to those identifying Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum were repeatedly retrieved from marine subsurface sediments, suggesting that the presented activation mechanism is naturally widespread in the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain hydrocarbons.

  7. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF A BIODEGRADABLE MATERIAL UNDER ANAEROBIC - THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO CAMACHO-MUÑOZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper dertermined the anaerobic biodegradation of a polymer obtained by extrusion process of native cassava starch, polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Initially a thermophilic - methanogenic inoculum was prepared from urban solid waste. The gas final methane concentration and medium’s pH reached values of 59,6% and 7,89 respectively. The assay assembly was carried out according ASTM D5511 standard. The biodegradation percent of used materials after 15 day of digestion were: 77,49%, 61,27%, 0,31% for cellulose, sample and polyethylene respectively. Due cellulose showed biodegradation levels higher than 70% it’s deduced that the inoculum conditions were appropriate. A biodegradation level of 61,27%, 59,35% of methane concentration in sample’s evolved gas and a medium’s finale pH of 7,71 in sample’s vessels, reveal the extruded polymer´s capacity to be anaerobically degraded under thermophilic- high solid concentration conditions.

  8. Impact of ammonia and sulphate concentration on thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, J A; Brekelmans, J; Martín, M A; Chica, A F; Martín, A

    2010-12-01

    The effect of increasing concentrations of ammonia and sulphate on thermophilic anaerobic digestion (52 degrees C) was studied at laboratory-scale. The substrate consisted of a synthetic solution supplemented with ammonia and sodium sulphate. In terms of biogas production, the results showed that the C/N and C/SO(4)(2-) thresholds were 4.40 and 1.60, respectively, corresponding to 620 mg FA (free ammonia)/L and 1400 mg SO(4)(2-)/L. No reduction in biogas production was observed until reaching the above concentration of sulphate in the sulphate toxicity test. However, when the concentration of ammonia was increased to 620 mg FA/L in the ammonia toxicity test, a gradual decrease of 21% was observed for the biogas. In order to characterise each set of experiments kinetically, a biogas production first-order kinetic model was used to fit the experimental data. The proposed model accurately predicted the behaviour of the microorganisms affecting the thermophilic anaerobic digestion, allowing its evolution to be predicted. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electricity production and microbial characterization of thermophilic microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kun; Wen, Jun-Li; Zhang, Fang; Ma, Xi-Wen; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Ting-Jia; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-11-01

    Thermophilic microbial fuel cell (TMFC) offers many benefits, but the investigations on the diversity of exoelectrogenic bacteria are scarce. In this study, a two-chamber TMFC was constructed using ethanol as an electron donor, and the microbial dynamics were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing and 16S rRNA clone-library sequencing. The open-circuit potential of TMFC was approximately 650mV, while the maximum voltage was around 550mV. The maximum power density was 437mW/m2, and the columbic efficiency in this work was 20.5±6.0%. The Firmicutes bacteria, related to the uncultured bacterium clone A55_D21_H_B_C01 with a similarity of 99%, accounted for 90.9% of all bacteria in the TMFC biofilm. This unknown bacterium has the potential to become a new thermophilic exoelectrogenic bacterium that is yet to be cultured. The development of TMFC-involved biotechnologies will be beneficial for the production of valuable chemicals and generation of energy in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conformational preferences underlying reduced activity of a thermophilic ribonuclease H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Kate A; Trbovic, Nikola; Butterwick, Joel A; Abel, Robert; Friesner, Richard A; Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-27

    The conformational basis for reduced activity of the thermophilic ribonuclease HI enzyme from Thermus thermophilus, compared to its mesophilic homolog from Escherichia coli, is elucidated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Explicit-solvent all-atom MD simulations of the two wild-type proteins and an E. coli mutant in which a glycine residue is inserted after position 80 to mimic the T. thermophilus protein reproduce the differences in conformational dynamics determined from (15)N spin-relaxation NMR spectroscopy of three loop regions that surround the active site and contain functionally important residues: the glycine-rich region, the handle region, and the β5/αE loop. Examination of the MD trajectories indicates that the thermophilic protein samples conformations productive for substrate binding and activity less frequently than the mesophilic enzyme, although these differences may manifest as either increased or decreased relative flexibility of the different regions. Additional MD simulations indicate that mutations increasing activity of the T. thermophilus enzyme at mesophilic temperatures do so by reconfiguring the local environments of the mutated sites to more closely resemble active conformations. Taken together, the results show that both locally increased and decreased flexibility contribute to an overall reduction in activity of T. thermophilus ribonuclease H compared to its mesophilic E. coli homolog. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydrolytic bacteria in mesophilic and thermophilic degradation of plant biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zverlov, Vladimir V.; Hiegl, Wolfgang; Koeck, Daniela E.; Koellmeier, Tanja; Schwarz, Wolfgang H. [Department of Microbiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Kellermann, Josef [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz, Martinsried (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Adding plant biomass to a biogas reactor, hydrolysis is the first reaction step in the chain of biological events towards methane production. Maize silage was used to enrich efficient hydrolytic bacterial consortia from natural environments under conditions imitating those in a biogas plant. At 55-60 C a more efficient hydrolyzing culture could be isolated than at 37 C. The composition of the optimal thermophilic bacterial consortium was revealed by sequencing clones from a 16S rRNA gene library. A modified PCR-RFLP pre-screening method was used to group the clones. Pure anaerobic cultures were isolated. 70% of the isolates were related to Clostridium thermocellum. A new culture-independent method for identification of cellulolytic enzymes was developed using the isolation of cellulose-binding proteins. MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis and end-sequencing of peptides from prominent protein bands revealed cellulases from the cellulosome of C. thermocellum and from a major cellulase of Clostridium stercorarium. A combined culture of C. thermocellum and C. stercorarium was shown to excellently degrade maize silage. A spore preparation method suitable for inoculation of maize silage and optimal hydrolysis was developed for the thermophilic bacterial consortium. This method allows for concentration and long-term storage of the mixed culture for instance for inoculation of biogas fermenters. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Enzyme dynamics and hydrogen tunnelling in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Amnon; Cannio, Raffaele; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Klinman, Judith P.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1999-06-01

    Biological catalysts (enzymes) speed up reactions by many orders of magnitude using fundamental physical processes to increase chemical reactivity. Hydrogen tunnelling has increasingly been found to contribute to enzyme reactions at room temperature. Tunnelling is the phenomenon by which a particle transfers through a reaction barrier as a result of its wave-like property. In reactions involving small molecules, the relative importance of tunnelling increases as the temperature is reduced. We have now investigated whether hydrogen tunnelling occurs at elevated temperatures in a biological system that functions physiologically under such conditions. Using a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), we find that hydrogen tunnelling makes a significant contribution at 65°C this is analogous to previous findings with mesophilic ADH at 25°C ( ref. 5). Contrary to predictions for tunnelling through a rigid barrier, the tunnelling with the thermophilic ADH decreases at and below room temperature. These findings provide experimental evidence for a role of thermally excited enzyme fluctuations in modulating enzyme-catalysed bond cleavage.

  13. Report: antibiotic production by thermophilic Bacillus specie SAT-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmad, Safia; Hameed, Abdul

    2009-07-01

    Production of antimicrobial compounds seems to be a general phenomenon for most bacteria. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among key microbial pathogens is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Current solutions involve development of a more rationale approach to antibiotic use and discover of new antimicrobials. Bacillus species produce a large number of biological compounds active against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The process of production usually involves screening of wide range of microorganisms, testing and modification. Production is carried out using fermentation. Thermophilic spore-forming, gram positive, motile rod bacterial strains were isolated from the Thar Desserts, Sindh Province, Pakistan. These strains were screened and checked for antibacterial activity. The best activity was observed by SAT4 against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The activity was only observed against gram positive bacteria and no activity was seen against Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Thermophilic Bacillus specie SAT4 was found to be active in the fermentation process to produce the antimicrobial agents. Further optimizations of different conditions (time of incubation, media, pH, glucose concentrations, nitrogen concentrations, and temperature) for antimicrobial production by the selected bacterial strain was performed. Agar diffusion assay was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity. Optimum conditions for the production of antimicrobials by selected isolate were observed to be 48 hour, pH 5, temperature 55 degrees C, 2% glucose and 1.5% nitrogen concentration. This newly isolated bacterial strain has great potential for antimicrobial production at industrial scale.

  14. On the Diversification of the Translation Apparatus across Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greco Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity is one of the most remarkable features of living organisms. Current assessments of eukaryote biodiversity reaches 1.5 million species, but the true figure could be several times that number. Diversity is ingrained in all stages and echelons of life, namely, the occupancy of ecological niches, behavioral patterns, body plans and organismal complexity, as well as metabolic needs and genetics. In this review, we will discuss that diversity also exists in a key biochemical process, translation, across eukaryotes. Translation is a fundamental process for all forms of life, and the basic components and mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes have been largely established upon the study of traditional, so-called model organisms. By using modern genome-wide, high-throughput technologies, recent studies of many nonmodel eukaryotes have unveiled a surprising diversity in the configuration of the translation apparatus across eukaryotes, showing that this apparatus is far from being evolutionarily static. For some of the components of this machinery, functional differences between different species have also been found. The recent research reviewed in this article highlights the molecular and functional diversification the translational machinery has undergone during eukaryotic evolution. A better understanding of all aspects of organismal diversity is key to a more profound knowledge of life.

  15. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil W. Blackstone

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real—the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as “non-Darwinian” because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious—all of the major features of eukaryotes were likely present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor thus rendering comparative methods ineffective. In addition to a multi-level theory, the development of rigorous, sequence-based phylogenetic and comparative methods represents the greatest achievement of modern evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, the rapid evolution of major features in the eukaryotic stem group requires the consideration of an alternative framework. Such a framework, based on the contingent nature of these evolutionary events, is developed and illustrated with three examples: the putative intron proliferation leading to the nucleus and the cell cycle; conflict and cooperation in the origin of eukaryotic bioenergetics; and the inter-relationship between aerobic metabolism, sterol synthesis, membranes, and sex. The modern synthesis thus provides sufficient scope to develop an evolutionary framework to understand the origin of eukaryotes.

  16. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2016-04-27

    Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real-the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as "non-Darwinian" because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious-all of the major features of eukaryotes were likely present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor thus rendering comparative methods ineffective. In addition to a multi-level theory, the development of rigorous, sequence-based phylogenetic and comparative methods represents the greatest achievement of modern evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, the rapid evolution of major features in the eukaryotic stem group requires the consideration of an alternative framework. Such a framework, based on the contingent nature of these evolutionary events, is developed and illustrated with three examples: the putative intron proliferation leading to the nucleus and the cell cycle; conflict and cooperation in the origin of eukaryotic bioenergetics; and the inter-relationship between aerobic metabolism, sterol synthesis, membranes, and sex. The modern synthesis thus provides sufficient scope to develop an evolutionary framework to understand the origin of eukaryotes.

  17. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  18. Ocean plankton. Eukaryotic plankton diversity in the sunlit ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vargas, Colomban; Audic, Stéphane; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Mahé, Frédéric; Logares, Ramiro; Lara, Enrique; Berney, Cédric; Le Bescot, Noan; Probert, Ian; Carmichael, Margaux; Poulain, Julie; Romac, Sarah; Colin, Sébastien; Aury, Jean-Marc; Bittner, Lucie; Chaffron, Samuel; Dunthorn, Micah; Engelen, Stefan; Flegontova, Olga; Guidi, Lionel; Horák, Aleš; Jaillon, Olivier; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Lukeš, Julius; Malviya, Shruti; Morard, Raphael; Mulot, Matthieu; Scalco, Eleonora; Siano, Raffaele; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel; Grimsley, Nigel; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Raes, Jeroen; Sieracki, Michael E; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric

    2015-05-22

    Marine plankton support global biological and geochemical processes. Surveys of their biodiversity have hitherto been geographically restricted and have not accounted for the full range of plankton size. We assessed eukaryotic diversity from 334 size-fractionated photic-zone plankton communities collected across tropical and temperate oceans during the circumglobal Tara Oceans expedition. We analyzed 18S ribosomal DNA sequences across the intermediate plankton-size spectrum from the smallest unicellular eukaryotes (protists, >0.8 micrometers) to small animals of a few millimeters. Eukaryotic ribosomal diversity saturated at ~150,000 operational taxonomic units, about one-third of which could not be assigned to known eukaryotic groups. Diversity emerged at all taxonomic levels, both within the groups comprising the ~11,200 cataloged morphospecies of eukaryotic plankton and among twice as many other deep-branching lineages of unappreciated importance in plankton ecology studies. Most eukaryotic plankton biodiversity belonged to heterotrophic protistan groups, particularly those known to be parasites or symbiotic hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W.

    2016-01-01

    Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real—the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as “non-Darwinian” because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious—all of the major features of eukaryotes were likely present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor thus rendering comparative methods ineffective. In addition to a multi-level theory, the development of rigorous, sequence-based phylogenetic and comparative methods represents the greatest achievement of modern evolutionary theory. Nevertheless, the rapid evolution of major features in the eukaryotic stem group requires the consideration of an alternative framework. Such a framework, based on the contingent nature of these evolutionary events, is developed and illustrated with three examples: the putative intron proliferation leading to the nucleus and the cell cycle; conflict and cooperation in the origin of eukaryotic bioenergetics; and the inter-relationship between aerobic metabolism, sterol synthesis, membranes, and sex. The modern synthesis thus provides sufficient scope to develop an evolutionary framework to understand the origin of eukaryotes. PMID:27128953

  20. A statistical anomaly indicates symbiotic origins of eukaryotic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Suneyna; Mittal, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Compositional analyses of nucleic acids and proteins have shed light on possible origins of living cells. In this work, rigorous compositional analyses of ∼5000 plasma membrane lipid constituents of 273 species in the three life domains (archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryotes) revealed a remarkable statistical paradox, indicating symbiotic origins of eukaryotic cells involving eubacteria. For lipids common to plasma membranes of the three domains, the number of carbon atoms in eubacteria was found to be similar to that in eukaryotes. However, mutually exclusive subsets of same data show exactly the opposite—the number of carbon atoms in lipids of eukaryotes was higher than in eubacteria. This statistical paradox, called Simpson's paradox, was absent for lipids in archaea and for lipids not common to plasma membranes of the three domains. This indicates the presence of interaction(s) and/or association(s) in lipids forming plasma membranes of eubacteria and eukaryotes but not for those in archaea. Further inspection of membrane lipid structures affecting physicochemical properties of plasma membranes provides the first evidence (to our knowledge) on the symbiotic origins of eukaryotic cells based on the “third front” (i.e., lipids) in addition to the growing compositional data from nucleic acids and proteins. PMID:25631820

  1. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer gives rise to genome mosaicism in euglenids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Andreas PM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euglenophytes are a group of photosynthetic flagellates possessing a plastid derived from a green algal endosymbiont, which was incorporated into an ancestral host cell via secondary endosymbiosis. However, the impact of endosymbiosis on the euglenophyte nuclear genome is not fully understood due to its complex nature as a 'hybrid' of a non-photosynthetic host cell and a secondary endosymbiont. Results We analyzed an EST dataset of the model euglenophyte Euglena gracilis using a gene mining program designed to detect laterally transferred genes. We found E. gracilis genes showing affinity not only with green algae, from which the secondary plastid in euglenophytes evolved, but also red algae and/or secondary algae containing red algal-derived plastids. Phylogenetic analyses of these 'red lineage' genes suggest that E. gracilis acquired at least 14 genes via eukaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfer from algal sources other than the green algal endosymbiont that gave rise to its current plastid. We constructed an EST library of the aplastidic euglenid Peranema trichophorum, which is a eukaryovorous relative of euglenophytes, and also identified 'red lineage' genes in its genome. Conclusions Our data show genome mosaicism in E. gracilis and P. trichophorum. One possible explanation for the presence of these genes in these organisms is that some or all of them were independently acquired by lateral gene transfer and contributed to the successful integration and functioning of the green algal endosymbiont as a secondary plastid. Alternative hypotheses include the presence of a phagocytosed alga as the single source of those genes, or a cryptic tertiary endosymbiont harboring secondary plastid of red algal origin, which the eukaryovorous ancestor of euglenophytes had acquired prior to the secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga.

  2. Microbial community dynamics in thermophilic undefined milk starter cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Eugenio; Guidone, Angela; Matera, Attilio; De Filippis, Francesca; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Ricciardi, Annamaria

    2016-01-18

    Model undefined thermophilic starter cultures were produced from raw milk of nine pasta-filata cheesemaking plants using a selective procedure based on pasteurization and incubation at high temperature with the objective of studying the microbial community dynamics and the variability in performances under repeated (7-13) reproduction cycles with backslopping. The traditional culture-dependent approach, based on random isolation and molecular characterization of isolates was coupled to the determination of pH and the evaluation of the ability to produce acid and fermentation metabolites. Moreover, a culture-independent approach based on amplicon-targeted next-generation sequencing was employed. The microbial diversity was evaluated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (V1-V3 regions), while the microdiversity of Streptococcus thermophilus populations was explored by using novel approach based on sequencing of partial amplicons of the phosphoserine phosphatase gene (serB). In addition, the occurrence of bacteriophages was evaluated by qPCR and by multiplex PCR. Although it was relatively easy to select for a community dominated by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) within a single reproduction cycle, final pH, LAB populations and acid production activity fluctuated over reproduction cycles. Both culture-dependent and -independent methods showed that the cultures were dominated by either S. thermophilus or Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis or by both species. Nevertheless, subdominant mesophilic species, including lactococci and spoilage organisms, persisted at low levels. A limited number of serB sequence types (ST) were present in S. thermophilus populations. L. delbrueckii and Lactococcus lactis bacteriophages were below the detection limit of the method used and high titres of cos type S. thermophilus bacteriophages were detected in only two cases. In one case a high titre of bacteriophages was concurrent with a S. thermophilus biotype shift in the culture

  3. Bioleaching of metals from electronic scrap by moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilyas, Sadia; Anwar, Munir A.; Niazi, Shahida B.; Ghauri, M. Afzal

    The present work was aimed at studying the bioleachability of metals from electronic scrap by the selected moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic chemolithotrophic and acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria. These included Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and an unidentified acidophilic

  4. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen-producing culture enriched from digested household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kotay, Shireen Meher; Trably, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enrich, characterize and identify strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen (H-2) producers from digested household solid wastes. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic H-2 producing bacterial culture was enriched from a lab-scale digester treating household...... to the genera Bacillus and Clostridium. Relative abundance of the culture members, assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, were 87 +/- 5% and 13 +/- 5% for Bacillus and Clostridium, respectively. An extreme thermophilic, strict anaerobic, mixed microbial culture with H-2-producing potential was enriched...... from digested household wastes. This study provided a culture with a potential to be applied in reactor systems for extreme thermophilic H-2 production from complex organic wastes....

  5. Perchlorate and chlorate reduction by the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and two thermophilic Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebensteiner, M.G.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Nijsse, B.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Tsesmetzis, N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lomans, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the ability of one hyperthermophilic and two thermophilic microorganisms to grow anaerobically by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate. Physiological, genomic and proteome analyses suggest that the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix reduces perchlorate with a periplasmic enzyme

  6. Vibrational entropy differences between mesophile and thermophile proteins and their use in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappier, Vincent; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    We recently introduced ENCoM, an elastic network atomic contact model, as the first coarse-grained normal mode analysis method that accounts for the nature of amino acids and can predict the effect of mutations on thermostability based on changes vibrational entropy. In this proof-of-concept article, we use pairs of mesophile and thermophile homolog proteins with identical structures to determine if a measure of vibrational entropy based on normal mode analysis can discriminate thermophile from mesophile proteins. We observe that in around 60% of cases, thermophile proteins are more rigid at equivalent temperatures than their mesophile counterpart and this difference can guide the design of proteins to increase their thermostability through series of mutations. We observe that mutations separating thermophile proteins from their mesophile orthologs contribute independently to a decrease in vibrational entropy and discuss the application and implications of this methodology to protein engineering. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  7. Molecular characterization of fervidolysin, a subtilisin-like serine protease from the thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium pennivorans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluskens, L.D.; Voorhorst, W.G.; Siezen, R.J.; Schwerdfeger, R.M.; Antranikian, G.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2002-01-01

    The fls gene encoding fervidolysin, a keratin-degrading proteolytic enzyme from the thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium pennivorans, was isolated using degenerate primers combined with Southern hybridization and inverse polymerase chain reaction. Further sequence characterization demonstrated

  8. Hydrogen production from carrot pulp by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Budde, M.A.W.; Lips, S.J.J.; Bakker, R.R.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen was produced from carrot pulp hydrolysate, untreated carrot pulp and (mixtures of) glucose and fructose by the extreme thermophiles Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga neapolitana in pH-controlled bioreactors. Carrot pulp hydrolysate was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis

  9. Bacterial cultures capable of facultative growth on methane under thermophilic or thermotolerant conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laursen, Andrew E; Kulpa, Charles F; Niedzielski, Maksymilian F; Estable, Mario C

    2007-01-01

    ...) are capable of growth on methane as a sole carbon source under thermotolerant (OS and 44) to thermophilic (SA) conditions. All three grew better on enriched medium, suggesting methane is not a preferred substrate...

  10. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  11. [Methylation of adenine residues in DNA of eukaryotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniushin, B F

    2005-01-01

    Like in bacteria, DNA in these organisms is subjected to enzymatic modification (methylation) both at adenine and cytosine residues. There is an indirect evidence that adenine DNA methylation takes place also in animals. In plants m6A was detected in total, mitochondrial and nuclear DNAs; in plants one and the same gene (DRM2) can be methylated both at adenine and cytosine residues. ORF homologous to bacterial adenine DNA-methyltransferases are present in nuclear DNA of protozoa, yeasts, insects, nematodes, higher plants, vertebrates and other eukaryotes. Thus, adenine DNA-methyltransferases can be found in the various evolutionary distant eukaryotes. First N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferase (wadmtase) of higher eukaryotes was isolated from vacuolar fraction of vesicles obtained from aging wheat coleoptiles; in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine this Mg2+ -, Ca2+ -dependent enzyme de novo methylates first adenine residue in TGATCA sequence in single- and double-stranded DNA but it prefers single-stranded DNA structures. Adenine DNA methylation in eukaryotes seems to be involved in regulation of both gene expression and DNA replication including replication of mitochondrial DNA. It can control persistence of foreign DNA in a cell and seems to be an element of R-M system in plants. Thus, in eukaryotic cell there are, at least, two different systems of the enzymatic DNA methylations (adenine and cytosine ones) and a special type of regulation of gene functioning based on the combinatory hierarchy of these interdependent genome modifications.

  12. The impact of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion on biogas production

    OpenAIRE

    P. Vindis; B. Mursec; M. Janzekovic; F. Cus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to compare mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of three maize varieties. Parameters such as biogas production and biogas composition from maize silage were measured and calculated. The amount of biogas production (methane) was observed by the mini digester.Design/methodology/approach: Biogas production and composition in mesophilic (35 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions were measured and compared. The measurements were performed with mi...

  13. Destruction by Anaerobic Mesophilic and Thermophilic Digestion of Viruses and Indicator Bacteria Indigenous to Domestic Sludges

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Gerald; Berman, Donald

    1980-01-01

    In raw sludges and in mesophilically and thermophilically digested anaerobic sludges, large variations in numbers of viruses occurred over narrow ranges of numbers of fecal coliforms, total coliforms, and fecal streptococci, demonstrating that the bacteria were poor quantitative reflectors of the numbers of the viruses detected. Mesophilic and thermophilic digestion of anaerobic sludges destroyed all three indicator bacteria more rapidly than such digestion destroyed the viruses. The relative...

  14. Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynd, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

  15. Gas Fermentation using Thermophilic Moorella Species for production of Biochemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redl, Stephanie Maria Anna

    Gas fermentation is a promising technology which gained increasing attention over the last years. In this process, acetogenic bacteria convert gases rich in H2, CO2, and CO, into compounds of higher value. The gas can derive from industrial off-gas or from waste streams via gasification. In the gas...... with a review of the feedstock potential for gas fermentation and how thermophilic production strains as well as unconventional fermentation processes such as mixotrophy can help to exploit this potential. I analyzed a process with respect to thermodynamic and economic considerations, in which acetone...... with collaborators, I identified M. thermoautotrophica to be a mixed culture of M. thermoacetica strains. We de novo sequenced the genome of several M. thermoacetica strains to shed light on the taxonomic relations within the genus Moorella. Although well studied, some aspects of the physiology of M. thermoacetica...

  16. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  17. Bioleaching of pollymetallic sulphide concentrate using thermophilic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Milovan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An extreme thermophilic, iron-sulphur oxidising bacterial culture was isolated and adapted to tolerate high metal and solids concentrations at 70°C. Following isolation and adaptation, the culture was used in a batch bioleach test employing a 5-l glass standard magnetic agitated and aerated reactor, for the bioleaching of a copper-lead-zinc collective concentrate. The culture exhibited stable leach performance over the period of leach operation and overall copper and zinc extractions higher than 97%. Lead sulphide is transformed into lead sulphate remaining in the bioleach residue due to the low solubility in sulphate media. Brine leaching of bioleach residue yields 95% lead extraction. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34023

  18. Treatment of thermomechanical pulping condensate using thermophilic and mesophilic sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, S P; Liao, B Q

    2010-01-01

    In-mill thermophilic treatment of individual wastewater streams to achieve water system closure has received much attention in pulp and paper mills. Aerobic biological treatment of thermomechanical pulping (TMP) condensate was conducted using thermophilic (55 °C) and mesophilic (35 °C) sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) for a period of 143 days at a cyclic time of 6, 8 and 12 h. A soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) removal efficiency of 77 to 91% was achieved, given an organic loading rate of 0.7-1.3 kg/m³ d. The COD removal efficiency of the thermophilic SBR was slightly lower than that of the mesophilic SBR. Majority of the soluble COD was removed by biodegradation with a small portion (9-13%) of soluble COD stripped by aeration. The settleability (sludge volume index) and the flocculating ability (effluent suspended solids) of thermophilic sludge were comparable to or slightly poorer than that of the mesophilic sludge. The level of filaments in thermophilic sludge was usually higher than that in mesophilic sludge. The results of the study indicate that both thermophilic and mesophilic SBRs can be successfully operated for in-mill treatment of TMP condensate. The treated effluent has the potential for subsequent reuse in the mill.

  19. State of the art and future perspectives of thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Iranpour, R.

    2002-01-01

    The slate of the art of thermophilic digestion is discussed. Thermophilic digestion is a well established technology in Europe for treatment of mixtures of waste in common large scale biogas plants or for treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Due to a large number of failure...... before final disposal. We show data of anaerobic digestion at extreme thermophilic temperatures.......The slate of the art of thermophilic digestion is discussed. Thermophilic digestion is a well established technology in Europe for treatment of mixtures of waste in common large scale biogas plants or for treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Due to a large number of failures...... over time with thermophilic digestion of sewage sludge this process has lost its appeal in the USA. New demands on sanitation of biosolids before land use will, however, bring the attention back to the use of elevated temperatures during sludge stabilization. In the paper we show how the use of a start...

  20. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  1. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  2. DNA mismatch repair and its many roles in eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dekang; Keijzers, Guido; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-01-01

    in the clinic, and as a biomarker of cancer susceptibility in animal model systems. Prokaryotic MMR is well-characterized at the molecular and mechanistic level; however, MMR is considerably more complex in eukaryotic cells than in prokaryotic cells, and in recent years, it has become evident that MMR plays......DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important DNA repair pathway that plays critical roles in DNA replication fidelity, mutation avoidance and genome stability, all of which contribute significantly to the viability of cells and organisms. MMR is widely-used as a diagnostic biomarker for human cancers...... novel roles in eukaryotic cells, several of which are not yet well-defined or understood. Many MMR-deficient human cancer cells lack mutations in known human MMR genes, which strongly suggests that essential eukaryotic MMR components/cofactors remain unidentified and uncharacterized. Furthermore...

  3. Unraveling adaptation in eukaryotic pathways: lessons from protocells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna De Palo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic adaptation pathways operate within wide-ranging environmental conditions without stimulus saturation. Despite numerous differences in the adaptation mechanisms employed by bacteria and eukaryotes, all require energy consumption. Here, we present two minimal models showing that expenditure of energy by the cell is not essential for adaptation. Both models share important features with large eukaryotic cells: they employ small diffusible molecules and involve receptor subunits resembling highly conserved G-protein cascades. Analyzing the drawbacks of these models helps us understand the benefits of energy consumption, in terms of adjustability of response and adaptation times as well as separation of cell-external sensing and cell-internal signaling. Our work thus sheds new light on the evolution of adaptation mechanisms in complex systems.

  4. Unraveling adaptation in eukaryotic pathways: lessons from protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palo, Giovanna; Endres, Robert G

    2013-10-01

    Eukaryotic adaptation pathways operate within wide-ranging environmental conditions without stimulus saturation. Despite numerous differences in the adaptation mechanisms employed by bacteria and eukaryotes, all require energy consumption. Here, we present two minimal models showing that expenditure of energy by the cell is not essential for adaptation. Both models share important features with large eukaryotic cells: they employ small diffusible molecules and involve receptor subunits resembling highly conserved G-protein cascades. Analyzing the drawbacks of these models helps us understand the benefits of energy consumption, in terms of adjustability of response and adaptation times as well as separation of cell-external sensing and cell-internal signaling. Our work thus sheds new light on the evolution of adaptation mechanisms in complex systems.

  5. Serial endosymbiosis or singular event at the origin of eukaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Nick

    2017-12-07

    'On the Origin of Mitosing Cells' heralded a new way of seeing cellular evolution, with symbiosis at its heart. Lynn Margulis (then Sagan) marshalled an impressive array of evidence for endosymbiosis, from cell biology to atmospheric chemistry and Earth history. Despite her emphasis on symbiosis, she saw plenty of evidence for gradualism in eukaryotic evolution, with multiple origins of mitosis and sex, repeated acquisitions of plastids, and putative evolutionary intermediates throughout the microbial world. Later on, Margulis maintained her view of multiple endosymbioses giving rise to other organelles such as hydrogenosomes, in keeping with the polyphyletic assumptions of the serial endosymbiosis theory. She stood at the threshold of the phylogenetic era, and anticipated its potential. Yet while predicting that the nucleotide sequences of genes would enable a detailed reconstruction of eukaryotic evolution, Margulis did not, and could not, imagine the radically different story that would eventually emerge from comparative genomics. The last eukaryotic common ancestor now seems to have been essentially a modern eukaryotic cell that had already evolved mitosis, meiotic sex, organelles and endomembrane systems. The long search for missing evolutionary intermediates has failed to turn up a single example, and those discussed by Margulis turn out to have evolved reductively from more complex ancestors. Strikingly, Margulis argued that all eukaryotes had mitochondria in her 1967 paper (a conclusion that she later disavowed). But she developed her ideas in the context of atmospheric oxygen and aerobic respiration, neither of which is consistent with more recent geological and phylogenetic findings. Instead, a modern synthesis of genomics and bioenergetics points to the endosymbiotic restructuring of eukaryotic genomes in relation to bioenergetic membranes as the singular event that permitted the evolution of morphological complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Bacterial Cellulose Hydrolysis in Anaerobic Environmental Subsystems—Clostridium thermocellumandClostridium stercorarium, Thermophilic Plant‐fiber Degraders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zverlov, Vladimir V; Schwarz, Wolfgang H

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is a rare trait in bacteria. However, the truly cellulolytic bacteria are extremely efficient hydrolyzers of plant cell wall polysaccharides, especially those in thermophilic anaerobic ecosystem...

  7. Conjugative plasmid transfer from Escherichia coli is a versatile approach for genetic transformation of thermophilic Bacillus and Geobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Yurie; Ohshiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    2016-05-01

    We previously demonstrated efficient transformation of the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 using conjugative plasmid transfer from Escherichia coli BR408. To evaluate the versatility of this approach to thermophile transformation, this study examined genetic transformation of various thermophilic Bacillus and Geobacillus spp. using conjugative plasmid transfer from E. coli strains. E. coli BR408 successfully transferred the E. coli-Geobacillus shuttle plasmid pUCG18T to 16 of 18 thermophiles with transformation efficiencies between 4.1 × 10(-7) and 3.8 × 10(-2)/recipient. Other E. coli strains that are different from E. coli BR408 in intracellular DNA methylation also generated transformants from 9 to 15 of the 18 thermophiles, including one that E. coli BR408 could not transform, although the transformation efficiencies of these strains were generally lower than those of E. coli BR408. The conjugation was performed by simple incubation of an E. coli donor and a thermophile recipient without optimization of experimental conditions. Moreover, thermophile transformants were distinguished from abundant E. coli donor only by high temperature incubation. These observations suggest that conjugative plasmid transfer, particularly using E. coli BR408, is a facile and versatile approach for plasmid introduction into thermophilic Bacillus and Geobacillus spp., and potentially a variety of other thermophiles.

  8. Thermophilic Microorganisms in Sediments at Arctic Marine Mud Volcanoes - Do They Come From the Deep Biosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Hubert, C.; Boetius, A.; Jorgensen, B. B.

    2008-12-01

    Thermophilic endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been detected in the permanently cold Arctic fjord sediments (Svalbard; 79°N). Incubating these sediments at 50°C results in high rates of sulfate reduction that are due to induction of an abundant thermophilic population. Sources for such a relatively high density of thermophiles in cold sediments are unknown, but could include the warm, deep biosphere where growth-supporting habitats for thermophiles may exist. This warm environment could be connected to the cold surface sediments via upward fluid flow within the sea bed. Mud volcanoes regularly transport hot sediment from the deep biosphere to surface areas, and as such may represent transport mechanisms from warm to cold environments. Sediment samples from the Haakon Mosby mud volcano (HMMV) located south of Svalbard in the Barents Sea (72°N, 14°44' E; 1,250 m water depth), were examined to further investigate this possibility. During incubations at 50°C, sulfate reduction rates in Smeerenburgfjorden and HMMV sediments began to increase exponentially following a lag phase, during which sulfate reduction rates were not detected using a radiotracer assay. Assuming that thermophilic SRB in both sediments are similar, the magnitude and nature of their response can be used to estimate their relative abundance in different samples. Using this approach, more thermophilic SRB were detected in Svalbard sediment than in HMMV sediments. The presence of thermophilic SRB at the HMMV supports the idea that mudflow may be a legitimate mechanism for transporting thermophiles from the deep biosphere to cold surface sediments. Further depth and concentric resolution at HMMV may allow a more thorough understanding of how the transport mechanism might work. Considering the relative responses and the distance between the two study sites, thermophilic SRB in Svalbard sediments likely do not come from the HMMV. Local cold seeps around Svalbard share some

  9. Distinct gene number-genome size relationships for eukaryotes and non-eukaryotes: gene content estimation for dinoflagellate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Hou

    Full Text Available The ability to predict gene content is highly desirable for characterization of not-yet sequenced genomes like those of dinoflagellates. Using data from completely sequenced and annotated genomes from phylogenetically diverse lineages, we investigated the relationship between gene content and genome size using regression analyses. Distinct relationships between log(10-transformed protein-coding gene number (Y' versus log(10-transformed genome size (X', genome size in kbp were found for eukaryotes and non-eukaryotes. Eukaryotes best fit a logarithmic model, Y' = ln(-46.200+22.678X', whereas non-eukaryotes a linear model, Y' = 0.045+0.977X', both with high significance (p0.91. Total gene number shows similar trends in both groups to their respective protein coding regressions. The distinct correlations reflect lower and decreasing gene-coding percentages as genome size increases in eukaryotes (82%-1% compared to higher and relatively stable percentages in prokaryotes and viruses (97%-47%. The eukaryotic regression models project that the smallest dinoflagellate genome (3x10(6 kbp contains 38,188 protein-coding (40,086 total genes and the largest (245x10(6 kbp 87,688 protein-coding (92,013 total genes, corresponding to 1.8% and 0.05% gene-coding percentages. These estimates do not likely represent extraordinarily high functional diversity of the encoded proteome but rather highly redundant genomes as evidenced by high gene copy numbers documented for various dinoflagellate species.

  10. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plots depicting the classification accuracy of Eu-Detect with various combinations of. 'cumulative sequence count' (40K, 50K, 60K, 70K, 80K) and 'coverage threshold' (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%,. 80%). While blue bars represent Eu-Detect's average classification accuracy with eukaryotic data sets, red bars represent.

  11. The biology of eukaryotic promoter prediction - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    Computational prediction of eukaryotic promoters from the nucleotide sequence is one of the most attractive problems in sequence analysis today, but it is also a very difficult one. Thus, current methods predict in the order of one promoter per kilobase in human DNA, while the average distance...

  12. An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in metagenomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Physical partitioning techniques are routinely employed (during sample preparation stage) for segregating the prokaryotic and eukaryotic fractions of metagenomic samples. In spite of these efforts, several metagenomic studies focusing on bacterial and archaeal populations have reported the presence of contaminating ...

