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Sample records for eukaryal trna anticodon

  1. Structure, Mechanism, and Specificity of a Eukaryal tRNA Restriction Enzyme Involved in Self-Nonself Discrimination

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    Anupam K. Chakravarty

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tRNA restriction by anticodon nucleases underlies cellular stress responses and self-nonself discrimination in a wide range of taxa. Anticodon breakage inhibits protein synthesis, which, in turn, results in growth arrest or cell death. The eukaryal ribotoxin PaT secreted by Pichia acaciae inhibits growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via cleavage of tRNAGln(UUG. We find that recombinant PaT incises a synthetic tRNAGln(UUG stem-loop RNA by transesterification at a single site 3′ of the wobble uridine, yielding 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate and 5′-OH ends. Incision is suppressed by replacement of the wobble nucleobase with adenine or guanine. The crystal structure of PaT reveals a distinctive fold and active site, essential components of which are demonstrated by mutagenesis. Pichia acaciae evades self-toxicity via a distinctive intracellular immunity protein, ImmPaT, which binds PaT and blocks nuclease activity. Our results highlight the evolutionary diversity of tRNA restriction and immunity systems.

  2. Base-pairing versatility determines wobble sites in tRNA anticodons of vertebrate mitogenomes.

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    Miguel M Fonseca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vertebrate mitochondrial genomes typically have one transfer RNA (tRNA for each synonymous codon family. This limited anticodon repertoire implies that each tRNA anticodon needs to wobble (establish a non-Watson-Crick base pairing between two nucleotides in RNA molecules to recognize one or more synonymous codons. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the factors that determine the nucleotide composition of wobble sites in vertebrate mitochondrial tRNA anticodons. Until now, the two major postulates--the "codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis" and the "wobble versatility hypothesis"--have not been formally tested in vertebrate mitochondria because both make the same predictions regarding the composition of anticodon wobble sites. The same is true for the more recent "wobble cost hypothesis". PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have analyzed the occurrence of synonymous codons and tRNA anticodon wobble sites in 1553 complete vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, focusing on three fish species with mtDNA codon usage bias reversal (L-strand is GT-rich. These mitogenomes constitute an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of the wobble nucleotide composition of tRNA anticodons because due to the reversal the predictions for the anticodon wobble sites differ between the existing hypotheses. We observed that none of the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in these unusual mitochondrial genomes coevolved to match the new overall codon usage bias, suggesting that nucleotides at the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes are determined by wobble versatility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that, at wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitogenomes, selection favors the most versatile nucleotide in terms of wobble base-pairing stability and that wobble site composition is not influenced by codon usage. These results are in agreement with the "wobble versatility hypothesis".

  3. Anticodon domain modifications contribute order to tRNA for ribosome-mediated codon binding.

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    Vendeix, Franck A P; Dziergowska, Agnieszka; Gustilo, Estella M; Graham, William D; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F

    2008-06-10

    The accuracy and efficiency with which tRNA decodes genomic information into proteins require posttranscriptional modifications in or adjacent to the anticodon. The modification uridine-5-oxyacetic acid (cmo (5)U 34) is found at wobble position 34 in a single isoaccepting tRNA species for six amino acids, alanine, leucine, proline, serine, threonine, and valine, each having 4-fold degenerate codons. cmo (5)U 34 makes possible the decoding of 24 codons by just six tRNAs. The contributions of this important modification to the structures and codon binding affinities of the unmodified and fully modified anticodon stem and loop domains of tRNA (Val3) UAC (ASL (Val3) UAC) were elucidated. The stems of the unmodified ASL (Val3) UAC and that with cmo (5)U 34 and N (6)-methyladenosine, m (6)A 37, adopted an A-form RNA conformation (rmsd approximately 0.6 A) as determined with NMR spectroscopy and torsion-angle molecular dynamics. However, the UV hyperchromicity, circular dichroism ellipticity, and structural analyses indicated that the anticodon modifications enhanced order in the loop. ASL (Val3) UAC-cmo (5)U 34;m (6)A 37 exhibited high affinities for its cognate and wobble codons GUA and GUG, and for GUU in the A-site of the programmed 30S ribosomal subunit, whereas the unmodified ASL (Val3) UAC bound less strongly to GUA and not at all to GUG and GUU. Together with recent crystal structures of ASL (Val3) UAC-cmo (5)U 34;m (6)A 37 bound to all four of the valine codons in the A-site of the ribosome's 30S subunit, these results clearly demonstrate that the xo (5)U 34-type modifications order the anticodon loop prior to A-site codon binding for an expanded codon reading, possibly reducing an entropic energy barrier to codon binding.

  4. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry

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    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    abstract The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  5. Loss of a conserved tRNA anticodon modification perturbs cellular signaling.

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    Boris Zinshteyn

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA modifications enhance the efficiency, specificity and fidelity of translation in all organisms. The anticodon modification mcm(5s(2U(34 is required for normal growth and stress resistance in yeast; mutants lacking this modification have numerous phenotypes. Mutations in the homologous human genes are linked to neurological disease. The yeast phenotypes can be ameliorated by overexpression of specific tRNAs, suggesting that the modifications are necessary for efficient translation of specific codons. We determined the in vivo ribosome distributions at single codon resolution in yeast strains lacking mcm(5s(2U. We found accumulations at AAA, CAA, and GAA codons, suggesting that translation is slow when these codons are in the ribosomal A site, but these changes appeared too small to affect protein output. Instead, we observed activation of the GCN4-mediated stress response by a non-canonical pathway. Thus, loss of mcm(5s(2U causes global effects on gene expression due to perturbation of cellular signaling.

  6. A trilogy on. delta. -aminolevulinic acid biosynthesis in plants and algae: I. Glutamate is the sole precursor to protoheme and heme a in maize. II. The UUC glutamate anticodon is a general feature of the tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis. III. Protein and ALA biosynthesis use the same tRNA

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    Schneegurt, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled substrates can be used to determine whether the heme and chlorophyll precursor {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is synthesized via the fife-carbon pathway (incorporation from L-1-({sup 14}C)glutamate) or ALA synthase (incorporation from 2-({sup 14}C)glycine). In etiolated maize epicotyl sections, highly purified total cellular protoheme was labeled 29.7 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Mitochondrial heme {alpha} was labeled 4.1 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Cell-free plant and algal preparations require tRNA for the enzymatic conversion of glutamate to ALA. The tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis ahs been shown to contain the UUC glutamate anticodon, as determined by its specific retention through anticodon:anticodon interactions by tRNA{sup Phe(GAA)}-acrylamide. A fraction that was highly enriched in the RNA which supported ALA formation was obtained by affinity chromatography of RNA extracts from Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena garcilis, Cyanidium caldarium, Synechocystis, sp. PCC 6803, pea, and spinach. Other glutamate-accepting RNAs that were not retained by the affinity column were ineffective in supporting ALA formation.

  7. Rationalization of some genetic anticodonic assignments

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    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Hall, L. M.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrophobicity of most amino acids correlates well with that of their anticodon nucleotides, with Trp, Tyr, Ile, and Ser being the exceptions to this rule. Using previous data on hydrophobicity and binding constants, and new data on rates of esterification of polyadenylic acid with several N-acetylaminoacyl imidazolides, several of the anticodon assignments are rationalized. Chemical reasons are shown supporting the idea of the inclusion of the Ile in the catalog of biological amino acids late in the evolution, through a mutation of the existing tRNA and its aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase. It was found that an addition of hexane increases the incorporation of hydrophobic Ac-Phe into poly-A, in support of the Fox (1965) and Oparin (1965) emphasis on the biogenetic importance of phase-separated systems.

  8. tRNA's modifications bring order to gene expression.

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    Gustilo, Estella M; Vendeix, Franck Ap; Agris, Paul F

    2008-04-01

    The posttranscriptional modification of RNA is a significant investment in genes, enzymes, substrates, and energy. Advances in molecular genetics and structural biology indicate strongly that modifications of tRNA's anticodon domain control gene expression. Modifications at the anticodon's wobble position are required for recognition of rarely used codons and restrict or expand codon recognition depending on their chemistries. A shift of the translational reading frame occurs in the absence of modifications at either wobble position-34 or the conserved purine-37, 3'-adjacent to the anticodon, causing expression of alternate protein sequences. These modifications have in common their contribution of order to tRNA's anticodon.

  9. tRNA's wobble decoding of the genome: 40 years of modification.

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    Agris, Paul F; Vendeix, Franck A P; Graham, William D

    2007-02-09

    The genetic code is degenerate, in that 20 amino acids are encoded by 61 triplet codes. In 1966, Francis Crick hypothesized that the cell's limited number of tRNAs decoded the genome by recognizing more than one codon. The ambiguity of that recognition resided in the third base-pair, giving rise to the Wobble Hypothesis. Post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA's wobble position 34, especially modifications of uridine 34, enable wobble to occur. The Modified Wobble Hypothesis proposed in 1991 that specific modifications of a tRNA wobble nucleoside shape the anticodon architecture in such a manner that interactions were restricted to the complementary base plus a single wobble pairing for amino acids with twofold degenerate codons. However, chemically different modifications at position 34 would expand the ability of a tRNA to read three or even four of the fourfold degenerate codons. One foundation of Crick's Wobble Hypothesis was that a near-constant geometry of canonical base-pairing be maintained in forming all three base-pairs between the tRNA anticodon and mRNA codon on the ribosome. In accepting an aminoacyl-tRNA, the ribosome requires maintenance of a specific geometry for the anticodon-codon base-pairing. However, it is the post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA wobble position 34 and purine 37, 3'-adjacent to the anticodon, that pre-structure the anticodon domain to ensure the correct codon binding. The modifications create both the architecture and the stability needed for decoding through restraints on anticodon stereochemistry and conformational space, and through selective hydrogen bonding. A physicochemical understanding of modified nucleoside contributions to the tRNA anticodon domain architecture and its decoding of the genome has advanced RNA world evolutionary theory, the principles of RNA chemistry, and the application of this knowledge to the introduction of new amino acids to proteins.

  10. Synthesis and investigation of the 5-formylcytidine modified, anticodon stem and loop of the human mitochondrial tRNAMet.

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    Lusic, Hrvoje; Gustilo, Estella M; Vendeix, Franck A P; Kaiser, Rob; Delaney, Michael O; Graham, William D; Moye, Virginia A; Cantara, William A; Agris, Paul F; Deiters, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    Human mitochondrial methionine transfer RNA (hmtRNA(Met)(CAU)) has a unique post-transcriptional modification, 5-formylcytidine, at the wobble position-34 (f(5)C(34)). The role of this modification in (hmtRNA(Met)(CAU)) for the decoding of AUA, as well as AUG, in both the peptidyl- and aminoacyl-sites of the ribosome in either chain initiation or chain elongation is still unknown. We report the first synthesis and analyses of the tRNA's anticodon stem and loop domain containing the 5-formylcytidine modification. The modification contributes to the tRNA's anticodon domain structure, thermodynamic properties and its ability to bind codons AUA and AUG in translational initiation and elongation.

