WorldWideScience

Sample records for eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer

  1. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer gives rise to genome mosaicism in euglenids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Andreas PM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euglenophytes are a group of photosynthetic flagellates possessing a plastid derived from a green algal endosymbiont, which was incorporated into an ancestral host cell via secondary endosymbiosis. However, the impact of endosymbiosis on the euglenophyte nuclear genome is not fully understood due to its complex nature as a 'hybrid' of a non-photosynthetic host cell and a secondary endosymbiont. Results We analyzed an EST dataset of the model euglenophyte Euglena gracilis using a gene mining program designed to detect laterally transferred genes. We found E. gracilis genes showing affinity not only with green algae, from which the secondary plastid in euglenophytes evolved, but also red algae and/or secondary algae containing red algal-derived plastids. Phylogenetic analyses of these 'red lineage' genes suggest that E. gracilis acquired at least 14 genes via eukaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfer from algal sources other than the green algal endosymbiont that gave rise to its current plastid. We constructed an EST library of the aplastidic euglenid Peranema trichophorum, which is a eukaryovorous relative of euglenophytes, and also identified 'red lineage' genes in its genome. Conclusions Our data show genome mosaicism in E. gracilis and P. trichophorum. One possible explanation for the presence of these genes in these organisms is that some or all of them were independently acquired by lateral gene transfer and contributed to the successful integration and functioning of the green algal endosymbiont as a secondary plastid. Alternative hypotheses include the presence of a phagocytosed alga as the single source of those genes, or a cryptic tertiary endosymbiont harboring secondary plastid of red algal origin, which the eukaryovorous ancestor of euglenophytes had acquired prior to the secondary endosymbiosis of a green alga.

  2. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer events revealed by the genome sequence of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Maite; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Galeote, Virginie; Gavory, Frédérick; Mallet, Sandrine; Cambon, Brigitte; Legras, Jean-Luc; Wincker, Patrick; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2009-09-22

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in winemaking, but little is known about the selective forces acting on the wine yeast genome. We sequenced the complete genome of the diploid commercial wine yeast EC1118, resulting in an assembly of 31 scaffolds covering 97% of the S288c reference genome. The wine yeast differed strikingly from the other S. cerevisiae isolates in possessing 3 unique large regions, 2 of which were subtelomeric, the other being inserted within an EC1118 chromosome. These regions encompass 34 genes involved in key wine fermentation functions. Phylogeny and synteny analyses showed that 1 of these regions originated from a species closely related to the Saccharomyces genus, whereas the 2 other regions were of non-Saccharomyces origin. We identified Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a major contaminant of wine fermentations, as the donor species for 1 of these 2 regions. Although natural hybridization between Saccharomyces strains has been described, this report provides evidence that gene transfer may occur between Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces species. We show that the regions identified are frequent and differentially distributed among S. cerevisiae clades, being found almost exclusively in wine strains, suggesting acquisition through recent transfer events. Overall, these data show that the wine yeast genome is subject to constant remodeling through the contribution of exogenous genes. Our results suggest that these processes are favored by ecologic proximity and are involved in the molecular adaptation of wine yeasts to conditions of high sugar, low nitrogen, and high ethanol concentrations.

  3. Mechanisms of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Cafini Barrado, Fabio; Medrano Romero, Verónica; Morikawa, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer plays important roles in the evolution of S. aureus, and indeed, a variety of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes are embedded in a series of mobile genetic elements. In this chapter, we review the mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer, including recent findings on the natural genetic competence. Then, we consider the transfer of two important antibiotic resistance genes: the methicillin resistance gene, mecA (in Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome) and ...

  4. Horizontal gene transfer in choanoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), also known as lateral gene transfer, results in the rapid acquisition of genes from another organism. HGT has long been known to be a driving force in speciation in prokaryotes, and there is evidence for HGT from symbiotic and infectious bacteria to metazoans, as well as from protists to bacteria. Recently, it has become clear that as many as a 1,000 genes in the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis may have been acquired by HGT. Interestingly, these genes reportedly come from algae, bacteria, and other choanoflagellate prey. Some of these genes appear to have allowed an ancestral choanoflagellate to exploit nutrient-poor environments and were not passed on to metazoan descendents. However, some of these genes are also found in animal genomes, suggesting that HGT into a common ancestor of choanozoans and animals may have contributed to metazoan evolution. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer in chromalveolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the non-genealogical transfer of genetic material between different organisms, is considered a potentially important mechanism of genome evolution in eukaryotes. Using phylogenomic analyses of expressed sequence tag (EST data generated from a clonal cell line of a free living dinoflagellate alga Karenia brevis, we investigated the impact of HGT on genome evolution in unicellular chromalveolate protists. Results We identified 16 proteins that have originated in chromalveolates through ancient HGTs before the divergence of the genera Karenia and Karlodinium and one protein that was derived through a more recent HGT. Detailed analysis of the phylogeny and distribution of identified proteins demonstrates that eight have resulted from independent HGTs in several eukaryotic lineages. Conclusion Recurring intra- and interdomain gene exchange provides an important source of genetic novelty not only in parasitic taxa as previously demonstrated but as we show here, also in free-living protists. Investigating the tempo and mode of evolution of horizontally transferred genes in protists will therefore advance our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in eukaryotes.

  7. Ethics of Cancer Gene Transfer Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Translation of cancer gene transfer confronts many familiar-and some distinctive-ethical challenges. In what follows, I survey three major ethical dimensions of cancer gene transfer development. Subheading 1 centers on the ethics of planning, designing, and reporting animal studies. Subheading 2 describes basic elements of human subjects protection as pertaining to cancer gene transfer. In Subheading 3, I describe how cancer gene transfer researchers have obligations to downstream consumers of the evidence they produce.

  8. Electro-acupuncture-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Qin, Y; Fu, A; Tang, J; Chen, G; Cai, D; Han, J

    1998-10-01

    Gene transfer is one of the key techniques in gene therapy application. Unfortunately, it seems that by now, there still exists no approach with simplicity, easiness, efficiency and safety. A novel method for gene delivery, electro-acupuncture needle-mediated gene transfer which combined the Chinese traditional acupuncture with modem gene introduction, was developed. With acupuncture needle carrying exogenous gene into muscle after direct electronic stimuli, efficient gene delivery was achieved.

  9. Gene transfer to the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2010-12-01

    There are several diseases for which gene transfer therapy to the cerebellum might be practicable. In these studies, we used recombinant Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors (rSV40s) to study gene delivery targeting the cerebellum. These vectors transduce neurons and microglia very effectively in vitro and in vivo, and so we tested them to evaluate gene transfer to the cerebellum in vivo. Using a rSV40 vector carrying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-Nef with a C-terminal FLAG epitope, we characterized the distribution, duration, and cell types transduced. Rats received test and control vectors by stereotaxic injection into the cerebellum. Transgene expression was assessed 1, 2, and 4 weeks later by immunostaining of serial brain sections. FLAG epitope-expressing cells were seen, at all times after vector administration, principally detected in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, identified as immunopositive for calbindin. Occasional microglial cells were tranduced; transgene expression was not detected in astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. No inflammatory or other reaction was detected at any time. Thus, SV40-derived vectors can deliver effective, safe, and durable transgene expression to the cerebellum.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer in the phytosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsas, van J.D.; Turner, S.; Bailey, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Here, the ecological aspects of gene transfer processes between bacteria in the phytosphere are examined in the context of emerging evidence for the dominant role that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played in the evolutionary shaping of bacterial communities. Moreover, the impact of the putative

  11. Horizontal gene transfer in human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer has a tremendous impact on the genome plasticity, adaptation and evolution of bacteria. Horizontally transferred mobile genetic elements are involved in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes, thus contributing to the emergence of novel "superbugs". This review provides update on various mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer and examines how horizontal gene transfer contributes to the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. Special focus is paid to the role horizontal gene transfer plays in pathogenicity of the emerging human pathogens: hypervirulent Clostridium difficile and Escherichia coli (including the most recent haemolytic uraemic syndrome outbreak strain) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which have been associated with largest outbreaks of infection recently.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is increasingly described between bacteria and animals. Such transfers that are vertically inherited have the potential to influence the evolution of animals. One classic example is the transfer of DNA from mitochondria and chloroplasts to the nucleus after the acquisition of these organelles by eukaryotes. Even today, many of the described instances of bacteria to animal transfer occur as part of intimate relationships like those of endosymbionts and their invertebrate hosts, particularly insects and nematodes, while numerous transfers are also found in asexual animals. Both of these observations are consistent with modern evolutionary theory, in particular the serial endosymbiotic theory and Muller’s ratchet. While it is tempting to suggest that these particular lifestyles might promote horizontal gene transfer, it is difficult to ascertain given the non-random sampling of animal genome sequencing projects and the lack of a systematic analysis of animal genomes for such transfers. PMID:21334091

  13. Detecting Highways of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Mukul S.; Gogarten, J. Peter; Shamir, Ron

    In a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event a gene is transferred between two species that do not share an ancestor-descendant relationship. Typically, no more than a few genes are horizontally transferred between any two species. However, several studies identified pairs of species between which many different genes were horizontally transferred. Such a pair is said to be linked by a highway of gene sharing. We present a method for inferring such highways. Our method is based on the fact that the evolutionary histories of horizontally transferred genes disagree with the corresponding species phylogeny. Specifically, given a set of gene trees and a trusted rooted species tree, each gene tree is first decomposed into its constituent quartet trees and the quartets that are inconsistent with the species tree are identified. Our method finds a pair of species such that a highway between them explains the largest (normalized) fraction of inconsistent quartets. For a problem on n species, our method requires O(n 4) time, which is optimal with respect to the quartets input size. An application of our method to a dataset of 1128 genes from 11 cyanobacterial species, as well as to simulated datasets, illustrates the efficacy of our method.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soanes, Darren; Richards, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer has been identified as a prevalent and pervasive phenomenon and an important source of genomic innovation in bacteria. The role of gene transfer in microbial eukaryotes seems to be of a reduced magnitude but in some cases can drive important evolutionary innovations, such as new functions that underpin the colonization of different niches. The aim of this review is to summarize published cases that support the hypothesis that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a role in the evolution of phytopathogenic traits in fungi and oomycetes. Our survey of the literature identifies 46 proposed cases of transfer of genes that have a putative or experimentally demonstrable phytopathogenic function. When considering the life-cycle steps through which a pathogen must progress, the majority of the HGTs identified are associated with invading, degrading, and manipulating the host. Taken together, these data suggest HGT has played a role in shaping how fungi and oomycetes colonize plant hosts.

  15. Novel gene transfer systems: intelligent gene transfer vectors for gene medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery systems for gene transfer are called 'vectors'. These systems were originally invented as a delivery system for the transfection in vitro or in vivo. Several vectors are then developed for clinical use of gene medicines and currently some of them are approved as animal drugs. Conventional drug delivery system generally consists of approved (existing) materials to avoid additional pre-clinical or clinical studies. However, current vectors contain novel materials to improve an efficacy of gene medicines. Thus, these vectors have functions more than a mere delivery of active ingredients. For example some vectors have immunological functions such as adjuvants in vaccines. These new types of vectors are called 'intelligent' or 'innovative' vector system', since the concept or strategy for the development is completely different from conventional drug delivery systems. In this article, we described a current status of 'intelligent gene transfer vectors and discussed on the potentials of them.

  16. Immunotherapy through TCR gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, H. W.; Wolkers, M. C.; van den Boom, M. D.; van der Valk, M. A.; Schumacher, T. N.

    2001-01-01

    The antigen specificity of T lymphocytes is dictated solely by the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains. Consequently, genetic transfer of TCR chains may be an appealing strategy with which to impose a desirable virus- or tumor-antigen specificity onto cytotoxic or helper T cell populations.

  17. The Potential for Horizontal Gene Transfer in Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R. E.; Deming, J. W.

    2010-04-01

    Sea ice is a potential hotspot for horizontal gene transfer due to physical concentration of bacteria, viruses, and extracellular DNA. An ice-affiliated bacterium, "Colwellia psychrerythraea," has acquired genes for compatible solute degradation via horizontal gene transfer.

  18. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  19. Plant gene transfer and expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Heddwyn

    1995-01-01

    ... proteins in plants can often lead to a better understanding of biochemical and physiological processes. Fourth, gene transfer technology has allowed the improvement of plant agricultural productivity. For example, plants have been engineered with improved viral resistance or the ability to withstand herbicide attack, therefore allowing a more eff...

  20. Rates of Lateral Gene Transfer in Prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Michiel; Hesselman, M.C.; Beek, te T.A.; Passel, van M.W.J.; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer is of fundamental importance to the evolution of prokaryote genomes and has important practical consequences, as evidenced by the rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants. Relatively little effort has so far been devoted to explicitly

  1. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    introduction of novel physiological traits from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological ..... degradation by host restriction endonucleases. (iii) Conjugation: In this mechanism, ... mosome, formation of a conjugative bridge and trans- position into the recipient strain.

  2. Tracing back EFL gene evolution in the cryptomonads-haptophytes assemblage: separate origins of EFL genes in haptophytes, photosynthetic cryptomonads, and goniomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Miako; Takishita, Kiyotaka; Matsumoto, Takuya; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2009-07-15

    A recently identified GTPase, elongation factor-like (EFL) protein is proposed to bear the principal functions of translation elongation factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha). Pioneering studies of EF-1alpha/EFL evolution have revealed the phylogenetically scattered distribution of EFL amongst eukaryotes, suggesting frequent eukaryote-to-eukaryote EFL gene transfer events and subsequent replacements of EF-1alpha functions by EFL. We here determined/identified seven new EFL sequences of the photosynthetic cryptomonad Cryptomonas ovata, the non-photosynthetic cryptomonad (goniomonad) Goniomonas amphinema, the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, the haptophyte Chrysochromulina sp., the centroheliozoan Raphidiophrys contractilis, and two red algae Chondrus crispus and Gracilaria changii. The analyses of these EFL sequences successfully brought new insights into lateral EFL gene transfer amongst eukaryotes. Of most interest is a complex EFL evolution in a monophyletic assemblage comprised of cryptomonads and haptophytes. Since our analyses rejected any phylogenetic affinity amongst the EFL sequences from Goniomonas, photosynthetic cryptomonads, and haptophytes, the EFL genes of the three lineages most likely originated from different phylogenetic sources.

  3. Horizontal gene transfer among genomes: The complexity hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Ravi; Rivera, Maria C.; Lake, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Increasingly, studies of genes and genomes are indicating that considerable horizontal transfer has occurred between prokaryotes. Extensive horizontal transfer has occurred for operational genes (those involved in housekeeping), whereas informational genes (those involved in transcription, translation, and related processes) are seldomly horizontally transferred. Through phylogenetic analysis of six complete prokaryotic genomes and the identification of 312 sets of orthologous genes present i...

  4. Endosymbiotic gene transfer and transcriptional regulation of transferred genes in Paulinella chromatophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Eva C M; Vogel, Heiko; Groth, Marco; Grossman, Arthur R; Melkonian, Michael; Glöckner, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Paulinella chromatophora is a cercozoan amoeba that contains "chromatophores," which are photosynthetic inclusions of cyanobacterial origin. The recent discovery that chromatophores evolved independently of plastids, underwent major genome reduction, and transferred at least two genes to the host nucleus has highlighted P. chromatophora as a model to infer early steps in the evolution of photosynthetic organelles. However, owing to the paucity of nuclear genome sequence data, the extent of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) and host symbiont regulation are currently unknown. A combination of 454 and Illumina next generation sequencing enabled us to generate a comprehensive reference transcriptome data set for P. chromatophora on which we mapped short Illumina cDNA reads generated from cultures from the dark and light phases of a diel cycle. Combined with extensive phylogenetic analyses of the deduced protein sequences, these data revealed that 1) about 0.3-0.8% of the nuclear genes were obtained by EGT compared with 11-14% in the Plantae, 2) transferred genes show a distinct bias in that many encode small proteins involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation, 3) host cells established control over expression of transferred genes, and 4) not only EGT, but to a minor extent also horizontal gene transfer from organisms that presumably served as food sources, helped to shape the nuclear genome of P. chromatophora. The identification of a significant number of transferred genes involved in photosynthesis and photoacclimation of thylakoid membranes as well as the observed transcriptional regulation of these genes strongly implies import of the encoded gene products into chromatophores, a feature previously thought to be restricted to canonical organelles. Thus, a possible mechanism by which P. chromatophora exerts control over the performance of its newly acquired photosynthetic organelle may involve controlling the expression of nuclear-encoded chromatophore

  5. Ultrasound enhances retrovirus-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Toshio; Sakoda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Takashi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Masuyama, Tohru; Kawashima, Seinosuke; Iwasaki, Tadaaki; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2007-01-01

    Viral vector systems are efficient for transfection of foreign genes into many tissues. Especially, retrovirus based vectors integrate the transgene into the genome of the target cells, which can sustain long term expression. However, it has been demonstrated that the transduction efficiency using retrovirus is relatively lower than those of other viruses. Ultrasound was recently reported to increase gene expression using plasmid DNA, with or without, a delivery vehicle. However, there are no reports, which show an ultrasound effect to retrovirus-mediated gene transfer efficiency. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer systems were used for transfection of 293T cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs), and rat skeletal muscle myoblasts (L6 cells) with beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) genes. Transduction efficiency and cell viability assay were performed on 293T cells that were exposed to varying durations (5 to 30 seconds) and power levels (1.0 watts/cm(2) to 4.0 watts/cm(2)) of ultrasound after being transduced by a retrovirus. Effects of ultrasound to the retrovirus itself was evaluated by transduction efficiency of 293T cells. After exposure to varying power levels of ultrasound to a retrovirus for 5 seconds, 293T cells were transduced by a retrovirus, and transduction efficiency was evaluated. Below 1.0 watts/cm(2) and 5 seconds exposure, ultrasound showed increased transduction efficiency and no cytotoxicity to 293T cells transduced by a retrovirus. Also, ultrasound showed no toxicity to the virus itself at the same condition. Exposure of 5 seconds at the power of 1.0 watts/cm(2) of an ultrasound resulted in significant increases in retrovirus-mediated gene expression in all four cell types tested in this experiment. Transduction efficiencies by ultrasound were enhanced 6.6-fold, 4.8-fold, 2.3-fold, and 3.2-fold in 293T cells, BAECs, RASMCs, and L6 cells, respectively. Furthermore, beta-Gal activities were also increased

  6. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  7. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thane Papke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer, dispersal and haloarchaeal speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, R Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; Haba, Rafael R de la; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-05-19

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria.

  9. Horizontal gene transfer from Agrobacterium to plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Matveeva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Most genetic engineering of plants uses Agrobacterium mediated transformation to introduce novel gene content. In nature, insertion of T-DNA in the plant genome and its subsequent transfer via sexual reproduction has been shown in several species in the genera Nicotiana and Linaria. In these natural examples of horizontal gene transfer from Agrobacterium to plants, the T-DNA donor is assumed to be a mikimopine strain of A.rhizogenes. A sequence homologous to the T-DNA of the Ri plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes was found in the genome of untransformed Nicotiana glauca about 30 years ago, and was named cellular T-DNA (cT-DNA. It represents an imperfect inverted repeat and contains homologues of several T-DNA oncogenes (NgrolB, NgrolC, NgORF13, NgORF14 and an opine synthesis gene (Ngmis. A similar cT-DNA has also been found in other species of the genus Nicotiana. These presumably ancient homologues of T-DNA genes are still expressed, indicating that they may play a role in the evolution of these plants. Recently T-DNA has been detected and characterized in Linaria vulgaris and L. dalmatica. In Linaria vulgaris the cT-DNA is present in two copies and organized as a tandem imperfect direct repeat, containing LvORF2, LvORF3, LvORF8, LvrolA, LvrolB, LvrolC, LvORF13, LvORF14, and the Lvmis genes. All L. vulgaris and L. dalmatica plants screened contained the same T-DNA oncogenes and the mis gene. Evidence suggests that there were several independent T-DNA integration events into the genomes of these plant genera. We speculate that ancient plants transformed by A. rhizogenes might have acquired a selective advantage in competition with the parental species. Thus, the events of T-DNA insertion in the plant genome might have affected their evolution, resulting in the creation of new plant species. In this review we focus on the structure and functions of cT-DNA in Linaria and Nicotiana and discuss their possible evolutionary role.

  10. Transfer of tetracycline resistance gene (tetr) between replicons in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transfer of tetracycline resistance gene (tetr) between replicons in some enteric bacteria of diarrhoeal origin from some hospitals in South-South, Nigeria. ... Attempt was made to transfer the tetr gene from one replicon to the other within the same species and from one genus to the other. The rate of intra-species transfer of ...

  11. The power of phylogenetic approaches to detect horizontally transferred genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poptsova, Maria S; Gogarten, J Peter

    2007-03-21

    Horizontal gene transfer plays an important role in evolution because it sometimes allows recipient lineages to adapt to new ecological niches. High genes transfer frequencies were inferred for prokaryotic and early eukaryotic evolution. Does horizontal gene transfer also impact phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolutionary history of genomes and organisms? The answer to this question depends at least in part on the actual gene transfer frequencies and on the ability to weed out transferred genes from further analyses. Are the detected transfers mainly false positives, or are they the tip of an iceberg of many transfer events most of which go undetected by current methods? Phylogenetic detection methods appear to be the method of choice to infer gene transfers, especially for ancient transfers and those followed by orthologous replacement. Here we explore how well some of these methods perform using in silico transfers between the terminal branches of a gamma proteobacterial, genome based phylogeny. For the experiments performed here on average the AU test at a 5% significance level detects 90.3% of the transfers and 91% of the exchanges as significant. Using the Robinson-Foulds distance only 57.7% of the exchanges and 60% of the donations were identified as significant. Analyses using bipartition spectra appeared most successful in our test case. The power of detection was on average 97% using a 70% cut-off and 94.2% with 90% cut-off for identifying conflicting bipartitions, while the rate of false positives was below 4.2% and 2.1% for the two cut-offs, respectively. For all methods the detection rates improved when more intervening branches separated donor and recipient. Rates of detected transfers should not be mistaken for the actual transfer rates; most analyses of gene transfers remain anecdotal. The method and significance level to identify potential gene transfer events represent a trade-off between the frequency of erroneous identification (false

  12. Horizontal gene transfer in evolution: facts and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Boto, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of horizontal gene transfer to evolution has been controversial since it was suggested to be a force driving evolution in the microbial world. In this paper, I review the current standpoint on horizontal gene transfer in evolutionary thinking and discuss how important horizontal gene transfer is in evolution in the broad sense, and particularly in prokaryotic evolution. I review recent literature, asking, first, which processes are involved in the evolutionary success of tran...

  13. Patterns of prokaryotic lateral gene transfers affecting parasitic microbial eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmark, Cecilia; Foster, Peter G; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of lateral gene transfer on gene origins and biology in eukaryotes is poorly understood compared with those of prokaryotes. A number of independent investigations focusing on specific genes, individual genomes, or specific functional categories from various eukaryotes have...... indicated that lateral gene transfer does indeed affect eukaryotic genomes. However, the lack of common methodology and criteria in these studies makes it difficult to assess the general importance and influence of lateral gene transfer on eukaryotic genome evolution. RESULTS: We used a phylogenomic...... approach to systematically investigate lateral gene transfer affecting the proteomes of thirteen, mainly parasitic, microbial eukaryotes, representing four of the six eukaryotic super-groups. All of the genomes investigated have been significantly affected by prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers...

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L. I. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  15. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-04-04

    A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. From the pair-wise alignments between human genome and 53 vertebrate genomes, 1,467 human genome regions (2.6 M bases) from all chromosomes were found to be more conserved with non-mammals than with most mammals. These human genome regions involve 642 known genes, which are enriched with ion binding. Compared to known horizontal gene transfer regions in the human genome, there were few overlapping regions, which indicated horizontal gene transfer is more common than we expected in the human genome. Horizontal gene transfer impacts hundreds of human genes and this study provided insight into potential mechanisms of HGT in the human genome.

  16. Ethical perception of cross-species gene transfer in plant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... the ethical acceptance of cross-species gene transfers in developing country. Key words: Ethical perception, genetically modified (GM) rice, cross-species gene transfer, Malaysia. INTRODUCTION. Rice is a staple food in much of Asia countries including. Malaysia, and by 2025 about 60% more rice must ...

  17. Problems associated with gene transfer and opportunities for microgravity environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, D.J. [Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Cornell University, Ithaca, New York14853 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The method of crop improvement by gene transfer is becoming increasingly routine with transgenic foods and ornamental crops now being marketed to consumers. However, biological processes of plants, and the physical barriers of current protocols continue to limit the application of gene transfer in many commercial crops. The goal of this paper is to outline the current limitations of gene transfer and to hypothesize possible opportunities for use of microgravity to overcome such limitations. The limitations detailed in this paper include host-range specificity of {ital Agrobacterium} mediated transformation, probability of gene insertion, position effects of the inserted genes, gene copy number, stability of foreign gene expression in host plants, and regeneration of recalcitrant plant species. Microgravity offers an opportunity for gene transfer where cell growth kinetics, DNA synthesis, and genetic recombination rates can be altered. Such biological conditions may enhance the ability for recombination of reporter genes and other genes of interest to agriculture. Proposed studies would be useful for understanding instability of foreign gene expression and may lead to stable transformed plants. Other aspects of gene transfer in microgravity are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Extensive horizontal gene transfer in cheese-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Kevin S; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Dutton, Rachel J

    2017-06-23

    Acquisition of genes through horizontal gene transfer (HGT) allows microbes to rapidly gain new capabilities and adapt to new or changing environments. Identifying widespread HGT regions within multispecies microbiomes can pinpoint the molecular mechanisms that play key roles in microbiome assembly. We sought to identify horizontally transferred genes within a model microbiome, the cheese rind. Comparing 31 newly sequenced and 134 previously sequenced bacterial isolates from cheese rinds, we identified over 200 putative horizontally transferred genomic regions containing 4733 protein coding genes. The largest of these regions are enriched for genes involved in siderophore acquisition, and are widely distributed in cheese rinds in both Europe and the US. These results suggest that HGT is prevalent in cheese rind microbiomes, and that identification of genes that are frequently transferred in a particular environment may provide insight into the selective forces shaping microbial communities.

  19. The chromosomal organization of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Touchon, Marie; Cury, Jean; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2017-10-10

    Bacterial adaptation is accelerated by the acquisition of novel traits through horizontal gene transfer, but the integration of these genes affects genome organization. We found that transferred genes are concentrated in only ~1% of the chromosomal regions (hotspots) in 80 bacterial species. This concentration increases with genome size and with the rate of transfer. Hotspots diversify by rapid gene turnover; their chromosomal distribution depends on local contexts (neighboring core genes), and content in mobile genetic elements. Hotspots concentrate most changes in gene repertoires, reduce the trade-off between genome diversification and organization, and should be treasure troves of strain-specific adaptive genes. Most mobile genetic elements and antibiotic resistance genes are in hotspots, but many hotspots lack recognizable mobile genetic elements and exhibit frequent homologous recombination at flanking core genes. Overrepresentation of hotspots with fewer mobile genetic elements in naturally transformable bacteria suggests that homologous recombination and horizontal gene transfer are tightly linked in genome evolution.Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important mechanism for genome evolution and adaptation in bacteria. Here, Oliveira and colleagues find HGT hotspots comprising  ~ 1% of the chromosomal regions in 80 bacterial species.

  20. Transfer of engineered genes from crop to wild plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke; Hauser, T.P.; Mikkelsen, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    The escape of engineered genes - genes inserted using recombinant DNA techniques - from cultivated plants to wild or weedy relatives has raised concern about possible risks to the environment or to health. The media have added considerably to public concern by suggesting that such gene escape...... is a new and rather unexpected phenomenon. However, transfer of engineered genes between plants is not at-all surprising, because it is mediated by exactly the same mechanisms as those responsible for transferring endogenous plant genes: it takes place by sexual crosses, with pollen as the carrier......, Such sexual reproduction has been the basis for breeding almost all crops....

  1. Widespread horizontal transfer of mitochondrial genes in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Adams, Keith L; Thomason, Brendan; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2003-07-10

    Horizontal gene transfer--the exchange of genes across mating barriers--is recognized as a major force in bacterial evolution. However, in eukaryotes it is prevalent only in certain phagotrophic protists and limited largely to the ancient acquisition of bacterial genes. Although the human genome was initially reported to contain over 100 genes acquired during vertebrate evolution from bacteria, this claim was immediately and repeatedly rebutted. Moreover, horizontal transfer is unknown within the evolution of animals, plants and fungi except in the special context of mobile genetic elements. Here we show, however, that standard mitochondrial genes, encoding ribosomal and respiratory proteins, are subject to evolutionarily frequent horizontal transfer between distantly related flowering plants. These transfers have created a variety of genomic outcomes, including gene duplication, recapture of genes lost through transfer to the nucleus, and chimaeric, half-monocot, half-dicot genes. These results imply the existence of mechanisms for the delivery of DNA between unrelated plants, indicate that horizontal transfer is also a force in plant nuclear genomes, and are discussed in the contexts of plant molecular phylogeny and genetically modified plants.

  2. A recently transferred cluster of bacterial genes in Trichomonas vaginalis - lateral gene transfer and the fate of acquired genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT) has recently gained recognition as an important contributor to some eukaryote proteomes, but the mechanisms of acquisition and fixation in eukaryotic genomes are still uncertain. A previously defined norm for LGTs in microbial eukaryotes states that the majority are genes involved in metabolism, the LGTs are typically localized one by one, surrounded by vertically inherited genes on the chromosome, and phylogenetics shows that a broad collection of bacterial lineages have contributed to the transferome. Results A unique 34 kbp long fragment with 27 clustered genes (TvLF) of prokaryote origin was identified in the sequenced genome of the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Using a PCR based approach we confirmed the presence of the orthologous fragment in four additional T. vaginalis strains. Detailed sequence analyses unambiguously suggest that TvLF is the result of one single, recent LGT event. The proposed donor is a close relative to the firmicute bacterium Peptoniphilus harei. High nucleotide sequence similarity between T. vaginalis strains, as well as to P. harei, and the absence of homologs in other Trichomonas species, suggests that the transfer event took place after the radiation of the genus Trichomonas. Some genes have undergone pseudogenization and degradation, indicating that they may not be retained in the future. Functional annotations reveal that genes involved in informational processes are particularly prone to degradation. Conclusions We conclude that, although the majority of eukaryote LGTs are single gene occurrences, they may be acquired in clusters of several genes that are subsequently cleansed of evolutionarily less advantageous genes. PMID:24898731

  3. LATERAL GENE TRANSFER AND THE HISTORY OF BACTERIAL GENOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Ochman

    2006-02-22

    The aims of this research were to elucidate the role and extent of lateral transfer in the differentiation of bacterial strains and species, and to assess the impact of gene transfer on the evolution of bacterial genomes. The ultimate goal of the project is to examine the dynamics of a core set of protein-coding genes (i.e., those that are distributed universally among Bacteria) by developing conserved primers that would allow their amplification and sequencing in any bacterial taxa. In addition, we adopted a bioinformatic approach to elucidate the extent of lateral gene transfer in sequenced genome.

  4. [Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Xia; Mao, Da-Qing; Luo, Yi; Wang, Qing; Mu, Quan-Hua

    2013-10-01

    The transfer of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), a new type of environmental pollutants, could have more adverse effects on the environment than the ARGs themselves, while the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) could be the most important propagation pathways of the ARGs, being one of the reasons for the growing pollution of ARGs in the environment. This paper systematically elaborated the molecular elements of the horizontal transfer of ARGs and the related affecting factors, which was of significance for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the horizontal transfer of the ARGs. In combining with the phylogenetic mechanisms of multiple antibiotic resistances, this paper also provided effective strategies to reduce the transfer and proliferation of ARGs in the environment. Based on the present contamination situations, the further researches on the horizontal transfer of ARGs in the environment were prospected.

  5. Evolution of mosaic operons by horizontal gene transfer and gene displacement in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Omelchenko, Marina V.; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2003-01-01

    Background Shuffling and disruption of operons and horizontal gene transfer are major contributions to the new, dynamic view of prokaryotic evolution. Under the 'selfish operon' hypothesis, operons are viewed as mobile genetic entities that are constantly disseminated via horizontal gene transfer, although their retention could be favored by the advantage of coregulation of functionally linked genes. Here we apply comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis to examine horizontal transfer o...

  6. Evolution of glutamate dehydrogenase genes: evidence for lateral gene transfer within and between prokaryotes and eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Andrew J

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral gene transfer can introduce genes with novel functions into genomes or replace genes with functionally similar orthologs or paralogs. Here we present a study of the occurrence of the latter gene replacement phenomenon in the four gene families encoding different classes of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, to evaluate and compare the patterns and rates of lateral gene transfer (LGT in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Results We extend the taxon sampling of gdh genes with nine new eukaryotic sequences and examine the phylogenetic distribution pattern of the various GDH classes in combination with maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses. The distribution pattern analyses indicate that LGT has played a significant role in the evolution of the four gdh gene families. Indeed, a number of gene transfer events are identified by phylogenetic analyses, including numerous prokaryotic intra-domain transfers, some prokaryotic inter-domain transfers and several inter-domain transfers between prokaryotes and microbial eukaryotes (protists. Conclusion LGT has apparently affected eukaryotes and prokaryotes to a similar extent within the gdh gene families. In the absence of indications that the evolution of the gdh gene families is radically different from other families, these results suggest that gene transfer might be an important evolutionary mechanism in microbial eukaryote genome evolution.

  7. Horizontal gene transfer and genome evolution in Methanosarcina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garushyants, Sofya K; Kazanov, Marat D; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2015-06-05

    Genomes of Methanosarcina spp. are among the largest archaeal genomes. One suggested reason for that is massive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria. Genes of bacterial origin may be involved in the central metabolism and solute transport, in particular sugar synthesis, sulfur metabolism, phosphate metabolism, DNA repair, transport of small molecules etc. Horizontally transferred (HT) genes are considered to play the key role in the ability of Methanosarcina spp. to inhabit diverse environments. At the moment, genomes of three Methanosarcina spp. have been sequenced, and while these genomes vary in length and number of protein-coding genes, they all have been shown to accumulate HT genes. However, previous estimates had been made when fewer archaeal genomes were known. Moreover, several Methanosarcinaceae genomes from other genera have been sequenced recently. Here, we revise the census of genes of bacterial origin in Methanosarcinaceae. About 5% of Methanosarcina genes have been shown to be horizontally transferred from various bacterial groups to the last common ancestor either of Methanosarcinaceae, or Methanosarcina, or later in the evolution. Simulation of the composition of the NCBI protein non-redundant database for different years demonstrates that the estimates of the HGT rate have decreased drastically since 2002, the year of publication of the first Methanosarcina genome. The phylogenetic distribution of HT gene donors is non-uniform. Most HT genes were transferred from Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, while no HGT events from Actinobacteria to the common ancestor of Methanosarcinaceae were found. About 50% of HT genes are involved in metabolism. Horizontal transfer of transcription factors is not common, while 46% of horizontally transferred genes have demonstrated differential expression in a variety of conditions. HGT of complete operons is relatively infrequent and half of HT genes do not belong to operons. While genes of bacterial origin are

  8. Muscle as a target for supplementary factor IX gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Brad E; Dobrzynski, Eric; Wang, Lixin; Hirao, Lauren; Mingozzi, Federico; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-07-01

    Immune responses to the factor IX (F.IX) transgene product are a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. The risk for such responses is determined by several factors, including the vector, target tissue, and others. Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatic gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can induce F.IX-specific immune tolerance. Muscle-derived F.IX expression, however, is limited by a local immune response. Here, skeletal muscle was investigated as a target for supplemental gene transfer. Given the low invasiveness of intramuscular injections, this route would be ideal for secondary gene transfer, thereby boosting levels of transgene expression. However, this is feasible only if immune tolerance established by compartmentalization of expression to the liver extends to other sites. Immune tolerance to human F.IX established by prior hepatic AAV-2 gene transfer was maintained after subsequent injection of AAV-1 or adenoviral vector into skeletal muscle, and tolerized mice failed to form antibodies or an interferon (IFN)-gamma(+) T cell response to human F.IX. A sustained increase in systemic transgene expression was obtained for AAV-1, whereas an increase after adenoviral gene transfer was transient. A CD8(+) T cell response specifically against adenovirus-transduced fibers was observed, suggesting that cytotoxic T cell responses against viral antigens were sufficient to eliminate expression in muscle. In summary, the data demonstrate that supplemental F.IX gene transfer to skeletal muscle does not break tolerance achieved by liver-derived expression. The approach is efficacious, if the vector for muscle gene transfer does not express immunogenic viral proteins.

  9. Gentamicin resistance genes in environmental bacteria: prevalence and transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuer, H.; Krögerrecklenfort, E.; Wellington, E.M.H.; Egan, S.; Elsas, van J.D.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Collard, J.M.; Guillaume, G.; Karagouni, A.; Nikolakopoulou, D.; Smalla, K.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive multiphasic survey of the prevalence and transfer of gentamicin resistance (Gmr) genes in different non-clinical environments has been performed. We were interested to find out whether Gmr genes described from clinical isolates can be detected in different environmental habitats and

  10. Global Analysis of Horizontal Gene Transfer in Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The co-occurrence of microbes within plants and other specialized niches may facilitate horizontal gene transfer (HGT) affecting host-pathogen interactions. We recently identified fungal-to-fungal HGTs involving metabolic gene clusters. For a global analysis of HGTs in the maize pathogen Fusarium ve...

  11. Improved gene tree error correction in the presence of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Mukul S; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Alm, Eric J; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-04-15

    The accurate inference of gene trees is a necessary step in many evolutionary studies. Although the problem of accurate gene tree inference has received considerable attention, most existing methods are only applicable to gene families unaffected by horizontal gene transfer. As a result, the accurate inference of gene trees affected by horizontal gene transfer remains a largely unaddressed problem. In this study, we introduce a new and highly effective method for gene tree error correction in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. Our method efficiently models horizontal gene transfers, gene duplications and losses, and uses a statistical hypothesis testing framework [Shimodaira-Hasegawa (SH) test] to balance sequence likelihood with topological information from a known species tree. Using a thorough simulation study, we show that existing phylogenetic methods yield inaccurate gene trees when applied to horizontally transferred gene families and that our method dramatically improves gene tree accuracy. We apply our method to a dataset of 11 cyanobacterial species and demonstrate the large impact of gene tree accuracy on downstream evolutionary analyses. An implementation of our method is available at http://compbio.mit.edu/treefix-dtl/ : mukul@engr.uconn.edu or manoli@mit.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer between Wolbachia and the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT from Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria to their eukaryotic hosts is a topic of considerable interest and debate. Recent transfers of genome fragments from Wolbachia into insect chromosomes have been reported, but it has been argued that these fragments may be on an evolutionary trajectory to degradation and loss. Results We have discovered a case of HGT, involving two adjacent genes, between the genomes of Wolbachia and the currently Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito Aedes aegypti, an important human disease vector. The lower level of sequence identity between Wolbachia and insect, the transcription of all the genes involved, and the fact that we have identified homologs of the two genes in another Aedes species (Ae. mascarensis, suggest that these genes are being expressed after an extended evolutionary period since horizontal transfer, and therefore that the transfer has functional significance. The association of these genes with Wolbachia prophage regions also provides a mechanism for the transfer. Conclusion The data support the argument that HGT between Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria and their hosts has produced evolutionary innovation.

  13. Gene transfer strategies for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, B.E.; Buchsbaum, D.J. [Birmingham University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Zinn, K.R. [Birmingham University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Radiology

    2000-09-01

    Utilization of molecular biology techniques offers attractive options in nuclear medicine for improving cancer imaging and therapy with radiolabeled peptides. Two of these options include utilization of phage-panning to identify novel tumor specific peptides or single chain antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the number of antigen/receptor sites expressed on malignant cells. The group has focused on the latter approach for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy. The most widely used gene transfer vectors in clinical gene therapy trials include retrovirus, cationic lipids and adenovirus. It has been utilized adenovirus vectors for gene transfer because of their ability to accomplish efficient in vivo gene transfer. Adenovirus vectors encoding the genes for a variety of antigens/receptors (carcinoembryonic antigen, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2)) have all shown that their expression is increased on cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo following adenovirus infection. Of particular interest has been the adenovirus encoding for SSTr2 (AdCMVSSTr2). Various radioisotopes have been attached to somatostatin analogues for imaging and therapy of SSTr2-positive tumors both clinically and in animal models. The use of these analogues in combination with AdCMVSSTr2 is a promising approach for improving the detection sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of these radiolabeled peptides against solid tumors. In addition, it has been proposed the use of SSTr2 as a marker for imaging the expression of another cancer therapeutic trans gene (e.g., cytosine deaminase, thymidine kinase) encoded within the same vector. This would allow for non-invasive monitoring of gene delivery to tumor sites.

  14. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer to chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wordragen, van M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of plants is a technique that enables us to add to the plant genome, in a precise and well controlled manner, one or a few new genes, coding for desirable traits. In contrast to this, the conventional method for the introduction of new properties in plants, by cross

  15. The infinitely many genes model with horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Baumdicker, Franz; Pfaffelhuber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The genome of bacterial species is much more flexible than that of eukaryotes. Moreover, the distributed genome hypothesis for bacteria states that the total number of genes present in a bacterial population is greater than the genome of every single individual. The pangenome, i.e. the set of all genes of a bacterial species (or a sample), comprises the core genes which are present in all living individuals, and accessory genes, which are carried only by some individuals. In order to use acce...

  16. From green to red: horizontal gene transfer of the phycoerythrin gene cluster between Planktothrix strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Sogge, Hanne; Rounge, Trine Ballestad; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Lagesen, Karin; Glöckner, Gernot; Hayes, Paul K; Rohrlack, Thomas; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2013-11-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is common in cyanobacteria, and transfer of large gene clusters may lead to acquisition of new functions and conceivably niche adaption. In the present study, we demonstrate that horizontal gene transfer between closely related Planktothrix strains can explain the production of the same oligopeptide isoforms by strains of different colors. Comparison of the genomes of eight Planktothrix strains revealed that strains producing the same oligopeptide isoforms are closely related, regardless of color. We have investigated genes involved in the synthesis of the photosynthetic pigments phycocyanin and phycoerythrin, which are responsible for green and red appearance, respectively. Sequence comparisons suggest the transfer of a functional phycoerythrin gene cluster generating a red phenotype in a strain that is otherwise more closely related to green strains. Our data show that the insertion of a DNA fragment containing the 19.7-kb phycoerythrin gene cluster has been facilitated by homologous recombination, also replacing a region of the phycocyanin operon. These findings demonstrate that large DNA fragments spanning entire functional gene clusters can be effectively transferred between closely related cyanobacterial strains and result in a changed phenotype. Further, the results shed new light on the discussion of the role of horizontal gene transfer in the sporadic distribution of large gene clusters in cyanobacteria, as well as the appearance of red and green strains.

  17. Staphylococci on ICE: Overlooked agents of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansevere, Emily A; Robinson, D Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer plays a significant role in spreading antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes throughout the genus Staphylococcus , which includes species of clinical relevance to humans and animals. While phages and plasmids are the most well-studied agents of horizontal gene transfer in staphylococci, the contribution of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) has been mostly overlooked. Experimental work demonstrating the activity of ICEs in staphylococci remained frozen for years after initial work in the 1980s that showed Tn 916 was capable of transfer from Enterococcus to Staphylococcus . However, recent work has begun to thaw this field. To date, 2 families of ICEs have been identified among staphylococci - Tn 916 that includes the Tn 5801 subfamily, and ICE 6013 that includes at least 7 subfamilies. Both Tn 5801 and ICE 6013 commonly occur in clinical strains of S. aureus . Tn 5801 is the most studied of the Tn 916 family elements in staphylococci and encodes tetracycline resistance and a protein that, when expressed in Escherichia coli , inhibits restriction barriers to incoming DNA. ICE 6013 is among the shortest known ICEs, but it still includes many uncharacterized open reading frames. This element uses an IS 30 -like transposase as its recombinase, providing some versatility in integration sites. ICE 6013 also conjugatively transfers among receptive S. aureus strains at relatively higher frequency than Tn 5801 . Continued study of these mobile genetic elements may reveal the full extent to which ICEs impact horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of staphylococci.

  18. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  19. Improved Adeno-associated Viral Gene Transfer to Murine Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, I; Luo, D; Gorbatyuk, Os; Hoffman, Be; Warrington, Kh; Herzog, Rw; Harrison, Jk; Cao, O

    2013-04-29

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly primary brain tumor. Current treatment, consisting of surgical removal of the tumor mass followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, does not significantly prolong survival. Gene therapies for GBM are being developed in clinical trials, for example using adenoviral vectors. While adeno-associated virus (AAV) represents an alternative vector system, limited gene transfer to glioma cells has hampered its use. Here, we evaluated newly emerged variants of AAV capsid for gene delivery to murine glioma. We tested a mutant AAV2 capsid devoid of 3 surface-exposed tyrosine residues, AAV2 (Y444-500-730F), and a "shuffed" capsid (ShH19, containing sequences from several serotypes) that had previously been selected for enhanced glial gene delivery. AAV2 (Y-F) and ShH19 showed improved transduction of murine glioma GL261 cells in vitro by 2- to 6-fold, respectively, over AAV2. While AAV2 gene transfer to GL261 cells in established tumors in brains of syngeneic mice was undetectable, intratumoral injection of AAV2 (Y-F) or ShH19 resulted in local transduction of approximately 10% of tumor cells. In addition, gene transfer to neurons adjacent to the tumor was observed, while microglia were rarely transduced. Use of self-complementary vectors further increased transduction of glioma cells. Together, the data demonstrate the potential for improved AAV-based gene therapy for glioma using recently developed capsid variants.

  20. Statistical Mechanics of Modularity and Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Michael W.

    2013-04-01

    Biological structure organizes over evolutionary timescales. This review discusses the spontaneous emergence of hierarchical structure in biology as a result of environmental change. A body of theoretical and experimental work on evolutionary dynamics is reviewed, and a theory for these results based on a principle of least action is discussed. The structure that has emerged in biology is complementary to a type of evolutionary dynamics known as horizontal gene transfer. How horizontal gene transfer ameliorates the difficulty that finite populations would otherwise have to evolve on rugged fitness landscapes is also discussed.

  1. Twenty Years of European Union Support to Gene Therapy and Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancberg, David

    2017-11-01

    For 20 years and throughout its research programmes, the European Union has supported the entire innovation chain for gene transfer and gene therapy. The fruits of this investment are ripening as gene therapy products are reaching the European market and as clinical trials are demonstrating the safety of this approach to treat previously untreatable diseases.

  2. Nervous system modification by transplants and gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, L C

    1994-11-01

    New possibilities to modify function and direct repair in the central nervous system (CNS) have been established by the merger of gene transfer technology with neural transplantation. Rapid advances in viral-mediated DNA-delivery procedures permit the study of novel gene expression in neurons and glial cells. Foreign genes, transferred by a virus vector, can be used to generate new cell lines, identify transplanted cells, and express growth factors or enzymes for neurotransmitter synthesis. In addition to CNS cell types, non-neural cells are also being studied with transgene technology in the nervous system. Functional effects have been obtained with grafts of genetically modified cells in animal models of several nervous system disorders, and the recent results set the stage for potential application of these techniques to human CNS gene therapy.

  3. Improved Adeno-associated Viral Gene Transfer to Murine Glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Zolotukhin, I; Luo, D.; Gorbatyuk, OS; Hoffman, BE; Warrington, KH; Herzog, RW; Harrison, JK; Cao, O

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly primary brain tumor. Current treatment, consisting of surgical removal of the tumor mass followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, does not significantly prolong survival. Gene therapies for GBM are being developed in clinical trials, for example using adenoviral vectors. While adeno-associated virus (AAV) represents an alternative vector system, limited gene transfer to glioma cells has hampered its use. Here, we evaluated newly emerged variants of AAV caps...

  4. Replacing and Additive Horizontal Gene Transfer in Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Chul; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Gronau, Ilan; Stanhope, Michael J.; Siepel, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The prominent role of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in the evolution of bacteria is now well documented, but few studies have differentiated between evolutionary events that predominantly cause genes in one lineage to be replaced by homologs from another lineage (“replacing HGT”) and events that result in the addition of substantial new genomic material (“additive HGT”). Here in, we make use of the distinct phylogenetic signatures of replacing and additive HGTs in a genome-wide study of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (SPY) and its close relatives S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDE) and S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDD). Using recently developed statistical models and computational methods, we find evidence for abundant gene flow of both kinds within each of the SPY and SDE clades and of reduced levels of exchange between SPY and SDD. In addition, our analysis strongly supports a pronounced asymmetry in SPY–SDE gene flow, favoring the SPY-to-SDE direction. This finding is of particular interest in light of the recent increase in virulence of pathogenic SDE. We find much stronger evidence for SPY–SDE gene flow among replacing than among additive transfers, suggesting a primary influence from homologous recombination between co-occurring SPY and SDE cells in human hosts. Putative virulence genes are correlated with transfer events, but this correlation is found to be driven by additive, not replacing, HGTs. The genes affected by additive HGTs are enriched for functions having to do with transposition, recombination, and DNA integration, consistent with previous findings, whereas replacing HGTs seen to influence a more diverse set of genes. Additive transfers are also found to be associated with evidence of positive selection. These findings shed new light on the manner in which HGT has shaped pathogenic bacterial genomes. PMID:22617954

  5. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huddleston JR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer R HuddlestonBiology Department, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, USAAbstract: Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed.Keywords: gut microbiome, conjugation, natural transformation, transduction

  7. Systematic inference of highways of horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Mukul S; Banay, Guy; Harlow, Timothy J; Gogarten, J Peter; Shamir, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a crucial role in the evolution of prokaryotic species. Typically, no more than a few genes are horizontally transferred between any two species. However, several studies identified pairs of species (or linages) between which many different genes were horizontally transferred. Such a pair is said to be linked by a highway of gene sharing. Inferring such highways is crucial to understanding the evolution of prokaryotes and for inferring past symbiotic and ecological associations among different species. We present a new improved method for systematically detecting highways of gene sharing. As we demonstrate using a variety of simulated datasets, our method is highly accurate and efficient, and robust to noise and high rates of HGT. We further validate our method by applying it to a published dataset of >22 000 gene trees from 144 prokaryotic species. Our method makes it practical, for the first time, to perform accurate highway analysis quickly and easily even on large datasets with high rates of HGT. An implementation of the method can be freely downloaded from: http://acgt.cs.tau.ac.il/hide.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotes: The weak-link model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    The significance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic evolution remains controversial. Although many eukaryotic genes are of bacterial origin, they are often interpreted as being derived from mitochondria or plastids. Because of their fixed gene pool and gene loss, however, mitochondria and plastids alone cannot adequately explain the presence of all, or even the majority, of bacterial genes in eukaryotes. Available data indicate that no insurmountable barrier to HGT exists, even in complex multicellular eukaryotes. In addition, the discovery of both recent and ancient HGT events in all major eukaryotic groups suggests that HGT has been a regular occurrence throughout the history of eukaryotic evolution. A model of HGT is proposed that suggests both unicellular and early developmental stages as likely entry points for foreign genes into multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:24037739

  9. Pollen irradiation and possible gene transfer in Nicotiana species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1985-01-01

    Progeny from crosses of Nicotiana langsdorffii with gamma irradiated pollen of Nicotiana alata ‘Crimson Bedder’ showed skewed segregation in the F2 favoring the maternal parent. This is probably not gene transfer in a strict sense, rather just an extreme case of reduced transmission of irradiated...

  10. Addressing the issue of horizontal gene transfer from a diet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of these hazards, which have great controversy reports, is the possible horizontal gene transfer from GM-food or feed to human or animal tissues. ... Analysis of the results revealed that: 1) ingested fragments from the CaMV-35S promoter incorporated into blood, liver, and brain tissues of experimental rats, 2) The total ...

  11. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Adato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT, the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM. Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain.

  12. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on “unusual” sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain. PMID:26439115

  13. Specific gene repression by CRISPRi system transferred through bacterial conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Weiyue; Lee, Derrick; Wong, Eric; Dadlani, Priyanka; Dinh, David; Huang, Verna; Kearns, Kendall; Teng, Sherry; Chen, Susan; Haliburton, John; Heimberg, Graham; Heineike, Benjamin; Ramasubramanian, Anusuya; Stevens, Thomas; Helmke, Kara J; Zepeda, Veronica; Qi, Lei S; Lim, Wendell A

    2014-12-19

    In microbial communities, bacterial populations are commonly controlled using indiscriminate, broad range antibiotics. There are few ways to target specific strains effectively without disrupting the entire microbiome and local environment. Here, we use conjugation, a natural DNA horizontal transfer process among bacterial species, to deliver an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system for targeting specific genes in recipient Escherichia coli cells. We show that delivery of the CRISPRi system is successful and can specifically repress a reporter gene in recipient cells, thereby establishing a new tool for gene regulation across bacterial cells and potentially for bacterial population control.

  14. Recurrent horizontal transfer of bacterial toxin genes to eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Yehu; Fredman, David; Szczesny, Pawel; Grynberg, Marcin; Technau, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we report likely recurrent horizontal (lateral) gene transfer events of genes encoding pore-forming toxins of the aerolysin family between species belonging to different kingdoms of life. Clustering based on pairwise similarity and phylogenetic analysis revealed several distinct aerolysin sequence groups, each containing proteins from multiple kingdoms of life. These results strongly support at least six independent transfer events between distantly related phyla in the evolutionary history of one protein family and discount selective retention of ancestral genes as a plausible explanation for this patchy phylogenetic distribution. We discuss the possible roles of these proteins and show evidence for a convergent new function in two extant species. We hypothesize that certain gene families are more likely to be maintained following horizontal gene transfer from commensal or pathogenic organism to its host if they 1) can function alone; and 2) are immediately beneficial for the ecology of the organism, as in the case of pore-forming toxins which can be utilized in multicellular organisms for defense and predation.

  15. Myeloprotection by Cytidine Deaminase Gene Transfer in Antileukemic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Lachmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer of drug resistance (CTX-R genes can be used to protect the hematopoietic system from the toxicity of anticancer chemotherapy and this concept recently has been proven by overexpression of a mutant O6-methylguaninemethyltransferase in the hematopoietic system of glioblastoma patients treated with temozolomide. Given its protection capacity against such relevant drugs as cytosine arabinoside (ara-C, gemcitabine, decitabine, or azacytidine and the highly hematopoiesis-specific toxicity profile of several of these agents, cytidine deaminase (CDD represents another interesting candidate CTX-R gene and our group recently has established the myeloprotective capacity of CDD gene transfer in a number of murine transplant studies. Clinically, CDD overexpression appears particularly suited to optimize treatment strategies for acute leukemias and myelodysplasias given the efficacy of ara-C (and to a lesser degree decitabine and azacytidine in these disease entities. This article will review the current state of the art with regard to CDD gene transfer and point out potential scenarios for a clinical application of this strategy. In addition, risks and potential side effects associated with this approach as well as strategies to overcome these problems will be highlighted.