  13. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fidelity in transmission of genetic characters is ensured by the faithful duplication of the genome, followed by equal segregation of the genetic material in the progeny. Thus, alternation of DNA duplication (S-phase) and chromosome segregation during the M-phase are hallmarks of most well studied eukaryotes. Several ...

  14. Potential of industrial biotechnology with cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Kruse, O.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Both cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae are promising organisms for sustainable production of bulk products such as food, feed, materials, chemicals and fuels. In this review we will summarize the potential and current biotechnological developments.Cyanobacteria are promising host organisms for

  15. Eu-Detect: An algorithm for detecting eukaryotic sequences in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Physical partitioning techniques are routinely employed (during sample preparation stage) for segregating the prokaryotic and eukaryotic fractions of metagenomic samples. In spite of these efforts, several metagenomic studies focusing on bacterial and archaeal populations have reported the presence of contaminating ...

  16. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  17. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes.

  18. Molecular typing of fecal eukaryotic microbiota of human infants and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. 18S rRNA library; gastrointestinal tract; micro-eukaryotic diversity ... Insect Molecular Biology Unit, National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra, India; Gastroenterology Unit, Department of P ediatrics, KEM Hospital, Rasta Peth, Pune 411 011, India ...

  19. Characterization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters usinghidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we utilize hidden Markov models (HMMs) and information theory to analyze prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters. We perform this analysis with special emphasis on the fact that promoters are divided into a number of different classes, depending on which polymerase-associated factors...

  20. Characterization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters using hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, P.; Chauvin, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we utilize hidden Markov models (HMMs) and information theory to analyze prokaryotic and eukaryotic promoters. We perform this analysis with special emphasis on the fact that promoters are divided into a number of different classes, depending on which polymerase-associated factors...

  1. The emerging roles of inositol pyrophosphates in eukaryotic cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These energy-rich small molecules are present in all eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, and are involved in a wide range of cellular functions including apoptosis, vesicle trafficking, DNA repair, osmoregulation, phosphate homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, immune signalling, cell cycle regulation, and ribosome ...

  2. Intracellular amorphous carbonates uncover a new biomineralization process in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignier, A; Pacton, M; Filella, M; Jaquet, J-M; Barja, F; Pollok, K; Langenhorst, F; Lavigne, S; Guagliardo, P; Kilburn, M R; Thomas, C; Martini, R; Ariztegui, D

    2017-03-01

    Until now, descriptions of intracellular biomineralization of amorphous inclusions involving alkaline-earth metal (AEM) carbonates other than calcium have been confined exclusively to cyanobacteria (Couradeau et al., 2012). Here, we report the first evidence of the presence of intracellular amorphous granules of AEM carbonates (calcium, strontium, and barium) in unicellular eukaryotes. These inclusions, which we have named micropearls, show concentric and oscillatory zoning on a nanometric scale. They are widespread in certain eukaryote phytoplankters of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) and represent a previously unknown type of non-skeletal biomineralization, revealing an unexpected pathway in the geochemical cycle of AEMs. We have identified Tetraselmis cf. cordiformis (Chlorophyta, Prasinophyceae) as being responsible for the formation of one micropearl type containing strontium ([Ca,Sr]CO3 ), which we also found in a cultured strain of Tetraselmis cordiformis. A different flagellated eukaryotic cell forms barium-rich micropearls [(Ca,Ba)CO3 ]. The strontium and barium concentrations of both micropearl types are extremely high compared with the undersaturated water of Lake Geneva (the Ba/Ca ratio of the micropearls is up to 800,000 times higher than in the water). This can only be explained by a high biological pre-concentration of these elements. The particular characteristics of the micropearls, along with the presence of organic sulfur-containing compounds-associated with and surrounding the micropearls-strongly suggest the existence of a yet-unreported intracellular biomineralization pathway in eukaryotic micro-organisms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Monitoring disulfide bond formation in the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Henrik; Tachibana, Christine; Winther, Jakob R.

    2004-01-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight thiol in the eukaryotic cytosol. The compartment-specific ratio and absolute concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG, respectively) are, however, not easily determined. Here, we present a glutathione-specific green flu...

  4. Trade-off between mesophilic and thermophilic denitrification: rates vs. sludge production, settleability and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Verliefde, Arne; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Boon, Nico

    2014-10-15

    The development of thermophilic nitrogen removal strategies will facilitate sustainable biological treatment of warm nitrogenous wastewaters. Thermophilic denitrification was extensively compared to mesophilic denitrification for the first time in this study. Two sequential batch reactors (SBR) at 34 °C and 55 °C were inoculated with mesophilic activated sludge (26 °C), fed with synthetic influent in a first phase. Subsequently, the carbon source was switched from acetate to molasses, whereas in a third phase, the nitrate source was fertilizer industry wastewater. The denitrifying sludge maintained its activity at 55 °C, resulting in an immediate process start-up, obtaining nitrogen removal rates higher than 500 mg N g(-1) VSS d(-1) in less than one week. Although the mesophilic SBR showed twice as high specific nitrogen removal rates, the maximum thermophilic denitrifying activity in this study was nearly 10 times higher than the activities reported thus far. The thermophilic SBR moreover had a 73% lower sludge volume index, a 45% lower sludge production and a higher resilience towards a change in carbon source compared with the mesophilic SBR. The higher resilience was potentially related to a higher microbial diversity and evenness of the thermophilic community at the end of the synthetic feeding period. The thermophilic microbial community showed a higher similarity over the different feeding periods implying a more stable community. Overall, this study showed the capability of mesophilic denitrifiers to maintain their activity after a large temperature increase. Existing mesophilic process systems with cooling for the treatment of warm wastewaters could thus efficiently be converted to thermophilic systems with low sludge production and good settling properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extremely Thermophilic Microorganisms as Metabolic Engineering Platforms for Production of Fuels and Industrial Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Zeldes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye towards potential technological

  6. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  7. Eukaryotic richness in the abyss: insights from pyrotag sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pawlowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The deep sea floor is considered one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. Recent environmental DNA surveys based on clone libraries of rRNA genes confirm this observation and reveal a high diversity of eukaryotes present in deep-sea sediment samples. However, environmental clone-library surveys yield only a modest number of sequences with which to evaluate the diversity of abyssal eukaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we examined the richness of eukaryotic DNA in deep Arctic and Southern Ocean samples using massively parallel sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA V9 hypervariable region. In very small volumes of sediments, ranging from 0.35 to 0.7 g, we recovered up to 7,499 unique sequences per sample. By clustering sequences having up to 3 differences, we observed from 942 to 1756 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs per sample. Taxonomic analyses of these OTUs showed that DNA of all major groups of eukaryotes is represented at the deep-sea floor. The dinoflagellates, cercozoans, ciliates, and euglenozoans predominate, contributing to 17%, 16%, 10%, and 8% of all assigned OTUs, respectively. Interestingly, many sequences represent photosynthetic taxa or are similar to those reported from the environmental surveys of surface waters. Moreover, each sample contained from 31 to 71 different metazoan OTUs despite the small sample volume collected. This indicates that a significant faction of the eukaryotic DNA sequences likely do not belong to living organisms, but represent either free, extracellular DNA or remains and resting stages of planktonic species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In view of our study, the deep-sea floor appears as a global DNA repository, which preserves genetic information about organisms living in the sediment, as well as in the water column above it. This information can be used for future monitoring of past and present environmental changes.

  8. Molecular Data are Transforming Hypotheses on the Origin and Diversification of Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, Yonas I; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Katz, Laura A

    2009-06-01

    The explosion of molecular data has transformed hypotheses on both the origin of eukaryotes and the structure of the eukaryotic tree of life. Early ideas about the evolution of eukaryotes arose through analyses of morphology by light microscopy and later electron microscopy. Though such studies have proven powerful at resolving more recent events, theories on origins and diversification of eukaryotic life have been substantially revised in light of analyses of molecular data including gene and, increasingly, whole genome sequences. By combining these approaches, progress has been made in elucidating both the origin and diversification of eukaryotes. Yet many aspects of the evolution of eukaryotic life remain to be illuminated.

  9. Novel highly thermostable endolysin from Thermus scotoductus MAT2119 bacteriophage Ph2119 with amino acid sequence similarity to eukaryotic peptidoglycan recognition proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotka, Magdalena; Kaczorowska, Anna-Karina; Stefanska, Aleksandra; Morzywolek, Agnieszka; Fridjonsson, Olafur H; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O; Kristjansson, Jakob K; Dabrowski, Slawomir; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we present the discovery and characterization of a highly thermostable endolysin from bacteriophage Ph2119 infecting Thermus strain MAT2119 isolated from geothermal areas in Iceland. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene affiliated the strain with the species Thermus scotoductus. Bioinformatics analysis has allowed identification in the genome of phage 2119 of an open reading frame (468 bp in length) coding for a 155-amino-acid basic protein with an Mr of 17,555. Ph2119 endolysin does not resemble any known thermophilic phage lytic enzymes. Instead, it has conserved amino acid residues (His(30), Tyr(58), His(132), and Cys(140)) that form a Zn(2+) binding site characteristic of T3 and T7 lysozymes, as well as eukaryotic peptidoglycan recognition proteins, which directly bind to, but also may destroy, bacterial peptidoglycan. The purified enzyme shows high lytic activity toward thermophiles, i.e., T. scotoductus (100%), Thermus thermophilus (100%), and Thermus flavus (99%), and also, to a lesser extent, toward mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, i.e., Escherichia coli (34%), Serratia marcescens (28%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (13%), and Salmonella enterica serovar Panama (10%). The enzyme has shown no activity against a number of Gram-positive bacteria analyzed, with the exception of Deinococcus radiodurans (25%) and Bacillus cereus (15%). Ph2119 endolysin was found to be highly thermostable: it retains approximately 87% of its lytic activity after 6 h of incubation at 95°C. The optimum temperature range for the enzyme activity is 50°C to 78°C. The enzyme exhibits lytic activity in the pH range of 6 to 10 (maximum at pH 7.5 to 8.0) and is also active in the presence of up to 500 mM NaCl.

  10. Effect of different redox mediators during thermophilic azo dye reduction by anaerobic granular sludge and comparative study between mesophilic (30C) and thermophilic (55C) treatments for decolourisation of textile wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezerra Dos Santos, A.; Bisschops, I.A.E.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of different redox mediators on colour removal of azo dye model compounds and textile wastewater by thermophilic anaerobic granular sludge (55 C) was investigated in batch assays. Additionally, a comparative study between mesophilic (30 C) and thermophilic (55 C) colour removal was

  11. Selecting the best inoculation for anaerobic thermophilic treatment in sewage plants; Seleccion de inoculo para el tratamiento anaerobio termofilico de lodos de depuradora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riau, V.; Rubia, M. A. de la; Forster, T.; Perez, M.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to propose a suitable method to obtain an thermophilic inoculum source able for the anaerobic thermophilic digestion of sludge raw. Also, the acclimatization period to the temperature and the substrate is study as well as the thermophilic process at different solids retention of solids is analyzed. (Author) 18 refs.

  12. The phagotrophic origin of eukaryotes and phylogenetic classification of Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2002-03-01

    Eukaryotes and archaebacteria form the clade neomura and are sisters, as shown decisively by genes fragmented only in archaebacteria and by many sequence trees. This sisterhood refutes all theories that eukaryotes originated by merging an archaebacterium and an alpha-proteobacterium, which also fail to account for numerous features shared specifically by eukaryotes and actinobacteria. I revise the phagotrophy theory of eukaryote origins by arguing that the essentially autogenous origins of most eukaryotic cell properties (phagotrophy, endomembrane system including peroxisomes, cytoskeleton, nucleus, mitosis and sex) partially overlapped and were synergistic with the symbiogenetic origin of mitochondria from an alpha-proteobacterium. These radical innovations occurred in a derivative of the neomuran common ancestor, which itself had evolved immediately prior to the divergence of eukaryotes and archaebacteria by drastic alterations to its eubacterial ancestor, an actinobacterial posibacterium able to make sterols, by replacing murein peptidoglycan by N-linked glycoproteins and a multitude of other shared neomuran novelties. The conversion of the rigid neomuran wall into a flexible surface coat and the associated origin of phagotrophy were instrumental in the evolution of the endomembrane system, cytoskeleton, nuclear organization and division and sexual life-cycles. Cilia evolved not by symbiogenesis but by autogenous specialization of the cytoskeleton. I argue that the ancestral eukaryote was uniciliate with a single centriole (unikont) and a simple centrosomal cone of microtubules, as in the aerobic amoebozoan zooflagellate Phalansterium. I infer the root of the eukaryote tree at the divergence between opisthokonts (animals, Choanozoa, fungi) with a single posterior cilium and all other eukaryotes, designated 'anterokonts' because of the ancestral presence of an anterior cilium. Anterokonts comprise the Amoebozoa, which may be ancestrally unikont, and a vast

  13. Bacterial community structure transformed after thermophilically composting human waste in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Sasha; Roy, Monika; Reid, Francine C.; Dubinsky, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Recycling human waste for beneficial use has been practiced for millennia. Aerobic (thermophilic) composting of sewage sludge has been shown to reduce populations of opportunistically pathogenic bacteria and to inactivate both Ascaris eggs and culturable Escherichia coli in raw waste, but there is still a question about the fate of most fecal bacteria when raw material is composted directly. This study undertook a comprehensive microbial community analysis of composting material at various stages collected over 6 months at two composting facilities in Haiti. The fecal microbiota signal was monitored using a high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip). Thermophilic composting altered the bacterial community structure of the starting material. Typical fecal bacteria classified in the following groups were present in at least half the starting material samples, yet were reduced below detection in finished compost: Prevotella and Erysipelotrichaceae (100% reduction of initial presence), Ruminococcaceae (98–99%), Lachnospiraceae (83–94%, primarily unclassified taxa remained), Escherichia and Shigella (100%). Opportunistic pathogens were reduced below the level of detection in the final product with the exception of Clostridium tetani, which could have survived in a spore state or been reintroduced late in the outdoor maturation process. Conversely, thermotolerant or thermophilic Actinomycetes and Firmicutes (e.g., Thermobifida, Bacillus, Geobacillus) typically found in compost increased substantially during the thermophilic stage. This community DNA-based assessment of the fate of human fecal microbiota during thermophilic composting will help optimize this process as a sanitation solution in areas where infrastructure and resources are limited. PMID:28570610

  14. Rapid startup of thermophilic anaerobic digester to remove tetracycline and sulfonamides resistance genes from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Qing-Peng; Bai, Yang; Liu, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Yan-Ru; Xiong, Wei-Ping; Ahmad, Kito; Fan, Chang-Zheng

    2018-01-15

    Spread of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) originating from sewage sludge is highlighted as an eminent health threat. This study established a thermophilic anaerobic digester using one-step startup strategy to quickly remove tetracycline and sulfonamides resistance genes from sewage sludge. At least 20days were saved in the startup period from mesophilic to thermophilic condition. Based on the results of 16S rDNA amplicons sequencing and predicted metagenomic method, the successful startup largely relied on the fast colonization of core thermophilic microbial population (e.g. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria). Microbial metabolic gene pathways for substrate degradation and methane production was also increased by one-step mode. In addition, real-time quantitative PCR approach revealed that most targeted tetracycline and sulfonamides resistance genes ARGs (sulI, tetA, tetO, tetX) were substantially removed during thermophilic digestion (removal efficiency>80%). Network analysis showed that the elimination of ARGs was attributed to the decline of their horizontal (intI1 item) and vertical (potential hosts) transfer-related elements under high-temperature. This research demonstrated that rapid startup thermophilic anaerobic digestion of wastewater solids would be a suitable technology for reducing quantities of various ARGs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bacterial community structure transformed after thermophilically composting human waste in Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette M Piceno

    Full Text Available Recycling human waste for beneficial use has been practiced for millennia. Aerobic (thermophilic composting of sewage sludge has been shown to reduce populations of opportunistically pathogenic bacteria and to inactivate both Ascaris eggs and culturable Escherichia coli in raw waste, but there is still a question about the fate of most fecal bacteria when raw material is composted directly. This study undertook a comprehensive microbial community analysis of composting material at various stages collected over 6 months at two composting facilities in Haiti. The fecal microbiota signal was monitored using a high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip. Thermophilic composting altered the bacterial community structure of the starting material. Typical fecal bacteria classified in the following groups were present in at least half the starting material samples, yet were reduced below detection in finished compost: Prevotella and Erysipelotrichaceae (100% reduction of initial presence, Ruminococcaceae (98-99%, Lachnospiraceae (83-94%, primarily unclassified taxa remained, Escherichia and Shigella (100%. Opportunistic pathogens were reduced below the level of detection in the final product with the exception of Clostridium tetani, which could have survived in a spore state or been reintroduced late in the outdoor maturation process. Conversely, thermotolerant or thermophilic Actinomycetes and Firmicutes (e.g., Thermobifida, Bacillus, Geobacillus typically found in compost increased substantially during the thermophilic stage. This community DNA-based assessment of the fate of human fecal microbiota during thermophilic composting will help optimize this process as a sanitation solution in areas where infrastructure and resources are limited.

  16. Bacterial community structure transformed after thermophilically composting human waste in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piceno, Yvette M; Pecora-Black, Gabrielle; Kramer, Sasha; Roy, Monika; Reid, Francine C; Dubinsky, Eric A; Andersen, Gary L

    2017-01-01

    Recycling human waste for beneficial use has been practiced for millennia. Aerobic (thermophilic) composting of sewage sludge has been shown to reduce populations of opportunistically pathogenic bacteria and to inactivate both Ascaris eggs and culturable Escherichia coli in raw waste, but there is still a question about the fate of most fecal bacteria when raw material is composted directly. This study undertook a comprehensive microbial community analysis of composting material at various stages collected over 6 months at two composting facilities in Haiti. The fecal microbiota signal was monitored using a high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip). Thermophilic composting altered the bacterial community structure of the starting material. Typical fecal bacteria classified in the following groups were present in at least half the starting material samples, yet were reduced below detection in finished compost: Prevotella and Erysipelotrichaceae (100% reduction of initial presence), Ruminococcaceae (98-99%), Lachnospiraceae (83-94%, primarily unclassified taxa remained), Escherichia and Shigella (100%). Opportunistic pathogens were reduced below the level of detection in the final product with the exception of Clostridium tetani, which could have survived in a spore state or been reintroduced late in the outdoor maturation process. Conversely, thermotolerant or thermophilic Actinomycetes and Firmicutes (e.g., Thermobifida, Bacillus, Geobacillus) typically found in compost increased substantially during the thermophilic stage. This community DNA-based assessment of the fate of human fecal microbiota during thermophilic composting will help optimize this process as a sanitation solution in areas where infrastructure and resources are limited.

  17. A further examination of heavy metal inhibition of gas production by thermophilic anaerobic sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, C; Forster, C F

    1988-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic digestion is a well established method for stabilising municipal sewage sludges. However, digestion in the thermophilic range is very restricted. The main reason for this has been the imbalance between the energy produced in the form of biogas and the energy required to maintain the temperature of a thermophilic system. It has been shown recently that an energy-positive process can be achieved using thickened sludges as the feedstock and, therefore, thermophilic digestion must be considered as a potentially attractive process for sludge stabilisation. However, before it can properly be offered as an alternative technology, the effect of toxic materials must be known. Currently, there is little information about the effect that known toxic agents can have on the microbial flora of a thermophilic sludge. This paper examines the toxicity (measured in terms of gas inhibition) of heavy metals, both individually and in combinations, on the sludge produced by a laboratory-scale digester (10 litres) operating at 55 degrees C with a solids retention time of 20 days. The metals used were zinc, lead, nickel, copper and cadmium and the gas inhibition studies were done in small (500 ml) flasks so that the gas production could be monitored precisely. Statistical analysis of the results showed that a model, developed previously to describe the toxicity of a range of compounds to mesophilic systems, was applicable to heavy metals and thermophilic sludges.

  18. Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

  19. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanne W Sammond

    Full Text Available Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  20. Biogeography of thermophilic phototrophic bacteria belonging to Roseiflexus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisin, Vasil A; Grouzdev, Denis S; Namsaraev, Zorigto B; Sukhacheva, Marina V; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Kuznetsov, Boris B

    2016-03-01

    Isolated environments such as hot springs are particularly interesting for studying the microbial biogeography. These environments create an 'island effect' leading to genetic divergence. We studied the phylogeographic pattern of thermophilic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, belonging to the Roseiflexus genus. The main characteristic of the observed pattern was geographic and geochronologic fidelity to the hot springs within Circum-Pacific and Alpine-Himalayan-Indonesian orogenic belts. Mantel test revealed a correlation between genetic divergence and geographic distance among the phylotypes. Cluster analysis revealed a regional differentiation of the global phylogenetic pattern. The phylogeographic pattern is in correlation with geochronologic events during the break up of Pangaea that led to the modern configuration of continents. To our knowledge this is the first geochronological scenario of intercontinental prokaryotic taxon divergence. The existence of the modern phylogeographic pattern contradicts with the existence of the ancient evolutionary history of the Roseiflexus group proposed on the basis of its deep-branching phylogenetic position. These facts indicate that evolutionary rates in Roseiflexus varied over a wide range. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  2. Rhamnolipid-producing thermophilic bacteria of species Thermus and Meiothermus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanka, Tomáš; Siristova, Lucie; Sigler, Karel

    2011-11-01

    Novel rhamnolipid-producing strains of three thermophilic bacteria, Thermus sp., T. aquaticus and Meiothermus ruber were identified that have not been previously described as rhamnolipid producers. Rhamnolipids were extracted from supernatant and further purified by thin-layer chromatography. Mass spectrometry with negative electrospray ionization revealed 77 rhamnolipid homologues varying in chain length and unsaturation. Tandem mass spectrometry identified mono-rhamnolipid and di-rhamnolipid homologues containing one or two 3-hydroxy-fatty acids, saturated, monounsaturated or diunsaturated, even- or odd-chain, up to unusual long chains with 24 carbon atoms. The stereochemistry of rhamnose was L and that of 3-hydroxy-fatty acids was R, the position of double bonds in monoenoic acids was cis ω-9. All three strains produced a rhamnolipid that differs in structure from Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids and exhibits excellent surfactant properties. Importantly, in comparison to P. aeruginosa both strains, i.e., Thermus and Meiothermus, are Biosafety level 1 microorganisms and are not pathogenic to humans.

  3. Cellulose- and xylan-degrading thermophilic anaerobic bacteria from biocompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizova, M V; Izquierdo, J A; Panikov, N S; Lynd, L R

    2011-04-01

    Nine thermophilic cellulolytic clostridial isolates and four other noncellulolytic bacterial isolates were isolated from self-heated biocompost via preliminary enrichment culture on microcrystalline cellulose. All cellulolytic isolates grew vigorously on cellulose, with the formation of either ethanol and acetate or acetate and formate as principal fermentation products as well as lactate and glycerol as minor products. In addition, two out of nine cellulolytic strains were able to utilize xylan and pretreated wood with roughly the same efficiency as for cellulose. The major products of xylan fermentation were acetate and formate, with minor contributions of lactate and ethanol. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and glycosyl hydrolase family 48 (GH48) gene sequences revealed that two xylan-utilizing isolates were related to a Clostridium clariflavum strain and represent a distinct novel branch within the GH48 family. Both isolates possessed high cellulase and xylanase activity induced independently by either cellulose or xylan. Enzymatic activity decayed after growth cessation, with more-rapid disappearance of cellulase activity than of xylanase activity. A mixture of xylan and cellulose was utilized simultaneously, with a significant synergistic effect observed as a reduction of lag phase in cellulose degradation.

  4. Thermophilic hydrogen fermentation from Korean rice straw by Thermotoga neapolitana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tam-Anh D.; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Sim, Sang Jun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Sun [Bioenergy Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Rice straw, a low-cost lignocellulosic biomass was used as feedstock for thermophilic hydrogen fermentation by Thermotoga neapolitana. Hydrogen production, the growth and cellulose digestibility of the hyperthermophile in batch mode from untreated as well as chemically pretreated (ammonia and dilute sulfuric acid) Korean rice straws were investigated. Pretreatment method using combination of 10% ammonia and 1.0% dilute sulfuric acid was developed to increase the digestibility of rice straw for the hyperthermophilic H{sub 2} fermentation and to decrease the time consumption. In a typical fermentation using raw rice straw, 29% of the substrate was digested and 2.3 mmol H{sub 2}/g straw of hydrogen yield was consistently obtained. Compared with the pretreatments using only ammonia or dilute sulfuric acid, the combined pretreatment method using both chemical agents significantly increases the digestibility of rice straw with 85.4% of substrate consumption. H{sub 2} production on rice straw from this combined pretreatment showed the highest yield (2.7 mmol H{sub 2}/g straw) and the highest sugar conversions (72.9% of glucose and 95.7% of xylose). (author)

  5. Isolation and characterization of novel thermophilic lipase-secreting bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rabbani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to screen and identify the lipase-producing microorganisms from various regions of Iran. Samples collected from hot spring, Persian Gulf, desert area and oil-contaminated soil, were analyzed for thermophilic extracellular-lipase producing organisms. Six strains with high activity on rhodamine B plates were selected for chemical identification and further study. Among these isolated bacteria, four strains show higher activity in pH-Stat method at 55 °C. These strains were identified by PCR amplification of 16s rRNA genes using universal primers. Fermentation increased the activity up to 50%. The growth medium, designed for lipase production, increased the activity up to 4.55 folds. The crude supernatant of ZR-5 after fermentation and separation the cells, was lyophilized and the activity was measured. Total activity of this strain was 12 kU/g that shows its potential for industrial uses. Further study is required for purification of enzyme and calculation its specific activity. Immobilization is another approach should be considered.

  6. Modeling temperature variations in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; López-Cruz, Irineo L; Domaschko, Max

    2011-05-01

    A model that predicts temperature changes in a pilot plant thermophilic anaerobic digester was developed based on fundamental thermodynamic laws. The methodology utilized two simulation strategies. In the first, model equations were solved through a searching routine based on a minimal square optimization criterion, from which the overall heat transfer coefficient values, for both biodigester and heat exchanger, were determined. In the second, the simulation was performed with variable values of these overall coefficients. The prediction with both strategies allowed reproducing experimental data within 5% of the temperature span permitted in the equipment by the system control, which validated the model. The temperature variation was affected by the heterogeneity of the feeding and extraction processes, by the heterogeneity of the digestate recirculation through the heating system and by the lack of a perfect mixing inside the biodigester tank. The use of variable overall heat transfer coefficients improved the temperature change prediction and reduced the effect of a non-ideal performance of the pilot plant modeled.

  7. Characterization of novel thermophilic alpha-glucosidase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na-Ri; Jeong, Da-Woon; Ko, Dam-Seul; Shim, Jae-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the gene encoding α-glucosidase from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum JCM1217 (BLAG) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The amino acid sequence alignment demonstrated that BLAG belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13. The optimal temperature for enzyme activity was 75°C; about 80% of the catalytic activity was lost at 50°C, which is very unusual for enzymes from the Bifidobacterium genus. In the presence of 5mM of Co2+ and Ca2+, enzyme activity was reduced to 47% and 48%, respectively. Furthermore, BLAG lost catalytic activity following the addition of 5mM of Fe2+ ion. The BLAG enzyme was able to hydrolyze α-1,2, α-1,3, α-1,4, and α-1,6 glycosidic O-linkages and liberated glucose from the non-reducing end of substrates. The kinetic study revealed that among the maltooligosaccharides, BLAG showed the highest kcat/Km value to maltotriose (G3), and had relatively low kcat/Km values on long-chain maltooligosaccharides. This is the first report describing the production of a thermophilic α-glucosidase from the Bifidobacterium genus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. AMMONIA INHIBITION IN THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF DAIRY CATTLE MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sutaryo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of five different concentrations of total ammonia nitrogen (TANand free ammonia (FA on the methane yield and digester performance under thermophilic conditions(50°C. Five identical continuously fed digesters were used. The experiment was run for four timeshydraulic retention time (HRT. Data were statitically analysed using the data Analysis Tool Packavailable with the Microsoft Excel program. Different ammonia levels were obtained by pulsing urea toobtain the target level of TAN and FA, and to subsequently maintaining the concentration of ammonialevels by daily urea additions. The result showed a strong negative correlation between both TAN andFA concentrations and methane yield. The methane yield was reduced by 24, 30, 52 and 66% indigesters that had TAN levels of 2.9, 3.6, 4.4 and 5.1 g/L, respectively, corresponding to 0.7, 1.1,1.5 and1.8 g/L FA. Total volatile fatty acid and especially isovaleric and isobutyric acid concentrations wereelevated during ammonia inhibition. Concentration of TAN in the biogas digester exceeding 3 g/Lindicating that very often the full biogas potential is not achieved due to ammonia inhibition and thatlonger HRT should be used to compensate or a lower process temperature should be chosen.

  9. Quantitative metabolomics of the thermophilic methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Marc; Vieira, Gilles; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Heux, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Bacillus methanolicus MGA3 is a promising candidate for methanol-based biotechnologies. Accurate determination of intracellular metabolites is crucial for engineering this bacteria into an efficient microbial cell factory. Due to the diversity of chemical and cell properties, an experimental protocol validated on B. methanolicus is needed. Here a systematic evaluation of different techniques for establishing a reliable basis for metabolome investigations is presented. Metabolome analysis was focused on metabolites closely linked with B. methanolicus central methanol metabolism. As an alternative to cold solvent based procedures, a solvent-free quenching strategy using stainless steel beads cooled to -20 °C was assessed. The precision, the consistency of the measurements, and the extent of metabolite leakage from quenched cells were evaluated in procedures with and without cell separation. The most accurate and reliable performance was provided by the method without cell separation, as significant metabolite leakage occurred in the procedures based on fast filtration. As a biological test case, the best protocol was used to assess the metabolome of B. methanolicus grown in chemostat on methanol at two different growth rates and its validity was demonstrated. The presented protocol is a first and helpful step towards developing reliable metabolomics data for thermophilic methylotroph B. methanolicus. This will definitely help for designing an efficient methylotrophic cell factory.

  10. Utilizing thermophilic microbe in lignocelluloses based bioethanol production: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriharti, Agustina, Wawan; Ratnawati, Lia; Rahman, Taufik; Salim, Takiyah

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of thermophilic microbe has attracted many parties, particularly in producing an alternative fuel like ethanol. Bioethanol is one of the alternative energy sources substituting for earth oil in the future. The advantage of using bioethanol is that it can reduce pollution levels and global warming because the result of bioethanol burning doesn't bring in a net addition of CO2 into environment. Moreover, decrease in the reserves of earth oil globally has also contributed to the notion on searching renewable energy resources such as bioethanol. Indonesia has a high biomass potential and can be used as raw material for bioethanol. The utilization of these raw materials will reduce fears of competition foodstuffs for energy production. The enzymes that play a role in degrading lignocelluloses are cellulolytic, hemicellulolytic, and lignolytic in nature. The main enzyme with an important role in bioethanol production is a complex enzyme capable of degrading lignocelluloses. The enzyme can be produced by the thermophilik microbes of the groups of bacteria and fungi such as Trichoderma viride, Clostridium thermocellum, Bacillus sp. Bioethanol production is heavily affected by raw material composition, microorganism type, and the condition of fermentation used.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Anoxybacillus flavithermus TNO-09.006, a thermophilic sporeformer associated with a dairy-processing environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caspers, M.P.; Boekhorst, J.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Kort, R.

    2013-01-01

    Spores of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. We isolated the thermophilic strain Anoxybacillus flavithermus TNO-09.006 from a milk-processing plant, and we report the complete genome of this isolate consisting of a single chromosome of 2.65 Mb.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Anoxybacillus flavithermus TNO-09.006, a Thermophilic Sporeformer Associated with a Dairy-Processing Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caspers, M.P.; Boekhorst, J.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Kort, R.

    2013-01-01

    Spores of thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. We isolated the thermophilic strain Anoxybacillus flavithermus TNO-09.006 from a milk-processing plant, and we report the complete genome of this isolate consisting of a single chromosome of 2.65 Mb.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020, a thermophilic sporeformer associated with a dairy-processing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Kort, R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. We isolated the thermophilic strain Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020 from a milk processing plant and report the complete genome of a dairy plant isolate consisting of a single chromosome of 3.75 Mb. ©

  14. Isolation of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum strains with methanol and sulfite from solfataric mud pools, and characterization of Desulfotomaculum solfataficum sp nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorissen, H.P.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Hansen, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Four strains of thermophilic, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacteria were enriched and isolated from hot solfataric fields in the Krafla area of north-east Iceland, using methanol and sulfite as substrates. Morphologically, these strains resembled thermophilic Desulfotomaculum species. The

  15. Isolation of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum strains with methanol and sulfite from solfataric mud pools, and characterization of Desulfotomaculum solfataficum sp nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorissen, HP; Boschker, HTS; Stams, AJM; Hansen, TA

    Four strains of thermophilic, endospore-forming, sulfate-reducing bacteria were enriched and isolated from hot solfataric fields in the Krafla area of north-east Iceland, using methanol and sulfite as substrates. Morphologically, these strains resembled thermophilic Desulfotomaculum species. The

  16. Group-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify thermophilic bacteria in marine hydrothermal vents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, HJM; Prieur, D; Jeanthon, C

    1997-01-01

    Four 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the detection of thermophilic members of the domain Bacteria known to thrive in marine hydrothermal systems, We developed and characterized probes encompassing most of the thermophilic members of the genus Bacillus, most species of the

  17. A Novel Process Configuration for Anaerobic Digestion of Source-Sorted Household Waste Using Hyper-Thermophilic Post-Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, H.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2005-01-01

    A novel reactor configuration was investigated for anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). An anaerobic hyper-thermophilic (68°C) reactor R68 was implemented as a post–treatment step for the effluent of a thermophilic reactor R1 (55°C) in order to enhance......). A single-stage thermophilic (55°C) reactor R2 was used as control. VS reduction and biogas yield of the combined system was 78 – 89% and 640 – 790 ml/g-VS, respectively. While the VS reduction in the combined system was up to 7% higher than in the single-stage treatment, no increase in methane yield......-thermophilic post-treatment. 7% of the ammonia load was removed in the hyper-thermophilic reactor with a flow of headspace gas through the reactor equivalent to four times the biogas flow produced in reactor R1....

  18. Computational identification of operon-like transcriptional loci in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannapaneni, Kishore; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda; Keen, Henry L; Welsh, Michael J; Casavant, Thomas L; Scheetz, Todd E

    2013-07-01

    Operons are primarily a bacterial phenomenon, not commonly observed in eukaryotes. However, new research indicates that operons are found in higher organisms as well. There are instances of operons found in C. elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and other eukaryotic species. We developed a prototype using positional, structural and gene expression information to identify candidate operons. We focused our efforts on "trans-spliced" operons in which the pre-mRNA is trans-spliced into individual transcripts and subsequently translated, as widely observed in C. elegans and some instances in Drosophila. We identify several candidate operons in Drosophila melanogaster of which two have been subsequently molecularly validated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Horizontal transfers of transposable elements in eukaryotes: The flying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaud, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the major components of eukaryotic genomes. Their propensity to densely populate and in some cases invade the genomes of plants and animals is in contradiction with the fact that transposition is strictly controlled by several molecular pathways acting at either transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels. Horizontal transfers, defined as the transmission of genetic material between sexually isolated species, have long been considered as rare phenomena. Here, we show that the horizontal transfers of transposable elements (HTTs) are very frequent in ecosystems. The exact mechanisms of such transfers are not well understood, but species involved in close biotic interactions, like parasitism, show a propensity to exchange genetic material horizontally. We propose that HTTs allow TEs to escape the silencing machinery of their host genome and may therefore be an important mechanism for their survival and their dissemination in eukaryotes. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Recognition of extremophilic archaeal viruses by eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch; Wu, Linping; Hall, Arnaldur

    2016-01-01

    Viruses from the third domain of life, Archaea, exhibit unusual features including extreme stability that allow their survival in harsh environments. In addition, these species have never been reported to integrate into human or any other eukaryotic genomes, and could thus serve for exploration...... of novel medical nanoplatforms. Here, we selected two archaeal viruses Sulfolobus monocaudavirus 1 (SMV1) and Sulfolobus spindle shaped virus 2 (SSV2) owing to their unique spindle shape, hyperthermostable and acid-resistant nature and studied their interaction with mammalian cells. Accordingly, we...... for selective cell targeting. On internalization, both viruses localize to the lysosomal compartments. Neither SMV1, nor SSV2 induced any detrimental effect on cell morphology, plasma membrane and mitochondrial functionality. This is the first study demonstrating recognition of archaeal viruses by eukaryotic...