  11. A comprehensive tRNA deletion library unravels the genetic architecture of the tRNA pool.

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    Zohar Bloom-Ackermann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the architecture of the tRNA pool is a prime challenge in translation research, as tRNAs govern the efficiency and accuracy of the process. Towards this challenge, we created a systematic tRNA deletion library in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aimed at dissecting the specific contribution of each tRNA gene to the tRNA pool and to the cell's fitness. By harnessing this resource, we observed that the majority of tRNA deletions show no appreciable phenotype in rich medium, yet under more challenging conditions, additional phenotypes were observed. Robustness to tRNA gene deletion was often facilitated through extensive backup compensation within and between tRNA families. Interestingly, we found that within tRNA families, genes carrying identical anti-codons can contribute differently to the cellular fitness, suggesting the importance of the genomic surrounding to tRNA expression. Characterization of the transcriptome response to deletions of tRNA genes exposed two disparate patterns: in single-copy families, deletions elicited a stress response; in deletions of genes from multi-copy families, expression of the translation machinery increased. Our results uncover the complex architecture of the tRNA pool and pave the way towards complete understanding of their role in cell physiology.

  12. Characterization of the RNA Required for Biosynthesis of delta-Aminolevulinic Acid from Glutamate : Purification by Anticodon-Based Affinity Chromatography and Determination That the UUC Glutamate Anticodon Is a General Requirement for Function in ALA Biosynthesis.

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    Schneegurt, M A; Beale, S I

    1988-02-01

    The heme and chlorophyll precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid acid (ALA) is formed in plants and algae from glutamate in a process that requires at least three enzyme components plus a low molecular weight RNA which co-purifies with the tRNA fraction during DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. RNA that is effective in the in vitro ALA biosynthetic system was extracted from several plant and algal species that form ALA via this route. In all cases, the effective RNA contained the UUC glutamate anticodon, as determined by its specific retention on an affinity resin containing an affine ligand directed against this anticodon. Construction of the affinity resin was based on the fact that the UUC glutamate anticodon is complementary to the GAA phenylalanine anticodon. By covalently linking the 3' terminus of yeast tRNA(Phe(GAA)) to hydrazine-activated polyacrylamide gel beads, a resin carrying an affine ligand specific for the anticodon of tRNA(Glu(UUC)) was obtained. Column chromatography of plant and algal RNA extracts over this resin yielded a fraction that was highly enriched in the ability to stimulate ALA formation from glutamate when added to enzyme extracts of the unicellular green alga Chlorella vulgaris. Enhancement of ALA formation per A(260) unit added was as much as 50 times greater with the affinity-purified RNA than with the RNA before affinity purification. The affinity column selectively retained RNA which supported ALA formation upon chromatography of RNA extracts from species of the diverse algal groups Chlorophyta (Chlorella Vulgaris), Euglenophyta (Euglena gracilis), Rhodophyta (Cyanidium caldarium), and Cyanophyta (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), and a higher plant (spinach). Other glutamate-accepting tRNAs that were not retained by the affinity column were ineffective in supporting ALA formation. These results indicate that possession of the UUC glutamate anticodon is a general requirement for RNA to participate in the conversion of glutamate to ALA

  13. Experimental Confirmation of a Whole Set of tRNA Molecules in Two Archaeal Species

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    Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Based on the genomic sequences for most archaeal species, only one tRNA gene (isodecoder) is predicted for each triplet codon. This observation promotes analysis of a whole set of tRNA molecules and actual splicing patterns of interrupted tRNA in one organism. The entire genomic sequences of two Creanarchaeota, Aeropyrum pernix and Sulfolobus tokodaii, were determined approximately 15 years ago. In these genome datasets, 47 and 46 tRNA genes were detected, respectively. Among them, 14 and 24 genes, respectively, were predicted to be interrupted tRNA genes. To confirm the actual transcription of these predicted tRNA genes and identify the actual splicing patterns of the predicted interrupted tRNA molecules, RNA samples were prepared from each archaeal species and used to synthesize cDNA molecules with tRNA sequence-specific primers. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones representing unspliced and spliced forms of interrupted tRNA molecules indicated that some introns were located at positions other than one base 3' from anticodon region and that bulge-helix-bulge structures were detected around the actual splicing sites in each interrupted tRNA molecule. Whole-set analyses of tRNA molecules revealed that the archaeal tRNA splicing mechanism may be essential for efficient splicing of all tRNAs produced from interrupted tRNA genes in these archaea. PMID:25608653

  14. Experimental Confirmation of a Whole Set of tRNA Molecules in Two Archaeal Species

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    Yoh-ichi Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the genomic sequences for most archaeal species, only one tRNA gene (isodecoder is predicted for each triplet codon. This observation promotes analysis of a whole set of tRNA molecules and actual splicing patterns of interrupted tRNA in one organism. The entire genomic sequences of two Creanarchaeota, Aeropyrum pernix and Sulfolobus tokodaii, were determined approximately 15 years ago. In these genome datasets, 47 and 46 tRNA genes were detected, respectively. Among them, 14 and 24 genes, respectively, were predicted to be interrupted tRNA genes. To confirm the actual transcription of these predicted tRNA genes and identify the actual splicing patterns of the predicted interrupted tRNA molecules, RNA samples were prepared from each archaeal species and used to synthesize cDNA molecules with tRNA sequence-specific primers. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones representing unspliced and spliced forms of interrupted tRNA molecules indicated that some introns were located at positions other than one base 3' from anticodon region and that bulge-helix-bulge structures were detected around the actual splicing sites in each interrupted tRNA molecule. Whole-set analyses of tRNA molecules revealed that the archaeal tRNA splicing mechanism may be essential for efficient splicing of all tRNAs produced from interrupted tRNA genes in these archaea.

  15. Biochemical and Structures Studies of tRNA Modificaton and Repair Enzymes

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    Zhou, Chun

    2009-01-01

    RNA hypermodifications near the anticodon of tRNA are fundamental for the efficiency and fidelity of protein synthesis. Dimethylallyltransferase (DMATase) catalyzes transfer of a dimethylallyl moiety from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate to N6 of A37 in certain tRNAs. We first determined the crystal structures of "Pseudomonas aeruginosa" DMATase.…

  16. Determination of phenylalanine tRNA recognition sites by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

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    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Kimura, Manami; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2007-01-01

    Phenylalanine tRNA identity has been determined in the bacteria and the eukaryote system, but remains unknown for the archaea system. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of phenylalanine tRNA by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of phenylalanine tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpressed A. pernix phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides G34, A35 and A36, discriminator base A73 and G20 in the variable pocket were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  17. Molecular recognition of histidine tRNA by histidyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

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    Nagatoyo, Yukari; Iwaki, Jun; Suzuki, Satoko; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the recognition sites of histidine tRNA for histidyl-tRNA synthetase from an extreme hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined histidylation activities by using overexpressed histidyl-tRNA synthetase and various histidine tRNA transcripts that were prepared by in vitro transcription system. Results indicated that anticodon was not recognized by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase similar to that of Escherichia coli histidine tRNA recognition system. Discriminator base C73 was weekly recognized and an additional G residue was specifically recognized by the enzyme.

  18. Recognition sites of glycine tRNA for glycyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

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    Okamoto, Koji; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the tRNA recognition sites of glycine tRNA from an extreme thermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, we examined glycylation activities using in vitro mutant glycine tRNA transcripts and recombinant A. pernix glycyl-tRNA synthetase. The recognition nucleotides were determined to be C35 and C36 of anticodon, C2-G71 and G3-C70 base-pairs of acceptor stem. However, discriminator base A73 was not recognized by glycyl-tRNA synthetase.

  19. An alanine tRNA gene cluster from Nephila clavipes.

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    Luciano, E; Candelas, G C

    1996-06-01

    We report the sequence of a 2.3-kb genomic DNA fragment from the orb-web spider, Nephila clavipes (Nc). The fragment contains four regions of high homology to tRNA(Ala). The members of this irregularly spaced cluster of genes are oriented in the same direction and have the same anticodon (GCA), but their sequence differs at several positions. Initiation and termination signals, as well as consensus intragenic promoter sequences characteristic of tRNA genes, have been identified in all genes. tRNA(Ala) are involved in the regulation of the fibroin synthesis in the large ampullate Nc glands.

  20. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

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    1983-11-30

    observation consistent with our original hypothesis. Investigations into tRNA modifications within the anticodon region have led to the identification of an...altered tiM Isoaccepting species to translate disparate mR A’s more efficiently. As we have now found, 7-mthylguanlne does inhibit tiM transglycosylase from...guanine into tRMA, J. Biol. Chem. 253:9082 (1978). 20. R. Glaser, M. Nonoyama, R. T. Szymanowski and W. Graham, Human nasopharyugeal carcinoma positiv

  1. Accuracy of translation on ribosome could be provided by a resonance of intramolecular oscillations in tRNA molecules

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    Semyonov, Denis

    2013-01-01

    X-ray data indicate that complexes of ribosomes with cognate and near cognate tRNAs are very similar structurally, and this was the ground for a suggestion that the ribosome discriminates correct codon-anticodon pair because of its higher stability. Here an alternative explanation of kinetic proofreading is suggested, and intramolecular oscillations in tRNAs play a keystone role in it. Resonance of the oscillations allows the cognate codon-anticodon pair to be conserved due to fast energy transfer to other part of the tRNA molecule. This mechanism can potentially discriminate correct pair from an incorrect one even if they have similar stabilities.

  2. Several RNase T2 enzymes function in induced tRNA and rRNA turnover in the ciliate Tetrahymena

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    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    RNase T2 enzymes are produced by a wide range of organisms and have been implicated to function in diverse cellular processes, including stress-induced anticodon loop cleavage of mature tRNAs to generate tRNA halves. Here we describe a family of eight RNase T2 genes (RNT2A-RNT2H) in the ciliate...... by growth arrest that functions to recycle idle protein synthesis machinery....