  16. Foamy virus for efficient gene transfer in regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Stanke, Nicole; Protze, Stephanie; Tanaka, Elly M; Lindemann, Dirk

    2013-05-03

    Molecular studies of appendage regeneration have been hindered by the lack of a stable and efficient means of transferring exogenous genes. We therefore sought an efficient integrating virus system that could be used to study limb and tail regeneration in salamanders. We show that replication-deficient foamy virus (FV) vectors efficiently transduce cells in two different regeneration models in cell culture and in vivo. Injection of EGFP-expressing FV but not lentivirus vector particles into regenerating limbs and tail resulted in widespread expression that persisted throughout regeneration and reamputation pointing to the utility of FV for analyzing adult phenotypes in non-mammalian models. Furthermore, tissue specific transgene expression is achieved using FV vectors during limb regeneration. FV vectors are efficient mean of transferring genes into axolotl limb/tail and infection persists throughout regeneration and reamputation. This is a nontoxic method of delivering genes into axolotls in vivo/ in vitro and can potentially be applied to other salamander species.

  17. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from prokaryotic pangenomes: Inherited chimerism in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chuan; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Roettger, Mayo; Garg, Sriram; Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2015-08-18

    Endosymbiotic theory in eukaryotic-cell evolution rests upon a foundation of three cornerstone partners--the plastid (a cyanobacterium), the mitochondrion (a proteobacterium), and its host (an archaeon)--and carries a corollary that, over time, the majority of genes once present in the organelle genomes were relinquished to the chromosomes of the host (endosymbiotic gene transfer). However, notwithstanding eukaryote-specific gene inventions, single-gene phylogenies have never traced eukaryotic genes to three single prokaryotic sources, an issue that hinges crucially upon factors influencing phylogenetic inference. In the age of genomes, single-gene trees, once used to test the predictions of endosymbiotic theory, now spawn new theories that stand to eventually replace endosymbiotic theory with descriptive, gene tree-based variants featuring supernumerary symbionts: prokaryotic partners distinct from the cornerstone trio and whose existence is inferred solely from single-gene trees. We reason that the endosymbiotic ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts brought into the eukaryotic--and plant and algal--lineage a genome-sized sample of genes from the proteobacterial and cyanobacterial pangenomes of their respective day and that, even if molecular phylogeny were artifact-free, sampling prokaryotic pangenomes through endosymbiotic gene transfer would lead to inherited chimerism. Recombination in prokaryotes (transduction, conjugation, transformation) differs from recombination in eukaryotes (sex). Prokaryotic recombination leads to pangenomes, and eukaryotic recombination leads to vertical inheritance. Viewed from the perspective of endosymbiotic theory, the critical transition at the eukaryote origin that allowed escape from Muller's ratchet--the origin of eukaryotic recombination, or sex--might have required surprisingly little evolutionary innovation.

  18. Lateral gene transfer, bacterial genome evolution, and the Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillings, Michael R

    2017-02-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has significantly influenced bacterial evolution since the origins of life. It helped bacteria generate flexible, mosaic genomes and enables individual cells to rapidly acquire adaptive phenotypes. In turn, this allowed bacteria to mount strong defenses against human attempts to control their growth. The widespread dissemination of genes conferring resistance to antimicrobial agents has precipitated a crisis for modern medicine. Our actions can promote increased rates of LGT and also provide selective forces to fix such events in bacterial populations. For instance, the use of selective agents induces the bacterial SOS response, which stimulates LGT. We create hotspots for lateral transfer, such as wastewater systems, hospitals, and animal production facilities. Conduits of gene transfer between humans and animals ensure rapid dissemination of recent transfer events, as does modern transport and globalization. As resistance to antibacterial compounds becomes universal, there is likely to be increasing selection pressure for phenotypes with adverse consequences for human welfare, such as enhanced virulence, pathogenicity, and transmission. Improved understanding of the ecology of LGT could help us devise strategies to control this fundamental evolutionary process. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Lateral gene transfer in phylogeny of azoreductase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafana, Amit; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2008-06-01

    This paper attempts to reconstruct the phylogeny of azoreductase enzyme from different organisms and compare it with the small subunit rRNA-based phylogeny of the organisms. The two phylogenies were found to be incongruent, indicating several events of lateral transfer of azoreductase gene between phylogenetically diverse organisms. However, the phylogenetic analysis methods have several limitations and a single method may not give the true pattern. Hence, it is necessary to corroborate the results with other complementary analysis tools. We used several tools to test our hypothesis of lateral transfer and found that it was supported not only by the analysis of the whole sequences, but also by the conserved motifs detected in these sequences. There were ample evidences for lateral transfer of azoreductase gene among enteric bacteria. There were also indications that azoreductase probably evolved in prokaryotes and then it was laterally transferred to eukaryotes in multiple events, resulting in some sequence variation among eukaryotic azoreductases. Finally, profile HMMs and conserved motifs extracted from these azoreductase sequences were found to provide sensitive tools for identifying potential azoreductases from the database. The analysis techniques used in this study can be extended to other gene trees to verify their evolutionary histories.

  20. Immunotherapy of Malignancy by in vivo Gene Transfer into Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Gregory E.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bei-Yue; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Leaf; Nabel, Gary J.

    1993-05-01

    The immune system confers protection against a variety of pathogens and contributes to the surveillance and destruction of neoplastic cells. Several cell types participate in the recognition and lysis of tumors, and appropriate immune stimulation provides therapeutic effects in malignancy. Foreign major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins also serve as a potent stimulus to the immune system. In this report, a foreign MHC gene was introduced directly into malignant tumors in vivo in an effort to stimulate tumor rejection. In contrast to previous attempts to induce tumor immunity by cell-mediated gene transfer, the recombinant gene was introduced directly into tumors in vivo. Expression of the murine class I H-2K^s gene within the CT26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma (H-2K^d) or the MCA 106 fibrosarcoma (H-2K^b) induced a cytotoxic T-cell response to H-2K^s and, more importantly, to other antigens present on unmodified tumor cells. This immune response attenuated tumor growth and caused complete tumor regression in many cases. Direct gene transfer in vivo can therefore induce cell-mediated immunity against specific gene products, which provides an immunotherapeutic effect for malignancy, and potentially can be applied to the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases in man.

  1. Horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal Amanita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaib De Mares, Maryam; Hess, Jaqueline; Floudas, Dimitrios; Lipzen, Anna; Choi, Cindy; Kennedy, Megan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Pringle, Anne

    2015-03-01

    The genus Amanita encompasses both symbiotic, ectomycorrhizal fungi and asymbiotic litter decomposers; all species are derived from asymbiotic ancestors. Symbiotic species are no longer able to degrade plant cell walls. The carbohydrate esterases family 1 (CE1s) is a diverse group of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, including decomposition and carbon storage. CE1 genes of the ectomycorrhizal A. muscaria appear diverged from all other fungal homologues, and more similar to CE1s of bacteria, suggesting a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event. In order to test whether AmanitaCE1s were acquired horizontally, we built a phylogeny of CE1s collected from across the tree of life, and describe the evolution of CE1 genes among Amanita and relevant lineages of bacteria. CE1s of symbiotic Amanita were very different from CE1s of asymbiotic Amanita, and are more similar to bacterial CE1s. The protein structure of one CE1 gene of A. muscaria matched a depolymerase that degrades the carbon storage molecule poly((R)-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Asymbiotic Amanita do not carry sequence or structural homologues of these genes. The CE1s acquired through HGT may enable novel metabolisms, or play roles in signaling or defense. This is the first evidence for the horizontal transfer of carbohydrate metabolism genes into ectomycorrhizal fungi. © 2014 The Authors New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Effective polyethyleneimine-mediated gene transfer into zebrafish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Sui-Dong; Pei, Yuan-Yuan; Weng, Shao-Ping; Lü, Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; He, Jian-Guo

    2009-09-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) has been broadly studied as a leading nonviral gene delivery carrier because of its relatively high transfection efficiency in a wide range of cell types. Here, we report gene transfer in zebrafish cells (ZF4) using PEI as a gene carrier and lipofectamine as a control. Formations of PEI-DNA complexes were characterized by a series of measurements. The particle size of PEI-DNA complexes decreased from 274 to 132 nm, the surface charge gradually increased from -26 to 29 mV, and the cytotoxicity for zebrafish cells was observed with increasing proportion of PEI. Gel retardation assay showed that DNA was completely bound by PEI with a negative-to-positive charge ratio of 4. It was observed by transmission electron microscopy that the morphology of PEI-DNA complexes was spherical with smooth surfaces. Flow cytometry revealed that the optimum transfection efficiency (27%) mediated by PEI was obtained at an negative-to-positive charge ratio of 8, which was higher than that with lipofectamine. Luciferase activity assay confirmed the increase in reporter gene expression probably due to a more efficient formation of complex between DNA and PEI than DNA and lipofectamine. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PEI may be applied as an effective gene carrier to mediate gene transfer into zebrafish cells.

  3. Improving Adenovirus Based Gene Transfer: Strategies to Accomplish Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amalfitano

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (Ad based gene transfer vectors continue to be the platform of choice for an increasing number of clinical trials worldwide. In fact, within the last five years, the number of clinical trials that utilize Ad based vectors has doubled, indicating growing enthusiasm for the numerous positive characteristics of this gene transfer platform. For example, Ad vectors can be easily and relatively inexpensively produced to high titers in a cGMP compliant manner, can be stably stored and transported, and have a broad applicability for a wide range of clinical conditions, including both gene therapy and vaccine applications. Ad vector based gene transfer will become more useful as strategies to counteract innate and/or pre-existing adaptive immune responses to Ads are developed and confirmed to be efficacious. The approaches attempting to overcome these limitations can be divided into two broad categories: pre-emptive immune modulation of the host, and selective modification of the Ad vector itself. The first category of methods includes the use of immunosuppressive drugs or specific compounds to block important immune pathways, which are known to be induced by Ads. The second category comprises several innovative strategies inclusive of: (1 Ad-capsid-display of specific inhibitors or ligands; (2 covalent modifications of the entire Ad vector capsid moiety; (3 the use of tissue specific promoters and local administration routes; (4 the use of genome modified Ads; and (5 the development of chimeric or alternative serotype Ads. This review article will focus on both the promise and the limitations of each of these immune evasion strategies, and in the process delineate future directions in developing safer and more efficacious Ad-based gene transfer strategies.

  4. Gorgeous mosaic of mitochondrial genes created by horizontal transfer and gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Weilong; Richardson, Aaron O; Zheng, Yihong; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2010-12-14

    The best known outcome of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the introduction of novel genes, but other outcomes have been described. When a transferred gene has a homolog in the recipient genome, the native gene may be functionally replaced (and subsequently lost) or partially overwritten by gene conversion with transiently present foreign DNA. Here we report the discovery, in two lineages of plant mitochondrial genes, of novel gene combinations that arose by conversion between coresident native and foreign homologs. These lineages have undergone intricate conversion between native and foreign copies, with conversion occurring repeatedly and differentially over the course of speciation, leading to radiations of mosaic genes involved in respiration and intron splicing. Based on these findings, we develop a model--the duplicative HGT and differential gene conversion model--that integrates HGT and ongoing gene conversion in the context of speciation. Finally, we show that one of these HGT-driven gene-conversional radiations followed two additional types of conversional chimerism, namely, intramitochondrial retroprocessing and interorganellar gene conversion across the 2 billion year divide between mitochondria and chloroplasts. These findings expand our appreciation of HGT and gene conversion as creative evolutionary forces, establish plant mitochondria as a premiere system for studying the evolutionary dynamics of HGT and its genetic reverberations, and recommend careful examination of bacterial and other genomes for similar, likely overlooked phenomena.

  5. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Wang, Jingfeng; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Zhang, Bin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2013-09-20

    Growing attention has been paid to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in wastewater microbial communities. The application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) in wastewater treatment is becoming increasingly widespread. We hypothesized that the transfer of ARGs among bacteria could occur in MBRs, which combine a high density of bacterial cells, biofilms, and antibiotic resistance bacteria or ARGs. In this study, the transfer discipline and dissemination of the RP4 plasmid in MBRs were investigated by the counting plate method, the MIDI microorganism identification system, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques. The results showed that the average transfer frequency of the RP4 plasmid from the donor strain to cultivable bacteria in activated sludge was 2.76×10⁻⁵ per recipient, which was greater than the transfer frequency in wastewater and bacterial sludge reported previously. In addition, many bacterial species in the activated sludge had received RP4 by horizontal transfer, while the genera of Shewanella spp., Photobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., and Vibrio spp. were more likely to acquire this plasmid. Interestingly, the abundance of the RP4 plasmid in total DNA remained at high levels and relatively stable at 10⁴ copies/mg of biosolids, suggesting that ARGs were transferred from donor strains to activated sludge bacteria in our study. Thus, the presence of ARGs in sewage sludge poses a potential health threat. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extensive horizontal gene transfer, duplication, and loss of chlorophyll synthesis genes in the algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsperger, Heather M; Randhawa, Tejinder; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-02-10

    Two non-homologous, isofunctional enzymes catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll a synthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae and land plants: the light-independent (LIPOR) and light-dependent (POR) protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases. Whereas the distribution of these enzymes in cyanobacteria and land plants is well understood, the presence, loss, duplication, and replacement of these genes have not been surveyed in the polyphyletic and remarkably diverse eukaryotic algal lineages. A phylogenetic reconstruction of the history of the POR enzyme (encoded by the por gene in nuclei) in eukaryotic algae reveals replacement and supplementation of ancestral por genes in several taxa with horizontally transferred por genes from other eukaryotic algae. For example, stramenopiles and haptophytes share por gene duplicates of prasinophytic origin, although their plastid ancestry predicts a rhodophytic por signal. Phylogenetically, stramenopile pors appear ancestral to those found in haptophytes, suggesting transfer from stramenopiles to haptophytes by either horizontal or endosymbiotic gene transfer. In dinoflagellates whose plastids have been replaced by those of a haptophyte or diatom, the ancestral por genes seem to have been lost whereas those of the new symbiotic partner are present. Furthermore, many chlorarachniophytes and peridinin-containing dinoflagellates possess por gene duplicates. In contrast to the retention, gain, and frequent duplication of algal por genes, the LIPOR gene complement (chloroplast-encoded chlL, chlN, and chlB genes) is often absent. LIPOR genes have been lost from haptophytes and potentially from the euglenid and chlorarachniophyte lineages. Within the chlorophytes, rhodophytes, cryptophytes, heterokonts, and chromerids, some taxa possess both POR and LIPOR genes while others lack LIPOR. The gradual process of LIPOR gene loss is evidenced in taxa possessing pseudogenes or partial LIPOR gene

  7. Plasmid and clonal interference during post horizontal gene transfer evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedhomme, S; Perez Pantoja, D; Bravo, I G

    2017-04-01

    Plasmids are nucleic acid molecules that can drive their own replication in a living cell. They can be transmitted horizontally and can thrive in the host cell to high-copy numbers. Plasmid replication and gene expression consume cellular resources and cells carrying plasmids incur fitness costs. But many plasmids carry genes that can be beneficial under certain conditions, allowing the cell to endure in the presence of antibiotics, toxins, competitors or parasites. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded genes can thus instantaneously confer differential adaptation to local or transient selection conditions. This conflict between cellular fitness and plasmid spread sets the scene for multilevel selection processes. We have engineered a system to study the short-term evolutionary impact of different synonymous versions of a plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance gene. Applying experimental evolution under different selection conditions and deep sequencing allowed us to show rapid local adaptation to the presence of antibiotic and to the specific version of the resistance gene transferred. We describe the presence of clonal interference at two different levels: at the within-cell level, because a single cell can carry several plasmids, and at the between-cell level, because a bacterial population may contain several clones carrying different plasmids and displaying different fitness in the presence/absence of antibiotic. Understanding the within-cell and between-cell dynamics of plasmids after horizontal gene transfer is essential to unravel the dense network of mobile elements underlying the worldwide threat to public health of antibiotic resistance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of an ancient lepidopteran lateral gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wheeler

    Full Text Available Bacteria to eukaryote lateral gene transfers (LGT are an important potential source of material for the evolution of novel genetic traits. The explosion in the number of newly sequenced genomes provides opportunities to identify and characterize examples of these lateral gene transfer events, and to assess their role in the evolution of new genes. In this paper, we describe an ancient lepidopteran LGT of a glycosyl hydrolase family 31 gene (GH31 from an Enterococcus bacteria. PCR amplification between the LGT and a flanking insect gene confirmed that the GH31 was integrated into the Bombyx mori genome and was not a result of an assembly error. Database searches in combination with degenerate PCR on a panel of 7 lepidopteran families confirmed that the GH31 LGT event occurred deep within the Order approximately 65-145 million years ago. The most basal species in which the LGT was found is Plutella xylostella (superfamily: Yponomeutoidea. Array data from Bombyx mori shows that GH31 is expressed, and low dN/dS ratios indicates the LGT coding sequence is under strong stabilizing selection. These findings provide further support for the proposition that bacterial LGTs are relatively common in insects and likely to be an underappreciated source of adaptive genetic material.

  9. Horizontal gene transfer of toxin genes in Clostridium botulinum: Involvement of mobile elements and plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Intoxication with the potent botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) gives rise to the serious paralytic illness botulism. BoNT is part of a complex that consists of the neurotoxin and several associated components, all encoded by the bont gene cluster. This gene cluster has likely been subjected to horizontal gene transfer between different groups of clostridia, which has given rise to the genetically diverse species Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum is divided into four physiological groups (I–IV), w...

  10. Risks from GMOs due to horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keese, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the stable transfer of genetic material from one organism to another without reproduction or human intervention. Transfer occurs by the passage of donor genetic material across cellular boundaries, followed by heritable incorporation to the genome of the recipient organism. In addition to conjugation, transformation and transduction, other diverse mechanisms of DNA and RNA uptake occur in nature. The genome of almost every organism reveals the footprint of many ancient HGT events. Most commonly, HGT involves the transmission of genes on viruses or mobile genetic elements. HGT first became an issue of public concern in the 1970s through the natural spread of antibiotic resistance genes amongst pathogenic bacteria, and more recently with commercial production of genetically modified (GM) crops. However, the frequency of HGT from plants to other eukaryotes or prokaryotes is extremely low. The frequency of HGT to viruses is potentially greater, but is restricted by stringent selection pressures. In most cases the occurrence of HGT from GM crops to other organisms is expected to be lower than background rates. Therefore, HGT from GM plants poses negligible risks to human health or the environment.

  11. A rice Stowaway MITE for gene transfer in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Fattash

    Full Text Available Miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs lack protein coding capacity and often share very limited sequence similarity with potential autonomous elements. Their capability of efficient transposition and dramatic amplification led to the proposition that MITEs are an untapped rich source of materials for transposable element (TE based genetic tools. To test the concept of using MITE sequence in gene transfer, a rice Stowaway MITE previously shown to excise efficiently in yeast was engineered to carry cargo genes (neo and gfp for delivery into the budding yeast genome. Efficient excision of the cargo gene cassettes was observed even though the excision frequency generally decreases with the increase of the cargo sizes. Excised elements insert into new genomic loci efficiently, with about 65% of the obtained insertion sites located in genes. Elements at the primary insertion sites can be remobilized, frequently resulting in copy number increase of the element. Surprisingly, the orientation of a cargo gene (neo on a construct bearing dual reporter genes (gfp and neo was found to have a dramatic effect on transposition frequency. These results demonstrated the concept that MITE sequences can be useful in engineering genetic tools to deliver cargo genes into eukaryotic genomes.

  12. Dynamic monitoring of horizontal gene transfer in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. Y.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.; Bennett, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microbial gene expression underlies microbial behaviors (phenotypes) central to many aspects of C, N, and H2O cycling. However, continuous monitoring of microbial gene expression in soils is challenging because genetically-encoded reporter proteins widely used in the lab are difficult to deploy in soil matrices: for example, green fluorescent protein cannot be easily visualized in soils, even in the lab. To address this problem we have developed a reporter protein that releases small volatile gases. Here, we applied this gas reporter in a proof-of-concept soil experiment, monitoring horizontal gene transfer, a microbial activity that alters microbial genotypes and phenotypes. Horizontal gene transfer is central to bacterial evolution and adaptation and is relevant to problems such as the spread of antibiotic resistance, increasing metal tolerance in superfund sites, and bioremediation capability of bacterial consortia. This process is likely to be impacted by a number of matrix properties not well-represented in the petri dish, such as microscale variations in water, nutrients, and O2, making petri-dish experiments a poor proxy for environmental processes. We built a conjugation system using synthetic biology to demonstrate the use of gas-reporting biosensors in safe, lab-based biogeochemistry experiments, and here we report the use of these sensors to monitor horizontal gene transfer in soils. Our system is based on the F-plasmid conjugation in Escherichia coli. We have found that the gas signal reports on the number of cells that acquire F-plasmids (transconjugants) in a loamy Alfisol collected from Kellogg Biological Station. We will report how a gas signal generated by transconjugants varies with the number of F-plasmid donor and acceptor cells seeded in a soil, soil moisture, and soil O2 levels.

  13. Horizontal gene transfer is a significant driver of gene innovation in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Brosnahan, Michael L; Hackett, Jeremiah D

    2013-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an evolutionarily and ecologically important group of microbial eukaryotes. Previous work suggests that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important source of gene innovation in these organisms. However, dinoflagellate genomes are notoriously large and complex, making genomic investigation of this phenomenon impractical with currently available sequencing technology. Fortunately, de novo transcriptome sequencing and assembly provides an alternative approach for investigating HGT. We sequenced the transcriptome of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense Group IV to investigate how HGT has contributed to gene innovation in this group. Our comprehensive A. tamarense Group IV gene set was compared with those of 16 other eukaryotic genomes. Ancestral gene content reconstruction of ortholog groups shows that A. tamarense Group IV has the largest number of gene families gained (314-1,563 depending on inference method) relative to all other organisms in the analysis (0-782). Phylogenomic analysis indicates that genes horizontally acquired from bacteria are a significant proportion of this gene influx, as are genes transferred from other eukaryotes either through HGT or endosymbiosis. The dinoflagellates also display curious cases of gene loss associated with mitochondrial metabolism including the entire Complex I of oxidative phosphorylation. Some of these missing genes have been functionally replaced by bacterial and eukaryotic xenologs. The transcriptome of A. tamarense Group IV lends strong support to a growing body of evidence that dinoflagellate genomes are extraordinarily impacted by HGT.

  14. Estimating the Frequency of Horizontal Gene Transfer Using Phylogenetic Models of Gene Gain and Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Okasha, Mohamed; Kosakowski, Jakub; Higgs, Paul G

    2016-07-01

    We analyze patterns of gene presence and absence in a maximum likelihood framework with rate parameters for gene gain and loss. Standard methods allow independent gains and losses in different parts of a tree. While losses of the same gene are likely to be frequent, multiple gains need to be considered carefully. A gene gain could occur by horizontal transfer or by origin of a gene within the lineage being studied. If a gene is gained more than once, then at least one of these gains must be a horizontal transfer. A key parameter is the ratio of gain to loss rates, a/v We consider the limiting case known as the infinitely many genes model, where a/v tends to zero and a gene cannot be gained more than once. The infinitely many genes model is used as a null model in comparison to models that allow multiple gains. Using genome data from cyanobacteria and archaea, it is found that the likelihood is significantly improved by allowing for multiple gains, but the average a/v is very small. The fraction of genes whose presence/absence pattern is best explained by multiple gains is only 15% in the cyanobacteria and 20% and 39% in two data sets of archaea. The distribution of rates of gene loss is very broad, which explains why many genes follow a treelike pattern of vertical inheritance, despite the presence of a significant minority of genes that undergo horizontal transfer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributes to the Evolution of Arthropod Herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybouw, Nicky; Pauchet, Yannick; Heckel, David G.; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Within animals, evolutionary transition toward herbivory is severely limited by the hostile characteristics of plants. Arthropods have nonetheless counteracted many nutritional and defensive barriers imposed by plants and are currently considered as the most successful animal herbivores in terrestrial ecosystems. We gather a body of evidence showing that genomes of various plant feeding insects and mites possess genes whose presence can only be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). HGT is the asexual transmission of genetic information between reproductively isolated species. Although HGT is known to have great adaptive significance in prokaryotes, its impact on eukaryotic evolution remains obscure. Here, we show that laterally transferred genes into arthropods underpin many adaptations to phytophagy, including efficient assimilation and detoxification of plant produced metabolites. Horizontally acquired genes and the traits they encode often functionally diversify within arthropod recipients, enabling the colonization of more host plant species and organs. We demonstrate that HGT can drive metazoan evolution by uncovering its prominent role in the adaptations of arthropods to exploit plants. PMID:27307274

  16. Gene Transfer by Transduction in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sunny C.; Paul, John H.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the potential for bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer in the marine environment, we established transduction systems by using marine phage host isolates. Plasmid pQSR50, which contains transposon Tn5 and encodes kanamycin and streptomycin resistance, was used in plasmid transduction assays. Both marine bacterial isolates and concentrated natural bacterial communities were used as recipients in transduction studies. Transductants were detected by a gene probe complementary to the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) gene in Tn5. The transduction frequencies ranged from 1.33 × 10−7 to 5.13 × 10−9 transductants/PFU in studies performed with the bacterial isolates. With the mixed bacterial communities, putative transductants were detected in two of the six experiments performed. These putative transductants were confirmed and separated from indigenous antibiotic-resistant bacteria by colony hybridization probed with the nptII probe and by PCR amplification performed with two sets of primers specific for pQSR50. The frequencies of plasmid transduction in the mixed bacterial communities ranged from 1.58 × 10−8 to 3.7 × 10−8 transductants/PFU. Estimates of the transduction rate obtained by using a numerical model suggested that up to 1.3 × 1014 transduction events per year could occur in the Tampa Bay Estuary. The results of this study suggest that transduction could be an important mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in the marine environment. PMID:9687430

  17. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributes to the Evolution of Arthropod Herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybouw, Nicky; Pauchet, Yannick; Heckel, David G; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2016-06-27

    Within animals, evolutionary transition toward herbivory is severely limited by the hostile characteristics of plants. Arthropods have nonetheless counteracted many nutritional and defensive barriers imposed by plants and are currently considered as the most successful animal herbivores in terrestrial ecosystems. We gather a body of evidence showing that genomes of various plant feeding insects and mites possess genes whose presence can only be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). HGT is the asexual transmission of genetic information between reproductively isolated species. Although HGT is known to have great adaptive significance in prokaryotes, its impact on eukaryotic evolution remains obscure. Here, we show that laterally transferred genes into arthropods underpin many adaptations to phytophagy, including efficient assimilation and detoxification of plant produced metabolites. Horizontally acquired genes and the traits they encode often functionally diversify within arthropod recipients, enabling the colonization of more host plant species and organs. We demonstrate that HGT can drive metazoan evolution by uncovering its prominent role in the adaptations of arthropods to exploit plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Interleukin-10 Gene Transfer in Rat Limbal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Claude; Mortimer, Lauren A; Brereton, Helen M; Irani, Yazad D; Parker, Douglas Ga; Anson, Donald S; Bachmann, Lucas M; Williams, Keryn A

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the gene transfer of the interleukin (IL)-10 cytokine as a treatment modality for prolonging limbal allograft survival in a rat model. Adenoviral (AV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors were produced for ex vivo gene transfer into limbal graft tissue prior to orthotopic transplantation. Experimental groups comprised unmodified isografts, unmodified allografts, allografts transfected with a reporter gene, and allografts transfected with IL-10. The functional effects of the transgenes were determined by clinical assessment and by following donor cell survival in the recipient animal. Group comparisons were made using survival analysis and tested with the log-rank test. Differences in mean rejection times between groups were tested using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Isografts survived during the entire observation period of 56 days. Allografts underwent clinical rejection at a mean of 6.7 days (standard deviation 2.0) postoperatively, irrespective of the presence of transgenes (p IL-10 with allografts transfected with reporter gene alone (p = 0.011 and p IL-10, leading to delayed rejection compared to the controls.

  19. Horizontal gene transfer of toxin genes in Clostridium botulinum: Involvement of mobile elements and plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2011-09-01

    Intoxication with the potent botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) gives rise to the serious paralytic illness botulism. BoNT is part of a complex that consists of the neurotoxin and several associated components, all encoded by the bont gene cluster. This gene cluster has likely been subjected to horizontal gene transfer between different groups of clostridia, which has given rise to the genetically diverse species Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum is divided into four physiological groups (I-IV), where group I and II cause disease in humans and group III in animals. Analysis of the genomes of group I, II and III has revealed that toxin genes, including the bont cluster, often are plasmid-borne. The genomes analyzed from group III contain an unusually high number of plasmids carrying different toxin genes. Some of these genes are also found in other Clostridium species and some have moved between different plasmids within the same physiological group. This indicates that horizontal transfer of toxin genes is taking place within and between species of Clostridium. The abundance of mobile elements, especially in genomes of group III, is likely connected to accelerated genome plasticity and gene transfer events.

  20. Lateral Gene Transfer Dynamics in the Ancient Bacterial Genus Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bradon R; Currie, Cameron R

    2017-06-06

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) profoundly shapes the evolution of bacterial lineages. LGT across disparate phylogenetic groups and genome content diversity between related organisms suggest a model of bacterial evolution that views LGT as rampant and promiscuous. It has even driven the argument that species concepts and tree-based phylogenetics cannot be applied to bacteria. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are surprisingly rare in the ubiquitous and biomedically important bacterial genus Streptomyces Using a molecular clock, we estimate that the Streptomyces bacteria are ~380 million years old, indicating that this bacterial genus is as ancient as land vertebrates. Calibrating LGT rate to this geologic time span, we find that on average only 10 genes per million years were acquired and subsequently maintained. Over that same time span, Streptomyces accumulated thousands of point mutations. By explicitly incorporating evolutionary timescale into our analyses, we provide a dramatically different view on the dynamics of LGT and its impact on bacterial evolution.IMPORTANCE Tree-based phylogenetics and the use of species as units of diversity lie at the foundation of modern biology. In bacteria, these pillars of evolutionary theory have been called into question due to the observation of thousands of lateral gene transfer (LGT) events within and between lineages. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are exceedingly rare in the bacterial genus Streptomyces, with merely one gene acquired in Streptomyces lineages every 100,000 years. These findings stand in contrast to the current assumption of rampant genetic exchange, which has become the dominant hypothesis used to explain bacterial diversity. Our results support a more nuanced understanding of genetic exchange, with LGT impacting evolution over short timescales but playing a significant role over long timescales. Deeper understanding of LGT provides new

  1. Horizontal transfer of expressed genes in a parasitic flowering plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Bradley, Robert K; Wurdack, Kenneth J; Wong, Km; Sugumaran, M; Bomblies, Kirsten; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C

    2012-06-08

    Recent studies have shown that plant genomes have potentially undergone rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In plant parasitic systems HGT appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasite and its host. HGT in these systems has been invoked when a DNA sequence obtained from a parasite is placed phylogenetically very near to its host rather than with its closest relatives. Studies of HGT in parasitic plants have relied largely on the fortuitous discovery of gene phylogenies that indicate HGT, and no broad systematic search for HGT has been undertaken in parasitic systems where it is most expected to occur. We analyzed the transcriptomes of the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi Solms-Laubach and its obligate host Tetrastigma rafflesiae Miq. using phylogenomic approaches. Our analyses show that several dozen actively transcribed genes, most of which appear to be encoded in the nuclear genome, are likely of host origin. We also find that hundreds of vertically inherited genes (VGT) in this parasitic plant exhibit codon usage properties that are more similar to its host than to its closest relatives. Our results establish for the first time a substantive number of HGTs in a plant host-parasite system. The elevated rate of unidirectional host-to- parasite gene transfer raises the possibility that HGTs may provide a fitness benefit to Rafflesia for maintaining these genes. Finally, a similar convergence in codon usage of VGTs has been shown in microbes with high HGT rates, which may help to explain the increase of HGTs in these parasitic plants.

  2. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eTechtmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is commonly known as a toxic gas, yet it is used by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and many archaea. In this study, we determined the prevalence of anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (anaerobic CODHs, or [Ni,Fe]-CODHs in currently available genomic sequence databases. More than 6% (185 genomes out of 2887 bacterial and archaeal genome sequences in the IMG database possess at least one gene encoding [Ni,Fe]-CODH, the key enzyme for anaerobic CO utilization. The phylogenetic study of this extended protein family revealed nine distinct clades of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs. These clades consisted of [Ni,Fe]-CODHs that, while apparently monophyletic within the clades, were encoded by microorganisms of disparate phylogeny, based on 16S rRNA sequences, and widely ranging physiology. Following this discovery, it was therefore of interest to examine the extent and possible routes of horizontal gene transfer (HGT affecting [Ni,Fe]-CODH genes and gene clusters that include [Ni,Fe]-CODHs.The genome sequence of the extreme thermophile Thermosinus carboxydivorans was used as a case study for HGT. The [Ni,Fe]-CODH operon of T. carboxydivorans differs from its whole genome in its G+C content by 8.2 mol%. Here, we apply statistical methods to establish acquisition by T. carboxydivorans of the gene cluster including [Ni,Fe]-CODH via HGT. Analysis of tetranucleotide frequency and codon usage with application of the Kullback-Leibler divergence metric showed that the [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon of T. carboxidyvorans is quite dissimilar to the whole genome. Using the same metrics, the T. carboxydivorans [Ni,Fe]-CODH-1 operon is highly similar to the genome of the phylogenetically distant anaerobic carboxydotroph Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. These results allow to assume recent HTG of the gene cluster from a relative of C. hydrogenoformans to T. carboxydivorans or a more ancient transfer from a C. hydrogenoformans ancestor to a T. carboxydivorans

  3. Gene transfer into mouse prepancreatic endoderm by whole embryo electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierreux, Christophe E; Poll, Aurélie V; Jacquemin, Patrick; Lemaigre, Frédéric P; Rousseau, Guy G

    2005-03-10

    Understanding gene function in the developing pancreas is a major issue for pancreatic cell therapy. The in vivo analysis of gene function has essentially been performed by modulating gene expression in transgenesis. A faster and easier method is electroporation of mouse embryos. This technique, coupled with whole embryo culture, enables one to deliver genes and analyze their effects in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. We wanted to adapt the electroporation technique for gene transfer of whole e8.5 mouse embryos into the endoderm to allow expression of transgenes in the pancreas or liver. Using two platinum plate electrodes, low voltage and a precise positioning of the embryo in the electroporation cuvette we could target and express DNA constructs in the prepancreatic or prehepatic territories, identified with cell markers. We also demonstrated that this technique is a valuable tool in the study of transcriptional regulation in the developing endoderm. Targeted electroporation of whole embryos is a useful method of characterizing the gene network which controls pancreatic development.

  4. Monitoring of gene transfer for cancer therapy with radioactive isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, U. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    Gene therapy for cancer has recently been developed, and four approaches are currently being evaluated in experimental and clinical studies: 1) protection of normal tissue, such as bone marrow, which are normally targets for cytotoxic drugs; 2) improvement of the host antitumor response by increasing the antitumor activity of tumor-infiltrating immuno-competent cells or by modifying the tumor cells to enhance their immunogenicity; 3) reversion of the malignant phenotype either by suppression of oncogene expression or by introduction of normal tumor suppressor genes; 4) direct killing of tumor cells by the transfer of cytotoxic or prodrug-activating genes. Monitoring of gene therapy by assessing metabolic effects or the uptake of a specific substance with radioactive isotopes is reviewed. The author's experience is mostly described: uptake measurements with {sup 11} Cthymidine, {sup 18}FDG, 3-D-methylglucose, and methionine in the presence of different concentrations of ganciclovir after transfection of a rat hepatoma cell line with a retroviral vector containing the HSVtk gene. Non-suicide reporter gene approaches are also discussed. (K.H.)

  5. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    OpenAIRE

    Huddleston JR

    2014-01-01

    Jennifer R HuddlestonBiology Department, Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX, USAAbstract: Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for ant...

  6. Experimental design and statistical rigor in phylogenomics of horizontal and endosymbiotic gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Stiller John W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A growing number of phylogenomic investigations from diverse eukaryotes are examining conflicts among gene trees as evidence of horizontal gene transfer. If multiple foreign genes from the same eukaryotic lineage are found in a given genome, it is increasingly interpreted as concerted gene transfers during a cryptic endosymbiosis in the organism's evolutionary past, also known as "endosymbiotic gene transfer" or EGT. A number of provocative hypotheses of lost or serially replaced end...

  7. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  8. Distributive Conjugal Transfer: New Insights into Horizontal Gene Transfer and Genetic Exchange in Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Keith M.; Gray, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen an explosion in the application of genomic tools across all biological disciplines. This is also true for mycobacteria, where whole genome sequences are now available for pathogens and non-pathogens alike. Genomes within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) bear the hallmarks of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Conjugation is the form of HGT with the highest potential capacity and evolutionary influence. Donor and recipient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis actively conjugate upon co-culturing in biofilms and on solid media. Whole genome sequencing of the transconjugant progeny demonstrated the incredible scale and range of genomic variation that conjugation generates. Transconjugant genomes are complex mosaics of the parental strains. Some transconjugant genomes are up to one-quarter donor-derived, distributed over 30 segments. Transferred segments range from ~50 bp to ~225,000 bp in length, and are exchanged with their recipient orthologs all around the genome. This unpredictable genome-wide infusion of DNA sequences is called Distributive Conjugal Transfer (DCT), to distinguish it from traditional oriT-based conjugation. The mosaicism generated in a single transfer event resembles that seen from meiotic recombination in sexually reproducing organisms, and contrasts with traditional models of HGT. This similarity allowed the application of a GWAS-like approach to map the donor genes that confer a donor mating identity phenotype. The mating identity genes map to the esx1 locus, expanding the central role of ESX-1 function in conjugation. The potential for DCT to instantaneously blend genomes will affect how we view mycobacterial evolution, and provide new tools for the facile manipulation of mycobacterial genomes. PMID:25505644

  9. Horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of novel traits by metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boto, Luis

    2014-02-22

    Horizontal gene transfer is accepted as an important evolutionary force modulating the evolution of prokaryote genomes. However, it is thought that horizontal gene transfer plays only a minor role in metazoan evolution. In this paper, I critically review the rising evidence on horizontally transferred genes and on the acquisition of novel traits in metazoans. In particular, I discuss suspected examples in sponges, cnidarians, rotifers, nematodes, molluscs and arthropods which suggest that horizontal gene transfer in metazoans is not simply a curiosity. In addition, I stress the scarcity of studies in vertebrates and other animal groups and the importance of forthcoming studies to understand the importance and extent of horizontal gene transfer in animals.

  10. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    House Christopher H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. Results We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria. We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Conclusions Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  11. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer in plants and biosafety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2012-12-01

    Agrobacterium, the natures' genetic engineer, has been used as a vector to create transgenic plants. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer in plants is a highly efficient transformation process which is governed by various factors including genotype of the host plant, explant, vector, plasmid, bacterial strain, composition of culture medium, tissue damage, and temperature of co-cultivation. Agrobacterium has been successfully used to transform various economically and horticulturally important monocot and dicot species by standard tissue culture and in planta transformation techniques like floral or seedling infilteration, apical meristem transformation, and the pistil drip methods. Monocots have been comparatively difficult to transform by Agrobacterium. However, successful transformations have been reported in the last few years based on the adjustment of the parameters that govern the responses of monocots to Agrobacterium. A novel Agrobacterium transferred DNA-derived nanocomplex method has been developed which will be highly valuable for plant biology and biotechnology. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation is known to be the preferred method of creating transgenic plants from a commercial and biosafety perspective. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer predominantly results in the integration of foreign genes at a single locus in the host plant, without associated vector backbone and is also known to produce marker free plants, which are the prerequisites for commercialization of transgenic crops. Research in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation can provide new and novel insights into the understanding of the regulatory process controlling molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and developmental processes occurring during Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and also into a wide range of aspects on biological safety of transgenic crops to improve crop production to meet the demands of ever-growing world's population.

  12. Production of papillomavirus-based gene transfer vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B; Thompson, Cynthia D

    2007-12-01

    Papillomaviruses are a diverse group of pathogens that infect the skin and mucosal tissues of humans and various animal species. The viral genome is a circular, double-stranded DNA molecule approximately 8-kb in length. The non-enveloped papillomavirus capsid is composed of a virally encoded major coat protein, L1, and a minor coat protein, L2. L1 and L2 co-assemble when expressed in mammalian cells, and can promiscuously encapsidate essentially any papillomavirus-based gene transfer vectors (also known as pseudoviruses). This unit outlines the production and propagative amplification of papillomaviral vectors. The system represents a highly tractable method for converting pre-existing mammalian expression plasmids into infectious virus stocks. The resulting vectors have utility for in vitro, as well as in vivo gene delivery applications. (c) 2007 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  14. Laterally Transferred Gene Recruited as a Venom in Parasitoid Wasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Ellen O.; Werren, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps use venom to manipulate the immunity and metabolism of their host insects in a variety of ways to provide resources for their offspring. Yet, how genes are recruited and evolve to perform venom functions remain open questions. A recently recognized source of eukaryotic genome innovation is lateral gene transfer (LGT). Glycoside hydrolase family 19 (GH19) chitinases are widespread in bacteria, microsporidia, and plants where they are used in nutrient acquisition or defense, but have previously not been known in metazoans. In this study, a GH19 chitinase LGT is described from the unicellular microsporidia/Rozella clade into parasitoid wasps of the superfamily Chalcidoidea, where it has become recruited as a venom protein. The GH19 chitinase is present in 15 species of chalcidoid wasps representing four families, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it was laterally transferred near or before the origin of Chalcidoidea (∼95 Ma). The GH19 chitinase gene is highly expressed in the venom gland of at least seven species, indicating a role in the complex host manipulations performed by parasitoid wasp venom. RNAi knockdown in the model parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis reveals that—following envenomation—the GH19 chitinase induces fly hosts to upregulate genes involved in an immune response to fungi. A second, independent LGT of GH19 chitinase from microsporidia into mosquitoes was also found, also supported by phylogenetic reconstructions. Besides these two LGT events, GH19 chitinase is not found in any other sequenced animal genome, or in any fungi outside the microsporidia/Rozella clade. PMID:26715630

  15. Gene Transfer Enhancement by Alkylcarboxylation of Poly(propylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hashemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among synthetic carriers, dendrimers with the more flexible structure have attracted a great deal of researchers’ attention in the field of gene delivery. Followed by the promising results upon hydrophobic modification on polymeric structures in our laboratory, alkylcarboxylated poly (propylenimine-based carriers were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of amines with alkyl moieties and were further characterized for their physicochemical and biological characteristics for plasmid DNA delivery. Although not noticeably effective gene transfer activity for hexanoate- and hexadecanoate-modified series was observed, but alkylation by decanoic acid significantly improved the transfection efficiency of the final constructs up to 60 fold in comparison with unmodified poly(propylenimine (PPI. PPI modified by 10-bromodecanoic acid at 50% grafting, showed significantly higher gene expression at c/p ratio of 2 compared to Superfect as positive control.  Overall, modification of PPI with 50% primary amines grafting with 10-bromodecanoic acid could increase the transfection efficiency which is occurred at lower c/p ratio when compared to Superfect, i.e. less amount of modified vector is required to exhibit the same efficiency as Superfect. Therefore, the obtained constructs seem to be safer carriers for long-term gene therapy applications.

  16. Widespread impact of horizontal gene transfer on plant colonization of land

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Sun, Hang; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    In complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants, horizontal gene transfer is commonly considered rare with very limited evolutionary significance. Here we show that horizontal gene transfer is a dynamic process occurring frequently in the early evolution of land plants. Our genome analyses of the moss Physcomitrella patens identified 57 families of nuclear genes that were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses. Many of these gene families were transferred to the ancestors ...

  17. Horizontal Gene Transfer and Population of Phyllosphere Bacteria on Transgenic and Nontransgenic Cotton

    OpenAIRE

    ROHANI CINTA BADIA GINTING; ANTONIUS SUWANTO; ARIS TJAHJOLEKSONO

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of horizontal gene transfer of plant genomic DNA and bacteria in the soil, particularly as this relates to the possible transfer of genes encoding antibiotic resistance, has been seen as hazard associated with genetically engineered plants. It is hypothesized that introduction of bacterial genes into the plant genome leads to a higher probability of gene transfer from plants to bacteria due to the presence of homologous sequences. Bollgard (BG) cotton was constructed through ...

  18. Synthetic Fatty Acids Prevent Plasmid-Mediated Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getino, María; Sanabria-Ríos, David J.; Fernández-López, Raúl; Campos-Gómez, Javier; Sánchez-López, José M.; Fernández, Antonio; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial conjugation constitutes a major horizontal gene transfer mechanism for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes among human pathogens. Antibiotic resistance spread could be halted or diminished by molecules that interfere with the conjugation process. In this work, synthetic 2-alkynoic fatty acids were identified as a novel class of conjugation inhibitors. Their chemical properties were investigated by using the prototype 2-hexadecynoic acid and its derivatives. Essential features of effective inhibitors were the carboxylic group, an optimal long aliphatic chain of 16 carbon atoms, and one unsaturation. Chemical modification of these groups led to inactive or less-active derivatives. Conjugation inhibitors were found to act on the donor cell, affecting a wide number of pathogenic bacterial hosts, including Escherichia, Salmonella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter spp. Conjugation inhibitors were active in inhibiting transfer of IncF, IncW, and IncH plasmids, moderately active against IncI, IncL/M, and IncX plasmids, and inactive against IncP and IncN plasmids. Importantly, the use of 2-hexadecynoic acid avoided the spread of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient population, demonstrating the feasibility of abolishing the dissemination of antimicrobial resistances by blocking bacterial conjugation. PMID:26330514

  19. Horizontal gene transfer of microbial cellulases into nematode genomes is associated with functional assimilation and gene turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieterich Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural acquisition of novel genes from other organisms by horizontal or lateral gene transfer is well established for microorganisms. There is now growing evidence that horizontal gene transfer also plays important roles in the evolution of eukaryotes. Genome-sequencing and EST projects of plant and animal associated nematodes such as Brugia, Meloidogyne, Bursaphelenchus and Pristionchus indicate horizontal gene transfer as a key adaptation towards parasitism and pathogenicity. However, little is known about the functional activity and evolutionary longevity of genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer and the mechanisms favoring such processes. Results We examine the transfer of cellulase genes to the free-living and beetle-associated nematode Pristionchus pacificus, for which detailed phylogenetic knowledge is available, to address predictions by evolutionary theory for successful gene transfer. We used transcriptomics in seven Pristionchus species and three other related diplogastrid nematodes with a well-defined phylogenetic framework to study the evolution of ancestral cellulase genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer. We performed intra-species, inter-species and inter-genic analysis by comparing the transcriptomes of these ten species and tested for cellulase activity in each species. Species with cellulase genes in their transcriptome always exhibited cellulase activity indicating functional integration into the host's genome and biology. The phylogenetic profile of cellulase genes was congruent with the species phylogeny demonstrating gene longevity. Cellulase genes show notable turnover with elevated birth and death rates. Comparison by sequencing of three selected cellulase genes in 24 natural isolates of Pristionchus pacificus suggests these high evolutionary dynamics to be associated with copy number variations and positive selection. Conclusion We could demonstrate functional integration of acquired

  20. Horizontal gene transfer of microbial cellulases into nematode genomes is associated with functional assimilation and gene turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Werner E; Schuster, Lisa N; Bartelmes, Gabi; Dieterich, Christoph; Sommer, Ralf J

    2011-01-13

    Natural acquisition of novel genes from other organisms by horizontal or lateral gene transfer is well established for microorganisms. There is now growing evidence that horizontal gene transfer also plays important roles in the evolution of eukaryotes. Genome-sequencing and EST projects of plant and animal associated nematodes such as Brugia, Meloidogyne, Bursaphelenchus and Pristionchus indicate horizontal gene transfer as a key adaptation towards parasitism and pathogenicity. However, little is known about the functional activity and evolutionary longevity of genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer and the mechanisms favoring such processes. We examine the transfer of cellulase genes to the free-living and beetle-associated nematode Pristionchus pacificus, for which detailed phylogenetic knowledge is available, to address predictions by evolutionary theory for successful gene transfer. We used transcriptomics in seven Pristionchus species and three other related diplogastrid nematodes with a well-defined phylogenetic framework to study the evolution of ancestral cellulase genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer. We performed intra-species, inter-species and inter-genic analysis by comparing the transcriptomes of these ten species and tested for cellulase activity in each species. Species with cellulase genes in their transcriptome always exhibited cellulase activity indicating functional integration into the host's genome and biology. The phylogenetic profile of cellulase genes was congruent with the species phylogeny demonstrating gene longevity. Cellulase genes show notable turnover with elevated birth and death rates. Comparison by sequencing of three selected cellulase genes in 24 natural isolates of Pristionchus pacificus suggests these high evolutionary dynamics to be associated with copy number variations and positive selection. We could demonstrate functional integration of acquired cellulase genes into the nematode's biology as predicted by theory

  1. AAV5-Factor VIII Gene Transfer in Severe Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Savita; Walsh, Liron; Lester, Will; Perry, David; Madan, Bella; Laffan, Michael; Yu, Hua; Vettermann, Christian; Pierce, Glenn F; Wong, Wing Y; Pasi, K John

    2017-12-28

    Patients with hemophilia A rely on exogenous factor VIII to prevent bleeding in joints, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. Although successful gene transfer has been reported in patients with hemophilia B, the large size of the factor VIII coding region has precluded improved outcomes with gene therapy in patients with hemophilia A. We infused a single intravenous dose of a codon-optimized adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector encoding a B-domain-deleted human factor VIII (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) in nine men with severe hemophilia A. Participants were enrolled sequentially into one of three dose cohorts (low dose [one participant], intermediate dose [one participant], and high dose [seven participants]) and were followed through 52 weeks. Factor VIII activity levels remained at 3 IU or less per deciliter in the recipients of the low or intermediate dose. In the high-dose cohort, the factor VIII activity level was more than 5 IU per deciliter between weeks 2 and 9 after gene transfer in all seven participants, and the level in six participants increased to a normal value (>50 IU per deciliter) that was maintained at 1 year after receipt of the dose. In the high-dose cohort, the median annualized bleeding rate among participants who had previously received prophylactic therapy decreased from 16 events before the study to 1 event after gene transfer, and factor VIII use for participant-reported bleeding ceased in all the participants in this cohort by week 22. The primary adverse event was an elevation in the serum alanine aminotransferase level to 1.5 times the upper limit of the normal range or less. Progression of preexisting chronic arthropathy in one participant was the only serious adverse event. No neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII were detected. The infusion of AAV5-hFVIII-SQ was associated with the sustained normalization of factor VIII activity level over a period of 1 year in six of seven participants who received a high dose, with

  2. Metazoan Ribosome Inactivating Protein encoding genes acquired by Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapadula, Walter J; Marcet, Paula L; Mascotti, María L; Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2017-05-12

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) are RNA N-glycosidases that depurinate a specific adenine residue in the conserved sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. These enzymes are widely distributed among plants and their presence has also been confirmed in several bacterial species. Recently, we reported for the first time in silico evidence of RIP encoding genes in metazoans, in two closely related species of insects: Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Here, we have experimentally confirmed the presence of these genes in mosquitoes and attempted to unveil their evolutionary history. A detailed study was conducted, including evaluation of taxonomic distribution, phylogenetic inferences and microsynteny analyses, indicating that mosquito RIP genes derived from a single Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) event, probably from a cyanobacterial donor species. Moreover, evolutionary analyses show that, after the HGT event, these genes evolved under purifying selection, strongly suggesting they play functional roles in these organisms.

  3. GENE TRANSFER IN TOBACCO MITOCHONDRIA IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katyshev A.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we had showed that isolated mitochondria from different organisms can import DNA. Exploiting this mechanism, we assessed the possibility of genes transfer in tobacco mitochondria in vitro and in vivo. Whereas homologous recombination is a rare occasion in higher plant nuclei, recombination between the large direct repeats in plant mitochondrial genome generates its multipartite structure. Following transfection of isolated organelles with constructs composed of a partial gfp gene flanked by mitochondrial DNA fragments, we showed the homologous recombination of imported DNA with the resident DNA and the integration of the reporter gene. The recombination yielded an insertion of a continuous exogenous DNA fragment including the gfp sequence and at least the 0.5 kb of the flanking sequence on each side. Using of transfection constructs carrying multiple sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA could be suitable for insertion of a target gene into any region of the mitochondrial genome, which turns this approach to be of a general and methodical importance. Usually mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS level is under strict control of the antioxidant system including the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD. MnSOD is presented in multiple forms encoded by several genes in plants. Possibly, this enzyme, beside its catalytic function, fulfills as well some unknown biochemical functions. Thus, one of maize SOD enzymes (SOD3.4 could bind with mitochondrial DNA. Another SOD form (SOD3.1 is located in close proximity to mitochondrial respiratory complexes, where ROS are generated. To study possible physiological functions of this enzyme, we cloned the maize SOD3.1 gene. Compared to the SOD3.4, this enzyme didn't demonstrate DNA-binding activity. At the same time, SOD3.1 didn't show non-specific DNA-hydrolyzing activity as Cu/ZnSOD does. It means that this enzyme might have some DNA protective function. We made NtPcob-sod3.1-IGR

  4. Adaptive Horizontal Gene Transfers between Multiple Cheese-Associated Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Jeanne; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sallet, Erika; Dumas, Émilie; Lacoste, Sandrine; Debuchy, Robert; Dupont, Joëlle; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana

    2015-10-05

    Domestication is an excellent model for studies of adaptation because it involves recent and strong selection on a few, identified traits [1-5]. Few studies have focused on the domestication of fungi, with notable exceptions [6-11], despite their importance to bioindustry [12] and to a general understanding of adaptation in eukaryotes [5]. Penicillium fungi are ubiquitous molds among which two distantly related species have been independently selected for cheese making-P. roqueforti for blue cheeses like Roquefort and P. camemberti for soft cheeses like Camembert. The selected traits include morphology, aromatic profile, lipolytic and proteolytic activities, and ability to grow at low temperatures, in a matrix containing bacterial and fungal competitors [13-15]. By comparing the genomes of ten Penicillium species, we show that adaptation to cheese was associated with multiple recent horizontal transfers of large genomic regions carrying crucial metabolic genes. We identified seven horizontally transferred regions (HTRs) spanning more than 10 kb each, flanked by specific transposable elements, and displaying nearly 100% identity between distant Penicillium species. Two HTRs carried genes with functions involved in the utilization of cheese nutrients or competition and were found nearly identical in multiple strains and species of cheese-associated Penicillium fungi, indicating recent selective sweeps; they were experimentally associated with faster growth and greater competitiveness on cheese and contained genes highly expressed in the early stage of cheese maturation. These findings have industrial and food safety implications and improve our understanding of the processes of adaptation to rapid environmental changes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of novel nonviral gene transfer systems for gene delivery to cells of the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Patrick; Weimer, Anja; Kaul, Gunter; Kohn, Dieter; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of novel nonviral gene delivery systems in cells of musculoskeletal origin. Primary cultures of lapine skeletal muscle cells, lapine articular chondrocytes, human cells from fibrous dysplasia and cell lines established from human osteosarcoma (SAOS-2), chondrosarcoma (CS-1), murine skeletal myoblasts (L8) and fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) were transfected with the P. pyralis luc or the E. coli lacZ genes using Nanofectin 1 and 2, Superfect, JetPEI, GeneJammer, Effectene, TransPass D2, FuGENE 6, Lipofectamine 2000, Dreamfect, Metafectene, Escort III, and calcium phosphate. Maximal transfection efficiency in lapine skeletal muscle cells was of 60.8 +/- 21.2% using Dreamfect, 38.9 +/- 5.0% in articular chondrocytes using Gene Jammer, 5.2 +/- 8.0% in human cells from fibrous dysplasia using Lipofectamine 2000, 12.7 +/- 16.2% in SAOS-2 cells using FuGENE 6, 29.9 +/- 3.5% in CS-1 cells using Lipofectamine 2000, 70.7 +/- 8.6% in L8 cells using FuGENE 6, and 48.9 +/- 13.0% in NIH 3T3 cells using Metafectene. When the cells were transfected with a human IGF-I gene, significant amounts of the IGF-I protein were secreted. These results indicate that relatively high levels of transfection can be achieved using novel nonviral gene transfer methods.