  1. Anionic lipids and the maintenance of membrane electrostatics in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-02-01

    A wide range of signaling processes occurs at the cell surface through the reversible association of proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Some low abundant lipids are enriched at the membrane of specific compartments and thereby contribute to the identity of cell organelles by acting as biochemical landmarks. Lipids also influence membrane biophysical properties, which emerge as an important feature in specifying cellular territories. Such parameters are crucial for signal transduction and include lipid packing, membrane curvature and electrostatics. In particular, membrane electrostatics specifies the identity of the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Membrane surface charges are carried by anionic phospholipids, however the exact nature of the lipid(s) that powers the plasma membrane electrostatic field varies among eukaryotes and has been hotly debated during the last decade. Herein, we discuss the role of anionic lipids in setting up plasma membrane electrostatics and we compare similarities and differences that were found in different eukaryotic cells.

  2. Kinetic model of DNA replication in eukaryotic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechhoefer, John; Herrick, John; Bensimon, Aaron

    2001-03-01

    We introduce an analogy between DNA replication in eukaryotic organisms and crystal growth in one dimension. Drawing on models of crystallization kinetics developed in the 1930s to describe the freezing of metals, we formulate a kinetic model of DNA replication that quantitatively describes recent results on DNA replication in the in vitro system of Xenopus laevis prior to the mid-blastula transition. It allows one, for the first time, to determine the parameters governing the DNA replication program in a eukaryote on a genome-wide basis. In particular, we have determined the frequency of origin activation in time and space during the cell cycle. Although we focus on a specific stage of development, this model can easily be adapted to describe replication in many other organisms, including budding yeast.

  3. Regulated eukaryotic DNA replication origin firing with purified proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; Deegan, Tom D; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2015-03-26

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication.

  4. Silencing or knocking out eukaryotic gene expression by oligodeoxynucleotide decoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Kenneth R; Ehrlich, H

    2006-01-01

    The elucidation of molecular and signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells is often achieved by targeting regulatory element(s) found in the promoter or the enhancer region of eukaryotic gene(s) using a double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing a specific cis-element. Our laboratory is focusing on dsODN decoys containing the TGF-beta element as a novel nonsteroidal antifibrotic for achieving normal wound healing. In the model systems discussed, there is either a specific gene possessing a specific cis-element or a cluster of genes with one gene containing the consensus cis-element. The rest of the genes in the cluster contain the cis-elements homologous to this consensus element, which allows for dsODN decoy regulation of a gene cluster at one time.

  5. Molecular Data are Transforming Hypotheses on the Origin and Diversification of Eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Tekle, Yonas I.; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Katz, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    The explosion of molecular data has transformed hypotheses on both the origin of eukaryotes and the structure of the eukaryotic tree of life. Early ideas about the evolution of eukaryotes arose through analyses of morphology by light microscopy and later electron microscopy. Though such studies have proven powerful at resolving more recent events, theories on origins and diversification of eukaryotic life have been substantially revised in light of analyses of molecular data including gene an...

  6. Stay Wet, Stay Stable? How Internal Water Helps Stability of Thermophilic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debashree; Taly, Antoine; Sterpone, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    We present a systematic computational investigation of the internal hydration of a set of homologous proteins of different stability content and molecular complexities. The goal of the study is to verify whether structural water can be part of the molecular mechanisms ensuring enhanced stability in thermophilic enzymes. Our free energy calculations show that internal hydration in the thermophilic variants is generally more favourable and that the cumulated effect of wetting multiple sites results in a meaningful contribution to stability. Moreover, thanks to a more effective capability to retain internal water some thermophilic proteins benefit of a systematic gain from internal wetting up to their optimal working temperature. Our work supports the idea that internal wetting can be viewed as an alternative molecular variable to be tuned for increasing protein stability. PMID:26335353

  7. Stay Wet, Stay Stable? How Internal Water Helps the Stability of Thermophilic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debashree; Taly, Antoine; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-10-08

    We present a systematic computational investigation of the internal hydration of a set of homologous proteins of different stability content and molecular complexities. The goal of the study is to verify whether structural water can be part of the molecular mechanisms ensuring enhanced stability in thermophilic enzymes. Our free-energy calculations show that internal hydration in the thermophilic variants is generally more favorable, and that the cumulated effect of wetting multiple sites results in a meaningful contribution to stability. Moreover, thanks to a more effective capability to retain internal water, some thermophilic proteins benefit by a systematic gain from internal wetting up to their optimal working temperature. Our work supports the idea that internal wetting can be viewed as an alternative molecular variable to be tuned for increasing protein stability.

  8. Thermophilic Sulfate Reduction in Hydrothermal Sediment of Lake Tanganyika, East-Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ELSGAARD, L.; PRIEUR, D.; MUKWAYA, GM

    1994-01-01

    In environments with temperatures above 60 degrees C, thermophilic prokaryotes are the only metabolically active life-forms. By using the (SO42-)-S-35 tracer technique, we studied the activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in hot sediment from a hydrothermal vent site in the northern...... population of SRM in the hydrothermal sediment. Thermophilic sulfate reduction had a pH optimum of about 7 and was completely inhibited at pH 8.8 to 9.2. SRM could be enriched from hydrothermal chimney and sediment samples at 60 and 75 degrees C. In lactate-grown enrichments, sulfide production occurred...... at up to 70 and 75 degrees C, with optima at 63 and 71 degrees C, respectively. Several sporulating thermophilic enrichments were morphologically similar to Desulfotomaculum spp. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in the studied hydrothermal area of Lake Tanganyika apparently has an upper temperature limit...

  9. Carbohydrate active enzyme domains from extreme thermophiles: components of a modular toolbox for lignocellulose degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Jonathan; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Myburg, Alexander A; Cowan, Don A

    2017-11-06

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising feedstock for the manufacture of biodegradable and renewable bioproducts. However, the complex lignocellulosic polymeric structure of woody tissue is difficult to access without extensive industrial pre-treatment. Enzyme processing of partly depolymerised biomass is an established technology, and there is evidence that high temperature (extremely thermophilic) lignocellulose degrading enzymes [carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes)] may enhance processing efficiency. However, wild-type thermophilic CAZymes will not necessarily be functionally optimal under industrial pre-treatment conditions. With recent advances in synthetic biology, it is now potentially possible to build CAZyme constructs from individual protein domains, tailored to the conditions of specific industrial processes. In this review, we identify a 'toolbox' of thermostable CAZyme domains from extremely thermophilic organisms and highlight recent advances in CAZyme engineering which will allow for the rational design of CAZymes tailored to specific aspects of lignocellulose digestion.

  10. Metagenomics of Thermophiles with a Focus on Discovery of Novel Thermozymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, María-Eugenia; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; González-Siso, María-Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Microbial populations living in environments with temperatures above 50°C (thermophiles) have been widely studied, increasing our knowledge in the composition and function of these ecological communities. Since these populations express a broad number of heat-resistant enzymes (thermozymes), they also represent an important source for novel biocatalysts that can be potentially used in industrial processes. The integrated study of the whole-community DNA from an environment, known as metagenomics, coupled with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, has allowed the generation of large amounts of data from thermophiles. In this review, we summarize the main approaches commonly utilized for assessing the taxonomic and functional diversity of thermophiles through metagenomics, including several bioinformatics tools and some metagenome-derived methods to isolate their thermozymes. PMID:27729905

  11. Biosynthesis of fructo-oligosaccharides by Sporotrichum thermophile during submerged batch cultivation in high sucrose media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katapodis, P.; Kalogeris, E.; Kekos, D.

    2004-01-01

    found to be the predominant compatible solutes. The fungus accumulated glutamic acid, arginine, alanine, leucine and lysine, in order to balance the outer osmotic pressure. Fatty acid analysis of the membrane lipids showed a relatively high percentage of unsaturated lipids, which is known......Biosynthesis of fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) was observed during growth of the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile on media containing high sucrose concentrations. Submerged batch cultivation with the optimum initial sucrose concentration of 250 g/l allowed the production of 12.5 g FOS....../l. The FOS mixture obtained was composed of three sugars, which were isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. They were characterized by acid hydrolysis and HPLC as 1-kestose, 6-kestose and neokestose. The mechanism of osmotic adaptation of S. thermophile was investigated and sugars and amino acids were...

  12. Improved fermentation performance in an expanded ectopic fermentation system inoculated with thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Zhu, Changxiong; Geng, Bing; Liu, Xue; Ye, Jing; Tian, Yunlong; Peng, Xiawei

    2015-12-01

    Previous research showed that ectopic fermentation system (EFS) inoculated with thermophilic bacteria is an excellent alternative for cow wastewater treatment. In this study, the effects of thermophilic bacterial consortium on the efficiency and quality of the fermentation process in EFS were evaluated by measuring physicochemical and environmental factors and the changes in organic matter composition. In parallel, the microbial communities correlated with fermentation performance were identified. Inoculation of EFS with thermophilic bacterial consortium led to higher temperatures, increased wastewater requirements for continuous fermentation, and improved quality of the litters in terms of physicochemical factors, security test, functional group analysis, and bacterial community composition. The relationship between the transformation of organic component and the dominant bacteria species indicated that environmental factors contributed to strain growth, which subsequently promoted the fermentation process. The results highlight the great potential of EFS model for wide application in cow wastewater treatment and re-utilization as bio-fertilizer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of Recombinant Phytase (rSt-Phy) of the Thermophilic mold Sporotrichum thermophile and its applicability in dephytinizing foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Bibhuti; Singh, Bijender; Satyanarayana, T

    2015-12-01

    Sporotrichum thermophile produces very low titres of phytase (St-Phy) extracellularly, which is acidstable, thermostable, and protease insensitive with broad substrate specificity, and therefore, the gene encoding phytase (St-Phy) has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant phytase (rSt-Phy) has the molecular mass of 55 kDa with Km and Vmax (calcium phytate), kcat and kcat/Km of 0.143 mM, 185.05 nmoles mg(-1)  s(-1), 5.1 × 10(3) s(-1), and 3.5 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Mg(2+) and Ba(2+) display slight stimulatory effect on the enzyme, while it is inhibited by other ions to a varied extent. The enzyme is also inhibited by chaotropic agents (guanidinium hydrochloride, potassium iodide, and urea), Woodward's reagent K, and 2,3-butanedione but resistant to both pepsin and trypsin. The rSt-Phy is useful in dephytinization of tandoori and naan (unleavened flat Indian breads), and bread, liberating soluble inorganic phosphate that mitigates anti-nutrient effects of phytic acid.

  14. Mixed Substrate Fermentation for Enhanced Phytase Production by Thermophilic Mould Sporotrichum thermophile and Its Application in Beneficiation of Poultry Feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amit; Satyanarayana, T; Singh, Bijender

    2016-01-01

    The optimum values of the critical variables determined by the central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM) for maximum phytase production (1881.26 U g(-1) dry mouldy residue (DMR)) by Sporotrichum thermophile are 2.5 % Tween 80, 1.0 % yeast extract and 48 h of incubation period. Phytase production in the mixed substrate (sugarcane bagasse and wheat bran) fermentation enhanced 11.6-fold over the initial production as a consequence of optimization. Phytase titres are sustainable in flasks, trays and column bioreactor (1796 to 2095 U g(-1) DMR), thus validating the model and the process for large-scale phytase production. When the yeast extract was replaced with corn steep liquor (2 % w/v), a sustained enzyme titre (1890 U g(-1) DMR) was attained, making the process cost-effective. Among all the detergents, Tween 80 supported a higher phytase production than others. The enzyme efficiently liberated nutritional components from poultry feed (inorganic phosphate, soluble protein and reducing sugars) in a time-dependent manner.

  15. Biological Influence of Deuterium on Procariotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Mosin; Ignat Ignatov

    2014-01-01

    Biologic influence of deuterium (D) on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates are investigated at growth on media with heavy water (D2О). The method of step by step adaptation technique of cells to D2О was developed, consisting in plating of cells on 2 % agarose nutrient media containing increasing gradient of concentration of ...

  16. Starting the protein synthesis machine: eukaryotic translation initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Thomas; W Hentze, Matthias

    2003-12-01

    The final assembly of the protein synthesis machinery occurs during translation initiation. This delicate process involves both ends of eukaryotic messenger RNAs as well as multiple sequential protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions. As is expected from its critical position in the gene expression pathway between the transcriptome and the proteome, translation initiation is a selective and highly regulated process. This synopsis summarises the current status of the field and identifies intriguing open questions. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Sulfate assimilation in eukaryotes: fusions, relocations and lateral transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durnford Dion G

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sulfate assimilation pathway is present in photosynthetic organisms, fungi, and many bacteria, providing reduced sulfur for the synthesis of cysteine and methionine and a range of other metabolites. In photosynthetic eukaryotes sulfate is reduced in the plastids whereas in aplastidic eukaryotes the pathway is cytosolic. The only known exception is Euglena gracilis, where the pathway is localized in mitochondria. To obtain an insight into the evolution of the sulfate assimilation pathway in eukaryotes and relationships of the differently compartmentalized isoforms we determined the locations of the pathway in lineages for which this was unknown and performed detailed phylogenetic analyses of three enzymes involved in sulfate reduction: ATP sulfurylase (ATPS, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR and sulfite reductase (SiR. Results The inheritance of ATPS, APR and the related 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPR are remarkable, with multiple origins in the lineages that comprise the opisthokonts, different isoforms in chlorophytes and streptophytes, gene fusions with other enzymes of the pathway, evidence a eukaryote to prokaryote lateral gene transfer, changes in substrate specificity and two reversals of cellular location of host- and endosymbiont-originating enzymes. We also found that the ATPS and APR active in the mitochondria of Euglena were inherited from its secondary, green algal plastid. Conclusion Our results reveal a complex history for the enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. Whilst they shed light on the origin of some characterised novelties, such as a recently described novel isoform of APR from Bryophytes and the origin of the pathway active in the mitochondria of Euglenids, the many distinct and novel isoforms identified here represent an excellent resource for detailed biochemical studies of the enzyme structure/function relationships.

  18. Hydrodynamics Versus Intracellular Coupling in the Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Greta; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Tam, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    The influence of hydrodynamic forces on eukaryotic flagella synchronization is investigated by triggering phase locking between a controlled external flow and the flagella of C. reinhardtii. Hydrodynamic forces required for synchronization are over an order of magnitude larger than hydrodynamic forces experienced in physiological conditions. Our results suggest that synchronization is due instead to coupling through cell internal fibers connecting the flagella. This conclusion is confirmed by observations of the vfl3 mutant, with impaired mechanical connection between the flagella.

  19. An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding the Origin of Eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Neil W Blackstone

    2016-01-01

    Two major obstacles hinder the application of evolutionary theory to the origin of eukaryotes. The first is more apparent than real—the endosymbiosis that led to the mitochondrion is often described as “non-Darwinian” because it deviates from the incremental evolution championed by the modern synthesis. Nevertheless, endosymbiosis can be accommodated by a multi-level generalization of evolutionary theory, which Darwin himself pioneered. The second obstacle is more serious—all of the major fea...

  20. Function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ABC proteins in lipid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Antje; Devaux, Philippe F; Herrmann, Andreas

    2005-03-21

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins are implicated in the transport of lipids. In humans, members of the ABC protein families A, B, C, D and G are mutated in a number of lipid transport and metabolism disorders, such as Tangier disease, Stargardt syndrome, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, adrenoleukodystrophy or sitosterolemia. Studies employing transfection, overexpression, reconstitution, deletion and inhibition indicate the transbilayer transport of endogenous lipids and their analogs by some of these proteins, modulating lipid transbilayer asymmetry. Other proteins appear to be involved in the exposure of specific lipids on the exoplasmic leaflet, allowing their uptake by acceptors and further transport to specific sites. Additionally, lipid transport by ABC proteins is currently being studied in non-human eukaryotes, e.g. in sea urchin, trypanosomatides, arabidopsis and yeast, as well as in prokaryotes such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis. Here, we review current information about the (putative) role of both pro- and eukaryotic ABC proteins in the various phenomena associated with lipid transport. Besides providing a better understanding of phenomena like lipid metabolism, circulation, multidrug resistance, hormonal processes, fertilization, vision and signalling, studies on pro- and eukaryotic ABC proteins might eventually enable us to put a name on some of the proteins mediating transbilayer lipid transport in various membranes of cells and organelles. It must be emphasized, however, that there are still many uncertainties concerning the functions and mechanisms of ABC proteins interacting with lipids. In particular, further purification and reconstitution experiments with an unambiguous role of ATP hydrolysis are needed to demonstrate a clear involvement of ABC proteins in lipid transbilayer asymmetry.

  1. Changes in Eukaryotic and Bacterial Communities along a 120 m Transect Associated with a Shallow Marine Hydrothermal Vent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydn Rubelmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The biocomplexity of sediment communities along a 120 m transect near an arsenic-rich, shallow marine hydrothermal vent at Tutum Bay, Papua New Guinea was thoroughly examined. A count of macro- and meiofaunal organisms was combined with bacterial and eukaryotic SSU rRNA gene surveys to assess biodiversity. Each site along the transect had distinct microbial communities. Near-vent sites were more similar to each other than sites further from the vent. Some species, such as Ignavibacterium, Caldilinea, and Capitella were only found near-vent. Biodiversity generally increased with distance from the vent. The community composition responded to the presence of hydrothermal fluids with a clear correlation between temperature and thermophilic organisms. Primary production appeared to be a mix of chemo- and phototrophy. Association analyses suggest many potential interactions between organisms occur at certain sites, and that species distributions and interactions occur in the context of complex spatial relationships related to the geochemistry of the hydrothermal vent fluids. While Tutum Bay is heavily influenced by arsenic, no specific correlation between bacteria that metabolize arsenic and the concentration of different oxidation states of arsenic ions was observed, perhaps because very little of the arsenic present was bioavailable. The observed homogeneous distribution of arsenic reducers along the transect could be due to background arsenic metabolism. This study represents a holistic study of biocomplexity on a broad phylogenetic range across a 120 m transect associated with a marine shallow-water hydrothermal vent.Subject Category: Microbial ecology and functional diversity of natural habitats.

  2. Non-coding RNAs: the architects of eukaryotic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, J S

    2001-11-01

    Around 98% of all transcriptional output in humans is non-coding RNA. RNA-mediated gene regulation is widespread in higher eukaryotes and complex genetic phenomena like RNA interference, co-suppression, transgene silencing, imprinting, methylation, and possibly position-effect variegation and transvection, all involve intersecting pathways based on or connected to RNA signaling. I suggest that the central dogma is incomplete, and that intronic and other non-coding RNAs have evolved to comprise a second tier of gene expression in eukaryotes, which enables the integration and networking of complex suites of gene activity. Although proteins are the fundamental effectors of cellular function, the basis of eukaryotic complexity and phenotypic variation may lie primarily in a control architecture composed of a highly parallel system of trans-acting RNAs that relay state information required for the coordination and modulation of gene expression, via chromatin remodeling, RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. This system has interesting and perhaps informative analogies with small world networks and dataflow computing.

  3. Eukaryotic transcriptomics in silico: Optimizing cDNA-AFLP efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wüst Christian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary-DNA based amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP is a commonly used tool for assessing the genetic regulation of traits through the correlation of trait expression with cDNA expression profiles. In spite of the frequent application of this method, studies on the optimization of the cDNA-AFLP assay design are rare and have typically been taxonomically restricted. Here, we model cDNA-AFLPs on all 92 eukaryotic species for which cDNA pools are currently available, using all combinations of eight restriction enzymes standard in cDNA-AFLP screens. Results In silco simulations reveal that cDNA pool coverage is largely determined by the choice of individual restriction enzymes and that, through the choice of optimal enzyme combinations, coverage can be increased from Conclusion The insights gained from in silico screening of cDNA-AFLPs from a broad sampling of eukaryotes provide a set of guidelines that should help to substantially increase the efficiency of future cDNA-AFLP experiments in eukaryotes. In silico simulations also suggest a novel use of cDNA-AFLP screens to determine the number of transcripts expressed in a target tissue, an application that should be invaluable as next-generation sequencing technologies are adapted for differential display.

  4. Evolution of networks and sequences in eukaryotic cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Frederick R; Buchler, Nicolas E; Skotheim, Jan M

    2011-12-27

    The molecular networks regulating the G1-S transition in budding yeast and mammals are strikingly similar in network structure. However, many of the individual proteins performing similar network roles appear to have unrelated amino acid sequences, suggesting either extremely rapid sequence evolution, or true polyphyly of proteins carrying out identical network roles. A yeast/mammal comparison suggests that network topology, and its associated dynamic properties, rather than regulatory proteins themselves may be the most important elements conserved through evolution. However, recent deep phylogenetic studies show that fungal and animal lineages are relatively closely related in the opisthokont branch of eukaryotes. The presence in plants of cell cycle regulators such as Rb, E2F and cyclins A and D, that appear lost in yeast, suggests cell cycle control in the last common ancestor of the eukaryotes was implemented with this set of regulatory proteins. Forward genetics in non-opisthokonts, such as plants or their green algal relatives, will provide direct information on cell cycle control in these organisms, and may elucidate the potentially more complex cell cycle control network of the last common eukaryotic ancestor.

  5. Horizontal gene acquisitions by eukaryotes as drivers of adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönknecht, Gerald; Weber, Andreas P M; Lercher, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to vertical gene transfer from parent to offspring, horizontal (or lateral) gene transfer moves genetic information between different species. Bacteria and archaea often adapt through horizontal gene transfer. Recent analyses indicate that eukaryotic genomes, too, have acquired numerous genes via horizontal transfer from prokaryotes and other lineages. Based on this we raise the hypothesis that horizontally acquired genes may have contributed more to adaptive evolution of eukaryotes than previously assumed. Current candidate sets of horizontally acquired eukaryotic genes may just be the tip of an iceberg. We have recently shown that adaptation of the thermoacidophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria to its hot, acid, toxic-metal laden, volcanic environment was facilitated by the acquisition of numerous genes from extremophile bacteria and archaea. Other recently published examples of horizontal acquisitions involved in adaptation include ice-binding proteins in marine algae, enzymes for carotenoid biosynthesis in aphids, and genes involved in fungal metabolism. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Jumping the fine LINE between species: Horizontal transfer of transposable elements in animals catalyses genome evolution Abstract. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. diArk – a resource for eukaryotic genome research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of completed eukaryotic genome sequences and cDNA projects has increased exponentially in the past few years although most of them have not been published yet. In addition, many microarray analyses yielded thousands of sequenced EST and cDNA clones. For the researcher interested in single gene analyses (from a phylogenetic, a structural biology or other perspective it is therefore important to have up-to-date knowledge about the various resources providing primary data. Description The database is built around 3 central tables: species, sequencing projects and publications. The species table contains commonly and alternatively used scientific names, common names and the complete taxonomic information. For projects the sequence type and links to species project web-sites and species homepages are stored. All publications are linked to projects. The web-interface provides comprehensive search modules with detailed options and three different views of the selected data. We have especially focused on developing an elaborate taxonomic tree search tool that allows the user to instantaneously identify e.g. the closest relative to the organism of interest. Conclusion We have developed a database, called diArk, to store, organize, and present the most relevant information about completed genome projects and EST/cDNA data from eukaryotes. Currently, diArk provides information about 415 eukaryotes, 823 sequencing projects, and 248 publications.

  7. Chromatin—a global buffer for eukaryotic gene control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Moshkin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of eukaryotic DNA is embedded into nucleosome arrays formed by DNA wrapped around a core histone octamer. Nucleosome is a fundamental repeating unit of chromatin guarding access to the genetic information. Here, I will discuss two facets of nucleosome in eukaryotic gene control. On the one hand, nucleosome acts as a regulatory unit, which controls gene switches through a set of post-translational modifications occurring on histone tails. On the other hand, global configuration of nucleosome arrays with respect to nucleosome positioning, spacing and turnover acts as a tuning parameter for all genomic functions. A “histone code” hypothesis extents the Jacob-Monod model for eukaryotic gene control; however, when considering factors capable of reconfiguring entire nucleosome array, such as ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, this model becomes limited. Global changes in nucleosome arrays will be sensed by every gene, yet the transcriptional responses might be specific and appear as gene targeted events. What determines such specificity is unclear, but it’s likely to depend on initial gene settings, such as availability of transcription factors, and on configuration of new nucleosome array state.

  8. Eukaryotic Penelope-Like Retroelements Encode Hammerhead Ribozyme Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Amelia; De la Peña, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Small self-cleaving RNAs, such as the paradigmatic Hammerhead ribozyme (HHR), have been recently found widespread in DNA genomes across all kingdoms of life. In this work, we found that new HHR variants are preserved in the ancient family of Penelope-like elements (PLEs), a group of eukaryotic retrotransposons regarded as exceptional for encoding telomerase-like retrotranscriptases and spliceosomal introns. Our bioinformatic analysis revealed not only the presence of minimalist HHRs in the two flanking repeats of PLEs but also their massive and widespread occurrence in metazoan genomes. The architecture of these ribozymes indicates that they may work as dimers, although their low self-cleavage activity in vitro suggests the requirement of other factors in vivo. In plants, however, PLEs show canonical HHRs, whereas fungi and protist PLEs encode ribozyme variants with a stable active conformation as monomers. Overall, our data confirm the connection of self-cleaving RNAs with eukaryotic retroelements and unveil these motifs as a significant fraction of the encoded information in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:25135949

  9. Mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew W; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2017-04-01

    Cellular DNA replication is initiated through the action of multiprotein complexes that recognize replication start sites in the chromosome (termed origins) and facilitate duplex DNA melting within these regions. In a typical cell cycle, initiation occurs only once per origin and each round of replication is tightly coupled to cell division. To avoid aberrant origin firing and re-replication, eukaryotes tightly regulate two events in the initiation process: loading of the replicative helicase, MCM2-7, onto chromatin by the origin recognition complex (ORC), and subsequent activation of the helicase by its incorporation into a complex known as the CMG. Recent work has begun to reveal the details of an orchestrated and sequential exchange of initiation factors on DNA that give rise to a replication-competent complex, the replisome. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that underpin eukaryotic DNA replication initiation - from selecting replication start sites to replicative helicase loading and activation - and describe how these events are often distinctly regulated across different eukaryotic model organisms.

  10. Evolution of filamentous plant pathogens: gene exchange across eukaryotic kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Dacks, Joel B; Jenkinson, Joanna M; Thornton, Christopher R; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2006-09-19

    Filamentous fungi and oomycetes are eukaryotic microorganisms that grow by producing networks of thread-like hyphae, which secrete enzymes to break down complex nutrients, such as wood and plant material, and recover the resulting simple sugars and amino acids by osmotrophy. These organisms are extremely similar in both appearance and lifestyle and include some of the most economically important plant pathogens . However, the morphological similarity of fungi and oomycetes is misleading because they represent some of the most distantly related eukaryote evolutionary groupings, and their shared osmotrophic growth habit is interpreted as being the result of convergent evolution . The fungi branch with the animals, whereas the oomycetes branch with photosynthetic algae as part of the Chromalveolata . In this report, we provide strong phylogenetic evidence that multiple horizontal gene transfers (HGT) have occurred from filamentous ascomycete fungi to the distantly related oomycetes. We also present evidence that a subset of the associated gene families was initially the product of prokaryote-to-fungi HGT. The predicted functions of the gene products associated with fungi-to-oomycete HGT suggest that this process has played a significant role in the evolution of the osmotrophic, filamentous lifestyle on two separate branches of the eukaryote tree.

  11. The first eukaryote cell: an unfinished history of contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2010-09-01

    The eukaryote cell is one of the most radical innovations in the history of life, and the circumstances of its emergence are still deeply contested. This paper will outline the recent history of attempts to reveal these origins, with special attention to the argumentative strategies used to support claims about the first eukaryote cell. I will focus on two general models of eukaryogenesis: the phagotrophy model and the syntrophy model. As their labels indicate, they are based on claims about metabolic relationships. The first foregrounds the ability to consume other organisms; the second the ability to enter into symbiotic metabolic arrangements. More importantly, however, the first model argues for the autogenous or self-generated origins of the eukaryote cell, and the second for its exogenous or externally generated origins. Framing cell evolution this way leads each model to assert different priorities in regard to cell-biological versus molecular evidence, cellular versus environmental influences, plausibility versus evolutionary probability, and irreducibility versus the continuity of cell types. My examination of these issues will conclude with broader reflections on the implications of eukaryogenesis studies for a philosophical understanding of scientific contestation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparative study on thermomechanical pulping pressate treatment using thermophilic and mesophilic sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Meiru; Liao, B Q

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study on the treatment of thermomechanical pulping (TMP) pressate was conducted under thermophilic (55 degrees C) and mesophilic (30 degrees C) temperatures to explore in-mill biological treatment, with the intention to operate under heat-efficient conditions. The experimental study involved sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated over 114 days. Receiving a total influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 3700-4100 mg L(-1), the COD removal efficiencies of 80-90% and 75-85% were achieved for the mesophilic and thermophilic SBRs, respectively, at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12 and 24h. Excellent sludge settleability (sludge volume index pulp and paper mill operation.

  13. Thermophilic anaerobes in arctic marine sediments induced to mineralize complex organic matter at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Arnosti, Carol; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-01-01

    , as well as with the addition of freeze-dried Spirulina or individual high-molecular-weight polysaccharides. During 50°C incubation experiments, Arctic thermophiles catalysed extensive mineralization of the organic matter via extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation and sulfate reduction. This high...... reactivity determined the extent of the thermophilic response. Fjord sediments with higher in situ SRR also supported higher SRR at 50°C. Amendment with Spirulina significantly increased volatile fatty acids production and SRR relative to unamended sediment in 50°C incubations. Spirulina amendment also...

  14. Kinetics of thermophilic anaerobes in fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, M; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2001-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to estimate growth kinetic constants and the concentration of "active" attached biomass in two anaerobic thermophilic reactors which contain different initial sizes of immobilized anaerobic mixed cultures and decompose distillery wastewater. This paper studies the substrate decomposition in two lab-scale fixed-bed reactors operating at batch conditions with corrugated tubes as support media. It can be demonstrated that high micro-organisms-substrate ratios favor the degradation activity of the different anaerobic cultures, allowing the stable operation without lag-phases and giving better quality in effluent. The kinetic parameters obtained--maximum specific growth rates (mu(max)), non-biodegradable substrate (S(NB)) and "active or viable biomass" concentrations (X(V0))--were obtained by applying the Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz], with COD as substrate and methane (CH4) as the main product of the anaerobic process. This method is suitable to calculate and to differentiate the main kinetic parameters of both the total anaerobic mixed culture and the methanogenic population. Comparison of experimental measured concentration of volatile attached solids (VS(att)) in both reactors with the estimated "active" biomass concentrations obtained by applying Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz] shows that a large amount of inert matter is present in the fixed-bed reactor.

  15. Origin of phagotrophic eukaryotes as social cheaters in microbial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of eukaryotic cells was one of the most dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. It is generally assumed that eukaryotes evolved later then prokaryotes by the transformation or fusion of prokaryotic lineages. However, as yet there is no consensus regarding the nature of the prokaryotic group(s ancestral to eukaryotes. Regardless of this, a hardly debatable fundamental novel characteristic of the last eukaryotic common ancestor was the ability to exploit prokaryotic biomass by the ingestion of entire cells, i.e. phagocytosis. The recent advances in our understanding of the social life of prokaryotes may help to explain the origin of this form of total exploitation. Presentation of the hypothesis Here I propose that eukaryotic cells originated in a social environment, a differentiated microbial mat or biofilm that was maintained by the cooperative action of its members. Cooperation was costly (e.g. the production of developmental signals or an extracellular matrix but yielded benefits that increased the overall fitness of the social group. I propose that eukaryotes originated as selfish cheaters that enjoyed the benefits of social aggregation but did not contribute to it themselves. The cheaters later evolved into predators that lysed other cells and eventually became professional phagotrophs. During several cycles of social aggregation and dispersal the number of cheaters was contained by a chicken game situation, i.e. reproductive success of cheaters was high when they were in low abundance but was reduced when they were over-represented. Radical changes in cell structure, including the loss of the rigid prokaryotic cell wall and the development of endomembranes, allowed the protoeukaryotes to avoid cheater control and to exploit nutrients more efficiently. Cellular changes were buffered by both the social benefits and the protective physico-chemical milieu of the interior of biofilms. Symbiosis

  16. Origin and evolution of the self-organizing cytoskeleton in the network of eukaryotic organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jékely, Gáspár

    2014-09-02

    The eukaryotic cytoskeleton evolved from prokaryotic cytomotive filaments. Prokaryotic filament systems show bewildering structural and dynamic complexity and, in many aspects, prefigure the self-organizing properties of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Here, the dynamic properties of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytoskeleton are compared, and how these relate to function and evolution of organellar networks is discussed. The evolution of new aspects of filament dynamics in eukaryotes, including severing and branching, and the advent of molecular motors converted the eukaryotic cytoskeleton into a self-organizing "active gel," the dynamics of which can only be described with computational models. Advances in modeling and comparative genomics hold promise of a better understanding of the evolution of the self-organizing cytoskeleton in early eukaryotes, and its role in the evolution of novel eukaryotic functions, such as amoeboid motility, mitosis, and ciliary swimming. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Concomitant production of cellulase and xylanase by thermophilic mould Sporotrichum thermophile in solid state fermentation and their applicability in bread making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Anju; Singh, Bijender

    2017-06-01

    Sporotrichum thermophile BJAMDU5 secreted high titres of xylanolytic and cellulolytic enzymes in solid state fermentation using mixture of wheat straw and cotton oil cake (ratio 1:1) at 45 °C, pH 5.0 after 72 h inoculated with 2.9 × 107 CFU/mL conidiospores. Supplementation of solid medium with lactose and ammonium sulphate further enhanced the production of hydrolytic enzymes. Among different surfactants studied, Tween 80 enhanced the production of all enzymes [3455 U/g DMR (dry mouldy residue), 879.26 U/g DMR, 976.28 U/g DMR and 35.10 U/g DMR for xylanase, CMCase (Carboxymethylcellulase), FPase (Filter paper activity) and β-glucosidase, respectively] as compared to other surfactants. Recycling of solid substrate reduced the production of all these enzymes after second cycle. End products analysis by TLC showed the ability of hydrolytic enzymes of S. thermophile to liberate monomeric (xylose and glucose) as well as oligomeric (xylobiose, cellobiose and higher ones) sugars. Supplementation of enzyme resulted in improved nutritional properties of the bread. Formation of oligomeric sugars by xylanase enzyme of S. thermophile BJAMDU5 make it a good candidate in food industry.

  18. A novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor system: biological stability and trace organic compound removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Cath, Tzahi Y; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-05-01

    The removal of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) by a novel membrane distillation-thermophilic bioreactor (MDBR) system was examined. Salinity build-up and the thermophilic conditions to some extent adversely impacted the performance of the bioreactor, particularly the removal of total nitrogen and recalcitrant TrOCs. While most TrOCs were well removed by the thermophilic bioreactor, compounds containing electron withdrawing functional groups in their molecular structure were recalcitrant to biological treatment and their removal efficiency by the thermophilic bioreactor was low (0-53%). However, the overall performance of the novel MDBR system with respect to the removal of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and TrOCs was high and was not significantly affected by the conditions of the bioreactor. All TrOCs investigated here were highly removed (>95%) by the MDBR system. Biodegradation, sludge adsorption, and rejection by MD contribute to the removal of TrOCs by MDBR treatment. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge for hydrogen production: Focusing on homoacetogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Zhang, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production with focus on homoacetogenesis, which mediated the consumption of H2 and CO2 for acetate production. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen yield of WAS increased...

  20. The anaerobic conversion of methanol under thermophilic conditions: pH and bicarbonate dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Villa, G.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The thermophilic (55degreesC) anaerobic conversion of methanol was studied in an unbuffered medium (pH 4 +/- 0.2) and in a phosphate buffered medium (pH 6.4 +/- 0.1), in both cases without bicarbonate addition. Our cultivated sludge consortium was unable to degrade methanol under acidic conditions.