  3. E. coli glutamyl-tRNA synthetase is inhibited by anticodon stem-loop domains and a minihelix.

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    Gustilo, Estella M; Dubois, Daniel Y; Lapointe, Jacques; Agris, Paul F

    2007-07-01

    Portions of E. coli tRNA(Glu) having identity determinants for glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (ERS, EC 6.1.1.17) have been designed to be the first RNA inhibitors of a Class I synthetase. ERS recognizes the 2-thionyl group of 2-thio-5-methylaminomethyluridine (mnm(5)s(2)U(34)) in the first or wobble anticodon position of E. coli tRNA(Glu). The interaction, as revealed by structural analysis, though specific, appears tenuous. Thus, it is surprising that RNAs designed from this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop domain with (ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34)) and without s(2)U(34) are bound by ERS and inhibit aminoacylation of the native tRNA. ASL(Glu), ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34), and a minihelix(Glu) composed of identity determinants of the amino acid accepting stem were thermally stable under conditions of aminoacylation (T(m)s = 75 +/- 1.5, 76 +/- 0.9 and 83 +/- 2.0 degrees C, respectively). In binding competition, the modified ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34) bound ERS with a higher affinity (half maximal inhibiting concentration, IC(50), 5.1 +/- 0.4 microM) than its unmodified counterpart, ASL(Glu) (IC(50), 10.3 +/- 0.6 microM). The minihelix(Glu), ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34) and ASL(Glu) bound ERS with K(d)s of 9.9 +/- 3.3, 6.5 +/- 1.7 and 20.5 +/- 3.8 microM. ERS aminoacylation of tRNA(Glu) was inhibited by the tRNA fragments. Unmodified ASL(Glu), minihelix(Glu), and ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34) exhibited a K(ic) of 1.9 +/- 0.2 microM, 4.1 +/- 0.2 microM, and 6.5 +/- 0.1 microM, respectively. The modified ASL(Glu)-s(2)U(34), though having a higher affinity for ERS, may be released more readily and thus, not be as good an inhibitor as the unmodified ASL. Thus, the RNA constructs are effective tools to study RNA-protein interaction.

  4. tRNA Modification and Genetic Code Variations in Animal Mitochondria

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    Kimitsuna Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In animal mitochondria, six codons have been known as nonuniversal genetic codes, which vary in the course of animal evolution. They are UGA (termination codon in the universal genetic code changes to Trp codon in all animal mitochondria, AUA (Ile to Met in most metazoan mitochondria, AAA (Lys to Asn in echinoderm and some platyhelminth mitochondria, AGA/AGG (Arg to Ser in most invertebrate, Arg to Gly in tunicate, and Arg to termination in vertebrate mitochondria, and UAA (termination to Tyr in a planaria and a nematode mitochondria, but conclusive evidence is lacking in this case. We have elucidated that the anticodons of tRNAs deciphering these nonuniversal codons (tRNATrp for UGA, tRNAMet for AUA, tRNAAsn for AAA, and tRNASer and tRNAGly for AGA/AGG are all modified; tRNATrp has 5-carboxymethylaminomethyluridine or 5-taurinomethyluridine, tRNAMet has 5-formylcytidine or 5-taurinomethyluridine, tRNASer has 7-methylguanosine and tRNAGly has 5-taurinomethyluridine in their anticodon wobble position, and tRNAAsn has pseudouridine in the anticodon second position. This review aims to clarify the structural relationship between these nonuniversal codons and the corresponding tRNA anticodons including modified nucleosides and to speculate on the possible mechanisms for explaining the evolutional changes of these nonuniversal codons in the course of animal evolution.

  5. Comparative analysis of nuclear tRNA genes of Nasonia vitripennis and other arthropods, and relationships to codon usage bias.

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    Behura, S K; Stanke, M; Desjardins, C A; Werren, J H; Severson, D W

    2010-02-01

    Using bioinformatics methods, we identified a total of 221 and 199 tRNA genes in the nuclear genomes of Nasonia vitripennis and honey bee (Apis mellifera), respectively. We performed comparative analyses of Nasonia tRNA genes with honey bee and other selected insects to understand genomic distribution, sequence evolution and relationship of tRNA copy number with codon usage patterns. Many tRNA genes are located physically close to each other in the form of small clusters in the Nasonia genome. However, the number of clusters and the tRNA genes that form such clusters vary from species to species. In particular, the Ala-, Pro-, Tyr- and His-tRNA genes tend to accumulate in clusters in Nasonia but not in honey bee, whereas the bee contains a long cluster of 15 tRNA genes (of which 13 are Gln-tRNAs) that is absent in Nasonia. Though tRNA genes are highly conserved, contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity are observed among the arm and loop regions of tRNAs between Nasonia and honey bee. Also, the sequence convergence between the reconstructed ancestral tRNAs and the present day tRNAs suggests a common ancestral origin of Nasonia and honey bee tRNAs. Furthermore, we also present evidence that the copy number of isoacceptor tRNAs (those having a different anticodon but charge the same amino acid) is correlated with codon usage patterns of highly expressed genes in Nasonia.

  6. Determinants of tRNA Recognition by the Radical SAM Enzyme RlmN.

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    Christina M Fitzsimmons

    Full Text Available RlmN, a bacterial radical SAM methylating enzyme, has the unusual ability to modify two distinct types of RNA: 23S rRNA and tRNA. In rRNA, RlmN installs a methyl group at the C2 position of A2503 of 23S rRNA, while in tRNA the modification occurs at nucleotide A37, immediately adjacent to the anticodon triplet. Intriguingly, only a subset of tRNAs that contain an adenosine at position 37 are substrates for RlmN, suggesting that the enzyme carefully probes the highly conserved tRNA fold and sequence features to identify its targets. Over the past several years, multiple studies have addressed rRNA modification by RlmN, while relatively few investigations have focused on the ability of this enzyme to modify tRNAs. In this study, we utilized in vitro transcribed tRNAs as model substrates to interrogate RNA recognition by RlmN. Using chimeras and point mutations, we probed how the structure and sequence of RNA influences methylation, identifying position 38 of tRNAs as a critical determinant of substrate recognition. We further demonstrate that, analogous to previous mechanistic studies with fragments of 23S rRNA, tRNA methylation requirements are consistent with radical SAM reactivity. Together, our findings provide detailed insight into tRNA recognition by a radical SAM methylating enzyme.

  7. tRNA integrity is a prerequisite for rapid CCA addition: implication for quality control.

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    Dupasquier, Marcel; Kim, Sangbumn; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2008-06-06

    CCA addition to the 3' end is an essential step in tRNA maturation. High-resolution crystal structures of the CCA enzymes reveal primary enzyme contact with the tRNA minihelix domain, consisting of the acceptor stem and T stem-loop. RNA and DNA minihelices are efficient substrates for CCA addition in steady-state kinetics. However, in contrast to structural models and steady-state experiments, we show here by single-turnover kinetics that minihelices are insufficient substrates for the Escherichia coli CCA enzyme and that only the full-length tRNA is kinetically competent. Even a nick in the full-length tRNA backbone in the T loop, or as far away from the minihelix domain as in the anticodon loop, prevents efficient CCA addition. These results suggest a kinetic quality control provided by the CCA enzyme to inspect the integrity of the tRNA molecule and to discriminate against nicked or damaged species from further maturation.

  8. Determination of tryptophan tRNA recognition sites for tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Umehara, Takuya; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from extreme hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, tryptophanylation activities were examined by using mutant tryptophan tRNA transcripts prepared by in vitro transcription system. Their transcripts were aminoacylated with tryptophan by overexpressed A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. The results indicated that anticodon nucleotides C34, C35 and A36, discriminator base A73, G1-C72 and G2-C71 base pairs of acceptor stem were base-specifically recognized by A. pernix tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

  9. Translational infidelity-induced protein stress results from a deficiency in Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ashish; Chan, Clement T Y; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Rooney, John P; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2012-07-01

    Correct codon-anticodon pairing promotes translational fidelity, with these interactions greatly facilitated by modified nucleosides found in tRNA. We hypothesized that wobble uridine modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) are essential for translational fidelity. In support, we have used phenotypic, reporter and protein-based assays to demonstrate increased translational infidelity in trm9Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Codon reengineering studies suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific genes, those rich in arginine and glutamic acid codons from mixed boxes. Using quantitative tRNA modification analysis, we determined that trm9Δ cells are only deficient in 2 of 23 tRNA modifications, with those 2, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm ( 5) U) and 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U), classified as key determinants of translational fidelity. We also show that in the absence of mcm ( 5) U and mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U, the resulting translational infidelity promotes protein errors and activation of unfolded protein and heat shock responses. These data support a model in which Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific transcripts, with decreased wobble base modification leading to translational infidelity, protein errors and activation of protein stress response pathways.

  10. Molecular recognition of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2009-05-01

    The identity elements of transfer RNA are the molecular basis for recognition by each cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. In the archaea system, the tryptophan tRNA identity has not been determined in detail. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) from the hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of tryptophan tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpression of A. pernix TrpRS. Substitution of the discriminator base, A73, impaired tryptophan incorporation activity. Changing the G1-C72 base pair to other base pairs also decreased the aminoacylation activity. Substitutions of anticodon CCA revealed that the C34 and C35 mutants dramatically reduced aminoacylation with tryptophan, but the A36 mutants had the same activity as the wild type. The results indicate that the anticodon nucleotides C34, C35, discriminator base A73 and G1-C72 base pair are major recognition sites for A. pernix TrpRS.

  11. Combined tRNA modification defects impair protein homeostasis and synthesis of the yeast prion protein Rnq1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffrath, Raffael; Klassen, Roland

    2017-01-02

    Modified nucleosides in tRNA anticodon loops such as 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U) and pseuduridine (Ψ) are thought to be required for an efficient decoding process. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the simultaneous presence of mcm5s2U and Ψ38 in tRNAGlnUUG was shown to mediate efficient synthesis of the Q/N rich [PIN+] prion forming protein Rnq1. 1 In the absence of these two tRNA modifications, higher than normal levels of hypomodified tRNAGlnUUG, but not its isoacceptor tRNAGlnCUG can restore Rnq1 synthesis. Moroever, tRNA overexpression rescues pleiotropic phenotypes that associate with loss of mcm5s2U and Ψ38 formation. Notably, combined absence of different tRNA modifications are shown to induce the formation of protein aggregates which likely mediate severe cytological abnormalities, including cytokinesis and nuclear segregation defects. In support of this, overexpression of the aggregating polyQ protein Htt103Q, but not its non-aggregating variant Htt25Q phenocopies these cytological abnormalities, most pronouncedly in deg1 single mutants lacking Ψ38 alone. It is concluded that slow decoding of particular codons induces defects in protein homeostasis that interfere with key steps in cytokinesis and nuclear segregation.