  6. CEP290 gene transfer rescues Leber congenital amaurosis cellular phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnight, E R; Wiley, L A; Drack, A V; Braun, T A; Anfinson, K R; Kaalberg, E E; Halder, J A; Affatigato, L M; Mullins, R F; Stone, E M; Tucker, B A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in CEP290 are the most common cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe inherited retinal degenerative disease for which there is currently no cure. Autosomal recessive CEP290-associated LCA is a good candidate for gene replacement therapy, and cells derived from affected individuals give researchers the ability to study human disease and therapeutic gene correction in vitro. Here we report the development of lentiviral vectors carrying full-length CEP290 for the purpose of correcting the CEP290 disease-specific phenotype in human cells. A lentiviral vector containing CMV-driven human full-length CEP290 was constructed. Following transduction of patient-specific, iPSC-derived, photoreceptor precursor cells, reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis and western blotting revealed vector-derived expression. As CEP290 is important in ciliogenesis, the ability of fibroblast cultures from CEP290-associated LCA patients to form cilia was investigated. In cultures derived from these patients, fewer cells formed cilia compared with unaffected controls. Cilia that were formed were shorter in patient-derived cells than in cells from unaffected individuals. Importantly, lentiviral delivery of CEP290 rescued the ciliogenesis defect. The successful construction and viral transfer of full-length CEP290 brings us closer to the goal of providing gene- and cell-based therapies for patients affected with this common form of LCA.

  7. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovjagin, Anton V; Dong, Juan; Passineau, Michael J; Ren, Changchun; Lamani, Ejvis; Mamaeva, Olga A; Wu, Hongju; Keyser, Enid; Murakami, Miho; Chen, Shuo; MacDougall, Mary

    2011-01-01

    To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3) fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold) of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(v)β3/α(v)β5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  8. Adenovirus gene transfer to amelogenesis imperfecta ameloblast-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V Borovjagin

    Full Text Available To explore gene therapy strategies for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI, a human ameloblast-like cell population was established from third molars of an AI-affected patient. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin 14, major enamel proteins and alkaline phosphatase staining. Suboptimal transduction of the ameloblast-like cells by an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector was consistent with lower levels of the coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (CAR on those cells relative to CAR-positive A549 cells. To overcome CAR -deficiency, we evaluated capsid-modified Ad5 vectors with various genetic capsid modifications including "pK7" and/or "RGD" motif-containing short peptides incorporated in the capsid protein fiber as well as fiber chimera with the Ad serotype 3 (Ad3 fiber "knob" domain. All fiber modifications provided an augmented transduction of AI-ameloblasts, revealed following vector dose normalization in A549 cells with a superior effect (up to 404-fold of pK7/RGD double modification. This robust infectivity enhancement occurred through vector binding to both α(vβ3/α(vβ5 integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs highly expressed by AI-ameloblasts as revealed by gene transfer blocking experiments. This work thus not only pioneers establishment of human AI ameloblast-like cell population as a model for in vitro studies but also reveals an optimal infectivity-enhancement strategy for a potential Ad5 vector-mediated gene therapy for AI.

  9. A first glimpse into the pattern and scale of gene transfer in the Apicomplexa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, J.L.; Mullapudi, N.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Reports of plant-like and bacterial-like genes for a number of parasitic organisms, most notably those within the Apicomplexa and Kinetoplastida, have appeared in the literature over the last few years. Among the apicomplexan organisms, following discovery of the apicomplexan plastid (apicoplast)...... been acquired via horizontal gene transfer.......), the discovery of plant-like genes was less surprising although the extent of transfer and the relationship of transferred genes to the apicoplast remained unclear. We used new genome sequence data to begin a systematic examination of the extent and origin of transferred genes in the Apicomplexa combined...... with a phylogenomic approach to detect potential gene transfers in four apicomplexan genomes. We have detected genes of algal nuclear, chloroplast (cyanobacterial) and proteobacterial origin. Plant-like genes were detected in species not currently harbouring a plastid (e.g. Cryptosporidium parvum) and putatively...

  10. Adaptive Evolution of Extreme Acidophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Potentially Driven by Horizontal Gene Transfer and Gene Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Liu, Xueduan; Liang, Yili; Guo, Xue; Xiao, Yunhua; Ma, Liyuan; Miao, Bo; Liu, Hongwei; Peng, Deliang; Huang, Wenkun; Zhang, Yuguang; Yin, Huaqun

    2017-04-01

    Recent phylogenomic analysis has suggested that three strains isolated from different copper mine tailings around the world were taxonomically affiliated with Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Here, we present a detailed investigation of their genomic features, particularly with respect to metabolic potentials and stress tolerance mechanisms. Comprehensive analysis of the Sulfobacillus genomes identified a core set of essential genes with specialized biological functions in the survival of acidophiles in their habitats, despite differences in their metabolic pathways. The Sulfobacillus strains also showed evidence for stress management, thereby enabling them to efficiently respond to harsh environments. Further analysis of metabolic profiles provided novel insights into the presence of genomic streamlining, highlighting the importance of gene loss as a main mechanism that potentially contributes to cellular economization. Another important evolutionary force, especially in larger genomes, is gene acquisition via horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which might play a crucial role in the recruitment of novel functionalities. Also, a successful integration of genes acquired from archaeal donors appears to be an effective way of enhancing the adaptive capacity to cope with environmental changes. Taken together, the findings of this study significantly expand the spectrum of HGT and genome reduction in shaping the evolutionary history of Sulfobacillus strains. IMPORTANCE Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and gene loss are recognized as major driving forces that contribute to the adaptive evolution of microbial genomes, although their relative importance remains elusive. The findings of this study suggest that highly frequent gene turnovers within microorganisms via HGT were necessary to incur additional novel functionalities to increase the capacity of acidophiles to adapt to changing environments. Evidence also reveals a fascinating phenomenon of potential cross-kingdom HGT

  11. Novel "Superspreader" Bacteriophages Promote Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Eric C; Bliskovsky, Valery V; Malagon, Francisco; Baker, James D; Prince, Jeffrey S; Klaus, James S; Adhya, Sankar L

    2017-01-17

    Bacteriophages infect an estimated 1023 to 1025 bacterial cells each second, many of which carry physiologically relevant plasmids (e.g., those encoding antibiotic resistance). However, even though phage-plasmid interactions occur on a massive scale and have potentially significant evolutionary, ecological, and biomedical implications, plasmid fate upon phage infection and lysis has not been investigated to date. Here we show that a subset of the natural lytic phage population, which we dub "superspreaders," releases substantial amounts of intact, transformable plasmid DNA upon lysis, thereby promoting horizontal gene transfer by transformation. Two novel Escherichia coli phage superspreaders, SUSP1 and SUSP2, liberated four evolutionarily distinct plasmids with equal efficiency, including two close relatives of prominent antibiotic resistance vectors in natural environments. SUSP2 also mediated the extensive lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance in unbiased communities of soil bacteria from Maryland and Wyoming. Furthermore, the addition of SUSP2 to cocultures of kanamycin-resistant E. coli and kanamycin-sensitive Bacillus sp. bacteria resulted in roughly 1,000-fold more kanamycin-resistant Bacillus sp. bacteria than arose in phage-free controls. Unlike many other lytic phages, neither SUSP1 nor SUSP2 encodes homologs to known hydrolytic endonucleases, suggesting a simple potential mechanism underlying the superspreading phenotype. Consistent with this model, the deletion of endonuclease IV and the nucleoid-disrupting protein ndd from coliphage T4, a phage known to extensively degrade chromosomal DNA, significantly increased its ability to promote plasmid transformation. Taken together, our results suggest that phage superspreaders may play key roles in microbial evolution and ecology but should be avoided in phage therapy and other medical applications. Bacteriophages (phages), viruses that infect bacteria, are the planet's most numerous biological entities

  12. Supra-operonic clusters of functionally related genes (SOCs) are a source of horizontal gene co-transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tin Yau; Lercher, Martin J

    2017-01-09

    Adaptation of bacteria occurs predominantly via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). While it is widely recognized that horizontal acquisitions frequently encompass multiple genes, it is unclear what the size distribution of successfully transferred DNA segments looks like and what evolutionary forces shape this distribution. Here, we identified 1790 gene family pairs that were consistently co-gained on the same branches across a phylogeny of 53 E. coli strains. We estimated a lower limit of their genomic distances at the time they were transferred to their host genomes; this distribution shows a sharp upper bound at 30 kb. The same gene-pairs can have larger distances (up to 70 kb) in other genomes. These more distant pairs likely represent recent acquisitions via transduction that involve the co-transfer of excised prophage genes, as they are almost always associated with intervening phage-associated genes. The observed distribution of genomic distances of co-transferred genes is much broader than expected from a model based on the co-transfer of genes within operons; instead, this distribution is highly consistent with the size distribution of supra-operonic clusters (SOCs), groups of co-occurring and co-functioning genes that extend beyond operons. Thus, we propose that SOCs form a basic unit of horizontal gene transfer.

  13. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer by transposase gene analyses in Fervidobacterium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuecas, Alba; Kanoksilapatham, Wirojne; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) plays an important role in the physiology and evolution of microorganisms above all thermophilic prokaryotes. Some members of the Phylum Thermotogae (i.e., Thermotoga spp.) have been reported to present genomes constituted by a mosaic of genes from a variety of origins. This study presents a novel approach to search on the potential plasticity of Fervidobacterium genomes using putative transposase-encoding genes as the target of analysis. Transposases are key proteins involved in genomic DNA rearrangements. A comprehensive comparative analysis, including phylogeny, non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis of tetranucleotide frequencies, repetitive flanking sequences and divergence estimates, was performed on the transposase genes detected in four Fervidobacterium genomes: F. nodosum, F. pennivorans, F. islandicum and a new isolate (Fervidobacterium sp. FC2004). Transposase sequences were classified in different groups by their degree of similarity. The different methods used in this study pointed that over half of the transposase genes represented putative HGT events with closest relative sequences within the phylum Firmicutes, being Caldicellulosiruptor the genus showing highest gene sequence proximity. These results confirmed a direct evolutionary relationship through HGT between specific Fervidobacterium species and thermophilic Firmicutes leading to potential gene sequence and functionality sharing to thrive under similar environmental conditions. Transposase-encoding genes represent suitable targets to approach the plasticity and potential mosaicism of bacterial genomes.

  14. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J

    2006-01-01

    's upper water column. The genomic context and phylogenetic relationships of the archaeal and proteobacterial proteorhodopsins indicate its probable lateral transfer between planktonic Bacteria and Archaea. About 10% of the euryarchaeotes in the photic zone contained the proteorhodopsin gene adjacent......Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light...... to their small-subunit ribosomal RNA. The archaeal proteorhodopsins were also found in other genomic regions, in the same or in different microbial lineages. Although euryarchaeotes were distributed throughout the water column, their proteorhodopsins were found only in the photic zone. The cosmopolitan...

  15. Statistical Mechanics of Horizontal Gene Transfer in Evolutionary Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2011-04-01

    The biological world, especially its majority microbial component, is strongly interacting and may be dominated by collective effects. In this review, we provide a brief introduction for statistical physicists of the way in which living cells communicate genetically through transferred genes, as well as the ways in which they can reorganize their genomes in response to environmental pressure. We discuss how genome evolution can be thought of as related to the physical phenomenon of annealing, and describe the sense in which genomes can be said to exhibit an analogue of information entropy. As a direct application of these ideas, we analyze the variation with ocean depth of transposons in marine microbial genomes, predicting trends that are consistent with recent observations using metagenomic surveys.

  16. Horizontal gene transfer: building the web of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Shannon M; Huang, Jinling; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the sharing of genetic material between organisms that are not in a parent-offspring relationship. HGT is a widely recognized mechanism for adaptation in bacteria and archaea. Microbial antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity are often associated with HGT, but the scope of HGT extends far beyond disease-causing organisms. In this Review, we describe how HGT has shaped the web of life using examples of HGT among prokaryotes, between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and even between multicellular eukaryotes. We discuss replacement and additive HGT, the proposed mechanisms of HGT, selective forces that influence HGT, and the evolutionary impact of HGT on ancestral populations and existing populations such as the human microbiome.

  17. Staunch protections: the ethics of haemophilia gene transfer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelman, J

    2008-01-01

    Haemophilia has long been considered an ideal system for validating human gene transfer (GT). However, haemophilia GT trials present a particular ethical challenge because they involve subjects whose medical condition is stabilized by standard therapies. Below, I review the ethics and risks of haemophilia GT clinical research. I propose several conditions and practices that strengthen the ethical basis for such trials. These include consultation with haemophilia advocacy organizations as trials are designed and executed, high standards of supporting evidence before trials are initiated, pretrial publication of this evidence, and the offer of indemnification for participants. I further argue against the conduct of paediatric haemophilia GT studies at this time, and raise questions about the fairness of recruiting economically disadvantaged subjects into studies that are primarily directed towards the health needs of persons in the developed world.

  18. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  19. The Impact of Gene Silencing on Horizontal Gene Transfer and Bacterial Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre, W W

    2016-01-01

    The H-NS family of DNA-binding proteins is the subject of intense study due to its important roles in the regulation of horizontally acquired genes critical for virulence, antibiotic resistance, and metabolism. Xenogeneic silencing proteins, typified by the H-NS protein of Escherichia coli, specifically target and downregulate expression from AT-rich genes by selectively recognizing specific structural features unique to the AT-rich minor groove. In doing so, these proteins facilitate bacterial evolution; enabling these cells to engage in horizontal gene transfer while buffering potential any detrimental fitness consequences that may result from it. Xenogeneic silencing and counter-silencing explain how bacterial cells can evolve effective gene regulatory strategies in the face of rampant gene gain and loss and it has extended our understanding of bacterial gene regulation beyond the classic operon model. Here we review the structures and mechanisms of xenogeneic silencers as well as their impact on bacterial evolution. Several H-NS-like proteins appear to play a role in facilitating gene transfer by other mechanisms including by regulating transposition, conjugation, and participating in the activation of virulence loci like the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island of pathogenic strains of E. coli. Evidence suggests that the critical determinants that dictate whether an H-NS-like protein will be a silencer or will perform a different function do not lie in the DNA-binding domain but, rather, in the domains that control oligomerization. This suggests that H-NS-like proteins are transcription factors that both recognize and alter the shape of DNA to exert specific effects that include but are not limited to gene silencing. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of novel traits by metazoans

    OpenAIRE

    Boto,Luis

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is accepted as an important evolutionary force modulating the evolution of prokaryote genomes. However, it is thought that horizontal gene transfer plays only a minor role in metazoan evolution. In this paper, I critically review the rising evidence on horizontally transferred genes and on the acquisition of novel traits in metazoans. In particular, I discuss suspected examples in sponges, cnidarians, rotifers, nematodes, molluscs and arthropods which suggest that hor...

  1. Crosstalk between vertical and horizontal gene transfer: plasmid replication control by a conjugative relaxase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Fernández-López, Cris; Lurz, Rudi; Bravo, Alicia; Espinosa, Manuel

    2017-07-27

    Horizontal gene transfer is a key process in the evolution of bacteria and also represents a source of genetic variation in eukaryotes. Among elements participating in gene transfer, thousands of small (horizontally transferred (mobilization) and/or vertically inherited (replication). This type of crosstalk between genetic modules involved in vertical and horizontal gene flow has not been reported before. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Widespread impact of horizontal gene transfer on plant colonization of land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Sun, Hang; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    In complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants, horizontal gene transfer is commonly considered rare with very limited evolutionary significance. Here we show that horizontal gene transfer is a dynamic process occurring frequently in the early evolution of land plants. Our genome analyses of the moss Physcomitrella patens identified 57 families of nuclear genes that were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses. Many of these gene families were transferred to the ancestors of green or land plants. Available experimental evidence shows that these anciently acquired genes are involved in some essential or plant-specific activities such as xylem formation, plant defence, nitrogen recycling as well as the biosynthesis of starch, polyamines, hormones and glutathione. These findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer had a critical role in the transition of plants from aquatic to terrestrial environments. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of horizontal gene transfer mechanism in nonvascular and seedless vascular plants.

  3. Effect of the environment on horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, Clara A; Collins, Roy Eric; Rocap, Gabrielle; Brazelton, William J

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer, the transfer and incorporation of genetic material between different species of organisms, has an important but poorly quantified role in the adaptation of microbes to their environment. Previous work has shown that genome size and the number of horizontally transferred genes are strongly correlated. Here we consider how genome size confuses the quantification of horizontal gene transfer because the number of genes an organism accumulates over time depends on its evolutionary history and ecological context (e.g., the nutrient regime for which it is adapted). We investigated horizontal gene transfer between archaea and bacteria by first counting reciprocal BLAST hits among 448 bacterial and 57 archaeal genomes to find shared genes. Then we used the DarkHorse algorithm, a probability-based, lineage-weighted method (Podell & Gaasterland, 2007), to identify potential horizontally transferred genes among these shared genes. By removing the effect of genome size in the bacteria, we have identified bacteria with unusually large numbers of shared genes with archaea for their genome size. Interestingly, archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share unusually large numbers of genes. However, high salt was not found to significantly affect the numbers of shared genes. Numbers of shared (genome size-corrected, reciprocal BLAST hits) and transferred genes (identified by DarkHorse) were strongly correlated. Thus archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share horizontally transferred genes. These horizontally transferred genes are over-represented by genes involved in energy conversion as well as the transport and metabolism of inorganic ions and amino acids. Anaerobic and thermophilic bacteria share unusually large numbers of genes with archaea. This is mainly due to horizontal gene transfer of genes from the archaea to the bacteria. In

  4. Horizontally transferred fungal carotenoid genes in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altincicek, Boran; Kovacs, Jennifer L; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2012-01-01

    ... that were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from fungi. Our search of available animal transcripts revealed the presence of two related genes in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae...

  5. HGTector: an automated method facilitating genome-wide discovery of putative horizontal gene transfers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Qiyun; Kosoy, Michael; Dittmar, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    First pass methods based on BLAST match are commonly used as an initial step to separate the different phylogenetic histories of genes in microbial genomes, and target putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events...

  6. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  7. Plant Growth-Promoting Genes can Switch to be Virulence Factors via Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritzler, Margarita; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás

    2018-02-23

    There are increasing evidences that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a critical mechanism of bacterial evolution, while its complete impact remains unclear. A main constraint of HGT effects on microbial evolution seems to be the conservation of the function of the horizontally transferred genes. From this perspective, inflexible nomenclature and functionality criteria have been established for some mobile genetic elements such as pathogenic and symbiotic islands. Adhesion is a universal prerequisite for both beneficial and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, and thus, adhesion systems (e.g., the Lap cluster) are candidates to have a dual function depending on the genomic background. In this study, we showed that the virulent factor Lap of the phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora SCRI1043, which is located within a genomic island, was acquired by HGT and probably derived from Pseudomonas. The transformation of the phytopathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae Ep1/96 with the beneficial factor Lap from the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 significantly increased its natural virulence, experimentally recapitulating the beneficial-to-virulence functional switch of the Lap cluster via HGT. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a functional switch of an individual gene or a cluster of genes mediated by HGT.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer of chlamydial-like tRNA genes into early vascular plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knie, Nils; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of lycophytes are surprisingly diverse, including strikingly different transfer RNA (tRNA) gene complements: No mitochondrial tRNA genes are present in the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii, whereas 26 tRNAs are encoded in the chondrome of the clubmoss Huperzia squarrosa. Reinvestigating the latter we found that trnL(gag) and trnS(gga) had never before been identified in any other land plant mitochondrial DNA. Sensitive sequence comparisons showed these two tRNAs as well as trnN(guu) and trnS(gcu) to be very similar to their respective counterparts in chlamydial bacteria. We identified homologs of these chlamydial-type tRNAs also in other lycophyte, fern, and gymnosperm DNAs, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) into mitochondria in the early vascular plant stem lineages. These findings extend plant mitochondrial HGT to affect individual tRNA genes, to include bacterial donors, and suggest that Chlamydiae on top of their recently proposed key role in primary chloroplast establishment may also have participated in early tracheophyte genome evolution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Fusarium graminearum Genome Reveals More Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters and Hints of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Münsterkötter, Martin; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Schmeitzl, Clemens; Varga, Elisabeth; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard; Güldener, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes are of major interest due to the pharmacological properties of their products (like mycotoxins and antibiotics). The genome of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum codes for a large number of candidate enzymes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. However, the chemical nature of most enzymatic products of proteins encoded by putative secondary metabolism biosynthetic genes is largely unknown. Based on our analysis we present 67 gene clusters with significant enrichment of predicted secondary metabolism related enzymatic functions. 20 gene clusters with unknown metabolites exhibit strong gene expression correlation in planta and presumably play a role in virulence. Furthermore, the identification of conserved and over-represented putative transcription factor binding sites serves as additional evidence for cluster co-regulation. Orthologous cluster search provided insight into the evolution of secondary metabolism clusters. Some clusters are characteristic for the Fusarium phylum while others show evidence of horizontal gene transfer as orthologs can be found in representatives of the Botrytis or Cochliobolus lineage. The presented candidate clusters provide valuable targets for experimental examination. PMID:25333987

  10. The Fusarium graminearum genome reveals more secondary metabolite gene clusters and hints of horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M K Sieber

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes are of major interest due to the pharmacological properties of their products (like mycotoxins and antibiotics. The genome of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum codes for a large number of candidate enzymes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. However, the chemical nature of most enzymatic products of proteins encoded by putative secondary metabolism biosynthetic genes is largely unknown. Based on our analysis we present 67 gene clusters with significant enrichment of predicted secondary metabolism related enzymatic functions. 20 gene clusters with unknown metabolites exhibit strong gene expression correlation in planta and presumably play a role in virulence. Furthermore, the identification of conserved and over-represented putative transcription factor binding sites serves as additional evidence for cluster co-regulation. Orthologous cluster search provided insight into the evolution of secondary metabolism clusters. Some clusters are characteristic for the Fusarium phylum while others show evidence of horizontal gene transfer as orthologs can be found in representatives of the Botrytis or Cochliobolus lineage. The presented candidate clusters provide valuable targets for experimental examination.

  11. Low rates of lateral gene transfer among metabolic genes define the evolving biogeochemical niches of archaea through deep time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Carrine E

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenomic analyses of archaeal genome sequences are providing windows into the group's evolutionary past, even though most archaeal taxa lack a conventional fossil record. Here, phylogenetic analyses were performed using key metabolic genes that define the metabolic niche of microorganisms. Such genes are generally considered to have undergone high rates of lateral gene transfer. Many gene sequences formed clades that were identical, or similar, to the tree constructed using large numbers of genes from the stable core of the genome. Surprisingly, such lateral transfer events were readily identified and quantifiable, occurring only a relatively small number of times in the archaeal domain of life. By placing gene acquisition events into a temporal framework, the rates by which new metabolic genes were acquired can be quantified. The highest lateral transfer rates were among cytochrome oxidase genes that use oxygen as a terminal electron acceptor (with a total of 12-14 lateral transfer events, or 3.4-4.0 events per billion years, across the entire archaeal domain). Genes involved in sulfur or nitrogen metabolism had much lower rates, on the order of one lateral transfer event per billion years. This suggests that lateral transfer rates of key metabolic proteins are rare and not rampant.

  12. Microbial Evolution Is in the Cards: Horizontal Gene Transfer in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagle, Jeanne; Hay, Anthony G.

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer, the exchange of genetic material between bacteria, is a potentially important factor in the degradation of synthetic compounds introduced to the environment and in the acquisition of other characteristics including antibiotic resistance. This game-based activity illustrates the role of horizontal gene transfer in the…

  13. Horizontal gene transfer of a Chlamydial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase gene to eukaryotic microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Sam; Harman, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    tRNA-guanine transglycosylases are found in all domains of life and mediate the base exchange of guanine with queuine in the anticodon loop of tRNAs. They can also regulate virulence in bacteria such as Shigella flexneri, which has prompted the development of drugs that inhibit the function of these enzymes. Here we report a group of tRNA-guanine transglycosylases in eukaryotic microbes (algae and protozoa) which are more similar to their bacterial counterparts than previously characterized eukaryotic tRNA-guanine transglycosylases. We provide evidence demonstrating that the genes encoding these enzymes were acquired by these eukaryotic lineages via horizontal gene transfer from the Chlamydiae group of bacteria. Given that the S. flexneri tRNA-guanine transglycosylase can be targeted by drugs, we propose that the bacterial-like tRNA-guanine transglycosylases could potentially be targeted in a similar fashion in pathogenic amoebae that possess these enzymes such as Acanthamoeba castellanii. This work also presents ancient prokaryote-to-eukaryote horizontal gene transfer events as an untapped resource of potential drug target identification in pathogenic eukaryotes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeted gene transfer of different genes to presynaptic and postsynaptic neocortical neurons connected by a glutamatergic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Zhao, Hua; Cao, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Geller, Alfred I

    2012-09-14

    Genetic approaches to analyzing neuronal circuits and learning would benefit from a technology to first deliver a specific gene into presynaptic neurons, and then deliver a different gene into an identified subset of their postsynaptic neurons, connected by a specific synapse type. Here, we describe targeted gene transfer across a neocortical glutamatergic synapse, using as the model the projection from rat postrhinal to perirhinal cortex. The first gene transfer, into the presynaptic neurons in postrhinal cortex, used a virus vector and standard gene transfer procedures. The vector expresses an artificial peptide neurotransmitter containing a dense core vesicle targeting domain, a NMDA NR1 subunit binding domain (from a monoclonal antibody), and the His tag. Upon release, this peptide neurotransmitter binds to NMDA receptors on the postsynaptic neurons. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer to these postsynaptic neurons in perirhinal cortex used a His tag antibody, as the peptide neurotransmitter contains the His tag. Confocal microscopy showed that with untargeted gene transfer, ~3% of the transduced presynaptic axons were proximal to a transduced postsynaptic dendrite. In contrast, with targeted gene transfer, ≥ 20% of the presynaptic axons were proximal to a transduced postsynaptic dendrite. Targeting across other types of synapses might be obtained by modifying the artificial peptide neurotransmitter to contain a binding domain for a different neurotransmitter receptor. This technology may benefit elucidating how specific neurons and subcircuits contribute to circuit physiology, behavior, and learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Witnessing Genome Evolution: Experimental Reconstruction of Endosymbiotic and Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Ralph

    2017-11-27

    Present day mitochondria and plastids (chloroplasts) evolved from formerly free-living bacteria that were acquired through endosymbiosis more than a billion years ago. Conversion of the bacterial endosymbionts into cell organelles involved the massive translocation of genetic material from the organellar genomes to the nucleus. The development of transformation technologies for organellar genomes has made it possible to reconstruct this endosymbiotic gene transfer in laboratory experiments and study the mechanisms involved. Recently, the horizontal transfer of genetic information between organisms has also become amenable to experimental investigation. It led to the discovery of horizontal genome transfer as an asexual process generating new species and new combinations of nuclear and organellar genomes. This review describes experimental approaches towards studying endosymbiotic and horizontal gene transfer processes, discusses the new knowledge gained from these approaches about both the evolutionary significance of gene transfer and the underlying molecular mechanisms, and highlights exciting possibilities to exploit gene and genome transfer in biotechnology and synthetic biology.

  16. [Studies on transference of hydrogenase genes of Rhizobium arachis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Long, M; Liu, Y; Zhang, F; Xu, L; Zhu, T; Jiang, S

    2001-08-01

    The hydrogen-uptake genes were transferred into wild Rhizobium arachis Ra strains (Hup-, Nif+, Apr) by triparental mating using pRK2013 as help plasmid. A transconjugant R. arachis Rz34-2(Hup+, Nif+, Apr, Tcr) which expressed high activities of hydrogenase and nitrogenase under free-living and symbiotic state was screened. Peanut inoculation test with recipient R. arachis Ra34, transcojugant Rz34-2 and control strain R. arachis L8-3 (Hup+, Nif+) was carried out respectively. The results showed that, compare to treatment without inoculation, inoculation with R. arachis Ra34 and R. arachis L8-3, the dry weight of leaf inoculated with transconjuant Rz34-2 increased 6.2%, 7.6% and 6.3% respectively; the N-content of seed increased 8.8%, 10.0% and 6.0%; the output increased 18.8%, 10.5% and 10.7%. This suggested that legume plants inoculated with Rhizobium strains (Hup+) were more efficient to accumulate N and to increase its output.

  17. Somatostatin receptor gene transfer inhibits established pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celinski, Scott A; Fisher, William E; Amaya, Felipe; Wu, Yuan Qing; Yao, Q; Youker, Keith A; Li, Min

    2003-11-01

    Most human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells do not express somatostatin receptors, and somatostatin does not inhibit the growth of these cancers. We have demonstrated previously that somatostatin inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancers expressing somatostatin receptor subtype-2 (SSTR2), but not receptor-negative cancers. SSTR2 expression may be an important tumor-suppressor pathway that is lost in human pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that SSTR2 gene transfer would restore the growth-inhibitory response of human pancreatic cancer to somatostatin. Palpable human pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors were established on the backs of nude mice by subcutaneous injection of cultured cells (Panc-1). The animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 10/group). Group I served as an untreated control. Group II received an intramuscular injection of the long-acting somatostatin analogue Sandostatin LAR. Group III received Lac-Z expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection. Group IV received SSTR2 expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection. Group V received SSTR2 expressing adenovirus via intraperitoneal injection and an intramuscular injection of Sandostatin LAR. The rate of tumor growth was assessed with calipers. After 28 days, the animals were anesthetized and exsanguanated, and the tumors were excised and weighed. Plasma somatostatin and octreotide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Expression of cell-surface somatostatin-receptor protein and known tumor-suppressor proteins was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Systemic delivery of SSTR2-expressing adenovirus by intraperitoneal injection resulted in expression of SSTR2 protein in the subcutaneous human pancreatic cancers. Final tumor weight was significantly decreased in the groups expressing SSTR2 receptors compared to the other 3 groups. Treatment with Sandostatin LAR increased plasma octreotide levels as determined by radioimmunoassay

  18. The standard lateral gene transfer model is statistically consistent for pectinate four-taxon trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Andreas; Steel, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary events such as incomplete lineage sorting and lateral gene transfers constitute major problems for inferring species trees from gene trees, as they can sometimes lead to gene trees which conflict with the underlying species tree. One particularly simple and efficient way to infer...... species trees from gene trees under such conditions is to combine three-taxon analyses for several genes using a majority vote approach. For incomplete lineage sorting this method is known to be statistically consistent; however, for lateral gene transfers it was recently shown that a zone...

  19. Identification of multiple independent horizontal gene transfers into poxviruses using a comparative genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLysaght Aoife

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poxviruses are important pathogens of humans, livestock and wild animals. These large dsDNA viruses have a set of core orthologs whose gene order is extremely well conserved throughout poxvirus genera. They also contain many genes with sequence and functional similarity to host genes which were probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Although phylogenetic trees can indicate the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer and even uncover multiple events, their use may be hampered by uncertainties in both the topology and the rooting of the tree. We propose to use synteny conservation around the horizontally transferred gene (HTgene to distinguish between single and multiple events. Results Here we devise a method that incorporates comparative genomic information into the investigation of horizontal gene transfer, and we apply this method to poxvirus genomes. We examined the synteny conservation around twenty four pox genes that we identified, or which were reported in the literature, as candidate HTgenes. We found support for multiple independent transfers into poxviruses for five HTgenes. Three of these genes are known to be important for the survival of the virus in or out of the host cell and one of them increases susceptibility to some antiviral drugs. Conclusion In related genomes conserved synteny information can provide convincing evidence for multiple independent horizontal gene transfer events even in the absence of a robust phylogenetic tree for the HTgene.

  20. Efficient Adenovirus Gene Transfer Methods in Human Colonic Caco-2 Epithelial Cells Using Capric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Naoya; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takamasa; Fujii, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are widely used in gene therapy and in vitro/in vivo gene transfer. However, Ad-mediated gene transfer in epithelial cells shows low efficiency, because Ad fiber cannot bind to the primary receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), present in tight junctions. Caco-2 monolayer cells cultured on Transwell-chamber plates for approximately 2 weeks are widely used for drug membrane permeation studies, but Ad-mediated gene transfer is difficult in Caco-2 monolayer cells. First, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer into Caco-2 monolayer cells. Luciferase production in cultured Caco-2 cells transduced with Ad vectors was 20-fold lower on day 12 than on day 1. In contrast, the expression of CAR protein in Caco-2 cells gradually increased along with the duration of culture. For efficient gene transfer into Caco-2 monolayer cells, the binding ability of Ad vectors with CAR was found to be important. Capric acid (C10), a medium-chain fatty acid is a tight-junction modulator used as a pharmaceutical agent. We found that a novel gene transfer method using transduction with Ad vectors in the presence of C10 led more efficiently to LacZ expression in Caco-2 monolayer cells than Ad vectors alone. The results of the present study indicate that C10 could be very useful for Ad-mediated gene transfer in human colonic Caco-2 epithelial cells.

  1. The transferome of metabolic genes explored: analysis of the horizontal transfer of enzyme encoding genes in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, John W; McConkey, Glenn A; Westhead, David R

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic networks are responsible for many essential cellular processes, and exhibit a high level of evolutionary conservation from bacteria to eukaryotes. If genes encoding metabolic enzymes are horizontally transferred and are advantageous, they are likely to become fixed. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a key role in prokaryotic evolution and its importance in eukaryotes is increasingly evident. High levels of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) accompanied the establishment of plastids and mitochondria, and more recent events have allowed further acquisition of bacterial genes. Here, we present the first comprehensive multi-species analysis of E/HGT of genes encoding metabolic enzymes from bacteria to unicellular eukaryotes. The phylogenetic trees of 2,257 metabolic enzymes were used to make E/HGT assertions in ten groups of unicellular eukaryotes, revealing the sources and metabolic processes of the transferred genes. Analyses revealed a preference for enzymes encoded by genes gained through horizontal and endosymbiotic transfers to be connected in the metabolic network. Enrichment in particular functional classes was particularly revealing: alongside plastid related processes and carbohydrate metabolism, this highlighted a number of pathways in eukaryotic parasites that are rich in enzymes encoded by transferred genes, and potentially key to pathogenicity. The plant parasites Phytophthora were discovered to have a potential pathway for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis of E/HGT origin not seen before in eukaryotes outside the Plantae. The number of enzymes encoded by genes gained through E/HGT has been established, providing insight into functional gain during the evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. In eukaryotic parasites, genes encoding enzymes that have been gained through horizontal transfer may be attractive drug targets if they are part of processes not present in the host, or are significantly diverged from equivalent host enzymes.

  2. Evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer from the draft genome of a tardigrade

    OpenAIRE

    Boothby, Thomas C.; Tenlen, Jennifer R.; Smith, Frank W.; Wang, Jeremy R; Patanella, Kiera A.; Osborne Nishimura, Erin; Tintori, Sophia C.; Li, Qing; Corbin D Jones; Yandell, Mark; Messina, David N.; Glasscock, Jarret; Goldstein, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Despite fascinating scientists for over 200 years, little at the molecular level is known about tardigrades, microscopic animals resistant to extreme stresses. We present the genome of a tardigrade. Approximately one-sixth of the genes in the tardigrade genome were found to have been acquired through horizontal transfer, a proportion nearly double the proportion of previous known cases of extreme horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in animals. Foreign genes have impacted the composition of the tar...

  3. Indirect Fitness Benefits Enable the Spread of Host Genes Promoting Costly Transfer of Beneficial Plasmids.

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Dimitriu; Dusan Misevic; Chantal Lotton; Brown, Sam P.; Lindner, Ariel B.; François Taddei

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genes that confer crucial phenotypes, such as antibiotic resistance, can spread horizontally by residing on mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Although many mobile genes provide strong benefits to their hosts, the fitness consequences of the process of transfer itself are less clear. In previous studies, transfer has been interpreted as a parasitic trait of the MGEs because of its costs to the host but also as a trait benefiting host populations through the sharing of a common gene poo...

  4. Differential gene transfers and gene duplications in primary and secondary endosymbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFadden Geoffrey I

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most genes introduced into phototrophic eukaryotes during the process of endosymbiosis are either lost or relocated into the host nuclear genome. In contrast, groEL homologues are found in different genome compartments among phototrophic eukaryotes. Comparative sequence analyses of recently available genome data, have allowed us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these genes and propose a hypothesis that explains the unusual genome distribution of groEL homologues. Results Our analyses indicate that while two distinct groEL genes were introduced into eukaryotes by a progenitor of plastids, these particular homologues have not been maintained in all evolutionary lineages. This is of significant interest, because two chaperone proteins always co-occur in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We infer strikingly different lineage specific processes of evolution involving deletion, duplication and targeting of groEL proteins. Conclusion The requirement of two groEL homologues for chaperon function in phototrophs has provided a constraint that has shaped convergent evolutionary scenarios in divergent evolutionary lineages. GroEL provides a general evolutionary model for studying gene transfers and convergent evolutionary processes among eukaryotic lineages.

  5. GENE TRANSFER BY F' STRAINS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI K-12. II. INTERACTION BETWEEN F-MEROGENOTE AND CHROMOSOME DURING TRANSFER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PITTARD, J; ADELBERG, E A

    1963-06-01

    Pittard, James (Yale University, New Haven, Conn.) and Edward A. Adelberg. Gene transfer by F' strains of Escherichia coli K-12. II. Interaction between F-merogenote and chromosome during transfer. J. Bacteriol. 85:1402-1408. 1963.-When F' strains harboring the F-merogenate F(14) are mated with female recipients, the transfer of the F-merogenote begins, in the majority of cases, before chromosome transfer. The markers on F(14) are transferred in the sequence met-1, arg-1, ilva-16, and sex-factor, met-1 being transferred first and sex-factor being transferred last, 9 min after met-1. In the class of zygotes that have received both the F-merogenote marker met-1 and the chromosomal marker xyl or mal, the gradient of recombination frequencies for the F-merogenote markers arg-1 and ilva-16 is much steeper than in the corresponding zygotes that have not received chromosomal markers. In F' strains which exhibit an increased frequency of transfer of chromosome markers, this gradient of recombination frequencies for merogenote markers is much steeper. An analysis of experiments involving an F' strain with a much shorter F-merogenote, F(16), and of a triparental mating in which F-merogenote and chromosome were transferred from different donor cells reveals that the effect of chromosome transfer on the recovery of distal F-merogenote markers in the zygotes is not due to any form of postzygotic elimination. It is suggested that, when F' strains which are transferring F-merogenote begin to transfer chromosome, the latter event causes breakage of the F-merogenote. A second consequence of this interaction is a delay of 8 to 10 min in the first appearance of chromosomal markers in the zygotes.

  6. SPRIT: Identifying horizontal gene transfer in rooted phylogenetic trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredriksson Robert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic trees based on sequences from a set of taxa can be incongruent due to horizontal gene transfer (HGT. By identifying the HGT events, we can reconcile the gene trees and derive a taxon tree that adequately represents the species' evolutionary history. One HGT can be represented by a rooted Subtree Prune and Regraft (RSPR operation and the number of RSPRs separating two trees corresponds to the minimum number of HGT events. Identifying the minimum number of RSPRs separating two trees is NP-hard, but the problem can be reduced to fixed parameter tractable. A number of heuristic and two exact approaches to identifying the minimum number of RSPRs have been proposed. This is the first implementation delivering an exact solution as well as the intermediate trees connecting the input trees. Results We present the SPR Identification Tool (SPRIT, a novel algorithm that solves the fixed parameter tractable minimum RSPR problem and its GPL licensed Java implementation. The algorithm can be used in two ways, exhaustive search that guarantees the minimum RSPR distance and a heuristic approach that guarantees finding a solution, but not necessarily the minimum one. We benchmarked SPRIT against other software in two different settings, small to medium sized trees i.e. five to one hundred taxa and large trees i.e. thousands of taxa. In the small to medium tree size setting with random artificial incongruence, SPRIT's heuristic mode outperforms the other software by always delivering a solution with a low overestimation of the RSPR distance. In the large tree setting SPRIT compares well to the alternatives when benchmarked on finding a minimum solution within a reasonable time. SPRIT presents both the minimum RSPR distance and the intermediate trees. Conclusions When used in exhaustive search mode, SPRIT identifies the minimum number of RSPRs needed to reconcile two incongruent rooted trees. SPRIT also performs quick approximations

  7. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D McDaniel

    Full Text Available Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT. However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA

  8. Migration and horizontal gene transfer divide microbial genomes into multiple niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehus, Rene; Mitri, Sara; Fletcher, Alexander G; Foster, Kevin R

    2015-11-23

    Horizontal gene transfer is central to microbial evolution, because it enables genetic regions to spread horizontally through diverse communities. However, how gene transfer exerts such a strong effect is not understood. Here we develop an eco-evolutionary model and show how genetic transfer, even when rare, can transform the evolution and ecology of microbes. We recapitulate existing models, which suggest that asexual reproduction will overpower horizontal transfer and greatly limit its effects. We then show that allowing immigration completely changes these predictions. With migration, the rates and impacts of horizontal transfer are greatly increased, and transfer is most frequent for loci under positive natural selection. Our analysis explains how ecologically important loci can sweep through competing strains and species. In this way, microbial genomes can evolve to become ecologically diverse where different genomic regions encode for partially overlapping, but distinct, ecologies. Under these conditions ecological species do not exist, because genes, not species, inhabit niches.

  9. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Functional Type VI Killing Genes by Natural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jacob; Watve, Samit S; Ratcliff, William C; Hammer, Brian K

    2017-07-25

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) can have profound effects on bacterial evolution by allowing individuals to rapidly acquire adaptive traits that shape their strategies for competition. One strategy for intermicrobial antagonism often used by Proteobacteria is the genetically encoded contact-dependent type VI secretion system (T6SS), a weapon used to kill heteroclonal neighbors by direct injection of toxic effectors. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that Vibrio cholerae can acquire new T6SS effector genes via horizontal transfer and utilize them to kill neighboring cells. Replacement of one or more parental alleles with novel effectors allows the recombinant strain to dramatically outcompete its parent. Using spatially explicit modeling, we examine how this process could affect the ecology and evolution of surface-attached microbial populations. HGT of T6SS effector-immunity pairs is risky: transformation brings a cell into conflict with its former clone mates but can be adaptive when superior T6SS alleles are acquired. More generally, we find that these costs and benefits are not symmetric and that high rates of HGT can act as a hedge against competitors with unpredictable T6SS efficacy. We conclude that antagonism and horizontal transfer drive successive rounds of weapon optimization and selective sweeps, dynamically shaping the composition of microbial communities. IMPORTANCE The contact-dependent type VI secretion system (T6SS) is frequently used by Proteobacteria to kill adjacent competitors. While DNA released by T6 killing can be horizontally acquired, it remains untested whether T6 genes themselves can be horizontally acquired and then utilized to compete with neighboring cells. Using naturally transformable Vibrio cholerae , we provide the first direct empirical support for the hypothesis that T6 genes are exchanged horizontally (e.g., from dead competitors) and functionally deployed to compete with neighboring cells. Using computational simulations, we

  10. Assessment and Improvement of Gene Transfer into Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Breems (Dimitri)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe application of somatic gene transfer as a potential treatment in human disease has progressed from speculation to reality in a short time [4,20,21,84,85,87,105,117,174]. In May 1989 the first clinical marker gene protocol took place [145], followed by the first gene therapy protocol

  11. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Pectinases from Bacteria Preceded the Diversification of Stick and Leaf Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelomi, Matan; Danchin, Etienne G. J.; Heckel, David; Wipfler, Benjamin; Bradler, Sven; Zhou, Xin; Pauchet, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Genes acquired by horizontal transfer are increasingly being found in animal genomes. Understanding their origin and evolution requires knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships from both source and recipient organisms. We used RNASeq data and respective assembled transcript libraries to trace the evolutionary history of polygalacturonase (pectinase) genes in stick insects (Phasmatodea). By mapping the distribution of pectinase genes on a Polyneoptera phylogeny, we identified the transfer of pectinase genes from known phasmatodean gut microbes into the genome of an early euphasmatodean ancestor that took place between 60 and 100 million years ago. This transfer preceded the rapid diversification of the suborder, enabling symbiont-free pectinase production that would increase the insects’ digestive efficiency and reduce dependence on microbes. Bacteria-to-insect gene transfer was thought to be uncommon, however the increasing availability of large-scale genomic data may change this prevailing notion. PMID:27210832

  12. Gene Transfer Efficiency in Gonococcal Biofilms: Role of Biofilm Age, Architecture, and Pilin Antigenic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzel, Nadzeya; Oldewurtel, Enno R; Maier, Berenike

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular DNA is an important structural component of many bacterial biofilms. It is unknown, however, to which extent external DNA is used to transfer genes by means of transformation. Here, we quantified the acquisition of multidrug resistance and visualized its spread under selective and nonselective conditions in biofilms formed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The density and architecture of the biofilms were controlled by microstructuring the substratum for bacterial adhesion. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between cocultured strains, each carrying a single resistance, occurred efficiently in early biofilms. The efficiency of gene transfer was higher in early biofilms than between planktonic cells. It was strongly reduced after 24 h and independent of biofilm density. Pilin antigenic variation caused a high fraction of nonpiliated bacteria but was not responsible for the reduced gene transfer at later stages. When selective pressure was applied to dense biofilms using antibiotics at their MIC, the double-resistant bacteria did not show a significant growth advantage. In loosely connected biofilms, the spreading of double-resistant clones was prominent. We conclude that multidrug resistance readily develops in early gonococcal biofilms through horizontal gene transfer. However, selection and spreading of the multiresistant clones are heavily suppressed in dense biofilms. Biofilms are considered ideal reaction chambers for horizontal gene transfer and development of multidrug resistances. The rate at which genes are exchanged within biofilms is unknown. Here, we quantified the acquisition of double-drug resistance by gene transfer between gonococci with single resistances. At early biofilm stages, the transfer efficiency was higher than for planktonic cells but then decreased with biofilm age. The surface topography affected the architecture of the biofilm. While the efficiency of gene transfer was independent of the architecture, spreading of

  13. Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of transcriptionalregulation in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-12-20

    Background: Most bacterial genes were acquired by horizontalgene transfer from other bacteria instead of being inherited bycontinuous vertical descent from an ancient ancestor}. To understand howthe regulation of these {acquired} genes evolved, we examined theevolutionary histories of transcription factors and of regulatoryinteractions from the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12. Results:Although most transcription factors have paralogs, these usually arose byhorizontal gene transfer rather than by duplication within the E. colilineage, as previously believed. In general, most neighbor regulators --regulators that are adjacent to genes that they regulate -- were acquiredby horizontal gene transfer, while most global regulators evolvedvertically within the gamma-Proteobacteria. Neighbor regulators wereoften acquired together with the adjacent operon that they regulate, sothe proximity might be maintained by repeated transfers (like "selfishoperons"). Many of the as-yet-uncharacterized (putative) regulators havealso been acquired together with adjacent genes, so we predict that theseare neighbor regulators as well. When we analyzed the histories ofregulatory interactions, we found that the evolution of regulation byduplication was rare, and surprisingly, many of the regulatoryinteractions that are shared between paralogs result from convergentevolution. Another surprise was that horizontally transferred genes aremore likely than other genes to be regulated by multiple regulators, andmost of this complex regulation probably evolved after the transfer.Conclusions: Our results highlight the rapid evolution of niche-specificgene regulation in bacteria.

  14. Leu452His mutation in lipoprotein lipase gene transfer associated with hypertriglyceridemia in mice in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyue Sun

    Full Text Available Mutated mouse lipoprotein lipase (LPL containing a leucine (L to histidine (H substitution at position 452 was transferred into mouse liver by hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HD. Mutated-LPL (MLPL gene transfer significantly increased the concentrations of plasma MLPL and triglyceride (TG but significantly decreased the activity of plasma LPL. Moreover, the gene transfer caused adiposis hepatica and significantly increased TG content in mouse liver. To understand the effects of MLPL gene transfer on energy metabolism, we investigated the expression of key functional genes related to energy metabolism in the liver, epididymal fat, and leg muscles. The mRNA contents of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, fatty acid-binding protein (FABP, and uncoupling protein (UCP were found to be significantly reduced. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which MLPL gene transfer affected fat deposition in the liver, fat tissue, and muscle. The gene expression and protein levels of forkhead Box O3 (FOXO3, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α were found to be remarkably decreased in the liver, fat and muscle. These results suggest that the Leu452His mutation caused LPL dysfunction and gene transfer of MLPL in vivo produced resistance to the AMPK/PGC-1α signaling pathway in mice.

  15. Conjugal gene transfer between bacteria in soil and rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.

    1994-01-01

    The extent of possible conjugal transfer of recombinant DNA present in genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) was studied. Occurrence of transfer of recombinant DNA is only one of the concerns regarding the use of GEMs (Chapter 2). Other potential hazards preventing the application of

  16. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  17. Exact Algorithms for Duplication-Transfer-Loss Reconciliation with Non-Binary Gene Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Misagh; Bansal, Mukul S

    2017-06-01

    Duplication-Transfer-Loss (DTL) reconciliation is a powerful method for studying gene family evolution in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. DTL reconciliation seeks to reconcile gene trees with species trees by postulating speciation, duplication, transfer, and loss events. Efficient algorithms exist for finding optimal DTL reconciliations when the gene tree is binary. In practice, however, gene trees are often non-binary due to uncertainty in the gene tree topologies, and DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees is known to be NP-hard. In this paper, we present the first exact algorithms for DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees. Specifically, we (i) show that the DTL reconciliation problem for non-binary gene trees is fixed-parameter tractable in the maximum degree of the gene tree, (ii) present an exponential-time, but in-practice efficient, algorithm to track and enumerate all optimal binary resolutions of a non-binary input gene tree, and (iii) apply our algorithms to a large empirical data set of over 4700 gene trees from 100 species to study the impact of gene tree uncertainty on DTL-reconciliation and to demonstrate the applicability and utility of our algorithms. The new techniques and algorithms introduced in this paper will help biologists avoid incorrect evolutionary inferences caused by gene tree uncertainty.

  18. Phylogeny poorly predicts the utility of a challenging horizontally transferred gene in Methylobacterium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, Joshua K; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J

    2014-06-01

    Horizontal gene transfer plays a crucial role in microbial evolution. While much is known about the mechanisms that determine whether physical DNA can be transferred into a new host, the factors determining the utility of the transferred genes are less clear. We have explored this issue using dichloromethane consumption in Methylobacterium strains. Methylobacterium extorquens DM4 expresses a dichloromethane dehalogenase (DcmA) that has been acquired through horizontal gene transfer and allows the strain to grow on dichloromethane as the sole carbon and energy source. We transferred the dcmA gene into six Methylobacterium strains that include both close and distant evolutionary relatives. The transconjugants varied in their ability to grow on dichloromethane, but their fitness on dichloromethane did not correlate with the phylogeny of the parental strains or with any single tested physiological factor. This work highlights an important limiting factor in horizontal gene transfer, namely, the capacity of the recipient strain to accommodate the stress and metabolic disruption resulting from the acquisition of a new enzyme or pathway. Understanding these limitations may help to rationalize historical examples of horizontal transfer and aid deliberate genetic transfers in biotechnology for metabolic engineering.

  19. Horizontally transferred genes in the genome of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Cheng-Zhang; Wei, Jian-Kai; Li, Fu-Hua; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2013-08-06

    In recent years, as the development of next-generation sequencing technology, a growing number of genes have been reported as being horizontally transferred from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, most of them involving arthropods. As a member of the phylum Arthropoda, the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei has to adapt to the complex water environments with various symbiotic or parasitic microorganisms, which provide a platform for horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In this study, we analyzed the genome-wide HGT events in L. vannamei. Through homology search and phylogenetic analysis, followed by experimental PCR confirmation, 14 genes with HGT event were identified: 12 of them were transferred from bacteria and two from fungi. Structure analysis of these genes showed that the introns of the two fungi-originated genes were substituted by shrimp DNA fragment, two genes transferred from bacteria had shrimp specific introns inserted in them. Furthermore, around other three bacteria-originated genes, there were three large DNA segments inserted into the shrimp genome. One segment was a transposon that fully transferred, and the other two segments contained only coding regions of bacteria. Functional prediction of these 14 genes showed that 6 of them might be related to energy metabolism, and 4 others related to defense of the organism. HGT events from bacteria or fungi were happened in the genome of L. vannamei, and these horizontally transferred genes can be transcribed in shrimp. This is the first time to report the existence of horizontally transferred genes in shrimp. Importantly, most of these genes are exposed to a negative selection pressure and appeared to be functional.