  1. Biohydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus: Current Status and Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielen, A.A.M.; Verhaart, M.R.A.; Oost, van der J.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus is one of the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms known to date. This Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium ferments a broad spectrum of mono-, di- and polysaccharides to mainly acetate, CO2 and hydrogen. With hydrogen yields approaching the theoretical limit

  2. Distinctive properties of high hydrogen producing extreme thermophiles, Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotaga elfii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Budde, M.A.W.; Haas, de G.G.; Wal, van der F.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Growth and hydrogen production by two extreme thermophiles during sugar fermentation was investigated. In cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus grown on sucrose and Thermotoga elfii grown on glucose stoichiometries of 3.3 mol of hydrogen and 2 mol of acetate per mol C6-sugar unit were

  3. Sexual crossing of thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora heterothallica improved enzymatic degradation of sugar beet pulp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar-Pontes, Maria Victoria; Zhou, Miaomiao; van der Horst, Sjors; Theelen, Bart; de Vries, Ronald P.; van den Brink, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Background Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass requires a complex mixture of many different enzymes. Like most fungi, thermophilic Myceliophthora species therefore have a large set of enzymes targeting different linkages in plant polysaccharides. The majority of these enzymes have not been

  4. Comparison of bio-hydrogen production from hydrolyzed wheat starch by mesophilic and thermophilic dark fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakir, Ayse; Ozmihci, Serpil; Kargi, Fikret [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogen gas production potentials of acid-hydrolyzed and boiled ground wheat were compared in batch dark fermentations under mesophilic (37 C) and thermophilic (55 C) conditions. Heat-treated anaerobic sludge was used as the inoculum and the hydrolyzed ground wheat was supplemented by other nutrients. The highest cumulative hydrogen gas production (752 ml) was obtained from the acid-hydrolyzed ground wheat starch at 55 C and the lowest (112 ml) was with the boiled wheat starch within 10 days. The highest rate of hydrogen gas formation (7.42 ml H{sub 2} h{sup -1}) was obtained with the acid-hydrolyzed and the lowest (1.12 ml H{sub 2} h{sup -1}) with the boiled wheat at 55 C. The highest hydrogen gas yield (333 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} total sugar or 2.40 mol H{sub 2} mol{sup -1} glucose) and final total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentration (10.08 g L{sup -1}) were also obtained with the acid-hydrolyzed wheat under thermophilic conditions (55 C). Dark fermentation of acid-hydrolyzed ground wheat under thermophilic conditions (55 C) was proven to be more beneficial as compared to mesophilic or thermophilic fermentation of boiled (partially hydrolyzed) wheat starch. (author)

  5. Xylose fermentation to biofuels (hydrogen and ethanol) by extreme thermophilic (70 C) mixed culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenxi, Zhao; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Lu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Combined biohydrogen and bioethanol (CHE) production from xylose was achieved by an extreme thermophilic (70 degrees C) mixed culture. Effect of initial pH, xylose, peptone, FeSO4, NaHCO3, yeast extract, trace mineral salts, vitamins, and phosphate buffer concentrations on bioethanol and biohydro...

  6. Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius Thermophilic Esterase EST2's Activity in Milk and Cheese Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandrich, L.; Manco, M.; Rossie, M.; Floris, E.; Jansen-van den Bosch, T.; Smit, G.; Wouters, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the behavior of thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius in milk and cheese models. The pure enzyme was used to compare the EST2 hydrolytic activity to the activity of endogenous esterase EstA from Lactococcus lactis. The results

  7. Growth characteristics of the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum in relation to production of mushroom compost.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegant, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    Scytalidium thermophilum is an important thermophilic fungus in the production of mushroom compost. I investigated the characteristics of this organism and present a simple model with which fungal growth in compost can be described. The model is used to predict better circumstances for rapid indoor

  8. Proteogenomic Analysis of a Thermophilic Bacterial Consortium Adapted to Deconstruct Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' haeseleer, Patrik; Gladden, John M.; Allgaier, Martin; Chain, Patrick; Tringe, Susannah G.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hugenholtz, Philip; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2013-07-19

    Thermophilic bacteria are a potential source of enzymes for the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the complement of proteins used to deconstruct biomass and the specific roles of different microbial groups in thermophilic biomass deconstruction are not well-explored. Here we report on the metagenomic and proteogenomic analyses of a compost-derived bacterial consortium adapted to switchgrass at elevated temperature with high levels of glycoside hydrolase activities. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for the most abundant populations, which included composite genomes for populations closely related to sequenced strains of Thermus thermophilus and Rhodothermus marinus, and for novel populations that are related to thermophilic Paenibacilli and an uncultivated subdivision of the littlestudied Gemmatimonadetes phylum. Partial genomes were also reconstructed for a number of lower abundance thermophilic Chloroflexi populations. Identification of genes for lignocellulose processing and metabolic reconstructions suggested Rhodothermus, Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes as key groups for deconstructing biomass, and Thermus as a group that may primarily metabolize low molecular weight compounds. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of the consortium was used to identify .3000 proteins in fractionated samples from the cultures, and confirmed the importance of Paenibacillus and Gemmatimonadetes to biomass deconstruction. These studies also indicate that there are unexplored proteins with important roles in bacterial lignocellulose deconstruction.

  9. Proteomics of early and late cold shock stress on thermophilic bacterium, Thermus sp. GH5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi-Nejad, Masoumeh; Manesh, Hossein Naderi-; Khajeh, Khosro

    2011-09-06

    Thermus sp. GH5 is an aerobic thermophilic bacterium with optimal growth at 70-75°C isolated from a hot spring in Ardabil, North West province of Iran. Due to industrial and biotechnological applications of thermophils, it is very important to know more about their proteomes and metabolomes. Since thermophils live in stressful environments it will be very useful to study their survival mechanisms. There are many reports on stress induced proteins, particularly the well characterized heat shock proteins, but little is known about the functions of proteins induced after a decrease in temperature. In this study, the proteomes of the thermophilic bacterium after a temperature down shift from 75°C to 45°C for 2h and 5h were investigated. We also compared protein profiles of early and late cold shock processes to that of cells grown at 75°C and identified a set of proteins, some of which are involved in metabolic processes such as fatty acid synthesis, pentose phosphate pathway, aromatic component degradation and signal transduction. Our data showed this organism could be tolerating the stress conditions by changing its metabolism and physiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Glycolytic pathway and hydrogen yield studies of the extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Mars, A.E.; Budde, M.A.W.; Lai, M.H.; Dijkema, C.; Waard, de P.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    NMR analysis of 13C-labelling patterns showed that the Embden¿Meyerhof (EM) pathway is the main route for glycolysis in the extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus. Glucose fermentation via the EM pathway to acetate results in a theoretical yield of 4 mol of hydrogen and 2 mol of

  11. Thermal pretreatment and bioaugmentation improve methane yield of microalgal mix produced in thermophilic anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrič, Lea; Cerar, Ana; Fanedl, Lijana; Lazar, Borut; Žitnik, Miha; Logar, Romana Marinšek

    2017-08-01

    Liquid fraction produced in anaerobic digestion (AD) of biodegradable waste can be treated on-site with microalgae, which can be recycled back as substrate to the biogas plant. For this research, a pilot high rate algal pond (HRAP) was set with connections to a full scale biogas plant that enabled the use of waste heat and CO2 from a combined heat and power gen-set (CHP). The microalgal mix produced in the thermophilic anaerobic digestate supernatant was tested as a substrate for biogas production in the thermophilic AD (i.e. untreated, bioaugmented with anaerobic bacteria Clostridium thermocellum, and thermally pretreated, respectively). The methane potential of the untreated microalgal mix was low (157.5 ± 18.7 mL CH4/g VS). However, after the thermal pretreatment of the microalgae, methane production increased by 62%, while in the bioaugmentation with C. thermocellum under thermophilic conditions (T = 55 °C) it was elevated by 12%. The outcome of our pilot trial suggests that microalgae produced in the thermophilic biogas digestate represent a prospective alternative AD feedstock. At the same time, microalgae reduce the digestate nitrogen and COD to the level sufficient for the outflow to meet the quality required by the sewage system (ammonia-nitrogen max 200 mg/L, nitrite max 10 mg/L). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Desulfotomaculum thermobenzoicum subsp. thermosyntrophicum subsp. nov., a thermophilic, syntrophic, propionate-oxidizing, spore-forming bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.M.; Balk, M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    From granular sludge from a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor operated at 55 degrees C with a mixture of volatile fatty acids as feed, a novel anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, syntrophic, spore-forming bacterium, strain TPO, was enriched on propionate in co-culture with

  13. Complete genome sequence of thermophilic Bacillus smithii type strain DSM 4216T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Koehorst, Jasper J.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus smithii is a facultatively anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium able to use a variety of sugars that can be derived from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Being genetically accessible, it is a potential new host for biotechnological production of green chemicals from renewable resources. We...

  14. Moorella stamsii sp. nov., a new anaerobic thermophilic hydrogenogenic carboxydotroph isolated from digester sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, J.I.; Gelder, van A.H.; Alves, M.M.; Sousa, D.Z.; Plugge, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, thermophilic, carbon monoxide-utilizing bacterium, strain E3-O, was isolated from anaerobic sludge of a municipal solid waste digester. Cells were straight rods, 0.6 to 1µm in diameter and 2 to 3 µm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Cells formed round terminal

  15. Growth media in anaerobic fermentative processes: The underestimated potential of thermophilic fermentation and anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, A T W M; van Lier, J B; de Kreuk, M K

    Fermentation and anaerobic digestion of organic waste and wastewater is broadly studied and applied. Despite widely available results and data for these processes, comparison of the generated results in literature is difficult. Not only due to the used variety of process conditions, but also because of the many different growth media that are used. Composition of growth media can influence biogas production (rates) and lead to process instability during anaerobic digestion. To be able to compare results of the different studies reported, and to ensure nutrient limitation is not influencing observations ascribed to process dynamics and/or reaction kinetics, a standard protocol for creating a defined growth medium for anaerobic digestion and mixed culture fermentation is proposed. This paper explains the role(s) of the different macro- and micronutrients, as well as the choices for a growth medium formulation strategy. In addition, the differences in nutrient requirements between mesophilic and thermophilic systems are discussed as well as the importance of specific trace metals regarding specific conversion routes and the possible supplementary requirement of vitamins. The paper will also give some insight into the bio-availability and toxicity of trace metals. A remarkable finding is that mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes are quite comparable at their optimum temperatures. This has consequences for the trace metal requirements of thermophiles under certain conditions. Under non-limiting conditions, the trace metal requirement of thermophilic systems is about 3 times higher than for mesophilic systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Abiotic and microbiotic factors controlling biofilm formation of thermophilic spore formers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.; Metselaar, K.I.; de Boer, W.P.H.; Roeselers, G.; Moezelaar, R.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Montijn, R.; Abee, T.; Kort, R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the production of dairy concentrates is the risk of contamination by heat-resistant spores from thermophilic bacteria. In order to acquire more insight in the composition of microbial communities occurring in the dairy concentrate industry, a bar-coded 16S amplicon

  17. Influence of Thermal and Bacterial Pretreatment of Microalgae on Biogas Production in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Beti; Marinšek Logar, Romana; Panjičko, Mario; Fanedl, Lijana

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae biomass has a great potential in search for new alternative energy sources. They can be used as a substrate for the biogas production in anaerobic digestion. When using microalgae, the efficiency of this process is hampered due to the resistant cell wall. In order to accelerate the hydrolysis of cell wall and increase the efficiency of biogas production we applied two different pretreatments - biological and thermal under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. During biological pretreatment we incubated microalgae with anaerobic hydrolytic bacteria Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans Mz5T. In thermal pretreatment we incubated microalgae at 90 °C. We also tested a combined thermal and biological pretreatment in which we incubated P. xylanivorans Mz5T with thermally pretreated microalgae. Thermal pretreatment in mesophilic and thermophilic process has increased methane production by 21% and 6%, respectively. Biological pretreatment of microalgae has increased methane production by 13%, but only under thermophilic conditions (pretreatment under mesophilic conditions showed no effect on methane production). Thermal-biological pretreatment increased methane production by 12% under thermophilic conditions and by 6% under mesophilic conditions.

  18. Health burden of infections with thermophilic Campylobacter species in the Netherlands, 1990 - 1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar AH; Wit MAS de; Koningsveld R van; MGB; CIE

    2000-01-01

    Infection with thermophilic Campylobacter spp. (mainly C. jejuni) usually leads to an episode of acute gastro-enteritis, which resolves within a few days to a few weeks. Occasionally, more severe and prolonged diseases may be induced, notably Guillain-Barre syndrome, reactive arthritis or

  19. Pathways of methanol conversion in a thermophilic anaerobic (55 degrees C) sludge consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Stams, A.J.M.; Field, J.A.; Dijkema, C.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The pathway of methanol conversion by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was elucidated by recording the fate of carbon in the presence and absence of bicarbonate and specific inhibitors. Results indicated that about 50% of methanol was directly converted to methane by the methylotrophic

  20. Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass

    OpenAIRE

    Eichorst, Stephanie A.; Joshua, Chijioke; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities that deconstruct plant biomass have broad relevance in biofuel production and global carbon cycling. Biomass pretreatments reduce plant biomass recalcitrance for increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. We exploited these chemical pretreatments to study how thermophilic bacterial consortia adapt to deconstruct switchgrass (SG) biomass of various compositions. Microbial communities were adapted to untreated, ammonium fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated, and ionic-liqui...

  1. Modelling the competition between sulphate reducers and methanogens in a thermophilic methanol-fed bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Weijma, J.; Abusam, A.

    2002-01-01

    Sulphate can be removed from wastewater by means of biological anaerobic reduction to sulphide. The reduction requires the presence of a substrate that can serve as an electron donor. Methanol a suitable electron donor for sulphate reduction under thermophilic conditions. In an anaerobic system

  2. Dissecting and engineering metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Interest in thermophilic bacteria as live-cell catalysts in biofuel and biochemical industry has surged in recent years, due to their tolerance of high temperature and wide spectrum of carbon-sources that include cellulose. However their direct employment as microbial cellular factories in the highly demanding industrial conditions has been hindered by uncompetitive biofuel productivity, relatively low tolerance to solvent and osmic stresses, and limitation in genome engineering tools. In this work we review recent advances in dissecting and engineering the metabolic and regulatory networks of thermophilic bacteria for improving the traits of key interest in biofuel industry: cellulose degradation, pentose-hexose co-utilization, and tolerance of thermal, osmotic, and solvent stresses. Moreover, new technologies enabling more efficient genetic engineering of thermophiles were discussed, such as improved electroporation, ultrasound-mediated DNA delivery, as well as thermo-stable plasmids and functional selection systems. Expanded applications of such technological advancements in thermophilic microbes promise to substantiate a synthetic biology perspective, where functional parts, module, chassis, cells and consortia were modularly designed and rationally assembled for the many missions at industry and nature that demand the extraordinary talents of these extremophiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Energy transduction in the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Clostridium fervidus is exclusively coupled to sodium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPEELMANS, G; POOLMAN, B; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1993-01-01

    The thermophilic, peptidolytic, anaerobic bacterium Clostridium fervidus is unable to generate a pH gradient in the range of 5.5-8.0, which limits growth of the organism to a narrow pH range (6.3-7.7). A significant membrane potential (DELTApsi almost-equal-to -60 mV) and chemical gradient of Na+

  4. Bicarbonate dosing: a tool to performance recovery of a thermophilic methanol-fed UASB reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The thermophilic-anaerobic treatment of methanol-containing wastewater in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, was found to be quite sensitive to pH shocks, both acid and alkaline. The results of the recovery experiments of sludge exposed to an alkaline shock, indicated that the

  5. DHAP-dependent aldolases from (hyper)thermophiles: biochemistry and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcicchio, P.; Wolterink-van Loo, S.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Oost, van der J.

    2014-01-01

    Generating new carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds in an enantioselective way is one of the big challenges in organic synthesis. Aldolases are a natural tool for stereoselective C-C bond formation in a green and sustainable way. This review will focus on thermophilic aldolases in general and on

  6. Kinetics of thermophilic, anaerobic oxidation of straight and branched chain butyrate and valerate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batstone, Damien J.; Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini

    2003-01-01

    is also addressed, extending previous pure-culture and batch studies. A previously published mathematical model was modified to allow competitive uptake of i-valerate, and used to model a thermophilic manure digester operated over 180 days. The digester was periodically pulsed with straight and branched...

  7. The F- or V-Type Na+-ATPase of the Thermophilic Bacterium Clostridium fervidus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPEELMANS, G; POOLMAN, B; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    Clostridium fervidus is a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium which uses solely Na+ as a coupling ion for energy transduction. Important features of the primary Na+ pump (ATPase) that generates the sodium motive force are presented. The advantage of using a sodium rather than a proton motive force at

  8. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  9. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2-7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2-7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2-7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2-7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted.

  10. Oceanographic structure drives the assembly processes of microbial eukaryotic communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Adam; Comte, Jérôme; Babin, Marcel; Forest, Alexandre; Matsuoka, Atsushi; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Arctic Ocean microbial eukaryote phytoplankton form subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM), where much of the annual summer production occurs. This SCM is particularly persistent in the Western Arctic Ocean, which is strongly salinity stratified. The recent loss of multiyear sea ice and increased particulate-rich river discharge in the Arctic Ocean results in a greater volume of fresher water that may displace nutrient-rich saltier waters to deeper depths and decrease light penetration in areas affected by river discharge. Here, we surveyed microbial eukaryotic assemblages in the surface waters, and within and below the SCM. In most samples, we detected the pronounced SCM that usually occurs at the interface of the upper mixed layer and Pacific Summer Water (PSW). Poorly developed SCM was seen under two conditions, one above PSW and associated with a downwelling eddy, and the second in a region influenced by the Mackenzie River plume. Four phylogenetically distinct communities were identified: surface, pronounced SCM, weak SCM and a deeper community just below the SCM. Distance–decay relationships and phylogenetic structure suggested distinct ecological processes operating within these communities. In the pronounced SCM, picophytoplanktons were prevalent and community assembly was attributed to water mass history. In contrast, environmental filtering impacted the composition of the weak SCM communities, where heterotrophic Picozoa were more numerous. These results imply that displacement of Pacific waters to greater depth and increased terrigenous input may act as a control on SCM development and result in lower net summer primary production with a more heterotroph dominated eukaryotic microbial community. PMID:25325383

  11. Exploitation of eukaryotic subcellular targeting mechanisms by bacterial effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stuart W; Galán, Jorge E

    2013-05-01

    Several bacterial species have evolved specialized secretion systems to deliver bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. These effectors have the capacity to modulate host cell pathways in order to promote bacterial survival and replication. The spatial and temporal context in which the effectors exert their biochemical activities is crucial for their function. To fully understand effector function in the context of infection, we need to understand the mechanisms that lead to the precise subcellular localization of effectors following their delivery into host cells. Recent studies have shown that bacterial effectors exploit host cell machinery to accurately target their biochemical activities within the host cell.

  12. Septins and the lateral compartmentalization of eukaryotic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron, Fabrice; Barral, Yves

    2009-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells from neurons and epithelial cells to unicellular fungi frequently rely on cellular appendages such as axons, dendritic spines, cilia, and buds for their biology. The emergence and differentiation of these appendages depend on the formation of lateral diffusion barriers at their bases to insulate their membranes from the rest of the cell. Here, we review recent progress regarding the molecular mechanisms and functions of such barriers. This overview underlines the importance and conservation of septin-dependent diffusion barriers, which coordinately compartmentalize both plasmatic and internal membranes. We discuss their role in memory establishment and the control of cellular aging.

  13. Eukaryotic cells and their cell bodies: Cell Theory revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, Frantisek; Volkmann, Dieter; Barlow, Peter W

    2004-07-01

    Cell Theory, also known as cell doctrine, states that all eukaryotic organisms are composed of cells, and that cells are the smallest independent units of life. This Cell Theory has been influential in shaping the biological sciences ever since, in 1838/1839, the botanist Matthias Schleiden and the zoologist Theodore Schwann stated the principle that cells represent the elements from which all plant and animal tissues are constructed. Some 20 years later, in a famous aphorism Omnis cellula e cellula, Rudolf Virchow annunciated that all cells arise only from pre-existing cells. General acceptance of Cell Theory was finally possible only when the cellular nature of brain tissues was confirmed at the end of the 20th century. Cell Theory then rapidly turned into a more dogmatic cell doctrine, and in this form survives up to the present day. In its current version, however, the generalized Cell Theory developed for both animals and plants is unable to accommodate the supracellular nature of higher plants, which is founded upon a super-symplasm of interconnected cells into which is woven apoplasm, symplasm and super-apoplasm. Furthermore, there are numerous examples of multinucleate coenocytes and syncytia found throughout the eukaryote superkingdom posing serious problems for the current version of Cell Theory. To cope with these problems, we here review data which conform to the original proposal of Daniel Mazia that the eukaryotic cell is composed of an elemental Cell Body whose structure is smaller than the cell and which is endowed with all the basic attributes of a living entity. A complement to the Cell Body is the Cell Periphery Apparatus, which consists of the plasma membrane associated with other periphery structures. Importantly, boundary structures of the Cell Periphery Apparatus, although capable of some self-assembly, are largely produced and maintained by Cell Body activities and can be produced from it de novo. These boundary structures serve not only as

  14. Rationales and Approaches for Studying Metabolism in Eukaryotic Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Veyel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of efficient production strains is essential for the use of eukaryotic microalgae for biofuel production. Systems biology approaches including metabolite profiling on promising microalgal strains, will provide a better understanding of their metabolic networks, which is crucial for metabolic engineering efforts. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii represents a suited model system for this purpose. We give an overview to genetically amenable microalgal strains with the potential for biofuel production and provide a critical review of currently used protocols for metabolite profiling on Chlamydomonas. We provide our own experimental data to underpin the validity of the conclusions drawn.

  15. The role of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 6 in tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Wei; Li, Gui Xian; Chen, Hong Lang; Liu, Xing Yan

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 6 (eIF6) affects the maturation of 60S ribosomal subunits. Found in yeast and mammalian cells, eIF6 is primarily located in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that the dysregulated expression of eIF6 is important in several types of human cancer, including head and neck carcinoma, colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and ovarian serous adenocarcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms by which eIF6 functions d...

  16. Automatic generation of gene finders for eukaryotic species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Krogh, A.

    2006-01-01

    Background The number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes is rapidly increasing. This means that over time it will be hard to keep supplying customised gene finders for each genome. This calls for procedures to automatically generate species-specific gene finders and to re-train them as the quantity...... length distributions. The performance of each individual gene predictor on each individual genome is comparable to the best of the manually optimised species-specific gene finders. It is shown that species-specific gene finders are superior to gene finders trained on other species....

  17. Localization of checkpoint and repair proteins in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the cellular response to DNA damage depends on the type of DNA structure being recognized by the checkpoint and repair machinery. DNA ends and single-stranded DNA are hallmarks of double-strand breaks and replication stress. These two structures are recognized by distinct sets...... is largely controlled by a network of protein-protein interactions, with the Mre11 complex initiating assembly at DNA ends and replication protein A directing recruitment to single-stranded DNA. This review summarizes current knowledge on the cellular organization of DSB repair and checkpoint proteins...... focusing on budding yeast and mammalian cells....

  18. Micro-Eukaryotic Diversity in Hypolithons from Miers Valley, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don A. Cowan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of extensive and complex hypolithic communities in both cold and hot deserts has raised many questions regarding their ecology, biodiversity and relevance in terms of regional productivity. However, most hypolithic research has focused on the bacterial elements of the community. This study represents the first investigation of micro-eukaryotic communities in all three hypolith types. Here we show that Antarctic hypoliths support extensive populations of novel uncharacterized bryophyta, fungi and protists and suggest that well known producer-decomposer-predator interactions may create the necessary conditions for hypolithic productivity in Antarctic deserts.

  19. Electrostatic stabilization of a thermophilic cold shock protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, D; Schmid, F X

    2001-10-19

    The cold shock protein Bc-Csp from the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus differs from its mesophilic homolog Bs-CspB from Bacillus subtilis by 15.8 kJ mol(-1) in the Gibbs free energy of denaturation (DeltaG(D)). The two proteins vary in sequence at 12 positions but only two of them, Arg3 and Leu66 of Bc-Csp, which replace Glu3 and Glu66 of Bs-CspB, are responsible for the additional stability of Bc-Csp. These two positions are near the ends of the protein chain, but close to each other in the three-dimensional structure. The Glu3Arg exchange alone changed the stability by more than 11 kJ mol(-1). Here, we elucidated the molecular origins of the stability difference between the two proteins by a mutational analysis. Electrostatic contributions to stability were characterized by measuring the thermodynamic stabilities of many variants as a function of salt concentration. Double and triple mutant analyses indicate that the stabilization by the Glu3Arg exchange originates from three sources. Improved hydrophobic interactions of the aliphatic moiety of Arg3 contribute about 4 kJ mol(-1). Another 4 kJ mol(-1) is gained from the relief of a pairwise electrostatic repulsion between Glu3 and Glu66, as in the mesophilic protein, and 3 kJ mol(-1) originate from a general electrostatic stabilization by the positive charge of Arg3, which is not caused by a pairwise interaction. Mutations of all potential partners for an ion pair within a radius of 10 A around Arg3 had only marginal effects on stability. The Glu3-->Arg3 charge reversal thus optimizes ionic interactions at the protein surface by both local and global effects. However, it cannot convert the coulombic repulsion with another Glu residue into a corresponding attraction. Avoidance of unfavorable coulombic repulsions is probably a much simpler route to thermostability than the creation of stabilizing surface ion pairs, which can form only at the expense of conformational entropy. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Thermophilic biodegradation of BTEX by two Thermus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.I.; Taylor, R.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-20

    Two thermophilic bacteria, Thermus aquaticus ATCC 25104 and Thermus species ATCC 27978, were investigated for their abilities to degrade BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Thermus aquaticus and the Thermus sp. were grown in a nominal medium at 70 C and 60 C, respectively, and resting cell suspensions were used to study BTEX biodegradation at the same corresponding temperatures. The degradation of BTEX by these cell suspensions was measured in sealed serum bottles against controls that also displayed significant abiotic removals of BTEX under such high-temperature conditions. For T. aquaticus at a suspension density of only 1.3 {times} 10{sup 7} cells/mL and an aqueous total BTEX concentration of 2.04 mg/L (0.022 mM), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and an unresolved mixture of o- and p-xylenes were biodegraded by 10, 12, 18, 20, and 20%, respectively, after 45 days of incubation at 70 C. For the thermus sp. at a suspension density of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 7} cells/mL and an aqueous total BTEX concentration of 6.98 mg/L (0.79mM), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and the unresolved mixture of o- and p-xylenes were biodegraded by 40, 35, 32, 33, and 33%, respectively, after 45 days of incubation at 60 C. Raising the BTEX concentrations lowered the extents of biodegradation. The biodegradations of both benzene and toluene were enhanced when T. aquaticus and the thermus sp. were pregrown on catechol and o-cresol, respectively, as carbon sources. Use of [U-{sup 14}C]benzene and [ring-{sup 14}C]toluene verified that a small fraction of these two compounds was metabolized within 7 days to water-soluble products and CO{sub 2} by these nongrowing cell suspensions. Their investigation also revealed that the nominal medium can be simplified by eliminating the yeast extract and using a higher tryptone concentration (0.2%) without affecting the growth and BTEX degrading activities of these cells.

  1. Methanogenic H2 syntrophy among thermophiles: a model of metabolism, adaptation and survival in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, B. D.; Stewart, L. C.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 1 giga ton (Gt, 1015 g) of CH4 is formed globally per year from H2, CO2 and acetate through methanogenesis, largely by methanogens growing in syntrophic association with anaerobic microbes that hydrolyze and ferment biopolymers. However, our understanding of methanogenesis in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor and potential syntrophic methanogenesis at thermophilic temperatures (i.e., >50°C) is nascent. In this study, the growth of natural assemblages of thermophilic methanogens from Axial Seamount was primarily limited by H2 availability. Heterotrophs supported thermophilic methanogenesis by H2 syntrophy in microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 55°C and 80°C supplemented with tryptone only. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only heterotrophic archaea that produce H2, H2-consuming methanogens, and sulfate reducing archaea were found in 80°C tryptone microcosms from Marker 113 vent. No bacteria were found. In 55°C tryptone microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In order to model the impact of H2 syntrophy at hyperthemophilic temperatures, a co-culture was established consisting of the H2-producing hyperthermophilic heterotroph Thermococcus paralvinellae and a H2-consuming hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens. When grown alone in a chemostat, the growth rates and steady-state cell concentrations of T. paralvinellae decreased significantly when a high H2 (70 µM) background was present. H2 inhibition was ameliorated by the production of formate, but in silico modeling suggests less energetic yield for the cells. H2 syntrophy relieved H2 inhibition for both the heterotroph and the methanogenic partners. The results demonstrate that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important alternative energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  2. Stability and activity of mesophilic subtilisin E and its thermophilic homolog: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, G.; Merz, K.M. Jr.

    1999-07-28

    This report examines the origin of the high-temperature (250 K) behavior of a thermophilic mutant enzyme (labeled at 5-3H5; see Zhao and Arnold Prot. Eng. 1999, 12, 47--53) derived from subtilisin E by eight amino acid substitutions. Through the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the authors have provided molecular-level insights into how point mutations can affect protein structure and dynamics. From simulations the authors observed a reduced rmsd in several key regions, an increased overall flexibility, an increase in the number of hydrogen bonds, and an increase in the number of stabilizing interactions in the thermophilic system. It was shown that it is not a necessary requirement that thermophilic enzymes be less flexible than their mesophilic counterparts at low temperatures. However, thermophilic enzymes must retain their three-dimensional structures and flexibility at high temperatures in order to retain activity. Furthermore, the authors have been able to point out the effects of some of the single substitutions. Even if it is not possible yet to give general rules for rational protein design, the authors are able to make some predictions on how a protein should be stabilized in order to be thermophilic. In particular, the authors suggest that a promising strategy toward speeding up the design of thermally stable proteins would be to identify fluxional regions within a protein through the use of MD simulations (or suitable experiments). Presumably these regions allow for autocatalytic reactions to occur and are also involved in allowing water to gain access to the interior of the protein and initiate protein unfolding. These fluxional regions could also adversely affect the positioning of the catalytic machinery, thereby decreasing catalytic efficiency. Thus, once these locations have been identified, focused directed evolution studies could be designed that stabilize these fluxional regions.

  3. Solution Structure of Archaeoglobus fulgidis Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase(Pth2) Provides Evidence for an Extensive Conserved Family of Pth2 Enzymes in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Robert; Mirkovic, Nebojsa; Goldsmith-Fischman, Sharon; Acton, Thomas; Chiang, Yiwen; Huang, Yuanpeng; Ma, LiChung; Rajan, Paranji K.; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard; Honig, Barry; Murray, Diana; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The solution structure of protein AF2095 from the thermophilic archaea Archaeglobus fulgidis, a 123-residue (13.6 kDa) protein, has been determined by NMR methods. The structure of AF2095 is comprised of four a-helices and a mixed b-sheet consisting of four parallel and anti-parallel b-strands, where the a-helices sandwich the b-sheet. Sequence and structural comparison of AF2095 with proteins from Homo sapiens, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Sulfolobus solfataricus, reveals that AF2095 is a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth2). This structural comparison also identifies putative catalytic residues and a tRNA interaction region for AF2095. The structure of AF2095 is also similar to the structure of protein TA0108 from archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum, which is deposited in the Protein Database but not functionally annotated. The NMR structure of AF2095 has been further leveraged to obtain good quality structural models for 55 other proteins. Although earlier studies have proposed that the Pth2 protein family is restricted to archeal and eukaryotic organisms, the similarity of the AF2095 structure to human Pth2, the conservation of key active-site residues, and the good quality of the resulting homology models demonstrate a large family of homologous Pth2 proteins that are conserved in eukaryotic, archaeal and bacterial organisms, providing novel insights in the evolution of the Pth and Pth2 enzyme families.

  4. Ciliary contact interactions dominate surface scattering of swimming eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-01-22

    Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces are essential to many microbiological processes, from bacterial biofilm formation to human fertilization. However, despite their fundamental importance, relatively little is known about the physical mechanisms that govern the scattering of flagellated or ciliated cells from solid surfaces. A more detailed understanding of these interactions promises not only new biological insights into structure and dynamics of flagella and cilia but may also lead to new microfluidic techniques for controlling cell motility and microbial locomotion, with potential applications ranging from diagnostic tools to therapeutic protein synthesis and photosynthetic biofuel production. Due to fundamental differences in physiology and swimming strategies, it is an open question of whether microfluidic transport and rectification schemes that have recently been demonstrated for pusher-type microswimmers such as bacteria and sperm cells, can be transferred to puller-type algae and other motile eukaryotes, because it is not known whether long-range hydrodynamic or short-range mechanical forces dominate the surface interactions of these microorganisms. Here, using high-speed microscopic imaging, we present direct experimental evidence that the surface scattering of both mammalian sperm cells and unicellular green algae is primarily governed by direct ciliary contact interactions. Building on this insight, we predict and experimentally verify the existence of optimal microfluidic ratchets that maximize rectification of initially uniform Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suspensions. Because mechano-elastic properties of cilia are conserved across eukaryotic species, we expect that our results apply to a wide range of swimming microorganisms.

  5. Biosynthesis of selenocysteine on its tRNA in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ming Xu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine (Sec is cotranslationally inserted into protein in response to UGA codons and is the 21st amino acid in the genetic code. However, the means by which Sec is synthesized in eukaryotes is not known. Herein, comparative genomics and experimental analyses revealed that the mammalian Sec synthase (SecS is the previously identified pyridoxal phosphate-containing protein known as the soluble liver antigen. SecS required selenophosphate and O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec as substrates to generate selenocysteyl-tRNA([Ser]Sec. Moreover, it was found that Sec was synthesized on the tRNA scaffold from selenide, ATP, and serine using tRNA([Ser]Sec, seryl-tRNA synthetase, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec kinase, selenophosphate synthetase, and SecS. By identifying the pathway of Sec biosynthesis in mammals, this study not only functionally characterized SecS but also assigned the function of the O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec kinase. In addition, we found that selenophosphate synthetase 2 could synthesize monoselenophosphate in vitro but selenophosphate synthetase 1 could not. Conservation of the overall pathway of Sec biosynthesis suggests that this pathway is also active in other eukaryotes and archaea that synthesize selenoproteins.

  6. A possible mechanism for exonuclease 1-independent eukaryotic mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, Farid A.; Genschel, Jochen; Fang, Yanan; Penland, Elisabeth; Edelmann, Winfried; Modrich, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Mismatch repair contributes to genetic stability, and inactivation of the mammalian pathway leads to tumor development. Mismatch correction occurs by an excision-repair mechanism and has been shown to depend on the 5′ to 3′ hydrolytic activity exonuclease 1 (Exo1) in eukaryotic cells. However, genetic and biochemical studies have indicated that one or more Exo1-independent modes of mismatch repair also exist. We have analyzed repair of nicked circular heteroduplex DNA in extracts of Exo1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblast cells. Exo1-independent repair under these conditions is MutLα-dependent and requires functional integrity of the MutLα endonuclease metal-binding motif. In contrast to the Exo1-dependent reaction, we have been unable to detect a gapped excision intermediate in Exo1-deficient extracts when repair DNA synthesis is blocked. A possible explanation for this finding has been provided by analysis of a purified system comprised of MutSα, MutLα, replication factor C, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, replication protein A, and DNA polymerase δ that supports Exo1-independent repair in vitro. Repair in this system depends on MutLα incision of the nicked heteroduplex strand and dNTP-dependent synthesis-driven displacement of a DNA segment spanning the mismatch. Such a mechanism may account, at least in part, for the Exo1-independent repair that occurs in eukaryotic cells, and hence the modest cancer predisposition of Exo1-deficient mammalian cells. PMID:19420220

  7. MicroRNAs: The Mega Regulators in Eukaryotic Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftekhar Ahmed Baloch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs of 18-25 nucleotide (nt in length that negatively regulate their complementary messenger RNAs (mRNAs at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional level in many eukaryotic organisms. By affecting the gene regulation, miRNAs are likely to be concerned with most biological processes. Majority of the miRNA genes are found in intergenic regions or in anti-sense orientation to genes and have their own miRNA gene promoter and regulatory units. In contrast to their name and size, the miRNAs perform mega functions in eukaryotic organisms. They perform important functions in plants and animals during growth, organogenesis, transgene suppression, signaling pathway, environmental stresses, disease development and defense against the invading viruses. miRNAs are evolutionarily conserved from species to species within the same kingdom. However, there is a controversy among scientists about their conservation from animals to plants. Their conserved nature becomes an important logical tool for homologous discovery of miRNAs in other species. This review is aimed at describing some basic concepts regarding biogenesis and functions of miRNAs.

  8. Mesophilic and thermophilic activated sludge post treatment of anaerobic effluent : sludge and wastewater characterization using batch experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, J.C.T.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic pretreated paper process water was characterized in terms of readily biodegradable, slowly biodegradable, very slowly biodegradable and inert wastewater fractions under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The anaerobic pretreated paper process water contained a relatively high amount

  9. Developmental Variation of Indian Thermophilic Variety of Scuttle Fly Megaselia (Megaselia) scalaris (Loew, 1866) (Diptera: Phoridae) on Different Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakraborty, Abesh; Naskar, Atanu; Parui, Panchanan; Banerjee, Dhriti

    2016-01-01

    ...; hence their immature stages are generally used for estimation of PMI. The effect of different substrates commonly used for developmental studies was studied to analyze the variation of growth of the thermophilic variety of Megaselia (M...

  10. Probing the redox metabolism in the strictly anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, hydrogen-producing Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus using amperometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Willquist, Karin; Emnéus, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the redox metabolism in the anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, hydrogen-forming bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus were probed for the first time in vivo using mediated amperometry with ferricyanide as a thermotolerant external mediator. Clear differences in the intracellul...