  12. One ancestor for two codes viewed from the perspective of two complementary modes of tRNA aminoacylation

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    Szathmáry Eörs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic code is brought into action by 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes are evenly divided into two classes (I and II that recognize tRNAs from the minor and major groove sides of the acceptor stem, respectively. We have reported recently that: (1 ribozymic precursors of the synthetases seem to have used the same two sterically mirror modes of tRNA recognition, (2 having these two modes might have helped in preventing erroneous aminoacylation of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, yet (3 the risk of confusion for the presumably earliest pairs of complementarily encoded amino acids had little to do with anticodons. Accordingly, in this communication we focus on the acceptor stem. Results Our main result is the emergence of a palindrome structure for the acceptor stem's common ancestor, reconstructed from the phylogenetic trees of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. In parallel, for pairs of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, we present updated evidence of concerted complementarity of the second bases in the acceptor stems. These two results suggest that the first pairs of "complementary" amino acids that were engaged in primordial coding, such as Gly and Ala, could have avoided erroneous aminoacylation if and only if the acceptor stems of their adaptors were recognized from the same, major groove, side. The class II protein synthetases then inherited this "primary preference" from isofunctional ribozymes. Conclusion Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the genetic code per se (the one associated with the anticodons and the operational code of aminoacylation (associated with the acceptor diverged from a common ancestor that probably began developing before translation. The primordial advantage of linking some amino acids (most likely glycine and alanine to the ancestral acceptor stem may have been selective retention in a protocell surrounded by a leaky membrane for use in

  13. One ancestor for two codes viewed from the perspective of two complementary modes of tRNA aminoacylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Andrei S; Szathmáry, Eörs; Rodin, Sergei N

    2009-01-27

    The genetic code is brought into action by 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes are evenly divided into two classes (I and II) that recognize tRNAs from the minor and major groove sides of the acceptor stem, respectively. We have reported recently that: (1) ribozymic precursors of the synthetases seem to have used the same two sterically mirror modes of tRNA recognition, (2) having these two modes might have helped in preventing erroneous aminoacylation of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, yet (3) the risk of confusion for the presumably earliest pairs of complementarily encoded amino acids had little to do with anticodons. Accordingly, in this communication we focus on the acceptor stem. Our main result is the emergence of a palindrome structure for the acceptor stem's common ancestor, reconstructed from the phylogenetic trees of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. In parallel, for pairs of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, we present updated evidence of concerted complementarity of the second bases in the acceptor stems. These two results suggest that the first pairs of "complementary" amino acids that were engaged in primordial coding, such as Gly and Ala, could have avoided erroneous aminoacylation if and only if the acceptor stems of their adaptors were recognized from the same, major groove, side. The class II protein synthetases then inherited this "primary preference" from isofunctional ribozymes. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the genetic code per se (the one associated with the anticodons) and the operational code of aminoacylation (associated with the acceptor) diverged from a common ancestor that probably began developing before translation. The primordial advantage of linking some amino acids (most likely glycine and alanine) to the ancestral acceptor stem may have been selective retention in a protocell surrounded by a leaky membrane for use in nucleotide and coenzyme synthesis. Such acceptor stems

  14. Genetic Code Optimization for Cotranslational Protein Folding: Codon Directional Asymmetry Correlates with Antiparallel Betasheets, tRNA Synthetase Classes

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    Hervé Seligmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new codon property, codon directional asymmetry in nucleotide content (CDA, reveals a biologically meaningful genetic code dimension: palindromic codons (first and last nucleotides identical, codon structure XZX are symmetric (CDA = 0, codons with structures ZXX/XXZ are 5′/3′ asymmetric (CDA = −1/1; CDA = −0.5/0.5 if Z and X are both purines or both pyrimidines, assigning negative/positive (−/+ signs is an arbitrary convention. Negative/positive CDAs associate with (a Fujimoto's tetrahedral codon stereo-table; (b tRNA synthetase class I/II (aminoacylate the 2′/3′ hydroxyl group of the tRNA's last ribose, respectively; and (c high/low antiparallel (not parallel betasheet conformation parameters. Preliminary results suggest CDA-whole organism associations (body temperature, developmental stability, lifespan. Presumably, CDA impacts spatial kinetics of codon-anticodon interactions, affecting cotranslational protein folding. Some synonymous codons have opposite CDA sign (alanine, leucine, serine, and valine, putatively explaining how synonymous mutations sometimes affect protein function. Correlations between CDA and tRNA synthetase classes are weaker than between CDA and antiparallel betasheet conformation parameters. This effect is stronger for mitochondrial genetic codes, and potentially drives mitochondrial codon-amino acid reassignments. CDA reveals information ruling nucleotide-protein relations embedded in reversed (not reverse-complement sequences (5′-ZXX-3′/5′-XXZ-3′.

  15. The enigmatic mitochondrial genome of Rhabdopleura compacta (Pterobranchia reveals insights into selection of an efficient tRNA system and supports monophyly of Ambulacraria

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    Stadler Peter F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hemichordata comprises solitary-living Enteropneusta and colonial-living Pterobranchia, sharing morphological features with both Chordata and Echinodermata. Despite their key role for understanding deuterostome evolution, hemichordate phylogeny is controversial and only few molecular data are available for phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, mitochondrial sequences are completely lacking for pterobranchs. Therefore, we determined and analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of the pterobranch Rhabdopleura compacta to elucidate deuterostome evolution. Thereby, we also gained important insights in mitochondrial tRNA evolution. Results The mitochondrial DNA of Rhabdopleura compacta corresponds in size and gene content to typical mitochondrial genomes of metazoans, but shows the strongest known strand-specific mutational bias in the nucleotide composition among deuterostomes with a very GT-rich main-coding strand. The order of the protein-coding genes in R. compacta is similar to that of the deuterostome ground pattern. However, the protein-coding genes have been highly affected by a strand-specific mutational pressure showing unusual codon frequency and amino acid composition. This composition caused extremely long branches in phylogenetic analyses. The unusual codon frequency points to a selection pressure on the tRNA translation system to codon-anticodon sequences of highest versatility instead of showing adaptations in anticodon sequences to the most frequent codons. Furthermore, an assignment of the codon AGG to Lysine has been detected in the mitochondrial genome of R. compacta, which is otherwise observed only in the mitogenomes of some arthropods. The genomes of these arthropods do not have such a strong strand-specific bias as found in R. compacta but possess an identical mutation in the anticodon sequence of the tRNALys. Conclusion A strong reversed asymmetrical mutational constraint in the mitochondrial genome of

  16. Formation of the chlorophyll precursor. gamma. -aminolevulinic acid in cyanobacteria requires aminoacylation of a tRNA sup Glu species. [Synechocystis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Nell, G.P.; Peterson, D.M.; Schoen, A., Chen, Minwei; Soell, D. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1988-09-01

    In the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, the biosynthesis of the chlorophyll precursor {gamma}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) involves at least three enzymes and a tRNA species. Here we demonstrate that in cell extracts of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 ALA was formed from glutamate in a series of reactions in which activation of glutamate by glutamyl-tRNA{sup Glu} formation was the first step. The activated glutamate was reduced by a dehydrogenase which displayed tRNA sequence specificity. Fractionation of strain 6803 tRNA by reverse-phase chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis yielded two pure tRNA{sup Glu} species which stimulated ALA synthesis in vitro. These tRNAs had identical primary sequence but differed in the nucleotide modification of their anticodon. The 6803 tRNA{sup Glu} was similar to the sequence of tRNA{sup Glu} species or tRNA genes from Escherichia coli and from chloroplasts of Euglena gracilis and higher plants. Southern blot analysis revealed at least two tRNA{sup Glu} gene copies in the 6803 chromosome. A glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase, the terminal enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to ALA in chloroplasts, was detected in 6803 cell extracts by the conversion of glutamate-1-semialdehyde to ALA and by the inhibition of this reaction by gabaculin.

  17. Protein folding and tRNA biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Mónica; Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Ehrlich, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Polypeptides can fold into tertiary structures while they are synthesized by the ribosome. In addition to the amino acid sequence, protein folding is determined by several factors within the cell. Among others, the folding pathway of a nascent polypeptide can be affected by transient interactions with other proteins, ligands, or the ribosome, as well as by the translocation through membrane pores. Particularly, the translation machinery and the population of tRNA under different physiological or adaptive responses can dramatically affect protein folding. This review summarizes the scientific evidence describing the role of translation kinetics and tRNA populations on protein folding and addresses current efforts to better understand tRNA biology. It is organized into three main parts, which are focused on: (i) protein folding in the cellular context; (ii) tRNA biology and the complexity of the tRNA population; and (iii) available methods and technical challenges in the characterization of tRNA pools. In this manner, this work illustrates the ways by which functional properties of proteins may be modulated by cellular tRNA populations.

  18. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution

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    Akio Kanai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70–100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs. In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves.

  19. Self-Referential Encoding on Modules of Anticodon Pairs—Roots of the Biological Flow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Guimarães, Romeu

    2017-01-01

    The proposal that the genetic code was formed on the basis of (proto)tRNA Dimer-Directed Protein Synthesis is reviewed and updated. The tRNAs paired through the anticodon loops are an indication on the process. Dimers are considered mimics of the ribosomes—structures that hold tRNAs together and facilitate the transferase reaction, and of the translation process—anticodons are at the same time codons for each other. The primitive protein synthesis system gets stabilized when the product peptides are stable and apt to bind the producers therewith establishing a self-stimulating production cycle. The chronology of amino acid encoding starts with Glycine and Serine, indicating the metabolic support of the Glycine-Serine C1-assimilation pathway, which is also consistent with evidence on origins of bioenergetics mechanisms. Since it is not possible to reach for substrates simpler than C1 and compounds in the identified pathway are apt for generating the other central metabolic routes, it is considered that protein synthesis is the beginning and center of a succession of sink-effective mechanisms that drive the formation and evolution of the metabolic flow system. Plasticity and diversification of proteins construct the cellular system following the orientation given by the flow and implementing it. Nucleic acid monomers participate in bioenergetics and the polymers are conservative memory systems for the synthesis of proteins. Protoplasmic fission is the final sink-effective mechanism, part of cell reproduction, guaranteeing that proteins don’t accumulate to saturation, which would trigger inhibition. PMID:28383509

  20. GidA, a tRNA modification enzyme, contributes to the growth and virulence of Streptococcus suis serotype 2

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    Ting eGao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA, is a tRNA modification enzyme functioning together with MnmE in the addition of a carboxymethylaminomethyl group to position 5 of the anticodon wobble uridine of tRNA. Here, we report a GidA homologue from a Chinese isolate SC-19 of the zoonotic Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2. gidA disruption led to a defective growth, increased capsule thickness, and reduced hemolytic activity. Moreover, the gidA deletion mutant (ΔgidA displayed reduced mortality and bacterial loads in mice, reduced ability of adhesion to and invasion in epithelial cells, and increased sensitivity to phagocytosis. The iTRAQ analysis identified 372 differentially expressed (182 up- and 190 down-regulated proteins in ΔgidA and SC-19. Numerous DNA replication, cell division and virulence associated proteins were downregulated, whereas many capsule synthesis enzymes were upregulated by gidA disruption. This is consistent with the phenotypes of the mutant. Thus, GidA is a translational regulator that plays an important role in the growth, cell division, capsule biosynthesis, and virulence of SS2. Our findings provide new insight into the regulatory function of GidA in bacterial pathogens.