  20. Horizontally transferred genes in the genome of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, as the development of next-generation sequencing technology, a growing number of genes have been reported as being horizontally transferred from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, most of them involving arthropods. As a member of the phylum Arthropoda, the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei has to adapt to the complex water environments with various symbiotic or parasitic microorganisms, which provide a platform for horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Results In this study, we analyzed the genome-wide HGT events in L. vannamei. Through homology search and phylogenetic analysis, followed by experimental PCR confirmation, 14 genes with HGT event were identified: 12 of them were transferred from bacteria and two from fungi. Structure analysis of these genes showed that the introns of the two fungi-originated genes were substituted by shrimp DNA fragment, two genes transferred from bacteria had shrimp specific introns inserted in them. Furthermore, around other three bacteria-originated genes, there were three large DNA segments inserted into the shrimp genome. One segment was a transposon that fully transferred, and the other two segments contained only coding regions of bacteria. Functional prediction of these 14 genes showed that 6 of them might be related to energy metabolism, and 4 others related to defense of the organism. Conclusions HGT events from bacteria or fungi were happened in the genome of L. vannamei, and these horizontally transferred genes can be transcribed in shrimp. This is the first time to report the existence of horizontally transferred genes in shrimp. Importantly, most of these genes are exposed to a negative selection pressure and appeared to be functional. PMID:23914989

  1. In utero recombinant adeno-associated virus gene transfer in mice, rats, and primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marrero Luis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer into the amniotic fluid using recombinant adenovirus vectors was shown previously to result in high efficiency transfer of transgenes into the lungs and intestines. Adenovirus mediated in utero gene therapy, however, resulted in expression of the transgene for less than 30 days. Recombinant adenovirus associated viruses (rAAV have the advantage of maintaining the viral genome in daughter cells thus providing for long-term expression of transgenes. Methods Recombinant AAV2 carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP was introduced into the amniotic sac of fetal rodents and nonhuman primates. Transgene maintenance and expression was monitor. Results Gene transfer resulted in rapid uptake and long-term gene expression in mice, rats, and non-human primates. Expression and secretion of the reporter gene, GFP, was readily demonstrated within 72 hours post-therapy. In long-term studies in rats and nonhuman primates, maintenance of GFP DNA, protein expression, and reporter gene secretion was documented for over one year. Conclusions Because only multipotential stem cells are present at the time of therapy, these data demonstrated that in utero gene transfer with AAV2 into stem cells resulted in long-term systemic expression of active transgene roducts. Thus, in utero gene transfer via the amniotic fluid may be useful in treatment of gene disorders.

  2. DNA rearrangement events and rps3 gene transfer in pieces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    samsung

    genes were qualified with no intron, high proportion of α-helix and classical tertiary structure of PPR protein. Based on ... co-determined by mitochondrial and nuclear genes (Dewey et al. 1987; Schnable and ...... 2012 Unusual and typical features of a novel restorer-of-fertility gene of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). Genetics.

  3. Indirect Fitness Benefits Enable the Spread of Host Genes Promoting Costly Transfer of Beneficial Plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Dimitriu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genes that confer crucial phenotypes, such as antibiotic resistance, can spread horizontally by residing on mobile genetic elements (MGEs. Although many mobile genes provide strong benefits to their hosts, the fitness consequences of the process of transfer itself are less clear. In previous studies, transfer has been interpreted as a parasitic trait of the MGEs because of its costs to the host but also as a trait benefiting host populations through the sharing of a common gene pool. Here, we show that costly donation is an altruistic act when it spreads beneficial MGEs favoured when it increases the inclusive fitness of donor ability alleles. We show mathematically that donor ability can be selected when relatedness at the locus modulating transfer is sufficiently high between donor and recipients, ensuring high frequency of transfer between cells sharing donor alleles. We further experimentally demonstrate that either population structure or discrimination in transfer can increase relatedness to a level selecting for chromosomal transfer alleles. Both mechanisms are likely to occur in natural environments. The simple process of strong dilution can create sufficient population structure to select for donor ability. Another mechanism observed in natural isolates, discrimination in transfer, can emerge through coselection of transfer and discrimination alleles. Our work shows that horizontal gene transfer in bacteria can be promoted by bacterial hosts themselves and not only by MGEs. In the longer term, the success of cells bearing beneficial MGEs combined with biased transfer leads to an association between high donor ability, discrimination, and mobile beneficial genes. However, in conditions that do not select for altruism, host bacteria promoting transfer are outcompeted by hosts with lower transfer rate, an aspect that could be relevant in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  4. Indirect Fitness Benefits Enable the Spread of Host Genes Promoting Costly Transfer of Beneficial Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriu, Tatiana; Misevic, Dusan; Lotton, Chantal; Brown, Sam P; Lindner, Ariel B; Taddei, François

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial genes that confer crucial phenotypes, such as antibiotic resistance, can spread horizontally by residing on mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Although many mobile genes provide strong benefits to their hosts, the fitness consequences of the process of transfer itself are less clear. In previous studies, transfer has been interpreted as a parasitic trait of the MGEs because of its costs to the host but also as a trait benefiting host populations through the sharing of a common gene pool. Here, we show that costly donation is an altruistic act when it spreads beneficial MGEs favoured when it increases the inclusive fitness of donor ability alleles. We show mathematically that donor ability can be selected when relatedness at the locus modulating transfer is sufficiently high between donor and recipients, ensuring high frequency of transfer between cells sharing donor alleles. We further experimentally demonstrate that either population structure or discrimination in transfer can increase relatedness to a level selecting for chromosomal transfer alleles. Both mechanisms are likely to occur in natural environments. The simple process of strong dilution can create sufficient population structure to select for donor ability. Another mechanism observed in natural isolates, discrimination in transfer, can emerge through coselection of transfer and discrimination alleles. Our work shows that horizontal gene transfer in bacteria can be promoted by bacterial hosts themselves and not only by MGEs. In the longer term, the success of cells bearing beneficial MGEs combined with biased transfer leads to an association between high donor ability, discrimination, and mobile beneficial genes. However, in conditions that do not select for altruism, host bacteria promoting transfer are outcompeted by hosts with lower transfer rate, an aspect that could be relevant in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  5. Nanoalumina promotes the horizontal transfer of multiresistance genes mediated by plasmids across genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhigang; Yu, Yunmei; Chen, Zhaoli; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Zhao, Zuguo; Wang, Jingfeng; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qian, Di; Huang, Aihua; Zhang, Buchang; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-03-27

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide public health concern. Conjugative transfer between closely related strains or species of bacteria is an important method for the horizontal transfer of multidrug-resistance genes. The extent to which nanomaterials are able to cause an increase in antibiotic resistance by the regulation of the conjugative transfer of antibiotic-resistance genes in bacteria, especially across genera, is still unknown. Here we show that nanomaterials in water can significantly promote the horizontal conjugative transfer of multidrug-resistance genes mediated by the RP4, RK2, and pCF10 plasmids. Nanoalumina can promote the conjugative transfer of the RP4 plasmid from Escherichia coli to Salmonella spp. by up to 200-fold compared with untreated cells. We also explored the mechanisms behind this phenomenon and demonstrate that nanoalumina is able to induce oxidative stress, damage bacterial cell membranes, enhance the expression of mating pair formation genes and DNA transfer and replication genes, and depress the expression of global regulatory genes that regulate the conjugative transfer of RP4. These findings are important in assessing the risk of nanomaterials to the environment, particularly from water and wastewater treatment systems, and in the estimation of the effect of manufacture and use of nanomaterials on the environment.

  6. Sampling the mobile gene pool: innovation via horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James P J; Brockhurst, Michael A; Harrison, Ellie

    2017-12-05

    In biological systems, evolutionary innovations can spread not only from parent to offspring (i.e. vertical transmission), but also 'horizontally' between individuals, who may or may not be related. Nowhere is this more apparent than in bacteria, where novel ecological traits can spread rapidly within and between species through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). This important evolutionary process is predominantly a by-product of the infectious spread of mobile genetic elements (MGEs). We will discuss the ecological conditions that favour the spread of traits by HGT, the evolutionary and social consequences of sharing traits, and how HGT is shaped by inherent conflicts between bacteria and MGEs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Incorporation of a horizontally transferred gene into an operon during cnidarian evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Dana

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing has revealed examples of horizontally transferred genes, but we still know little about how such genes are incorporated into their host genomes. We have previously reported the identification of a gene (flp that appears to have entered the Hydra genome through horizontal transfer. Here we provide additional evidence in support of our original hypothesis that the transfer was from a unicellular organism, and we show that the transfer occurred in an ancestor of two medusozoan cnidarian species. In addition we show that the gene is part of a bicistronic operon in the Hydra genome. These findings identify a new animal phylum in which trans-spliced leader addition has led to the formation of operons, and define the requirements for evolution of an operon in Hydra. The identification of operons in Hydra also provides a tool that can be exploited in the construction of transgenic Hydra strains.

  8. Type IV secretion systems and genomic islands-mediated horizontal gene transfer in Pseudomonas and Haemophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial secretion systems, such as type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) are multi-subunit machines transferring macromolecules across membranes. Besides proteins, T4SSs also transfer nucleoprotein complexes, thus having a significant impact on the evolution of bacterial species. By T4SS-mediated horizontal gene transfer bacteria can acquire a broad spectrum of fitness genes allowing them to thrive in the wide variety of environments. Furthermore, acquisition of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes can lead to the emergence of novel 'superbugs'. This review provides an update on the investigation of T4SSs. It highlights the role T4SSs play in the horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the evolution of catabolic pathways, antibiotic-resistance and virulence in Haemophilus and Pseudomonas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacteriophage WO Can Mediate Horizontal Gene Transfer in Endosymbiotic Wolbachia Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan H.; Sun, Bao F.; Xiong, Tuan L.; Wang, Yan K.; Murfin, Kristen E.; Xiao, Jin H.; Huang, Da W.

    2016-01-01

    Phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is common in free-living bacteria, and many transferred genes can play a significant role in their new bacterial hosts. However, there are few reports concerning phage-mediated HGT in endosymbionts (obligate intracellular bacteria within animal or plant hosts), such as Wolbachia. The Wolbachia-infecting temperate phage WO can actively shift among Wolbachia genomes and has the potential to mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains. In the present study, we extend previous findings by validating that the phage WO can mediate transfer of non-phage genes. To do so, we utilized bioinformatic, phylogenetic, and molecular analyses based on all sequenced Wolbachia and phage WO genomes. Our results show that the phage WO can mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains, regardless of whether the transferred genes originate from Wolbachia or other unrelated bacteria. PMID:27965627

  10. Genome-wide identification of horizontal gene transfer in Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange and stable integration of genetic material between different lineages, breaks species boundaries and generates new biological diversity. In eukaryotes, despite potential barriers, like the nuclear envelope and multicellularity, HGT may be facilitated by t...

  11. Intrapleural 'outside-in' gene therapy: therapeutics for organs of the chest via gene transfer to the pleura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heguy, Adriana; Crystal, Ronald G

    2005-10-01

    The pleural space is an attractive site for using viral vectors to deliver gene products to the lung parenchyma, other thoracic structures and the systemic circulation. The advantages of intrapleural gene transfer using viral vectors include: (i) easy accessibility; (ii) large surface area; (iii) ability to provide high concentrations of secreted gene products to chest structures; (iv) low risk of detrimental effects of possible vector-induced inflammation compared with intravascular delivery; and (v) because it is local, lower vector doses can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to thoracic structures than less efficient systemic routes. Examples of pleural gene transfer include the use of adenovirus vectors to treat mesothelioma by transiently expressing genes that encode toxic proteins, immunomodulatory molecules or anti-angiogenesis factors. Intrapleural delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors represents an efficient strategy to treat alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, achieving high lung and systemic therapeutic levels of alpha1AT. Intrapleural delivery of gene transfer vectors holds promise for the treatment of diseases requiring transient, localized gene expression, as well as sustained expression of genes to correct hereditary disorders requiring localized or systemic expression of the therapeutic protein.

  12. THE RISK OF GENE TRANSFERRING IN THE INSURANCE PROTECTION OF AGRICULTERE

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, M; Hudz, H.

    2016-01-01

    The paper justified essence of genetic engineering as the object of insurance services. Defines the concept of risk gene transferring. The character features of this specific risk. The influence and consequences for agricultural producers. The description of the possible creation of the concept of insurance services that cover risk of gene transferring. The study reveals of the use of GMOs in agriculture, due to issues of economic security of a particular region or country as a whole. To dete...

  13. In vitro mecA gene transfer among Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple experiment was performed to observe in vitro transfer of mecA gene from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Malaysian clinical isolates, to methicillin-sensitive one. PCR-based method was used in combination with the selective antibiotic screening method to study the transfer of resistance among clinical ...

  14. Horizontal gene transfer from diverse bacteria to an insect genome enables a tripartite nested mealybug symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnik, Filip; Nikoh, Naruo; Koga, Ryuichi; Ross, Laura; Duncan, Rebecca P; Fujie, Manabu; Tanaka, Makiko; Satoh, Nori; Bachtrog, Doris; Wilson, Alex C C; von Dohlen, Carol D; Fukatsu, Takema; McCutcheon, John P

    2013-06-20

    The smallest reported bacterial genome belongs to Tremblaya princeps, a symbiont of Planococcus citri mealybugs (PCIT). Tremblaya PCIT not only has a 139 kb genome, but possesses its own bacterial endosymbiont, Moranella endobia. Genome and transcriptome sequencing, including genome sequencing from a Tremblaya lineage lacking intracellular bacteria, reveals that the extreme genomic degeneracy of Tremblaya PCIT likely resulted from acquiring Moranella as an endosymbiont. In addition, at least 22 expressed horizontally transferred genes from multiple diverse bacteria to the mealybug genome likely complement missing symbiont genes. However, none of these horizontally transferred genes are from Tremblaya, showing that genome reduction in this symbiont has not been enabled by gene transfer to the host nucleus. Our results thus indicate that the functioning of this three-way symbiosis is dependent on genes from at least six lineages of organisms and reveal a path to intimate endosymbiosis distinct from that followed by organelles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An XMRV Derived Retroviral Vector as a Tool for Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas-Martinez Augusto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene delivery and gene therapy. They are useful for gene expression studies and genetic manipulation in vitro and in vivo. Many retroviral vectors are derived from the mouse gammaretrovirus, murine leukemia virus (MLV. These vectors have been widely used in gene therapy clinical trials. XMRV, initially found in prostate cancer tissue, was the first human gammaretrovirus described. Findings We developed a new retroviral vector based on XMRV called pXC. It was developed for gene transfer to human cells and is produced by transient cotransfection of LNCaP cells with pXC and XMRV-packaging plasmids. Conclusions We demonstrated that pXC mediates expression of inserted transgenes in cell lines. This new vector will be a useful tool for gene transfer in human and non-human cell lines, including gene therapy studies.

  16. Horizontal transfers of transposable elements in eukaryotes: The flying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaud, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the major components of eukaryotic genomes. Their propensity to densely populate and in some cases invade the genomes of plants and animals is in contradiction with the fact that transposition is strictly controlled by several molecular pathways acting at either transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels. Horizontal transfers, defined as the transmission of genetic material between sexually isolated species, have long been considered as rare phenomena. Here, we show that the horizontal transfers of transposable elements (HTTs) are very frequent in ecosystems. The exact mechanisms of such transfers are not well understood, but species involved in close biotic interactions, like parasitism, show a propensity to exchange genetic material horizontally. We propose that HTTs allow TEs to escape the silencing machinery of their host genome and may therefore be an important mechanism for their survival and their dissemination in eukaryotes. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Interleukin-6 gene transfer reverses body weight gain and fatty liver in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Sun, Hao; Liu, Dexi

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional protein and has a major influence on energy metabolism. The current study was designed to assess the therapeutic effect of overexpression of Il-6 gene through gene transfer on high fat diet-induced obese mice. Hydrodynamic delivery of 1 μg pLIVE-IL6 plasmid per mouse into C57BL/6 obese mice resulted in peak level at 10 ng/ml of circulating IL-6 1 day after gene transfer and above 1n g/ml thereafter for a period of 6 weeks. Persistent Il-6 gene expression did not affect food intake but induced a significant reduction in body weight and improved obesity-associated hepatic steatosis. Il-6 gene delivery enhanced thermogenic gene expression and elevated protein levels of phosphorylated STAT3, PGC1α and UCP1 in brown adipose tissue. Il-6 overexpression elevated mRNA levels of lipolysis genes, triggered phosphorylation of STAT3, AMPK, and ACC, and increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. IL-6 did not affect macrophage infiltration but maintained the M2 macrophage population in adipose tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that overexpression of the Il-6 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery induces weight loss and alleviates obesity-induced fatty liver and insulin resistance, supporting the notion that gene transfer is a valid approach in managing obesity epidemics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  19. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RESEARCH ARTICLE. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice. HAILONG OU1∗, QINGHAI ZHANG2 and JIA ZENG1. 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and 2Department of Biology, Guizhou Medical University, ...

  20. Horizontal gene transfer and antibiotic resistance plasmids in multi-drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens pose serious public health concerns and increase the burden of disease treatment. Antibiotic resistance genes can reside on the bacterial chromosome or on other self-replicating DNA molecules such as plasmids. The resistance genes/DNA can be transferred int...

  1. The tetrapyrrole synthesis pathway as a model of horizontal gene transfer in euglenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Bryan; Triemer, Richard

    2017-02-01

    The history of euglenoids may have begun as early as ~2 bya. These early phagotrophs ate cyanobacteria, archaea, and eubacteria, and the subsequent appearance of red algae and chromalveolates provided euglenoids with additional food sources. Following the appearance of green algae, euglenoids acquired a chloroplast via a secondary endosymbiotic event with a green algal ancestor. This endosymbiosis also involved a massive transfer of nuclear-encoded genes from the symbiont nucleus to the host. Expecting these genes to have a green algal origin, this research has shown, through the use of DNA-sequences and the analysis of phylogenetic relationships, that many housekeeping genes have a red algal/chromalveolate ancestry. This suggested that many other endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfers, which brought genes from chromalveolates to euglenoids, may have been taking place long before the acquisition of the chloroplast. The investigation of the origin of the enzymes involved in the tetrapyrrole synthesis pathway provided insights into horizontal gene transfer in euglenoids and demonstrated that the euglenoid nuclear genome is a mosaic comprised of genes from the ancestral lineage plus genes transferred endosymbiotically/horizontally from green, red, and chromalveolates lineages. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  2. Lateral gene transfer between prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes: ongoing and significant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, V.I.D.; Hurst, G.D.D.

    2009-01-01

    The expansion of genome sequencing projects has produced accumulating evidence for lateral transfer of genes between prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. However, it remains controversial whether these genes are of functional importance in their recipient host. Nikoh and Nakabachi, in a recent paper

  3. Minor fitness costs in an experimental model of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöppel, Anna; Lind, Peter A; Lustig, Ulrika; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-05-01

    Genes introduced by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from other species constitute a significant portion of many bacterial genomes, and the evolutionary dynamics of HGTs are important for understanding the spread of antibiotic resistance and the emergence of new pathogenic strains of bacteria. The fitness effects of the transferred genes largely determine the fixation rates and the amount of neutral diversity of newly acquired genes in bacterial populations. Comparative analysis of bacterial genomes provides insight into what genes are commonly transferred, but direct experimental tests of the fitness constraints on HGT are scarce. Here, we address this paucity of experimental studies by introducing 98 random DNA fragments varying in size from 0.45 to 5 kb from Bacteroides, Proteus, and human intestinal phage into a defined position in the Salmonella chromosome and measuring the effects on fitness. Using highly sensitive competition assays, we found that eight inserts were deleterious with selection coefficients (s) ranging from ≈ -0.007 to -0.02 and 90 did not have significant fitness effects. When inducing transcription from a PBAD promoter located at one end of the insert, 16 transfers were deleterious and 82 were not significantly different from the control. In conclusion, a major fraction of the inserts had minor effects on fitness implying that extra DNA transferred by HGT, even though it does not confer an immediate selective advantage, could be maintained at selection-transfer balance and serve as raw material for the evolution of novel beneficial functions.

  4. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  5. Kinetics of conjugative gene transfer on surfaces in granular porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudieh, A.; Crain, C.; Lambertini, E.; Nelson, K. E.; Barkouki, T.; L'Amoreaux, P.; Loge, F. J.; Ginn, T. R.

    2010-03-01

    The transfer of genetic material among bacteria in the environment can occur both in the planktonic and attached state. Given the propensity of organisms to exist in sessile microbial communities in oligotrophic subsurface conditions, and that such conditions typify the subsurface, this study focuses on exploratory modeling of horizontal gene transfer among surface-associated Escherichiacoli in the subsurface. The mathematics so far used to describe the kinetics of conjugation in biofilms are developed largely from experimental observations of planktonic gene transfer, and are absent of lags or plasmid stability that appear experimentally. We develop a model and experimental system to quantify bacterial filtration and gene transfer in the attached state, on granular porous media. We include attachment kinetics described in Nelson et al. (2007) using the filtration theory approach of Nelson and Ginn (2001, 2005) with motility of E. coli described according to Biondi et al. (1998).

  6. Neutrality of foreign complex subunits in an experimental model of lateral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, Alon; Gophna, Uri

    2008-09-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is a powerful force in microbial evolution. However, the barriers that restrict this evolutionary phenomenon are not fully understood. It has long been observed that genes that encode subunits of complexes exhibit relatively compatible phylogenies, implying mostly vertical evolution. This may be explained by the failure of a new gene product to effectively interact with preexisting protein subunits, making its acquisition neutral--a theory termed the "complexity hypothesis." On the other hand, such genes may reduce the fitness of the host by disturbing the stoichiometric balance between complex subunits, resulting in purifying selection against gene retention. To examine these 2 alternative scenarios, we designed an experimental system that mimics the transfer of genes encoding homologs of essential complex subunits into the model bacterium Escherichia coli. In addition, we overexpressed the native E. coli gene in order to examine the contribution of gene dosage effects. We show that accumulation of native or foreign complex subunits in the cell does not result in loss of fitness, except for a minor fitness reduction observed for a single foreign homolog. Indeed, a series of genetic and biochemical assays failed to detect any interaction between the foreign subunits and the native polypeptides of the complex, implying an inability of such transfer events to generate positive selection for gene retention. We conclude that LGT of complex subunits may be mostly neutral and that forces operating against gene retention appear to be moderate.

  7. Investigation of horizontal gene transfer of pathogenicity islands in Escherichia coli using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerer, Maxim; Fischer, Wolfgang; Schubert, Sören

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) contributes to the evolution of bacteria. All extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) harbour pathogenicity islands (PAIs), however relatively little is known about the acquisition of these PAIs. Due to these islands, ExPEC have properties to colonize and invade its hosts efficiently. Even though these PAIs are known to be acquired by HGT, only very few PAIs do carry mobilization and transfer genes required for the transmission by HGT. In this study, we apply for the first time next-generation sequencing (NGS) and in silico analyses in combination with in vitro experiments to decipher the mechanisms of PAI acquisition in ExPEC. For this, we investigated three neighbouring E. coli PAIs, namely the high-pathogenicity island (HPI), the pks and the serU island. As these PAIs contain no mobilization and transfer genes, they are immobile and dependent on transfer vehicles. By whole genome sequencing of the entire E. coli reference (ECOR) collection and by applying a phylogenetic approach we could unambiguously demonstrate that these PAIs are transmitted not only vertically, but also horizontally. Furthermore, we could prove in silico that distinct groups of PAIs were transferred "en bloc" in conjunction with the neighbouring chromosomal backbone. We traced this PAI transfer in vitro using an F' plasmid. Different lengths of transferred DNA were exactly detectable in the sequenced transconjugants indicating NGS as a powerful tool for determination of PAI transfer.

  8. HVJ-envelope vector for gene transfer into central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Morishita, Ryuichi; Endoh, Masayuki; Oshima, Kazuo; Aoki, Motokuni; Waguri, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2003-01-10

    To overcome some problems of virus vectors, we developed a novel non-viral vector system, the HVJ-envelope vector (HVJ-E). In this study, we investigated the feasibility of gene transfer into the CNS using the HVJ-E both in vitro and in vivo. Using the Venus reporter gene, fluorescence could be detected in cultured rat cerebral cortex neurons and glial cells. In vivo, the reporter gene (Venus) was successfully transfected into the rat brain by direct injection into the thalamus, intraventricular injection, or intrathecal injection, without inducing immunological change. When the vector was injected after transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, fluorescence due to EGFP gene or luciferase activity could be detected only in the injured hemisphere. Finally, luciferase activity was markedly enhanced by the addition of 50 U/ml heparin (PHVJ-E for gene transfer into the CNS will be useful for research and clinical gene therapy.

  9. Complexity of genetic sequences modified by horizontal gene transfer and degraded-DNA uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, George; Dehipawala, S.; Nguyen, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    Horizontal gene transfer has been a major vehicle for efficient transfer of genetic materials among living species and could be one of the sources for noncoding DNA incorporation into a genome. Our previous study of lnc- RNA sequence complexity in terms of fractal dimension and information entropy shows a tight regulation among the studied genes in numerous diseases. The role of sequence complexity in horizontal transferred genes was investigated with Mealybug in symbiotic relation with a 139K genome microbe and Deinococcus radiodurans as examples. The fractal dimension and entropy showed correlation R-sq of 0.82 (N = 6) for the studied Deinococcus radiodurans sequences. For comparison the Deinococcus radiodurans oxidative stress tolerant catalase and superoxide dismutase genes under extracellular dGMP growth condition showed R-sq ~ 0.42 (N = 6); and the studied arsenate reductase horizontal transferred genes for toxicity survival in several microorganisms showed no correlation. Simulation results showed that R-sq transferred genes in Mealybug. The mild correlation of R-sq ~ 0.5 for fractal dimension versus transcription level in the studied Deinococcus radiodurans sequences upon extracellular dGMP growth condition would suggest that lower fractal dimension with less electron density fluctuation favors higher transcription level.

  10. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  11. Cellular automata-based artificial life system of horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-xin Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutation and natural selection is the core of Darwin's idea about evolution. Many algorithms and models are based on this idea. However, in the evolution of prokaryotes, more and more researches have indicated that horizontal gene transfer (HGT would be much more important and universal than the authors had imagined. Owing to this mechanism, the prokaryotes not only become adaptable in nearly any environment on Earth, but also form a global genetic bank and a super communication network with all the genes of the prokaryotic world. Under this background, they present a novel cellular automata model general gene transfer to simulate and study the vertical gene transfer and HGT in the prokaryotes. At the same time, they use Schrodinger's life theory to formulate some evaluation indices and to discuss the intelligence and cognition of prokaryotes which is derived from HGT.

  12. Fundamental study on gene transfer utilizing magnetic force and jet injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Nakagami, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishjima, S. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Recently, DNA vaccination is attracting attentions as a new therapeutic method for lifestyle diseases and autoimmune diseases. However, its clinical applications are limited because a safe and efficient gene transfer method has not been established yet. In this study, a new method of gene transfer was proposed which utilizes the jet injection and the magnetic transfection. The jet injection is a method to inject medical liquid by momentary high pressure without needle. The injected liquid diffuses in the bio tissue and the endocytosis is considered to be improved by the diffusion. The magnetic transfection is a method to deliver the conjugates of plasmid DNA and magnetic particles to the desired site by external magnetic field. It is expected that jet injection of the conjugates causes slight membrane disruptions and the traction of the conjugates by magnetic field induces the efficient gene transfer. In conclusion, the possibility of improvement of the gene expression by the combination of jet injection and magnetic transfection was confirmed.

  13. Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer as Origin of Putrescine Production in Oenococcus oeni RM83▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcobal, Ángela; de las Rivas, Blanca; Moreno-Arribas, M. Victoria; Muñoz, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 17.2-kb chromosomal DNA fragment containing the odc gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase has been determined in the putrescine producer Oenococcus oeni RM83. This DNA fragment contains 13 open reading frames, including genes coding for five transposases and two phage proteins. This description might represent the first evidence of a horizontal gene transfer event as the origin of a biogenic amine biosynthetic locus. PMID:17056681

  14. Horizontal gene transfer in the innovation and adaptation of land plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Huang, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been well documented in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, but its role in plants and animals remains elusive. In a recent study, we showed that at least 57 families of nuclear genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses and that HGT played a critical role in plant colonization of land. In this paper, we categorize all acquired genes based on their putative functions and biological processes, and further addr...

  15. Gene loss and horizontal gene transfer contributed to the genome evolution of the extreme acidophile Ferrovum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Roxana Ullrich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD, associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus Ferrovum are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of Ferrovum has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain Ferrovum myxofaciens P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of Ferrovum (PN-J185 and Z-31 derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of Ferrovum sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G. Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three Ferrovum species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2. Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the F. myxofaciens strains (group 1 appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features contributed to the observed

  16. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Phytochelatin Synthases from Bacteria to Extremophilic Green Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Sanna; Penacho, Vanessa; Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Díaz, Silvia; Gonzalez-Pastor, José Eduardo; Aguilera, Angeles

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptomic sequencing together with bioinformatic analyses and an automated annotation process led us to identify novel phytochelatin synthase (PCS) genes from two extremophilic green algae (Chlamydomonas acidophila and Dunaliella acidophila). These genes are of intermediate length compared to known PCS genes from eukaryotes and PCS-like genes from prokaryotes. A detailed phylogenetic analysis gives new insight into the complicated evolutionary history of PCS genes and provides evidence for multiple horizontal gene transfer events from bacteria to eukaryotes within the gene family. A separate subgroup containing PCS-like genes within the PCS gene family is not supported since the PCS genes are monophyletic only when the PCS-like genes are included. The presence and functionality of the novel genes in the organisms were verified by genomic sequencing and qRT-PCR. Furthermore, the novel PCS gene in Chlamydomonas acidophila showed very strong induction by cadmium. Cloning and expression of the gene in Escherichia coli clearly improves its cadmium resistance. The gene in Dunaliella was not induced, most likely due to gene duplication.

  17. Lysogenic Transfer of Group A Streptococcus Superantigen Gene among Streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtek, Ivo; Pirzada, Zaid A.; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Mastny, Markus; Janapatla, Rajendra P.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    A group A Streptococcus(GAS) isolate,serotypeM12,recovered from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was analyzed for superantigen-carrying prophages, revealing 149, which encodes superantigen SSA. Sequence analysis of the att-L proximal region of 149 showed that the phage had a mosaic nature. Remarkably, we successfully obtained lysogenic conversion of GAS clinical isolates of various M serotypes (M1, M3, M5, M12, M19, M28, and M94), as well as of group C Streptococcus equisimilis (GCSE) clinical isolates, via transfer of a recombinant phage 149::Kmr. Phage149::Kmr from selected lysogenized GAS and GCSE strains could be transferred back to M12 GAS strains. Our data indicate that horizontal transfer of lysogenic phages among GAS can occur across the M-type barrier; these data also provide further support for the hypothesis that toxigenic conversion can occur via lysogeny between species. Streptococci might employ this mechanism specifically to allow more efficient adaptation to changing host challenges, potentially leading to fitter and more virulent clones. PMID:18179387

  18. Horizontal gene transfer from genus agrobacterium to the plant linaria in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Tatiana V; Bogomaz, Denis I; Pavlova, Olga A; Nester, Eugene W; Lutova, Ludmila A

    2012-12-01

    Genes can be transferred horizontally between prokaryotes and eukaryotes in nature. The best-studied examples occur between Agrobacterium rhizogenes and certain Nicotiana spp. To investigate possible additional cases of horizontal gene transfer in nature between Agrobacterium and plants, a real-time polymerase chain reaction-based approach was employed to screen 127 plant species, belonging to 38 families of Dicotyledones, for the presence of oncogenes homologous to the transfer DNA fragments (T-DNA) from both A. tumefaciens and A. rhizogenes. Among all of the analyzed plant species, we found that only Linaria vulgaris contained sequences homologous to the T-DNA of A. rhizogenes. All screened L. vulgaris plants from various parts of Russia contained the same homologous sequences, including rolB, rolC, ORF13, ORF14, and mis genes. The same opine gene is found in the species of Nicotiana which contain genes of A. rhizogenes. In L. vulgaris, there are two copies of T-DNA organized as a single tandem imperfect direct repeat. The plant DNA sequence of the site of integration shows similarity to a retrotransposon. This site is most likely silent, suggesting that the T-DNA is not expressed. Attempts to demonstrate expression of the T-DNA genes were negative. Our study indicates that the frequency of gene transfer and fixation in the germline from Agrobacterium to plant hosts is rare in the natural environment.

  19. The impact of long-distance horizontal gene transfer on prokaryotic genome size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Otto X; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2009-12-22

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is one of the most dominant forces molding prokaryotic gene repertoires. These repertoires can be as small as approximately 200 genes in intracellular organisms or as large as approximately 9,000 genes in large, free-living bacteria. In this article we ask what is the impact of HGT from phylogenetically distant sources, relative to the size of the gene repertoire. Using different approaches for HGT detection and focusing on both cumulative and recent evolutionary histories, we find a surprising pattern of nonlinear enrichment of long-distance transfers in large genomes. Moreover, we find a strong positive correlation between the sizes of the donor and recipient genomes. Our results also show that distant horizontal transfers are biased toward those functional groups that are enriched in large genomes, showing that the trends in functional gene content and the impact of distant transfers are interdependent. These results highlight the intimate relationship between environmental and genomic complexity in microbes and suggest that an ecological, as opposed to phylogenetic, signal in gene content gains relative importance in large-genomed bacteria.

  20. Experimental design and statistical rigor in phylogenomics of horizontal and endosymbiotic gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiller John W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A growing number of phylogenomic investigations from diverse eukaryotes are examining conflicts among gene trees as evidence of horizontal gene transfer. If multiple foreign genes from the same eukaryotic lineage are found in a given genome, it is increasingly interpreted as concerted gene transfers during a cryptic endosymbiosis in the organism's evolutionary past, also known as "endosymbiotic gene transfer" or EGT. A number of provocative hypotheses of lost or serially replaced endosymbionts have been advanced; to date, however, these inferences largely have been post-hoc interpretations of genomic-wide conflicts among gene trees. With data sets as large and complex as eukaryotic genome sequences, it is critical to examine alternative explanations for intra-genome phylogenetic conflicts, particularly how much conflicting signal is expected from directional biases and statistical noise. The availability of genome-level data both permits and necessitates phylogenomics that test explicit, a priori predictions of horizontal gene transfer, using rigorous statistical methods and clearly defined experimental controls.

  1. AAV serotype influences gene transfer in corneal stroma in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ajay; Jonathan C K Tovey; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the cellular tropism and relative transduction efficiency of three AAV serotypes, AAV6, AAV8 and AAV9, for corneal gene delivery using mouse cornea in vivo and donor human cornea ex vivo. The AAV6, AAV8 and AAV9 serotypes having AAV2 plasmid encoding for alkaline phosphatase (AP) gene were generated by transfecting HEK293 cell line with pHelper, pARAP4 and pRep/Cap plasmids. Viral vectors (109 vg/μl) were topically applied onto mouse cornea in vivo and human cornea ex viv...

  2. Prokaryotic genes in eukaryotic genome sequences: when to infer horizontal gene transfer and when to suspect an actual microbe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonova, Irena I; Lappi, Tanya; Zudina, Liudmila; Mushegian, Arcady R

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of phylogenetic positions of predicted gene and protein sequences is a routine step in any genome project, useful for validating the species' taxonomic position and for evaluating hypotheses about genome evolution and function. Several recent eukaryotic genome projects have reported multiple gene sequences that were much more similar to homologues in bacteria than to any eukaryotic sequence. In the spirit of the times, horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes has been invoked in some of these cases. Here, we show, using comparative sequence analysis, that some of those bacteria-like genes indeed appear likely to have been horizontally transferred from bacteria to eukaryotes. In other cases, however, the evidence strongly indicates that the eukaryotic DNA sequenced in the genome project contains a sample of non-integrated DNA from the actual bacteria, possibly providing a window into the host microbiome. Recent literature suggests also that common reagents, kits and laboratory equipment may be systematically contaminated with bacterial DNA, which appears to be sampled by metagenome projects non-specifically. We review several bioinformatic criteria that help to distinguish putative horizontal gene transfers from the admixture of genes from autonomously replicating bacteria in their hosts' genome databases or from the reagent contamination. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Horizontal transfer of archaeal genes into the deinococcaceae: detection by molecular and computer-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendzenski, L.; Liu, L.; Zhaxybayeva, O.; Murphey, R.; Shin, D. G.; Gogarten, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the Deinococcaceae (e.g., Thermus, Meiothermus, Deinococcus) contain A/V-ATPases typically found in Archaea or Eukaryotes which were probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Two methods were used to quantify the extent to which archaeal or eukaryotic genes have been acquired by this lineage. Screening of a Meiothermus ruber library with probes made against Thermoplasma acidophilum DNA yielded a number of clones which hybridized more strongly than background. One of these contained the prolyl tRNA synthetase (RS) gene. Phylogenetic analysis shows the M. ruber and D. radiodurans prolyl RS to be more closely related to archaeal and eukaryal forms of this gene than to the typical bacterial type. Using a bioinformatics approach, putative open reading frames (ORFs) from the prerelease version of the D. radiodurans genome were screened for genes more closely related to archaeal or eukaryotic genes. Putative ORFs were searched against representative genomes from each of the three domains using automated BLAST. ORFs showing the highest matches against archaeal and eukaryotic genes were collected and ranked. Among the top-ranked hits were the A/V-ATPase catalytic and noncatalytic subunits and the prolyl RS genes. Using phylogenetic methods, ORFs were analyzed and trees assessed for evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Of the 45 genes examined, 20 showed topologies in which D. radiodurans homologues clearly group with eukaryotic or archaeal homologues, and 17 additional trees were found to show probable evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Compared to the total number of ORFs in the genome, those that can be identified as having been acquired from Archaea or Eukaryotes are relatively few (approximately 1%), suggesting that interdomain transfer is rare.

  4. Transfer of tetracycline resistance genes with aggregation substance in food-borne Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong-Mi; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2015-04-01

    Enterococcus faecalis has the ability to conjugate with the aid of aggregation substance (AS) and inducible sex pheromones to exchange genetic elements in food matrix. To evaluate the food safety condition and the transferable factor, 250 tetracycline-resistant food-borne E. faecalis were collected in Korea. Among the isolates, a majority of tetracycline-resistant isolates (49.6 %) harbored both the tet(M) and tet(L) genes together, followed by tet(M) (19.6 %), and tet(L) (6.8 %) alone. Also, we found the combination of tet(L)/tet(M)/tet(O) or tet(M)/tet(O). We identified two tet(S) genes including the isolate carrying tet(M) + tet(S) genes. Additionally, most E. faecalis were positive for cpd and ccf (both 96.8 %) followed by cob (57.2 %). Through mating experiments, we confirmed E. faecalis possessing the Int-Tn gene and/or any AS gene successfully transferred tet genes to JH2-2 E. faecalis, whereas neither E. faecalis carrying AS genes nor the Int-Tn gene showed the conjugation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results supported a distinct pattern, implying transfer of genetic information. Our study revealed a high occurrence of tetracycline resistance genes in E. faecalis from various foods. The widespread dissemination of tetracycline resistance genes would be promoted to transfer tetracycline resistance genes by pheromone-mediated conjugation systems.

  5. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars H.

    2012-01-01

    are independent replicons that enhance their own success by promoting inter-bacterial interactions. They typically also carry genes that heighten their hosts’ direct fitness. Furthermore, current research shows that the so-called mafia traits encoded on mobile genetic elements can enforce bacteria to maintain...

  6. Transfer of tetracycline resistance gene (tet ) between replicons in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... (71.4%), gentamicin (43.5%), nalidixic acid (38.3%) and nitrofurantoin (7.7%; Table 2). The results of antibiotic susceptibility test also indicated that E. coli showed higher rates of resistance to most of the antibiotics. A total of 110 (71.4%) isolates were resistant to tetracy- cline. Tetracycline resistant gene tetr ...

  7. Recombinant adenovirus vectors with knobless fibers for targeted gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusechem, VW; van Rijswijk, ALCT; van Es, HHG; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    2000-01-01

    Adenoviral vector systems for gene therapy can be much improved by targeting vectors to specific cell types. This requires both the complete ablation of native adenovirus tropism and the introduction of a novel binding affinity in the viral capsid. We reasoned that these requirements could be

  8. Investigation of horizontal gene transfer in poplar/Amanita muscaria ectomycorrhizas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Fine roots of forest trees form together with certain soil fungi symbiotic structures (ectomycorrhizas), where fungal hyphae are in intimate contact with plant cells. Due to root cell degeneration, plant DNA is released and could be taken up by the fungus. The possibility that horizontal gene transfer might result in a risk for the environment should be evaluated before a massive release of genetically engineered trees into nature occurs, even though only a few convincing examples of horizontal gene transfer are known. Transgenic poplars containing a construct of the Streptomyces hygroscopicus bar gene under the control of the Cochliobolus heterostrophus GPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) promoter were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The functionality of this construct in the ectomycorrhizal model fungus Amanita muscaria was previously verified by protoplast-based fungal transformation. 35,000 ectomycorrhizas, formed between transgenic poplars and non-transgenic A. muscaria hyphae, were isolated and transferred to selective agar plates. Putative herbicide-resistant fungal colonies were obtained after the first round of selection. However, none of these colonies survived a transfer onto fresh selection medium, nor did they contain the bar gene, indicating that no horizontal gene transfer from poplar to A. muscaria occurred during symbiosis under axenic conditions. However, since ectomycorrhizas are associated under natural conditions with viruses, bacteria and other fungi, these additional associations should be evaluated in future.

  9. Plant expansins in bacteria and fungi: evolution by horizontal gene transfer and independent domain fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Doran, Nicole; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been described as a common mechanism of transferring genetic material between prokaryotes, whereas genetic transfers from eukaryotes to prokaryotes have been rarely documented. Here we report a rare case of HGT in which plant expansin genes that code for plant cell-wall loosening proteins were transferred from plants to bacteria, fungi, and amoebozoa. In several cases, the species in which the expansin gene was found is either in intimate association with plants or is a known plant pathogen. Our analyses suggest that at least two independent genetic transfers occurred from plants to bacteria and fungi. These events were followed by multiple HGT events within bacteria and fungi. We have also observed that in bacteria expansin genes have been independently fused to DNA fragments that code for an endoglucanase domain or for a carbohydrate binding module, pointing to functional convergence at the molecular level. Furthermore, the functional similarities between microbial expansins and their plant xenologs suggest that these proteins mediate microbial-plant interactions by altering the plant cell wall and therefore may provide adaptive advantages to these species. The evolution of these nonplant expansins represents a unique case in which bacteria and fungi have found innovative and adaptive ways to interact with and infect plants by acquiring genes from their host. This evolutionary paradigm suggests that despite their low frequency such HGT events may have significantly contributed to the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species.

  10. Mucus altering agents as adjuncts for nonviral gene transfer to airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, S; Kitson, C; Farley, R; Steel, R; Marriott, C; Parkins, D A; Scarpa, M; Wainwright, B; Evans, M J; Colledge, W H; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    2001-09-01

    Nonviral vectors have been shown to be a safe and valid alternative to recombinant viruses for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF). Nevertheless, gene transfer efficiency needs to be increased before clinical efficacy is likely in man. One barrier to increased efficacy is normal airway mucus. Using an ex vivo model of sheep tracheal epithelium, we show that this barrier can, in part, be overcome by treatment with the mucolytic agents, Nacystelyn or N-acetylcysteine using either a cationic lipid or a cationic polymer as the gene transfer agent. Further, in vivo application of either Nacystelyn or the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate, both clinically used agents, resulted in increased reporter gene expression in the mouse lung, but no significant correction of the bioelectric defect in CF null mice. These results, whilst unlikely to be sufficient in themselves to achieve clinically relevant gene therapy, may be a further useful step in the attainment of this goal.

  11. GFP as a marker for transient gene transfer and expression in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Liu, Maojun; Yang, Ruosong; Xiong, Qiyan; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs and has been shown to transform cell cultures, which has increased the interest of researchers. The green florescence proteins (GFP) gene of Aquorea victoria, proved to be a vital marker to identify transformed cells in mixed populations. Use of GFP to observe gene transfer and expression in M. hyorhinis (strain HUB-1) has not been described. We have constructed a pMD18-O/MHRgfp plasmid containing the p97 gene promoter, origin of replication, tetracycline resistance marker and GFP gene controlled by the p97 gene promoter. The plasmid transformed into M. hyorhinis with a frequency of ~4 × 10(-3) cfu/µg plasmid DNA and could be detected by PCR amplification of the GFP gene from the total DNA of the transformant mycoplasmas. Analysis of a single clone grown on KM2-Agar containing tetracycline, showed a green fluorescence color. Conclusively, this report suggests the usefulness of GFP to monitor transient gene transfer and expression in M. hyorhinis, eventually minimizing screening procedures for gene transfer and expression.

  12. HGT-Finder: A New Tool for Horizontal Gene Transfer Finding and Application to Aspergillus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Marcus; Ekstrom, Alex; Li, Xueqiong; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-10-09

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a fast-track mechanism that allows genetically unrelated organisms to exchange genes for rapid environmental adaptation. We developed a new phyletic distribution-based software, HGT-Finder, which implements a novel bioinformatics algorithm to calculate a horizontal transfer index and a probability value for each query gene. Applying this new tool to the Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus nidulans genomes, we found 273, 542, and 715 transferred genes (HTGs), respectively. HTGs have shorter length, higher guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and relaxed selection pressure. Metabolic process and secondary metabolism functions are significantly enriched in HTGs. Gene clustering analysis showed that 61%, 41% and 74% of HTGs in the three genomes form physically linked gene clusters (HTGCs). Overlapping manually curated, secondary metabolite gene clusters (SMGCs) with HTGCs found that 9 of the 33 A. fumigatus SMGCs and 31 of the 65 A. nidulans SMGCs share genes with HTGCs, and that HTGs are significantly enriched in SMGCs. Our genome-wide analysis thus presented very strong evidence to support the hypothesis that HGT has played a very critical role in the evolution of SMGCs. The program is freely available at http://cys.bios.niu.edu/HGTFinder/ HGTFinder.tar.gz.

  13. The absorption enhancer sodium deoxycholate promotes high gene transfer in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leborgne, Christian; Alimi-Guez, Debborah; El Shafey, Nelly; van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Bigey, Pascal; Scherman, Daniel; Kichler, Antoine

    2017-05-15

    Gene delivery to skeletal muscle is a promising strategy for the treatment of muscle disorders and for the systemic secretion of therapeutic proteins. In addition, muscle is an attractive target tissue because it is easily accessible. However, very few synthetic vectors proved capable of surpassing naked DNA mediated muscle gene transfer. In fact, only neutral copolymers, in particular poloxamers, demonstrated capacities to increase transgene expression in skeletal muscles. Here, we studied in vitro and in vivo behaviour of different bile salts. We report that sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and derivatives thereof increase after intramuscular injection by more than 100-fold the levels of the reporter gene luciferase compared to naked DNA. Using a LacZ expression cassette, we found that more than 20% of the muscle fibers expressed the reporter gene. Prolonged expression of a secreted reporter gene derived from a natural murine alkaline phosphatase enzyme could be documented. Altogether, our results demonstrate that bile salts belong to the most efficient chemicals identified so far for skeletal muscle gene transfer. Importantly, since these compounds are naturally found in the body, there is no risk of immune response against them and in addition several bile salts are already used in human medicine. Bile salt mediated muscle gene transfer may thus have broad applications in gene therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Horizontally transferred fungal carotenoid genes in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altincicek, Boran; Kovacs, Jennifer L; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2012-04-23

    Carotenoids are organic pigments commonly synthesized by plants, algae and some micro-organisms. Through absorption of light energy, carotenoids facilitate photosynthesis and provide protection against photo-oxidation. While it was presumed that all carotenoids in animals were sequestered from their diets, aphids were recently shown to harbour genomic copies of functional carotenoid biosynthesis genes that were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from fungi. Our search of available animal transcripts revealed the presence of two related genes in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the T. urticae genes were transferred from fungi into the spider mite genome, probably in a similar manner as recently suggested for aphids. The genes are expressed in both green and red morphs, with red morphs exhibiting higher levels of gene expression. Additionally, there appear to be changes in the expression of these genes during diapause. As carotenoids are associated with diapause induction in these animals, our results add to recent findings highlighting the importance of eukaryotic horizontal gene transfer in the ecology and evolution of higher animals.

  15. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  16. Mathematical modelling of antimicrobial resistance in agricultural waste highlights importance of gene transfer rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michelle; Hobman, Jon L; Dodd, Christine E R; Ramsden, Stephen J; Stekel, Dov J

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is of global concern. Most antimicrobial use is in agriculture; manures and slurry are especially important because they contain a mix of bacteria, including potential pathogens, antimicrobial resistance genes and antimicrobials. In many countries, manures and slurry are stored, especially over winter, before spreading onto fields as organic fertilizer. Thus, these are a potential location for gene exchange and selection for resistance. We develop and analyse a mathematical model to quantify the spread of antimicrobial resistance in stored agricultural waste. We use parameters from a slurry tank on a UK dairy farm as an exemplar. We show that the spread of resistance depends in a subtle way on the rates of gene transfer and antibiotic inflow. If the gene transfer rate is high, then its reduction controls resistance, while cutting antibiotic inflow has little impact. If the gene transfer rate is low, then reducing antibiotic inflow controls resistance. Reducing length of storage can also control spread of resistance. Bacterial growth rate, fitness costs of carrying antimicrobial resistance and proportion of resistant bacteria in animal faeces have little impact on spread of resistance. Therefore, effective treatment strategies depend critically on knowledge of gene transfer rates. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  18. Nano-vectors for efficient liver specific gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Atul Pathak; Vyas, Suresh P.; Gupta, Kailash C.

    2008-01-01

    Atul Pathak1, Suresh P Vyas2, Kailash C Gupta11Nucleic Acids Research Laboratory, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi  University Campus, Delhi, India 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. Harisingh Gour Vishwavidyalaya, Sagar, (M.P.), IndiaAbstract: Recent progress in nanotechnology has triggered the site specific drug/gene delivery research and gained wide acknowledgment in contemporary DNA therapeutics. Amongst various organs, liver plays a crucial role in v...

  19. Rare Events of Intragenus and Intraspecies Horizontal Transfer of the 16S rRNA Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Cao, Hui-Luo; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-07-27

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of operational genes has been widely reported in prokaryotic organisms. However, informational genes such as those involved in transcription and translation processes are very difficult to be horizontally transferred, as described by Woese's complexity hypothesis. Here, we analyzed all of the completed prokaryotic genome sequences (2,143 genomes) in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database, scanned for genomes with high intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA gene copies, and explored potential HGT events of ribosomal RNA genes based on the phylogeny, genomic organization, and secondary structures of the ribosomal RNA genes. Our results revealed 28 genomes with relatively high intragenomic heterogeneity of multiple 16S rRNA gene copies (lowest pairwise identity gene only occurred at intragenus or intraspecies levels, which is quite different from the HGT of operational genes. Our results improve our understanding regarding the exchange of informational genes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Horizontal Transfer of Plasmid-Mediated Cephalosporin Resistance Genes in the Intestine of Houseflies (Musca domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Akira; Usui, Masaru; Okubo, Torahiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Houseflies are a mechanical vector for various types of bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB). If the intestine of houseflies is a suitable site for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), houseflies could also serve as a biological vector for ARB. To clarify whether cephalosporin resistance genes are transferred efficiently in the housefly intestine, we compared with conjugation experiments in vivo (in the intestine) and in vitro by using Escherichia coli with eight combinations of four donor and two recipient strains harboring plasmid-mediated cephalosporin resistance genes and chromosomal-encoded rifampicin resistance genes, respectively. In the in vivo conjugation experiment, houseflies ingested donor strains for 6 hr and then recipient strains for 3 hr, and 24 hr later, the houseflies were surface sterilized and analyzed. In vitro conjugation experiments were conducted using the broth-mating method. In 3/8 combinations, the in vitro transfer frequency (Transconjugants/Donor) was ≥1.3 × 10(-4); the in vivo transfer rates of cephalosporin resistance genes ranged from 2.0 × 10(-4) to 5.7 × 10(-5). Moreover, cephalosporin resistance genes were transferred to other species of enteric bacteria of houseflies such as Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens. These results suggest that houseflies are not only a mechanical vector for ARB but also a biological vector for the occurrence of new ARB through the horizontal transfer of ARGs in their intestine.

  1. Cellular immune response to cryptic epitopes during therapeutic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Goudy, Kevin; Hirsch, Matt; Asokan, Aravind; Fan, Yun; Alexander, Jeff; Sun, Junjiang; Monahan, Paul; Seiber, David; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Tisch, Roland; Frelinger, Jeff; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-06-30

    The immune response has been implicated as a critical factor in determining the success or failure of clinical gene therapy trials. Generally, such a response is elicited by the desired transgene product or, in some cases, the delivery system. In the current study, we report the previously uncharacterized finding that a therapeutic cassette currently being used for human investigation displays alternative reading frames (ARFs) that generate unwanted protein products to induce a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that antigenic epitopes derived from an ARF in coagulation factor IX (F9) cDNA can induce CTL reactivity, subsequently killing F9-expressing hepatocytes. One peptide (p18) of 3 candidates from an ARF of the F9 transgene induced CD8(+) T cell reactivity in mice expressing the human MHC class I molecule B0702. Subsequently, upon systemic administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2 vectors packaged with the F9 transgene (AAV2/F9), a robust CD8(+) CTL response was elicited against peptide p18. Of particular importance is that the ARF epitope-specific CTLs eliminated AAV2/F9-transduced hepatocytes but not AAV2/F9 codon-optimized (AAV2/F9-opt)-transduced liver cells in which p18 epitope was deleted. These results demonstrate a previously undiscovered mechanism by which CTL responses can be elicited by cryptic epitopes generated from a therapeutic transgene and have significant implications for all gene therapy modalities. Such unforeseen epitope generation warrants careful analysis of transgene sequences for ARFs to reduce the potential for adverse events arising from immune responses during clinical gene therapy protocols.