  11. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter isolates from free range domestic duck (Cairina moschata) in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonga, Hezron Emmanuel; Muhairwa, A P

    2010-02-01

    Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter isolated from free-ranging ducks was determined in Morogoro Municipality, Tanzania. Ninety intestinal contents from ducks were screened for thermophilic Campylobacter using Skirrow's protocol. Of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates, 50 were tested for sensitivity to 12 antibiotics. Overall prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter was 80%. The prevalence of Campylobacter in adult ducks (91.3%) was significantly (p sodium, tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Between 20-50% of isolates were resistant to erythromycin, gentamicin, cloxacillin and amoxicillin. Norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin had lower C. jejuni resistance of 10% and 16% respectively. C. jejuni isolates from adult ducks showed significantly higher rates of resistance (p < 0.05) to most antibiotics than did duckling isolates. High prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter in ducks could be of public health significance in Morogoro municipality. The observed multidrug resistance in this study poses a threat of transfer of antibiotic resistance to human pathogens because of the close contact between ducks and human.

  12. Bacillus sp. JR3 esterase LipJ: A new mesophilic enzyme showing traces of a thermophilic past.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Ribera

    Full Text Available A search for extremophile enzymes from ancient volcanic soils in El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain allowed isolation of a microbial sporulated strain collection from which several enzymatic activities were tested. Isolates were obtained after sample cultivation under several conditions of nutrient contents and temperature. Among the bacterial isolates, supernatants from the strain designated JR3 displayed high esterase activity at temperatures ranging from 30 to 100°C, suggesting the presence of at least a hyper-thermophilic extracellular lipase. Sequence alignment of known thermophilic lipases allowed design of degenerated consensus primers for amplification and cloning of the corresponding lipase, named LipJ. However, the cloned enzyme displayed maximum activity at 30°C and pH 7, showing a different profile from that observed in supernatants of the parental strain. Sequence analysis of the cloned protein showed a pentapeptide motif -GHSMG- distinct from that of thermophilic lipases, and much closer to that of esterases. Nevertheless, the 3D structural model of LipJ displayed the same folding as that of thermophilic lipases, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. A phylogenetic study confirmed this possibility, positioning LipJ as a new member of the thermophilic family of bacterial lipases I.5. However, LipJ clusters in a clade close but separated from that of Geobacillus sp. thermophilic lipases. Comprehensive analysis of the cloned enzyme suggests a common origin of LipJ and other bacterial thermophilic lipases, and highlights the most probable divergent evolutionary pathway followed by LipJ, which during the harsh past times would have probably been a thermophilic enzyme, having lost these properties when the environment changed to more benign conditions.

  13. Network dynamics of eukaryotic LTR retroelements beyond phylogenetic trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Carlos; Muñoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Bernad, Lucia; Botella, Hector; Moya, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Background Sequencing projects have allowed diverse retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons from different eukaryotic organisms to be characterized. It is known that retroviruses and other retro-transcribing viruses evolve from LTR retrotransposons and that this whole system clusters into five families: Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia, Bel/Pao and Caulimoviridae. Phylogenetic analyses usually show that these split into multiple distinct lineages but what is yet to be understood is how deep evolution occurred in this system. Results We combined phylogenetic and graph analyses to investigate the history of LTR retroelements both as a tree and as a network. We used 268 non-redundant LTR retroelements, many of them introduced for the first time in this work, to elucidate all possible LTR retroelement phylogenetic patterns. These were superimposed over the tree of eukaryotes to investigate the dynamics of the system, at distinct evolutionary times. Next, we investigated phenotypic features such as duplication and variability of amino acid motifs, and several differences in genomic ORF organization. Using this information we characterized eight reticulate evolution markers to construct phenotypic network models. Conclusion The evolutionary history of LTR retroelements can be traced as a time-evolving network that depends on phylogenetic patterns, epigenetic host-factors and phenotypic plasticity. The Ty1/Copia and the Ty3/Gypsy families represent the oldest patterns in this network that we found mimics eukaryotic macroevolution. The emergence of the Bel/Pao, Retroviridae and Caulimoviridae families in this network can be related with distinct inflations of the Ty3/Gypsy family, at distinct evolutionary times. This suggests that Ty3/Gypsy ancestors diversified much more than their Ty1/Copia counterparts, at distinct geological eras. Consistent with the principle of preferential attachment, the connectivities among phenotypic markers, taken as network

  14. Network dynamics of eukaryotic LTR retroelements beyond phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Carlos; Muñoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Bernad, Lucia; Botella, Hector; Moya, Andrés

    2009-11-02

    Sequencing projects have allowed diverse retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons from different eukaryotic organisms to be characterized. It is known that retroviruses and other retro-transcribing viruses evolve from LTR retrotransposons and that this whole system clusters into five families: Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia, Bel/Pao and Caulimoviridae. Phylogenetic analyses usually show that these split into multiple distinct lineages but what is yet to be understood is how deep evolution occurred in this system. We combined phylogenetic and graph analyses to investigate the history of LTR retroelements both as a tree and as a network. We used 268 non-redundant LTR retroelements, many of them introduced for the first time in this work, to elucidate all possible LTR retroelement phylogenetic patterns. These were superimposed over the tree of eukaryotes to investigate the dynamics of the system, at distinct evolutionary times. Next, we investigated phenotypic features such as duplication and variability of amino acid motifs, and several differences in genomic ORF organization. Using this information we characterized eight reticulate evolution markers to construct phenotypic network models. The evolutionary history of LTR retroelements can be traced as a time-evolving network that depends on phylogenetic patterns, epigenetic host-factors and phenotypic plasticity. The Ty1/Copia and the Ty3/Gypsy families represent the oldest patterns in this network that we found mimics eukaryotic macroevolution. The emergence of the Bel/Pao, Retroviridae and Caulimoviridae families in this network can be related with distinct inflations of the Ty3/Gypsy family, at distinct evolutionary times. This suggests that Ty3/Gypsy ancestors diversified much more than their Ty1/Copia counterparts, at distinct geological eras. Consistent with the principle of preferential attachment, the connectivities among phenotypic markers, taken as network-represented combinations, are power

  15. Network dynamics of eukaryotic LTR retroelements beyond phylogenetic trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernad Lucia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing projects have allowed diverse retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons from different eukaryotic organisms to be characterized. It is known that retroviruses and other retro-transcribing viruses evolve from LTR retrotransposons and that this whole system clusters into five families: Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia, Bel/Pao and Caulimoviridae. Phylogenetic analyses usually show that these split into multiple distinct lineages but what is yet to be understood is how deep evolution occurred in this system. Results We combined phylogenetic and graph analyses to investigate the history of LTR retroelements both as a tree and as a network. We used 268 non-redundant LTR retroelements, many of them introduced for the first time in this work, to elucidate all possible LTR retroelement phylogenetic patterns. These were superimposed over the tree of eukaryotes to investigate the dynamics of the system, at distinct evolutionary times. Next, we investigated phenotypic features such as duplication and variability of amino acid motifs, and several differences in genomic ORF organization. Using this information we characterized eight reticulate evolution markers to construct phenotypic network models. Conclusion The evolutionary history of LTR retroelements can be traced as a time-evolving network that depends on phylogenetic patterns, epigenetic host-factors and phenotypic plasticity. The Ty1/Copia and the Ty3/Gypsy families represent the oldest patterns in this network that we found mimics eukaryotic macroevolution. The emergence of the Bel/Pao, Retroviridae and Caulimoviridae families in this network can be related with distinct inflations of the Ty3/Gypsy family, at distinct evolutionary times. This suggests that Ty3/Gypsy ancestors diversified much more than their Ty1/Copia counterparts, at distinct geological eras. Consistent with the principle of preferential attachment, the connectivities among phenotypic markers, taken as

  16. What can we infer about the origin of sex in early eukaryotes?

    OpenAIRE

    Speijer, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis shows that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was capable of full meiotic sex. The original eukaryotic life cycle can probably be described as clonal, interrupted by episodic sex triggered by external or internal stressors. The cycle could have started in a highly flexible form, with the interruption of either diploid or haploid clonal growth determined by stress signals only. Eukaryotic sex most likely evolved in response to a high mutation rate, arising from the upt...

  17. Novel Features of Eukaryotic Photosystem II Revealed by Its Crystal Structure Analysis from a Red Alga*

    OpenAIRE

    Ago, Hideo; Adachi, Hideyuki; Umena, Yasufumi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo; Tian, Lirong; Han, Guangye; Kuang, Tingyun; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Fangjun; Zou, Hanfa; Enami, Isao; Miyano, Masashi; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes light-induced water splitting, leading to the evolution of molecular oxygen indispensible for life on the earth. The crystal structure of PSII from cyanobacteria has been solved at an atomic level, but the structure of eukaryotic PSII has not been analyzed. Because eukaryotic PSII possesses additional subunits not found in cyanobacterial PSII, it is important to solve the structure of eukaryotic PSII to elucidate their detailed functions, as well as evolutionar...

  18. A two-host fosmid system for functional screening of (meta)genomic libraries from extreme thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Angel; Mientus, Markus; Liebl, Susanne; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2009-05-01

    A new cloning system is described, which allows the construction of large-insert fosmid libraries in Escherichia coli and the transfer of the recombinant libraries to the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus via natural transformation. Libraries are established in the thermophilic host by site-specific chromosomal insertion of the recombinant fosmids via single crossover or double crossover recombination at the T. thermophilus pyr locus. Comparative screening of a fosmid library constructed from genomic DNA from the thermophilic spirochaete, Spirochaeta thermophila, for clones expressing thermoactive xylanase activity revealed that 50% of the fosmids that conferred xylanase activity upon the corresponding T. thermophilus transformants did not give rise to xylanase-positive E. coli clones, indicating that significantly more S. thermophila genes are functionally expressed in T. thermophilus than in E. coli. The novel T. thermophilus host/vector system may be of value for the construction and functional screening of recombinant DNA libraries from individual thermophilic or extremely thermophilic organisms as well as from complex metagenomes isolated from thermophilic microbial communities.

  19. An Interactive Exercise To Learn Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Organelle Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Tomashek, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a cooperative, interactive problem-solving exercise for studying eukaryotic cell structure and function. Highlights the dynamic aspects of movement through the cell. Contains 15 references. (WRM)

  20. Distinct type I and type II toxin-antitoxin modules control Salmonella lifestyle inside eukaryotic cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Moreno-Córdoba, Inmaculada; Figueroa, Virginia; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    .... Using the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model, here we show that a selected group of TA modules impact bacterial fitness inside eukaryotic cells...

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a versatile eukaryotic system in virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breinig Tanja

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-established model system for understanding fundamental cellular processes relevant to higher eukaryotic organisms. Less known is its value for virus research, an area in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be very fruitful as well. The present review will discuss the main achievements of yeast-based studies in basic and applied virus research. These include the analysis of the function of individual proteins from important pathogenic viruses, the elucidation of key processes in viral replication through the development of systems that allow the replication of higher eukayotic viruses in yeast, and the use of yeast in antiviral drug development and vaccine production.

  2. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  3. Unicellular cyanobacterium symbiotic with a single-celled eukaryotic alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Anne W; Foster, Rachel A; Krupke, Andreas; Carter, Brandon J; Musat, Niculina; Vaulot, Daniel; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-09-21

    Symbioses between nitrogen (N)(2)-fixing prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes are important for nitrogen acquisition in N-limited environments. Recently, a widely distributed planktonic uncultured nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium (UCYN-A) was found to have unprecedented genome reduction, including the lack of oxygen-evolving photosystem II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which suggested partnership in a symbiosis. We showed that UCYN-A has a symbiotic association with a unicellular prymnesiophyte, closely related to calcifying taxa present in the fossil record. The partnership is mutualistic, because the prymnesiophyte receives fixed N in exchange for transferring fixed carbon to UCYN-A. This unusual partnership between a cyanobacterium and a unicellular alga is a model for symbiosis and is analogous to plastid and organismal evolution, and if calcifying, may have important implications for past and present oceanic N(2) fixation.

  4. Substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Pooja; Jayasinghe, Manori; Stan, George

    2009-03-01

    Chaperonins are double ring-shaped biological nanomachines that assist protein folding. Spectacular conformational changes take place within each chaperonin ring using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. These changes result in transitions from the open to the closed ring. Substrate proteins bind to the open ring and are encapsulated within the closed ring cavity. We focus on the substrate protein recognition mechanism of archaeal and eukaryotic chaperonins. We predict substrate protein binding sites using structural and bioinformatic analyses of functional states during the chaperonin cycle. Based on large changes in solvent accessible surface area and contact maps we glean the functional role of chaperonin amino acids. During the transition between open to closed chaperonin ring, the largest change in accessible surface area of amino acids is found in helical protrusion and two helices located at the cavity opening. Our calculations suggest that the helical protrusion and two helices constitute the substrate protein binding site.

  5. Pi sensing and signalling: from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wanjun; Baldwin, Stephen A; Muench, Stephen P; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Phosphorus is one of the most important macronutrients and is indispensable for all organisms as a critical structural component as well as participating in intracellular signalling and energy metabolism. Sensing and signalling of phosphate (Pi) has been extensively studied and is well understood in single-cellular organisms like bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae In comparison, the mechanism of Pi regulation in plants is less well understood despite recent advances in this area. In most soils the available Pi limits crop yield, therefore a clearer understanding of the molecular basis underlying Pi sensing and signalling is of great importance for the development of plants with improved Pi use efficiency. This mini-review compares some of the main Pi regulation pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and identifies similarities and differences among different organisms, as well as providing some insight into future research. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Ancient photosynthetic eukaryote biofilms in an Atacama Desert coastal cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azua-Bustos, A.; Gonzalez-Silva, C.; Mancilla, R.A.; Salas, L.; Palma, R.E.; Wynne, J.J.; McKay, C.P.; Vicuna, R.

    2009-01-01

    Caves offer a stable and protected environment from harsh and changing outside prevailing conditions. Hence, they represent an interesting habitat for studying life in extreme environments. Here, we report the presence of a member of the ancient eukaryote red algae Cyanidium group in a coastal cave of the hyperarid Atacama Desert. This microorganism was found to form a seemingly monospecific biofilm growing under extremely low photon flux levels. Our work suggests that this species, Cyanidium sp. Atacama, is a new member of a recently proposed novel monophyletic lineage of mesophilic "cave" Cyanidium sp., distinct from the remaining three other lineages which are all thermo-acidophilic. The cave described in this work may represent an evolutionary island for life in the midst of the Atacama Desert. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009.

  7. Structure of a eukaryotic SWEET transporter in a homotrimeric complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuyong; Cheung, Lily S; Li, Shuo; Eom, Joon-Seob; Chen, Li-Qing; Xu, Yan; Perry, Kay; Frommer, Wolf B; Feng, Liang

    2015-11-12

    Eukaryotes rely on efficient distribution of energy and carbon skeletons between organs in the form of sugars. Glucose in animals and sucrose in plants serve as the dominant distribution forms. Cellular sugar uptake and release require vesicular and/or plasma membrane transport proteins. Humans and plants use proteins from three superfamilies for sugar translocation: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the sodium solute symporter family (SSF; only in the animal kingdom), and SWEETs. SWEETs carry mono- and disaccharides across vacuolar or plasma membranes. Plant SWEETs play key roles in sugar translocation between compartments, cells, and organs, notably in nectar secretion, phloem loading for long distance translocation, pollen nutrition, and seed filling. Plant SWEETs cause pathogen susceptibility possibly by sugar leakage from infected cells. The vacuolar Arabidopsis thaliana AtSWEET2 sequesters sugars in root vacuoles; loss-of-function mutants show increased susceptibility to Pythium infection. Here we show that its orthologue, the vacuolar glucose transporter OsSWEET2b from rice (Oryza sativa), consists of an asymmetrical pair of triple-helix bundles, connected by an inversion linker transmembrane helix (TM4) to create the translocation pathway. Structural and biochemical analyses show OsSWEET2b in an apparent inward (cytosolic) open state forming homomeric trimers. TM4 tightly interacts with the first triple-helix bundle within a protomer and mediates key contacts among protomers. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the close paralogue SWEET1 from Arabidopsis identified key residues in substrate translocation and protomer crosstalk. Insights into the structure-function relationship of SWEETs are valuable for understanding the transport mechanism of eukaryotic SWEETs and may be useful for engineering sugar flux.

  8. Cryoconite pans on Snowball Earth: supraglacial oases for Cryogenian eukaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P F

    2016-11-01

    Geochemical, paleomagnetic, and geochronological data increasingly support the Snowball Earth hypothesis for Cryogenian glaciations. Yet, the fossil record reveals no clear-cut evolutionary bottleneck. Climate models and the modern cryobiosphere offer insights on this paradox. Recent modeling implies that Snowball continents never lacked ice-free areas. Wind-blown dust from these areas plus volcanic ash were trapped by snow on ice sheets and sea ice. At a Snowball onset, sea ice was too thin to flow and ablative ice was too cold for dust retention. After a few millenia, sea ice reached 100 s of meters in thickness and began to flow as a 'sea glacier' toward an equatorial ablation zone. At first, dust advected to the ablative surface was recycled by winds, but as the surface warmed with rising CO2 , dust aka cryoconite began to accumulate. As a sea glacier has no terminus, cryoconite saturated the surface. It absorbed solar radiation, supported cyanobacterial growth, and sank to an equilibrium depth forming holes and decameter-scale pans of meltwater. As meltwater production rose, drainages developed, connecting pans to moulins, where meltwater was flushed into the subglacial ocean. Flushing cleansed the surface, creating a stabilizing feedback. If the dust flux rose, cryoconite was removed; if the dust flux waned, cryoconite accumulated. In addition to cyanobacteria, modern cryoconite holes are inhabited by green algae, fungi, protists, and certain metazoans. On Snowball Earth, cryoconite pans provided stable interconnected habitats for eukaryotes tolerant of fresh to brackish cold water on an ablation surface 60 million km2 in area. Flushing and burial of organic matter was a potential source of atmospheric oxygen. Dominance of green algae among Ediacaran eukaryotic primary producers is a possible legacy of Cryogenian cryoconite pans, but a schizohaline ocean-supraglacial freshwater and subglacial brine-may have exerted selective stress on early metazoans, or

  9. Structural and evolutionary divergence of eukaryotic protein kinases in Apicomplexa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talevich Eric

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Apicomplexa constitute an evolutionarily divergent phylum of protozoan pathogens responsible for widespread parasitic diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. Many cellular functions in these medically important organisms are controlled by protein kinases, which have emerged as promising drug targets for parasitic diseases. However, an incomplete understanding of how apicomplexan kinases structurally and mechanistically differ from their host counterparts has hindered drug development efforts to target parasite kinases. Results We used the wealth of sequence data recently made available for 15 apicomplexan species to identify the kinome of each species and quantify the evolutionary constraints imposed on each family of apicomplexan kinases. Our analysis revealed lineage-specific adaptations in selected families, namely cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK and CLK/LAMMER, which have been identified as important in the pathogenesis of these organisms. Bayesian analysis of selective constraints imposed on these families identified the sequence and structural features that most distinguish apicomplexan protein kinases from their homologs in model organisms and other eukaryotes. In particular, in a subfamily of CDKs orthologous to Plasmodium falciparum crk-5, the activation loop contains a novel PTxC motif which is absent from all CDKs outside Apicomplexa. Our analysis also suggests a convergent mode of regulation in a subset of apicomplexan CDPKs and mammalian MAPKs involving a commonly conserved arginine in the αC helix. In all recognized apicomplexan CLKs, we find a set of co-conserved residues involved in substrate recognition and docking that are distinct from metazoan CLKs. Conclusions We pinpoint key conserved residues that can be predicted to mediate functional differences from eukaryotic homologs in three identified kinase families. We discuss the structural, functional and

  10. The language of methylation in genomics of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, P

    2005-05-01

    Background studies have shown that 6-methylaminopurine (m6A) and 5-methylcytosine (m5C), detected in DNA, are products of its post-synthetic modification. At variance with bacterial genomes exhibiting both, eukaryotic genomes essentially carry only m5C in m5CpG doublets. This served to establish that, although a slight extra-S phase asymmetric methylation occurs de novo on 5'-CpC-3'/3'GpG-5', 5'-CpT-3'/3'-GpA-5', and 5'-CpA-3'/3'-GpT-5' dinucleotide pairs, a heavy methylation during S involves Okazaki fragments and thus semiconservatively newly made chains to guarantee genetic maintenance of -CH3 patterns in symmetrically dimethylated 5'-m5CpG-3'/3'-Gpm5C-5' dinucleotide pairs. On the other hand, whilst inverse correlation was observed between bulk DNA methylation, in S, and bulk RNA transcription, in G1 and G2, probes of methylated DNA helped to discover the presence of coding (exon) and uncoding (intron) sequences in the eukaryotic gene. These achievements led to the search for a language that genes regulated by methylation should have in common. Such a deciphering, initially providing restriction minimaps of hypermethylatable promoters and introns vs. hypomethylable exons, became feasible when bisulfite methodology allowed the direct sequencing of m5C. It emerged that, while in lymphocytes, where the transglutaminase gene (hTGc) is inactive, the promoter shows two fully methylated CpG-rich domains at 5 and one fully unmethylated CpG-rich domain at 3' (including the site +1 and a 5'-UTR), in HUVEC cells, where hTGc is active, in the first CpG-rich domain of its promoter four CpGs lack -CH3: a result suggesting new hypotheses on the mechanism of transcription, particularly in connection with radio-induced DNA demethylation.

  11. Why use a thermophilic aerobic membrane reactor for the treatment of industrial wastewater/liquid waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Abbà, Alessandro; Bertanza, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of thermophilic aerobic membrane reactor (TAMR) for the treatment of high strength wastewaters. The results were obtained from the monitoring of an industrial and a pilot scale plant. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal yield was equal to 78% with an organic loading rate (OLR) up to 8-10 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) despite significant scattering of the influent wastewater composition. Total phosphorus (TP) was removed with a rate of 90%, the most important removal mechanism being chemical precipitation (as hydroxyapatite, especially), which is improved by the continuous aeration that promotes phosphorus crystallization. Moreover, surfactants were removed with efficiency between 93% and 97%. Finally, the experimental work showed that thermophilic processes (TPPs) are complementary with respect to mesophilic treatments.

  12. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of poultry litter and thin stillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Huber, David H

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the performance of a thermophilic CSTR digester that has been stabilized on poultry litter will be enhanced or diminished by the addition of thin stillage as co-substrate. Replicate laboratory digesters, derived from a stable pilot-scale digester, were operated with increasing ratios (w/w) of thin stillage/poultry litter feedstock. After a period of adaptation to 20% and 40% thin stillage, digester performance showed increases in biogas, percent methane and COD removal, as well as a decrease in volatile acids. Peak performance occurred with 60% thin stillage. However, 80% thin stillage caused significant reduction of performance, including declines of methanogenic activity and COD removal. In conclusion, supplementing the thermophilic digestion of poultry litter with thin stillage improved the bioenergy (methane) output, but thin stillage became inhibitory at high concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High ethanol tolerance of the thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producer Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    The low ethanol tolerance of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria, generally less than 2% (v/v) ethanol, is one of the main limiting factors for their potential use for second generation fuel ethanol production. In this work, the tolerance of thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG 1L1...... to exogenously added ethanol was studied in a continuous immobilized reactor system at a growth temperature of 70 degrees C. Ethanol tolerance was evaluated based on inhibition of fermentative performance e.g.. inhibition of substrate conversion. At the highest ethanol concentration tested (8.3% v/v), the strain...... was able to convert 42% of the xylose initially present, indicating that this ethanol concentration is not the upper limit tolerated by the strain. Long-term strain adaptation to high ethanol concentrations (6 - 8.3%) resulted in an improvement of xylose conversion by 25% at an ethanol concentration of 5...

  14. Strategies for recovering inhibition caused by long chain fatty acids on anaerobic thermophilic biogas reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palatsi, J.; Laureni, M.; Andres, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) concentrations over 1.0 g L1 were inhibiting manure thermophilic digestion, in batch and semi-continuous experiments, resulting in a temporary cease of the biogas production. The aim of the work was to test and evaluate several recovery actions, such as reactor feedi...... inhibition in manure anaerobic co-digestion. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved......Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) concentrations over 1.0 g L1 were inhibiting manure thermophilic digestion, in batch and semi-continuous experiments, resulting in a temporary cease of the biogas production. The aim of the work was to test and evaluate several recovery actions, such as reactor feeding...... and reducing the bioavailable LCFA concentration, were found to be the best recovery strategies, improving the recovery time from 10 to 2 days, in semi-continuously fed systems. Moreover, acclimatization was introduced by repeated inhibition and process recovery. The subsequent exposure of the anaerobic...

  15. In vivo and in vitro protein imaging in thermophilic archaea by exploiting a novel protein tag

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visone, Valeria; Han, Wenyuan; Perugino, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    , and measure protein activity and kinetics in living cells. Whereas several tags are suitable for protein imaging in mesophilic organisms, the application of this approach to microorganisms living at high temperature has lagged behind. Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding basic cell......, and allowed visualization of the enzyme in living cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo imaging of any protein of a thermophilic archaeon, filling an important gap in available tools for cell biology studies in these organisms....... to production of a functional H5 protein, which was successfully labeled with appropriate fluorescent molecules and visualized in cell extracts as well as in Δogt live cells. H5 was fused to reverse gyrase, a peculiar thermophile-specific DNA topoisomerase endowed with positive supercoiling activity...

  16. Ammonia inhibition on hydrogen enriched anaerobic digestion of manure under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    to be sensitive to ammonia. In this study, the tolerance of the biogas process under supply of hydrogen, to ammonia toxicity was studied under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. When the initial hydrogen partial pressure was 0.5 atm, the methane yield at high ammonia load (7 g NH4+-N L−1) was 41.0% and 22.......3% lower than that at low ammonia load (1 g NH4+-N L−1) in mesophilic and thermophilic condition, respectively. Meanwhile no significant effect on the biogas composition was observed. Moreover, we found that hydrogentrophic methanogens were more tolerant to the ammonia toxicity than acetoclastic...... more tolerant to high ammonia levels (≥5 g NH4+-N L−1), compared with mesophilic methanogens. The present study offers insight in developing resistant hydrogen enriched biogas production and upgrading processes treating ammonia-rich waste streams....

  17. Structure and flexibility of the thermophilic cold-shock protein of Thermus aquaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bonghwan; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Kim, Yangmee

    2014-08-29

    The thermophilic bacterium Thermus aquaticus is a well-known source of Taq polymerase. Here, we studied the structure and dynamics of the T. aquaticus cold-shock protein (Ta-Csp) to better understand its thermostability using NMR spectroscopy. We found that Ta-Csp has a five-stranded β-barrel structure with five salt bridges which are important for more rigid structure and a higher melting temperature (76 °C) of Ta-Csp compared to mesophilic and psychrophilic Csps. Microsecond to millisecond time scale exchange processes occur only at the β1-β2 surface region of the nucleic acid binding site with an average conformational exchange rate constant of 674 s(-1). The results imply that thermophilic Ta-Csp has a more rigid structure and may not need high structural flexibility to accommodate nucleic acids upon cold shock compared to its mesophile and psychrophile counterparts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effect of substrate concentration on pathogen indicators inactivation during thermophilic anaerobic digestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong-Qing; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Li, Jian; Tong, Zi-Lin; Hu, Zhen-Hu

    2014-03-01

    Because excess sludge contains high density of pathogens, it has to be treated to reduce pathogens before being disposed for land application. In this study, the effect of substrate concentration on pathogen inactivation during thermophilic anaerobic digestion was investigated. The results show that, with the increase of substrate concentration, VFAs and cumulative methane production increased. The density of total coliforms in the suspension liquid has a 2.0-3.0 orders of magnitude decline and fecal coliforms has 1.8-3.3 orders of magnitude decline after 28 days thermophilic anaerobic digestion at substrate concentration of 28-84 g x L(-1) and temperature of 55 degrees C. More than 99% of total coliforms and fecal coliforms have been killed after 28 days digestion. Salmonella spp. was not detected in the suspension and solid after anaerobic digestion. When substrate concentration was higher than 45 g x L(-1), the inactivation of total coliforms and fecal coliforms declined.

  19. Action of amylolytic and pullulytic enzymes from various anaerobic thermophiles on linear and branched glucose polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, R. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie); Antranikian, G. (Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany, F.R.). Arbeitsbereich Biotechnologie 1)

    1990-10-01

    A detailed study has been conducted on the action of starch hydrolyzing enzymes from thermophilic anaerobic bacteria belonging to the genera Clostridium, Thermoanaerobacter and Thermobacteroides. The appearance of multiple bands on polyacrylamide gels with amylolytic as well as pullulytic activities was shown to be a general feature of bacteria investigated. Analysis of the hydrolysis products of each protein band clearly demonstrated the capability of these organisms to hydrolyze {alpha}-1,4-glycosidic bonds in linear oligosaccharides and {alpha}-1,6-glycosidic linkages in pullulan. Furthermore, the enzyme system of thermophilic bacteria investigated was also capable of attacking in the {alpha}-1,6-linkages in branched oligosaccharides. Due to the action of these thermoactive enzymes with multiple specificity an almost complete hydrolysis of raw starch and maltodextrin could be achieved under the same conditions and in one step. (orig.).

  20. Identification of a component of crystalline egg albumin bactericidal for thermophilic aerobic sporeformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, D H; Wilson, A A; Evancho, G M

    1975-11-01

    During an investigation of the effect of basic and acidic proteins on the growth of thermophilic aerobic sporeformers, crystalline egg albumin was found to be strongly bactericidal. This finding was uncharacteristic of acidic proteins. The bactericidal fraction was heat sensitive and separated from the non-bactericidal albumin fraction during gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. Cells of Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Bacillus stearothermophilus were lysed rapidly by the bactericidal component, leading to its tentative identification as lysozyme. The bactericidal substance possessed an electrophoretic mobility on polyacrylamide gel containing sodium dodecyl sulfate identical to that of crystalline egg white lysozyme. Users of crystalline egg albumin are cautioned that commerical preparations may be contaminated with lysozyme. Destruction of the thermophilic aerobes by lysozyme should be considered when performing counts on egg products.

  1. Error-reducing Structure of the Genetic Code Indicates Code Origin in Non-thermophile Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Kempf, Achim

    2008-02-01

    During the RNA World, organisms experienced high rates of genetic errors, which implies that there was strong evolutionary pressure to reduce the errors’ phenotypical impact by suitably structuring the still-evolving genetic code. Therefore, the relative rates of the various types of genetic errors should have left characteristic imprints in the structure of the genetic code. Here, we show that, therefore, it is possible to some extent to reconstruct those error rates, as well as the nucleotide frequencies, for the time when the code was fixed. We find evidence indicating that the frequencies of G and C in the genome were not elevated. Since, for thermodynamic reasons, RNA in thermophiles tends to possess elevated G+C content, this result indicates that the fixation of the genetic code occurred in organisms which were either not thermophiles or that the code’s fixation occurred after the rise of DNA.

  2. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Progress report, May 15, 1989--May 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.H.

    1993-06-01

    The primary goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of thermophilic microorganisms which convert acetic acid to CH{sub 4}. The previous funding period represents a departure from earlier research in this laboratory, which was more physiological and ecological. The present work is centered on the biochemistry of the thermophile Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. this organism presents a unique opportunity, with its purity and relatively rapid growth, to do comparative biochemical studies with the other major acetotrophic genus Methanosarcina. We previously found that Methanothrix is capable of using acetate at concentrations 100 fold lower than Methanosarcina. This finding suggests that there are significant differences in the pathways of methanogenesis from acetate in the two genera.

  3. Novel Anoxybacillus flavithermus AK1: A Thermophile Isolated from a Hot Spring in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Khalil, Amjad

    2017-06-14

    Anoxybacillus flavithermus AK1 is a thermophilic bacterium that is able to survive at temperatures ranging from 55 to 60∘C. The AK1 strain was isolated from the hot spring “Al-Ain Alhara” located at a distance of 50 km southeast of the city of Gazan, Saudi Arabia. This study presents the morphological characterization of A. flavithermus AK1, including a detailed description of its complete genome sequence. A total of 50 contigs were used to produce a genome sequence of 2,630,664 bp that includes 2724 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA genes, 18 of which are rRNA genes. A comparison of this genome sequence with those of Anoxybacillus flavithermus strains that were previously submitted to NCBI revealed that the AK1 strain has the smallest genome size with the highest GC content. The strain can therefore be exploited for several biotechnological applications based on its high thermophilic potential.

  4. RNase MRP and the RNA processing cascade in the eukaryotic ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Michael D; Stadler, Peter F; Penny, David; Collins, Lesley J

    2007-02-08

    Within eukaryotes there is a complex cascade of RNA-based macromolecules that process other RNA molecules, especially mRNA, tRNA and rRNA. An example is RNase MRP processing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome biogenesis. One hypothesis is that this complexity was present early in eukaryotic evolution; an alternative is that an initial simpler network later gained complexity by gene duplication in lineages that led to animals, fungi and plants. Recently there has been a rapid increase in support for the complexity-early theory because the vast majority of these RNA-processing reactions are found throughout eukaryotes, and thus were likely to be present in the last common ancestor of living eukaryotes, herein called the Eukaryotic Ancestor. We present an overview of the RNA processing cascade in the Eukaryotic Ancestor and investigate in particular, RNase MRP which was previously thought to have evolved later in eukaryotes due to its apparent limited distribution in fungi and animals and plants. Recent publications, as well as our own genomic searches, find previously unknown RNase MRP RNAs, indicating that RNase MRP has a wide distribution in eukaryotes. Combining secondary structure and promoter region analysis of RNAs for RNase MRP, along with analysis of the target substrate (rRNA), allows us to discuss this distribution in the light of eukaryotic evolution. We conclude that RNase MRP can now be placed in the RNA-processing cascade of the Eukaryotic Ancestor, highlighting the complexity of RNA-processing in early eukaryotes. Promoter analyses of MRP-RNA suggest that regulation of the critical processes of rRNA cleavage can vary, showing that even these key cellular processes (for which we expect high conservation) show some species-specific variability. We present our consensus MRP-RNA secondary structure as a useful model for further searches.

  5. Diversity of Bacteria and Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 48 Genes in Cellulolytic Consortia Enriched from Thermophilic Biocompost▿

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo, Javier A.; Sizova, Maria V.; Lee R Lynd

    2010-01-01

    The enrichment from nature of novel microbial communities with high cellulolytic activity is useful in the identification of novel organisms and novel functions that enhance the fundamental understanding of microbial cellulose degradation. In this work we identify predominant organisms in three cellulolytic enrichment cultures with thermophilic compost as an inoculum. Community structure based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries featured extensive representation of clostridia from cluster III, w...

  6. Cellulose- and Xylan-Degrading Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacteria from Biocompost ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Sizova, M. V.; Izquierdo, J A.; Panikov, N. S.; Lynd, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    Nine thermophilic cellulolytic clostridial isolates and four other noncellulolytic bacterial isolates were isolated from self-heated biocompost via preliminary enrichment culture on microcrystalline cellulose. All cellulolytic isolates grew vigorously on cellulose, with the formation of either ethanol and acetate or acetate and formate as principal fermentation products as well as lactate and glycerol as minor products. In addition, two out of nine cellulolytic strains were able to utilize xy...

  7. Effect of sulfate on methanol degradation in thermophilic (55 oC) methanogenic UASB reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallero, M.V.G.; Lens, P.N.L.; Paulo, P.L.; Trevino, R.H.M.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A thermophilic (55 degreesC) lab-scale (0.921) methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor (pH 7.0 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 7.5 h) was operated at chemical oxygen demand (COD) to sulfate (SO42-) ratios of 10, 5 and 0.5 during 155 days to evaluate the effects of the presence

  8. Thermophilic composting – a hygienization method of source-separated faecal toilet waste

    OpenAIRE

    Holmkvist, A; Møller, J; Dalsgaard, A

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the sanitizing effect of thermophilic composting of faecal material from urine diverting toilets as a function of temperature and exposure-time. Methods and Results: A composting lab with reactors imitating centralized in-vessel composting systems was used. The elimination of indicator organisms was investigated at temperatures between 50 and 65C. Salmonella serotype Senftenberg 775W and thermotolerant coliforms were rapidly inactivated during less than one day at all te...

  9. Converting mesophilic upflow sludge blanket (UASB) reactors to thermophilic by applying axenic methanogenic culture bioaugmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis G.

    2018-01-01

    The application of thermophilic conditions in anaerobic digesters leads to higher methane production rates and better sanitation of the effluents compared to mesophilic operation. However, an increase in operational temperature is challenging due to the tremendous selective pressure imposed...... be encapsulated in granular structures and concomitantly promote the growth of syntrophic fatty acid oxidizing bacteria. The results derived from the current study indicated that microbial community manipulation is an efficient alternative method to speed up transition of UASB reactors from mesophilic...