  1. Affinity labelling in situ of the bL12 protein on E. coli 70S ribosomes by means of a tRNA dialdehyde derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Codjo; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Le Caër, Jean-Pierre; Lancelot, Véronique; Cognet, Jean A H; Baouz, Soria

    2017-12-01

    In this report, we have used periodate-oxidized tRNA (tRNAox) as an affinity laleling reagent to demonstrate that: (i) the bL12 protein contacts the CCA-arm of P-site bound tRNA on the Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes; (ii) the stoichiometry of labelling is one molecule of tRNAox bound to one polypeptide chain of endogenous bL12; (iii) cross-linking in situ of bL12 with tRNAox on the ribosomes provokes the loss of activity; (iv) intact tRNA protects bL12 in the 70S ribosomes against cross-linking with tRNAox; (v) both tRNAox and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) compete for the same or for proximal cross-linking site(s) on bL12 inside the ribosome; (vi) the stoichiometry of cross-linking of PLP to the recombinant E. coli bL12 protein is one molecule of PLP covalently bound per polypeptide chain; (vii) the amino acid residue of recombinant bL12 cross-linked with PLP is Lys-65; (viii) Lys-65 of E. coli bL12 corresponds to Lys-53 of eL42 which was previously shown to cross-link with P-site bound tRNAox on human 80S ribosomes in situ; (ix) finally, E. coli bL12 and human eL42 proteins display significant primary structure similarities, which argues for evolutionary conservation of these two proteins located at the tRNA-CCA binding site on eubacterial and eukaryal ribosomes. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. The crystal structure of tRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    However, my attention was soon captured by the 'strange'. tRNA, shown to be formylmethionyl-tRNA (fMet-tRNA), recently discovered by Kjeld Marcker and Fred Sanger. I was able to put my experience of decoding and cell-free protein synthesis to good use in a close collaboration with. Marcker over the next six years.

  3. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

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    Thalia Salinas-Giegé

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation.

  4. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Richard; Giegé, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation. PMID:25734984

  5. A nutrient-driven tRNA modification alters translational fidelity and genome-wide protein coding across an animal genus.

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    John M Zaborske

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection favors efficient expression of encoded proteins, but the causes, mechanisms, and fitness consequences of evolved coding changes remain an area of aggressive inquiry. We report a large-scale reversal in the relative translational accuracy of codons across 12 fly species in the Drosophila/Sophophora genus. Because the reversal involves pairs of codons that are read by the same genomically encoded tRNAs, we hypothesize, and show by direct measurement, that a tRNA anticodon modification from guanosine to queuosine has coevolved with these genomic changes. Queuosine modification is present in most organisms but its function remains unclear. Modification levels vary across developmental stages in D. melanogaster, and, consistent with a causal effect, genes maximally expressed at each stage display selection for codons that are most accurate given stage-specific queuosine modification levels. In a kinetic model, the known increased affinity of queuosine-modified tRNA for ribosomes increases the accuracy of cognate codons while reducing the accuracy of near-cognate codons. Levels of queuosine modification in D. melanogaster reflect bioavailability of the precursor queuine, which eukaryotes scavenge from the tRNAs of bacteria and absorb in the gut. These results reveal a strikingly direct mechanism by which recoding of entire genomes results from changes in utilization of a nutrient.

  6. Genomic characteristics comparisons of 12 food-related filamentous fungi in tRNA gene set, codon usage and amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanping; Xie, Ting; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2012-04-10

    Filamentous fungi are widely exploited in food industry due to their abilities to secrete large amounts of enzymes and metabolites. The recent availability of fungal genome sequences has provided an opportunity to explore the genomic characteristics of these food-related filamentous fungi. In this paper, we selected 12 representative filamentous fungi in the areas of food processing and safety, which were Aspergillus clavatus, A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans, A. niger, A. oryzae, A. terreus, Monascus ruber, Neurospora crassa, Penicillium chrysogenum, Rhizopus oryzae and Trichoderma reesei, and did the comparative studies of their genomic characteristics of tRNA gene distribution, codon usage pattern and amino acid composition. The results showed that the copy numbers greatly differed among isoaccepting tRNA genes and the distribution seemed to be related with translation process. The results also revealed that genome compositional variation probably constrained the base choice at the third codon, and affected the overall amino acid composition but seemed to have little effect on the integrated physicochemical characteristics of overall amino acids. The further analysis suggested that the wobble pairing and base modification were the important mechanisms in codon-anticodon interaction. In the scope of authors' knowledge, it is the first report about the genomic characteristics analysis of food-related filamentous fungi, which would be informative for the analysis of filamentous fungal genome evolution and their practical application in food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Valine Anticodon and Valylatability of Peanut Clump Virus RNAs Are Not Essential but Provide a Modest Competitive Advantage in Plants†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Daiki; Dunoyer, Patrice; Hemmer, Odile; Fritsch, Christiane; Dreher, Theo W.

    2000-01-01

    The role of valine aminoacylation of the two genomic RNAs of Peanut clump virus (PCV) was studied by comparing the amplification in vivo of RNAs with GAC, GΔC, or CCA anticodons in the tRNA-like structure (TLS) present at the 3′ end of each viral RNA. The PCV RNA1 TLS of isolate PCV2 possesses a GAC anticodon and is capable of highly efficient valylation, whereas the RNA2 TLS has a GΔC anticodon that does not support valylation. The presence in RNA1 of GΔC or CCA anticodons that conferred nonvalylatability resulted in about 2- to 4-fold and a 14- to 24-fold reduction, respectively, in RNA accumulations in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts inoculated with the RNA1 variants together with wild-type RNA2(GΔC). No differences in RNA levels were observed among protoplasts inoculated with the three variant RNA2s in the presence of wild-type RNA1(GAC). All combinations of valylatable and nonvalylatable RNAs 1 and 2 were similarly infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and viral RNAs accumulated to similar levels; all input TLS sequences were present unchanged in apical leaves. In direct competition experiments in N. benthamiana plants, however, both RNA1 and RNA2 with GAC valylatable anticodons outcompeted the nonvalylatable variants. We conclude that valylation provides a small but significant replicational advantage to both PCV RNAs. Sequence analysis of the TLS from RNA2 of a second PCV isolate, PO2A, revealed the presence of an intact GAC valine anticodon, suggesting that the differential valylation of the genomic RNAs of isolate PCV2 is not a general characteristic of PCV. PMID:10954573

  8. The valine anticodon and valylatability of Peanut clump virus RNAs are not essential but provide a modest competitive advantage in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, D; Dunoyer, P; Hemmer, O; Fritsch, C; Dreher, T W

    2000-09-01

    The role of valine aminoacylation of the two genomic RNAs of Peanut clump virus (PCV) was studied by comparing the amplification in vivo of RNAs with GAC, GDeltaC, or CCA anticodons in the tRNA-like structure (TLS) present at the 3' end of each viral RNA. The PCV RNA1 TLS of isolate PCV2 possesses a GAC anticodon and is capable of highly efficient valylation, whereas the RNA2 TLS has a GDeltaC anticodon that does not support valylation. The presence in RNA1 of GDeltaC or CCA anticodons that conferred nonvalylatability resulted in about 2- to 4-fold and a 14- to 24-fold reduction, respectively, in RNA accumulations in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts inoculated with the RNA1 variants together with wild-type RNA2(GDeltaC). No differences in RNA levels were observed among protoplasts inoculated with the three variant RNA2s in the presence of wild-type RNA1(GAC). All combinations of valylatable and nonvalylatable RNAs 1 and 2 were similarly infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and viral RNAs accumulated to similar levels; all input TLS sequences were present unchanged in apical leaves. In direct competition experiments in N. benthamiana plants, however, both RNA1 and RNA2 with GAC valylatable anticodons outcompeted the nonvalylatable variants. We conclude that valylation provides a small but significant replicational advantage to both PCV RNAs. Sequence analysis of the TLS from RNA2 of a second PCV isolate, PO2A, revealed the presence of an intact GAC valine anticodon, suggesting that the differential valylation of the genomic RNAs of isolate PCV2 is not a general characteristic of PCV.

  9. CCA addition to tRNA: implications for tRNA quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    2010-04-01

    The CCA sequence is conserved at the 3' end of all mature tRNA molecules to function as the site of amino acid attachment. This sequence is acquired and maintained by stepwise nucleotide addition by the ubiquitous CCA enzyme, which is an unusual RNA polymerase that does not use a nucleic acid template for nucleotide addition. Crystal structural work has divided CCA enzymes into two structurally distinct classes, which differ in the mechanism of template-independent nucleotide selection. Recent kinetic work of the class II E. coli CCA enzyme has demonstrated a rapid and uniform rate constant for the chemistry of nucleotide addition at each step of CCA synthesis, although the enzyme uses different determinants to control the rate of each step. Importantly, the kinetic work reveals that, at each step of CCA synthesis, E. coli CCA enzyme has an innate ability to discriminate against tRNA backbone damage. This discrimination suggests the possibility of a previously unrecognized quality control mechanism that would prevent damaged tRNA from CCA maturation and from entering the ribosome machinery of protein synthesis. This quality control is relevant to cellular stress conditions that damage tRNA backbone and predicts a role of CCA addition in stress response.

  10. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as “adaptor” molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3′ terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. “Why CCA?” is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC. The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  11. Studies on crenarchaeal tyrosylation accuracy with mutational analyses of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and tyrosine tRNA from Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Jun; Endo, Kanako; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Fujimoto, Zui; Momma, Mitsuru; Kuno, Atsushi; Nishimura, Susumu; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2012-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a key role in the translation of genetic code into correct protein sequences. These enzymes recognize cognate amino acids and tRNAs from noncognate counterparts, and catalyze the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs. While Although several tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases (TyrRSs) from various species have been structurally and functionally well characterized, the crenarchaeal TyrRS remains poorly understood. In this study, we performed mutational analyses on tyrosine tRNA (tRNA(Tyr)) and TyrRS from the crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix, to investigate the molecular recognition mechanism. Kinetics for tyrosylation using in vitro transcript indicated that the discriminator base A73 and adjacent G72 in the acceptor stem are identity elements of tRNA(Tyr), whereas the C1 base and anticodon had modest roles as identity determinants. Intriguingly, in contrast to the identity element of eukaryotic/euryarchaeal TyrRSs, the first base-pair (C1-G72) of the acceptor stem was not essential in crenarchaeal TyrRS as a pair. Furthermore, A. pernix TyrRS mutants were constructed at positions Tyr39 and Asp172, which could form hydrogen bonds with the 4-hydroxyl group of l-tyrosine. The tyrosylation activities with the mutants resulted that Asp172 mutants completely abolished tyrosylation activity, whereas Tyr39 mutants had no effect on activity. Thus, crenarchaeal TyrRS appears to adopt different molecular recognition mechanism from other TyrRSs.