  2. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributes to Plant Evolution: The Case of Agrobacterium T-DNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora G. Quispe-Huamanquispe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT can be defined as the acquisition of genetic material from another organism without being its offspring. HGT is common in the microbial world including archaea and bacteria, where HGT mechanisms are widely understood and recognized as an important force in evolution. In eukaryotes, HGT now appears to occur more frequently than originally thought. Many studies are currently detecting novel HGT events among distinct lineages using next-generation sequencing. Most examples to date include gene transfers from bacterial donors to recipient organisms including fungi, plants, and animals. In plants, one well-studied example of HGT is the transfer of the tumor-inducing genes (T-DNAs from some Agrobacterium species into their host plant genomes. Evidence of T-DNAs from Agrobacterium spp. into plant genomes, and their subsequent maintenance in the germline, has been reported in Nicotiana, Linaria and, more recently, in Ipomoea species. The transferred genes do not produce the usual disease phenotype, and appear to have a role in evolution of these plants. In this paper, we review previous reported cases of HGT from Agrobacterium, including the transfer of T-DNA regions from Agrobacterium spp. to the sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam.] genome which is, to date, the sole documented example of a naturally-occurring incidence of HGT from Agrobacterium to a domesticated crop plant. We also discuss the possible evolutionary impact of T-DNA acquisition on plants.

  3. Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributes to Plant Evolution: The Case ofAgrobacteriumT-DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe-Huamanquispe, Dora G; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kreuze, Jan F

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) can be defined as the acquisition of genetic material from another organism without being its offspring. HGT is common in the microbial world including archaea and bacteria, where HGT mechanisms are widely understood and recognized as an important force in evolution. In eukaryotes, HGT now appears to occur more frequently than originally thought. Many studies are currently detecting novel HGT events among distinct lineages using next-generation sequencing. Most examples to date include gene transfers from bacterial donors to recipient organisms including fungi, plants, and animals. In plants, one well-studied example of HGT is the transfer of the tumor-inducing genes (T-DNAs) from some Agrobacterium species into their host plant genomes. Evidence of T-DNAs from Agrobacterium spp. into plant genomes, and their subsequent maintenance in the germline, has been reported in Nicotiana , Linaria and, more recently, in Ipomoea species. The transferred genes do not produce the usual disease phenotype, and appear to have a role in evolution of these plants. In this paper, we review previous reported cases of HGT from Agrobacterium , including the transfer of T-DNA regions from Agrobacterium spp. to the sweetpotato [ Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] genome which is, to date, the sole documented example of a naturally-occurring incidence of HGT from Agrobacterium to a domesticated crop plant. We also discuss the possible evolutionary impact of T-DNA acquisition on plants.

  4. Molecular evolution of a novel hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase enables robust stable gene transfer in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mátés, Lajos; Chuah, Marinee K L; Belay, Eyayu; Jerchow, Boris; Manoj, Namitha; Acosta-Sanchez, Abel; Grzela, Dawid P; Schmitt, Andrea; Becker, Katja; Matrai, Janka; Ma, Ling; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Gysemans, Conny; Pryputniewicz, Diana; Miskey, Csaba; Fletcher, Bradley; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2009-06-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is a promising technology platform for gene transfer in vertebrates; however, its efficiency of gene insertion can be a bottleneck in primary cell types. A large-scale genetic screen in mammalian cells yielded a hyperactive transposase (SB100X) with approximately 100-fold enhancement in efficiency when compared to the first-generation transposase. SB100X supported 35-50% stable gene transfer in human CD34(+) cells enriched in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Transplantation of gene-marked CD34(+) cells in immunodeficient mice resulted in long-term engraftment and hematopoietic reconstitution. In addition, SB100X supported sustained (>1 year) expression of physiological levels of factor IX upon transposition in the mouse liver in vivo. Finally, SB100X reproducibly resulted in 45% stable transgenesis frequencies by pronuclear microinjection into mouse zygotes. The newly developed transposase yields unprecedented stable gene transfer efficiencies following nonviral gene delivery that compare favorably to stable transduction efficiencies with integrating viral vectors and is expected to facilitate widespread applications in functional genomics and gene therapy.

  5. Potential transfer of extended spectrum β-lactamase encoding gene, blashv18 gene, between Klebsiella pneumoniae in raw foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yangjin; Matthews, Karl R

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the transfer frequency of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding gene (blaSHV18) among Klebsiella pneumoniae in tryptic soy broth (TSB), pasteurized milk, unpasteurized milk, alfalfa sprouts and chopped lettuce at defined temperatures. All transconjugants were characterized phenotypically and genotypically. KP04(ΔKM) and KP08(ΔKM) isolated from seed sprouts and KP342 were used as recipients in mating experiments with K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 serving as the donor. In mating experiments, no transconjugants were detected at 4 °C in liquid media or chopped lettuce, but detected in all media tested at 15 °C, 24 °C, and 37 °C. At 24 °C, the transfer of blaSHV18 gene occurred more frequently in alfalfa sprouts (5.15E-04 transconjugants per recipient) and chopped lettuce (3.85E-05) than liquid media (1.08E-05). On chopped lettuce, transconjugants were not detected at day 1 post-mating at 15 °C, but observed on day 2 (1.43E-05). Transconjugants carried the blaSHV18 gene transferred from the donor and the virulence gene harbored by recipient. More importantly, a class 1 integrase gene and resistance to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were co-transferred during mating. These quantitative results suggest that fresh produce exposed to temperature abuse may serve as a competent vehicle for the spread of gene encoding for antibiotic resistance, having a potential negative impact on human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vanadium accelerates horizontal transfer of tet(M) gene from marine Photobacterium to Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Kimura, Midori; Agusa, Tetsuro; Rahman, Habibur M

    2012-11-01

    Vanadium is a contaminant from steel additive and ship fuel in coastal and port areas, and its effect on marine microbes remains largely unknown. We showed that vanadium accelerates transfer of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) from Photobacterium to Escherichia coli, and found a positive correlation between the concentration of vanadium in natural marine sediment and the rate of oxytetracycline resistance. These results suggest the possibility that vanadium may play a role in the preservation and horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in the marine environment. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  8. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlinger Bernard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX, aracytin (ara-C or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy.

  9. The Kinetic and Thermodynamic Aftermath of Horizontal Gene Transfer Governs Evolutionary Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doore, Sarah M; Fane, Bentley A

    2015-10-01

    Shared host cells can serve as melting pots for viral genomes, giving many phylogenies a web-like appearance due to horizontal gene transfer. However, not all virus families exhibit web-like phylogenies. Microviruses form three distinct clades, represented by φX174, G4, and α3. Here, we investigate protein-based barriers to horizontal gene transfer between clades. We transferred gene G, which encodes a structural protein, between φX174 and G4, and monitored the evolutionary recovery of the resulting chimeras. In both cases, particle assembly was the major barrier after gene transfer. The G4φXG chimera displayed a temperature-sensitive assembly defect that could easily be corrected through single mutations that promote productive assembly. Gene transfer in the other direction was more problematic. The initial φXG4G chimera required an exogenous supply of both the φX174 major spike G and DNA pilot H proteins. Elevated DNA pilot protein levels may be required to compensate for off-pathway reactions that may have become thermodynamically and/or kinetically favored when the foreign spike protein was present. After three targeted genetic selections, the foreign spike protein was productively integrated into the φX174 background. The first adaption involved a global decrease in gene expression. This was followed by modifications affecting key protein-protein interactions that govern assembly. Finally, gene expression was re-elevated. Although the first selection suppresses nonproductive reactions, subsequent selections promote productive assembly and ultimately viability. However, viable chimeric strains exhibited reduced fitness compared with wild-type. This chimera's path to recovery may partially explain how unusual recombinant viruses could persist long enough to naturally emerge. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene diversity in eubacteria and eukaryotes: evidence for intra- and inter-kingdom gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figge, R M; Schubert, M; Brinkmann, H; Cerff, R

    1999-04-01

    Cyanobacteria contain up to three highly divergent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) genes: gap1, gap2, and gap3. Genes gap1 and gap2 are closely related at the sequence level to the nuclear genes encoding cytosolic and chloroplast GAPDH of higher plants and have recently been shown to play distinct key roles in catabolic and anabolic carbon flow, respectively, of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In the present study, sequences of 10 GAPDH genes distributed across the cyanobacteria Prochloron didemni, Gloeobacter violaceus PCC7421, and Synechococcus PCC7942 and the alpha-proteobacterium Paracoccus denitrificans and the beta-proteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum were determined. Prochloron didemni possesses homologs to the gap2 and gap3 genes from Anabaena, Gloeobacter harbors gap1 and gap2 homologs, and Synechococcus possesses gap1, gap2, and gap3. Paracoccus harbors two highly divergent gap genes that are related to gap3, and Ralstonia possesses a homolog of the gap1 gene. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences in the context of other eubacterial and eukaryotic GAPDH genes reveal that divergence across eubacterial gap1, and gap2, and gap3 genes is greater than that between eubacterial gap1 and eukaroytic glycolytic GapC or between eubacterial gap2 and eukaryotic Calvin cycle GapAB. These data strongly support previous analyses which suggested that eukaryotes acquired their nuclear genes for GapC and GapAB via endosymbiotic gene transfer from the antecedents of mitochondria and chloroplasts, and extend the known range of sequence diversity of the antecedent eubacterial genes. Analyses of available GAPDH sequences from other eubacterial sources indicate that the glycosomal gap gene from trypanosomes (cytosolic in Euglena) and the gap gene from the spirochete Treponema pallidum are each other's closest relatives. This specific relationship can therefore not reflect organismal evolution but must be the result of an

  11. Evolutionary analysis revealed the horizontal transfer of the Cyt b gene from Fungi to Chromista.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liang-Fen; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Kuang, Hanhui; Schnabel, Guido; Li, Guo-Qing; Luo, Chao-Xi

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the cytochrome b (Cyt b) amino acid sequences were analyzed in 50 organisms covering all 5 kingdoms of eukaryotes. Six conserved domains, i.e., heme bL binding sites, heme bH binding sites, Qo binding sites, Qi binding sites, the interchain domain interface, and the intrachain domain interface were found in all investigated sequences. The topology of the phylogenetic trees was largely consistent with the well recognized taxonomic relationships, indicating that the Cyt b genes originated from a common ancestral gene before the divergence of eukaryotic kingdoms. The eukaryotic Cyt b genes likely originated from an ancient prokaryotic gene in Alphaproteobacteria based on shared conserved domains. We provide evidence that the Cyt b gene of oomycete Pseudoperonospora cubensis was horizontally transferred from a fungus in the order Hypocreales. To our knowledge, this is the first reported evidence of Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from Fungi to Chromista involving an essential house-keeping gene. Our data suggest that HGT events must be considered when evolutionary trees are constructed only based on Cyt b genes. Additional analysis of thousands of Cyt b sequences from Genbank revealed that introns in mitochondrial Cyt b genes were acquired after the endosymbiosis of alphaproteobacteria in eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Widespread Horizontal Gene Transfer from Circular Single-stranded DNA Viruses to Eukaryotic Genomes

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    Xie Jiatao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to vertical transmission, organisms can also acquire genes from other distantly related species or from their extra-chromosomal elements (plasmids and viruses via horizontal gene transfer (HGT. It has been suggested that phages represent substantial forces in prokaryotic evolution. In eukaryotes, retroviruses, which can integrate into host genome as an obligate step in their replication strategy, comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. Unlike retroviruses, few members of other virus families are known to transfer genes to host genomes. Results Here we performed a systematic search for sequences related to circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses in publicly available eukaryotic genome databases followed by comprehensive phylogenetic analysis. We conclude that the replication initiation protein (Rep-related sequences of geminiviruses, nanoviruses and circoviruses have been frequently transferred to a broad range of eukaryotic species, including plants, fungi, animals and protists. Some of the transferred viral genes were conserved and expressed, suggesting that these genes have been coopted to assume cellular functions in the host genomes. We also identified geminivirus-like and parvovirus-like transposable elements in genomes of fungi and lower animals, respectively, and thereby provide direct evidence that eukaryotic transposons could derive from ssDNA viruses. Conclusions Our discovery extends the host range of circular ssDNA viruses and sheds light on the origin and evolution of these viruses. It also suggests that ssDNA viruses act as an unforeseen source of genetic innovation in their hosts.

  13. In vivo tyrosinase mini-gene transfer enhances killing effect of BNCT on amelanotic melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, H.; Mishima, Y. [Mishima Institute for Dermatological Research, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Hiratsuka, J. [Kawasaki Medical School, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Iwakura, M. [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Using accentuated melanogenesis principally occurring within melanoma cells, we have successfully treated human malignant melanoma (Mm) with {sup 10}B-BPA BNCT. Despite this success, there are still remaining issues for poorly melanogenic Mm and further non-pigment cell tumors. We found the selective accumulation of {sup 10}B-BPA to Mm is primarily due to the complex formation of BPA and melanin-monomers activity synthesized within Mm cells. Then, we succeeded in transferring the tyrosinase gene into amelanotic to substantially produce melanin monomers. These cells has demonstrated increased boron accumulation and enhanced killing effect of BNCT. Further, transfection of TRP-2 (DOPAchrome tautomerase) gene into poorly eumelanotic and slightly phenomelanotic Mm cells in culture cell systems also led to increased BPA accumulation. Thereafter, we studied in vivo gene transfer. We transferred the tyrosinase mini-gene by intra-tumor injection into poorly melanotic Mm proliferating subcutaneously in hamster skin, and performed BNCT. Compared to control tumors, gene-transferred tumors showed increased BPA accumulation leading to enhanced killing effect. (author)

  14. Horizontal gene transfer is more frequent with increased heterotrophy and contributes to parasite adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yeting; Wafula, Eric K.; Honaas, Loren A.; Ralph, Paula E.; Jones, Sam; Clarke, Christopher R.; Liu, Siming; Su, Chun; Zhang, Huiting; Altman, Naomi S.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Timko, Michael P.; Yoder, John I.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the transfer of genetic material across species boundaries and has been a driving force in prokaryotic evolution. HGT involving eukaryotes appears to be much less frequent, and the functional implications of HGT in eukaryotes are poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that parasitic plants, because of their intimate feeding contacts with host plant tissues, are especially prone to horizontal gene acquisition. We sought evidence of HGTs in transcriptomes of three parasitic members of Orobanchaceae, a plant family containing species spanning the full spectrum of parasitic capabilities, plus the free-living Lindenbergia. Following initial phylogenetic detection and an extensive validation procedure, 52 high-confidence horizontal transfer events were detected, often from lineages of known host plants and with an increasing number of HGT events in species with the greatest parasitic dependence. Analyses of intron sequences in putative donor and recipient lineages provide evidence for integration of genomic fragments far more often than retro-processed RNA sequences. Purifying selection predominates in functionally transferred sequences, with a small fraction of adaptively evolving sites. HGT-acquired genes are preferentially expressed in the haustorium—the organ of parasitic plants—and are strongly biased in predicted gene functions, suggesting that expression products of horizontally acquired genes are contributing to the unique adaptive feeding structure of parasitic plants. PMID:27791104

  15. Plant nodulation inducers enhance horizontal gene transfer of Azorhizobium caulinodans symbiosis island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Ping; Li, Tao; Tang, Yu; Naseer, Nawar; Zheng, Huiming; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2016-11-29

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of genomic islands is a driving force of bacterial evolution. Many pathogens and symbionts use this mechanism to spread mobile genetic elements that carry genes important for interaction with their eukaryotic hosts. However, the role of the host in this process remains unclear. Here, we show that plant compounds inducing the nodulation process in the rhizobium-legume mutualistic symbiosis also enhance the transfer of symbiosis islands. We demonstrate that the symbiosis island of the Sesbania rostrata symbiont, Azorhizobium caulinodans, is an 87.6-kb integrative and conjugative element (ICE Ac ) that is able to excise, form a circular DNA, and conjugatively transfer to a specific site of gly-tRNA gene of other rhizobial genera, expanding their host range. The HGT frequency was significantly increased in the rhizosphere. An ICE Ac -located LysR-family transcriptional regulatory protein AhaR triggered the HGT process in response to plant flavonoids that induce the expression of nodulation genes through another LysR-type protein, NodD. Our study suggests that rhizobia may sense rhizosphere environments and transfer their symbiosis gene contents to other genera of rhizobia, thereby broadening rhizobial host-range specificity.

  16. GENE TRANSFER BY F′ STRAINS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI K-12 II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, James; Adelberg, Edward A.

    1963-01-01

    Pittard, James (Yale University, New Haven, Conn.) and Edward A. Adelberg. Gene transfer by F′ strains of Escherichia coli K-12. II. Interaction between F-merogenote and chromosome during transfer. J. Bacteriol. 85:1402–1408. 1963.—When F′ strains harboring the F-merogenate F14 are mated with female recipients, the transfer of the F-merogenote begins, in the majority of cases, before chromosome transfer. The markers on F14 are transferred in the sequence met-1, arg-1, ilva-16, and sex-factor, met-1 being transferred first and sex-factor being transferred last, 9 min after met-1. In the class of zygotes that have received both the F-merogenote marker met-1 and the chromosomal marker xyl or mal, the gradient of recombination frequencies for the F-merogenote markers arg-1 and ilva-16 is much steeper than in the corresponding zygotes that have not received chromosomal markers. In F′ strains which exhibit an increased frequency of transfer of chromosome markers, this gradient of recombination frequencies for merogenote markers is much steeper. An analysis of experiments involving an F′ strain with a much shorter F-merogenote, F16, and of a triparental mating in which F-merogenote and chromosome were transferred from different donor cells reveals that the effect of chromosome transfer on the recovery of distal F-merogenote markers in the zygotes is not due to any form of postzygotic elimination. It is suggested that, when F′ strains which are transferring F-merogenote begin to transfer chromosome, the latter event causes breakage of the F-merogenote. A second consequence of this interaction is a delay of 8 to 10 min in the first appearance of chromosomal markers in the zygotes. PMID:14047236

  17. AAV serotype influences gene transfer in corneal stroma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay; Tovey, Jonathan C K; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the cellular tropism and relative transduction efficiency of three AAV serotypes, AAV6, AAV8 and AAV9, for corneal gene delivery using mouse cornea in vivo and donor human cornea ex vivo. The AAV6, AAV8 and AAV9 serotypes having AAV2 plasmid encoding for alkaline phosphatase (AP) gene were generated by transfecting HEK 293 cell line with pHelper, pARAP4 and pRep/Cap plasmids. Viral vectors (10(9) vg/microl) were topically applied onto mouse cornea in vivo and human cornea ex vivo after removing the epithelium. Human corneas were processed for transgene delivery at day 5 after viral vector application. Mouse corneas were harvested at 4, 14 and 30 days after vector application for AP staining. Transduction efficiency was calculated by quantifying pixels of AP-stained area using Image J software and also confirmed by functional AP enzyme activity in the corneal lysates. Cellular toxicity of the three AAV serotypes was tested with TUNEL assay. Inflammatory response was detected by immunostaining for CD11b and F4/80. All three AAV serotypes successfully transduced mouse and human corneas. The order of transduction efficiency was AAV9 > AAV8 > AAV6. The transduction efficiency of AAV9 was 1.1-1.4 fold higher (p > 0.05) as compared to AAV8 and 3.5-5.5 fold higher (p AAV6. The level of transgene expression for all the three serotypes was greater at 14 days compared to 4 days and this high level of transgene expression was maintained up to the tested time point of 30 days. Corneas exposed to any of the three AAV serotypes did not show significant TUNEL positive cells or any inflammatory response as tested by CD11b or F4/80 staining suggesting that tested AAV serotypes do not induce cell death or inflammation and are safe for corneal gene therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Collective evolution of cyanobacteria and cyanophages mediated by horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Rogers, Tim; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    We describe a model for how antagonistic predator-prey coevolution can lead to mutualistic adaptation to an environment, as a result of horizontal gene transfer. Our model is a simple description of ecosystems such as marine cyanobacteria and their predator cyanophages, which carry photosynthesis genes. These genes evolve more rapidly in the virosphere than the bacterial pan-genome, and thus the bacterial population could potentially benefit from phage predation. By modeling both the barrier to predation and horizontal gene transfer, we study this balance between individual sacrifice and collective benefits. The outcome is an emergent mutualistic coevolution of improved photosynthesis capability, benefiting both bacteria and phage. This form of multi-level selection can contribute to niche stratification in the cyanobacteria-phage ecosystem. This work is supported in part by a cooperative agreement with NASA, Grant NNA13AA91A/A0018.

  19. [Non-viral gene transfer results in therapeutic factor IX levels in haemophilia B mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttrumpf, J; Milanov, P; Roth, S; Seifried, E; Tonn, T

    2008-10-01

    Safety issues concerning the risk of malignancy formation and immune response to viral vectors were raised in initial gene therapy trials. In contrast, non-viral gene delivery methods have long been offside. We therefore explore a non-viral gene transfer approach for the treatment of hemophilia B. First, we constructed a strong liver-specific expression plasmid for human factor IX (FIX). Next, we tested the vector by injecting two doses under hydrodynamic conditions into the tail veins of FIX knockout mice. A single injection resulted in an increase in FIX expression over 100% of normal plasma levels. The FIX resulted fully functional. Further, no anti-FIX antibodies were observed and expression levels were vector dose dependent. The high expression obtained in small animals give hope for further development of non-viral gene transfer for the treatment of hemophilia B in humans.

  20. Origin of the plant Tm-1-like gene via two independent horizontal transfer events and one gene fusion event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zefeng; Liu, Li; Fang, Huimin; Li, Pengcheng; Xu, Shuhui; Cao, Wei; Xu, Chenwu; Huang, Jinling; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) resistance gene Tm-1 encodes a direct inhibitor of ToMV RNA replication to protect tomato from infection. The plant Tm-1-like (Tm-1L) protein is predicted to contain an uncharacterized N-terminal UPF0261 domain and a C-terminal TIM-barrel signal transduction (TBST) domain. Homologous searches revealed that proteins containing both of these two domains are mainly present in charophyte green algae and land plants but absent from glaucophytes, red algae and chlorophyte green algae. Although Tm-1 homologs are widely present in bacteria, archaea and fungi, UPF0261- and TBST-domain-containing proteins are generally encoded by different genes in these linages. A co-evolution analysis also suggested a putative interaction between UPF0261- and TBST-domain-containing proteins. Phylogenetic analyses based on homologs of these two domains revealed that plants have acquired UPF0261- and TBST-domain-encoding genes through two independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events before the origin of land plants from charophytes. Subsequently, gene fusion occurred between these two horizontally acquired genes and resulted in the origin of the Tm-1L gene in streptophytes. Our results demonstrate a novel evolutionary mechanism through which the recipient organism may acquire genes with functional interaction through two different HGT events and further fuse them into one functional gene. PMID:27647002

  1. Systematic Search for Evidence of Interdomain Horizontal Gene Transfer from Prokaryotes to Oomycete Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Charley G P; Fitzpatrick, David A

    2016-01-01

    While most commonly associated with prokaryotes, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) can also have a significant influence on the evolution of microscopic eukaryotes. Systematic analysis of HGT in the genomes of the oomycetes, filamentous eukaryotic microorganisms in the Stramenopiles-Alveolates-Rhizaria (SAR) supergroup, has to date focused mainly on intradomain transfer events between oomycetes and fungi. Using systematic whole-genome analysis followed by phylogenetic reconstruction, we have investigated the extent of interdomain HGT between bacteria and plant-pathogenic oomycetes. We report five putative instances of HGT from bacteria into the oomycetes. Two transfers were found in Phytophthora species, including one unique to the cucurbit pathogen Phytophthora capsici. Two were found in Pythium species only, and the final transfer event was present in Phytopythium and Pythium species, the first reported bacterium-inherited genes in these genera. Our putative transfers included one protein that appears to be a member of the Pythium secretome, metabolic proteins, and enzymes that could potentially break down xenobiotics within the cell. Our findings complement both previous reports of bacterial genes in oomycete and SAR genomes and the growing body of evidence suggesting that interdomain transfer from prokaryotes into eukaryotes occurs more frequently than previously thought. IMPORTANCE Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the nonvertical inheritance of genetic material by transfer between different species. HGT is an important evolutionary mechanism for prokaryotes and in some cases is responsible for the spread of antibiotic resistance from resistant to benign species. Genome analysis has shown that examples of HGT are not as frequent in eukaryotes, but when they do occur they may have important evolutionary consequences. For example, the acquisition of fungal genes by an ancestral Phytophthora (plant destroyer) species is responsible for the large repertoire of

  2. Extensive horizontal transfer of core genome genes between two Lactobacillus species found in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguin Emmanuelle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While genes that are conserved between related bacterial species are usually thought to have evolved along with the species, phylogenetic trees reconstructed for individual genes may contradict this picture and indicate horizontal gene transfer. Individual trees are often not resolved with high confidence, however, and in that case alternative trees are generally not considered as contradicting the species tree, although not confirming it either. Here we conduct an in-depth analysis of 401 protein phylogenetic trees inferred with varying levels of confidence for three lactobacilli from the acidophilus complex. At present the relationship between these bacteria, isolated from environments as diverse as the gastrointestinal tract (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus johnsonii and yogurt (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, is ambiguous due to contradictory phenotypical and 16S rRNA based classifications. Results Among the 401 phylogenetic trees, those that could be reconstructed with high confidence support the 16S-rRNA tree or one alternative topology in an astonishing 3:2 ratio, while the third possible topology is practically absent. Lowering the confidence threshold for trees to be taken into consideration does not significantly affect this ratio, and therefore suggests that gene transfer may have affected as much as 40% of the core genome genes. Gene function bias suggests that the 16S rRNA phylogeny of the acidophilus complex, which indicates that L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus are the closest related of these three species, is correct. A novel approach of comparison of interspecies protein divergence data employed in this study allowed to determine that gene transfer most likely took place between the lineages of the two species found in the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion This case-study reports an unprecedented level of phylogenetic incongruence, presumably resulting from extensive

  3. Horizontally transferred fungal carotenoid genes in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae

    OpenAIRE

    Altincicek, Boran; Kovacs, Jennifer L; Gerardo, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are organic pigments commonly synthesized by plants, algae and some micro-organisms. Through absorption of light energy, carotenoids facilitate photosynthesis and provide protection against photo-oxidation. While it was presumed that all carotenoids in animals were sequestered from their diets, aphids were recently shown to harbour genomic copies of functional carotenoid biosynthesis genes that were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from fungi. Our search of available animal t...

  4. Ancient gene transfer from algae to animals: Mechanisms and evolutionary significance

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Ting; Yue Jipei; Sun Guiling; Zou Yong; Wen Jianfan; Huang Jinling

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is traditionally considered to be rare in multicellular eukaryotes such as animals. Recently, many genes of miscellaneous algal origins were discovered in choanoflagellates. Considering that choanoflagellates are the existing closest relatives of animals, we speculated that ancient HGT might have occurred in the unicellular ancestor of animals and affected the long-term evolution of animals. Results Through genome screening, phylogenetic and ...

  5. Horizontal transfer of a eukaryotic plastid-targeted protein gene to cyanobacteria

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    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal or lateral transfer of genetic material between distantly related prokaryotes has been shown to play a major role in the evolution of bacterial and archaeal genomes, but exchange of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is not as well understood. In particular, gene flow from eukaryotes to prokaryotes is rarely documented with strong support, which is unusual since prokaryotic genomes appear to readily accept foreign genes. Results Here, we show that abundant marine cyanobacteria in the related genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus acquired a key Calvin cycle/glycolytic enzyme from a eukaryote. Two non-homologous forms of fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA are characteristic of eukaryotes and prokaryotes respectively. However, a eukaryotic gene has been inserted immediately upstream of the ancestral prokaryotic gene in several strains (ecotypes of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. In one lineage this new gene has replaced the ancestral gene altogether. The eukaryotic gene is most closely related to the plastid-targeted FBA from red algae. This eukaryotic-type FBA once replaced the plastid/cyanobacterial type in photosynthetic eukaryotes, hinting at a possible functional advantage in Calvin cycle reactions. The strains that now possess this eukaryotic FBA are scattered across the tree of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, perhaps because the gene has been transferred multiple times among cyanobacteria, or more likely because it has been selectively retained only in certain lineages. Conclusion A gene for plastid-targeted FBA has been transferred from red algae to cyanobacteria, where it has inserted itself beside its non-homologous, functional analogue. Its current distribution in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus is punctate, suggesting a complex history since its introduction to this group.

  6. Development of gene transfer for induction of antigen-specific tolerance

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    Brandon K Sack

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene replacement therapies, like organ and cell transplantation, are likely to introduce neoantigens that elicit rejection via humoral and/or effector T-cell immune responses. Nonetheless, thanks to an ever-growing body of preclinical studies; it is now well accepted that gene transfer protocols can be specifically designed and optimized for induction of antigen-specific immune tolerance. One approach is to specifically express a gene in a tissue with a tolerogenic microenvironment such as the liver or thymus. Another strategy is to transfer a particular gene into hematopoietic stem cells or immunological precursor cells thus educating the immune system to recognize the therapeutic protein as “self.” In addition, expression of the therapeutic protein in protolerogenic antigen-presenting cells such as immature dendritic cells and B cells has proven to be promising. All three approaches have successfully prevented unwanted immune responses in preclinical studies aimed at the treatment of inherited protein deficiencies, e.g., lysosomal storage disorders and hemophilia, and of type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. In this review, we focus on current gene transfer protocols that induce tolerance, including gene delivery vehicles and target tissues, and discuss successes and obstacles in different disease models.

  7. Horizontal transfer of a nitrate assimilation gene cluster and ecological transitions in fungi: a phylogenetic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Slot

    Full Text Available High affinity nitrate assimilation genes in fungi occur in a cluster (fHANT-AC that can be coordinately regulated. The clustered genes include nrt2, which codes for a high affinity nitrate transporter; euknr, which codes for nitrate reductase; and NAD(PH-nir, which codes for nitrite reductase. Homologs of genes in the fHANT-AC occur in other eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but they have only been found clustered in the oomycete Phytophthora (heterokonts. We performed independent and concatenated phylogenetic analyses of homologs of all three genes in the fHANT-AC. Phylogenetic analyses limited to fungal sequences suggest that the fHANT-AC has been transferred horizontally from a basidiomycete (mushrooms and smuts to an ancestor of the ascomycetous mold Trichoderma reesei. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences from diverse eukaryotes and eubacteria, and cluster structure, are consistent with a hypothesis that the fHANT-AC was assembled in a lineage leading to the oomycetes and was subsequently transferred to the Dikarya (Ascomycota+Basidiomycota, which is a derived fungal clade that includes the vast majority of terrestrial fungi. We propose that the acquisition of high affinity nitrate assimilation contributed to the success of Dikarya on land by allowing exploitation of nitrate in aerobic soils, and the subsequent transfer of a complete assimilation cluster improved the fitness of T. reesei in a new niche. Horizontal transmission of this cluster of functionally integrated genes supports the "selfish operon" hypothesis for maintenance of gene clusters.

  8. Gene organization and sequence analyses of transfer RNA genes in Trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myler Peter J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protozoan pathogens Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi (the Tritryps are parasites that produce devastating human diseases. These organisms show very unusual mechanisms of gene expression, such as polycistronic transcription. We are interested in the study of tRNA genes, which are transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. To analyze the sequences and genomic organization of tRNA genes and other Pol III-transcribed genes, we have performed an in silico analysis of the Tritryps genome sequences. Results Our analysis indicated the presence of 83, 66 and 120 genes in L. major, T. brucei and T. cruzi, respectively. These numbers include several previously unannotated selenocysteine (Sec tRNA genes. Most tRNA genes are organized into clusters of 2 to 10 genes that may contain other Pol III-transcribed genes. The distribution of genes in the L. major genome does not seem to be totally random, like in most organisms. While the majority of the tRNA clusters do not show synteny (conservation of gene order between the Tritryps, a cluster of 13 Pol III genes that is highly syntenic was identified. We have determined consensus sequences for the putative promoter regions (Boxes A and B of the Tritryps tRNA genes, and specific changes were found in tRNA-Sec genes. Analysis of transcription termination signals of the tRNAs (clusters of Ts showed differences between T. cruzi and the other two species. We have also identified several tRNA isodecoder genes (having the same anticodon, but different sequences elsewhere in the tRNA body in the Tritryps. Conclusion A low number of tRNA genes is present in Tritryps. The overall weak synteny that they show indicates a reduced importance of genome location of Pol III genes compared to protein-coding genes. The fact that some of the differences between isodecoder genes occur in the internal promoter elements suggests that differential control of the expression of some

  9. Detection of horizontal transfer of individual genes by anomalous oligomer frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhai, Jeff; Liu, Hailan; Taton, Arnaud

    2012-06-15

    Understanding the history of life requires that we understand the transfer of genetic material across phylogenetic boundaries. Detecting genes that were acquired by means other than vertical descent is a basic step in that process. Detection by discordant phylogenies is computationally expensive and not always definitive. Many have used easily computed compositional features as an alternative procedure. However, different compositional methods produce different predictions, and the effectiveness of any method is not well established. The ability of octamer frequency comparisons to detect genes artificially seeded in cyanobacterial genomes was markedly increased by using as a training set those genes that are highly conserved over all bacteria. Using a subset of octamer frequencies in such tests also increased effectiveness, but this depended on the specific target genome and the source of the contaminating genes. The presence of high frequency octamers and the GC content of the contaminating genes were important considerations. A method comprising best practices from these tests was devised, the Core Gene Similarity (CGS) method, and it performed better than simple octamer frequency analysis, codon bias, or GC contrasts in detecting seeded genes or naturally occurring transposons. From a comparison of predictions with phylogenetic trees, it appears that the effectiveness of the method is confined to horizontal transfer events that have occurred recently in evolutionary time. The CGS method may be an improvement over existing surrogate methods to detect genes of foreign origin.

  10. The scale and evolutionary significance of horizontal gene transfer in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jipei; Sun, Guiling; Hu, Xiangyang; Huang, Jinling

    2013-10-25

    It is generally agreed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is common in phagotrophic protists. However, the overall scale of HGT and the cumulative impact of acquired genes on the evolution of these organisms remain largely unknown. Choanoflagellates are phagotrophs and the closest living relatives of animals. In this study, we performed phylogenomic analyses to investigate the scale of HGT and the evolutionary importance of horizontally acquired genes in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. Our analyses identified 405 genes that are likely derived from algae and prokaryotes, accounting for approximately 4.4% of the Monosiga nuclear genome. Many of the horizontally acquired genes identified in Monosiga were probably acquired from food sources, rather than by endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) from obsolete endosymbionts or plastids. Of 193 genes identified in our analyses with functional information, 84 (43.5%) are involved in carbohydrate or amino acid metabolism, and 45 (23.3%) are transporters and/or involved in response to oxidative, osmotic, antibiotic, or heavy metal stresses. Some identified genes may also participate in biosynthesis of important metabolites such as vitamins C and K12, porphyrins and phospholipids. Our results suggest that HGT is frequent in Monosiga brevicollis and might have contributed substantially to its adaptation and evolution. This finding also highlights the importance of HGT in the genome and organismal evolution of phagotrophic eukaryotes.

  11. Detection of horizontal transfer of individual genes by anomalous oligomer frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the history of life requires that we understand the transfer of genetic material across phylogenetic boundaries. Detecting genes that were acquired by means other than vertical descent is a basic step in that process. Detection by discordant phylogenies is computationally expensive and not always definitive. Many have used easily computed compositional features as an alternative procedure. However, different compositional methods produce different predictions, and the effectiveness of any method is not well established. Results The ability of octamer frequency comparisons to detect genes artificially seeded in cyanobacterial genomes was markedly increased by using as a training set those genes that are highly conserved over all bacteria. Using a subset of octamer frequencies in such tests also increased effectiveness, but this depended on the specific target genome and the source of the contaminating genes. The presence of high frequency octamers and the GC content of the contaminating genes were important considerations. A method comprising best practices from these tests was devised, the Core Gene Similarity (CGS) method, and it performed better than simple octamer frequency analysis, codon bias, or GC contrasts in detecting seeded genes or naturally occurring transposons. From a comparison of predictions with phylogenetic trees, it appears that the effectiveness of the method is confined to horizontal transfer events that have occurred recently in evolutionary time. Conclusions The CGS method may be an improvement over existing surrogate methods to detect genes of foreign origin. PMID:22702893

  12. Detection of horizontal transfer of individual genes by anomalous oligomer frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhai Jeff

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the history of life requires that we understand the transfer of genetic material across phylogenetic boundaries. Detecting genes that were acquired by means other than vertical descent is a basic step in that process. Detection by discordant phylogenies is computationally expensive and not always definitive. Many have used easily computed compositional features as an alternative procedure. However, different compositional methods produce different predictions, and the effectiveness of any method is not well established. Results The ability of octamer frequency comparisons to detect genes artificially seeded in cyanobacterial genomes was markedly increased by using as a training set those genes that are highly conserved over all bacteria. Using a subset of octamer frequencies in such tests also increased effectiveness, but this depended on the specific target genome and the source of the contaminating genes. The presence of high frequency octamers and the GC content of the contaminating genes were important considerations. A method comprising best practices from these tests was devised, the Core Gene Similarity (CGS method, and it performed better than simple octamer frequency analysis, codon bias, or GC contrasts in detecting seeded genes or naturally occurring transposons. From a comparison of predictions with phylogenetic trees, it appears that the effectiveness of the method is confined to horizontal transfer events that have occurred recently in evolutionary time. Conclusions The CGS method may be an improvement over existing surrogate methods to detect genes of foreign origin.

  13. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Arun

    2008-09-01

    Although the remarkable versatility and efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors in transducing a wide variety of cells and tissues in vitro, and in numerous pre-clinical animal models of human diseases in vivo, have been well established, the published literature is replete with controversies with regard to the efficacy of AAV2 vectors in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transduction. A number of factors have contributed to these controversies, the molecular bases of which have begun to come to light in recent years. With the availability of several novel serotypes (AAV1 through AAV12), rational design of AAV capsid mutants, and strategies (self-complementary vector genomes, hematopoietic cell-specific promoters), it is indeed becoming feasible to achieve efficient transduction of HSC by AAV vectors. Using a murine serial bone marrow transplantation model in vivo, we have recently documented stable integration of the proviral AAV genome into mouse chromosomes, which does not lead to any overt hematological abnormalities. Thus, a better understanding of the AAV-HSC interactions, and the availability of a vast repertoire of novel serotype and capsid mutant vectors, are likely to have significant implications in the use of AAV vectors in high-efficiency transduction of HSCs as well as in gene therapy applications involving the hematopoietic system. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer and nucleotide compositional anomaly in large DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Hiroyuki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA viruses have a wide range of genome sizes (5 kb up to 1.2 Mb, compared to 0.16 Mb to 1.5 Mb for obligate parasitic bacteria that do not correlate with their virulence or the taxonomic distribution of their hosts. The reasons for such large variation are unclear. According to the traditional view of viruses as gifted "gene pickpockets", large viral genome sizes could originate from numerous gene acquisitions from their hosts. We investigated this hypothesis by studying 67 large DNA viruses with genome sizes larger than 150 kb, including the recently characterized giant mimivirus. Given that horizontally transferred DNA often have anomalous nucleotide compositions differing from the rest of the genome, we conducted a detailed analysis of the inter- and intra-genome compositional properties of these viruses. We then interpreted their compositional heterogeneity in terms of possible causes, including strand asymmetry, gene function/expression, and horizontal transfer. Results We first show that the global nucleotide composition and nucleotide word usage of viral genomes are species-specific and distinct from those of their hosts. Next, we identified compositionally anomalous (cA genes in viral genomes, using a method based on Bayesian inference. The proportion of cA genes is highly variable across viruses and does not exhibit a significant correlation with genome size. The vast majority of the cA genes were of unknown function, lacking homologs in the databases. For genes with known homologs, we found a substantial enrichment of cA genes in specific functional classes for some of the viruses. No significant association was found between cA genes and compositional strand asymmetry. A possible exogenous origin for a small fraction of the cA genes could be confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction. Conclusion At odds with the traditional dogma, our results argue against frequent genetic transfers to large DNA viruses from their

  15. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer between human and animal commensal Escherichia coli strains identified by microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Elena; François, Patrice; Gutacker, Michaela; Gettler, Brian; Benagli, Cinzia; Convert, Maruska; Boerlin, Patrick; Schrenzel, Jacques; Piffaretti, Jean-Claude

    2008-08-01

    Bacteria exchange genetic material by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). To evaluate the impact of HGT on Escherichia coli genome plasticity, 19 commensal strains collected from the intestinal floras of humans and animals were analyzed by microarrays. Strains were hybridized against an oligoarray containing 2700 E. coli K12 chromosomal genes. A core (genes shared among compared genomes) and a flexible gene pool (genes unique for each genome) have been identified. Analysis of hybridization signals evidenced 1015 divergent genes among the 19 strains and each strain showed a specific genomic variability pattern. Four hundred and fifty-eight genes were characterized by higher rates of interstrain variation and were considered hyperdivergent. These genes are not randomly distributed onto the chromosome but are clustered in precise regions. Hyperdivergent genes belong to the flexible gene pool and show a specific GC content, differing from that of the chromosome, indicating acquisition by HGT. Among these genes, those involved in defense mechanisms and cell motility as well as intracellular trafficking and secretion were far more represented than others. The observed genome plasticity contributes to the maintenance of genetic diversity and may therefore be a source of evolutionary adaptation and survival.

  16. Operon Formation is Driven by Co-Regulation and Not by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-04-12

    Although operons are often subject to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), non-HGT genes are particularly likely to be in operons. To resolve this apparent discrepancy and to determine whether HGT is involved in operon formation, we examined the evolutionary history of the genes and operons in Escherichia coli K12. We show that genes that have homologs in distantly related bacteria but not in close relatives of E. coli (indicating HGTi) form new operons at about the same rates as native genes. Furthermore, genes in new operons are no more likely than other genes to have phylogenetic trees that are inconsistent with the species tree. In contrast, essential genes and ubiquitous genes without paralogs (genes believed to undergo HGT rarely) often form new operons. We conclude that HGT is not associated with operon formation, but instead promotes the prevalence of pre-existing operons. To explain operon formation, we propose that new operons reduce the amount of regulatory information required to specify optimal expression patterns. Consistent with this hypothesis, operons have greater amounts of conserved regulatory sequences than do individually transcribed genes.

  17. In vitro and in vivo gene transfer to pulmonary cells mediated by cationic liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Fortunati (Elisabetta); A. Bout; M.A. Zanta (Maria Antonia); D. Valerio (Dinko); M. Scarpa (Maurizio)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractCationic liposomes have been proposed as alternative to adenovirus in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease. Therefore, we have investigated the efficiency of two lipid mixtures in mediating gene transfer in in vitro and in vivo models. The cationic lipid DOTMA

  18. Generation of antigen-specific T cell immunity through T cell receptor gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccoris, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells often escape the attack of immune cells because they originate from self-tissue. Through T cell receptor gene transfer it is possible to equip peripheral T cells with a desired specificity, and this strategy may be useful to generate tumor-specific T cells for the treatment of cancer in

  19. The animal gut as a melting pot for horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shterzer, N; Mizrahi, I

    2015-09-01

    In this minireview, we examine horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and their role in the evolutionary adaptation of microorganisms to the gut environment. We explore the notion of the mammalian gut as a melting pot of genetic exchange, resulting in the large extent of HGT occurrence.

  20. Direct gene transfer in the Gottingen minipig CNS using stereotaxic lentiviral microinjections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GLUD, AN; Hedegaard, Claus; nielsen, MS

    2010-01-01

    We aim to induce direct viral mediated gene transfer in the substantia nigra (SN) of the Gottingen minipig using MRI guided stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Nine female Gottingen minipigs were injected unilaterally into the SN with 6...

  1. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Nehrke, Keith; Blaser, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria occurs in the intestinal tract of their animal hosts and facilitates both virulence and antibiotic resistance. A model in which both the pathogen and the host are genetically tractable facilitates developing insight into mechanistic processes enabling or restricting the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Here we develop an in vivo experimental system to study HGT in bacteria using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Using a thermosensitive conjugative system, we provide evidence that conjugation between two Escherichia coli strains can take place in the intestinal lumen of N2 wild-type worms at a rate of 10−3 and 10−2 per donor. We also show that C. elegans age and genotype are important determinants of the frequency of conjugation. Whereas ∼1 transconjugant for every 100 donor cells could be recovered from the intestine of N2 C. elegans, for the age-1 and tol-1 mutants, the detected rate of transconjugation (10−3 and 10−4 per donor cell, respectively) was significantly lower. This work demonstrates that increased recombination among lumenal microbial populations is a phenotype associated with host aging, and the model provides a framework to study the dynamics of bacterial horizontal gene transfer within the intestinal environment.—Portal-Celhay, C., Nehrke, K., Blaser, M. J. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria. PMID:23085995

  2. The evolution of land plants: a perspective from horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qia Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that horizontal gene transfer (HGT played a significant role in the evolution of eukaryotic lineages. We here review the mechanisms of HGT in plants and the importance of HGT in land plant evolution. In particular, we discuss the role of HGT in plant colonization of land, phototropic response, C4 photosynthesis, and mitochondrial genome evolution.

  3. Co-transfer of gfp, CHS and hptII genes into Oncidium Sharry Baby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... orchid genera includes Cymbidium (Yang et al., 1999),. Phalaenopsis (Anzai et al., 1996; Belarmino and Mii,. 2000) and Vanilla (Malabadi and Nataraja, 2007). The various orchid genera each have its own optimal transfor- mation conditions. Therefore, an effective transformation system for gene transfer ...

  4. Role of Vibrio cholerae exochitinase ChiA2 in horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Moumita; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae exochitinase ChiA2 plays a key role in acquisition of nutrients by chitin hydrolysis in the natural environment as well as in pathogenesis in the intestinal milieu. In this study we demonstrate the importance of ChiA2 in horizontal gene transfer in the natural environment. We found that the expression of ChiA2 and TfoX, the central regulator of V. cholerae horizontal gene transfer, varied with changes in environmental conditions. The activity of ChiA2 was also dependent on these conditions. In 3 different environmental conditions tested here, we observed that the supporting environmental condition for maximum expression and activity of ChiA2 was 20 °C, pH 5.5, and 100 mmol/L salinity in the presence of chitin. The same condition also induced TfoX expression and was favorable for horizontal gene transfer in V. cholerae. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that ChiA2 released a significant amount of (GlcNAc)2 from chitin hydrolysis under the favorable condition. We hypothesized that under the favorable environmental condition, ChiA2 was upregulated and maximally active to produce a significant amount of (GlcNAc)2 from chitin. The same environmental condition also induced tfoX expression, followed by its translational activation by the (GlcNAc)2 produced, leading to efficient horizontal gene transfer.

  5. Ethical perception of cross-species gene transfer in plant | Amin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plants can be genetically modified through a variety of methods in the hope that it will be improved in some way to increase the yield and quality of a crop, or to add nutritional value or shelf life. The development of genetically modified (GM) rice to enrich its nutritional value, such as Vitamin C might involve gene transfer ...

  6. An efficient marker-free vector for clean gene transfer into plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-23

    Feb 23, 2012 ... A marker-free vector, pBINMF, for clean gene transfer was constructed based on the binary vector. pBINPLUS. Vector pBINMF, carrying only a multiple cloning site (MCS) between the left and the right. T-DNA border, was suitable to directly generate marker-free transgenic plants (MFTPs) without any.

  7. Reliable transfer of transcriptional gene regulatory networks between taxonomically related organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauch Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation of gene activity is essential for any living organism. Transcription factors therefore recognize specific binding sites within the DNA to regulate the expression of particular target genes. The genome-scale reconstruction of the emerging regulatory networks is important for biotechnology and human medicine but cost-intensive, time-consuming, and impossible to perform for any species separately. By using bioinformatics methods one can partially transfer networks from well-studied model organisms to closely related species. However, the prediction quality is limited by the low level of evolutionary conservation of the transcription factor binding sites, even within organisms of the same genus. Results Here we present an integrated bioinformatics workflow that assures the reliability of transferred gene regulatory networks. Our approach combines three methods that can be applied on a large-scale: re-assessment of annotated binding sites, subsequent binding site prediction, and homology detection. A gene regulatory interaction is considered to be conserved if (1 the transcription factor, (2 the adjusted binding site, and (3 the target gene are conserved. The power of the approach is demonstrated by transferring gene regulations from the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum to the human pathogens C. diphtheriae, C. jeikeium, and the biotechnologically relevant C. efficiens. For these three organisms we identified reliable transcriptional regulations for ~40% of the common transcription factors, compared to ~5% for which knowledge was available before. Conclusion Our results suggest that trustworthy genome-scale transfer of gene regulatory networks between organisms is feasible in general but still limited by the level of evolutionary conservation.

  8. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community.

  9. Horizontal gene transfer in the innovation and adaptation of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Huang, Jinling

    2013-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been well documented in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, but its role in plants and animals remains elusive. In a recent study, we showed that at least 57 families of nuclear genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses and that HGT played a critical role in plant colonization of land. In this paper, we categorize all acquired genes based on their putative functions and biological processes, and further address the importance of HGT in plant innovation and evolution.

  10. Fluorescence reporter gene platform applicable for the detection and quantification of horizontal gene transfer in anoxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinilla Redondo, Rafael

    Background: The study of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in microbial communities has been revolutionized by advances in cultivation-independent methods based on fluorescence reporter-gene technologies. However, the use of fluorescent markers like green fluorescent protein (GFP) and m...... of the impact the pH has on their fluorescence intensities. Validation of the dual-labelling system for the study of HGT in anoxic milieus. Methods: The time-course fluorescent recovery of mCherry and GFPmut3 in vivo, as well as the effect of the extracellular pH on fluorescence was monitored through flow...

  11. Identification of a Divided Genome for VSH-1, the Prophage-Like Gene Transfer Agent of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brachyspira hyodysenteriae B204 genome sequence revealed three VSH-1 tail genes hvp31, hvp60, and hvp37, in a 3.6 kb cluster. The location and transcription direction of these genes relative to the previously described VSH-1 16.3 kb gene operon indicate that the gene transfer agent VSH-1 has a ...

  12. Source–sink plasmid transfer dynamics maintain gene mobility in soil bacterial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a fundamental process in bacterial evolution that can accelerate adaptation via the sharing of genes between lineages. Conjugative plasmids are the principal genetic elements mediating the horizontal transfer of genes, both within and between bacterial species. In some species, plasmids are unstable and likely to be lost through purifying selection, but when alternative hosts are available, interspecific plasmid transfer could counteract this and maintain access to plasmid-borne genes. To investigate the evolutionary importance of alternative hosts to plasmid population dynamics in an ecologically relevant environment, we established simple soil microcosm communities comprising two species of common soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and a mercury resistance (HgR) plasmid, pQBR57, both with and without positive selection [i.e., addition of Hg(II)]. In single-species populations, plasmid stability varied between species: although pQBR57 survived both with and without positive selection in P. fluorescens, it was lost or replaced by nontransferable HgR captured to the chromosome in P. putida. A simple mathematical model suggests these differences were likely due to pQBR57’s lower intraspecific conjugation rate in P. putida. By contrast, in two-species communities, both models and experiments show that interspecific conjugation from P. fluorescens allowed pQBR57 to persist in P. putida via source–sink transfer dynamics. Moreover, the replacement of pQBR57 by nontransferable chromosomal HgR in P. putida was slowed in coculture. Interspecific transfer allows plasmid survival in host species unable to sustain the plasmid in monoculture, promoting community-wide access to the plasmid-borne accessory gene pool and thus potentiating future evolvability. PMID:27385827

  13. Targeting a newly established spontaneous feline fibrosarcoma cell line by gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rounak Nande

    Full Text Available Fibrosarcoma is a deadly disease in cats and is significantly more often located at classical vaccine injections sites. More rare forms of spontaneous non-vaccination site (NSV fibrosarcomas have been described and have been found associated to genetic alterations. Purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of adenoviral gene transfer in NVS fibrosarcoma. We isolated and characterized a NVS fibrosarcoma cell line (Cocca-6A from a spontaneous fibrosarcoma that occurred in a domestic calico cat. The feline cells were karyotyped and their chromosome number was counted using a Giemsa staining. Adenoviral gene transfer was verified by western blot analysis. Flow cytometry assay and Annexin-V were used to study cell-cycle changes and cell death of transduced cells. Cocca-6A fibrosarcoma cells were morphologically and cytogenetically characterized. Giemsa block staining of metaphase spreads of the Cocca-6A cells showed deletion of one of the E1 chromosomes, where feline p53 maps. Semi-quantitative PCR demonstrated reduction of p53 genomic DNA in the Cocca-6A cells. Adenoviral gene transfer determined a remarkable effect on the viability and growth of the Cocca-6A cells following single transduction with adenoviruses carrying Mda-7/IL-24 or IFN-γ or various combination of RB/p105, Ras-DN, IFN-γ, and Mda-7 gene transfer. Therapy for feline fibrosarcomas is often insufficient for long lasting tumor eradication. More gene transfer studies should be conducted in order to understand if these viral vectors could be applicable regardless the origin (spontaneous vs. vaccine induced of feline fibrosarcomas.

  14. Targeting a Newly Established Spontaneous Feline Fibrosarcoma Cell Line by Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nande, Rounak; De Carlo, Flavia; Carper, Miranda; Claudio, Charlene D.; Denvir, Jim; Valluri, Jagan; Duncan, Gary C.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a deadly disease in cats and is significantly more often located at classical vaccine injections sites. More rare forms of spontaneous non-vaccination site (NSV) fibrosarcomas have been described and have been found associated to genetic alterations. Purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of adenoviral gene transfer in NVS fibrosarcoma. We isolated and characterized a NVS fibrosarcoma cell line (Cocca-6A) from a spontaneous fibrosarcoma that occurred in a domestic calico cat. The feline cells were karyotyped and their chromosome number was counted using a Giemsa staining. Adenoviral gene transfer was verified by western blot analysis. Flow cytometry assay and Annexin-V were used to study cell-cycle changes and cell death of transduced cells. Cocca-6A fibrosarcoma cells were morphologically and cytogenetically characterized. Giemsa block staining of metaphase spreads of the Cocca-6A cells showed deletion of one of the E1 chromosomes, where feline p53 maps. Semi-quantitative PCR demonstrated reduction of p53 genomic DNA in the Cocca-6A cells. Adenoviral gene transfer determined a remarkable effect on the viability and growth of the Cocca-6A cells following single transduction with adenoviruses carrying Mda-7/IL-24 or IFN-γ or various combination of RB/p105, Ras-DN, IFN-γ, and Mda-7 gene transfer. Therapy for feline fibrosarcomas is often insufficient for long lasting tumor eradication. More gene transfer studies should be conducted in order to understand if these viral vectors could be applicable regardless the origin (spontaneous vs. vaccine induced) of feline fibrosarcomas. PMID:22666387

  15. Biofilm-Forming ClinicalStaphylococcusIsolates Harbor Horizontal Transfer and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águila-Arcos, Sandra; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Itxaso; Garaiyurrebaso, Olatz; Garbisu, Carlos; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    Infections caused by staphylococci represent a medical concern, especially when related to biofilms located in implanted medical devices, such as prostheses and catheters. Unfortunately, their frequent resistance to high doses of antibiotics makes the treatment of these infections a difficult task. Moreover, biofilms represent a hot spot for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) by bacterial conjugation. In this work, 25 biofilm-forming clinical staphylococcal isolates were studied. We found that Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates showed a higher biofilm-forming capacity than Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Additionally, horizontal transfer and relaxase genes of two common staphylococcal plasmids, pSK41 and pT181, were detected in all isolates. In terms of antibiotic resistance genes, aac6-aph2a, ermC , and tetK genes, which confer resistance to gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline, respectively, were the most prevalent. The horizontal transfer and antibiotic resistance genes harbored on these staphylococcal clinical strains isolated from biofilms located in implanted medical devices points to the potential risk of the development and dissemination of multiresistant bacteria.