  10. Microbial community structure and dynamics in thermophilic composting viewed through metagenomics and metatranscriptomics

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Principal Antunes; Layla Farage Martins; Roberta Verciano Pereira; Andrew Maltez Thomas; Deibs Barbosa; Leandro Nascimento Lemos; Gianluca Major Machado Silva; Livia Maria Silva Moura; George Willian Condomitti Epamino; Luciano Antonio Digiampietri; Karen Cristina Lombardi; Patricia Locosque Ramos; Ronaldo Bento Quaggio; Julio Cezar Franco de Oliveira; Renata Castiglioni Pascon

    2016-01-01

    Composting is a promising source of new organisms and thermostable enzymes that may be helpful in environmental management and industrial processes. Here we present results of metagenomic- and metatranscriptomic-based analyses of a large composting operation in the S?o Paulo Zoo Park. This composting exhibits a sustained thermophilic profile (50??C to 75??C), which seems to preclude fungal activity. The main novelty of our study is the combination of time-series sampling with shotgun DNA, 16S...

  11. Inactivation of Ascaris suum and poliovirus in biosolids under thermophilic anaerobic digestion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Michael D; Sobsey, Mark D; Blauth, Kimberly E; Shehee, Mina; Crunk, Phillip L; Walters, Glenn W

    2005-08-01

    There is considerable interest in the United States in production of Class A (low pathogen content) biosolids from the treatment of municipal wastewater sludge. Current requirements imposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency make it difficult for thermophilic anaerobic digestion, in its simplest process configurations, to achieve Class A status. In particular, the time-temperature requirements necessitate long batch treatment times at temperatures associated with thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The time-temperature requirements are meant to ensure extensive inactivation of helminth eggs and enteric viruses, considered to be the most heat-resistant of the relevant pathogen classes. However, data on inactivation kinetics of these pathogens at precisely controlled and well-characterized temperatures are scarce. We measured inactivation of vaccine-strain poliovirus and eggs from the helminth Ascaris suum at temperatures from 49 to 55 degrees C in a lab-scale batch reactor containing biosolids from a continuous-flow thermophilic anaerobic digester. Both microbes were inactivated rapidly, with Ascaris more resistant to inactivation than poliovirus, and the relationships between inactivation rate and temperature were steep. The Arrhenius correlation between inactivation rate and temperature over the range 49-53 degrees C is consistent with protein denaturation as the inactivation mechanism for both microbes. The least stringent of the EPA time-temperature equations for thermal processes requires batch treatment times more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than would be required for three-log reduction of Ascaris at the rates we measured, suggesting an overly conservative regulatory approach. Such a grossly conservative approach can hinder full-scale implementation of thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

  12. Comparing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chicken manure: Microbial community dynamics and process resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Qigui; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Tohoku University, 6-6-06 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Li, Yu-You, E-mail: yyli@epl1.civil.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Tohoku University, 6-6-06 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Key Lab of Northwest Water Resource, Environment and Ecology, MOE, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S{sub in} in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Thermophilic Bacterium Schleiferia thermophila Strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Ramaley, Robert F; Schuster, Stephan C; Steinke, Laurey; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-08-28

    The draft genome sequence of the moderately thermophilic bacterium Schleiferia thermophila strain Yellowstone (Bacteroidetes), isolated from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 2,617,694 bp in 35 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 2,457 protein coding genes and 37 tRNA encoding genes and two rRNA operons. Copyright © 2014 Thiel et al.

  14. Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses using a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses by a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process was investigated in a series of two up‐flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The first reactor that was dominated with hydrogen‐producing bacteria of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharo...... molasses. Furthermore, the mixed gas with a volumetric content of 16.5% H2, 38.7% CO2, and 44.8% CH4, containing approximately 15% energy by hydrogen is viable to be bio‐hythane....

  15. Screening of thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi aiming β-xylosidase and arabinanase production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, Vivian Machado; de Lucas, Rosymar Coutinho; Jorge, João Atílio; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes Teixeira de Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell wall is mainly composed by cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The heterogeneous structure and composition of the hemicellulose are key impediments to its depolymerization and subsequent use in fermentation processes. Thus, this study aimed to perform a screening of thermophilic and thermotolerant filamentous fungi collected from different regions of the São Paulo state, and analyze the production of β-xylosidase and arabinanase at different temperatures. These enzymes are important to cell wall degradation and synthesis of end products as xylose and arabinose, respectively, which are significant sugars to fermentation and ethanol production. A total of 12 fungal species were analyzed and 9 of them grew at 45 °C, suggesting a thermophilic or thermotolerant character. Additionally Aspergillus thermomutatus anamorph of Neosartorya and A. parasiticus grew at 50 °C. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus thermomutatus were the filamentous fungi with the most expressive production of β-xylosidase and arabinanase, respectively. In general for most of the tested microorganisms, β-xylosidase and arabinanase activities from mycelial extract (intracellular form) were higher in cultures grown at high temperatures (35–40 °C), while the correspondent extracellular activities were favorably secreted from cultures at 30 °C. This study contributes to catalogue isolated fungi of the state of São Paulo, and these findings could be promising sources for thermophilic and thermotolerant microorganisms, which are industrially important due to their enzymes. PMID:25763055

  16. Fecal coliform population dynamics associated with the thermophilic stabilization of treated sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Chris; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-10-26

    The inactivation of fecal coliforms in anaerobic batch reactors has been investigated at the thermophilic temperatures of 50, 55 and 60 °C. Throughout inactivation experiments at each temperature, individual colonies were isolated and identified by 16S rDNA gene sequencing to illustrate how the diversity of fecal coliforms is affected by thermophilic treatment. Results indicate that even though fecal coliforms in raw sewage sludge are comprised of several different bacterial species, each with variable temperature induced decay rates, the overall inactivation of fecal coliforms in raw sewage sludge was found to follow a first-order relationship. No tailing was observed across the range of fecal coliform concentrations measured. Fecal coliforms in raw sludge contained six different genera of bacteria and were 62% enriched in E. coli. Within 1.5 log removal of fecal coliform concentration by thermophilic treatment, the populations had shifted to, and remained at 100% E. coli. Subsequent inactivation rates measured in isolated fecal coliform strains confirmed that E. coli cells isolated post-treatment were more thermotolerant than E. coli and non-E coli bacteria isolated prior to thermal treatment. Overall, this study describes the potential enrichment of thermotolerant E. coli in biosolids fecal coliforms and demonstrates that while thermotolerant species are present at the end of treatment, pure first-order approximations are appropriate for estimating residence times to reduce fecal coliforms to levels promulgated in U.S. Class A biosolids standards.

  17. Microbial conversion of food wastes for biofertilizer production with thermophilic lipolytic microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Shang-Shyng [Institute of Microbiology and Biochemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, (Taiwan); Liu, Ching-Piao [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Meiho Institute of Technology, Pingtung 91201, (Taiwan)

    2007-05-15

    Food waste is approximately one quarter of the total garbage in Taiwan. To investigate the feasibility of microbial conversion of food waste to multiple functional biofertilizer, food waste was mixed with bulking materials, inoculated with thermophilic and lipolytic microbes and incubated at 50{sup o}C in a mechanical composter. Microbial inoculation enhanced the degradation of food wastes, increased the total nitrogen and the germination rate of alfalfa seed, shortened the maturity period and improved the quality of biofertilizer. In food waste inoculated with thermophilic and lipolytic Brevibacillus borstelensis SH168 for 28 days, total nitrogen increased from 2.01% to 2.10%, ash increased from 24.94% to 29.21%, crude fat decreased from 4.88% to 1.34% and the C/N ratio decreased from 18.02 to 17.65. Each gram of final product had a higher population of thermophilic microbes than mesophilic microbes. Microbial conversion of food waste to biofertilizer is a feasible and potential technology in the future to maintain the natural resources and to reduce the impact on environmental quality. (author)

  18. Treatment of high strength aqueous wastes in a thermophilic aerobic membrane reactor (TAMR): performance and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Abbà, Alessandro; Bertanza, Giorgio; Barbieri, Giacomo

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, the thermophilic aerobic membrane reactor technology was studied for the treatment of high strength aqueous wastes mainly containing dyes, surfactants and solvents. The thermophilic biomass resilience and the process stability under critical conditions (such as rapid rise of the mixed liquor pH, oxygen supply interruption, etc.) were also evaluated. The experimental work was carried out with the use of a pilot plant at semi-industrial scale, which was managed throughout for 14 months; the operation temperature was 49 °C and the organic loading rate was increased from 3 to 12 kgCOD m-3 d-1. Critical conditions, especially the interruption of oxygen supply, affected the pilot plant performance but did not cause a complete system break down. After the temporary reduction of process performance, also proven by the decrease in the oxygen consumption, the normal working conditions were restored. Moreover, the longer non-aerated phase involved a significant reduction (40%) of volatile suspended solids concentration in the biological reactor and the increase of 30% in foaming power; nevertheless, once the oxygen supply was reactivated, optimal conditions were rapidly restored. Therefore, the study showed the high resilience of the thermophilic biomass, which was able to recover full functionality after critical events.

  19. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Manned Mars exploration requires recycle of materials to support human life A conceptual design is developed for space agriculture which is driven by the biologically regenerative function Hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology is the core of materials recycling system to process human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and convert them to fertilizer for plants cultivation A photosynthetic reaction of plants will be driven by solar energy Water will be recycled by cultivation of plants and passing it through plant bodies Sub-surface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide are the natural resource available on Mars and these resources will be converted to oxygen and foods We envision that the agricultural system will be scaled up by importing materials from Martian environment Excess oxygen will be obtained from growing trees for structural and other components Minor elements including N P K and other traces will be introduced as fertilizers or nutrients into the agricultural materials circulation Nitrogen will be collected from Martian atmosphere We will assess biological fixation of nitrogen using micro-organisms responsible in Earth biosphere Hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacterial ecology is effective to convert waste materials into useful forms to plants This microbial technology has been well established on ground for processing sewage and waste materials For instance the hyper-thermophilic bacterial system is applied to a composting machine in a size of a trash box in home kitchen Since such a home electronics

  20. Potential use of thermophilic dark fermentation effluents in photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgura, E.; Afsar, N.; Eroglu, I. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); De Vrije, T.; Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Yucel, M.; Gunduz, U. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biology, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Biological hydrogen production by a sequential operation of dark and photofermentation is a promising route to produce hydrogen. The possibility of using renewable resources, like biomass and agro-industrial wastes, provides a dual effect of sustainability in biohydrogen production and simultaneous waste removal. In this study, photofermentative hydrogen production on effluents of thermophilic dark fermentations on glucose, potato steam peels (PSP) hydrolysate and molasses was investigated in indoor, batch operated bioreactors. An extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was used in the dark fermentation step, and Rhodobacter capsulatus (DSM1710) was used in the photofermentation step. Addition of buffer, Fe and Mo to dark fermentor effluents (DFEs) improved the overall efficiency of hydrogen production. The initial acetate concentration in the DFE needed to be adjusted to 30-40 mM by dilution to increase the yield of hydrogen in batch light-supported fermentations. The thermophilic DFEs are suitable for photofermentative hydrogen production, provided that they are supplemented with buffer and nutrients. The overall hydrogen yield of the two-step fermentations was higher than the yield of single step dark fermentations.

  1. High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A. P.; Allgaier, M.; Singer, S.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; VanderGheynst, J.S.

    2011-04-01

    Thermophilic microbial communities that are active in a high-solids environment offer great potential for the discovery of industrially relevant enzymes that efficiently deconstruct bioenergy feedstocks. In this study, finished green waste compost was used as an inoculum source to enrich microbial communities and associated enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose during thermophilic high-solids fermentation of the bioenergy feedstocks switchgrass and corn stover. Methods involving the disruption of enzyme and plant cell wall polysaccharide interactions were developed to recover xylanase and endoglucanase activity from deconstructed solids. Xylanase and endoglucanase activity increased by more than a factor of 5, upon four successive enrichments on switchgrass. Overall, the changes for switchgrass were more pronounced than for corn stover; solids reduction between the first and second enrichments increased by a factor of four for switchgrass while solids reduction remained relatively constant for corn stover. Amplicon pyrosequencing analysis of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes recovered from enriched samples indicated rapid changes in the microbial communities between the first and second enrichment with the simplified communities achieved by the third enrichment. The results demonstrate a successful approach for enrichment of unique microbial communities and enzymes active in a thermophilic high-solids environment.

  2. Recurrence of fecal coliforms and Salmonella species in biosolids following thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, Reza; Cox, Huub H J

    2006-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Part 503 Biosolids Rule requires the fecal coliform (indicator) or Salmonella species (pathogen) density requirements for Class A biosolids to be met at the last point of plant control (truck-loading facility and/or farm for land application). The three Southern Californian wastewater treatment plants in this study produced biosolids by thermophilic anaerobic digestion and all met the Class A limits for both fecal coliforms and Salmonella sp. in the digester outflow biosolids. At two plants, however, a recurrence of fecal coliforms was observed in postdigestion biosolids, which caused exceedance of the Class A limit for fecal coliforms at the truck-loading facility and farm for land application. Comparison of observations at the three plants and further laboratory tests indicated that the recurrence of fecal coliforms can possibly be related to the following combination of factors: (1) incomplete destruction of fecal coliforms during thermophilic anaerobic digestion, (2) contamination of Class A biosolids with fecal coliforms from external sources during postdigestion, (3) a large drop of the postdigestion biosolids temperature to below the maximum for fecal coliform growth, (4) an unknown effect of biosolids dewatering in centrifuges. At Hyperion Treatment Plant (City of Los Angeles, California), fecal coliform recurrence could be prevented by the following: (1) complete conversion to thermophilic operation to exclude contamination by mesophilically digested biosolids and (2) insulation and electrical heat-tracing of postdigestion train for maintaining a high biosolids temperature in postdigestion.

  3. Comparative microbiological-hygienic studies in mesophilic and thermophilic fouling of sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlig-Schmitt, M.; Philipp, W.; Wekerle, J.; Strauch, D.

    Investigations concerning the inactivation of microbial pathogens (bacteria, viruses and parasites) during anaerobic, alkaline dignestion of sludge are described. A thermophilic (54/sup 0/C) and a mesophilic (34/sup 0/C) operated biogas model plant were compared from the point of view of hygiene. Is was found that in the thermophilic process Salmonella senftenberg survived 13,5 h, Streptococcus faecium 55 h, Streptococcus faecalis 42 h and Klebsiella pneumoniae 0,5 h. Within 30 min eggs of Ascaris suum lost their infectivity Bovine Parvovirus was inactivated after 1 d to 2 d treatment. Survival times under mesophilic conditions of 13 d for Salmonella senftenberg and more than 8 mouth for Streptococcus faecium were found. Poliovirus Type 1 was inactivated in 8 d while Bovine Parvovirus survived no longer than 15 d. The results obtained in the thermophilic process were compared to those after heat treatment of the test microorganisms in ampules exposed in a wather-bath under defined conditions to 54/sup 0/C. It was found, that the bacteria survived only about half the time in this case. Poliovirus Type 1 was inactivated after 0,75 h and Bovine Parvovirus after 7 d exposure. (orig.RB)

  4. Thermophilic degradation of phenolic compounds in lab scale hybrid up flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreekanth, D.; Sivaramakrishna, D. [Center for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500085, Andhra Pradesh (India); Himabindu, V., E-mail: vurimindihimabindu@yahoo.com [Center for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500085, Andhra Pradesh (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2009-05-30

    This Study describes the feasibility of anaerobic degradation of United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) listed 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C-2-NP), 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C-4-NP), 2-chloro-5-methylphenol (2C-5-MP) from a simulated wastewater using four identical 7L bench scale hybrid up flow anaerobic sludge blankets (HUASBs) at five different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) under thermophilic condition (55 {+-} 3 deg. C). The substrate to co-substrate ratios were maintained between 1:33.3 and 1:166.6. Continuous monitoring of parameters like pH, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation, oxidation reduction potential, chemical oxygen demand (COD), alkalinity, gas productions, methane percentages were carried out along with compound reduction to asses the efficiency of biodegradation. The compound reduction was estimated by using spectrophotometric methods and further validated with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Optimum HRT values were observed at 24 h. Optimum ratio of substrate (phenolic compounds) to co-substrate (glucose) was 1:100. Scanning electron micrographs show that the granules were composed of thermophilic Methanobrevibacter and thermophilic Methanothrix like bacteria.

  5. Screening of thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi aiming β-xylosidase and arabinanase production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Machado Benassi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall is mainly composed by cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The heterogeneous structure and composition of the hemicellulose are key impediments to its depolymerization and subsequent use in fermentation processes. Thus, this study aimed to perform a screening of thermophilic and thermotolerant filamentous fungi collected from different regions of the São Paulo state, and analyze the production of β-xylosidase and arabinanase at different temperatures. These enzymes are important to cell wall degradation and synthesis of end products as xylose and arabinose, respectively, which are significant sugars to fermentation and ethanol production. A total of 12 fungal species were analyzed and 9 of them grew at 45 ºC, suggesting a thermophilic or thermotolerant character. Additionally Aspergillus thermomutatus anamorph of Neosartorya and A. parasiticus grew at 50 ºC. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus thermomutatus were the filamentous fungi with the most expressive production of β-xylosidase and arabinanase, respectively. In general for most of the tested microorganisms, β-xylosidase and arabinanase activities from mycelial extract (intracellular form were higher in cultures grown at high temperatures (35-40 ºC, while the correspondent extracellular activities were favorably secreted from cultures at 30 ºC. This study contributes to catalogue isolated fungi of the state of São Paulo, and these findings could be promising sources for thermophilic and thermotolerant microorganisms, which are industrially important due to their enzymes.

  6. Investigating the potential of thermophilic species for ethanol production from industrial spent sulfite liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Weissgram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic microorganisms hold a great potential for bioethanol production on waste biomass, due to their ability to utilize pentoses and hexoses alike. However, to date hardly any data on thermophiles growing directly on industrial substrates like spent sulfite liquor (SSL are available. This contribution investigates the ability of Thermoanaerobacter species to utilize the main sugars in the used SSL (mannose, glucose and xylose and the effect of process parameters (pH, temperature and sugar concentration on their growth. Based on these results the strain T. mathranii was chosen for further studies. The ability of T. mathranii to grow directly on SSL was investigated and the effect of several inhibiting substances on growth was elucidated. Furthermore it was tested whether pretreatment with activated charcoal can increase the fermentability of SSL. The fermentations were evaluated based on yields and specific rates. It could be shown that T. mathranii was able to ferment all sugars in the investigated softwood SSL and fermented diluted, untreated SSL (up to 2.7% (w/w dry matter. Pretreatment with activated charcoal could slightly reduce the amount of phenols in the substrate and thus facilitate growth and ethanol production on higher SSL concentrations (up to 4.7% (w/v dry matter. Ethanol yields of 0.29-0.44 Cmmol of ethanol per Cmmol sugar were obtained on untreated and pretreated spent sulfite liquor, respectively. These results on an industrial substrate strengthen the claim that thermophilic microorganisms might be the optimal candidates for forest biorefinery.

  7. Performance and microbial community analysis of two-stage process with extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from hydrolysate in UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-03-01

    The two-stage process for extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Specific hydrogen and methane yields of 89 ml-H(2)/g-VS (190 ml-H(2)/g-sugars) and 307 ml-CH(4)/g-VS, respectively were achieved simultaneously with the overall VS removal efficiency of 81% by operating with total hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days . The energy conversion efficiency was dramatically increased from only 7.5% in the hydrogen stage to 87.5% of the potential energy from hydrolysate, corresponding to total energy of 13.4 kJ/g-VS. Dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the H(2)-UASB reactor were Thermoanaerobacter wiegelii, Caldanaerobacter subteraneus, and Caloramator fervidus. Meanwhile, the CH(4)-UASB reactor was dominated with methanogens of Methanosarcina mazei and Methanothermobacter defluvii. The results from this study suggest the two stage anaerobic process can be effectively used for energy recovery and for stabilization of hydrolysate at anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Bjornberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyv...... of the eukaryotic or prokaryotic genes involved in pyrimidine degradation described to date....

  9. Eelgrass Leaf Surface Microbiomes Are Locally Variable and Highly Correlated with Epibiotic Eukaryotes

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    Mia M. Bengtsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eelgrass (Zostera marina is a marine foundation species essential for coastal ecosystem services around the northern hemisphere. Like all macroscopic organisms, it possesses a microbiome (here defined as an associated prokaryotic community which may play critical roles in modulating the interaction of eelgrass with its environment. For example, its leaf surface microbiome could inhibit or attract eukaryotic epibionts which may overgrow the eelgrass leading to reduced primary productivity and subsequent eelgrass meadow decline. We used amplicon sequencing of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to assess the leaf surface microbiome (prokaryotes as well as eukaryotic epibionts in- and outside lagoons on the German Baltic Sea coast. Prokaryote microbiomes varied substantially both between sites inside lagoons and between open coastal and lagoon sites. Water depth, leaf area and biofilm chlorophyll a concentration explained a large amount of variation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic community composition. The prokaryotic microbiome and eukaryotic epibiont communities were highly correlated, and network analysis revealed disproportionate co-occurrence between a limited number of eukaryotic taxa and several bacterial taxa. This suggests that eelgrass leaf surfaces are home to a mosaic of microbiomes of several epibiotic eukaryotes, in addition to the microbiome of the eelgrass itself. Our findings thereby underline that eukaryotic diversity should be taken into account in order to explain prokaryotic microbiome assembly and dynamics in aquatic environments.

  10. Distribution of eukaryotic plankton in the English Channel and the North Sea in summer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masquelier, S.; Foulon, E.; Jouenne, F.; Ferréol, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Vaulot, D.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of eukaryotic plankton was investigated in the English Channel and the North Sea during the MICROVIR cruise in summer 2007. The size distribution of autotrophic, heterotrophic eukaryotes and species composition was analyzed with a focus on two major divisions, Haptophyta and

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of ferlin genes reveals ancient eukaryotic origins

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    Lek Monkol

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ferlin gene family possesses a rare and identifying feature consisting of multiple tandem C2 domains and a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Much currently remains unknown about the fundamental function of this gene family, however, mutations in its two most well-characterised members, dysferlin and otoferlin, have been implicated in human disease. The availability of genome sequences from a wide range of species makes it possible to explore the evolution of the ferlin family, providing contextual insight into characteristic features that define the ferlin gene family in its present form in humans. Results Ferlin genes were detected from all species of representative phyla, with two ferlin subgroups partitioned within the ferlin phylogenetic tree based on the presence or absence of a DysF domain. Invertebrates generally possessed two ferlin genes (one with DysF and one without, with six ferlin genes in most vertebrates (three DysF, three non-DysF. Expansion of the ferlin gene family is evident between the divergence of lamprey (jawless vertebrates and shark (cartilaginous fish. Common to almost all ferlins is an N-terminal C2-FerI-C2 sandwich, a FerB motif, and two C-terminal C2 domains (C2E and C2F adjacent to the transmembrane domain. Preservation of these structural elements throughout eukaryotic evolution suggests a fundamental role of these motifs for ferlin function. In contrast, DysF, C2DE, and FerA are optional, giving rise to subtle differences in domain topologies of ferlin genes. Despite conservation of multiple C2 domains in all ferlins, the C-terminal C2 domains (C2E and C2F displayed higher sequence conservation and greater conservation of putative calcium binding residues across paralogs and orthologs. Interestingly, the two most studied non-mammalian ferlins (Fer-1 and Misfire in model organisms C. elegans and D. melanogaster, present as outgroups in the phylogenetic analysis, with results suggesting

  12. Nitrogen fixation in eukaryotes – New models for symbiosis

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    Lockhart Peter

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen, a component of many bio-molecules, is essential for growth and development of all organisms. Most nitrogen exists in the atmosphere, and utilisation of this source is important as a means of avoiding nitrogen starvation. However, the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme complex is restricted to some bacteria. Eukaryotic organisms are only able to obtain fixed nitrogen through their symbiotic interactions with nitrogen-fixing prokaryotes. These symbioses involve a variety of host organisms, including animals, plants, fungi and protists. Results We have compared the morphological, physiological and molecular characteristics of nitrogen fixing symbiotic associations of bacteria and their diverse hosts. Special features of the interaction, e.g. vertical transmission of symbionts, grade of dependency of partners and physiological modifications have been considered in terms of extent of co-evolution and adaptation. Our findings are that, despite many adaptations enabling a beneficial partnership, most symbioses for molecular nitrogen fixation involve facultative interactions. However, some interactions, among them endosymbioses between cyanobacteria and diatoms, show characteristics that reveal a more obligate status of co-evolution. Conclusion Our review emphasises that molecular nitrogen fixation, a driving force for interactions and co-evolution of different species, is a widespread phenomenon involving many different organisms and ecosystems. The diverse grades of symbioses, ranging from loose associations to highly specific intracellular interactions, might themselves reflect the range of potential evolutionary fates for symbiotic partnerships. These include the extreme evolutionary modifications and adaptations that have accompanied the formation of organelles in eukaryotic cells: plastids and mitochondria. However, age and extensive adaptation of plastids and mitochondria complicate the

  13. Horizontal DNA transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and a lesson from experimental transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsunori; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is widespread among bacteria and plays a key role in genome dynamics. HGT is much less common in eukaryotes, but is being reported with increasing frequency in eukaryotes. The mechanism as to how eukaryotes acquired genes from distantly related organisms remains obscure yet. This paper cites examples of bacteria-derived genes found in eukaryotic organisms, and then describes experimental DNA transports to eukaryotes by bacterial type 4 secretion systems in optimized conditions. The mechanisms of the latter are efficient, quite reproducible in vitro and predictable, and thereby would provide insight into natural HGT and to the development of new research tools. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Heavy metal whole-cell biosensors using eukaryotic microorganisms: an updated critical review.

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    Juan-Carlos eGutierrez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of using eukaryotic microorganisms to design whole-cell biosensors (WCBs for monitoring environmental heavy metal pollution in soil or aquatic habitats. Basic considerations for designing an eukaryotic WCB are also shown. A comparative analysis of the promoter genes used to design whole-cell biosensors is carried out, and the sensitivity and reproducibility of the main reporter genes used is also reviewed. Three main eukaryotic taxonomic groups are considered: yeasts, microalgae and ciliated protozoa. Models that have been widely analyzed as potential WCBs are the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model among yeasts, the Tetrahymena thermophila model for ciliates and Chlamydomonas model for microalgae. The advantages and disadvantages of each microbial group are discussed, and a ranking of sensitivity to the same type of metal pollutant from reported eukaryotic WCBs is also shown. General conclusions and possible future developments of eukaryotic WCBs are reported.

  15. Space agriculture for habitation on Mars with hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Space Agriculture Task Force; Ishikawa, Y.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kitaya, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Nagatomo, M.; Oshima, T.; Wada, H.

    Manned Mars exploration, especially for extended periods of time, will require recycle of materials to support human life. Here, a conceptual design is developed for a Martian agricultural system driven by biologically regenerative functions. One of the core biotechnologies function is the use of hyper-thermophilic aerobic composting bacterial ecology. These thermophilic bacteria can play an important role in increasing the effectiveness of the processing of human metabolic waste and inedible biomass and of converting them to fertilizer for the cultivation of plants. This microbial technology has been already well established for the purpose of processing sewage and waste materials for small local communities in Japan. One of the characteristics of the technology is that the metabolic heat release that occurs during bacterial fermentation raises the processing temperature sufficiently high at 80 100 °C to support hyper-thermophilic bacteria. Such a hyper-thermophilic system is found to have great capability of decomposing wastes including even their normally recalcitrant components, in a reasonably short period of time and of providing a better quality of fertilizer as an end-product. High quality compost has been shown to be a key element in creating a healthy regenerative food production system. In ground-based studies, the soil microbial ecology after the addition of high quality compost was shown to improve plant growth and promote a healthy symbiosis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Another advantage of such high processing temperature is the ability to sterilize the pathogenic organisms through the fermentation process and thus to secure the hygienic safety of the system. Plant cultivation is one of the other major systems. It should fully utilize solar energy received on the Martian surface for supplying energy for photosynthesis. Subsurface water and atmospheric carbon dioxide mined on Mars should be also used in the plant cultivation system. Oxygen and

  16. Mcm10: A Dynamic Scaffold at Eukaryotic Replication Forks

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    Ryan M. Baxley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To complete the duplication of large genomes efficiently, mechanisms have evolved that coordinate DNA unwinding with DNA synthesis and provide quality control measures prior to cell division. Minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10 is a conserved component of the eukaryotic replisome that contributes to this process in multiple ways. Mcm10 promotes the initiation of DNA replication through direct interactions with the cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45-minichromosome maintenance complex proteins 2-7 (Mcm2-7-go-ichi-ni-san GINS complex proteins, as well as single- and double-stranded DNA. After origin firing, Mcm10 controls replication fork stability to support elongation, primarily facilitating Okazaki fragment synthesis through recruitment of DNA polymerase-α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Based on its multivalent properties, Mcm10 serves as an essential scaffold to promote DNA replication and guard against replication stress. Under pathological conditions, Mcm10 is often dysregulated. Genetic amplification and/or overexpression of MCM10 are common in cancer, and can serve as a strong prognostic marker of poor survival. These findings are compatible with a heightened requirement for Mcm10 in transformed cells to overcome limitations for DNA replication dictated by altered cell cycle control. In this review, we highlight advances in our understanding of when, where and how Mcm10 functions within the replisome to protect against barriers that cause incomplete replication.

  17. The evolutionary dynamics of operon distributions in eukaryote genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Asher D; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2010-06-01

    Genes in nematode and ascidian genomes frequently occur in operons--multiple genes sharing a common promoter to generate a polycistronic primary transcript--and such genes comprise 15-20% of the coding genome for Caenorhabditis elegans and Ciona intestinalis. Recent work in nematodes has demonstrated that the identity of genes within operons is highly conserved among species and that the unifying feature of genes within operons is that they are expressed in germline tissue. However, it is generally unknown what processes are responsible for generating the distribution of operon sizes across the genome, which are composed of up to eight genes per operon. Here we investigate several models for operon evolution to better understand their abundance, distribution of sizes, and evolutionary dynamics over time. We find that birth-death models of operon evolution reasonably describe the relative abundance of operons of different sizes in the C. elegans and Ciona genomes and generate predictions about the number of monocistronic, nonoperon genes that likely participate in the birth-death process. This theory, and applications to C. elegans and Ciona, motivates several new and testable hypotheses about eukaryote operon evolution.

  18. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively. Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism.

  19. Diffusion-limited phase separation in eukaryotic chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Andrea; de Candia, Antonio; Di Talia, Stefano; Coniglio, Antonio; Bussolino, Federico; Serini, Guido

    2005-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense spatial gradients of chemoattractant factors governs the development of complex eukaryotic organisms. Cells exposed to shallow chemoattractant gradients respond with strong accumulation of the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its D3-phosphoinositide product (PIP3) on the plasma membrane side exposed to the highest chemoattractant concentration, whereas PIP3-degrading enzyme PTEN and its product PIP2 localize in a complementary pattern. Such an early symmetry-breaking event is a mandatory step for directed cell movement elicited by chemoattractants, but its physical origin is still mysterious. Here, we propose that directional sensing is the consequence of a phase-ordering process mediated by phosphoinositide diffusion and driven by the distribution of chemotactic signal. By studying a realistic reaction–diffusion lattice model that describes PI3K and PTEN enzymatic activity, recruitment to the plasma membrane, and diffusion of their phosphoinositide products, we show that the effective enzyme–enzyme interaction induced by catalysis and diffusion introduces an instability of the system toward phase separation for realistic values of physical parameters. In this framework, large reversible amplification of shallow chemotactic gradients, selective localization of chemical factors, macroscopic response timescales, and spontaneous polarization arise naturally. The model is robust with respect to order-of-magnitude variations of the parameters. PMID:16291809

  20. Cosmopolitanism of microbial eukaryotes in the global deep seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creer, Simon; Sinniger, Frederic

    2012-03-01

    Deep sea environments cover more than 65% of the earth's surface and fulfil a range of ecosystem functions, yet they are also amongst the least known habitats on earth. Whilst the discovery of key geological processes, combined with technological developments, has focused interest onto geologically active areas such as hydrothermal vents, most abyssal biodiversity remains to be discovered (Danovaro et al. 2010). However, as for terrestrial reservoirs of biodiversity, the world's largest biome is under threat from anthropogenic activities ranging from environmental change to the exploitation of minerals and rare-earth elements (Kato et al. 2011). It is therefore important to understand the magnitude, nature and composition of deep sea biological communities to inform us of levels of local adaptation, functionality and resilience with respect to future environmental perturbation. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Bik et al. utilize 454 Roche metagenetic environmental sequencing to assess microbial metazoan community composition and phylogenetic identity across deep sea depth gradients and between ocean basins. The analyses suggest that although the majority of microbial eukaryotic taxa are regionally restricted, a small percentage might maintain cosmopolitan deep sea distributions, and an even smaller fraction appear to be eurybathic (live across depth gradients). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Synthetic biology tools for bioprospecting of natural products in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkles, Shiela E; Valiante, Vito; Mattern, Derek J; Brakhage, Axel A

    2014-04-24

    Filamentous fungi have the capacity to produce a battery of natural products of often unknown function, synthesized by complex metabolic pathways. Unfortunately, most of these pathways appear silent, many in intractable organisms, and their products consequently unidentified. One basic challenge is the difficulty of expressing a biosynthesis pathway for a complex natural product in a heterologous eukaryotic host. Here, we provide a proof-of concept solution to this challenge and describe how the entire penicillin biosynthesis pathway can be expressed in a heterologous host. The method takes advantage of a combination of improved yeast in vivo cloning technology, generation of polycistronic mRNA for the gene cluster under study, and an amenable and easily manipulated fungal host, i.e., Aspergillus nidulans. We achieve expression from a single promoter of the pathway genes to yield a large polycistronic mRNA by using viral 2A peptide sequences to direct successful cotranslational cleavage of pathway enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crystal structures of two eukaryotic nucleases involved in RNA metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    as well as the controlled turnover of these in response to changing surrounding conditions is of vital importance to ensure optimal fitness of a cell. Central to both these processes is the degradation of RNA, either as a means of decreasing the level of particular RNAs or as a way to get rid of aberrant...... form the 3'-end of mRNA, is normally the first and also rate-limiting step in cellular mRNA degradation and therefore a key process in the control of eukaryotic mRNA turnover. Since Ccr4p is believed to be the main deadenylase the precise role of Pop2p in the complex is less clear. Nevertheless, Pop2p....... In the nucleus Rrp6p associates with the exosome and participates in the degradation of improperly processed precursor mRNAs and trimming of stable RNAs. The crystal structure of S. cerevisiae Rrp6p presented here displays a conserved DEDD nuclease core with a flanking HRDC domain believed to be involved in RNA...

  3. A biobrick library for cloning custom eukaryotic plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constante, Marco; Grünberg, Raik; Isalan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Researchers often require customised variations of plasmids that are not commercially available. Here we demonstrate the applicability and versatility of standard synthetic biological parts (biobricks) to build custom plasmids. For this purpose we have built a collection of 52 parts that include multiple cloning sites (MCS) and common protein tags, protein reporters and selection markers, amongst others. Importantly, most of the parts are designed in a format to allow fusions that maintain the reading frame. We illustrate the collection by building several model contructs, including concatemers of protein binding-site motifs, and a variety of plasmids for eukaryotic stable cloning and chromosomal insertion. For example, in 3 biobrick iterations, we make a cerulean-reporter plasmid for cloning fluorescent protein fusions. Furthermore, we use the collection to implement a recombinase-mediated DNA insertion (RMDI), allowing chromosomal site-directed exchange of genes. By making one recipient stable cell line, many standardised cell lines can subsequently be generated, by fluorescent fusion-gene exchange. We propose that this biobrick collection may be distributed peer-to-peer as a stand-alone library, in addition to its distribution through the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (http://partsregistry.org/).

  4. A biobrick library for cloning custom eukaryotic plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Constante

    Full Text Available Researchers often require customised variations of plasmids that are not commercially available. Here we demonstrate the applicability and versatility of standard synthetic biological parts (biobricks to build custom plasmids. For this purpose we have built a collection of 52 parts that include multiple cloning sites (MCS and common protein tags, protein reporters and selection markers, amongst others. Importantly, most of the parts are designed in a format to allow fusions that maintain the reading frame. We illustrate the collection by building several model contructs, including concatemers of protein binding-site motifs, and a variety of plasmids for eukaryotic stable cloning and chromosomal insertion. For example, in 3 biobrick iterations, we make a cerulean-reporter plasmid for cloning fluorescent protein fusions. Furthermore, we use the collection to implement a recombinase-mediated DNA insertion (RMDI, allowing chromosomal site-directed exchange of genes. By making one recipient stable cell line, many standardised cell lines can subsequently be generated, by fluorescent fusion-gene exchange. We propose that this biobrick collection may be distributed peer-to-peer as a stand-alone library, in addition to its distribution through the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (http://partsregistry.org/.

  5. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

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    Heike Angerer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine motif proteins (LYRMs of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6 or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1 of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria.