  12. The tRNA Elbow in Structure, Recognition and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prominent in the L-shaped three-dimensional structure of tRNAs is the “elbow” where their two orthogonal helical stacks meet. It has a conserved structure arising from the interaction of the terminal loops of the D- and T-stem-loops, and presents to solution a flat face of a tertiary base pair between the D- and T-loops. In addition to the ribosome, which interacts with the elbow in all three of its tRNA binding sites, several cellular RNAs and many proteins are known to recognize the elbow. At least three classes of non-coding RNAs, namely 23S rRNA, ribonuclease P, and the T-box riboswitches, recognize the tRNA elbow employing an identical structural motif consisting of two interdigitated T-loops. In contrast, structural solutions to tRNA-elbow recognition by proteins are varied. Some enzymes responsible for post-transcriptional tRNA modification even disrupt the elbow structure in order to access their substrate nucleotides. The evolutionary origin of the elbow is mysterious, but, because it does not explicitly participate in the flow of genetic information, it has been proposed to be a late innovation. Regardless, it is biologically essential. Even some viruses that hijack the cellular machinery using tRNA decoys have convergently evolved near-perfect mimics of the tRNA elbow.

  13. Tandemly repeated tRNA pseudogenes in photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, S; Cedergren, R

    1988-01-01

    A region distal to three tRNA genes in Photobacterium phosphoreum, a Gram-negative eubacterium, unexpectedly contains a high number of repeated DNA segments that are closely related to the adjacent tRNAPro gene. The 5' to 3' order of this cluster is tRNAPro-tRNAHis-tRNAPro followed by eight tRNAPro-like structures interspersed by rho-independent terminators. The two tRNAPro genes, which are identical, and the tRNAHis gene have 86% and 87% positional identity, respectively, to their counterparts in the argT operon of Escherichia coli. The facts that these tRNA-like structures are not transcribed, in contrast to the tRNA retropseudogenes of eukaryotes, and that these structures are clustered near their progenitor suggest they are an unusual class of tRNA pseudogenes that arose by tandem duplication. Images PMID:3194413

  14. Initiator tRNA genes template the 3' CCA end at high frequencies in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, David H; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2016-12-08

    While the CCA sequence at the mature 3' end of tRNAs is conserved and critical for translational function, a genetic template for this sequence is not always contained in tRNA genes. In eukaryotes and Archaea, the CCA ends of tRNAs are synthesized post-transcriptionally by CCA-adding enzymes. In Bacteria, tRNA genes template CCA sporadically. In order to understand the variation in how prokaryotic tRNA genes template CCA, we re-annotated tRNA genes in tRNAdb-CE database version 0.8. Among 132,129 prokaryotic tRNA genes, initiator tRNA genes template CCA at the highest average frequency (74.1%) over all functional classes except selenocysteine and pyrrolysine tRNA genes (88.1% and 100% respectively). Across bacterial phyla and a wide range of genome sizes, many lineages exist in which predominantly initiator tRNA genes template CCA. Convergent and parallel retention of CCA templating in initiator tRNA genes evolved in independent histories of reductive genome evolution in Bacteria. Also, in a majority of cyanobacterial and actinobacterial genera, predominantly initiator tRNA genes template CCA. We also found that a surprising fraction of archaeal tRNA genes template CCA. We suggest that cotranscriptional synthesis of initiator tRNA CCA 3' ends can complement inefficient processing of initiator tRNA precursors, "bootstrap" rapid initiation of protein synthesis from a non-growing state, or contribute to an increase in cellular growth rates by reducing overheads of mass and energy to maintain nonfunctional tRNA precursor pools. More generally, CCA templating in structurally non-conforming tRNA genes can afford cells robustness and greater plasticity to respond rapidly to environmental changes and stimuli.

  15. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-20

    According to the wobble hypothesis of codon-anticodon pairing proposed by Francis Crick , inosine in the first position of the anticodon of tRNAs could base...U,C,A *The purine and pyrimidine bases of the nucleosides listed in the table were predicted by Francis Crick to be able to base-pair in the tRNA...allopurinol proposed by Crick (2) states that inosine in the first position (Como n tof te aticdonof RN~, culdbas par wth ridne, DEAE-cellulose Column

  16. Biosynthesis and functions of sulfur modifications in tRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eShigi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential element for a variety of cellular constituents in all living organisms. In tRNA molecules, there are many sulfur-containing nucleosides, such as the derivatives of 2‑thiouridine (s2U, 4-thiouridine (s4U, 2-thiocytidine (s2C, and 2-methylthioadenosine (ms2A. Earlier studies established the functions of these modifications for accurate and efficient translation, including proper recognition of the codons in mRNA or stabilization of tRNA structure. In many cases, the biosynthesis of these sulfur modifications starts with cysteine desulfurases, which catalyze the generation of persulfide (an activated form of sulfur from cysteine. Many sulfur-carrier proteins are responsible for delivering this activated sulfur to each biosynthesis pathway. Finally, specific modification enzymes activate target tRNAs and then incorporate sulfur atoms. Intriguingly, the biosynthesis of 2-thiouridine in all domains of life is functionally and evolutionarily related to the ubiquitin-like post-translational modification system of cellular proteins in eukaryotes. This review summarizes the recent characterization of the biosynthesis of sulfur modifications in tRNA and the novel roles of this modification in cellular functions in various model organisms, with a special emphasis on 2-thiouridine derivatives. Each biosynthesis pathway of sulfur-containing molecules is mutually modulated via sulfur trafficking, and 2-thiouridine and codon usage bias have been proposed to control the translation of specific genes.

  17. Purification, Structure and Properties of Escherichia coli tRNA Pseudouridine Synthase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    enzymes which are reactive at C5 of uracil ( thymidylate synthase and aminoacyl synthetases). The deduced amino acid sequence of PSUI was also compared with...localize the sites of tRNA interaction with PSUI. The mechanism elucidated by Santi and others for thymidylate synthase (34-38) provides a conceptual...aminoacyl tRNA synthetases with residue U8 of their cognate tRNA substrates (39,40). In the case of thymidylate synthase , I the catalytic nucleophile is

  18. Capture, unfolding, and detection of individual tRNA molecules using a nanopore device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Smith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNA are the most common RNA molecules in cells and have critical roles as both translators of the genetic code and regulators of protein synthesis. As such, numerous methods have focused on studying tRNA abundance and regulation, with the most widely used methods being RNA-seq and microarrays. Though revolutionary to transcriptomics, these assays are limited by an inability to encode tRNA modifications in the requisite cDNA. These modifications are abundant in tRNA and critical to their function. Here we describe proof-of-concept experiments where individual tRNA molecules are examined as linear strands using a biological nanopore. This method utilizes an enzymatically ligated synthetic DNA adapter to concentrate tRNA at the lipid bilayer of the nanopore device and efficiently denature individual tRNA molecules as they are pulled through the α-hemolysin (α-HL nanopore. Additionally, the DNA adapter provides a loading site for ϕ29 DNA polymerase (ϕ29 DNAP, which acts as a brake on the translocating tRNA. This increases the dwell time of adapted tRNA in the nanopore, allowing us to identify the region of the nanopore signal that is produced by the translocating tRNA itself. Using adapter-modified E. coli tRNAfMet and tRNALys, we show that the nanopore signal during controlled translocation is dependent on the identity of the tRNA. This confirms that adapter-modified tRNA can translocate end-to-end through nanopores and provides the foundation for future work in direct sequencing of individual transfer RNA with a nanopore-based device.

  19. Two complementary enzymes for threonylation of tRNA in crenarchaeota: crystal structure of Aeropyrum pernix threonyl-tRNA synthetase lacking a cis-editing domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Sato, Yoshiteru; Miyashita, Yu-Ichiro; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sagara, Tsubasa; Tsunoda, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Takénaka, Akio

    2009-11-27

    In protein synthesis, threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) must recognize threonine (Thr) from the 20 kinds of amino acids and the cognate tRNA(Thr) from different tRNAs in order to generate Thr-tRNA(Thr). In general, an organism possesses one kind of gene corresponding to ThrRS. However, it has been recently found that some organisms have two different genes for ThrRS in the genome, suggesting that their proteins ThrRS-1 and ThrRS-2 function separately and complement each other in the threonylation of tRNA(Thr), one for catalysis and the other for trans-editing of misacylated Ser-tRNA(Thr). In order to clarify their three-dimensional structures, we performed X-ray analyses of two putatively assigned ThrRSs from Aeropyrum pernix (ApThrRS-1 and ApThrRS-2). These proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure of ApThrRS-1 has been successfully determined at 2.3 A resolution. ApThrRS-1 is a dimeric enzyme composed of two identical subunits, each containing two domains for the catalytic reaction and for anticodon binding. The essential editing domain is completely missing as expected. These structural features reveal that ThrRS-1 catalyzes only the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA, suggesting the necessity of the second enzyme ThrRS-2 for trans-editing. Since the N-terminal sequence of ApThrRS-2 is similar to the sequence of the editing domain of ThrRS from Pyrococcus abyssi, ApThrRS-2 has been expected to catalyze deaminoacylation of a misacylated serine moiety at the CCA terminus.

  20. Analysis of the complement and molecular evolution of tRNA genes in cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barris Wesley C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information regarding the number and organization of transfer RNA (tRNA genes at the genome level is becoming readily available with the increase of DNA sequencing of whole genomes. However the identification of functional tRNA genes is challenging for species that have large numbers of repetitive elements containing tRNA derived sequences, such as Bos taurus. Reliable identification and annotation of entire sets of tRNA genes allows the evolution of tRNA genes to be understood on a genomic scale. Results In this study, we explored the B. taurus genome using bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to catalogue and analyze cow tRNA genes. The initial analysis of the cow genome using tRNAscan-SE identified 31,868 putative tRNA genes and 189,183 pseudogenes, where 28,830 of the 31,868 predicted tRNA genes were classified as repetitive elements by the RepeatMasker program. We then used comparative genomics to further discriminate between functional tRNA genes and tRNA-derived sequences for the remaining set of 3,038 putative tRNA genes. For our analysis, we used the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, horse, dog, chicken and fugu genomes to predict that the number of active tRNA genes in cow lies in the vicinity of 439. Of this set, 150 tRNA genes were 100% identical in their sequences across all nine vertebrate genomes studied. Using clustering analyses, we identified a new tRNA-GlyCCC subfamily present in all analyzed mammalian genomes. We suggest that this subfamily originated from an ancestral tRNA-GlyGCC gene via a point mutation prior to the radiation of the mammalian lineages. Lastly, in a separate analysis we created phylogenetic profiles for each putative cow tRNA gene using a representative set of genomes to gain an overview of common evolutionary histories of tRNA genes. Conclusion The use of a combination of bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches has allowed the confident identification of a