  16. Intensive Pharmacological Immunosuppression Allows for Repetitive Liver Gene Transfer With Recombinant Adenovirus in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector–mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell–mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector. PMID:20087317

  17. In vivo gene transfer into choroidal neovascularization by the HVJ liposome method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, T; Ogata, N; Takahashi, K; Matsushima, M; Uyama, M; Kaneda, Y

    2000-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the HVJ liposome method for gene transfer in rats with experimentally induced choroidal neovascularization. Plasmid DNA containing the LacZ reporter gene, or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled double-stranded phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (S-ODNs), was encapsulated in liposomes. The liposomes were coated with the envelope of inactivated hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). Intense laser burns were applied to the posterior pole of the retina of pigmented rats to induce choroidal neovascularization. Following photocoagulation, HVJ liposome suspension was injected into the vitreous. On days 3, 7, 14, and 28 after injection, the eyes were removed and fixed. The eyes injected with LacZ gene were reacted with X-gal, frozen, and cut into thin sections. The sections were examined for the expression of the LacZ gene by light microscopy. The enucleated eyes injected with double-stranded S-ODNs were frozen, cut into thin sections, and examined a confocal scanning laser microscope for FITC labeling. Eyes without injection of HVJ liposomes served as controls. Expression of LacZ genes (beta-galactosidase activity), or localization of FITC labeling, was observed mainly in the laser-induced choroidal neovascular tissue from 3 to 28 days after the intravitreal injection of HVJ liposome. We conclude that the HVJ liposome method achieved effective gene transfer into choroidal neovascular tissue. Thus, this method can be used as a nonviral gene therapy system for the treatment of choroidal neovascularization in vivo.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer: essentiality and evolvability in prokaryotes, and roles in evolutionary transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread of gene exchange and loss in the prokaryotic world has prompted the concept of ‘lateral genomics’ to the point of an outright denial of the relevance of phylogenetic trees for evolution. However, the pronounced coherence congruence of the topologies of numerous gene trees, particularly those for (nearly) universal genes, translates into the notion of a statistical tree of life (STOL), which reflects a central trend of vertical evolution. The STOL can be employed as a framework for reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in the prokaryotic world. Quantitatively, however, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) dominates microbial evolution, with the rate of gene gain and loss being comparable to the rate of point mutations and much greater than the duplication rate. Theoretical models of evolution suggest that HGT is essential for the survival of microbial populations that otherwise deteriorate due to the Muller’s ratchet effect. Apparently, at least some bacteria and archaea evolved dedicated vehicles for gene transfer that evolved from selfish elements such as plasmids and viruses. Recent phylogenomic analyses suggest that episodes of massive HGT were pivotal for the emergence of major groups of organisms such as multiple archaeal phyla as well as eukaryotes. Similar analyses appear to indicate that, in addition to donating hundreds of genes to the emerging eukaryotic lineage, mitochondrial endosymbiosis severely curtailed HGT. These results shed new light on the routes of evolutionary transitions, but caution is due given the inherent uncertainty of deep phylogenies. PMID:27508073

  19. Horizontal gene transfer: essentiality and evolvability in prokaryotes, and roles in evolutionary transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread of gene exchange and loss in the prokaryotic world has prompted the concept of 'lateral genomics' to the point of an outright denial of the relevance of phylogenetic trees for evolution. However, the pronounced coherence congruence of the topologies of numerous gene trees, particularly those for (nearly) universal genes, translates into the notion of a statistical tree of life (STOL), which reflects a central trend of vertical evolution. The STOL can be employed as a framework for reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in the prokaryotic world. Quantitatively, however, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) dominates microbial evolution, with the rate of gene gain and loss being comparable to the rate of point mutations and much greater than the duplication rate. Theoretical models of evolution suggest that HGT is essential for the survival of microbial populations that otherwise deteriorate due to the Muller's ratchet effect. Apparently, at least some bacteria and archaea evolved dedicated vehicles for gene transfer that evolved from selfish elements such as plasmids and viruses. Recent phylogenomic analyses suggest that episodes of massive HGT were pivotal for the emergence of major groups of organisms such as multiple archaeal phyla as well as eukaryotes. Similar analyses appear to indicate that, in addition to donating hundreds of genes to the emerging eukaryotic lineage, mitochondrial endosymbiosis severely curtailed HGT. These results shed new light on the routes of evolutionary transitions, but caution is due given the inherent uncertainty of deep phylogenies.

  20. Pyrosequencing of antibiotic-contaminated river sediments reveals high levels of resistance and gene transfer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansson, Erik; Fick, Jerker; Janzon, Anders; Grabic, Roman; Rutgersson, Carolin; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Söderström, Hanna; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2011-02-16

    The high and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics has accelerated the development of antibiotic resistance, creating a major challenge for the sustainable treatment of infections world-wide. Bacterial communities often respond to antibiotic selection pressure by acquiring resistance genes, i.e. mobile genetic elements that can be shared horizontally between species. Environmental microbial communities maintain diverse collections of resistance genes, which can be mobilized into pathogenic bacteria. Recently, exceptional environmental releases of antibiotics have been documented, but the effects on the promotion of resistance genes and the potential for horizontal gene transfer have yet received limited attention. In this study, we have used culture-independent shotgun metagenomics to investigate microbial communities in river sediments exposed to waste water from the production of antibiotics in India. Our analysis identified very high levels of several classes of resistance genes as well as elements for horizontal gene transfer, including integrons, transposons and plasmids. In addition, two abundant previously uncharacterized resistance plasmids were identified. The results suggest that antibiotic contamination plays a role in the promotion of resistance genes and their mobilization from environmental microbes to other species and eventually to human pathogens. The entire life-cycle of antibiotic substances, both before, under and after usage, should therefore be considered to fully evaluate their role in the promotion of resistance.

  1. Phylogenetic evidence for lateral gene transfer in the intestine of marine iguanas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Nelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lateral gene transfer (LGT appears to promote genotypic and phenotypic variation in microbial communities in a range of environments, including the mammalian intestine. However, the extent and mechanisms of LGT in intestinal microbial communities of non-mammalian hosts remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two fosmid inserts obtained from a genomic DNA library derived from an agar-degrading enrichment culture of marine iguana fecal material. The inserts harbored 16S rRNA genes that place the organism from which they originated within Clostridium cluster IV, a well documented group that habitats the mammalian intestinal tract. However, sequence analysis indicates that 52% of the protein-coding genes on the fosmids have top BLASTX hits to bacterial species that are not members of Clostridium cluster IV, and phylogenetic analysis suggests that at least 10 of 44 coding genes on the fosmids may have been transferred from Clostridium cluster XIVa to cluster IV. The fosmids encoded four transposase-encoding genes and an integrase-encoding gene, suggesting their involvement in LGT. In addition, several coding genes likely involved in sugar transport were probably acquired through LGT. CONCLUSION: Our phylogenetic evidence suggests that LGT may be common among phylogenetically distinct members of the phylum Firmicutes inhabiting the intestinal tract of marine iguanas.

  2. Efficient gene transfer into neurons in monkey brain by adeno-associated virus 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamizu, Yoshito; Okada, Takashi; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yuasa, Shigeki; Nakahara, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-21

    Although the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector is a promising tool for gene transfer into neurons, especially for therapeutic purposes, neurotropism in primate brains is not fully elucidated for specific AAV serotypes. Here, we injected AAV serotype 8 (AAV8) vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene under a ubiquitous promoter into the cerebral cortex, striatum and substantia nigra of common marmosets. Robust neuronal EGFP expression was observed at all injected sites. Cell typing with immunohistochemistry confirmed efficient AAV8-mediated gene transfer into the pyramidal neurons in the cortex, calbindin-positive medium spiny neurons in the striatum and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The results indicate a preferential tropism of AAV8 for subsets of neurons, but not for glia, in monkey brains.

  3. First study of sperm mediated gene transfer in Egyptian river buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Hassanane

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to find the best treatments for enhancing the ration of insertion of a desired gene construct (pEGFP-N1 onto the sperm of buffalo as the first step for the production of transgenic buffalo using sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT. The tested conditions were plasmid DNA concentration, sperm concentration, transfecting agent concentration: Dimethyle sulphoxide (DMSO and time of transfection. The study proved that the best conditions for producing transgenic embryos were incubation sperm solution its concentration is 107/ml sperm with 3% DMSO: with 20 µg/ml from the linarized DNA, for 15 min at 4 °C are the best conditions to produce transgenic buffalo embryo using sperm mediated gene transfer.

  4. Parallel Evolution and Horizontal Gene Transfer of the pst Operon in Firmicutes from Oligotrophic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moreno-Letelier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The high affinity phosphate transport system (pst is crucial for phosphate uptake in oligotrophic environments. Cuatro Cienegas Basin (CCB has extremely low P levels and its endemic Bacillus are closely related to oligotrophic marine Firmicutes. Thus, we expected the pst operon of CCB to share the same evolutionary history and protein similarity to marine Firmicutes. Orthologs of the pst operon were searched in 55 genomes of Firmicutes and 13 outgroups. Phylogenetic reconstructions were performed for the pst operon and 14 concatenated housekeeping genes using maximum likelihood methods. Conserved domains and 3D structures of the phosphate-binding protein (PstS were also analyzed. The pst operon of Firmicutes shows two highly divergent clades with no correlation to the type of habitat nor a phylogenetic congruence, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Despite sequence divergence, the PstS protein had a similar 3D structure, which could be due to parallel evolution after horizontal gene transfer events.

  5. Ancient gene transfer from algae to animals: Mechanisms and evolutionary significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ting

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is traditionally considered to be rare in multicellular eukaryotes such as animals. Recently, many genes of miscellaneous algal origins were discovered in choanoflagellates. Considering that choanoflagellates are the existing closest relatives of animals, we speculated that ancient HGT might have occurred in the unicellular ancestor of animals and affected the long-term evolution of animals. Results Through genome screening, phylogenetic and domain analyses, we identified 14 gene families, including 92 genes, in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis that are likely derived from miscellaneous photosynthetic eukaryotes. Almost all of these gene families are distributed in diverse animals, suggesting that they were mostly acquired by the common ancestor of animals. Their miscellaneous origins also suggest that these genes are not derived from a particular algal endosymbiont. In addition, most genes identified in our analyses are functionally related to molecule transport, cellular regulation and methylation signaling, suggesting that the acquisition of these genes might have facilitated the intercellular communication in the ancestral animal. Conclusions Our findings provide additional evidence that algal genes in aplastidic eukaryotes are not exclusively derived from historical plastids and thus important for interpreting the evolution of eukaryotic photosynthesis. Most importantly, our data represent the first evidence that more anciently acquired genes might exist in animals and that ancient HGT events have played an important role in animal evolution.

  6. Ancient gene transfer from algae to animals: Mechanisms and evolutionary significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is traditionally considered to be rare in multicellular eukaryotes such as animals. Recently, many genes of miscellaneous algal origins were discovered in choanoflagellates. Considering that choanoflagellates are the existing closest relatives of animals, we speculated that ancient HGT might have occurred in the unicellular ancestor of animals and affected the long-term evolution of animals. Results Through genome screening, phylogenetic and domain analyses, we identified 14 gene families, including 92 genes, in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis that are likely derived from miscellaneous photosynthetic eukaryotes. Almost all of these gene families are distributed in diverse animals, suggesting that they were mostly acquired by the common ancestor of animals. Their miscellaneous origins also suggest that these genes are not derived from a particular algal endosymbiont. In addition, most genes identified in our analyses are functionally related to molecule transport, cellular regulation and methylation signaling, suggesting that the acquisition of these genes might have facilitated the intercellular communication in the ancestral animal. Conclusions Our findings provide additional evidence that algal genes in aplastidic eukaryotes are not exclusively derived from historical plastids and thus important for interpreting the evolution of eukaryotic photosynthesis. Most importantly, our data represent the first evidence that more anciently acquired genes might exist in animals and that ancient HGT events have played an important role in animal evolution. PMID:22690978

  7. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  8. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qizhi; Wang, Yunzhi; Lin, Fan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yan; Ge, Ruowen; Hong, Yunhan

    2015-01-01

    Retrovirus (RV) is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM) to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT) via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES) cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  9. "Is a cure in my sight?" Multi-stakeholder perspectives on phase I choroideremia gene transfer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminy, Shelly; Macdonald, Ian; Bubela, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Ocular gene transfer clinical trials are raising patient hopes for the treatment of choroideremia--a blinding degenerative retinopathy. Phase I choroideremia gene transfer trials necessitate communicating about the risks of harm and potential benefits with patients while avoiding the sensationalism that has historically undermined this field of translational medicine. We conducted interviews between June 2011 and June 2012 with 6 choroideremia patient advocates, 20 patients, and 15 clinicians about their hopes for benefits, perceived risks of harm, and hopes for the time frame of clinical implementation of choroideremia gene transfer. Despite the safety focus of phase I trials, participants hoped for direct visual benefits with evident discrepancies between stakeholder perspectives about the degree of visual benefit. Clinicians and patient advocates were concerned by limited patient attention to risks of harm. Interviews revealed confusion about the time frames for the clinical implementation of choroideremia gene transfer and patient urgency to access gene transfer within a limited therapeutic window. Differences in stakeholder perspectives about choroideremia gene transfer necessitate strategies that promote responsible communications about choroideremia gene transfer and aid in its translation. Strategies should counter historical sensationalism associated with gene transfer, promote informed consent, and honor patient hope while grounding communications in current clinical realities.

  10. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  11. Intraspecies Transfer of the Chromosomal Acinetobacter baumannii blaNDM-1 Carbapenemase Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Thomas; Wibberg, Daniel; Maus, Irena; Winkler, Anika; Bontron, Séverine; Sczyrba, Alexander; Nordmann, Patrice; Pühler, Alfred; Poirel, Laurent; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The species Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important multidrug-resistant human pathogens. To determine its virulence and antibiotic resistance determinants, the genome of the nosocomial blaNDM-1-positive A. baumannii strain R2090 originating from Egypt was completely sequenced. Genome analysis revealed that strain R2090 is highly related to the community-acquired Australian A. baumannii strain D1279779. The two strains belong to sequence type 267 (ST267). Isolate R2090 harbored the chromosomally integrated transposon Tn125 carrying the carbapenemase gene blaNDM-1 that is not present in the D1279779 genome. To test the transferability of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene region, the clinical isolate R2090 was mated with the susceptible A. baumannii recipient CIP 70.10, and the carbapenem-resistant derivative R2091 was obtained. Genome sequencing of the R2091 derivative revealed that it had received an approximately 66-kb region comprising the transposon Tn125 embedding the blaNDM-1 gene. This region had integrated into the chromosome of the recipient strain CIP 70.10. From the four known mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer (conjugation, outer membrane vesicle-mediated transfer, transformation, and transduction), conjugation could be ruled out, since strain R2090 lacks any plasmid, and a type IV secretion system is not encoded in its chromosome. However, strain R2090 possesses three putative prophages, two of which were predicted to be complete and therefore functional. Accordingly, it was supposed that the transfer of the resistance gene region from the clinical isolate R2090 to the recipient occurred by general transduction facilitated by one of the prophages present in the R2090 genome. Hence, phage-mediated transduction has to be taken into account for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes within the species A. baumannii. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Low cytotoxicity effect of dendrosome as an efficient carrier for rotavirus VP2 gene transferring into a human lung cell line : dendrosome, as a novel intranasally gene porter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Ahmadian, Shahin; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi; Massumi, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of dendrosome (a gene porter) was assessed in transferring recombinant human rotavirus VP2 cDNA into A549, a human lung cell line. After gene transferring, transmission electron microscopy showed core-like particles (CLPs) formation in the transfected cells both with dendrosome and lipofectamine porters. In addition, western blotting analysis showed that the expression of VP2 gene was almost equal in the dendrosome and lipofectamine-transfected cells. Also, the cytotoxicity studies revealed that dendrosome had a lower cytotoxicity than lipofectamine. Therefore, our study may introduce dendrosome as a possible carrier for gene transferring into the human lung cell line, especially, for intranasally administration of DNA vaccines.

  13. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  14. CRISPR-Cas-Mediated Phage Resistance Enhances Horizontal Gene Transfer by Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Bridget N J; Staals, Raymond H J; Fineran, Peter C

    2018-02-13

    A powerful contributor to prokaryotic evolution is horizontal gene transfer (HGT) through transformation, conjugation, and transduction, which can be advantageous, neutral, or detrimental to fitness. Bacteria and archaea control HGT and phage infection through CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) adaptive immunity. Although the benefits of resisting phage infection are evident, this can come at a cost of inhibiting the acquisition of other beneficial genes through HGT. Despite the ability of CRISPR-Cas to limit HGT through conjugation and transformation, its role in transduction is largely overlooked. Transduction is the phage-mediated transfer of bacterial DNA between cells and arguably has the greatest impact on HGT. We demonstrate that in Pectobacterium atrosepticum , CRISPR-Cas can inhibit the transduction of plasmids and chromosomal loci. In addition, we detected phage-mediated transfer of a large plant pathogenicity genomic island and show that CRISPR-Cas can inhibit its transduction. Despite these inhibitory effects of CRISPR-Cas on transduction, its more common role in phage resistance promotes rather than diminishes HGT via transduction by protecting bacteria from phage infection. This protective effect can also increase transduction of phage-sensitive members of mixed populations. CRISPR-Cas systems themselves display evidence of HGT, but little is known about their lateral dissemination between bacteria and whether transduction can contribute. We show that, through transduction, bacteria can acquire an entire chromosomal CRISPR-Cas system, including cas genes and phage-targeting spacers. We propose that the positive effect of CRISPR-Cas phage immunity on enhancing transduction surpasses the rarer cases where gene flow by transduction is restricted. IMPORTANCE The generation of genetic diversity through acquisition of DNA is a powerful contributor to microbial evolution and occurs through

  15. Transcriptional regulation of pWW0 transfer genes in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.M.; Molin, Søren; Kroer, N.

    2004-01-01

    The conjugative IncP-9 plasmid pWW0 (TOL) carries transfer genes, many of whose functions can be predicted from sequence similarities to the well-studied IncW and IncP-1 plasmids, and that are clustered with the replication and maintenance genes of the plasmid core. In this study we show...... that the IncP-9 transfer genes are transcribed from at least three promoter regions. The promoters for traA and traD act divergently from the region found to encode the origin of transfer, oriT. These promoters regulate expression of traA, B, and perhaps traC in one direction and traD in the other, all...... are, as in pWWO, transcribed divergently from an operon for replication and/or stable inheritance functions, MpfR is not related to the known regulatory proteins of these other transfer systems outside those of the IncP-9 family and indeed the regulators tend to be specific for each plasmid family...

  16. Systemic protein delivery by muscle-gene transfer is limited by a local immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Schlachterman, Alexander; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2005-06-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been successfully used for therapeutic expression of systemic transgene products (such as factor IX or erythropoietin) following in vivo administration to skeletal muscle of animal models of inherited hematologic disorders. However, an immune response may be initiated if the transgene product represents a neoantigen. Here, we use ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and demonstrate immune-mediated elimination of expression on muscle-directed AAV-2 gene transfer. Administration to immune competent mice resulted in transient systemic OVA expression. Within 10 days, OVA-specific T-helper cells had been activated in draining lymph nodes, an inflammatory immune response ensued, and OVA-expressing muscle fibers were destroyed by a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response. Use of a muscle-specific promoter did not prevent this immune response. Adoptively transferred CD4(+) cells transgenic for a T-cell receptor specific to OVA peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II showed antigen-specific, vector dose-dependent proliferation confined to the draining lymph nodes of AAV-OVA-transduced muscle within 5 days after gene transfer and subsequently participated in lymphocytic infiltration of transduced muscle. This study documents that a local immune response limits sustained expression of a secreted protein in muscle gene transfer, a finding that may have consequences for design of clinical protocols.

  17. [AAV vector-mediated gene transfer and its application to the nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2003-11-01

    AAV vectors are considered to be promising gene-delivery vehicles for gene therapy, because they are derived from non-pathogenic virus, efficiently transduce non-dividing cells, and cause long-term gene expression. Appropriate AAV serotypes are utilized depending on the type of target cells; e.g., neurons are efficiently transduced with AAV2 and AAV5 vectors, and an AAV1 vector is most suitable for muscles. Among various neurological disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most appropriate candidates of gene therapy. PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that predominantly affects dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There are two major approaches to gene therapy of PD; i.e., 1) intrastriatal expression of dopamine (DA)-synthesizing enzyme genes, and 2) neuroprotection using the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene to prevent the disease progression. As for the initial step of clinical application, AADC (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase; the enzyme converting L-DOPA to DA) gene transfer in combination with oral administration of L-DOPA would be appropriate, since DA production can be regulated by the dose of L-DOPA. Preclinical studies are being conducted in MPTP-parkinsonian monkeys. AAV vector-mediated gene therapy would be feasible as a novel treatment of PD in the near future.

  18. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  19. Evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer from the draft genome of a tardigrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Thomas C; Tenlen, Jennifer R; Smith, Frank W; Wang, Jeremy R; Patanella, Kiera A; Nishimura, Erin Osborne; Tintori, Sophia C; Li, Qing; Jones, Corbin D; Yandell, Mark; Messina, David N; Glasscock, Jarret; Goldstein, Bob

    2015-12-29

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the transfer of genes between species, has been recognized recently as more pervasive than previously suspected. Here, we report evidence for an unprecedented degree of HGT into an animal genome, based on a draft genome of a tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. Tardigrades are microscopic eight-legged animals that are famous for their ability to survive extreme conditions. Genome sequencing, direct confirmation of physical linkage, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that a large fraction of the H. dujardini genome is derived from diverse bacteria as well as plants, fungi, and Archaea. We estimate that approximately one-sixth of tardigrade genes entered by HGT, nearly double the fraction found in the most extreme cases of HGT into animals known to date. Foreign genes have supplemented, expanded, and even replaced some metazoan gene families within the tardigrade genome. Our results demonstrate that an unexpectedly large fraction of an animal genome can be derived from foreign sources. We speculate that animals that can survive extremes may be particularly prone to acquiring foreign genes.

  20. Phylogenomics of the archaeal flagellum: rare horizontal gene transfer in a unique motility structure

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    Brochier-Armanet Celine

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As bacteria, motile archaeal species swim by means of rotating flagellum structures driven by a proton gradient force. Interestingly, experimental data have shown that the archaeal flagellum is non-homologous to the bacterial flagellum either in terms of overall structure, components and assembly. The growing number of complete archaeal genomes now permits to investigate the evolution of this unique motility system. Results We report here an exhaustive phylogenomic analysis of the components of the archaeal flagellum. In all complete archaeal genomes, the genes coding for flagellum components are co-localized in one or two well-conserved genomic clusters showing two different types of organizations. Despite their small size, these genes harbor a good phylogenetic signal that allows reconstruction of their evolutionary histories. These support a history of mainly vertical inheritance for the components of this unique motility system, and an interesting possible ancient horizontal gene transfer event (HGT of a whole flagellum-coding gene cluster between Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. Conclusion Our study is one of the few exhaustive phylogenomics analyses of a non-informational cell machinery from the third domain of life. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the evolution of the components of the archaeal flagellum. Moreover, we show that the components of the archaeal flagellar system have not been frequently transferred among archaeal species, indicating that gene fixation following HGT can also be rare for genes encoding components of large macromolecular complexes with a structural role.

  1. Gene transfer of arginine kinase to skeletal muscle using adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, S C; Bish, L T; Ye, F; Spinazzola, J; Baligand, C; Plant, D; Vandenborne, K; Barton, E R; Sweeney, H L; Walter, G A

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we tested the feasibility of non-invasively measuring phosphoarginine (PArg) after gene delivery of arginine kinase (AK) using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to murine hindlimbs. This was achieved by evaluating the time course, regional distribution and metabolic flux of PArg using (31)phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). AK gene was injected into the gastrocnemius of the left hindlimb of C57Bl10 mice (age 5 weeks, male) using self-complementary AAV, type 2/8 with desmin promoter. Non-localized (31)P-MRS data were acquired over 9 months after injection using 11.1-T and 17.6-T Bruker Avance spectrometers. In addition, (31)P two-dimensional chemical shift imaging and saturation transfer experiments were performed to examine the spatial distribution and metabolic flux of PArg, respectively. PArg was evident in each injected mouse hindlimb after gene delivery, increased until 28 weeks, and remained elevated for at least 9 months (P<0.05). Furthermore, PArg was primarily localized to the injected posterior hindimb region and the metabolite was in exchange with ATP. Overall, the results show the viability of AAV gene transfer of AK gene to skeletal muscle, and provide support of PArg as a reporter that can be used to non-invasively monitor the transduction of genes for therapeutic interventions.

  2. Horizontal gene transfer regulation in bacteria as a "spandrel" of DNA repair mechanisms.

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    Saliou Fall

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as the major force for bacterial genome evolution. Yet, numerous questions remain about the transferred genes, their function, quantity and frequency. The extent to which genetic transformation by exogenous DNA has occurred over evolutionary time was initially addressed by an in silico approach using the complete genome sequence of the Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 strain. Methods based on phylogenetic reconstruction of prokaryote homologous genes families detected 151 genes (13.3% of foreign origin in the R. solanacearum genome and tentatively identified their bacterial origin. These putative transfers were analyzed in comparison to experimental transformation tests involving 18 different genomic DNA positions in the genome as sites for homologous or homeologous recombination. Significant transformation frequency differences were observed among these positions tested regardless of the overall genomic divergence of the R. solanacearum strains tested as recipients. The genomic positions containing the putative exogenous DNA were not systematically transformed at the highest frequencies. The two genomic "hot spots", which contain recA and mutS genes, exhibited transformation frequencies from 2 to more than 4 orders of magnitude higher than positions associated with other genes depending on the recipient strain. These results support the notion that the bacterial cell is equipped with active mechanisms to modulate acquisition of new DNA in different genomic positions. Bio-informatics study correlated recombination "hot-spots" to the presence of Chi-like signature sequences with which recombination might be preferentially initiated. The fundamental role of HGT is certainly not limited to the critical impact that the very rare foreign genes acquired mainly by chance can have on the bacterial adaptation potential. The frequency to which HGT with homologous and homeologous DNA happens in the environment

  3. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer of SOX trio to enhance chondrogenesis in adipose stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, G-I; Kim, H-J

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if the electroporation-mediated gene transfer of SOX trio enhances the chondrogenic potential of adipose stem cells (ASCs). ASCs were transfected with SOX trio genes using an electroporation technique and cultured for 3 weeks. The pellets were analyzed for DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis, and the gene and protein expression of SOX-5, SOX-6, SOX-9, type 1 collagen (COL1Al), type 2 collagen (COL2Al) and type 10 collagen (COL10A1) using real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Further in vivo studies were carried out by subcutaneous transplantation of pellets in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice for 3 weeks. The gene transfer efficiency was high (approximately 70%). Transfected ASCs showed high expression of corresponding genes after 21 days, and each SOX protein was detected in ASCs transfected with the corresponding gene. The chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs, as demonstrated by GAG levels and Safranin-O staining, showed significant enhancement when SOX trio were co-transfected, while subsets with single gene transfer of SOX-5, -6, or -9 did not show significant elevation. SOX trio co-transfection enhanced COL2A1 mRNA, but did not increase COL1A1 and COL10A1 mRNA. Type II collagen protein dramatically increased, and type X collagen decreased with co-transfection of the SOX trio. When pellets were implanted in the subcutaneous pouch of SCID mice for 3 weeks, ASCs co-transfected with SOX trio demonstrated abundant proteoglycan, significantly reduced mineralization. The electroporation-mediated transfection of SOX trio greatly enhances chondrogenesis from ASCs, while decreasing hypertrophy. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  5. Differential effects of dystrophin and utrophin gene transfer in immunocompetent muscular dystrophy (mdx) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, S; Guibinga, G H; Gilbert, R; Nalbantoglu, J; Massie, B; Karpati, G; Petrof, B J

    2000-09-08

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by defects in the gene encoding dystrophin. Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein, which together with its associated protein complex, helps to protect the sarcolemma from mechanical stresses associated with muscle contraction. Gene therapy efforts aimed at supplying a normal dystrophin gene to DMD muscles could be hampered by host immune system recognition of dystrophin as a "foreign" protein. In contrast, a closely related protein called utrophin is not foreign to DMD patients and is able to compensate for dystrophin deficiency when overexpressed throughout development in transgenic mice. However, the issue of which of the two candidate molecules is superior for DMD therapy has remained an open question. In this study, dystrophin and utrophin gene transfer effects on dystrophic muscle function were directly compared in the murine (mdx) model of DMD using E1/E3-deleted adenovirus vectors containing either a dystrophin (AdV-Dys) or a utrophin (AdV-Utr) transgene. In immunologically immature neonatal animals, AdV-Dys and AdV-Utr improved tibialis anterior muscle histopathology, force-generating capacity, and the ability to resist injury caused by high-stress contractions to an equivalent degree. By contrast, only AdV-Utr was able to achieve significant improvement in force generation and the ability to resist stress-induced injury in the soleus muscle of immunocompetent mature mdx animals. In addition, in mature mdx mice, there was significantly greater transgene persistence and reduced inflammation with utrophin compared to dystrophin gene transfer. We conclude that dystrophin and utrophin are largely equivalent in their intrinsic abilities to prevent the development of muscle necrosis and weakness when expressed in neonatal mdx animals with an immature immune system. However, because immunity against dystrophin places an important limitation on the efficacy of dystrophin gene replacement in an

  6. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) can reduce ethylene levels in plants through 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, which cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia, resulting in reduced ethylene production. The whole genome sequence data showed that A. tumefaciens does not possess an ACC deaminase gene in its genome. Therefore, providing ACC deaminase activity to the bacteria would improve gene transfer. As expected, A. tumefaciens with ACC deaminase activity, designated as super-Agrobacterium, could suppress ethylene evolution and increase the gene transfer efficiency in several plant species. In this review, we summarize plant–Agrobacterium interactions and their applications for improving Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering techniques via super-Agrobacterium. PMID:25520733

  7. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  8. Evidence of recent interkingdom horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and Candida parapsilosis

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    Butler Geraldine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date very few incidences of interdomain gene transfer into fungi have been identified. Here, we used the emerging genome sequences of Candida albicans WO-1, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Pichia guilliermondii, and Lodderomyces elongisporus to identify recent interdomain HGT events. We refer to these as CTG species because they translate the CTG codon as serine rather than leucine, and share a recent common ancestor. Results Phylogenetic and syntenic information infer that two C. parapsilosis genes originate from bacterial sources. One encodes a putative proline racemase (PR. Phylogenetic analysis also infers that there were independent transfers of bacterial PR enzymes into members of the Pezizomycotina, and protists. The second HGT gene in C. parapsilosis belongs to the phenazine F (PhzF superfamily. Most CTG species also contain a fungal PhzF homolog. Our phylogeny suggests that the CTG homolog originated from an ancient HGT event, from a member of the proteobacteria. An analysis of synteny suggests that C. parapsilosis has lost the endogenous fungal form of PhzF, and subsequently reacquired it from a proteobacterial source. There is evidence that Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Basidiomycotina also obtained a PhzF homolog through HGT. Conclusion Our search revealed two instances of well-supported HGT from bacteria into the CTG clade, both specific to C. parapsilosis. Therefore, while recent interkingdom gene transfer has taken place in the CTG lineage, its occurrence is rare. However, our analysis will not detect ancient gene transfers, and we may have underestimated the global extent of HGT into CTG species.

  9. Evolution of Antifreeze Protein Genes in the Diatom Genus Fragilariopsis: Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer, Gene Duplication and Episodic Diversifying Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorhannus, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Hypotheses about horizontal transfer of antifreeze protein genes to ice-living diatoms were addressed using two different statistical methods available in the program Prunier. The role of diversifying selection in driving the differentiation of a set of antifreeze protein genes in the diatom genus Fragilariopsis was also investigated. Four horizontal gene transfer events were identified. Two of these took place between two major eukaryote lineages, that is from the diatom Chaetoceros neogracile to the copepod Stephos longipes and from a basidiomycete clade to a monophyletic group, consisting of the diatom species Fragilariopsis curta and Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The remaining two events included transfers from an ascomycete lineage to the proteobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca and from the proteobacterium Polaribacter irgensii to a group composed of 4 proteobacterium species. After the Fragilariopsis lineage acquired the antifreeze protein gene from the basidiomycetes, it duplicated and went through episodic evolution, characterized by strong positive selection acting on short segments of the branches in the tree. This selection pattern suggests that the paralogs differentiated functionally over relatively short time periods. Taken together, the results obtained here indicate that the group of antifreeze protein genes considered here have a complex evolutionary history. PMID:22253534

  10. Enhanced horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater microcosms induced by an ionic liquid.

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    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The spread and propagation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs is a worldwide public health concern. Ionic liquids (ILs, considered as "environmentally friendly" replacements for industrial organic solvents, have been widely applied in modern industry. However, few data have been collected regarding the potential ecological and environmental risks of ILs, which are important for preparing for their potential discharge into the environment. In this paper, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6] (0.001-5.0 g/L was tested for its effects on facilitating ARGs horizontal transfer mediated by plasmid RP4 in freshwater microcosms. In the horizontal transfer microcosms, the transfer frequency of plasmid RP4 was significantly enhanced (60-fold higher than untreated groups by the IL [BMIm][PF6] (1.0 g/L. Meanwhile, two strains of opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. were isolated among the transconjugants, illustrating plasmid RP4 mediated horizontal transfer of ARGs occurred in pathogen. This could increase the risk of ARGs dissemination to human pathogens and pose great threat to public health. The cause that [BMIm[PF6] enhanced the transfer frequency of plasmid RP4 was proposed by suppressed cell membrane barrier and enhanced cell membrane permeability, which was evidenced by flow cytometry (FCM. This is the first report that some ILs facilitate horizontal transfer of plasmid RP4 which is widely distributed in the environment and thus add the adverse effects of the environmental risk of ILs.

  11. Enhanced horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in freshwater microcosms induced by an ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Mao, Daqing; Mu, Quanhua; Luo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The spread and propagation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is a worldwide public health concern. Ionic liquids (ILs), considered as "environmentally friendly" replacements for industrial organic solvents, have been widely applied in modern industry. However, few data have been collected regarding the potential ecological and environmental risks of ILs, which are important for preparing for their potential discharge into the environment. In this paper, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6]) (0.001-5.0 g/L) was tested for its effects on facilitating ARGs horizontal transfer mediated by plasmid RP4 in freshwater microcosms. In the horizontal transfer microcosms, the transfer frequency of plasmid RP4 was significantly enhanced (60-fold higher than untreated groups) by the IL [BMIm][PF6] (1.0 g/L). Meanwhile, two strains of opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. were isolated among the transconjugants, illustrating plasmid RP4 mediated horizontal transfer of ARGs occurred in pathogen. This could increase the risk of ARGs dissemination to human pathogens and pose great threat to public health. The cause that [BMIm[PF6] enhanced the transfer frequency of plasmid RP4 was proposed by suppressed cell membrane barrier and enhanced cell membrane permeability, which was evidenced by flow cytometry (FCM). This is the first report that some ILs facilitate horizontal transfer of plasmid RP4 which is widely distributed in the environment and thus add the adverse effects of the environmental risk of ILs.

  12. Transcriptional Analysis of the Conjugal Transfer Genes of Rickettsia bellii RML 369-C.

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    Chan C Heu

    Full Text Available Rickettsia bellii is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is one of the few rickettsiae that encode a complete set of conjugative transfer (tra genes involved in bacterial conjugation and has been shown to exhibit pili-like structures. The reductive genomes of rickettsiae beg the question whether the tra genes are nonfunctional or functioning to enhance the genetic plasticity and biology of rickettsiae. We characterized the transcriptional dynamics of R. bellii tra genes in comparison to genes transcribed stably and above the background level to understand when and at what levels the tra genes are active or whether the tra genes are degenerative. We determined that the best reference genes, out of 10 tested, were methionyl tRNA ligase (metG or a combination of metG and ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase 2 subunit beta (nrdF, using statistical algorithms from two different programs: Normfinder and BestKeeper. To validate the use of metG with other rickettsial genes exhibiting variable transcriptional patterns we examined its use with sca2 and rickA, genes involved in actin based motility. Both were shown to be up-regulated at different times of replication in Vero cells, showing variable and stable transcription levels of rickA and sca2, respectively. traATi was up-regulated at 72 hours post inoculation in the tick cell line ISE6, but showed no apparent changes in the monkey cell line Vero and mouse cell line L929. The transcription of tra genes was positively correlated with one another and up-regulated from 12 to 72 hours post inoculation (HPI when compared to RBE_0422 (an inactivated transposase-derivative found within the tra cluster. Thus, the up-regulation of the tra genes indicated that the integrity and activity of each gene were intact and may facilitate the search for the optimal conditions necessary to demonstrate conjugation in rickettsiae.

  13. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

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    Kaul Rajinder

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia

  14. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, T.; Giffard, P.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S.; Auerbach, R.; Hornstra, H.; Tuanyok, A.; Price, E.P.; Glass, M.B.; Leadem, B.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, J. S.; Allan, G.J.; Foster, J.T.; Wagner, D.M.; Okinaka, R.T.; Sim, S.H.; Pearson, O.; Wu, Z.; Chang, J.; Kaul, R.; Hoffmaster, A.R.; Brettin, T.S.; Robison, R.A.; Mayo, M.; Gee, J.E.; Tan, P.; Currie, B.J.; Keim, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results: Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. Conclusion: We describe an

  15. Analysis of novel nonviral gene transfer systems for gene delivery to cells of the musculoskeletal system

    OpenAIRE

    Orth, Patrick; Weimer, Anja; Kaul, Gunter; Kohn, Dieter; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of novel nonviral gene delivery systems in cells of musculoskeletal origin. Primary cultures of lapine skeletal muscle cells, lapine articular chondrocytes, human cells from fibrous dysplasia and cell lines established from human osteosarcoma (SAOS-2), chondrosarcoma (CS-1), murine skeletal myoblasts (L8) and fibroblasts (NIH 3T3)were transfected with the P. pyralis luc or the E. coli lacZ genes using Nanofectin 1 and 2, Superfect, Jet...

  16. Improvement of Hydrodynamics-Based Gene Transfer of Nonviral DNA Targeted to Murine Hepatocytes

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    Shingo Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an important organ for supporting the life of an individual. Gene transfer toward this organ has been attempted in many laboratories to date; however, there have been few reports on improved liver-targeted gene delivery by using a nonviral vector. In this study, we examined the effect of various types of gene delivery carriers on enhancing the uptake and gene expression of exogenous DNA in murine hepatocytes when a hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HGD is performed via tail-vein injection. Mice were singly injected with a large amount of phosphate-buffered saline containing reporter plasmid DNA and/or with a gene delivery carrier. One day after the gene delivery, the animals' livers were dissected and subjected to biochemical, histochemical, and molecular biological analyses. The strongest signal from the reporter plasmid DNA was observed when the DNA was mixed with a polyethylenimine- (PEI- based reagent. Coinjection with pCRTEIL (a loxP-floxed reporter construct and pTR/NCre (a liver-specific Cre expression vector resulted in the liver-specific recombination of pCRTEIL. The combination of PEI with HGD would thus be a valuable tool for liver-specific manipulation to examine the function of a gene of interest in the liver and for creating liver disease models.

  17. A Preliminary List of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Prokaryotes Determined by Tree Reconstruction and Reconciliation

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    Hyeonsoo Jeong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide global detection of genes involved in horizontal gene transfer (HGT remains an active area of research in medical microbiology and evolutionary genomics. Utilizing the explicit evolutionary method of comparing topologies of a total of 154,805 orthologous gene trees against corresponding 16S rRNA “reference” trees, we previously detected a total of 660,894 candidate HGT events in 2,472 completely-sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Here, we report an HGT-index for each individual gene-reference tree pair reconciliation, representing the total number of detected HGT events on the gene tree divided by the total number of genomes (taxa member of that tree. HGT-index is thus a simple measure indicating the sensitivity of prokaryotic genes to participate (or not participate in HGT. Our preliminary list provides HGT-indices for a total of 69,365 genes (detected in >10 and <50% available prokaryotic genomes that are involved in a wide range of biological processes such as metabolism, information, and bacterial response to environment. Identification of horizontally-derived genes is important to combat antibiotic resistance and is a step forward toward reconstructions of improved phylogenies describing the history of life. Our effort is thus expected to benefit ongoing research in the fields of clinical microbiology and evolutionary biology.

  18. Gene transfer from bacteria and archaea facilitated evolution of an extremophilic eukaryote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönknecht, Gerald; Chen, Wei-Hua; Ternes, Chad M; Barbier, Guillaume G; Shrestha, Roshan P; Stanke, Mario; Bräutigam, Andrea; Baker, Brett J; Banfield, Jillian F; Garavito, R Michael; Carr, Kevin; Wilkerson, Curtis; Rensing, Stefan A; Gagneul, David; Dickenson, Nicholas E; Oesterhelt, Christine; Lercher, Martin J; Weber, Andreas P M

    2013-03-08

    Some microbial eukaryotes, such as the extremophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria, live in hot, toxic metal-rich, acidic environments. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of adaptation, we sequenced the 13.7-megabase genome of G. sulphuraria. This alga shows an enormous metabolic flexibility, growing either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on more than 50 carbon sources. Environmental adaptation seems to have been facilitated by horizontal gene transfer from various bacteria and archaea, often followed by gene family expansion. At least 5% of protein-coding genes of G. sulphuraria were probably acquired horizontally. These proteins are involved in ecologically important processes ranging from heavy-metal detoxification to glycerol uptake and metabolism. Thus, our findings show that a pan-domain gene pool has facilitated environmental adaptation in this unicellular eukaryote.

  19. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer

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    Ruchita Selot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAVrh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold, migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27–64 fold in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans.

  20. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selot, Ruchita; Arumugam, Sathyathithan; Mary, Bertin; Cheemadan, Sabna; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2017-01-01

    Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAV)rh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold), migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors) in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27-64 fold) in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans.

  1. Lateral Gene Transfer in the Adaptation of the Anaerobic Parasite Blastocystis to the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eme, Laura; Gentekaki, Eleni; Curtis, Bruce; Archibald, John M; Roger, Andrew J

    2017-03-20

    Blastocystis spp. are the most prevalent eukaryotic microbes found in the intestinal tract of humans. Here we present an in-depth investigation of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the genome of Blastocystis sp. subtype 1. Using rigorous phylogeny-based methods and strict validation criteria, we show that ∼2.5% of the genes of this organism were recently acquired by LGT. We identify LGTs both from prokaryote and eukaryote donors. Several transfers occurred specifically in ancestors of a subset of Blastocystis subtypes, demonstrating that LGT is an ongoing process. Functional predictions reveal that these genes are involved in diverse metabolic pathways, many of which appear related to adaptation of Blastocystis to the gut environment. Specifically, we identify genes involved in carbohydrate scavenging and metabolism, anaerobic amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, oxygen-stress resistance, and pH homeostasis. A number of the transferred genes encoded secreted proteins that are potentially involved in infection, escaping host defense, or most likely affect the prokaryotic microbiome and the inflammation state of the gut. We also show that Blastocystis subtypes differ in the nature and copy number of LGTs that could relate to variation in their prevalence and virulence. Finally, we identified bacterial-derived genes encoding NH3-dependent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase in Blastocystis and other protozoan parasites, which are promising targets for drug development. Collectively, our results suggest new avenues for research into the role of Blastocystis in intestinal disease and unequivocally demonstrate that LGT is an important mechanism by which eukaryotic microbes adapt to new environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

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    Lafitte Marie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene

  3. Horizontal Gene Transfer and Population of Phyllosphere Bacteria on Transgenic and Nontransgenic Cotton

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    ROHANI CINTA BADIA GINTING

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of horizontal gene transfer of plant genomic DNA and bacteria in the soil, particularly as this relates to the possible transfer of genes encoding antibiotic resistance, has been seen as hazard associated with genetically engineered plants. It is hypothesized that introduction of bacterial genes into the plant genome leads to a higher probability of gene transfer from plants to bacteria due to the presence of homologous sequences. Bollgard (BG cotton was constructed through the introduction of cry1A(c gene, encodes for insecticidal activity againts Lepidopteran pests, together with genes for spectinomycin/streptomycin resistant (aad and kanamycin resistant (nptII, into the genome of a conventional cotton variety, Delta Pine (DP. The aim of this study were to evaluate the ability of naturally competent Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain ADP1 to take up and integrate transgenic plant DNA based on homologous recombination under optimized laboratory condition, and to compare phyllosphere microbial population resistant to antibiotic on leaves of transgenic and nontransgenic plant. The results showed that transformation of ADP1 cells with Bollgard DNA was not detected on nitrocellulose membrane nor in sterile soil. Total phyllosphere bacterial population on leaves collected from one month after planting were 1.3 x 108 and 1.6 x 108 cfu/g leave fresh weight for BG and DP, respectively. Samples collected after three month contained 5.9 x 107 and 7.1 x 107 cfu/g leave fresh weight for BG and DP, respectively. This study also showed that there was no significant difference of phyllosphere bacterial population resistant to streptomycin and kanamycin on leaves of BG or DP samples collected from one or three month after planting.

  4. Adaptations to High Salt in a Halophilic Protist: Differential Expression and Gene Acquisitions through Duplications and Gene Transfers

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    Tommy Harding

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of halophiles to thrive in extreme hypersaline habitats derives partly from the tight regulation of ion homeostasis, the salt-dependent adjustment of plasma membrane fluidity, and the increased capability to manage oxidative stress. Halophilic bacteria, and archaea have been intensively studied, and substantial research has been conducted on halophilic fungi, and the green alga Dunaliella. By contrast, there have been very few investigations of halophiles that are phagotrophic protists, i.e., protozoa. To gather fundamental knowledge about salt adaptation in these organisms, we studied the transcriptome-level response of Halocafeteria seosinensis (Stramenopiles grown under contrasting salinities. We provided further evolutionary context to our analysis by identifying genes that underwent recent duplications. Genes that were highly responsive to salinity variations were involved in stress response (e.g., chaperones, ion homeostasis (e.g., Na+/H+ transporter, metabolism and transport of lipids (e.g., sterol biosynthetic genes, carbohydrate metabolism (e.g., glycosidases, and signal transduction pathways (e.g., transcription factors. A significantly high proportion (43% of duplicated genes were also differentially expressed, accentuating the importance of gene expansion in adaptation by H. seosinensis to high salt environments. Furthermore, we found two genes that were lateral acquisitions from bacteria, and were also highly up-regulated and highly expressed at high salt, suggesting that this evolutionary mechanism could also have facilitated adaptation to high salt. We propose that a transition toward high-salt adaptation in the ancestors of H. seosinensis required the acquisition of new genes via duplication, and some lateral gene transfers (LGTs, as well as the alteration of transcriptional programs, leading to increased stress resistance, proper establishment of ion gradients, and modification of cell structure properties like

  5. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

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    Xue, Huping; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr) family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study), ovine mastitis (ED133), pig (ST398), chicken (ED98), and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9) were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may inadvertently enhance the contact of human and animal bacterial

  6. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

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    Huping Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study, ovine mastitis (ED133, pig (ST398, chicken (ED98, and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9 were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may

  7. Optimizing in vivo gene transfer into mouse corpus cavernosum by use of surface electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kang-Moon; Choi, Min Ji; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Ghatak, Kalyan; Park, Soo-Hwan; Ryu, Dong-Soo; Ryu, Ji-Kan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Electroporation is known to enhance the efficiency of gene transfer through a transient increase in cell membrane permeability. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal conditions for in vivo electroporation-mediated gene delivery into mouse corpus cavernosum. Materials and Methods Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin. After intracavernous injection of pCMV-Luc (100 µg/40 µL), different electroporation settings (5-50 V, 8-16 pulses with a duration of 40-100 ms) were applied to the penis to establish the optimal conditions for electroporation. Gene expression was evaluated by luciferase assay. We also assessed the undesired consequences of electroporation by visual inspection and hematoxylin-eosin staining of penile tissue. Results Electroporation profoundly induced gene expression in the corpus cavernosum tissue of normal mice in a voltage-dependent manner. We observed electrical burn scars in the penis of normal mice who received electroporation with eight 40-ms pulses at a voltage of 50 V and sixteen 40-ms pulses, eight 100-ms pulses, and sixteen 100-ms pulses at a voltage of 30 V. No detectable burn scars were noted in normal mice stimulated with eight 40-ms pulses at a voltage of 30 V. Electroporation also significantly induced gene expression in diabetic mice stimulated with 40-ms pulse at a voltage of 30 V without injury to the penis. Conclusions We have established the optimal electroporation conditions for maximizing gene transfer into the corpus cavernosum of mice while avoiding damage to the erectile tissue. The electroporation-mediated gene delivery technique will be a valuable tool for gene therapy in the field of erectile dysfunction. PMID:25763123

  8. Gene transfers from diverse bacteria compensate for reductive genome evolution in the chromatophore of Paulinella chromatophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Eva C M; Price, Dana C; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Singer, Anna; Melkonian, Michael; Grossman, Arthur R

    2016-10-25

    Plastids, the photosynthetic organelles, originated >1 billion y ago via the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium. The resulting proliferation of primary producers fundamentally changed global ecology. Endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) from the intracellular cyanobacterium to the nucleus is widely recognized as a critical factor in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The contribution of horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) from other bacteria to plastid establishment remains more controversial. A novel perspective on this issue is provided by the amoeba Paulinella chromatophora, which contains photosynthetic organelles (chromatophores) that are only 60-200 million years old. Chromatophore genome reduction entailed the loss of many biosynthetic pathways including those for numerous amino acids and cofactors. How the host cell compensates for these losses remains unknown, because the presence of bacteria in all available P. chromatophora cultures excluded elucidation of the full metabolic capacity and occurrence of HGT in this species. Here we generated a high-quality transcriptome and draft genome assembly from the first bacteria-free P. chromatophora culture to deduce rules that govern organelle integration into cellular metabolism. Our analyses revealed that nuclear and chromatophore gene inventories provide highly complementary functions. At least 229 nuclear genes were acquired via HGT from various bacteria, of which only 25% putatively arose through EGT from the chromatophore genome. Many HGT-derived bacterial genes encode proteins that fill gaps in critical chromatophore pathways/processes. Our results demonstrate a dominant role for HGT in compensating for organelle genome reduction and suggest that phagotrophy may be a major driver of HGT.

  9. Massive gene transfer and extensive RNA editing of a symbiotic dinoflagellate plastid genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungpakdee, Sutada; Shinzato, Chuya; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Kawashima, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Hisata, Kanako; Tanaka, Makiko; Goto, Hiroki; Fujie, Manabu; Lin, Senjie; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-05-31

    Genome sequencing of Symbiodinium minutum revealed that 95 of 109 plastid-associated genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome and subsequently expanded by gene duplication. Only 14 genes remain in plastids and occur as DNA minicircles. Each minicircle (1.8-3.3 kb) contains one gene and a conserved noncoding region containing putative promoters and RNA-binding sites. Nine types of RNA editing, including a novel G/U type, were discovered in minicircle transcripts but not in genes transferred to the nucleus. In contrast to DNA editing sites in dinoflagellate mitochondria, which tend to be highly conserved across all taxa, editing sites employed in DNA minicircles are highly variable from species to species. Editing is crucial for core photosystem protein function. It restores evolutionarily conserved amino acids and increases peptidyl hydropathy. It also increases protein plasticity necessary to initiate photosystem complex assembly. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX antigen by in vivo hepatic gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingozzi, Federico; Liu, Yi-Lin; Dobrzynski, Eric; Kaufhold, Antje; Liu, Jian Hua; Wang, YuQin; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A; Herzog, Roland W

    2003-05-01

    Gene replacement therapy is an attractive approach for treatment of genetic disease, but may be complicated by the risk of a neutralizing immune response to the therapeutic gene product. There are examples of humoral and cellular immune responses against the transgene product as well as absence of such responses, depending on vector design and the underlying mutation in the dysfunctional gene. It has been unclear, however, whether transgene expression can induce tolerance to the therapeutic antigen. Here, we demonstrate induction of immune tolerance to a secreted human coagulation factor IX (hF.IX) antigen by adeno-associated viral gene transfer to the liver. Tolerized mice showed absence of anti-hF.IX and substantially reduced in vitro T cell responses after immunization with hF.IX in adjuvant. Tolerance induction was antigen specific, affected a broad range of Th cell subsets, and was favored by higher levels of transgene expression as determined by promoter strength, vector dose, and mouse strain. Hepatocyte-derived hF.IX expression induced regulatory CD4(+) T cells that can suppress anti-hF.IX formation after adoptive transfer. With a strain-dependent rate of success, tolerance to murine F.IX was induced in mice with a large F.IX gene deletion, supporting the relevance of these data for treatment of hemophilia B and other genetic diseases.