  6. A conserved mechanism for extracellular signaling in eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallio, Marco; Sturgill, Gwen; Rather, Philip; Kylsten, Per

    2002-09-17

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) is a key mediator of cell communication during animal development and homeostasis. In Drosophila, the signaling event is commonly regulated by the polytopic membrane protein Rhomboid (RHO), which mediates the proteolytic activation of EGFr ligands, allowing the secretion of the active signal. Until very recently, the biochemical function of RHO had remained elusive. It is now believed that Drosophila RHO is the founder member of a previously undescribed family of serine proteases, and that it could be directly responsible for the unusual, intramembranous cleavage of EGFr ligands. Here we show that the function of RHO is conserved in Gram-negative bacteria. AarA, a Providencia stuartii RHO-related protein, is active in Drosophila on the fly EGFr ligands. Vice versa, Drosophila RHO-1 can effectively rescue the bacterium's ability to produce or release the signal that activates density-dependent gene regulation (or quorum sensing). This study provides the first evidence that prokaryotic and eukaryotic RHOs could have a conserved role in cell communication and that their biochemical properties could be more similar than previously anticipated.

  7. Specificity and evolvability in eukaryotic protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beltrao

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in uncovering the protein interaction networks of several species has led to questions of what underlying principles might govern their organization. Few studies have tried to determine the impact of protein interaction network evolution on the observed physiological differences between species. Using comparative genomics and structural information, we show here that eukaryotic species have rewired their interactomes at a fast rate of approximately 10(-5 interactions changed per protein pair, per million years of divergence. For Homo sapiens this corresponds to 10(3 interactions changed per million years. Additionally we find that the specificity of binding strongly determines the interaction turnover and that different biological processes show significantly different link dynamics. In particular, human proteins involved in immune response, transport, and establishment of localization show signs of positive selection for change of interactions. Our analysis suggests that a small degree of molecular divergence can give rise to important changes at the network level. We propose that the power law distribution observed in protein interaction networks could be partly explained by the cell's requirement for different degrees of protein binding specificity.

  8. Endocytosis and Signaling: Cell Logistics Shape the Eukaryotic Cell Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismund, Sara; Confalonieri, Stefano; Ciliberto, Andrea; Polo, Simona; Scita, Giorgio; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of endocytosis has evolved remarkably in little more than a decade. This is the result not only of advances in our knowledge of its molecular and biological workings, but also of a true paradigm shift in our understanding of what really constitutes endocytosis and of its role in homeostasis. Although endocytosis was initially discovered and studied as a relatively simple process to transport molecules across the plasma membrane, it was subsequently found to be inextricably linked with almost all aspects of cellular signaling. This led to the notion that endocytosis is actually the master organizer of cellular signaling, providing the cell with understandable messages that have been resolved in space and time. In essence, endocytosis provides the communications and supply routes (the logistics) of the cell. Although this may seem revolutionary, it is still likely to be only a small part of the entire story. A wealth of new evidence is uncovering the surprisingly pervasive nature of endocytosis in essentially all aspects of cellular regulation. In addition, many newly discovered functions of endocytic proteins are not immediately interpretable within the classical view of endocytosis. A possible framework, to rationalize all this new knowledge, requires us to “upgrade” our vision of endocytosis. By combining the analysis of biochemical, biological, and evolutionary evidence, we propose herein that endocytosis constitutes one of the major enabling conditions that in the history of life permitted the development of a higher level of organization, leading to the actuation of the eukaryotic cell plan. PMID:22298658

  9. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Break induced replication in eukaryotes: mechanisms, functions, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Malkova, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) is an important pathway specializing in repair of one-ended double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This type of DSB break typically arises at collapsed replication forks or at eroded telomeres. BIR initiates by invasion of a broken DNA end into a homologous template followed by initiation of DNA synthesis that can proceed for hundreds of kilobases. This synthesis is drastically different from S-phase replication in that instead of a replication fork, BIR proceeds via a migrating bubble and is associated with conservative inheritance of newly synthesized DNA. This unusual mode of DNA replication is responsible for frequent genetic instabilities associated with BIR, including hyper-mutagenesis, which can lead to the formation of mutation clusters, extensive loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, copy-number variations and complex genomic rearrangements. In addition to budding yeast experimental systems that were initially employed to investigate eukaryotic BIR, recent studies in different organisms including humans, have provided multiple examples of BIR initiated within different cellular contexts, including collapsed replication fork and telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase. In addition, significant progress has been made towards understanding microhomology-mediated BIR (MMBIR) that can promote complex chromosomal rearrangements, including those associated with cancer and those leading to a number of neurological disorders in humans.

  11. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  12. Structural genomics of eukaryotic targets at a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Didier; Poussin-Courmontagne, Pierre; Rosé, David; Ripp, Raymond; Litt, Alain; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Moras, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Structural genomics programs are distributed worldwide and funded by large institutions such as the NIH in United-States, the RIKEN in Japan or the European Commission through the SPINE network in Europe. Such initiatives, essentially managed by large consortia, led to technology and method developments at the different steps required to produce biological samples compatible with structural studies. Besides specific applications, method developments resulted mainly upon miniaturization and parallelization. The challenge that academic laboratories faces to pursue structural genomics programs is to produce, at a higher rate, protein samples. The Structural Biology and Genomics Department (IGBMC - Illkirch - France) is implicated in a structural genomics program of high eukaryotes whose goal is solving crystal structures of proteins and their complexes (including large complexes) related to human health and biotechnology. To achieve such a challenging goal, the Department has established a medium-throughput pipeline for producing protein samples suitable for structural biology studies. Here, we describe the setting up of our initiative from cloning to crystallization and we demonstrate that structural genomics may be manageable by academic laboratories by strategic investments in robotic and by adapting classical bench protocols and new developments, in particular in the field of protein expression, to parallelization.

  13. Reexamining opportunities for therapeutic protein production in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Catherine B; Wright, Chapman; Kuo, Angel; Colant, Noelle; Westoby, Matthew; Love, J Christopher

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are an important class of therapeutics and are predominantly produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines. While this manufacturing platform is sufficiently productive to supply patient populations of currently approved therapies, it is unclear whether or not the current CHO platform can address two significant areas of need: affordable access to biologics for patients around the globe and production of unprecedented quantities needed for very large populations of patients. Novel approaches to recombinant protein production for therapeutic biologic products may be needed, and might be enabled by non-mammalian expression systems and recent advances in bioengineering. Eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi, microalgae, and protozoa offer the potential to produce high-quality antibodies in large quantities. In this review, we lay out the current understanding of a wide range of species and evaluate based on theoretical considerations which are best poised to deliver a step change in cost of manufacturing and volumetric productivity within the next decade.Related article: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bit.26383/full. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Manganese transport in eukaryotes: the role of DMT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Catherine; Benedetto, Alexandre; Aschner, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a transition metal that is essential for normal cell growth and development, but is toxic at high concentrations. While Mn deficiency is uncommon in humans, Mn toxicity is known to be readily prevalent due to occupational overexposure in miners, smelters and possibly welders. Excessive exposure to Mn can cause Parkinson's disease-like syndrome; patients typically exhibit extrapyramidal symptoms that include tremor, rigidity and hypokinesia [Calne DB, Chu NS, Huang CC, Lu CS, Olanow W. Manganism and idiopathic parkinsonism: similarities and differences. Neurology 1994;44(9):1583-6; Dobson AW, Erikson KM, Aschner M. Manganese neurotoxicity. Ann NY Acad Sci 2004;1012:115-28]. Mn-induced motor neuron diseases have been the subjects of numerous studies; however, this review is not intended to discuss its neurotoxic potential or its role in the etiology of motor neuron disorders. Rather, it will focus on Mn uptake and transport via the orthologues of the divalent metal transporter (DMT1) and its possible implications to Mn toxicity in various categories of eukaryotic systems, such as in vitro cell lines, in vivo rodents, the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, the honeybee, Apis mellifera L., the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  15. Elongation factor methyltransferase 3--a novel eukaryotic lysine methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lelin; Hamey, Joshua J; Hart-Smith, Gene; Erce, Melissa A; Wilkins, Marc R

    2014-08-22

    Here we describe the discovery of Saccharomycescerevisiae protein YJR129Cp as a new eukaryotic seven-beta-strand lysine methyltransferase. An immunoblotting screen of 21 putative methyltransferases showed a loss in the methylation of elongation factor 2 (EF2) on knockout of YJR129C. Mass spectrometric analysis of EF2 tryptic peptides localised this loss of methylation to lysine 509, in peptide LVEGLKR. In vitro methylation, using recombinant methyltransferases and purified EF2, validated YJR129Cp as responsible for methylation of lysine 509 and Efm2p as responsible for methylation at lysine 613. Contextualised on previously described protein structures, both sites of methylation were found at the interaction interface between EF2 and the 40S ribosomal subunit. In line with the recently discovered Efm1 and Efm2 we propose that YJR129C be named elongation factor methyltransferase 3 (Efm3). The human homolog of Efm3 is likely to be the putative methyltransferase FAM86A, according to sequence homology and multiple lines of literature evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM 2–7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the “MCM paradox.” Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology.

  17. Endocytosis and signaling: cell logistics shape the eukaryotic cell plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismund, Sara; Confalonieri, Stefano; Ciliberto, Andrea; Polo, Simona; Scita, Giorgio; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of endocytosis has evolved remarkably in little more than a decade. This is the result not only of advances in our knowledge of its molecular and biological workings, but also of a true paradigm shift in our understanding of what really constitutes endocytosis and of its role in homeostasis. Although endocytosis was initially discovered and studied as a relatively simple process to transport molecules across the plasma membrane, it was subsequently found to be inextricably linked with almost all aspects of cellular signaling. This led to the notion that endocytosis is actually the master organizer of cellular signaling, providing the cell with understandable messages that have been resolved in space and time. In essence, endocytosis provides the communications and supply routes (the logistics) of the cell. Although this may seem revolutionary, it is still likely to be only a small part of the entire story. A wealth of new evidence is uncovering the surprisingly pervasive nature of endocytosis in essentially all aspects of cellular regulation. In addition, many newly discovered functions of endocytic proteins are not immediately interpretable within the classical view of endocytosis. A possible framework, to rationalize all this new knowledge, requires us to "upgrade" our vision of endocytosis. By combining the analysis of biochemical, biological, and evolutionary evidence, we propose herein that endocytosis constitutes one of the major enabling conditions that in the history of life permitted the development of a higher level of organization, leading to the actuation of the eukaryotic cell plan.

  18. Horizontal transfer of bacterial polyphosphate kinases to eukaryotes: implications for the ice age and land colonisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Michael P; Hooley, Paul; W Brown, Michael R

    2013-06-05

    Studies of online database(s) showed that convincing examples of eukaryote PPKs derived from bacteria type PPK1 and PPK2 enzymes are rare and currently confined to a few simple eukaryotes. These enzymes probably represent several separate horizontal transfer events. Retention of such sequences may be an advantage for tolerance to stresses such as desiccation or nutrient depletion for simple eukaryotes that lack more sophisticated adaptations available to multicellular organisms. We propose that the acquisition of encoding sequences for these enzymes by horizontal transfer enhanced the ability of early plants to colonise the land. The improved ability to sequester and release inorganic phosphate for carbon fixation by photosynthetic algae in the ocean may have accelerated or even triggered global glaciation events. There is some evidence for DNA sequences encoding PPKs in a wider range of eukaryotes, notably some invertebrates, though it is unclear that these represent functional genes.Polyphosphate (poly P) is found in all cells, carrying out a wide range of essential roles. Studied mainly in prokaryotes, the enzymes responsible for synthesis of poly P in eukaryotes (polyphosphate kinases PPKs) are not well understood. The best characterised enzyme from bacteria known to catalyse the formation of high molecular weight polyphosphate from ATP is PPK1 which shows some structural similarity to phospholipase D. A second bacterial PPK (PPK2) resembles thymidylate kinase. Recent reports have suggested a widespread distribution of these bacteria type enzymes in eukaryotes. On - line databases show evidence for the presence of genes encoding PPK1 in only a limited number of eukaryotes. These include the photosynthetic eukaryotes Ostreococcus tauri, O. lucimarinus, Porphyra yezoensis, Cyanidioschyzon merolae and the moss Physcomitrella patens, as well as the amoeboid symbiont Capsaspora owczarzaki and the non-photosynthetic eukaryotes Dictyostelium (3 species

  19. Thermophilic Dry Methane Fermentation of Distillation Residue Eluted from Ethanol Fermentation of Kitchen Waste and Dynamics of Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lian; Tan, Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Thermophilic dry methane fermentation is advantageous for feedstock with high solid content. Distillation residue with 65.1 % moisture content was eluted from ethanol fermentation of kitchen waste and subjected to thermophilic dry methane fermentation, after adjusting the moisture content to 75 %. The effect of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio on thermophilic dry methane fermentation was investigated. Results showed that thermophilic dry methane fermentation could not be stably performed for >10 weeks at a C/N ratio of 12.6 and a volatile total solid (VTS) loading rate of 1 g/kg sludge/d; however, it was stably performed at a C/N ratio of 19.8 and a VTS loading rate of 3 g/kg sludge/d with 83.4 % energy recovery efficiency. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the number of bacteria and archaea decreased by two orders of magnitude at a C/N ratio of 12.6, whereas they were not influenced at a C/N ratio of 19.8. Microbial community analysis revealed that the relative abundance of protein-degrading bacteria increased and that of organic acid-oxidizing bacteria and acetic acid-oxidizing bacteria decreased at a C/N ratio of 12.6. Therefore, there was accumulation of NH4(+) and acetic acid, which inhibited thermophilic dry methane fermentation.

  20. The independent prokaryotic origins of eukaryotic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase and the implications of their origins for the evolution of eukaryotic Calvin cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yong-Hai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Calvin cycle of eubacteria, the dephosphorylations of both fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphate (SBP are catalyzed by the same bifunctional enzyme: fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase/sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (F/SBPase, while in that of eukaryotic chloroplasts by two distinct enzymes: chloroplastic fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase and sedoheptulose-1, 7-bisphosphatase (SBPase, respectively. It was proposed that these two eukaryotic enzymes arose from the divergence of a common ancestral eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase of mitochondrial origin. However, no specific affinity between SBPase and eubacterial FBPase or F/SBPase can be observed in the previous phylogenetic analyses, and it is hard to explain why SBPase and/or F/SBPase are/is absent from most extant nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes according to this scenario. Results Domain analysis indicated that eubacterial F/SBPase of two different resources contain distinct domains: proteobacterial F/SBPases contain typical FBPase domain, while cyanobacterial F/SBPases possess FBPase_glpX domain. Therefore, like prokaryotic FBPase, eubacterial F/SBPase can also be divided into two evolutionarily distant classes (Class I and II. Phylogenetic analysis based on a much larger taxonomic sampling than previous work revealed that all eukaryotic SBPase cluster together and form a close sister group to the clade of epsilon-proteobacterial Class I FBPase which are gluconeogenesis-specific enzymes, while all eukaryotic chloroplast FBPase group together with eukaryotic cytosolic FBPase and form another distinct clade which then groups with the Class I FBPase of diverse eubacteria. Motif analysis of these enzymes also supports these phylogenetic correlations. Conclusions There are two evolutionarily distant classes of eubacterial bifunctional F/SBPase. Eukaryotic FBPase and SBPase do not diverge from either of them but have two independent origins

  1. Effect of thermal additions on the density and distribution of thermophilic amoebae and pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in a newly created cooling lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.; Ironside, K.S.; Metler, P.L.; Tan, E.L. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA)); Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B. (E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Aiken, SC (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of fatal human amoebic meningoencephalitis. The protozoan is ubiquitous in nature, and its presence is enhanced by thermal additions. In this investigation, water and sediments from a newly created cooling lake were quantitatively analyzed for the presence of thermophilic amoebae, thermophilic Naegleria spp., and the pathogen Naegleria fowleri. During periods of thermal additions, the concentrations of thermophilic amoebae and thermophilic Naegleria spp. increased as much as 5 orders of magnitude, and the concentration of the pathogen N. fowleri increased as much as 2 orders of magnitude. Concentrations of amoebae returned to prior thermal perturbation levels within 30 to 60 days after cessation of thermal additions. Increases in the thermophilic amoeba concentrations were noted in Savannah River oxbows downriver from the Savannah River plant discharge streams as compared with oxbows upriver from the discharges. Concentrations of thermophilic amoebae and thermophilic Naegleria spp. correlated significantly with temperature and conductivity. Air samples taken proximal to the lade during periods of thermal addition showed no evidence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. Isoenzyme patterns of the N. fowleri isolated from the cooling lake were identical to patterns of N. fowleri isolated from other sites in the United States and Belgium.

  2. A thermophilic membrane bioreactor for treating and re-using paper mill effluent; Biorreactor de membrana termofilico para el tratamiento y reutilizacion de efluentes de papelera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopetegui Garnika, J.; Sancho Seuma, L.; Abad Oliva, A.

    2002-07-01

    Thermophilic operation of a membrane bioreactor offers many advantages; biodegradation rates increase with temperature and flux is higher because of water viscosity decrease. Therefore,poor sttleability related to thermophilic sludges is solved by ultrafiltration and a suspended solids and turbidity free effluent is obtained. That suppose a wider range of applications interns of water reuse. (Author) 18 refs.

  3. Expression of the neutral protease gene from a thermophilic Bacillus sp BT1 strain in Bacillus subtilis and its natural host : Identification of a functional promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecerek, B; Venema, G

    The expression of the neutral protease gene (npr) from the thermophilic Bacillus sp. BT1 strain was studied in its natural host and in mesophilic Bacillus subtilis. In the thermophilic BT1 strain, the transcription of the protease gene is initiated from its own promoter, just 5' to the gene. In

  4. Isolation and Screening of Thermophilic Bacilli from Compost for Electrotransformation and Fermentation: Characterization of Bacillus smithii ET 138 as a New Biocatalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, E.F.; Weijer, van de A.H.P.; Daas, M.J.A.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.; Kranenburg, van R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermophilic bacteria are regarded as attractive production organisms for cost-efficient conversion of renewable resources to green chemicals, but their genetic accessibility is a major bottleneck in developing them into versatile platform organisms. In this study, we aimed to isolate thermophilic,

  5. Microbial eukaryotes in the human microbiome: ecology, evolution, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eWegener Parfrey

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing technology has opened a window into the vast communities of bacteria that live on and in humans, demonstrating tremendous variability and that they play a large role in health and disease. The eukaryotic component of the human gut microbiome remains relatively unexplored with these methods, but turning these tools toward microbial eukaryotes in the gut will likely yield myriad insights into disease states as well as the ecological and evolutionary principles that govern the gut microbiota. Microbial eukaryotes are common inhabitants of the human gut worldwide and parasitic taxa are a major source of morbidity and mortality, especially in developing countries, though there are also many taxa that cause no harm or are beneficial. While the role microbial eukaryotes play in healthy individuals is much less clear, there are likely many complex interactions between the bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic components of the human microbiome that influence health and disease states. Integrating eukaryotic microbes into a broad view of microbiome function requires an integrated ecological approach rather than one focused on specific, disease-causing taxa. Moving forward, we expect broad surveys of the eukaryotic microbiota and associated bacteria from geographically and socioeconomically diverse populations to paint a more complete picture of the human gut microbiome in health and disease.

  6. Leading role of TBP in the Establishment of Complexity in Eukaryotic Transcription Initiation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiryo Kawakami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While both archaeal and eukaryotic transcription initiation systems utilize TBP (TATA box-binding protein and TFIIB (transcription factor IIB, eukaryotic systems include larger numbers of initiation factors. It remains uncertain how eukaryotic transcription initiation systems have evolved. Here, we investigate the evolutionary development of TBP and TFIIB, each of which has an intramolecular direct repeat, using two evolutionary indicators. Inter-repeat sequence dissimilarity (dDR, distance between direct repeats indicates that the asymmetry of two repeats in TBP and TFIIB has gradually increased during evolution. Interspecies sequence diversity (PD, phylogenetic diversity indicates that the resultant asymmetric structure, which is related to the ability to interact with multiple factors, diverged in archaeal TBP and archaeal/eukaryotic TFIIB during evolution. Our findings suggest that eukaryotic TBP initially acquired multiple Eukarya-specific interactors through asymmetric evolution of the two repeats. After the asymmetric TBP generated the complexity of the eukaryotic transcription initiation systems, its diversification halted and its asymmetric structure spread throughout eukaryotic species.

  7. Repertory of eukaryotes (eukaryome) in the human gastrointestinal tract: taxonomy and detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, I; Raoult, D; Bittar, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotes are an important component of the human gut, and their relationship with the human host varies from parasitic to commensal. Understanding the diversity of human intestinal eukaryotes has important significance for human health. In the past few decades, most of the multitudes of techniques that are involved in the diagnosis of the eukaryotic population in the human intestinal tract were confined to pathological and parasitological aspects that mainly rely on traditionally based methods. However, development of culture-independent molecular techniques comprised of direct DNA extraction from faeces followed by sequencing, offer new opportunities to estimate the occurrence of eukaryotes in the human gut by providing data on the entire eukaryotic community, particularly not-yet-cultured or fastidious organisms. Further broad surveys of the eukaryotic communities in the gut based on high throughput tools such as next generation sequencing might lead to uncovering the real diversity of these ubiquitous organisms in the human intestinal tract and discovering the unrecognized roles of these eukaryotes in modulating the host immune system and inducing changes in host gut physiology and ecosystem. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Energy metabolism among eukaryotic anaerobes in light of Proterozoic ocean chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentel, Marek; Martin, William

    2008-08-27

    Recent years have witnessed major upheavals in views about early eukaryotic evolution. One very significant finding was that mitochondria, including hydrogenosomes and the newly discovered mitosomes, are just as ubiquitous and defining among eukaryotes as the nucleus itself. A second important advance concerns the readjustment, still in progress, about phylogenetic relationships among eukaryotic groups and the roughly six new eukaryotic supergroups that are currently at the focus of much attention. From the standpoint of energy metabolism (the biochemical means through which eukaryotes gain their ATP, thereby enabling any and all evolution of other traits), understanding of mitochondria among eukaryotic anaerobes has improved. The mainstream formulations of endosymbiotic theory did not predict the ubiquity of mitochondria among anaerobic eukaryotes, while an alternative hypothesis that specifically addressed the evolutionary origin of energy metabolism among eukaryotic anaerobes did. Those developments in biology have been paralleled by a similar upheaval in the Earth sciences regarding views about the prevalence of oxygen in the oceans during the Proterozoic (the time from ca 2.5 to 0.6 Ga ago). The new model of Proterozoic ocean chemistry indicates that the oceans were anoxic and sulphidic during most of the Proterozoic. Its proponents suggest the underlying geochemical mechanism to entail the weathering of continental sulphides by atmospheric oxygen to sulphate, which was carried into the oceans as sulphate, fueling marine sulphate reducers (anaerobic, hydrogen sulphide-producing prokaryotes) on a global scale. Taken together, these two mutually compatible developments in biology and geology underscore the evolutionary significance of oxygen-independent ATP-generating pathways in mitochondria, including those of various metazoan groups, as a watermark of the environments within which eukaryotes arose and diversified into their major lineages.

  9. Horizontal transfer of a eukaryotic plastid-targeted protein gene to cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal or lateral transfer of genetic material between distantly related prokaryotes has been shown to play a major role in the evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes, but exchange of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is not as well understood. In particular, gene flow from eukaryotes to prokaryotes is rarely documented with strong support, which is unusual since prokaryotic genomes appear to readily accept foreign genes. Results Here, we show that abundant marine cyanobacteria in the related genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus acquired a key Calvin cycle/glycolytic enzyme from a eukaryote. Two non-homologous forms of fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA are characteristic of eukaryotes and prokaryotes respectively. However, a eukaryotic gene has been inserted immediately upstream of the ancestral prokaryotic gene in several strains (ecotypes of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. In one lineage this new gene has replaced the ancestral gene altogether. The eukaryotic gene is most closely related to the plastid-targeted FBA from red algae. This eukaryotic-type FBA once replaced the plastid/cyanobacterial type in photosynthetic eukaryotes, hinting at a possible functional advantage in Calvin cycle reactions. The strains that now possess this eukaryotic FBA are scattered across the tree of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, perhaps because the gene has been transferred multiple times among cyanobacteria, or more likely because it has been selectively retained only in certain lineages. Conclusion A gene for plastid-targeted FBA has been transferred from red algae to cyanobacteria, where it has inserted itself beside its non-homologous, functional analogue. Its current distribution in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus is punctate, suggesting a complex history since its introduction to this group.

  10. Isolation of cultivable thermophilic lactic acid bacteria from cheeses made with mesophilic starter and molecular comparison with dairy-related Lactobacillus helveticus strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Elisabeth Penderup; Ardö, Ylva Margareta; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To isolate cultivable thermophilic lactic acid bacteria from cheeses made with mesophilic starter and compare them with dairy-related Lactobacillus helveticus strains using molecular typing methods. Methods and Results: The number of thermophilic bacteria in seven commercial cheeses...... was identical to the rep-PCR profile of the Lact. helveticus adjunct culture used in the specific cheese, but their pulsed field gel electrophoresis profiles differed slightly. Conclusion: It was possible to isolate cultivable thermophilic bacteria from ripened cheeses manufactured with mesophilic starter...... and thermophilic adjunct cultures by using an enumeration step. Significance and Impact of the Study: Isolation of cultivable thermophilic bacteria from ripened cheeses made with mesophilic starters offers an original source for new dairy-relevant cultures....

  11. Positive selection for unpreferred codon usage in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan James E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection has traditionally been understood as a force responsible for pushing genes to states of higher translational efficiency, whereas lower translational efficiency has been explained by neutral mutation and genetic drift. We looked for evidence of directional selection resulting in increased unpreferred codon usage (and presumably reduced translational efficiency in three divergent clusters of eukaryotic genomes using a simple optimal-codon-based metric (Kp/Ku. Results Here we show that for some genes natural selection is indeed responsible for causing accelerated unpreferred codon substitution, and document the scope of this selection. In Cryptococcus and to a lesser extent Drosophila, we find many genes showing a statistically significant signal of selection for unpreferred codon usage in one or more lineages. We did not find evidence for this type of selection in Saccharomyces. The signal of positive selection observed from unpreferred synonymous codon substitutions is coincident in Cryptococcus and Drosophila with the distribution of upstream open reading frames (uORFs, another genic feature known to reduce translational efficiency. Functional enrichment analysis of genes exhibiting low Kp/Ku ratios reveals that genes in regulatory roles are particularly subject to this type of selection. Conclusion Through genome-wide scans, we find recent selection for unpreferred codon usage at approximately 1% of genetic loci in a Cryptococcus and several genes in Drosophila. Unpreferred codons can impede translation efficiency, and we find that genes with translation-impeding uORFs are enriched for this selection signal. We find that regulatory genes are particularly likely to be subject to selection for unpreferred codon usage. Given that expression noise can propagate through regulatory cascades, and that low translational efficiency can reduce expression noise, this finding supports the hypothesis that translational

  12. Integrated databases and computer systems for studying eukaryotic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolchanov, N A; Ponomarenko, M P; Frolov, A S; Ananko, E A; Kolpakov, F A; Ignatieva, E V; Podkolodnaya, O A; Goryachkovskaya, T N; Stepanenko, I L; Merkulova, T I; Babenko, V V; Ponomarenko, Y V; Kochetov, A V; Podkolodny, N L; Vorobiev, D V; Lavryushev, S V; Grigorovich, D A; Kondrakhin, Y V; Milanesi, L; Wingender, E; Solovyev, V; Overton, G C

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the work was to develop a WWW-oriented computer system providing a maximal integration of informational and software resources on the regulation of gene expression and navigation through them. Rapid growth of the variety and volume of information accumulated in the databases on regulation of gene expression necessarily requires the development of computer systems for automated discovery of the knowledge that can be further used for analysis of regulatory genomic sequences. The GeneExpress system developed includes the following major informational and software modules: (1) Transcription Regulation (TRRD) module, which contains the databases on transcription regulatory regions of eukaryotic genes and TRRD Viewer for data visualization; (2) Site Activity Prediction (ACTIVITY), the module for analysis of functional site activity and its prediction; (3) Site Recognition module, which comprises (a) B-DNA-VIDEO system for detecting the conformational and physicochemical properties of DNA sites significant for their recognition, (b) Consensus and Weight Matrices (ConsFrec) and (c) Transcription Factor Binding Sites Recognition (TFBSR) systems for detecting conservative contextual regions of functional sites and their recognition; (4) Gene Networks (GeneNet), which contains an object-oriented database accumulating the data on gene networks and signal transduction pathways, and the Java-based Viewer for exploration and visualization of the GeneNet information; (5) mRNA Translation (Leader mRNA), designed to analyze structural and contextual properties of mRNA 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) and predict their translation efficiency; (6) other program modules designed to study the structure-function organization of regulatory genomic sequences and regulatory proteins. GeneExpress is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc. ru/systems/GeneExpress/ and the links to the mirror site(s) can be found at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/mgs/links/mirrors.html+ ++.

  13. The ecology of viruses that infect eukaryotic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Steven M

    2012-09-01

    Because viruses of eukaryotic algae are incredibly diverse, sweeping generalizations about their ecology are rare. These obligate parasites infect a range of algae and their diversity can be illustrated by considering that isolates range from small particles with ssRNA genomes to much larger particles with 560 kb dsDNA genomes. Molecular research has also provided clues about the extent of their diversity especially considering that genetic signatures of algal viruses in the environment rarely match cultivated viruses. One general concept in algal virus ecology that has emerged is that algal viruses are very host specific and most infect only certain strains of their hosts; with the exception of viruses of brown algae, evidence for interspecies infectivity is lacking. Although some host-virus systems behave with boom-bust oscillations, complex patterns of intraspecies infectivity can lead to host-virus coexistence obfuscating the role of viruses in host population dynamics. Within the framework of population dynamics, host density dependence is an important phenomenon that influences virus abundances in nature. Variable burst sizes of different viruses also influence their abundances and permit speculations about different life strategies, but as exceptions are common in algal virus ecology, life strategy generalizations may not be broadly applicable. Gaps in knowledge of virus seasonality and persistence are beginning to close and investigations of environmental reservoirs and virus resilience may answer questions about virus inter-annual recurrences. Studies of algal mortality have shown that viruses are often important agents of mortality reinforcing notions about their ecological relevance, while observations of the surprising ways viruses interact with their hosts highlight the immaturity of our understanding. Considering that just two decades ago algal viruses were hardly acknowledged, recent progress affords the optimistic perspective that future studies

  14. Novel eukaryotic enzymes modifying cell-surface biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic extracellular matrices such as proteoglycans, sclerotinized structures, mucus, external tests, capsules, cell walls and waxes contain highly modified proteins, glycans and other composite biopolymers. Using comparative genomics and sequence profile analysis we identify several novel enzymes that could be potentially involved in the modification of cell-surface glycans or glycoproteins. Results Using sequence analysis and conservation we define the acyltransferase domain prototyped by the fungal Cas1p proteins, identify its active site residues and unify them to the superfamily of classical 10TM acyltransferases (e.g. oatA. We also identify a novel family of esterases (prototyped by the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain of Cas1p that have a similar fold as the SGNH/GDSL esterases but differ from them in their conservation pattern. Conclusions We posit that the combined action of the acyltransferase and esterase domain plays an important role in controlling the acylation levels of glycans and thereby regulates their physico-chemical properties such as hygroscopicity, resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis and physical strength. We present evidence that the action of these novel enzymes on glycans might play an important role in host-pathogen interaction of plants, fungi and metazoans. We present evidence that in plants (e.g. PMR5 and ESK1 the regulation of carbohydrate acylation by these acylesterases might also play an important role in regulation of transpiration and stress resistance. We also identify a subfamily of these esterases in metazoans (e.g. C7orf58, which are fused to an ATP-grasp amino acid ligase domain that is predicted to catalyze, in certain animals, modification of cell surface polymers by amino acid or peptides. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gaspar Jekely and Frank Eisenhaber

  15. The Superoxide Reductase from the Early Diverging Eukaryote Giardia Intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabelli, D.E.; Testa, F.; Mastronicola, D.; Bordi, E.; Pucillo, L.P.; Sarti, P.; Saraiva, L.M.; Giuffre, A.; Teixeira, M.

    2011-10-15

    Unlike superoxide dismutases (SODs), superoxidereductases (SORs) eliminate superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-}) not through its dismutation, but via reduction to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the presence of an electron donor. The microaerobic protist Giardia intestinalis, responsible for a common intestinal disease in humans, though lacking SOD and other canonical reactive oxygen species-detoxifying systems, is among the very few eukaryotes encoding a SOR yet identified. In this study, the recombinant SOR from Giardia (SOR{sub Gi}) was purified and characterized by pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The protein, isolated in the reduced state, after oxidation by superoxide or hexachloroiridate(IV), yields a resting species (T{sub final}) with Fe{sup 3+} ligated to glutamate or hydroxide depending on pH (apparent pK{sub a} = 8.7). Although showing negligible SOD activity, reduced SOR{sub Gi} reacts with O{sub 2}{sup {sm_bullet}-} with a pH-independent second-order rate constant k{sub 1} = 1.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and yields the ferric-(hydro)peroxo intermediate T{sub 1}; this in turn rapidly decays to the T{sub final} state with pH-dependent rates, without populating other detectable intermediates. Immunoblotting assays show that SOR{sub Gi} is expressed in the disease-causing trophozoite of Giardia. We propose that the superoxide-scavenging activity of SOR in Giardia may promote the survival of this air-sensitive parasite in the fairly aerobic proximal human small intestine during infection.

  16. MetWAMer: eukaryotic translation initiation site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendel Volker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translation initiation site (TIS identification is an important aspect of the gene annotation process, requisite for the accurate delineation of protein sequences from transcript data. We have developed the MetWAMer package for TIS prediction in eukaryotic open reading frames of non-viral origin. MetWAMer can be used as a stand-alone, third-party tool for post-processing gene structure annotations generated by external computational programs and/or pipelines, or directly integrated into gene structure prediction software implementations. Results MetWAMer currently implements five distinct methods for TIS prediction, the most accurate of which is a routine that combines weighted, signal-based translation initiation site scores and the contrast in coding potential of sequences flanking TISs using a perceptron. Also, our program implements clustering capabilities through use of the k-medoids algorithm, thereby enabling cluster-specific TIS parameter utilization. In practice, our static weight array matrix-based indexing method for parameter set lookup can be used with good results in data sets exhibiting moderate levels of 5'-complete coverage. Conclusion We demonstrate that improvements in statistically-based models for TIS prediction can be achieved by taking the class of each potential start-methionine into account pending certain testing conditions, and that our perceptron-based model is suitable for the TIS identification task. MetWAMer represents a well-documented, extensible, and freely available software system that can be readily re-trained for differing target applications and/or extended with existing and novel TIS prediction methods, to support further research efforts in this area.

  17. The classification, structure and functioning of Ago proteins in Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Poterala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ago proteins are members of the highly specialized and conserved Argonaute family, primarily responsible for regulation of gene expression. As a part of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs Ago proteins are responsible for binding a short RNA and cleavage/inhibition of translation of target mRNAs. Phosphorylation may work as the switch between those two functions, but the role of magnesium ion concentration is also taken into consideration. Recent reports indicate that Ago proteins can interact with an mRNA and cause inhibition of translation without the participation of a short RNA. As key elements in RNA interference processes, Ago proteins are an important and intensively exploited area of research. Furthermore, these proteins are involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination, modifications of chromatin, and alternative splicing. Their role in the cell cycle and senescence is also being studied. In addition, Ago expression is tissue-specific, which potentially may be used for diagnostic purposes. Understanding the mechanisms of Ago functioning is therefore crucial for understanding many cellular processes. The following article presents a detailed description of the Ago proteins including their post-translational modifications, recent data and hypotheses concerning their interactions with short RNAs and mRNAs as well as the mechanisms of siRNA/miRNA sorting into individual members of the Ago subfamily, and their role in eukaryotic cells. The latest classification of Ago proteins within the Argonaute family based on evolutionary studies and their possible interactions with DNA are also described.

  18. Large-scale analysis of phosphorylation site occupancy in eukaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    in proteins is currently lacking. We have therefore analyzed the occurrence and occupancy of phosphorylated sites (~ 100,281) in a large set of eukaryotic proteins (~ 22,995). Phosphorylation probability was found to be much higher in both the  termini of protein sequences and this is much pronounced...... maximum randomness. An analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that just 40 motifs and a much lower number of associated kinases might account for nearly 50% of the known phosphorylations in eukaryotic proteins. Our results provide a broad picture of the phosphorylation sites in eukaryotic proteins....