  1. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  2. Viral tRNA Mimicry from a Biocommunicative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Ariza-Mateos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses have very small genomes which limits the functions they can encode. One of the strategies employed by these viruses is to mimic key factors of the host cell so they can take advantage of the interactions and activities these factors typically participate in. The viral RNA genome itself was first observed to mimic cellular tRNA over 40 years ago. Since then researchers have confirmed that distinct families of RNA viruses are accessible to a battery of cellular factors involved in tRNA-related activities. Recently, potential tRNA-like structures have been detected within the sequences of a 100 mRNAs taken from human cells, one of these being the host defense interferon-alpha mRNA; these are then additional to the examples found in bacterial and yeast mRNAs. The mimetic relationship between tRNA, cellular mRNA, and viral RNA is the central focus of two considerations described below. These are subsequently used as a preface for a final hypothesis drawing on concepts relating to mimicry from the social sciences and humanities, such as power relations and creativity. Firstly, the presence of tRNA-like structures in mRNAs indicates that the viral tRNA-like signal could be mimicking tRNA-like elements that are contextualized by the specific carrier mRNAs, rather than, or in addition to, the tRNA itself, which would significantly increase the number of potential semiotic relations mediated by the viral signals. Secondly, and in particular, mimicking a host defense mRNA could be considered a potential new viral strategy for survival. Finally, we propose that mRNA’s mimicry of tRNA could be indicative of an ancestral intracellular conflict in which species of mRNAs invaded the cell, but from within. As the meaning of the mimetic signal depends on the context, in this case, the conflict that arises when the viral signal enters the cell can change the meaning of the mRNAs’ internal tRNA-like signals, from their current significance to that

  3. tRNA - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/rmg/LATEST/rmg_trna.zip File size: 1 KB Simple search URL http:...ption Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us tRNA - RMG | LSDB Archive ...

  4. Infidelity of translation of encephalomyocarditis viral RNA with tRNA from human malignant trophoblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, O.K.; Kuchino, Y.

    1977-09-23

    We have investigated tRNA from the human malignant trophoblastic cells (BeWo cell) and human chorionic tissue for the translation of specific mRNAs, in a tRNA-dependent protein synthesizing system from Ehrlich ascites cells. BeWo cell tRNA and chorionic tRNA supported oviduct mRNA or encephalomyocarditis (EMC) viral RNA directed amino acid incorporation into polypeptides equally effectively. Polypeptides synthesized with oviduct mRNA and tRNA from both sources were identical upon sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. But the EMC RNA directed polypeptides synthesized with BeWo cell tRNA were different from those synthesized with chorionic tRNA. A polypeptide (molecular weight 58,000) was apparently not synthesized and the synthesis of a faster moving component (molecular weight, 14,000) was enhanced when BeWo cell tRNA was used. These results imply a functional difference in tRNA from human malignant cells compared to their normal counterpart.

  5. Early days of tRNA research: Discovery, function, purification and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... exchange and by their reaction with neutral hydroxylamine to form amino acid hydroxamates1 (figure 2). ... also catalyzed the transfer of the activated amino acid to the. tRNA (Berg and Ofengand 1958; Lipmann .... (i) complete cleavage of the purified tRNA with base- specific nucleases such as pancreatic ...

  6. Mechanism of 3'-Matured tRNA Discrimination from 3'-Immature tRNA by Class-II CCA-Adding Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2016-06-07

    CCA-adding enzyme adds the 3'-CCA of tRNA, using CTP and ATP as substrates, and terminates RNA synthesis after completion of CCA addition, without using a nucleic acid template. The complex structure of class-II Thermotoga maritima CCA-adding enzyme and mature tRNA with 3'-CCA revealed the mechanisms by which the enzyme terminates RNA synthesis after completion of 3'-CCA addition, and discriminates 3'-mature tRNA from 3'-immature tRNA. After completion of 3'-CCA addition at the catalytic site, the 3'-CCA refolds and relocates to the release site, which is discrete from the catalytic site. The 3'-CCA forms a continuously stacked, stable conformation together with the enzyme. Consequently, the 3'-mature tRNA rotates relative to the surface of the enzyme, and only the 3'-mature tRNA is ready for release. The 3'-regions of immature tRNAs cannot form the stable stacking conformation in the release site; thus, the 3' end is relocated in the catalytic site, and the 3'-CCA is reconstructed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Origin, evolution, and mechanism of 5′ tRNA editing in chytridiomycete fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAFOREST, MARIE-JOSÉE; BULLERWELL, CHARLES E.; FORGET, LISE; LANG, B. FRANZ

    2004-01-01

    5′ tRNA editing has been demonstrated to occur in the mitochondria of the distantly related rhizopod amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the chytridiomycete fungus Spizellomyces punctatus. In these organisms, canonical tRNA structures are restored by removing mismatched nucleotides at the first three 5′ positions and replacing them with nucleotides capable of forming Watson–Crick base pairs with their 3′ counterparts. This form of editing seems likely to occur in members of Amoebozoa other than A. castellanii, as well as in members of Heterolobosea. Evidence for 5′ tRNA editing has not been found to date, however, in any other fungus including the deeply branching chytridiomycete Allomyces macrogynus. We predicted that a similar form of tRNA editing would occur in members of the chytridiomycete order Monoblepharidales based on the analysis of complete mitochondrial tRNA complements. This prediction was confirmed by analysis of tRNA sequences using a tRNA circularization/ RT-PCR-based approach. The presence of partially and completely unedited tRNAs in members of the Monoblepharidales suggests the involvement of a 5′-to-3′ exonuclease rather than an endonuclease in removing the three 5′ nucleotides from a tRNA substrate. Surprisingly, analysis of the mtDNA of the chytridiomycete Rhizophydium brooksianum, which branches as a sister group to S. punctatus in molecular phylogenies, did not suggest the presence of editing. This prediction was also confirmed experimentally. The absence of tRNA editing in R. brooksianum raises the possibility that 5′ tRNA editing may have evolved twice independently within Chytridiomycota, once in the lineage leading to S. punctatus and once in the lineage leading to the Monoblepharidales. PMID:15247432

  8. Origin, evolution, and mechanism of 5' tRNA editing in chytridiomycete fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforest, Marie-Josée; Bullerwell, Charles E; Forget, Lise; Lang, B Franz

    2004-08-01

    5' tRNA editing has been demonstrated to occur in the mitochondria of the distantly related rhizopod amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the chytridiomycete fungus Spizellomyces punctatus. In these organisms, canonical tRNA structures are restored by removing mismatched nucleotides at the first three 5' positions and replacing them with nucleotides capable of forming Watson-Crick base pairs with their 3' counterparts. This form of editing seems likely to occur in members of Amoebozoa other than A. castellanii, as well as in members of Heterolobosea. Evidence for 5' tRNA editing has not been found to date, however, in any other fungus including the deeply branching chytridiomycete Allomyces macrogynus. We predicted that a similar form of tRNA editing would occur in members of the chytridiomycete order Monoblepharidales based on the analysis of complete mitochondrial tRNA complements. This prediction was confirmed by analysis of tRNA sequences using a tRNA circularization/RT-PCR-based approach. The presence of partially and completely unedited tRNAs in members of the Monoblepharidales suggests the involvement of a 5'-to-3' exonuclease rather than an endonuclease in removing the three 5' nucleotides from a tRNA substrate. Surprisingly, analysis of the mtDNA of the chytridiomycete Rhizophydium brooksianum, which branches as a sister group to S. punctatus in molecular phylogenies, did not suggest the presence of editing. This prediction was also confirmed experimentally. The absence of tRNA editing in R. brooksianum raises the possibility that 5' tRNA editing may have evolved twice independently within Chytridiomycota, once in the lineage leading to S. punctatus and once in the lineage leading to the Monoblepharidales.

  9. tRNA gene diversity in the three domains of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eFujishima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA is widely known for its key role in decoding mRNA into protein. Despite their necessity and relatively short nucleotide sequences, a large diversity of gene structures and RNA secondary structures of pre-tRNAs and mature tRNAs have recently been discovered in the three domains of life. Growing evidences of disrupted tRNA genes in the genomes of Archaea reveals unique gene structures such as, intron-containing tRNA, split tRNA, and permuted tRNA. Coding sequence for these tRNAs are either separated with introns, fragmented, or permuted at the genome level. Although evolutionary scenario behind the tRNA gene disruption is still unclear, diversity of tRNA structure seems to be co-evolved with their processing enzyme, so-called RNA splicing endonuclease. Metazoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mtRNAs are known for their unique lack of either one or two arms from the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure, while still maintaining functionality. Recently identified nematode-specific V-arm containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs possess long variable arms that are specific to eukaryotic class II tRNASer and tRNALeu but also decode class I tRNA codons. Moreover, many tRNA-like sequences have been found in the genomes of different organisms and viruses. Thus this review is aimed to cover the latest knowledge on tRNA gene diversity and further recapitulate the evolutionary and biological aspects that caused such uniqueness.

  10. tRNA genes protect a reporter gene from epigenetic silencing in mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Thomas; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Samoshkin, Alexander; Kouprina, Natalay; Pavlicek, Adam; White, Robert J; Larionov, Vladimir

    2011-08-15

    It is a well-established fact that the tRNA genes in yeast can function as chromatin barrier elements. However, so far there is no experimental evidence that tRNA and other Pol III-transcribed genes exhibit barrier activity in mammals. This study utilizes a recently developed reporter gene assay to test a set of Pol III-transcribed genes and gene clusters with variable promoter and intergenic regions for their ability to prevent heterochromatin-mediated reporter gene silencing in mouse cells. The results show that functional copies of mouse tRNA genes are effective barrier elements. The number of tRNA genes as well as their orientation influence barrier function. Furthermore, the DNA sequence composition of intervening and flanking regions affects barrier activity of tRNA genes. Barrier activity was maintained for much longer time when the intervening and flanking regions of tRNA genes were replaced by AT-rich sequences, suggesting a negative role of DNA methylation in the establishment of a functional barrier. Thus, our results suggest that tRNA genes are essential elements in establishment and maintenance of chromatin domain architecture in mammalian cells.

  11. Effect of correlated tRNA abundances on translation errors and evolution of codon usage bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premal Shah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that tRNA abundances are thought to play a major role in determining translation error rates, their distribution across the genetic code and the resulting implications have received little attention. In general, studies of codon usage bias (CUB assume that codons with higher tRNA abundance have lower missense error rates. Using a model of protein translation based on tRNA competition and intra-ribosomal kinetics, we show that this assumption can be violated when tRNA abundances are positively correlated across the genetic code. Examining the distribution of tRNA abundances across 73 bacterial genomes from 20 different genera, we find a consistent positive correlation between tRNA abundances across the genetic code. This work challenges one of the fundamental assumptions made in over 30 years of research on CUB that codons with higher tRNA abundances have lower missense error rates and that missense errors are the primary selective force responsible for CUB.