  11. Immune deviation by mucosal antigen administration suppresses gene-transfer-induced inhibitor formation to factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ou; Armstrong, Elina; Schlachterman, Alexander; Wang, Lixin; Okita, David K; Conti-Fine, Bianca; High, Katherine A; Herzog, Roland W

    2006-07-15

    Formation of inhibitory antibodies is a serious complication of protein or gene replacement therapy for hemophilias, congenital X-linked bleeding disorders. In hemophilia B (coagulation factor IX [F.IX] deficiency), lack of endogenous F.IX antigen expression and other genetic factors may increase the risk of antibody formation to functional F.IX. Here, we developed a protocol for reducing inhibitor formation in gene therapy by prior mucosal (intranasal) administration of a peptide representing a human F.IX-specific CD4(+) T-cell epitope in hemophilia B mice. C3H/HeJ mice with a F.IX gene deletion produced inhibitory IgG to human F.IX after hepatic gene transfer with an adeno-associated viral vector. These animals subsequently lost systemic F.IX expression. In contrast, repeated intranasal administration of the specific peptide resulted in reduced inhibitor formation, sustained circulating F.IX levels, and sustained partial correction of coagulation following hepatic gene transfer. This was achieved through immune deviation to a T-helper-cell response with increased IL-10 and TGF-beta production and activation of regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells.

  12. Correction of Fanconi Anemia Group C Hematopoietic Stem Cells Following Intrafemoral Gene Transfer

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    Ouassila Habi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of morbidity and mortality in Fanconi anemia patients is the development of bone marrow (BM failure; thus correction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs through gene transfer approaches would benefit FA patients. However, gene therapy trials for FA patients using ex vivo transduction protocols have failed to provide long-term correction. In addition, ex vivo cultures have been found to be hazardous for FA cells. To circumvent negative effects of ex vivo culture in FA stem cells, we tested the corrective ability of direct injection of recombinant lentiviral particles encoding FancC-EGFP into femurs of FancC−/− mice. Using this approach, we show that FancC−/− HSCs were efficiently corrected. Intrafemoral gene transfer of the FancC gene prevented the mitomycin C-induced BM failure. Moreover, we show that intrafemoral gene delivery into aplastic marrow restored the bone marrow cellularity and corrected the remaining HSCs. These results provide evidence that targeting FA-deficient HSCs directly in their environment enables efficient and long-term correction of BM defects in FA.

  13. Intra- and interspecies transfer and expression of Rhizobium japonicum hydrogen uptake genes and autotrophic growth capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, G R; Cantrell, M A; Hanus, F J; Russell, S A; Haddad, K R; Evans, H J

    1985-05-01

    Cosmids containing hydrogen uptake genes have previously been isolated in this laboratory. Four new cosmids that contain additional hup gene(s) have now been identified by conjugal transfer of a Rhizobium japonicum 122DES gene bank into a Tn5-generated Hup(-) mutant and screening for the acquisition of Hup activity. The newly isolated cosmids, pHU50-pHU53, contain part of the previously isolated pHU1 but extend as far as 20 kilobases beyond its border. pHU52 complements five of six Hup(-) mutants and confers activity on several Hup(-) wild-type R. japonicum strains in the free-living state and where tested in nodules. Transconjugants obtained from interspecies transfer of pHU52 to Rhizobium meliloti 102F28, 102F32, and 102F51 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53 showed hydrogen-dependent methyleneblue reduction, performed the oxyhydrogen reaction, and showed hydrogen-dependent autotrophic growth by virtue of the introduced genes. The identity of the presumptive transconjugants was confirmed by antibiotic-resistance profiles and by plant nodulation tests.

  14. The Extent and Regulation of Lateral Gene Transfer in Natural Microbial Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in bacterial evolution is evident from the retrospective analyses of bacterial genomes, which suggest that a substantial part of bacterial genomes is of foreign origin. Another line of evidence that supports the possibility of rapid adaptation...... of bacteria through lateral gene exchange is the history of antibiotic use by humans. Within a very brief period of the 'antibiotic era' many bacterial pathogens were able to acquire the mechanisms allowing them to withstand the selective pressure of antibiotics. And, finally, field and microcosm studies...

  15. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbian, Yael; Maori, Eyal; Kalev, Haim; Shafir, Sharoni; Sela, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  16. Gene transfer occurs with enhanced efficiency in biofilms and induces enhanced stabilisation of the biofilm structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    There has been much interest in bioremediation based on the introduction of bacteria able to catabolise recalcitrant compounds deposited in the environment. In particular, the delivery of catabolic information in the form of conjugative plasmids to bacterial populations in situ has great potential....... As most bacteria in the environment live in surface-associated communities (biofilms), the gene transfer systems within these communities need to be better characterised for bio-enhancement strategies to be developed. Recent findings suggest that gene transfer does take place within biofilms, but studies...... also identified limitations and bottlenecks of the process. The dense population structure in biofilms increases plasmid dispersal by conjugation, and the conjugation mechanism itself may stimulate biofilm development. Moreover, DNA release and transformation seem to be part of a biofilm-related life...

  17. Bidirectional transfer of RNAi between honey bee and Varroa destructor: Varroa gene silencing reduces Varroa population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Garbian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mite Varroa destructor is an obligatory ectoparasite of the honey bee (Apis mellifera and is one of the major threats to apiculture worldwide. We previously reported that honey bees fed on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA with a sequence homologous to that of the Israeli acute paralysis virus are protected from the viral disease. Here we show that dsRNA ingested by bees is transferred to the Varroa mite and from mite on to a parasitized bee. This cross-species, reciprocal exchange of dsRNA between bee and Varroa engendered targeted gene silencing in the latter, and resulted in an over 60% decrease in the mite population. Thus, transfer of gene-silencing-triggering molecules between this invertebrate host and its ectoparasite could lead to a conceptually novel approach to Varroa control.

  18. Light-controlled inhibition of malignant glioma by opsin gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Tu, J; Pan, J-Q; Luo, H-L; Liu, Y-H; Wan, J; Zhang, J; Wei, P-F; Jiang, T; Chen, Y-H; Wang, L-P

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive cancers with low survival rates and poor prognosis because of their highly proliferative and invasive capacity. In the current study, we describe a new optogenetic strategy that selectively inhibits glioma cells through light-controlled membrane depolarization and cell death. Transfer of the engineered opsin ChETA (engineered Channelrhodopsin-2 variant) gene into primary human glioma cells or cell lines, but not normal astrocytes, unexpectedly decreased cell proliferation and increased mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, upon light stimulation. These optogenetic effects were mediated by membrane depolarization-induced reductions in cyclin expression and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Importantly, the ChETA gene transfer and light illumination in mice significantly inhibited subcutaneous and intracranial glioma growth and increased the survival of the animals bearing the glioma. These results uncover an unexpected effect of opsin ion channels on glioma cells and offer the opportunity for the first time to treat glioma using a light-controllable optogenetic approach. PMID:24176851

  19. Emergence of collective territorial defense in bacterial communities: horizontal gene transfer can stabilize microbiomes.

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    János Juhász

    Full Text Available Multispecies bacterial communities such as the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract can be remarkably stable and resilient even though they consist of cells and species that compete for resources and also produce a large number of antimicrobial agents. Computational modeling suggests that horizontal transfer of resistance genes may greatly contribute to the formation of stable and diverse communities capable of protecting themselves with a battery of antimicrobial agents while preserving a varied metabolic repertoire of the constituent species. In other words horizontal transfer of resistance genes makes a community compatible in terms of exoproducts and capable to maintain a varied and mature metagenome. The same property may allow microbiota to protect a host organism, or if used as a microbial therapy, to purge pathogens and restore a protective environment.

  20. Emergence of collective territorial defense in bacterial communities: horizontal gene transfer can stabilize microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, János; Kertész-Farkas, Attila; Szabó, Dóra; Pongor, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Multispecies bacterial communities such as the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract can be remarkably stable and resilient even though they consist of cells and species that compete for resources and also produce a large number of antimicrobial agents. Computational modeling suggests that horizontal transfer of resistance genes may greatly contribute to the formation of stable and diverse communities capable of protecting themselves with a battery of antimicrobial agents while preserving a varied metabolic repertoire of the constituent species. In other words horizontal transfer of resistance genes makes a community compatible in terms of exoproducts and capable to maintain a varied and mature metagenome. The same property may allow microbiota to protect a host organism, or if used as a microbial therapy, to purge pathogens and restore a protective environment.

  1. [Effect of PRX-2 gene transferred by lipofectamine on the proliferation of human skin fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui-feng; Chai, Jia-ke; Lin, Zi-hao

    2011-10-11

    To explore the effects of PRX-2 gene transferred by lipofectamine on the human skin fibroblasts. Normal human skin fibroblasts were cultured and PRX-2 gene was transferred by lipofectamine. The proliferation of fibroblasts was detected by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) and flow cytometry. The proliferation of PRX-2-transfected fibroblasts was stronger than that of normal counterparts. There were fewer cells during G0-G1 period and more cells during S and G2-M periods. The proliferative index increased. The proliferation of fibroblasts may be modified by transfected PRX-2. Thus PRX-2 plays an important role during the healing of human skin wound.

  2. Et tu, Brute? Not Even Intracellular Mutualistic Symbionts Escape Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Many insect species maintain mutualistic relationships with endosymbiotic bacteria. In contrast to their free-living relatives, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has traditionally been considered rare in long-term endosymbionts. Nevertheless, meta-omics exploration of certain symbiotic models has unveiled an increasing number of bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host genetic transfers. The abundance and function of transferred loci suggest that HGT might play a major role in the evolution of the corresponding consortia, enhancing their adaptive value or buffering detrimental effects derived from the reductive evolution of endosymbionts’ genomes. Here, we comprehensively review the HGT cases recorded to date in insect-bacteria mutualistic consortia, and discuss their impact on the evolutionary success of these associations. PMID:28961177

  3. Et tu, Brute? Not Even Intracellular Mutualistic Symbionts Escape Horizontal Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Madrigal, Sergio; Gil, Rosario

    2017-09-29

    Many insect species maintain mutualistic relationships with endosymbiotic bacteria. In contrast to their free-living relatives, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has traditionally been considered rare in long-term endosymbionts. Nevertheless, meta-omics exploration of certain symbiotic models has unveiled an increasing number of bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host genetic transfers. The abundance and function of transferred loci suggest that HGT might play a major role in the evolution of the corresponding consortia, enhancing their adaptive value or buffering detrimental effects derived from the reductive evolution of endosymbionts' genomes. Here, we comprehensively review the HGT cases recorded to date in insect-bacteria mutualistic consortia, and discuss their impact on the evolutionary success of these associations.

  4. Et tu, Brute? Not Even Intracellular Mutualistic Symbionts Escape Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio López-Madrigal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many insect species maintain mutualistic relationships with endosymbiotic bacteria. In contrast to their free-living relatives, horizontal gene transfer (HGT has traditionally been considered rare in long-term endosymbionts. Nevertheless, meta-omics exploration of certain symbiotic models has unveiled an increasing number of bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host genetic transfers. The abundance and function of transferred loci suggest that HGT might play a major role in the evolution of the corresponding consortia, enhancing their adaptive value or buffering detrimental effects derived from the reductive evolution of endosymbionts’ genomes. Here, we comprehensively review the HGT cases recorded to date in insect-bacteria mutualistic consortia, and discuss their impact on the evolutionary success of these associations.

  5. Bacteriophages Isolated from Chicken Meat and the Horizontal Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Amira; Awaiwanont, Nattakarn; Sofka, Dmitrij; Smulders, Frans J M; Paulsen, Peter; Szostak, Michael P; Humphrey, Tom; Hilbert, Friederike

    2015-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in microbes poses a global and increasing threat to public health. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes was thought to be due largely to conjugative plasmids or transposons, with only a minor part being played by transduction through bacteriophages. However, whole-genome sequencing has recently shown that the latter mechanism could be highly important in the exchange of antimicrobial resistance genes between microorganisms and environments. The transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by phages could underlie the origin of resistant bacteria found in food. We show that chicken meat carries a number of phages capable of transferring antimicrobial resistance. Of 243 phages randomly isolated from chicken meat, about a quarter (24.7%) were able to transduce resistance to one or more of the five antimicrobials tested into Escherichia coli ATCC 13706 (DSM 12242). Resistance to kanamycin was transduced the most often, followed by that to chloramphenicol, with four phages transducing tetracycline resistance and three transducing ampicillin resistance. Phages able to transduce antimicrobial resistance were isolated from 44% of the samples of chicken meat that we tested. The statistically significant (P = 0.01) relationship between the presence of phages transducing kanamycin resistance and E. coli isolates resistant to this antibiotic suggests that transduction may be an important mechanism for transferring kanamycin resistance to E. coli. It appears that the transduction of resistance to certain antimicrobials, e.g., kanamycin, not only is widely distributed in E. coli isolates found on meat but also could represent a major mechanism for resistance transfer. The result is of high importance for animal and human health. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Updated clusters of orthologous genes for Archaea: a complex ancestor of the Archaea and the byways of horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Yuri I; Makarova, Kira S; Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-12-14

    Collections of Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COGs) provide indispensable tools for comparative genomic analysis, evolutionary reconstruction and functional annotation of new genomes. Initially, COGs were made for all complete genomes of cellular life forms that were available at the time. However, with the accumulation of thousands of complete genomes, construction of a comprehensive COG set has become extremely computationally demanding and prone to error propagation, necessitating the switch to taxon-specific COG collections. Previously, we reported the collection of COGs for 41 genomes of Archaea (arCOGs). Here we present a major update of the arCOGs and describe evolutionary reconstructions to reveal general trends in the evolution of Archaea. The updated version of the arCOG database incorporates 91% of the pangenome of 120 archaea (251,032 protein-coding genes altogether) into 10,335 arCOGs. Using this new set of arCOGs, we performed maximum likelihood reconstruction of the genome content of archaeal ancestral forms and gene gain and loss events in archaeal evolution. This reconstruction shows that the last Common Ancestor of the extant Archaea was an organism of greater complexity than most of the extant archaea, probably with over 2,500 protein-coding genes. The subsequent evolution of almost all archaeal lineages was apparently dominated by gene loss resulting in genome streamlining. Overall, in the evolution of Archaea as well as a representative set of bacteria that was similarly analyzed for comparison, gene losses are estimated to outnumber gene gains at least 4 to 1. Analysis of specific patterns of gene gain in Archaea shows that, although some groups, in particular Halobacteria, acquire substantially more genes than others, on the whole, gene exchange between major groups of Archaea appears to be largely random, with no major 'highways' of horizontal gene transfer. The updated collection of arCOGs is expected to become a key resource for

  7. Gene transfer to vein graft wall by HVJ-liposome method: time course and localization of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, H Z; Sawa, Y; Zhang, W D; Yamakawa, T; Morishita, R; Kaneda, Y; Matsuda, H

    1998-09-01

    A novel gene transfer method using liposomes with a viral envelope of hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ) has been reported to be very effective for gene transfection into somatic cells and might be applicable to improve the patency of vein grafts. The present study examined the time course and localization of gene expression to assess the feasibility of ex vivo gene transfer into the vein graft by the HVJ-liposome method. The HVJ-liposome complex containing either beta-galactosidase plasmid DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or no genes (controls) (experiment 1) or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled oligonucleotides either with or without HVJ-liposomes (experiment 2) was infused into rabbit vein grafts and allowed to incubate before autologous transplantation to carotid arteries. In experiment 1, all grafts incubated with beta-galactosidase plasmid with HVJ-liposomes showed the blue staining of X-gal 7 days after operation, whereas the controls did not. The blue granules were present in the medial and adventitial tissue and were still present after 14 days. In experiment 2, many fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nuclei were observed in the graft wall 2 and 4 days after operation and remained present mainly in the media of HVJ-liposome-treated grafts after 7 and 14 days, when no fluorescein isothiocyanate activity was observed without HVJ-liposome treatment. These results demonstrated the feasibility of ex vivo transfection to the medial and adventitial tissue of the vein graft by the HVJ-liposome method and suggest the possibility of its clinical application to prevent vein graft failure.

  8. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community. PMID:27014196

  9. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Deverman, Benjamin E.; Pravdo, Piers L.; Simpson, Bryan P.; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y.; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P.; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer 1-6 . However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics 7-13 . Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre-recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREA...

  10. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-pro...

  11. Transcriptional reprogramming of gene expression in bovine somatic cell chromatin transfer embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Grier P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful reprogramming of a somatic genome to produce a healthy clone by somatic cells nuclear transfer (SCNT is a rare event and the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly defined. When serial or successive rounds of cloning are performed, blastocyst and full term development rates decline even further with the increasing rounds of cloning. Identifying the "cumulative errors" could reveal the epigenetic reprogramming blocks in animal cloning. Results Bovine clones from up to four generations of successive cloning were produced by chromatin transfer (CT. Using Affymetrix bovine microarrays we determined that the transcriptomes of blastocysts derived from the first and the fourth rounds of cloning (CT1 and CT4 respectively have undergone an extensive reprogramming and were more similar to blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF than to the donor cells used for the first and the fourth rounds of chromatin transfer (DC1 and DC4 respectively. However a set of transcripts in the cloned embryos showed a misregulated pattern when compared to IVF embryos. Among the genes consistently upregulated in both CT groups compared to the IVF embryos were genes involved in regulation of cytoskeleton and cell shape. Among the genes consistently upregulated in IVF embryos compared to both CT groups were genes involved in chromatin remodelling and stress coping. Conclusion The present study provides a data set that could contribute in our understanding of epigenetic errors in somatic cell chromatin transfer. Identifying "cumulative errors" after serial cloning could reveal some of the epigenetic reprogramming blocks shedding light on the reprogramming process, important for both basic and applied research.

  12. Effect of Caenorhabditis elegans age and genotype on horizontal gene transfer in intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Nehrke, Keith; Blaser, Martin J

    2013-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria occurs in the intestinal tract of their animal hosts and facilitates both virulence and antibiotic resistance. A model in which both the pathogen and the host are genetically tractable facilitates developing insight into mechanistic processes enabling or restricting the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Here we develop an in vivo experimental system to study HGT in bacteria using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Using a thermosensitive conjugative system, we provide evidence that conjugation between two Escherichia coli strains can take place in the intestinal lumen of N2 wild-type worms at a rate of 10(-3) and 10(-2) per donor. We also show that C. elegans age and genotype are important determinants of the frequency of conjugation. Whereas ∼1 transconjugant for every 100 donor cells could be recovered from the intestine of N2 C. elegans, for the age-1 and tol-1 mutants, the detected rate of transconjugation (10(-3) and 10(-4) per donor cell, respectively) was significantly lower. This work demonstrates that increased recombination among lumenal microbial populations is a phenotype associated with host aging, and the model provides a framework to study the dynamics of bacterial horizontal gene transfer within the intestinal environment.

  13. THE RISK OF GENE TRANSFERRING IN THE INSURANCE PROTECTION OF AGRICULTERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper justified essence of genetic engineering as the object of insurance services. Defines the concept of risk gene transferring. The character features of this specific risk. The influence and consequences for agricultural producers. The description of the possible creation of the concept of insurance services that cover risk of gene transferring. The study reveals of the use of GMOs in agriculture, due to issues of economic security of a particular region or country as a whole. To determined the impact of risks and control for developing and developed countries that are important aspects of farming. Changes in weather, climate, productivity, price values, public policy, the situation on global markets can cause large fluctuations in agricultural production, and consequently affecting the income of agricultural producers. Risk management includes a range of strategies that reduce the social and financial implications of possible changes affecting the production and income of farmers. There is a need for an in-depth study of the theoretical and practical aspects of the impact of the risk of gene transferring in the context of insurance protection.

  14. [Horizontal transfer of bacterial genes and its significance for antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, L C; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E

    2007-12-08

    * Sexual reproduction does not occur in bacteria. The point of departure in bacterial reproduction is always that one individual divides itself into two identical descendants. * In the bacterial world, however, there is certainly exchange of hereditary characteristics (DNA). This type of exchange is called horizontal gene transfer. * There are 3 basic ways for the exchange of DNA between bacteria: conjugation, transduction and natural transformation. Each of these has its specific impact on the species. * During conjugation, a piece of DNA is copied in one bacterium and transferred to another via a temporary connection, a conjugative pilus. In this way, for example, a particular gene that codes for resistance against antibiotics can be transmitted. * In transduction, the transfer of DNA takes place with the aid of bacteriophages. The gene that codes for the toxin produced by Vibrio cholerae is spread by transduction. * In transformation, DNA that is located outside the cell is fragmented and imported into the cell, after which, via recombination, the DNA replaces a piece of original DNA in the chromosome of the host. Transformation is responsible for, among other things, antigen variation in the pneumococcal capsule. Antigen variation helps the pneumococci to resist the immune response leading to the forming of antibodies and adequate opsonisation.

  15. The Use of Chromatin Insulators to Improve the Expression and Safety of Integrating Gene Transfer Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The therapeutic application of recombinant retroviruses and other integrating gene transfer vectors has been limited by problems of vector expression and vector-mediated genotoxicity. These problems arise in large part from the interactions between vector sequences and the genomic environment surrounding sites of integration. Strides have been made in overcoming both of these problems through the modification of deleterious vector sequences, the inclusion of better enhancers and promoters, and the use of alternative virus systems. However, these modifications often add other restrictions on vector design, which in turn can further limit therapeutic applications. As an alternative, several groups have been investigating a class of DNA regulatory elements known as chromatin insulators. These elements provide a means of blocking the interaction between an integrating vector and the target cell genome in a manner that is independent of the vector transgene, regulatory elements, or virus of origin. This review outlines the background, rationale, and evidence for using chromatin insulators to improve the expression and safety of gene transfer vectors. Also reviewed are topological factors that constrain the use of insulators in integrating gene transfer vectors, alternative sources of insulators, and the role of chromatin insulators as one of several components for optimal vector design. PMID:21247248

  16. Staphylococcus aureus temperate bacteriophage: carriage and horizontal gene transfer is lineage associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Alex J; Witney, Adam A; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of human and animal infections. Bacteriophage are a class of mobile genetic element (MGE) that carry virulence genes and disseminate them horizontally, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), the immune evasion cluster (IEC) associated with human specificity, and enterotoxin A the major toxin associated with food poisoning. S. aureus isolates group into major clonal complex (CC) lineages that largely evolve independently due to possession of different restriction-modification (RM) systems. We aimed to better understand the horizontal and vertical transmission dynamics of virulence and resistance genes by bacteriophage by using (i) bioinformatic approaches to analyze bacteriophage genomes from the first 79 sequenced S. aureus isolates and (ii) S. aureus microarrays to analyze the distribution of bacteriophage and virulence genes in S. aureus isolates from a broader range of lineages. The distribution of eight bacteriophage families was highly variable but lineage associated. Nevertheless, there was evidence of frequent acquisition and loss and not just vertical transmission. Most bacteriophage genes were dispensable, and extensive mosaicism was seen. Surprisingly, virulence genes were tightly associated with specific phage families. This data suggests S. aureus bacteriophage evolve rapidly, and the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of virulence genes encoded by bacteriophage is restricted by bacteriophage family and the lineage of the host bacterium, delaying the evolution of fully resistant and virulent strains.

  17. Improving the Safety of Cell Therapy Products by Suicide Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eDi Stasi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T-cell therapy can involve donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the administration of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TILs expanded ex-vivo, or more recently the use of T cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR redirected T cells. However cellular therapies can pose significant risks, including graft-versus-host-disease and other on and off-target effects, and therefore strategies need to be implemented to permanently reverse any sign of toxicity. A suicide gene is a genetically encoded molecule that allows selective destruction of adoptively transferred cells. Suicide gene addition to cellular therapeutic products can lead to selective ablation of gene-modified cells, preventing collateral damage to contiguous cells and/or tissues. The ‘ideal’ suicide gene would ensure the safety of gene modified cellular applications by granting irreversible elimination of ‘all’ and ‘only’ the cells responsible for the unwanted toxicity. This review presents the suicide gene safety systems reported to date, with a focus on the state-of-the-art and potential applications regarding two of the most extensively validated suicide genes, including the clinical setting: herpes-simplex-thymidine-kinase (HSV-TK and inducible-caspase-9 (iCasp9.

  18. Improving the safety of cell therapy products by suicide gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin S; Lamb, Lawrence S; Goldman, Frederick; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy can involve donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the administration of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte expanded ex-vivo, or more recently the use of T cell receptor or chimeric antigen receptor redirected T cells. However, cellular therapies can pose significant risks, including graft-vs.-host-disease and other on and off-target effects, and therefore strategies need to be implemented to permanently reverse any sign of toxicity. A suicide gene is a genetically encoded molecule that allows selective destruction of adoptively transferred cells. Suicide gene addition to cellular therapeutic products can lead to selective ablation of gene-modified cells, preventing collateral damage to contiguous cells and/or tissues. The "ideal" suicide gene would ensure the safety of gene modified cellular applications by granting irreversible elimination of "all" and "only" the cells responsible for the unwanted toxicity. This review presents the suicide gene safety systems reported to date, with a focus on the state-of-the-art and potential applications regarding two of the most extensively validated suicide genes, including the clinical setting: herpes-simplex-thymidine-kinase and inducible-caspase-9.

  19. Horizontal transfer of β-carbonic anhydrase genes from prokaryotes to protozoans, insects, and nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari Emameh, Reza; Barker, Harlan R; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Parkkila, Seppo; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2016-03-16

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a movement of genetic information occurring outside of normal mating activities. It is especially common between prokaryotic endosymbionts and their protozoan, insect, and nematode hosts. Although beta carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) plays a crucial role in metabolic functions of many living organisms, the origin of β-CA genes in eukaryotic species remains unclear. This study was conducted using phylogenetics, prediction of subcellular localization, and identification of β-CA, transposase, integrase, and resolvase genes on the MGEs of bacteria. We also structurally analyzed β-CAs from protozoans, insects, and nematodes and their putative prokaryotic common ancestors, by homology modelling. Our investigations of a number of target genomes revealed that genes coding for transposase, integrase, resolvase, and conjugation complex proteins have been integrated with β-CA gene sequences on mobile genetic elements (MGEs) which have facilitated the mobility of β-CA genes from bacteria to protozoan, insect, and nematode species. The prokaryotic origin of protozoan, insect, and nematode β-CA enzymes is supported by phylogenetic analyses, prediction of subcellular localization, and homology modelling. MGEs form a complete set of enzymatic tools, which are relevant to HGT of β-CA gene sequences from prokaryotes to protozoans, insects, and nematodes.

  20. Improvement of lentiviral transfer vectors using cis-acting regulatory elements for increased gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Gonçalo; Monteiro, Francisca; Burger, Christa; Alves, Paula M

    2011-09-01

    Lentiviral vectors are an important tool for gene delivery in vivo and in vitro. The success of gene transfer approaches relies on high and stable levels of gene expression. To this end, several molecular strategies have been employed to manipulate these vectors towards improving gene expression in the targeted animal cells. Low gene expression can be accepted due to the weak transcription from the majority of available mammalian promoters; however, this obstacle can be in part overcome by the insertion of cis-acting elements that enhance gene expression in various expression contexts. In this work, we created different lentiviral vectors in which several posttranscriptional regulatory elements, namely the Woodchuck hepatitis posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) and different specialized poly(A) termination sequences (BGH and SV40) were used to develop vectors leading to improved transgene expression. These vectors combine the advantages of restriction enzyme/ligation-independent cloning eliminating the instability and recombinogenic problems occurring from traditional cloning methods in lentiviral expression vectors and were tested by expressing GFP and the firefly Luciferase reporter gene from different cellular promoters in different cell lines. We show that the promoter activity varies between cell lines and is affected by the lentiviral genomic context. Moreover, we show that the combination of the WPRE element with the BGH poly(A) signal significantly enhances transgene expression. The vectors herein created can be easily modified and adapted without the need for extensive recloning making them a valuable tool for viral vector development.

  1. Bayesian analysis of congruence of core genes in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus and implications on horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Matzke

    Full Text Available It is often suggested that horizontal gene transfer is so ubiquitous in microbes that the concept of a phylogenetic tree representing the pattern of vertical inheritance is oversimplified or even positively misleading. "Universal proteins" have been used to infer the organismal phylogeny, but have been criticized as being only the "tree of one percent." Currently, few options exist for those wishing to rigorously assess how well a universal protein phylogeny, based on a relative handful of well-conserved genes, represents the phylogenetic histories of hundreds of genes. Here, we address this problem by proposing a visualization method and a statistical test within a Bayesian framework. We use the genomes of marine cyanobacteria, a group thought to exhibit substantial amounts of HGT, as a test case. We take 379 orthologous gene families from 28 cyanobacteria genomes and estimate the Bayesian posterior distributions of trees - a "treecloud" - for each, as well as for a concatenated dataset based on putative "universal proteins." We then calculate the average distance between trees within and between all treeclouds on various metrics and visualize this high-dimensional space with non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMMDS. We show that the tree space is strongly clustered and that the universal protein treecloud is statistically significantly closer to the center of this tree space than any individual gene treecloud. We apply several commonly-used tests for incongruence/HGT and show that they agree HGT is rare in this dataset, but make different choices about which genes were subject to HGT. Our results show that the question of the representativeness of the "tree of one percent" is a quantitative empirical question, and that the phylogenetic central tendency is a meaningful observation even if many individual genes disagree due to the various sources of incongruence.

  2. Molecular variation and horizontal gene transfer of the homocysteine methyltransferase gene mmuM and its distribution in clinical pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jianchao; Wang, Huifeng; Bao, Bokan; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jinfang; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Aifang; Lu, Junwan; Li, Peizhen; Ying, Jun; Liu, Qi; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Jinsong; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Tieli; Xu, Zuyuan; Ni, Liyan; Bao, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    The homocysteine methyltransferase encoded by mmuM is widely distributed among microbial organisms. It is the key enzyme that catalyzes the last step in methionine biosynthesis and plays an important role in the metabolism process. It also enables the microbial organisms to tolerate high concentrations of selenium in the environment. In this research, 533 mmuM gene sequences covering 70 genera of the bacteria were selected from GenBank database. The distribution frequency of mmuM is different in the investigated genera of bacteria. The mapping results of 160 mmuM reference sequences showed that the mmuM genes were found in 7 species of pathogen genomes sequenced in this work. The polymerase chain reaction products of one mmuM genotype (NC_013951 as the reference) were sequenced and the sequencing results confirmed the mapping results. Furthermore, 144 representative sequences were chosen for phylogenetic analysis and some mmuM genes from totally different genera (such as the genes between Escherichia and Klebsiella and between Enterobacter and Kosakonia) shared closer phylogenetic relationship than those from the same genus. Comparative genomic analysis of the mmuM encoding regions on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes showed that pKF3-140 and pIP1206 plasmids shared a 21 kb homology region and a 4.9 kb fragment in this region was in fact originated from the Escherichia coli chromosome. These results further suggested that mmuM gene did go through the gene horizontal transfer among different species or genera of bacteria. High-throughput sequencing combined with comparative genomics analysis would explore distribution and dissemination of the mmuM gene among bacteria and its evolution at a molecular level.

  3. Bayesian analysis of congruence of core genes in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus and implications on horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Nicholas J; Shih, Patrick M; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2014-01-01

    It is often suggested that horizontal gene transfer is so ubiquitous in microbes that the concept of a phylogenetic tree representing the pattern of vertical inheritance is oversimplified or even positively misleading. "Universal proteins" have been used to infer the organismal phylogeny, but have been criticized as being only the "tree of one percent." Currently, few options exist for those wishing to rigorously assess how well a universal protein phylogeny, based on a relative handful of well-conserved genes, represents the phylogenetic histories of hundreds of genes. Here, we address this problem by proposing a visualization method and a statistical test within a Bayesian framework. We use the genomes of marine cyanobacteria, a group thought to exhibit substantial amounts of HGT, as a test case. We take 379 orthologous gene families from 28 cyanobacteria genomes and estimate the Bayesian posterior distributions of trees - a "treecloud" - for each, as well as for a concatenated dataset based on putative "universal proteins." We then calculate the average distance between trees within and between all treeclouds on various metrics and visualize this high-dimensional space with non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMMDS). We show that the tree space is strongly clustered and that the universal protein treecloud is statistically significantly closer to the center of this tree space than any individual gene treecloud. We apply several commonly-used tests for incongruence/HGT and show that they agree HGT is rare in this dataset, but make different choices about which genes were subject to HGT. Our results show that the question of the representativeness of the "tree of one percent" is a quantitative empirical question, and that the phylogenetic central tendency is a meaningful observation even if many individual genes disagree due to the various sources of incongruence.

  4. Horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions in all categories of the living matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the history of widespread exchanges of genetic segments initiated over 3 billion years ago, to be part of their life style, by sphero-protoplastic cells, the ancestors of archaea, prokaryota, and eukaryota. These primordial cells shared a hostile anaerobic and overheated environment and competed for survival. "Coexist with, or subdue and conquer, expropriate its most useful possessions, or symbiose with it, your competitor" remain cellular life's basic rules. This author emphasizes the role of viruses, both in mediating cell fusions, such as the formation of the first eukaryotic cell(s) from a united crenarchaeon and prokaryota, and the transfer of host cell genes integrated into viral (phages) genomes. After rising above the Darwinian threshold, rigid rules of speciation and vertical inheritance in the three domains of life were established, but horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions were never abolished. The author proves with extensive, yet highly selective documentation, that not only unicellular microorganisms, but the most complex multicellular entities of the highest ranks resort to, and practice, cell fusions, and donate and accept horizontally (laterally) transferred genes. Cell fusions and horizontally exchanged genetic materials remain the fundamental attributes and inherent characteristics of the living matter, whether occurring accidentally or sought after intentionally. These events occur to cells stagnating for some 3 milliard years at a lower yet amazingly sophisticated level of evolution, and to cells achieving the highest degree of differentiation, and thus functioning in dependence on the support of a most advanced multicellular host, like those of the human brain. No living cell is completely exempt from gene drains or gene insertions.

  5. Marine Snow ― A Hotspot Microenvironment for Microbial Horizontal Gene Transfer and Enhanced Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H.

    2016-02-01

    Marine snow is the hotspot for microbial biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Compared to their free-living counterparts, marine snow-associated microorganisms (MSAM) usually possess higher diversity, increased abundance, and enhanced activities such as respiration and extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of biopolymers. MSAM are usually copiotrophic, while many free-living microorganisms, particularly those thriving in the open ocean, are oligotrophic. The sinking of marine snow, along with zooplankton fecal pellets and algal phytodetrital aggregates, contributes to the export and sequestration of particulate organic carbon in the ocean. The enriched abundance and diversity of MSAM may facilitate intraspecies and interspecies horizontal gene transfer due to the close spatial juxtaposition of the microbial cells and to the surface-stimulated gene expression for natural competency. The enhanced genetic exchange induced by living on marine snow may lay a foundation for the microbial (micro)diversity and (micro)evolution, especially in the deep ocean where the abundance of the resident free-living microorganisms is generally low. The enhanced genetic exchange among MSAM may also facilitate the dispersion and acquirement of unique metabolic genes, particular for recalcitrant organic matter in the organically depleted deep ocean waters. Thus, the enhanced horizontal gene transfer frequency in marine snow-associated microbial communities may help to explain the biogeography of deep-sea microorganisms. Furthermore, this community genetic characteristic may influence carbon sequestration in the ocean by modulating both the biological pump and the microbial carbon pump. Under increased anthropogenic impacts, marine snow warrants in depth investigation, especially on its perspective of enhanced microbial horizontal gene transfer and metabolic activities.

  6. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes.

  7. Involvement of plastid, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virginia Sanchez-Puerta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on plant-to-plant horizontal gene transfer (HGT involving the three DNA-containing cellular compartments. It highlights the great incidence of HGT in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA of angiosperms, the increasing number of examples in plant nuclear genomes, and the lack of any convincing evidence for HGT in the well-studied plastid genome of land plants. Most of the foreign mitochondrial genes are non-functional, generally found as pseudogenes in the recipient plant mtDNA that maintains its functional native genes. The few exceptions involve chimeric HGT, in which foreign and native copies recombine leading to a functional and single copy of the gene. Maintenance of foreign genes in plant mitochondria is probably the result of genetic drift, but a possible evolutionary advantage may be conferred through the generation of genetic diversity by gene conversion between native and foreign copies. Conversely, a few cases of nuclear HGT in plants involve functional transfers of novel genes that resulted in adaptive evolution. Direct cell-to-cell contact between plants (e.g. host-parasite relationships or natural grafting facilitate the exchange of genetic material, in which HGT has been reported for both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and in the form of genomic DNA, instead of RNA. A thorough review of the literature indicates that HGT in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of angiosperms is much more frequent than previously expected and that the evolutionary impact and mechanisms underlying plant-to-plant HGT remain to be uncovered.

  8. Ocular gene transfer in the spotlight: implications of newspaper content for clinical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminy, Shelly; Bubela, Tania

    2014-07-16

    Ocular gene transfer clinical trials are raising hopes for blindness treatments and attracting media attention. News media provide an accessible health information source for patients and the public, but are often criticized for overemphasizing benefits and underplaying risks of novel biomedical interventions. Overly optimistic portrayals of unproven interventions may influence public and patient expectations; the latter may cause patients to downplay risks and over-emphasize benefits, with implications for informed consent for clinical trials. We analyze the news media communications landscape about ocular gene transfer and make recommendations for improving communications between clinicians and potential trial participants in light of media coverage. We analyzed leading newspaper articles about ocular gene transfer (1990-2012) from United States (n = 55), Canada (n = 26), and United Kingdom (n = 77) from Factiva and Canadian Newsstand databases using pre-defined coding categories. We evaluated the content of newspaper articles about ocular gene transfer for hereditary retinopathies, exploring representations of framing techniques, research design, risks/benefits, and translational timelines. The dominant frame in 61% of stories was a celebration of progress, followed by human-interest in 30% of stories. Missing from the positive frames were explanations of research design; articles conflated clinical research with treatment. Conflicts-of-interest and funding sources were similarly omitted. Attention was directed to the benefits of gene transfer, while risks were only reported in 43% of articles. A range of visual outcomes was described from slowing vision loss to cure, but the latter was the most frequently represented even though it is clinically infeasible. Despite the prominence of visual benefit portrayals, 87% of the articles failed to provide timelines for the commencement of clinical trials or for clinical implementation. Our analysis confirms

  9. Gene transfer properties and structural modeling of human stem cell-derived AAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura J; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Carvaines, Sarah K; Van Vliet, Kim; Yang, Ethel; Wong, Kamehameha K; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Chatterjee, Saswati

    2014-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are proving to be remarkably successful for in vivo gene delivery. Based upon reports of abundant AAV in the human marrow, we tested CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells for the presence of natural AAV. Here, we report for the first time, the presence of novel AAV variants in healthy CD34(+) human peripheral blood stem cells. The majority of healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors were found to harbor AAV in their CD34(+) cells. Every AAV isolated from CD34(+) cells mapped to AAV Clade F. Gene transfer vectors derived from these novel AAVs efficiently underwent entry and postentry processing in human cord blood stem cells and supported stable gene transfer into long-term, in vivo engrafting human HSCs significantly better than other serotypes. AAVHSC-transduced human CD34(+) cells engrafted in vivo and gave rise to differentiated transgene-expressing progeny. Importantly, gene-marked CD34(+) stem cells persisted long term in xenograft recipients, indicating transduction of primitive progenitors. Notably, correlation of structure with function permitted identification of potential capsid components important for HSC transduction. Thus, AAVHSCs represent a new class of genetic vectors for the manipulation of HSC genomes.

  10. CysQ of , a Protozoa, May Have Been Acquired from Bacteria by Horizontal Gene Transfer

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    Ji Young Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is the movement of genetic material between kingdoms and is considered to play a positive role in adaptation. Cryptosporidium parvum is a parasitic protozoan that causes an infectious disease. Its genome sequencing reported 14 bacteria-like proteins in the nuclear genome. Among them, cgd2_1810, which has been annotated as CysQ, a sulfite synthesis pathway protein, is listed as one of the candidates of genes horizontally transferred from bacterial origin. In this report, we examined this issue using phylogenetic analysis. Our BLAST search showed that C. parvum CysQ protein had the highest similarity with that of proteobacteria. Analysis with NCBI's Conserved Domain Tree showed phylogenetic incongruence, in that C. parvum CysQ protein was located within a branch of proteobacteria in the cd01638 domain, a bacterial member of the inositol monophosphatase family. According to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway, the sulfate assimilation pathway, where CysQ plays an important role, is well conserved in most eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes. However, the Apicomplexa, including C. parvum, largely lack orthologous genes of the pathway, suggesting its loss in those protozoan lineages. Therefore, we conclude that C. parvum regained cysQ from proteobacteria by HGT, although its functional role is elusive.

  11. Insights on the Horizontal Gene Transfer of Carbapenemase Determinants in the Opportunistic Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge; Domingues, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a driving force to the evolution of bacteria. The fast emergence of antimicrobial resistance reflects the ability of genetic adaptation of pathogens. Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged in the last few decades as an important opportunistic nosocomial pathogen, in part due to its high capacity of acquiring resistance to diverse antibiotic families, including to the so-called last line drugs such as carbapenems. The rampant selective pressure and genetic exchange of resistance genes hinder the effective treatment of resistant infections. A. baumannii uses all the resistance mechanisms to survive against carbapenems but production of carbapenemases are the major mechanism, which may act in synergy with others. A. baumannii appears to use all the mechanisms of gene dissemination. Beyond conjugation, the mostly reported recent studies point to natural transformation, transduction and outer membrane vesicles-mediated transfer as mechanisms that may play a role in carbapenemase determinants spread. Understanding the genetic mobilization of carbapenemase genes is paramount in preventing their dissemination. Here we review the carbapenemases found in A. baumannii and present an overview of the current knowledge of contributions of the various HGT mechanisms to the molecular epidemiology of carbapenem resistance in this relevant opportunistic pathogen. PMID:27681923

  12. Horizontal gene transfer events reshape the global landscape of arm race between viruses and homo sapiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Yi-Quan; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, San-Jie; Chen, Shan-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) drives the evolution of recipient organism particularly if it provides a novel function which enhances the fitness or its adaption to the environment. Virus-host co-evolution is attractive for studying co-evolutionary processes, since viruses strictly replicate inside of the host cells and thus their evolution is inexorably tangled with host biology. HGT, as a mechanism of co-evolution between human and viruses, has been widely documented, however, the roles HGT play during the interaction between human and viruses are still in their infancy. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the genes horizontally transferred between viruses and their corresponding human hosts. Our study suggests that the HGT genes in human are predominantly enriched in immune related GO terms while viral HGT genes are tend to be encoded by viruses which promote the invasion of immune system of hosts. Based on our results, it gives us a hint about the evolution trajectory of HGT events. Overall, our study suggests that the HGT between human and viruses are highly relevant to immune interaction and probably reshaped the arm race between hosts and viruses. PMID:27270140

  13. Horizontal Transfer of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in the Subsurface of a Poultry Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y.; Ward, M.; Hilpert, M.

    2008-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are considered to be important man-made reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. At a poultry farm, we, together with Mr.~James Doolittle from USDA, measured the apparent subsurface electrical conductivity (ECa) using a EM38 meter. The resulting ECaR) associated with the poultry farm due to the fact that tetracycline (Tc) is one of the most frequently used antibiotics in food animal production and therefore is probably used at this farm. Soil and aquifer samples were taken from the farm. TcR bacteria were detected, with higher concentrations in the top layer of soil than in the aquifer. TcR bacteria were then enriched from a soil sample, and two classes of TcR genes were detected: tet(M) genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins and tet(L) genes encoding tet efflux pumps. Sequences of the PCR products were compared to known tet(M) and tet(L) genes in GenBank using BLASTN. Phylogenetic trees were also built based on the sequence information. The tet(M) genes found in our soil sample were highly similar to those located on transposons. In a soil microcosm experiment, we used the aforementioned soil sample as incubation medium as well as genetic donor (TcR soil bacteria), and a green fluorescent strain of E. coli as a model genetic recipient to study horizontal transfer of TcR genes from soil bacteria to naïve bacteria. Concentrations of inoculated E. coli were continuously monitored for 15 days, TcR E. coli isolated, and colony PCR performed. The tet(M) genes were found to be transferred to naïve E. coli. The highest horizontal transfer ratio, 0.62 transconjugant per recipient, was observed when Tc was supplemented to a soil microcosm at a concentration of 140 μg/kg soil. Modeling is also ongoing to obtain a better understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  14. Tolerance induction to cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase by hepatic AAV gene transfer: implications for antigen presentation and immunotoxicity.

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    Ashley T Martino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic gene transfer, in particular using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, has been shown to induce immune tolerance to several protein antigens. This approach has been exploited in animal models of inherited protein deficiency for systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins. Adequate levels of transgene expression in hepatocytes induce a suppressive T cell response, thereby promoting immune tolerance. This study addresses the question of whether AAV gene transfer can induce tolerance to a cytoplasmic protein.AAV-2 vector-mediated hepatic gene transfer for expression of cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase (beta-gal was performed in immune competent mice, followed by a secondary beta-gal gene transfer with E1/E3-deleted adenoviral Ad-LacZ vector to provoke a severe immunotoxic response. Transgene expression from the AAV-2 vector in approximately 2% of hepatocytes almost completely protected from inflammatory T cell responses against beta-gal, eliminated antibody formation, and significantly reduced adenovirus-induced hepatotoxicity. Consequently, approximately 10% of hepatocytes continued to express beta-gal 45 days after secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer, a time point when control mice had lost all Ad-LacZ derived expression. Suppression of inflammatory T cell infiltration in the liver and liver damage was linked to specific transgene expression and was not seen for secondary gene transfer with Ad-GFP. A combination of adoptive transfer studies and flow cytometric analyses demonstrated induction of Treg that actively suppressed CD8(+ T cell responses to beta-gal and that was amplified in liver and spleen upon secondary Ad-LacZ gene transfer.These data demonstrate that tolerance induction by hepatic AAV gene transfer does not require systemic delivery of the transgene product and that expression of a cytoplasmic neo-antigen in few hepatocytes can induce Treg and provide long-term suppression of inflammatory responses and immunotoxicity.

  15. Improved Gene Transfer with Functionalized Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles of Reduced Cytotoxicity

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    Zhengwen Zhan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of genetically caused diseases. Successful gene delivery requires an efficient carrier to transfer the desired gene into host cells. Recently, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs functionalized with 25 kD polyethyleneimine (PEI were extensively used as gene delivery carriers. However, 25 kD PEI could significantly reduce the safety of the modified MSNs although it is efficient for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. In addition, limited drug loading remains a challenge for conventional MSNs drug carriers. Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs with high pore volume, tunable pore size, and excellent biocompatibility are attractive alternatives. To make them more efficient, a less toxic 1.8 kD PEI polymer was used to functionalize the HMSNs which have large pore size (~10 nm and form PEI-HMSNs. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic images showed that HMSNs were spherical in shape and approximately 270 nm in diameter with uniform hollow nanostructures. The maximum loading capacity of green fluorescent protein labeled DNA (GFP-DNA in PEI-HMSNs was found to be 37.98 mg/g. The loading capacity of PEI-HMSNs was nearly three-fold higher than those of PEI modified solid nanoparticles, indicating that both hollow and large pores contributed to the increase in DNA adsorption. The transfection of GFP-DNA plasmid loaded in PEI-HMSNs was increased two-fold in comparison to that of 25 kD PEI. MTT assays in Lovo cells showed that the cell viability was more than 85% when the concentration of PEI-HMSNs was 120 µg/mL, whereas the cell viability was less than 20% when the 25 kD PEI was used at the same concentration. These results indicated that PEI-HMSNs could be used as a delivery system for nucleic acids due to good biocompatibility, high gene loading capacity, and enhanced gene transfer efficiency.

  16. The advantages and disadvantages of horizontal gene transfer and the emergence of the first species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) is beneficial to a cell if the acquired gene confers a useful function, but is detrimental if the gene has no function, if it is incompatible with existing genes, or if it is a selfishly replicating mobile element. If the balance of these effects is beneficial on average, we would expect cells to evolve high rates of acceptance of horizontally transferred genes, whereas if it is detrimental, cells should reduce the rate of HGT as far as possible. It has been proposed that the rate of HGT was very high in the early stages of prokaryotic evolution, and hence there were no separate lineages of organisms. Only when the HGT rate began to fall, would lineages begin to emerge with their own distinct sets of genes. Evolution would then become more tree-like. This phenomenon has been called the Darwinian Threshold. Results We study a model for genome evolution that incorporates both beneficial and detrimental effects of HGT. We show that if rate of gene loss during genome replication is high, as was probably the case in the earliest genomes before the time of the last universal common ancestor, then a high rate of HGT is favourable. HGT leads to the rapid spread of new genes and allows the build-up of larger, fitter genomes than could be achieved by purely vertical inheritance. In contrast, if the gene loss rate is lower, as in modern prokaryotes, then HGT is, on average, unfavourable. Conclusions Modern cells should therefore evolve to reduce HGT if they can, although the prevalence of independently replicating mobile elements and viruses may mean that cells cannot avoid HGT in practice. In the model, natural selection leads to gradual improvement of the replication accuracy and gradual decrease in the optimal rate of HGT. By clustering genomes based on gene content, we show that there are no separate lineages of organisms when the rate of HGT is high; however, as the rate of HGT decreases, a tree-like structure emerges with well

  17. The advantages and disadvantages of horizontal gene transfer and the emergence of the first species

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    Higgs Paul G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT is beneficial to a cell if the acquired gene confers a useful function, but is detrimental if the gene has no function, if it is incompatible with existing genes, or if it is a selfishly replicating mobile element. If the balance of these effects is beneficial on average, we would expect cells to evolve high rates of acceptance of horizontally transferred genes, whereas if it is detrimental, cells should reduce the rate of HGT as far as possible. It has been proposed that the rate of HGT was very high in the early stages of prokaryotic evolution, and hence there were no separate lineages of organisms. Only when the HGT rate began to fall, would lineages begin to emerge with their own distinct sets of genes. Evolution would then become more tree-like. This phenomenon has been called the Darwinian Threshold. Results We study a model for genome evolution that incorporates both beneficial and detrimental effects of HGT. We show that if rate of gene loss during genome replication is high, as was probably the case in the earliest genomes before the time of the last universal common ancestor, then a high rate of HGT is favourable. HGT leads to the rapid spread of new genes and allows the build-up of larger, fitter genomes than could be achieved by purely vertical inheritance. In contrast, if the gene loss rate is lower, as in modern prokaryotes, then HGT is, on average, unfavourable. Conclusions Modern cells should therefore evolve to reduce HGT if they can, although the prevalence of independently replicating mobile elements and viruses may mean that cells cannot avoid HGT in practice. In the model, natural selection leads to gradual improvement of the replication accuracy and gradual decrease in the optimal rate of HGT. By clustering genomes based on gene content, we show that there are no separate lineages of organisms when the rate of HGT is high; however, as the rate of HGT decreases, a tree

  18. Control of gene transfer on a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer by the incorporation of carbonate and fluoride ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2011-07-01

    Gene transfer techniques are useful tools for controlling cell behavior, such as proliferation and differentiation. We have recently developed an efficient area-specific gene transfer system using a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer (DF-Ap layer). In this system, partial dissolution of the composite layer is likely to be a crucial step for gene transfer. In the present study, layer solubility was adjusted by incorporating various contents of carbonate or fluoride ions into the DF-Ap layer via ionic substitution for the apatite crystals. Carbonate ion incorporation increased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby increasing the efficiency of gene transfer on the layer. In contrast, the incorporation of fluoride ions decreased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby decreasing the efficiency and delaying the timing of gene transfer on the layer dose-dependently. The present gene transfer system with controllable efficiency and timing would be useful in tissue engineering applications because cell differentiation can be induced effectively by regulating appropriate gene expression with suitable timing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene expression system in green sulfur bacteria by conjugative plasmid transfer.

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    Chihiro Azai

    Full Text Available Gene transfer and expression systems in green sulfur bacteria were established by bacterial conjugation with Escherichia coli. Conjugative plasmid transfer from E. coli S17-1 to a thermophilic green sulfur bacterium, Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum WT2321, was executed with RSF1010-derivative broad-host-range plasmids, named pDSK5191 and pDSK5192, that confer erythromycin and streptomycin/spectinomycin resistance, respectively. The transconjugants harboring these plasmids were reproducibly obtained at a frequency of approximately 10(-5 by selection with erythromycin and a combination of streptomycin and spectinomycin, respectively. These plasmids were stably maintained in C. tepidum cells in the presence of these antibiotics. The plasmid transfer to another mesophilic green sulfur bacterium, C. limnaeum (formerly Chlorobium phaeobacteroides RK-j-1, was also achieved with pDSK5192. The expression plasmid based on pDSK5191 was constructed by incorporating the upstream and downstream regions of the pscAB gene cluster on the C. tepidum genome, since these regions were considered to include a constitutive promoter and a ρ-independent terminator, respectively. Growth defections of the ∆cycA and ∆soxB mutants were completely rescued after introduction of pDSK5191-cycA and -soxB that were designed to express their complementary genes. On the other hand, pDSK5191-6xhis-pscAB, which incorporated the gene cluster of 6xhis-pscA and pscB, produced approximately four times more of the photosynthetic reaction center complex with His-tagged PscA as compared with that expressed in the genome by the conventional natural transformation method. This expression system, based on conjugative plasmid, would be applicable to general molecular biological studies of green sulfur bacteria.

  20. Spatially and temporally controlled gene transfer by electroporation into adherent cells on plasmid DNA-loaded electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kato, Koichi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2004-01-01

    Functional characterization of human genes is one of the most challenging tasks in current genomics. Owing to a large number of newly discovered genes, high-throughput methodologies are greatly needed to express in parallel each gene in living cells. To develop a method that allows efficient transfection of plasmids into adherent cells in spatial- and temporal-specific manners, we studied electric pulse-triggered gene transfer using a plasmid-loaded electrode. A plasmid was loaded on a gold e...

  1. HVJ-based non-viral gene transfer method: successful gene therapy using HGF and VEGF genes in experimental ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Sato, Naoyuki; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2006-01-01

    VEGF and HGF are pleiotropic factors that regulate cell growth, cell motility, and morphogenesis of various types of cells. The receptors of these growth factors are expressed in neurons and endothelial cells, and are identified as neurotrophic, neuroprotective, and angiogenic factors. Indeed, gene therapy using viral vectors encoding the VEGF or HGF gene has been reported to be effective for preventing the expansion of ischemic injury. However, the safety issue of viral vectors is a major problem in clinical application. To overcome this problem, we have developed an HVJ-based non-viral vector, which achieves high-efficiency transfection rates of viral vectors with the safety of liposomes. This review discusses the feasibility of gene therapy using an HVJ-based non-viral vector containing the VEGF or HGF gene for cerebral ischemia.