  19. A novel eukaryote-made thermostable DNA polymerase which is free from bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideki; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Kitajima, Isao

    2011-09-01

    To achieve the production of a thermostable DNA polymerase free from bacterial DNA contamination, we developed eukaryote-made thermostable DNA (Taq) polymerase. The novel eukaryote-made thermostable DNA polymerase resolves the problem of contaminating bacterial DNA in conventional bacterially made thermostable DNA polymerase as a result of its manufacture and incomplete purification. Using eukaryote-made thermostable DNA polymerase, the sensitive and reliable detection of bacteria becomes feasible for large fields, thereby making the development of a wide range of powerful applications possible.

  20. Dispersal of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum endospores into Baltic Sea sediments over thousands of years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezende, Julia Rosa de; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Hubert, Casey RJ

    2013-01-01

    a natural model for investigating passive dispersal in the ocean. We investigated the activity, diversity and abundance of thermophilic endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in Aarhus Bay by incubating pasteurized sediment between 28 and 85°C, and by subsequent molecular diversity analyses of 16......S rRNA and of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes within the endospore-forming SRB genus Desulfotomaculum. The thermophilic Desulfotomaculum community in Aarhus Bay sediments consisted of at least 23 species-level 16S rRNA sequence phylotypes. In two cases, pairs of identical 16S r......RNA and dsrAB sequences in Arctic surface sediment 3000km away showed that the same phylotypes are present in both locations. Radiotracer-enhanced most probable number analysis revealed that the abundance of endospores of thermophilic SRB in Aarhus Bay sediment was ca. 104 per cm3 at the surface and decreased...

  1. Multiple approaches to characterize the microbial community in a thermophilic anaerobic digester running on swine manure: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Chang, Yi-Chia; Yu, Chang-Ping; Huang, Shir-Ly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the first survey of microbial community in thermophilic anaerobic digester using swine manure as sole feedstock was performed by multiple approaches including denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), clone library and pyrosequencing techniques. The integrated analysis of 21 DGGE bands, 126 clones and 8506 pyrosequencing read sequences revealed that Clostridia from the phylum Firmicutes account for the most dominant Bacteria. In addition, our analysis also identified additional taxa that were missed by the previous researches, including members of the bacterial phyla Synergistetes, Planctomycetes, Armatimonadetes, Chloroflexi and Nitrospira which might also play a role in thermophilic anaerobic digester. Most archaeal 16S rRNA sequences could be assigned to the order Methanobacteriales instead of Methanomicrobiales comparing to previous studies. In addition, this study reported that the member of Methanothermobacter genus was firstly found in thermophilic anaerobic digester. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. Effect of pre-treatment at elevated temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Yenal, U.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an appropriate technique for the treatment of sludge before final disposal and it is employed worldwide as the oldest and most important process for sludge stabilization. In general, mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is more widely used compared to thermophilic...... between mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge and (b) the effect of the pretreatment at 70 degreesC on mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. The pretreatment step showed very positive effect on the methane potential and production rate upon...... digestion. Furthermore, thermal pre-treatment is suitable for the improvement of stabilization, enhancement of dewatering of the sludge, reduction of the numbers of pathogens and could be realized at relatively low cost especially at low temperatures. The present study investigates (a) the differences...

  3. Biogas Upgrading via Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenesis in Two-Stage Continuous Stirred Tank Reactors at Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis; Treu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative setup composed by two stage reactors to achieve biogas upgrading coupling the CO2 in the biogas with external H2 and subsequent conversion into CH4 by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. In this configuration, the biogas produced in the first reactor was transferred...... to the second one, where H2 was injected. This configuration was tested at both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. After H2 addition, the produced biogas was upgraded to average CH4 content of 89% in the mesophilic reactor and 85% in the thermophilic. At thermophilic conditions, a higher efficiency of CH4...... the hydrogenotrophic pathway enhancing biogas upgrading. Moreover, Thermoanaerobacteraceae were likely involved in syntrophic acetate oxidation with hydrogenotrophic methanogens in absence of aceticlastic methanogenesis....

  4. Complete genome sequence of the strain Defluviitoga tunisiensis L3, isolated from a thermophilic, production-scale biogas plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Irena; Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Stolze, Yvonne; König, Helmut; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2015-06-10

    An anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium belonging to the phylum Thermotogae was isolated from a rural, thermophilic biogas plant (54°C) producing methane-rich biogas from maize silage, barley, cattle and pig manure. Here we report the first complete genome sequence of the Defluviitoga tunisiensis strain L3, an isolate from the family Thermotogaceae. The strain L3 encodes several genes predicted to be involved in utilization of a large diversity of complex carbohydrates including cellobiose and xylan for the production of acetate, hydrogen (H2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The genome sequence of D. tunisiensis L3 provides the basis for biotechnological exploitation of genetic determinants playing an important role in thermophilic fermentation processes utilizing renewable primary products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phytase production by thermophilic mold Sporotrichum thermophile in solid-state fermentation and its application in dephytinization of sesame oil cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bijender; Satyanarayana, T

    2006-06-01

    The phytase production by Sporotrichum thermophile TLR50 was recorded on all the commonly used animal feed ingredients tested to varying degrees in solid-state fermentation. Enzyme production increased to 180 U/g of dry moldy residue (DMR) in sesame oil cake at 120 h and 45 degrees C at the initial substrate-to-moisture ratio of 1:2.5 and aw of 0.95. Supplementation of sesame oil cake with glucose and ammonium sulfate further enhanced phytase titer (282 U/g of DMR). An overall 76% enhancement in phytase production was achieved owing to optimization. The mold secreted acid phosphatase, amylase, xylanase, and lipase along with phytase. By the action of phytase, inorganic phosphate was liberated efficiently, leading to dephytinization of sesame oil cake.

  6. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and chemically enhanced primary-treated sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with primary sewage sludge is beneficial for urban centers, while the optimized conditions reported in the literature are not locally suitable for Hong Kong. Therefore, the present study was aimed to develop an optimized mixing ratio of food waste to chemically enhanced primary-treated sewer sludge (CEPT) for co-digestion using batch tests under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The mixing ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 (v v(-1)) of food waste to CEPT sludge was tested under the following conditions: temperature - 35°C and 55°C; pH - not regulated; agitation - 150 rpm and time - 20 days. The thermophilic incubations led a good hydrolysis rate and 2-12-fold higher enzyme activities than in mesophilic incubations for different mixing ratios. While the acidogenesis were found retarded that leading to 'sour and stuck' digestion for all mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge from thermophilic incubations. The measured zeta potential was most favourable (-5 to -16.8 mV) for methane production under thermophilic incubations; however the CH4 recovery was less than that in mesophilic incubations. The results suggested that the quick hydrolysis and subsequent acid accumulation under thermophilic incubation lead to inhibited methanogenesis at the early stage than in mesophilic systems. It is concluded that buffer addition is therefore required for any mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge for improved CH4 recovery for both mesophilic and thermophilic operations.

  7. Conversion of hemicelluloses and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can be used for fermentation of the hemicelluloses fraction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, physiological studies of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria have shown that the ethanol yield decreases at increasing substrate concentration. The biochemical limitations causing this phenomenon are not known in detail. Physiological and biochemical studies of a newly characterized thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii, was performed. This study included extraction of intracellular metabolites and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. These studies revealed several bottlenecks in the D-xylose metabolism. This knowledge makes way for physiological and genetic engineering of this strain to improve the ethanol yield and productivity at high concentration of D-xylose. (au)

  8. Highly thermostable xylanase production from a thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 utilizing lignocellulosic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya eBhalla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractEfficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars requires a complete repertoire of biomass deconstruction enzymes. Hemicellulases play an important role in hydrolyzing hemicellulose component of lignocellulose to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. Thermostable xylanases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life at high temperatures. Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 produced thermostable xylanase activity (crude xylanase cocktail when grown on xylan or various inexpensive untreated and pretreated lignocellulosic biomasses such as prairie cord grass and corn stover. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude xylanase cocktail were 6.5 and 70ºC, respectively. The WSUCF1 crude xylanase was found to be highly thermostable with half-lives of 18 and 12 days at 60 and 70ºC, respectively. At 70ºC, rates of xylan hydrolysis were also found to be better with the WSUCF1 secretome than those with commercial enzymes, i.e., for WSUCF1 crude xylanase, CellicHTec2, and AccelleraseXY, the percent xylan conversions were 68.9, 49.4, and 28.92, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, WSUCF1 crude xylanase cocktail is among the most thermostable xylanases produced by thermophilic Geobacillus spp. and other thermophilic microbes (optimum growth temperature ≤70ºC. High thermostability, activity over wide range of temperatures, and better xylan hydrolysis than commercial enzymes make WSUCF1 crude xylanase suitable for thermophilic lignocellulose bioconversion processes.

  9. Net energy production associated with pathogen inactivation during mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Christopher; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-10-15

    The potential for anaerobic digester energy production must be balanced with the sustainability of reusing the resultant biosolids for land application. Mesophilic, thermophilic, temperature-phased, and high temperature (60 or 70 °C) batch pre-treatment digester configurations have been systematically evaluated for net energy production and pathogen inactivation potential. Energy input requirements and net energy production were modeled for each digester scheme. First-order inactivation rate coefficients for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and bacteriophage MS-2 were measured at each digester temperature and full-scale pathogen inactivation performance was estimated for each indicator organism and each digester configuration. Inactivation rates were found to increase dramatically at temperatures above 55 °C. Modeling full-scale performance using retention times based on U.S. EPA time and temperature constraints predicts a 1-2 log inactivation in mesophilic treatment, and a 2-5 log inactivation in 50-55 °C thermophilic and temperature-phased treatments. Incorporating a 60 or 70 °C batch pre-treatment phase resulted in dramatically higher potency, achieving MS-2 inactivation of 14 and 16 logs respectively, and complete inactivation (over 100 log reduction) of E. coli and E. faecalis. For temperatures less than 70 °C, viability staining of thermally-treated E. coli showed significantly reduced inactivation relative to standard culture enumeration. Due to shorter residence times in thermophilic reactors, the net energy production for all digesters was similar (less than 20% difference) with the 60 or 70 °C batch treatment configurations producing the most net energy and the mesophilic treatment producing the least. Incorporating a 60 or 70 °C pre-treatment phase can dramatically increase pathogen inactivation performance without decreasing net energy capture from anaerobic digestion. Energy consumption is not a significant barrier against

  10. Temperature-Dependent Alkyl Glycerol Ether Lipid Composition of Mesophilic and Thermophilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnauld Vinçon-Laugier

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of non-isoprenoid alkyl glycerol ether lipids in Bacteria and natural environments is increasingly being reported and the specificity and diagenetic stability of these lipids make them powerful biomarkers for biogeochemical and environmental studies. Yet the environmental controls on the biosynthesis of these peculiar membrane lipids remain poorly documented. Here, the lipid content of two mesophilic (Desulfatibacillum aliphaticivorans and Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans and one thermophilic (Thermodesulfobacterium commune sulfate-reducing bacteria—whose membranes are mostly composed of ether lipids—was investigated as a function of growth temperature (20–40°C and 54–84°C, respectively. For all strains, the cellular lipid content was lower at sub- or supra-optimal growth temperature, but the relative proportions of dialkyl glycerols, monoalkyl glycerols and fatty acids remained remarkably stable whatever the growth temperature. Rather than changing the proportions of the different lipid classes, the three strains responded to temperature changes by modifying the average structural composition of the alkyl and acyl chains constitutive of their membrane lipids. Major adaptive mechanisms concerned modifications of the level of branching and of the proportions of the different methyl branched lipids. Specifically, an increase in temperature induced mesophilic strains to produce less dimethyl branched dialkyl glycerols and 10-methyl branched lipids relative to linear structures, and the thermophilic strain to decrease the proportion of anteiso relative to iso methyl branched compounds. These modifications were in agreement with a regulation of the membrane fluidity. In one mesophilic and the thermophilic strains, a modification of the growth temperature further induced changes in the relative proportions of sn-2 vs sn-1 monoalkyl glycerols, suggesting an unprecedented mechanism of homeoviscous adaptation in Bacteria. Strong

  11. Methane Emission from Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME in a Thermophilic Anaerobic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Irvan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As the issue of global warming draws increasing concern, many studies to reduce CO2 and CH4 gases (greenhouse gases, GHG have been implemented in several countries, including in Indonesia. Considering that Indonesia has a huge numbers of palm oil mills, no doubt if their waste water treatment as one of the major sources in GHG.  This paper presents the results from a research project between Metawater Co., Ltd.-Japan and University of Sumatera Utara-Indonesia. The objective of the research is to study the methane emission of thermophilic fermentation in the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME on a laboratory scale. Anaerobic digestion was performed in two-litre water jacketed biodigester type continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR and operated at a thermophilic temperature (55 oC. As raw material, a real liquid waste (POME from palm oil mill was used. Fresh POME was obtained from seeding pond of PTPN II waste water treatment facility which has concentration of 39.7 g of VS/L and COD value of 59,000 mg/L. To gain precise results, complete recording and reliable equipment of reactor was employed. As the experimental results, for hydraulic retention time (HRT 8 days, VS decomposition rate of 63.5% and gas generation of 6.05-9.82 L/day were obtained, while for HRT 6 and 4 days, VS decomposition rate of 61.2, 53.3% and gas generation of  6.93-8.94  and  13.95-16.14 L/day were obtained respectively. Keywords—methane (CH4, palm oil mill effluent (POME, anaerobic digestion, thermophilic, green house gases (GHG

  12. Mechanisms for stabilisation and the maintenance of solubility in proteins from thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwicker Jim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The database of protein structures contains representatives from organisms with a range of growth temperatures. Various properties have been studied in a search for the molecular basis of protein adaptation to higher growth temperature. Charged groups have emerged as key distinguishing factors for proteins from thermophiles and mesophiles. Results A dataset of 291 thermophile-derived protein structures is compared with mesophile proteins. Calculations of electrostatic interactions support the importance of charges, but indicate that increases in charge contribution to folded state stabilisation do not generally correlate with the numbers of charged groups. Relative propensities of charged groups vary, such as the substitution of glutamic for aspartic acid sidechains. Calculations suggest an energetic basis, with less dehydration for longer sidechains. Most other properties studied show weak or insignificant separation of proteins from moderate thermophiles or hyperthermophiles and mesophiles, including an estimate of the difference in sidechain rotameric entropy upon protein folding. An exception is increased burial of alanine and proline residues and decreased burial of phenylalanine, methionine, tyrosine and tryptophan in hyperthermophile proteins compared to those from mesophiles. Conclusion Since an increase in the number of charged groups for hyperthermophile proteins is separable from charged group contribution to folded state stability, we hypothesise that charged group propensity is important in the context of protein solubility and the prevention of aggregation. Accordingly we find some separation between mesophile and hyperthermophile proteins when looking at the largest surface patch that does not contain a charged sidechain. With regard to our observation that aromatic sidechains are less buried in hyperthermophile proteins, further analysis indicates that the placement of some of these groups may facilitate the

  13. Thermophilic versus Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge: A Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreeyessus, Getachew D.; Jenicek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    During advanced biological wastewater treatment, a huge amount of sludge is produced as a by-product of the treatment process. Hence, reuse and recovery of resources and energy from the sludge is a big technological challenge. The processing of sludge produced by Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is massive, which takes up a big part of the overall operational costs. In this regard, anaerobic digestion (AD) of sewage sludge continues to be an attractive option to produce biogas that could contribute to the wastewater management cost reduction and foster the sustainability of those WWTPs. At the same time, AD reduces sludge amounts and that again contributes to the reduction of the sludge disposal costs. However, sludge volume minimization remains, a challenge thus improvement of dewatering efficiency is an inevitable part of WWTP operation. As a result, AD parameters could have significant impact on sludge properties. One of the most important operational parameters influencing the AD process is temperature. Consequently, the thermophilic and the mesophilic modes of sludge AD are compared for their pros and cons by many researchers. However, most comparisons are more focused on biogas yield, process speed and stability. Regarding the biogas yield, thermophilic sludge AD is preferred over the mesophilic one because of its faster biochemical reaction rate. Equally important but not studied sufficiently until now was the influence of temperature on the digestate quality, which is expressed mainly by the sludge dewateringability, and the reject water quality (chemical oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen, and pH). In the field of comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion process, few and often inconclusive research, unfortunately, has been published so far. Hence, recommendations for optimized technologies have not yet been done. The review presented provides a comparison of existing sludge AD technologies and the gaps that need to be filled so as to optimize

  14. Ultrasound-mediated DNA transformation in thermophilic gram-positive anaerobes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thermophilic, Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria (TGPAs are generally recalcitrant to chemical and electrotransformation due to their special cell-wall structure and the low intrinsic permeability of plasma membranes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we established for any Gram-positive or thermophiles an ultrasound-based sonoporation as a simple, rapid, and minimally invasive method to genetically transform TGPAs. We showed that by applying a 40 kHz ultrasound frequency over a 20-second exposure, Texas red-conjugated dextran was delivered with 27% efficiency into Thermoanaerobacter sp. X514, a TGPA that can utilize both pentose and hexose for ethanol production. Experiments that delivered plasmids showed that host-cell viability and plasmid DNA integrity were not compromised. Via sonoporation, shuttle vectors pHL015 harboring a jellyfish gfp gene and pIKM2 encoding a Clostridium thermocellum β-1,4-glucanase gene were delivered into X514 with an efficiency of 6x10(2 transformants/µg of methylated DNA. Delivery into X514 cells was confirmed via detecting the kanamycin-resistance gene for pIKM2, while confirmation of pHL015 was detected by visualization of fluorescence signals of secondary host-cells following a plasmid-rescue experiment. Furthermore, the foreign β-1,4-glucanase gene was functionally expressed in X514, converting the host into a prototypic thermophilic consolidated bioprocessing organism that is not only ethanologenic but cellulolytic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we developed an ultrasound-based sonoporation method in TGPAs. This new DNA-delivery method could significantly improve the throughput in developing genetic systems for TGPAs, many of which are of industrial interest yet remain difficult to manipulate genetically.

  15. High-efficiency hydrogen production by an anaerobic, thermophilic enrichment culture from an Icelandic hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Perttu E P; Lay, Chyi-How; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Lin, Ping-Jei; Wu, Shu-Yii; Orlygsson, Jóhann; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2008-11-01

    Dark fermentative hydrogen production from glucose by a thermophilic culture (33HL), enriched from an Icelandic hot spring sediment sample, was studied in two continuous-flow, completely stirred tank reactors (CSTR1, CSTR2) and in one semi-continuous, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) at 58 degrees C. The 33HL produced H2 yield (HY) of up to 3.2 mol-H2/mol-glucose along with acetate in batch assay. In the CSTR1 with 33HL inoculum, H2 production was unstable. In the ASBR, maintained with 33HL, the H2 production enhanced after the addition of 6 mg/L of FeSO4 x H2O resulting in HY up to 2.51 mol-H2/mol-glucose (H2 production rate (HPR) of 7.85 mmol/h/L). The H2 production increase was associated with an increase in butyrate production. In the CSTR2, with ASBR inoculum and FeSO4 supplementation, stable, high-rate H2 production was obtained with HPR up to 45.8 mmol/h/L (1.1 L/h/L) and HY of 1.54 mol-H2/mol-glucose. The 33HL batch enrichment was dominated by bacterial strains closely affiliated with Thermobrachium celere (99.8-100%). T. celere affiliated strains, however, did not thrive in the three open system bioreactors. Instead, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense (98.5-99.6%) affiliated strains, producing H2 along with butyrate and acetate, dominated the reactor cultures. This culture had higher H2 production efficiency (HY and specific HPR) than reported for mesophilic mixed cultures. Further, the thermophilic culture readily formed granules in CSTR and ASBR systems. In summary, the thermophilic culture as characterized by high H2 production efficiency and ready granulation is considered very promising for H2 fermentation from carbohydrates.

  16. Comprehensive microbial analysis of combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process treating high-strength food wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-01-01

    A combined mesophilic anaerobic-thermophilic aerobic process was used to treat high-strength food wastewater in this study. During the experimental period, most of solid residue from the mesophilic anaerobic reactor (R1) was separated by centrifugation and introduced into the thermophilic aerobic...... organic matter removal efficiencies (over 90%) of TS, VS and COD and methane production than did R3. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results indicated that higher populations of both bacteria and archaea were maintained in R1 than in R3. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed relatively high abundance...

  17. Effects of Temperature on Methanogenesis in a Thermophilic (58°C) Anaerobic Digestor

    OpenAIRE

    Zinder, S. H.; Anguish, T.; Cardwell, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    The short-term effects of temperature on methanogenesis from acetate or CO2 in a thermophilic (58°C) anaerobic digestor were studied by incubating digestor sludge at different temperatures with 14C-labeled methane precursors (14CH3COO− or 14CO2). During a period when Methanosarcina sp. was numerous in the sludge, methanogenesis from acetate was optimal at 55 to 60°C and was completely inhibited at 65°C. A Methanosarcina culture isolated from the digestor grew optimally on acetate at 55 to 58°...

  18. Single-step bioconversion of lignocellulose to hydrogen using novel moderately thermophilic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of lignocellulosic biomass to hydrogen offers great potential for lower cost and higher efficiency compared to processes featuring dedicated cellulase production. Current studies on CBP-based hydrogen production mainly focus on using the thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum and the extremely thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus. However, no studies have demonstrated that the strains in the genus Thermoanaerobacterium could be used as the sole microorganism to accomplish both cellulose degradation and H2 generation. Results We have specifically screened for moderately thermophilic cellulolytic bacteria enabling to produce hydrogen directly from conversion of lignocellulosic materials. Three new strains of thermophilic cellulolytic bacteria in the genus Thermoanaerobacterium growing at a temperature of 60°C were isolated. All of them grew well on various plant polymers including microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, xylan, glucose, and xylose. In particular, the isolated bacterium, designated as Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum M18, showed high cellulolytic activity and a high yield of H2. When it was grown in 0.5% microcrystalline cellulose, approximately 82% cellulose was consumed, and the H2 yield and maximum production rate reached 10.86 mmol/g Avicel and 2.05 mmol/L/h, respectively. Natural lignocellulosic materials without any physicochemical or biological pretreatment also supported appreciable growth of strain M18, which resulted in 56.07% to 62.71% of insoluble cellulose and hemicellulose polymer degradation in corn cob, corn stalk, and wheat straw with a yield of 3.23 to 3.48 mmol H2/g substrate and an average production rate of 0.10 to 0.13 mmol H2/L/h. Conclusions The newly isolated strain T. thermosaccharolyticum M18 displayed effective degradation of lignocellulose and produced large amounts of hydrogen. This is the first report

  19. Macroscopic mass and energy balance of a pilot plant anaerobic bioreactor operated under thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Bombardiere, John; Chatfield, Mark; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael; Stafford, David A; Castillo-Angeles, Saul; Castellanos-Hernandez, Nehemias

    2006-01-01

    Intensive poultry production generates over 100,000 t of litter annually in West Virginia and 9 x 10(6) t nationwide. Current available technological alternatives based on thermophilic anaerobic digestion for residuals treatment are diverse. A modification of the typical continuous stirred tank reactor is a promising process being relatively stable and owing to its capability to manage considerable amounts of residuals at low operational cost. A 40-m3 pilot plant digester was used for performance evaluation considering energy input and methane production. Results suggest some changes to the pilot plant configuration are necessary to reduce power consumption although maximizing biodigester performance.

  20. Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples: evaluation of two automated enzyme immunoassays and conventional microbiological techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borck, Birgitte; Stryhn, H.; Ersboll, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    , neckskin and environmental samples) were collected over a period of 4 months at a turkey slaughterhouse and meat-cutting plant in Denmark. Faecal and environmental samples were tested by the conventional culture method and by the two EIAs, whereas meat and neckskin samples were tested by the two EIAs only......Aims: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of two automated enzyme immunoassays (EIA), EiaFoss and Minividas, and a conventional microbiological culture technique for detecting thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples. Methods and Results: A total of 286 samples (faecal, meat...

  1. A constant flux of diverse thermophilic bacteria into the cold Arctic seabed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Loy, Alexander; Nickel, Maren

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms have been repeatedly discovered in environments that do not support their metabolic activity. Identifying and quantifying these misplaced organisms can reveal dispersal mechanisms that shape natural microbial diversity. Using endospore germination experiments, we estimated a stable......, fermentation, and sulfate reduction upon induction at 50°C. The closest relatives to these bacteria come from warm subsurface petroleum reservoir and ocean crust ecosystems, suggesting that seabed fluid flow from these environments is delivering thermophiles to the cold ocean. These transport pathways may...... broadly influence microbial community composition in the marine environment....

  2. A constant flux of diverse thermophilic bacteria into the cold arctic seabed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Loy, Alexander; Nickel, Maren

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms have been repeatedly discovered in environments that do not support their metabolic activity. Identifying and quantifying these misplaced organisms can reveal dispersal mechanisms that shape natural microbial diversity. Using endospore germination experiments, we estimated a stable......, fermentation, and sulfate reduction upon induction at 50°C. The closest relatives to these bacteria come from warm subsurface petroleum reservoir and ocean crust ecosystems, suggesting that seabed fluid flow from these environments is delivering thermophiles to the cold ocean. These transport pathways may...... broadly influence microbial community composition in the marine environment....

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of two novel plasmids from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Schrøder, I.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of two novel plasmids isolated from the extreme thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM6725 (A. thermophilum), growing optimally at 70degreesC, has been determined. pBAS2 was found to be a 3653 bp plasmid with a GC content of 43%, and the sequence...... revealed 10 open reading frames (ORFs). The two largest of these, namely Orf21 and Orf41, showed similarity to a Bacillus plasmid recombinase and a Pseudoalteromonas plasmid replication protein, respectively. A sequence with homology to double stranded replication origins from rolling circle plasmids...

  4. Alternating terminal electron-acceptors at the basis of symbiogenesis: How oxygen ignited eukaryotic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speijer, Dave

    2017-02-01

    What kind of symbiosis between archaeon and bacterium gave rise to their eventual merger at the origin of the eukaryotes? I hypothesize that conditions favouring bacterial uptake were based on exchange of intermediate carbohydrate metabolites required by recurring changes in availability and use of the two different terminal electron chain acceptors, the bacterial one being oxygen. Oxygen won, and definitive loss of the archaeal membrane potential allowed permanent establishment of the bacterial partner as the proto-mitochondrion, further metabolic integration and highly efficient ATP production. This represents initial symbiogenesis, when crucial eukaryotic traits arose in response to the archaeon-bacterium merger. The attendant generation of internal reactive oxygen species (ROS) gave rise to a myriad of further eukaryotic adaptations, such as extreme mitochondrial genome reduction, nuclei, peroxisomes and meiotic sex. Eukaryotic origins could have started with shuffling intermediate metabolites as is still essential today. © 2017 The Authors. BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genome-wide Purification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Eukaryotic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik D.; Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Tachibana, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are common genetic elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and are reported in other eukaryotes as well. EccDNAs contribute to genetic variation among somatic cells in multicellular organisms and to evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. Sensitive methods...... for detecting eccDNA are needed to clarify how these elements affect genome stability and how environmental and biological factors induce their formation in eukaryotic cells. This video presents a sensitive eccDNA-purification method called Circle-Seq. The method encompasses column purification of circular DNA...... circularization is conserved between strains at these loci. In sum, the Circle-Seq method has broad applicability for genome-scale screening for eccDNA in eukaryotes as well as for detecting specific eccDNA types....

  6. Stochastic distribution of small soil eukaryotes resulting from high dispersal and drift in a local environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bahram, Mohammad; Kohout, Petr; Anslan, Sten; Harend, Helery; Abarenkov, Kessy; Tedersoo, Leho

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we examine the spatial structure of communities of small soil eukaryotes to elucidate the underlying stochastic and deterministic processes in the absence of environmental gradients at a local scale...

  7. High genetic diversity and novelty in eukaryotic plankton assemblages inhabiting saline lakes in the Qaidam basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution.

  8. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, Alvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles

  9. DNA-mismatch repair. The intricacies of eukaryotic spell-checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, T A

    1995-10-01

    Recent work suggests that the eukaryotic system responsible for repairing DNA mismatches, and so correcting replication errors, is more complex than was thought; its multiple components have many cellular functions.

  10. The Explanatory Models about the eukaryotic cell by secondary school students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camacho González, Johanna Patricia; Jara Colicoy, Natalia; Morales Orellana, Cristina; Rubio García, Nicole; Muñoz Guerrero, Tatiana; Rodríguez Tirado, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the explanatory models of secondary school students, about the structure of the animal eukaryotic cells before and after an didactic intervention, based...

  11. The ring of life hypothesis for eukaryote origins is supported by multiple kinds of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, James; Pisani, Davide; O'Connell, Mary J

    2015-09-26

    The literature is replete with manuscripts describing the origin of eukaryotic cells. Most of the models for eukaryogenesis are either autogenous (sometimes called slow-drip), or symbiogenic (sometimes called big-bang). In this article, we use large and diverse suites of 'Omics' and other data to make the inference that autogeneous hypotheses are a very poor fit to the data and the origin of eukaryotic cells occurred in a single symbiosis. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Evolutionary origin, diversification and specialization of eukaryotic MutS homolog mismatch repair proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Culligan, Kevin M.; Meyer-Gauen, Gilbert; Lyons-Weiler, James; Hays, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Most eubacteria, and all eukaryotes examined thus far, encode homologs of the DNA mismatch repair protein MutS. Although eubacteria encode only one or two MutS-like proteins, eukaryotes encode at least six distinct MutS homolog (MSH) proteins, corresponding to conserved (orthologous) gene families. This suggests evolution of individual gene family lines of descent by several duplication/specialization events. Using quantitative phylogenetic analyses (RASA, or relative apparent synapomorphy an...

  13. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  14. Phylogenomics reveals a new ‘megagroup’ including most photosynthetic eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Burki, Fabien; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Pawlowski, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Advances in molecular phylogeny of eukaryotes have suggested a tree composed of a small number of supergroups. Phylogenomics recently established the relationships between some of these large assemblages, yet the deepest nodes are still unresolved. Here, we investigate early evolution among the major eukaryotic supergroups using the broadest multigene dataset to date (65 species, 135 genes). Our analyses provide strong support for the clustering of plants, chromalveolates, rhizarians, haptoph...

  15. Changes of resistome, mobilome and potential hosts of antibiotic resistance genes during the transformation of anaerobic digestion from mesophilic to thermophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Min

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to reveal how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their horizontal and vertical transfer-related items (mobilome and bacterial hosts) respond to the transformation of anaerobic digestion (AD) from mesophilic to thermophilic using one-step temperature increase. The resistomes and mobilomes of mesophilic and thermophilic sludge were investigated using metagenome sequencing, and the changes in 24 representative ARGs belonging to three categories, class 1 integron and bacterial genera during the transition period were further followed using quantitative PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. After the temperature increase, resistome abundance in the digested sludge decreased from 125.97 ppm (day 0, mesophilic) to 50.65 ppm (day 57, thermophilic) with the reduction of most ARG types except for the aminoglycoside resistance genes. Thermophilic sludge also had a smaller mobilome, including plasmids, insertion sequences and integrons, than that of mesophilic sludge, suggesting the lower horizontal transfer potential of ARGs under thermophilic conditions. On the other hand, the total abundance of 18 bacterial genera, which were suggested as the possible hosts for 13 ARGs through network analysis, decreased from 23.27% in mesophilic sludge to 11.92% in thermophilic sludge, indicating fewer hosts for the vertical expansion of ARGs after the increase in temperature. These results indicate that the better reduction of resistome abundance by thermophilic AD might be associated with the decrease of both the horizontal and vertical transferability of ARGs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of mode of storage and drying of fodder on thermophilic actinomycete aerocontamination in dairy farms of the Doubs region of France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalphin, J C; Pernet, D; Reboux, G; Martinez, J; Dubiez, A; Barale, T; Depierre, A

    1991-09-01

    Airborne contamination by thermophilic actinomycetes, micromycetes and Gram negative bacteria was determined on 34 dairy farms and related to fodder drying and storage methods. Eighteen farms had a barn drying system, eight with additional heating; the remaining 16 had traditional fodder storage methods. Three air samples were obtained for each farm with a six stage Andersen sampler. The thermophilic actinomycetes were identified as Streptomyces and the dominant micromycetes as Aspergillus spp; there was no relation between the levels of these organisms. There were fewer thermophilic actinomycete colonies per Petri dish (stage 5 on the Anderson sampler) on farms with barn drying than on those with traditional storage (median (range) 7 (0-2628) and 56 (4-2628) respectively). The three farms where no thermophilic actinomycetes were found had barn drying with heating and the four most modern farms had lower thermophilic actinomycete colony counts than the others (median (range) 3 (0-10) and 48 (0-2628)). The level of thermophilic actinomycetes and, to a lesser degree, of micromycetes was higher where the farmer had farmer's lung. Thermophilic actinomycetes of the genus Streptomyces are probably the antigens associated with farmer's lung in the Doubs, and modern farms with barn drying and heating furnish some protection against this disease.

  17. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, D.P.; Eberl, D.D.; Dong, H.; Kim, J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65??C) were the most favorable conditions forthe formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  18. Sugar Metabolism of the First Thermophilic Planctomycete Thermogutta terrifontis: Comparative Genomic and Transcriptomic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcheninov, Alexander G.; Menzel, Peter; Gudbergsdottir, Soley R.; Slesarev, Alexei I.; Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Krogh, Anders; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Peng, Xu; Kublanov, Ilya V.

    2017-01-01

    Xanthan gum, a complex polysaccharide comprising glucose, mannose and glucuronic acid residues, is involved in numerous biotechnological applications in cosmetics, agriculture, pharmaceuticals, food and petroleum industries. Additionally, its oligosaccharides were shown to possess antimicrobial, antioxidant, and few other properties. Yet, despite its extensive usage, little is known about xanthan gum degradation pathways and mechanisms. Thermogutta terrifontis, isolated from a sample of microbial mat developed in a terrestrial hot spring of Kunashir island (Far-East of Russia), was described as the first thermophilic representative of the Planctomycetes phylum. It grows well on xanthan gum either at aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Genomic analysis unraveled the pathways of oligo- and polysaccharides utilization, as well as the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic respiration. The combination of genomic and transcriptomic approaches suggested a novel xanthan gum degradation pathway which involves novel glycosidase(s) of DUF1080 family, hydrolyzing xanthan gum backbone beta-glucosidic linkages and beta-mannosidases instead of xanthan lyases, catalyzing cleavage of terminal beta-mannosidic linkages. Surprisingly, the genes coding DUF1080 proteins were abundant in T. terrifontis and in many other Planctomycetes genomes, which, together with our observation that xanthan gum being a selective substrate for many planctomycetes, suggest crucial role of DUF1080 in xanthan gum degradation. Our findings shed light on the metabolism of the first thermophilic planctomycete, capable to degrade a number of polysaccharides, either aerobically or anaerobically, including the biotechnologically important bacterial polysaccharide xanthan gum. PMID:29163426

  19. Mesophilic versus thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure: methane productivity and microbial ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moset, Veronica; Poulsen, Morten; Wahid, Radziah; Højberg, Ole; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    In this study, productivity and physicochemical and microbiological (454 sequencing) parameters, as well as environmental criteria, were investigated in anaerobic reactors to contribute to the ongoing debate about the optimal temperature range for treating animal manure, and expand the general knowledge on the relation between microbiological and physicochemical process indicators. For this purpose, two reactor sizes were used (10 m3 and 16 l), in which two temperature conditions (35°C and 50°C) were tested. In addition, the effect of the hydraulic retention time was evaluated (16 versus 20 days). Thermophilic anaerobic digestion showed higher organic matter degradation (especially fiber), higher pH and higher methane (CH4) yield, as well as better percentage of ultimate CH4 yield retrieved and lower residual CH4 emission, when compared with mesophilic conditions. In addition, lower microbial diversity was found in the thermophilic reactors, especially for Bacteria, where a clear intensification towards Clostridia class members was evident. Independent of temperature, some similarities were found in digestates when comparing with animal manure, including low volatile fatty acids concentrations and a high fraction of Euryarchaeota in the total microbial community, in which members of Methanosarcinales dominated for both temperature conditions; these indicators could be considered a sign of process stability. PMID:25737010

  20. Performance comparison between mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic reactors for treatment of palm oil mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Joo-Young; Son, Sung-Min; Pyon, Jun-Hyeon; Park, Joo-Yang

    2014-08-01

    The anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) was carried out under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions without long-time POME storage in order to compare the performance of each condition in the field of Sumatra Island, Indonesia. The anaerobic treatment system was composed of anaerobic hybrid reactor and anaerobic baffled filter. Raw POME was pretreated by screw decanter to reduce suspended solids and residual oil. The total COD removal rate of 90-95% was achieved in both conditions at the OLR of 15kg[COD]/m(3)/d. The COD removal in thermophilic conditions was slightly better, however the biogas production was much higher than that in the mesophilic one at high OLR. The organic contents in pretreated POME were highly biodegradable in mesophilic under the lower OLRs. The biogas production was 13.5-20.0l/d at the 15kg[COD]/m(3)/d OLR, and the average content of carbon dioxide was 5-35% in both conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.