  2. Bacterial Transport and Fate and Its Effect on Horizontal Gene Transfer in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, N.; Massoudieh, A.; Nguyen, T. H.; Kamai, T.; Zilles, J. L.; Ginn, T. R.; Liang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycling in ecosystems relies heavily on soil bacterial communities. Bacterial communities adapt to natural or anthropogenic disruptions through mutation and horizontal gene transfer. Horizontal gene transfer alters bacterial communities rapidly by transferring DNA across species. A systematic understanding of bacterial transport and fate and its effects on horizontal gene transfer is critical for predicting and harnessing bacterial adaption and evolution in soil. In this work, a multi-scale approach was applied to study the effects of both flagella and motility on transport and fate of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii in porous media. Both micromodel and column experiments showed decreasing deposition over time, suggesting that both flagellated and non-flagellated cells were blocked from deposition by previously deposited cells. In later stages, ripening effects were also observed, and they appeared earlier for the non-flagellated strain. Based on the overall clean collector removal efficiencies determined from micromodel and column experiments, the non-motile and non-flagellated strain DJNM deposited the most, while the motile, wild-type strain DJ showed the least deposition. The overall clean collector removal efficiencies was due to decreased deposition of motile cells on the front sides of the collectors (relative to the flow direction). The horizontal gene transfer of extracellular DNA, known as natural transformation, was evaluated with both dissolved and adsorbed extracellular DNA and with motile and non-motile but flagellated strains (DJ and DJ77, respectively). The distinct transport mechanisms of these strains resulted in different natural transformation rates and relationships to the concentration of cells and dissolved extracellular DNA. A modified mass action type relationship with power relationships was established to model the differences in natural transformation between DJ and DJ77. A cell-DNA pairing hypothesis was

  3. Contribution of Multiple Inter-kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers to Evolution and Adaptation of Amphibian-killing Chytrid, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

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    Baofa Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amphibian populations are experiencing catastrophic declines driven by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. Although horizontal gene transfer (HGT facilitates the evolution and adaptation in many fungi by conferring novel function genes to the recipient fungi, inter-kingdom HGT in Bd remains largely unexplored. In this study, our investigation detects 19 bacterial genes transferred to Bd, including metallo-beta-lactamase and arsenate reductase that play important roles in the resistance to antibiotics and arsenates. Moreover, three probable HGT gene families in Bd are from plants and one gene family coding the ankyrin repeat-containing protein appears to come from oomycetes. The observed multi-copy gene families associated with HGT are probably due to the independent transfer events or gene duplications. Five HGT genes with extracellular locations may relate to infection, and some other genes may participate in a variety of metabolic pathways, and in doing so add important metabolic traits to the recipient. The evolutionary analysis indicates that all the transferred genes evolved under purifying selection, suggesting that their functions in Bd are similar to those of the donors. Collectively, our results indicate that HGT from diverse donors may be an important evolutionary driver of Bd, and improve its adaptations for infecting and colonizing host amphibians.

  4. Contribution of Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers to Evolution and Adaptation of Amphibian-Killing Chytrid, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baofa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jinhua; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W; He, Shunmin; Huang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian populations are experiencing catastrophic declines driven by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Although horizontal gene transfer (HGT) facilitates the evolution and adaptation in many fungi by conferring novel function genes to the recipient fungi, inter-kingdom HGT in Bd remains largely unexplored. In this study, our investigation detects 19 bacterial genes transferred to Bd, including metallo-beta-lactamase and arsenate reductase that play important roles in the resistance to antibiotics and arsenates. Moreover, three probable HGT gene families in Bd are from plants and one gene family coding the ankyrin repeat-containing protein appears to come from oomycetes. The observed multi-copy gene families associated with HGT are probably due to the independent transfer events or gene duplications. Five HGT genes with extracellular locations may relate to infection, and some other genes may participate in a variety of metabolic pathways, and in doing so add important metabolic traits to the recipient. The evolutionary analysis indicates that all the transferred genes evolved under purifying selection, suggesting that their functions in Bd are similar to those of the donors. Collectively, our results indicate that HGT from diverse donors may be an important evolutionary driver of Bd, and improve its adaptations for infecting and colonizing host amphibians.

  5. Fat-to-glucose interconversion by hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzyme genes

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    Marzo F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The glyoxylate cycle, which is well characterized in higher plants and some microorganisms but not in vertebrates, is able to bypass the citric acid cycle to achieve fat-to-carbohydrate interconversion. In this context, the hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzymes, such as isocytrate lyase (ICL and malate synthase (MS, could accomplish the shift of using fat for the synthesis of glucose. Therefore, 20 mice weighing 23.37 ± 0.96 g were hydrodinamically gene transferred by administering into the tail vein a bolus with ICL and MS. After 36 hours, body weight, plasma glucose, respiratory quotient and energy expenditure were measured. The respiratory quotient was increased by gene transfer, which suggests that a higher carbohydrate/lipid ratio is oxidized in such animals. This application could help, if adequate protocols are designed, to induce fat utilization for glucose synthesis, which might be eventually useful to reduce body fat depots in situations of obesity and diabetes.

  6. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

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    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  7. Regulatory T Cells and Immune Tolerance to Coagulation Factor IX in the Context of Intramuscular AAV1 Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Meagan; Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Tacke, Frank; Chao, Hengjun

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells play a major role in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and immunological homeostasis. A variety of strategies have been attempted to induce regulatory T cells for control of unwanted, adverse immunity in autoimmune diseases, transplantation as well as gene transfer. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) following intramuscular AAV1 gene transfer. In the current study, we performed a systematic and comprehensi...

  8. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

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    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  9. Lentivirus vector-mediated gene transfer to the developing bronchiolar airway epithelium in the fetal lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ze-Yan; McKay, Karen; van Asperen, Peter; Zheng, Maolin; Fleming, Jane; Ginn, Samantha L; Kizana, Eddy; Latham, Margot; Feneley, Michael P; Kirkland, Peter D; Rowe, Peter B; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Alexander, Ian E

    2007-06-01

    Development of effective and durable gene therapy for treatment of the respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis remains a formidable challenge. Obstacles include difficulty in achieving efficient gene transfer to mature airway epithelium and the need to stably transduce self-renewing epithelial progenitor cells in order to avoid loss of transgene expression through epithelial turnover. Targeting the developing airway epithelium during fetal life offers the prospect of circumventing these challenges. In the current study we investigated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVg)-pseudotyped HIV-1-derived lentivirus vector-mediated gene transfer to the airway epithelium of mid-gestation fetal lambs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro studies epithelial sheet explants and lung organ culture were used to examine transduction of the proximal and more distal airway epithelium, respectively. For the in vivo studies, vector was delivered directly into the proximal airway. We found that even during the early pseudoglandular and canalicular phases of lung development, occurring through mid-gestation, the proximal bronchial airway epithelium was relatively mature and highly resistant to lentivirus-mediated transduction. In contrast, the more distal bronchiolar airway epithelium was relatively permissive for transduction although the absolute levels achieved remained low. This result is promising as the bronchiolar airway epithelium is a major site of pathology in the cystic fibrosis airway, and much higher levels of transduction are likely to be achieved by developing strategies that increase the amount of vector reaching the more distal airway after intratracheal delivery.

  10. Transluminal gene transfer into brain capillary endothelial cells in vivo with HVJ-liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Matsuo, Hirotami; Koyabu, Noriko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Fujimoto, Hidenori; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Narro, Mikihiko; Tsuruo, Takashi; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2002-06-01

    Bioactive proteins or peptides cannot be effectively delivered into brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) or brain parenchyma. In this study, we selectively transferred Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene (beta-gal) as a model gene into BCECs by using the hemagglutination virus of Japan (HVJ)-liposomes. HVJ-liposomes encapsulating a beta-gal plasmid were used to transfect MBEC4 cells in vitro, and were administrated via the internal carotid artery to rat in vivo. Success of the procedure was confirmed by the detection of 116 kDa beta-gal protein in transfected MBEC4 cells and in brain capillaries isolated from transfected rats, by Western blot analysis and histological staining. The enzymatic activities of beta-galactosidase were 5- to 10-fold and 20-fold higher than when beta-gal-containing liposomes without fusogenic activity (uncoated liposomes) or plasmid alone were employed in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Thus, HVJ-liposomes were demonstrated to be a useful vector to transfer a foreign gene into the brain capillary endothelium in vivo via the transluminal route.

  11. Evolution of Phototrophy in the Chloroflexi Phylum Driven by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis M. Ward

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary mechanisms behind the extant distribution of photosynthesis is a point of substantial contention. Hypotheses range from the presence of phototrophy in the last universal common ancestor and massive gene loss in most lineages, to a later origin in Cyanobacteria followed by extensive horizontal gene transfer into the extant phototrophic clades, with intermediate scenarios that incorporate aspects of both end-members. Here, we report draft genomes of 11 Chloroflexi: the phototrophic Chloroflexia isolate Kouleothrix aurantiaca as well as 10 genome bins recovered from metagenomic sequencing of microbial mats found in Japanese hot springs. Two of these metagenome bins encode photrophic reaction centers and several of these bins form a metabolically diverse, monophyletic clade sister to the Anaerolineae class that we term Candidatus Thermofonsia. Comparisons of organismal (based on conserved ribosomal and phototrophy (reaction center and bacteriochlorophyll synthesis protein phylogenies throughout the Chloroflexi demonstrate that two new lineages acquired phototrophy independently via horizontal gene transfer (HGT from different ancestral donors within the classically phototrophic Chloroflexia class. These results illustrate a complex history of phototrophy within this group, with metabolic innovation tied to HGT. These observations do not support simple hypotheses for the evolution of photosynthesis that require massive character loss from many clades; rather, HGT appears to be the defining mechanic for the distribution of phototrophy in many of the extant clades in which it appears.

  12. Major role of local immune responses in antibody formation to factor IX in AAV gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Cao, O; Swalm, B; Dobrzynski, E; Mingozzi, F; Herzog, R W

    2005-10-01

    The risk of an immune response to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product is a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. In order to investigate the mechanism of F.IX-specific lymphocyte activation in the context of adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer to skeletal muscle, we injected AAV-2 vector expressing human F.IX (hF.IX) into outbred immune-competent mice. Systemic hF.IX levels were transiently detected in the circulation, but diminished concomitant with activation of CD4+ T and B cells. ELISPOT assays documented robust responses to hF.IX in the draining lymph nodes of injected muscle by day 14. Formation of inhibitory antibodies to hF.IX was observed over a wide range of vector doses, with increased doses causing stronger immune responses. A prolonged inflammatory reaction in muscle started at 1.5-2 months, but ultimately failed to eliminate transgene expression. By 1.5 months, hF.IX antigen re-emerged in circulation in approximately 70% of animals injected with high vector dose. Hepatic gene transfer elicited only infrequent and weaker immune responses, with higher vector doses causing a reduction in T-cell responses to hF.IX. In summary, the data document substantial influence of target tissue, local antigen presentation, and antigen levels on lymphocyte responses to F.IX.

  13. Strand-biased Gene Distribution in Bacteria Is Related to both Horizontal Gene Transfer and Strand-biased Nucleotide Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Qu, Hongzhu; Wan, Ning; Zhang, Zhang; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although strand-biased gene distribution (SGD) was described some two decades ago, the underlying molecular mechanisms and their relationship remain elusive. Its facets include, but are not limited to, the degree of biases, the strand-preference of genes, and the influence of background nucleotide composition variations. Using a dataset composed of 364 non-redundant bacterial genomes, we sought to illustrate our current understanding of SGD. First, when we divided the collection of bacterial genomes into non-polC and polC groups according to their possession of DnaE isoforms that correlate closely with taxonomy, the SGD of the polC group stood out more significantly than that of the non-polC group. Second, when examining horizontal gene transfer, coupled with gene functional conservation (essentiality) and expressivity (level of expression), we realized that they all contributed to SGD. Third, we further demonstrated a weaker G-dominance on the leading strand of the non-polC group but strong purine dominance (both G and A) on the leading strand of the polC group. We propose that strand-biased nucleotide composition plays a decisive role for SGD since the polC-bearing genomes are not only AT-rich but also have pronounced purine-rich leading strands, and we believe that a special mutation spectrum that leads to a strong purine asymmetry and a strong strand-biased nucleotide composition coupled with functional selections for genes and their functions are both at work. PMID:23084774

  14. Algal endosymbionts as vectors of horizontal gene transfer in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan eQiu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis in eukaryotes occurs in the plastid, an organelle that is derived from a single cyanobacterial primary endosymbiosis in the common ancestor of the supergroup Plantae (or Archaeplastida that includes green, red, and glaucophyte algae and plants. However a variety of other phytoplankton such as the chlorophyll c-containing diatoms, dinoflagellates, and haptophytes contain a red alga-derived plastid that traces its origin to secondary or tertiary (eukaryote engulfs eukaryote endosymbiosis. The hypothesis of Plantae monophyly has only recently been substantiated, however the extent and role of endosymbiotic and horizontal gene transfer (EGT and HGT in algal genome evolution still remain to be fully understood. What is becoming clear from analysis of complete genome data is that algal gene complements can no longer be considered essentially eukaryotic in provenance; i.e., with the expected addition of several hundred cyanobacterial genes derived from EGT and a similar number derived from the mitochondrial ancestor. For example, we now know that foreign cells such as Chlamydiae and other prokaryotes have made significant contributions to plastid functions in Plantae. Perhaps more surprising is the recent finding of extensive bacterium-derived HGT in the nuclear genome of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium purpureum that does not relate to plastid functions. These non-endosymbiont gene transfers not only shaped the evolutionary history of Plantae but also were propagated via secondary endosymbiosis to a multitude of other phytoplankton. Here we discuss the idea that Plantae (in particular red algae are one of the major players in eukaryote genome evolution by virtue of their ability to act as sinks and sources of foreign genes through HGT and endosymbiosis, respectively. This hypothesis recognizes the often under-appreciated Rhodophyta as major sources of genetic novelty among photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  15. Recurrent horizontal transfer of arsenite methyltransferase genes facilitated adaptation of life to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song-Can; Sun, Guo-Xin; Rosen, Barry P; Zhang, Si-Yu; Deng, Ye; Zhu, Bo-Kai; Rensing, Christopher; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-08-10

    The toxic metalloid arsenic has been environmentally ubiquitous since life first arose nearly four billion years ago and presents a challenge for the survival of all living organisms. Its bioavailability has varied dramatically over the history of life on Earth. As life spread, biogeochemical and climate changes cyclically increased and decreased bioavailable arsenic. To elucidate the history of arsenic adaptation across the tree of life, we reconstructed the phylogeny of the arsM gene that encodes the As(III) S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransferase. Our results suggest that life successfully moved into arsenic-rich environments in the late Archean Eon and Proterozoic Eon, respectively, by the spread of arsM genes. The arsM genes of bacterial origin have been transferred to other kingdoms of life on at least six occasions, and the resulting domesticated arsM genes promoted adaptation to environmental arsenic. These results allow us to peer into the history of arsenic adaptation of life on our planet and imply that dissemination of genes encoding diverse adaptive functions to toxic chemicals permit adaptation to changes in concentrations of environmental toxins over evolutionary history.

  16. Radioiodinated Capsids Facilitate In Vivo Non-Invasive Tracking of Adeno-Associated Gene Transfer Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, P; De, B P; He, B; Chen, A; Chiuchiolo, M J; Kim, D; Nikolopoulou, A; Amor-Coarasa, A; Dyke, J P; Voss, H U; Kaminsky, S M; Foley, C P; Vallabhajosula, S; Hu, B; DiMagno, S G; Sondhi, D; Crystal, R G; Babich, J W; Ballon, D

    2017-01-06

    Viral vector mediated gene therapy has become commonplace in clinical trials for a wide range of inherited disorders. Successful gene transfer depends on a number of factors, of which tissue tropism is among the most important. To date, definitive mapping of the spatial and temporal distribution of viral vectors in vivo has generally required postmortem examination of tissue. Here we present two methods for radiolabeling adeno-associated virus (AAV), one of the most commonly used viral vectors for gene therapy trials, and demonstrate their potential usefulness in the development of surrogate markers for vector delivery during the first week after administration. Specifically, we labeled adeno-associated virus serotype 10 expressing the coding sequences for the CLN2 gene implicated in late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with iodine-124. Using direct (Iodogen) and indirect (modified Bolton-Hunter) methods, we observed the vector in the murine brain for up to one week using positron emission tomography. Capsid radioiodination of viral vectors enables non-invasive, whole body, in vivo evaluation of spatial and temporal vector distribution that should inform methods for efficacious gene therapy over a broad range of applications.

  17. Ancient horizontal transfer of transaldolase-like protein gene and its role in plant vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zefeng; Zhou, Yong; Huang, Jinling; Hu, Yunyun; Zhang, Enying; Xie, Zhengwen; Ma, Sijia; Gao, Yun; Song, Song; Xu, Chenwu; Liang, Guohua

    2015-04-01

    A major event in land plant evolution is the origin of vascular tissues, which ensure the long-distance transport of water, nutrients and organic compounds. However, the molecular basis for the origin and evolution of plant vascular tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we investigate the evolution of the land plant TAL-type transaldolase (TAL) gene and its potential function in rice (Oryza sativa) based on phylogenetic analyses and transgenic experiments, respectively. TAL genes are only present in land plants and bacteria. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that land plant TAL genes are derived from Actinobacteria through an ancient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event. Further evidence reveals that land plant TAL genes have undergone positive selection and gained several introns following its acquisition by the most recent common ancestor of land plants. Transgenic plant experiments show that rice TAL is specifically expressed in vascular tissues and that knockdown of TAL expression leads to changes in both the number and pattern of vascular bundles. Our findings show that the ancient HGT of TAL from bacteria probably plays an important role in plant vascular development and adaptation to land environments. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. No evidence for extensive horizontal gene transfer in the genome of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Kumar, Sujai; Laetsch, Dominik R; Stevens, Lewis; Daub, Jennifer; Conlon, Claire; Maroon, Habib; Thomas, Fran; Aboobaker, Aziz A; Blaxter, Mark

    2016-05-03

    Tardigrades are meiofaunal ecdysozoans that are key to understanding the origins of Arthropoda. Many species of Tardigrada can survive extreme conditions through cryptobiosis. In a recent paper [Boothby TC, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(52):15976-15981], the authors concluded that the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini had an unprecedented proportion (17%) of genes originating through functional horizontal gene transfer (fHGT) and speculated that fHGT was likely formative in the evolution of cryptobiosis. We independently sequenced the genome of H. dujardini As expected from whole-organism DNA sampling, our raw data contained reads from nontarget genomes. Filtering using metagenomics approaches generated a draft H. dujardini genome assembly of 135 Mb with superior assembly metrics to the previously published assembly. Additional microbial contamination likely remains. We found no support for extensive fHGT. Among 23,021 gene predictions we identified 0.2% strong candidates for fHGT from bacteria and 0.2% strong candidates for fHGT from nonmetazoan eukaryotes. Cross-comparison of assemblies showed that the overwhelming majority of HGT candidates in the Boothby et al. genome derived from contaminants. We conclude that fHGT into H. dujardini accounts for at most 1-2% of genes and that the proposal that one-sixth of tardigrade genes originate from functional HGT events is an artifact of undetected contamination.

  19. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype 5 vector improves gene transfer in arthritic joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparailly, F; Khoury, M; Vervoordeldonk, M J B; Adriaansen, J; Gicquel, E; Perez, N; Riviere, C; Louis-Plence, P; Noel, D; Danos, O; Douar, A-M; Tak, P P; Jorgensen, C

    2005-04-01

    The potential for gene delivery to joints, using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has received much attention. Different serotypes have different virion shell proteins and, as a consequence, vary in their tropism for diverse tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the transduction efficiency of different AAV serotypes encoding murine secreted alkaline phosphatase (mSEAP) or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase for intraarticular gene delivery in an experimental model of arthritis. The vectors contained AAV2 terminal repeats flanking the reporter gene in an AAV1, AAV2, or AAV5 capsid, producing the pseudotypes rAAV-2/1, rAAV-2/2, and rAAV-2/5. Left knee joints of mice with collagen-induced arthritis were injected and transgene expression was analyzed by chemiluminescence or direct in situ staining of frozen sections. We show for the first time that intraarticular gene transfer with AAV- 2/5 was far more efficient than with the other serotypes tested. Transgene expression was detectable as early as 7 days after injection, reached a maximum at 21 days, and was stably expressed for at least 130 days, whereas AAV-2/1- and AAV-2/2-mediated expression levels were barely detectable. These findings provide a practical application for future local AAV-mediated gene therapy trials in RA.

  20. Survival of antibiotic resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer control antibiotic resistance gene content in anaerobic digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hafer Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp. and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp. anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate (tet(G remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O, tet(W, and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457 to 0.829, P<0.05 with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O or tet(W ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130 to 0.486, P = 0.075 to 0.612. However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O and tet(W ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  1. BMP7 gene transfer via gold nanoparticles into stroma inhibits corneal fibrosis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Tandon

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of BMP7 gene transfer on corneal wound healing and fibrosis inhibition in vivo using a rabbit model. Corneal haze in rabbits was produced with the excimer laser performing -9 diopters photorefractive keratectomy. BMP7 gene was introduced into rabbit keratocytes by polyethylimine-conjugated gold nanoparticles (PEI2-GNPs transfection solution single 5-minute topical application on the eye. Corneal haze and ocular health in live animals was gauged with stereo- and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The levels of fibrosis [α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA, F-actin and fibronectin], immune reaction (CD11b and F4/80, keratocyte apoptosis (TUNEL, calcification (alizarin red, vonKossa and osteocalcin, and delivered-BMP7 gene expression in corneal tissues were quantified with immunofluorescence, western blotting and/or real-time PCR. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF and in vitro experiments were used to characterize the molecular mechanism mediating BMP7's anti-fibrosis effects. PEI2-GNPs showed substantial BMP7 gene delivery into rabbit keratocytes in vivo (2×10(4 gene copies/ug DNA. Localized BMP7 gene therapy showed a significant corneal haze decrease (1.68±0.31 compared to 3.2±0.43 in control corneas; p88%; p<0.0001, and immunoblotting of BMP7-transefected HCFs grown in the presence of TGFβ demonstrated significantly enhanced pSmad-1/5/8 (95%; p<0.001 and Smad6 (53%, p<0.001, and decreased αSMA (78%; p<0.001 protein levels. These results suggest that localized BMP7 gene delivery in rabbit cornea modulates wound healing and inhibits fibrosis in vivo by counter balancing TGFβ1-mediated profibrotic Smad signaling.

  2. Increased in vitro and in vivo gene transfer by adenovirus vectors containing chimeric fiber proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wickham, T.J.; E.; Tzeng; Shears, L. L.; Roelvink, P. W.; Li, Y; Lee, G. M.; Brough, D E; Lizonova, A; Kovesdi, I

    1997-01-01

    Alteration of the natural tropism of adenovirus (Ad) will permit gene transfer into specific cell types and thereby greatly broaden the scope of target diseases that can be treated by using Ad. We have constructed two Ad vectors which contain modifications to the Ad fiber coat protein that redirect virus binding to either alpha(v) integrin [AdZ.F(RGD)] or heparan sulfate [AdZ.F(pK7)] cellular receptors. These vectors were constructed by a novel method involving E4 rescue of an E4-deficient Ad...

  3. HgtSIM: a simulator for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weizhi; Steensen, Kerrin; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The development and application of metagenomic approaches have provided an opportunity to study and define horizontal gene transfer (HGT) on the level of microbial communities. However, no current metagenomic data simulation tools offers the option to introduce defined HGT within a microbial community. Here, we present HgtSIM, a pipeline to simulate HGT event among microbial community members with user-defined mutation levels. It was developed for testing and benchmarking pipelines for recovering HGTs from complex microbial datasets. HgtSIM is implemented in Python3 and is freely available at: https://github.com/songweizhi/HgtSIM.

  4. HgtSIM: a simulator for horizontal gene transfer (HGT in microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhi Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and application of metagenomic approaches have provided an opportunity to study and define horizontal gene transfer (HGT on the level of microbial communities. However, no current metagenomic data simulation tools offers the option to introduce defined HGT within a microbial community. Here, we present HgtSIM, a pipeline to simulate HGT event among microbial community members with user-defined mutation levels. It was developed for testing and benchmarking pipelines for recovering HGTs from complex microbial datasets. HgtSIM is implemented in Python3 and is freely available at: https://github.com/songweizhi/HgtSIM.

  5. Transfer of energy pathway genes in microbial enhanced biological phosphorus removal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dennis H-J; Beiko, Robert G

    2015-07-16

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is an important evolutionary process in microbial evolution. In sewage treatment plants, LGT of antibiotic resistance and xenobiotic degradation-related proteins has been suggested, but the role of LGT outside these processes is unknown. Microbial communities involved in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) have been used to treat wastewater in the last 50 years and may provide insights into adaptation to an engineered environment. We introduce two different types of analysis to identify LGT in EBPR sewage communities, based on identifying assembled sequences with more than one strong taxonomic match, and on unusual phylogenetic patterns. We applied these methods to investigate the role of LGT in six energy-related metabolic pathways. The analyses identified overlapping but non-identical sets of transferred enzymes. All of these were homologous with sequences from known mobile genetic elements, and many were also in close proximity to transposases and integrases in the EBPR data set. The taxonomic method had higher sensitivity than the phylogenetic method, identifying more potential LGTs. Both analyses identified the putative transfer of five enzymes within an Australian community, two in a Danish community, and none in a US-derived culture. Our methods were able to identify sequences with unusual phylogenetic or compositional properties as candidate LGT events. The association of these candidates with known mobile elements supports the hypothesis of transfer. The results of our analysis strongly suggest that LGT has influenced the development of functionally important energy-related pathways in EBPR systems, but transfers may be unique to each community due to different operating conditions or taxonomic composition.

  6. Localized gene transfer into organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and acute hippocampal slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Shen, H

    1993-01-01

    that directs expression of E. coli beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), were microapplied into stratum pyramidale or stratum granulosum of slice cultures. Twenty-four hours later, a cluster of transduced cells expressing beta-gal was observed at the microapplication site. Gene transfer by microapplication was both...... effective and rapid. The titer of the HSVlac stocks was determined on NIH3T3 cells. Eighty-three percent of the beta-gal forming units successfully transduced beta-gal after microapplication to slice cultures. beta-Gal expression was detected as rapidly as 4 h after transduction into cultures of fibroblasts...... or hippocampal slices. The rapid expression of beta-gal by HSVlac allowed efficient transduction of acute hippocampal slices. Many genes have been transduced and expressed using HSV vectors; therefore, this microapplication method can be applied to many neurobiological questions....

  7. Gene transfer by retrovirus-derived shuttle vectors in the generation of murine bispecific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMonte, L B; Nistico, P; Tecce, R; Dellabona, P; Momo, M; Anichini, A; Mariani, M; Natali, P G; Malavasi, F

    1990-01-01

    The present study reports on the use of gene transfer by retrovirus-derived shuttle vectors in the generation of hybrid hybridomas secreting bispecific monoclonal antibodies. neo- and dhfr- genes were infected into distinct murine hybridomas, thus conferring a dominant resistance trait to geneticin (G418) and to methotrexate. The vectors employed were replication-deficient and dependent on complementation by a helper virus provided by the irradiated packaging lines. After cocultivation with the relevant packaging cell lines, stable hybridoma lines expressing the selectable markers were easily obtained and were then suitable for conventional somatic fusion. This high-efficiency method was used to generate two bispecific monoclonal antibodies simultaneously targeting molecules expressed on cytotoxic cells (i.e., T lymphocytes and natural killer cells) against a human melanoma-associated antigen. Images PMID:2326256

  8. Transfer and expression of the rabbit defensin NP-1 gene in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, D; Xiong, X; Tu, W F; Yao, W; Liang, H W; Chen, F J; He, Z Q

    2017-01-23

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae, with high food and medicinal value. However, the crop is susceptible to several viruses that are transmitted by aphids and is highly vulnerable to post-harvest diseases, as well as insect and mammal pests and fungal and bacterial diseases. Here, the rabbit defensin gene NP-1 was transferred into lettuce by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to obtain a broad-spectrum disease-resistant lettuce. Transgenic lettuce plants were selected and regenerated on selective media. The presence of the NP-1 gene in these plants was confirmed by western blot analyses. Resistance tests revealed native defensin NP-1 expression conferred partial resistance to Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which suggests new possibilities for lettuce disease resistance.

  9. NPY gene transfer in the hippocampus attenuates synaptic plasticity and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Carli, Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    . Future clinical progress, however, requires more detailed evaluation of possible side effects of this treatment. Until now it has been unknown whether rAAV vector-based NPY overexpression in the hippocampus alters normal synaptic transmission and plasticity, which could disturb learning and memory...... processing. Here we show, by electrophysiological recordings in CA1 of the hippocampal formation of rats, that hippocampal NPY gene transfer into the intact brain does not affect basal synaptic transmission, but slightly alters short-term synaptic plasticity, most likely via NPY Y2 receptor...... is partially impaired and animals have a slower rate of hippocampal-based spatial discrimination learning. These data provide the first evidence that rAAV-based gene therapy using NPY exerts relative limited effect on synaptic plasticity and learning in the hippocampus, and therefore this approach could...

  10. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. Results A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Conclusions Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts

  11. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dale; Qi, Jinfeng; Yue, Jipei; Huang, Jinling; Sun, Ting; Li, Suoping; Wen, Jian-Fan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Wu, Jinsong; Wang, Lei; Zhuang, Huifu; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2014-01-13

    Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts.

  12. All-fish gene constructs for growth hormone gene transfer in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavari, B; Hong, Y; Funkenstein, B; Moav, B; Schartl, M

    1993-07-01

    In order to develop all-fish expression vectors for microinjection into fertilized fish eggs, we have prepared the following constructs: rainbow trout metallothionein a/b and the gilthead seabream growth hormone cDNA (ptMTa-gbsGHcDNA, ptMTb-gsbGHcDNA), carp β-actin gilthead seabream GH cDNA (pcAβ-gsbGHcDNA). The inducible metallothionein promoters a and b were cloned from rainbow trout, and the constitutive promoter β-actin was isolated from carp.The metallothionein promoters were cloned by using the PCR technique. The tMTa contains 430 bp, while the tMTb contains 260 bp (Hong et al. 1992). These two promoters were introduced to pGEM-3Z containing the GH cDNA of Sparus aurata to form ptMTa-gsbGH and ptMTb-gsbGH, respectively. The carp cytoplasmic β-actin gene was chosen as a source for isolating strong constitutive regulatory sequences. One of these regulatory sequences in pUC118 was ligated to GH cDNA of S. aurata to form the pcAβ-gsbGHcDNA.Expression of the constructs containing the metallothionein promoters was tested in fish cell culture and was found to be induced effectively by zinc. The ptMTa gsb-GH cDNA construct was microinjected into fertilized carp eggs, and integration in the genome of carp was detected in the DNA isolated from fins at the age of two months.

  13. Gene transfer to the rat biliary tract with the HVJ-cationic liposome method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, T; Honda, K; Hatano, E; Terao, R; Iimuro, Y; Yamamoto, N; Yamamoto, M; Kaneda, Y; Yamaoka, Y

    1999-05-01

    The ability to transfer foreign genes into the biliary tract would be useful for the treatment of biliary tract diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis and other genetic diseases. To introduce a foreign gene precisely into the rat biliary epithelial cells, we developed a new technique, inserting a polyethylene catheter into the common bile duct through the papilla of Vater by use of a fusigenic cationic liposome with hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ-cationic liposome). Transfection efficiency was estimated with the use of FITC-oligonucleotides (FITC-ODNs) and cDNA of beta-galactosidase (pCAG-lacZ). FITC-ODNs encapsulated in HVJ-cationic liposome were effectively transfected into cell nuclei of human cholangiocellular carcinoma in vitro after a 30-min incubation as compared with the simple application of naked FITC-ODNs. After in vivo injection of FITC-ODNs using the HVJ-cationic liposome method through the papilla of Vater, fluorescence accumulation was observed only in the epithelial cells of the biliary tract, but not in the parenchymal cells of the liver. Beta-galactosidase expression was observed in the biliary epithelial cells 3 days after the transfection of pCAG-lacZ and was also detected at 14 days, but not at 28 days, without obvious cytotoxicity. HVJ-cationic liposome-mediated gene transfer to the biliary tract via the papilla of Vater is a minimally-invasive and an effective gene-delivery method for site-specific targeting to the epithelial cells of the biliary tract, which could be applied to the treatment of human biliary tract diseases.

  14. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

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    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90% in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM, correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the

  15. Improved induction of immune tolerance to factor IX by hepatic AAV-8 gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mario; Nayak, Sushrusha; Hoffman, Brad E; Terhorst, Cox; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2009-07-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia B has been shown to result in long-term expression and immune tolerance to factor IX (F.IX) after in vivo transduction of hepatocytes with adeno-associated viral (AAV-2) vectors in experimental animals. An optimized protocol was effective in several strains of mice with a factor 9 gene deletion (F9(-/-)). However, immune responses against F.IX were repeatedly observed in C3H/HeJ F9(-/-) mice. We sought to establish a gene transfer protocol that results in sustained expression without a requirement for additional manipulation of the immune system. Compared with AAV-2, AAV-8 was more efficient in transgene expression and induction of tolerance to F.IX in three different strains of wild-type mice. At equal vector doses, AAV-8 induced transgene product-specific regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells at significantly higher frequency. Moreover, sustained correction of hemophilia B in C3H/HeJ F9(-/-) mice without antibody formation was documented in all animals treated with > or =4 x 10(11) vector genomes (VG)/kg and in 80% of mice treated with 8 x 10(10) VG/kg. Therefore, it is possible to develop a gene transfer protocol that reliably induces tolerance to F.IX largely independent of genetic factors. A comparison with other studies suggests that additional parameters besides plateau levels of F.IX expression contributed to the improved success rate of tolerance induction.

  16. Towards a better detection of horizontally transferred genes by combining unusual properties effectively.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Xiong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is one of the major mechanisms contributing to microbial genome diversification. A number of computational methods for finding horizontally transferred genes have been proposed in the past decades; however none of them has provided a reliable detector yet. In existing parametric approaches, only one single compositional property can participate in the detection process, or the results obtained through each single property are just simply combined. It's known that different properties may mean different information, so the single property can't sufficiently contain the information encoded by gene sequences. In addition, the class imbalance problem in the datasets, which also results in great errors for the gene detection, hasn't been considered by the published methods. Here we developed an effective classifier system (Hgtident that used support vector machine (SVM by combining unusual properties effectively for HGT detection. RESULTS: Our approach Hgtident includes the introduction of more representative datasets, optimization of SVM model, feature selection, handling of imbalance problem in the datasets and extensive performance evaluation via systematic cross-validation methods. Through feature selection, we found that JS-DN and JS-CB have higher discriminating power for HGT detection, while GC1-GC3 and k-mer (k = 1, 2, …, 7 make the least contribution. Extensive experiments indicated the new classifier could reduce Mean error dramatically, and also improve Recall by a certain level. For the testing genomes, compared with the existing popular multiple-threshold approach, on average, our Recall and Mean error was respectively improved by 2.81% and reduced by 26.32%, which means that numerous false positives were identified correctly. CONCLUSIONS: Hgtident introduced here is an effective approach for better detecting HGT. Combining multiple features of HGT is also essential for a wider range of HGT

  17. Towards a better detection of horizontally transferred genes by combining unusual properties effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dapeng; Xiao, Fen; Liu, Li; Hu, Kai; Tan, Yanping; He, Shunmin; Gao, Xieping

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is one of the major mechanisms contributing to microbial genome diversification. A number of computational methods for finding horizontally transferred genes have been proposed in the past decades; however none of them has provided a reliable detector yet. In existing parametric approaches, only one single compositional property can participate in the detection process, or the results obtained through each single property are just simply combined. It's known that different properties may mean different information, so the single property can't sufficiently contain the information encoded by gene sequences. In addition, the class imbalance problem in the datasets, which also results in great errors for the gene detection, hasn't been considered by the published methods. Here we developed an effective classifier system (Hgtident) that used support vector machine (SVM) by combining unusual properties effectively for HGT detection. Our approach Hgtident includes the introduction of more representative datasets, optimization of SVM model, feature selection, handling of imbalance problem in the datasets and extensive performance evaluation via systematic cross-validation methods. Through feature selection, we found that JS-DN and JS-CB have higher discriminating power for HGT detection, while GC1-GC3 and k-mer (k = 1, 2, …, 7) make the least contribution. Extensive experiments indicated the new classifier could reduce Mean error dramatically, and also improve Recall by a certain level. For the testing genomes, compared with the existing popular multiple-threshold approach, on average, our Recall and Mean error was respectively improved by 2.81% and reduced by 26.32%, which means that numerous false positives were identified correctly. Hgtident introduced here is an effective approach for better detecting HGT. Combining multiple features of HGT is also essential for a wider range of HGT events detection.

  18. Improving the ex vivo retroviral-mediated suicide-gene transfer process in T lymphocytes to preserve immune function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinet, E; Fehse, B; Ebeling, S; Sauce, D; Ferrand, C; Tiberghien, P

    The retroviral-mediated transfer of a suicide gene into donor T cells has been proposed as a method to control alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Gene-modified cells (GMC) may be infused into the patient either at the time of transplantation, together with a T-cell

  19. Induction of cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis in hepatoma cells through adenoviral-mediated transfer of p53 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Neumann, I; Schmiegel, W; Wu, P C; Lau, J Y

    2000-05-01

    Loss of p53 function is common in hepatocellular carcinoma and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the biologic effect of adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of wild-type p53 gene in four hepatoma cell lines with different p53 genetic makeup. Recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 was used. Recombinant adenoviruses with either an empty expression cassette or expressing beta-galactosidase gene served as controls. High-level expression of wild-type p53 was achieved with adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. The expressed p53 protein showed nuclear localization and its expression was associated with an induction of p21 and bax expression. Expression of the p53 gene was associated with inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Expression of p53 was also associated with an upregulation of CD95 (Apo-1/Fas) gene expression, which may predispose the tumor cells to undergo apoptosis induced by the Fas Ligand/Fas cytolytic pathway. An additional anti-tumor effect, in terms of allowing the replication-defective adenovirus to replicate, was observed in hepatoma cells with homozygous deletion of p53 genes and to a lesser extent, hepatoma cells with mutated p53 genes. These data showed that adenoviral-mediated gene transfer is effective in delivering p53 gene to tumor cells, and the multiple pathways involved in their antitumor activities.

  20. Agrobacterium tumefaciens exoR controls acid response genes and impacts exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Brynn C; Tomlinson, Amelia D; Morton, Elise R; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative plant pathogen and the causative agent of crown gall disease. The initial stage of infection involves attachment to plant tissues, and subsequently, biofilms may form at these sites. This study focuses on the periplasmic ExoR regulator, which was identified based on the severe biofilm deficiency of A. tumefaciens exoR mutants. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed to elucidate the complete ExoR regulon. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan is a dramatic phenotype of exoR mutants. Comparative expression analyses revealed that the core ExoR regulon is unaffected by succinoglycan synthesis. Several findings are consistent with previous observations: genes involved in succinoglycan biosynthesis, motility, and type VI secretion are differentially expressed in the ΔexoR mutant. In addition, these studies revealed new functional categories regulated by ExoR, including genes related to virulence, conjugation of the pAtC58 megaplasmid, ABC transporters, and cell envelope architecture. To address how ExoR exerts a broad impact on gene expression from its periplasmic location, a genetic screen was performed to isolate suppressor mutants that mitigate the exoR motility phenotype and identify downstream components of the ExoR regulatory pathway. This suppression analysis identified the acid-sensing two-component system ChvG-ChvI, and the suppressor mutant phenotypes suggest that all or most of the characteristic exoR properties are mediated through ChvG-ChvI. Subsequent analysis indicates that exoR mutants are simulating a response to acidic conditions, even in neutral media. This work expands the model for ExoR regulation in A. tumefaciens and underscores the global role that this regulator plays on gene expression. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Suppression of tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells by transfer of human chromosome 17 does not require transferred BRCA1 and p53 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Hartmann, S; Scherthan, H; Arnold, W; Deppert, W; Frege, R; Glaab, F; Haensch, W; Scherneck, S

    1995-02-02

    A number of candidate tumor suppressor genes located on the human chromosome 17 are thought to have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. In addition to the p53 gene on 17p13.1 and the BRCA1 gene mapped to 17q12-21, other chromosomal regions for tumor suppressor genes have been suggested to exist on 17p13.3 and both the central and the distal parts of 17q, although definitive functional proof of their involvement in breast cancer tumorigenesis is still lacking. In this report we show that microcell transfer of a human chromosome 17 into wild-type p53 breast cancer cells CAL51 results in loss of tumorigenicity and anchorage-independent growth, changes in cell morphology and a reduction of cell growth rates of the neo-selected microcell hybrids. In the hybrid cells, which express the p53 wild-type protein, only the p- and the distal parts of the q arm of donor chromosome 17 are transferred. Thus, our results provide functional evidence for the presence of one or more tumor suppressor gene(s) on chromosome 17, which are distinct from the p53 and the BRCA1 genes.

  2. An Approach for Treating the Hepatobiliary Disease of Cystic Fibrosis by Somatic Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiping; Raper, Steven E.; Cohn, Jonathan A.; Engelhardt, John F.; Wilson, James M.

    1993-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disease of epithelial cell ion transport that is associated with pathology in multiple organ systems, including lung, pancreas, and liver. As treatment of the pulmonary manifestations of CF has improved, management of CF liver disease has become increasingly important in adult patients. This report describes an approach for treating CF liver disease by somatic gene transfer. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry analysis of rat liver sections indicated that the endogenous CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene is primarily expressed in the intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. To specifically target recombinant genes to the biliary epithelium in vivo, recombinant adenoviruses expressing lacZ or human CFTR were infused retrograde into the biliary tract through the common bile duct. Conditions were established for achieving recombinant gene expression in virtually all cells of the intrahepatic bile ducts in vivo. Expression persisted in the smaller bile ducts for the duration of the experiment, which was 21 days. These studies suggest that it may be feasible to prevent CF liver disease by genetically reconstituting CFTR expression in the biliary tract, using an approach that is clinically feasible.

  3. Design and bioinformatics analysis of novel biomimetic peptides as nanocarriers for gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asia Majidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The introduction of nucleic acids into cells for therapeutic objectives is significantly hindered by the size and charge of these molecules and therefore requires efficient vectors that assist cellular uptake. For several years great efforts have been devoted to the study of development of recombinant vectors based on biological domains with potential applications in gene therapy. Such vectors have been synthesized in genetically engineered approach, resulting in biomacromolecules with new properties that are not present in nature. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have designed new peptides using homology modeling with the purpose of overcoming the cell barriers for successful gene delivery through Bioinformatics tools. Three different carriers were designed and one of those with better score through Bioinformatics tools was cloned, expressed and its affinity for pDNA was monitored. Results: The resultszz demonstrated that the vector can effectively condense pDNAinto nanoparticles with the average sizes about 100 nm. Conclusion: We hope these peptides can overcome the biological barriers associated with gene transfer, and mediate efficient gene delivery.

  4. Genetic Diversity of Bacterial Communities and Gene Transfer Agents in Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fu-Lin; Wang, You-Shao; Wu, Mei-Lin; Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Sun, Cui-Ci; Cheng, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) amplicons was performed to investigate the unique distribution of bacterial communities in northern South China Sea (nSCS) and evaluate community structure and spatial differences of bacterial diversity. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes constitute the majority of bacteria. The taxonomic description of bacterial communities revealed that more Chroococcales, SAR11 clade, Acidimicrobiales, Rhodobacterales, and Flavobacteriales are present in the nSCS waters than other bacterial groups. Rhodobacterales were less abundant in tropical water (nSCS) than in temperate and cold waters. Furthermore, the diversity of Rhodobacterales based on the gene transfer agent (GTA) major capsid gene (g5) was investigated. Four g5 gene clone libraries were constructed from samples representing different regions and yielded diverse sequences. Fourteen g5 clusters could be identified among 197 nSCS clones. These clusters were also related to known g5 sequences derived from genome-sequenced Rhodobacterales. The composition of g5 sequences in surface water varied with the g5 sequences in the sampling sites; this result indicated that the Rhodobacterales population could be highly diverse in nSCS. Phylogenetic tree analysis result indicated distinguishable diversity patterns among tropical (nSCS), temperate, and cold waters, thereby supporting the niche adaptation of specific Rhodobacterales members in unique environments. PMID:25364820

  5. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  6. Butyrylcholinesterase gene transfer in obese mice prevents postdieting body weight rebound by suppressing ghrelin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vicky Ping; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate but treatment options remain limited. Despite initial success, weight loss by calorie restriction (CR) often fails because of rebound weight gain. Postdieting hyperphagia along with altered hypothalamic neuro-architecture appears to be one direct cause of this undesirable outcome. In response to calorie deficiency the circulating levels of the appetite-promoting hormone, acyl-ghrelin, rise sharply. We hypothesize that proper modulation of acyl-ghrelin and its receptor’s sensitivity will favorably impact energy intake and reprogram the body weight set point. Here we applied viral gene transfer of the acyl-ghrelin hydrolyzing enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Our results confirmed that BChE overexpression decreased circulating acyl-ghrelin levels, suppressed CR-provoked ghrelin signaling, and restored central ghrelin sensitivity. In addition to maintaining healthy body weights, BChE treated mice had modest postdieting food intake and showed normal glucose homeostasis. Spontaneous activity and energy expenditure did not differ significantly between treated and untreated mice after body weight rebound, suggesting that BChE gene transfer did not alter energy expenditure in the long term. These findings indicate that combining BChE treatment with CR could be an effective approach in treating human obesity and aiding lifelong weight management. PMID:28973869

  7. Vesicular stomatitis virus enables gene transfer and transsynaptic tracing in a wide range of organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Nathan A.; Beier, Kevin T.; Pan, Y. Albert; Lapan, Sylvain W.; Göz Aytürk, Didem; Berezovskii, Vladimir K.; Wark, Abigail R.; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Bielecki, Jan; Born, Richard T.; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in technology have prevented an extensive analysis of the connections among neurons, particularly within nonmammalian organisms. We developed a transsynaptic viral tracer originally for use in mice, and then tested its utility in a broader range of organisms. By engineering the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to encode a fluorophore and either the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV‐G) or its own glycoprotein (VSV‐G), we created viruses that can transsynaptically label neuronal circuits in either the retrograde or anterograde direction, respectively. The vectors were investigated for their utility as polysynaptic tracers of chicken and zebrafish visual pathways. They showed patterns of connectivity consistent with previously characterized visual system connections, and revealed several potentially novel connections. Further, these vectors were shown to infect neurons in several other vertebrates, including Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, axolotls, and Xenopus. They were also shown to infect two invertebrates, Drosophila melanogaster, and the box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, a species previously intractable for gene transfer, although no clear evidence of transsynaptic spread was observed in these species. These vectors provide a starting point for transsynaptic tracing in most vertebrates, and are also excellent candidates for gene transfer in organisms that have been refractory to other methods. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:1639–1663, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25688551

  8. Microbial co-habitation and lateral gene transfer: what transposases can tell us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Sean D.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-03-01

    Determining the habitat range for various microbes is not a simple, straightforward matter, as habitats interlace, microbes move between habitats, and microbial communities change over time. In this study, we explore an approach using the history of lateral gene transfer recorded in microbial genomes to begin to answer two key questions: where have you been and who have you been with? All currently sequenced microbial genomes were surveyed to identify pairs of taxa that share a transposase that is likely to have been acquired through lateral gene transfer. A microbial interaction network including almost 800 organisms was then derived from these connections. Although the majority of the connections are between closely related organisms with the same or overlapping habitat assignments, numerous examples were found of cross-habitat and cross-phylum connections. We present a large-scale study of the distributions of transposases across phylogeny and habitat, and find a significant correlation between habitat and transposase connections. We observed cases where phylogenetic boundaries are traversed, especially when organisms share habitats; this suggests that the potential exists for genetic material to move laterally between diverse groups via bridging connections. The results presented here also suggest that the complex dynamics of microbial ecology may be traceable in the microbial genomes.

  9. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications.

  10. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  11. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  12. Negative feedback and transcriptional overshooting in a regulatory network for horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Fernandez-Lopez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is a major force driving bacterial evolution. Because of their ability to cross inter-species barriers, bacterial plasmids are essential agents for HGT. This ability, however, poses specific requisites on plasmid physiology, in particular the need to overcome a multilevel selection process with opposing demands. We analyzed the transcriptional network of plasmid R388, one of the most promiscuous plasmids in Proteobacteria. Transcriptional analysis by fluorescence expression profiling and quantitative PCR revealed a regulatory network controlled by six transcriptional repressors. The regulatory network relied on strong promoters, which were tightly repressed in negative feedback loops. Computational simulations and theoretical analysis indicated that this architecture would show a transcriptional burst after plasmid conjugation, linking the magnitude of the feedback gain with the intensity of the transcriptional burst. Experimental analysis showed that transcriptional overshooting occurred when the plasmid invaded a new population of susceptible cells. We propose that transcriptional overshooting allows genome rebooting after horizontal gene transfer, and might have an adaptive role in overcoming the opposing demands of multilevel selection.

  13. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes on abiotic touch surfaces: implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Highmore, Callum J; Keevil, C William

    2012-11-27

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is largely responsible for increasing the incidence of antibiotic-resistant infections worldwide. While studies have focused on HGT in vivo, this work investigates whether the ability of pathogens to persist in the environment, particularly on touch surfaces, may also play an important role. Escherichia coli, virulent clone ST131, and Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) bla(CTX-M-15) and metallo-β-lactamase bla(NDM-1), respectively, exhibited prolonged survival on stainless steel, with approximately 10(4) viable cells remaining from an inoculum of 10(7) CFU per cm(2) after 1 month at 21°C. HGT of bla to an antibiotic-sensitive but azide-resistant recipient E. coli strain occurred on stainless steel dry touch surfaces and in suspension but not on dry copper. The conjugation frequency was approximately 10 to 50 times greater and occurred immediately, and resulting transconjugants were more stable with ESBL E. coli as the donor cell than with K. pneumoniae, but bla(NDM-1) transfer increased with time. Transconjugants also exhibited the same resistance profile as the donor, suggesting multiple gene transfer. Rapid death, inhibition of respiration, and destruction of genomic and plasmid DNA of both pathogens occurred on copper alloys accompanied by a reduction in bla copy number. Naked E. coli DNA degraded on copper at 21°C and 37°C but slowly at 4°C, suggesting a direct role for the metal. Persistence of viable pathogenic bacteria on touch surfaces may not only increase the risk of infection transmission but may also contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance by HGT. The use of copper alloys as antimicrobial touch surfaces may help reduce infection and HGT. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) conferring resistance to many classes of antimicrobials has resulted in a worldwide epidemic of nosocomial and community infections caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms, leading to suggestions that we

  14. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W Florian; Johnsen, Pål J; da Silva, Gabriela J; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much

  15. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

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    Sara Domingues

    Full Text Available We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like. Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE, Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation

  16. Activities of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor revealed by gene transfer and gene knockout studies.

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    Dranoff, G; Mulligan, R C

    1994-01-01

    We used retroviral mediated gene transfer and gene knockout technologies to explore the in vivo functions of murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) [1, 2]. In tumor vaccination experiments, GM-CSF was the most potent molecule of a large number of cytokines, adhesion molecules and other immunomodulators for the induction of specific and long-lasting anti-tumor immunity. Vaccination required activities of both CD4 and CD8 positive lymphocytes, and likely involved the augmentation by GM-CSF of host professional antigen-presenting cell function. Mice engineered by homologous recombination techniques in embryonic stem cells to lack GM-CSF demonstrated no significant perturbations in steady-state hematopoiesis. All mutant animals, however, developed the accumulation of surfactant proteins and lipids in the alveolar space, the defining feature of the idiopathic human disorder pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Surfactant lipid and protein content were increased in the absence of alterations in surfactant protein mRNA, supporting the concept that surfactant clearance or catabolism was perturbed. Extensive lymphoid hyperplasia associated with lung airways and blood vessels was also found, yet no infectious agents could be isolated. These results demonstrate that GM-CSF is not an essential growth factor for basal hematopoiesis and reveal an unexpected, critical role for GM-CSF in pulmonary homeostasis. It is tempting to speculate that the ability of GM-CSF to modulate the uptake and processing of particulate material underlies the mechanisms of immunostimulation and surfactant accumulation.

  17. The Transcriptomes of Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus Suggest Independent Acquisition of Some Plant Parasitism Genes by Horizontal Gene Transfer in Early-Branching Nematodes.

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    Danchin, Etienne G J; Perfus-Barbeoch, Laetitia; Rancurel, Corinne; Thorpe, Peter; Da Rocha, Martine; Bajew, Simon; Neilson, Roy; Guzeeva, Elena Sokolova; Da Silva, Corinne; Guy, Julie; Labadie, Karine; Esmenjaud, Daniel; Helder, Johannes; Jones, John T; den Akker, Sebastian Eves-van

    2017-10-23

    Nematodes have evolved the ability to parasitize plants on at least four independent occasions, with plant parasites present in Clades 1, 2, 10 and 12 of the phylum. In the case of Clades 10 and 12, horizontal gene transfer of plant cell wall degrading enzymes from bacteria and fungi has been implicated in the evolution of plant parasitism. We have used ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNAseq) to generate reference transcriptomes for two economically important nematode species, Xiphinema index and Longidorus elongatus , representative of two genera within the early-branching Clade 2 of the phylum Nematoda. We used a transcriptome-wide analysis to identify putative horizontal gene transfer events. This represents the first in-depth transcriptome analysis from any plant-parasitic nematode of this clade. For each species, we assembled ~30 million Illumina reads into a reference transcriptome. We identified 62 and 104 transcripts, from X. index and L. elongatus , respectively, that were putatively acquired via horizontal gene transfer. By cross-referencing horizontal gene transfer prediction with a phylum-wide analysis of Pfam domains, we identified Clade 2-specific events. Of these, a GH12 cellulase from X. index was analysed phylogenetically and biochemically, revealing a likely bacterial origin and canonical enzymatic function. Horizontal gene transfer was previously shown to be a phenomenon that has contributed to the evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes. Our findings underline the importance and the extensiveness of this phenomenon in the evolution of plant-parasitic life styles in this speciose and widespread animal phylum.

  18. The efficacy and safety of gene transfer into the porcine liver in vivo by HVJ (Sendai virus) liposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Yujo; Fujioka, Hikaru; Ohtsuru, Akira; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kamohara, Yukio; Ka