  12. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  13. Analyses of Genomic tRNA Reveal Presence of Novel tRNAs in Oryza sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan K.; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-01-01

    Transfer rRNAs are important molecules responsible for the translation event during protein synthesis. tRNAs are widespread found in unicellular to multi-cellular organisms. Analysis of tRNA gene family members in Oryza sativa revealed the presence of 750 tRNA genes distributed unevenly in different chromosomes. The length of O. sativa tRNAs genes were ranged from 66 to 91 nucleotides encoding 52 isoacceptor in total. tRNASer found in chromosome 8 of O. sativa encoded only 66 nucleotides which is the smallest tRNA of O. sativa and to our knowledge, this is the smallest gene of eukaryotic lineage reported so far. Analyses revealed the presence of several novel/pseudo tRNA genes in O. sativa which are reported for the first time. Multiple sequence alignment of tRNAs revealed the presence of family specific conserved consensus sequences. Functional study of these novel tRNA and family specific conserved consensus sequences will be crucial to decipher their importance in biological events. The rate of transition of O. sativa tRNA was found to be higher than the rate of transversion. Evolutionary study revealed, O. sativa tRNAs were evolved from the lineages of multiple common ancestors. Duplication and loss study of tRNAs genes revealed, majority of the O. sativa tRNA were duplicated and 17 of them were found to be undergone loss during the evolution. Orthology and paralogy study showed, the majority of O. sativa tRNA were paralogous and only a few of tRNASer were found to contain orthologous tRNAs. PMID:28713421

  14. A genetically encoded fluorescent tRNA is active in live-cell protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Isao; Igarashi, Takao; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Nitharwal, Ram G.; Takase, Ryuichi; Han, Kyu Young; Leslie, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cuiping; Gamper, Howard; Ha, Taekjip; Sanyal, Suparna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) perform essential tasks for all living cells. They are major components of the ribosomal machinery for protein synthesis and they also serve in non-ribosomal pathways for regulation and signaling metabolism. We describe the development of a genetically encoded fluorescent tRNA fusion with the potential for imaging in live Escherichia coli cells. This tRNA fusion carries a Spinach aptamer that becomes fluorescent upon binding of a cell-permeable and non-toxic fluorophore. We show that, despite having a structural framework significantly larger than any natural tRNA species, this fusion is a viable probe for monitoring tRNA stability in a cellular quality control mechanism that degrades structurally damaged tRNA. Importantly, this fusion is active in E. coli live-cell protein synthesis allowing peptidyl transfer at a rate sufficient to support cell growth, indicating that it is accommodated by translating ribosomes. Imaging analysis shows that this fusion and ribosomes are both excluded from the nucleoid, indicating that the fusion and ribosomes are in the cytosol together possibly engaged in protein synthesis. This fusion methodology has the potential for developing new tools for live-cell imaging of tRNA with the unique advantage of both stoichiometric labeling and broader application to all cells amenable to genetic engineering. PMID:27956502

  15. Alternative tRNA priming of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription explains sequence variation in the primer-binding site that has been attributed to APOBEC3G activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Vink, Monique; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uses exclusively the cellular tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a primer for reverse transcription. We demonstrate that HIV-1 uses not only tRNA(3)(Lys) but also an alternative tRNA primer. This tRNA was termed tRNA(5)(Lys), and the

  16. Biosynthesis of selenocysteine on its tRNA in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ming Xu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine (Sec is cotranslationally inserted into protein in response to UGA codons and is the 21st amino acid in the genetic code. However, the means by which Sec is synthesized in eukaryotes is not known. Herein, comparative genomics and experimental analyses revealed that the mammalian Sec synthase (SecS is the previously identified pyridoxal phosphate-containing protein known as the soluble liver antigen. SecS required selenophosphate and O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec as substrates to generate selenocysteyl-tRNA([Ser]Sec. Moreover, it was found that Sec was synthesized on the tRNA scaffold from selenide, ATP, and serine using tRNA([Ser]Sec, seryl-tRNA synthetase, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec kinase, selenophosphate synthetase, and SecS. By identifying the pathway of Sec biosynthesis in mammals, this study not only functionally characterized SecS but also assigned the function of the O-phosphoseryl-tRNA([Ser]Sec kinase. In addition, we found that selenophosphate synthetase 2 could synthesize monoselenophosphate in vitro but selenophosphate synthetase 1 could not. Conservation of the overall pathway of Sec biosynthesis suggests that this pathway is also active in other eukaryotes and archaea that synthesize selenoproteins.

  17. Informational redundancy of tRNA(4Ser) and tRNA(7Ser) genes in Drosophila melanogaster and evidence for intergenic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, J; Sinclair, D A; Hayashi, S; Tener, G M; Grigliatti, T A

    1991-05-20

    Variant tRNA genes have been widely observed in multicellular eukaryotes. Recent biochemical studies have shown that some of them are expressed in a tissue- or a stage-specific manner. These findings would thus imply that certain modified tRNAs may be crucial for the development of the organism. Using Drosophila melanogaster as a model, we have taken a combined genetic and molecular approach to examine critically the possible biological functions of tRNA(4, 7Ser) genes. We showed that at least 50% of the total templates can be deleted from the genome without inducing abnormal phenotypes such as Minute, or a decrease in viability. In addition, two of the tRNASer variant genes that are unique in sequence are also completely dispensable. This strongly implies that even though they may be expressed in vivo, they play no essential role in the development of the fruitfly. By comparison with some of the corresponding tRNA genes in another sibling species, Drosophila erecta, our results suggest strongly that the variants are products non-reciprocal exchanges among the tRNA(4, 7Ser), genes. Such intergenic recombination events may have a major influence in the concerted evolution of the two gene families.

  18. Mode of action of RNase BN/RNase Z on tRNA precursors: RNase BN does not remove the CCA sequence from tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanmay; Deutscher, Murray P

    2010-07-23

    RNase BN, the Escherichia coli homolog of RNase Z, was previously shown to act as both a distributive exoribonuclease and an endoribonuclease on model RNA substrates and to be inhibited by the presence of a 3'-terminal CCA sequence. Here, we examined the mode of action of RNase BN on bacteriophage and bacterial tRNA precursors, particularly in light of a recent report suggesting that RNase BN removes CCA sequences (Takaku, H., and Nashimoto, M. (2008) Genes Cells 13, 1087-1097). We show that purified RNase BN can process both CCA-less and CCA-containing tRNA precursors. On CCA-less precursors, RNase BN cleaved endonucleolytically after the discriminator nucleotide to allow subsequent CCA addition. On CCA-containing precursors, RNase BN acted as either an exoribonuclease or endoribonuclease depending on the nature of the added divalent cation. Addition of Co(2+) resulted in higher activity and predominantly exoribonucleolytic activity, whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), RNase BN was primarily an endoribonuclease. In no case was any evidence obtained for removal of the CCA sequence. Certain tRNA precursors were extremely poor substrates under any conditions tested. These findings provide important information on the ability of RNase BN to process tRNA precursors and help explain the known physiological properties of this enzyme. In addition, they call into question the removal of CCA sequences by RNase BN.

  19. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  20. Antibiotic inhibition of the movement of tRNA substrates through a peptidyl transferase cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Rodriguez-Fonseca, C; Leviev, I

    1996-01-01

    movement of the 5' end of P-site-bound tRNA relative to the ribosome that occurs on peptide bond formation. The 3' ends of the tRNAs enter, and move through, a catalytic cavity where antibiotics are considered to act by at least three primary mechanisms: (i) they interfere with the entry of the aminoacyl......The present review attempts to deal with movement of tRNA substrates through the peptidyl transferase centre on the large ribosomal subunit and to explain how this movement is interrupted by antibiotics. It builds on the concept of hybrid tRNA states forming on ribosomes and on the observed...... moiety into the catalytic cavity before peptide bond formation; (ii) they inhibit movement of the nascent peptide along the peptide channel, a process that may generally involve destabilization of the peptidyl tRNA, and (iii) they prevent movement of the newly deacylated tRNA between the P/P and hybrid P...

  1. tRNA modification profiles of the fast-proliferating cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chao; Niu, Leilei; Song, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiong, Xin; Zhang, Xianhua [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Zhenxi; Yang, Yi; Yi, Fan [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology and Tumor Biology, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Li-He [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhai, Suodi [Departmentof Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Hua, E-mail: huali88@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ye, Min, E-mail: yemin@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Du, Quan, E-mail: quan.du@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Despite the recent progress in RNA modification study, a comprehensive modification profile is still lacking for mammalian cells. Using a quantitative HPLC/MS/MS assay, we present here a study where RNA modifications are examined in term of the major RNA species. With paired slow- and fast-proliferating cell lines, distinct RNA modification profiles are first revealed for diverse RNA species. Compared to mRNAs, increased ribose and nucleobase modifications are shown for the highly-structured tRNAs and rRNAs, lending support to their contribution to the formation of high-order structures. This study also reveals a dynamic tRNA modification profile in the fast-proliferating cells. In addition to cultured cells, this unique tRNA profile has been further confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, the results indicate that tRNA is a actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells, and suggest that they may play a more active role in biological process than expected. -- Highlights: •RNA modifications were first examined in term of the major RNA species. •A dynamic tRNA modifications was characterized for the fast-proliferating cells. •The unique tRNA profile was confirmed with endometrial cancers and their adjacent normal tissues. •tRNA was predicted as an actively regulated RNA species in the fast-proliferating cancer cells.

  2. The CCA-adding enzyme: A central scrutinizer in tRNA quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2015-09-01

    tRNA nucleotidyltransferase adds the invariant CCA-terminus to the tRNA 3'-end, a central step in tRNA maturation. This CCA-adding enzyme is a specialized RNA polymerase that synthesizes the CCA sequence at high fidelity in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an additional function of this enzyme was identified, where it generates a specific degradation tag on structurally unstable tRNAs. This tag consists of an additional repeat of the CCA triplet, leading to a 3'-terminal CCACCA sequence. In order to explain how the enzyme catalyzes this extended polymerization reaction, Kuhn et al. solved a series of co-crystal structures of the CCA-adding enzyme from Archaeoglobus fulgidus in complex with different tRNA substrates. They show that the enzyme forces a bound unstable tRNA to refold the acceptor stem for a second round of CCA-addition, while stable transcripts are robust enough to resist this isomerization. In this review, we discuss how the CCA-adding enzyme uses a simple yet very elegant way to scrutinize its substrates for sufficient structural stability and, consequently, functionality. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Idiosyncratic recognition of UUG/UUA codons by modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine, τm5U present at 'wobble' position in anticodon loop of tRNALeu: A molecular modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita S Kamble

    Full Text Available Lack of naturally occurring modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm5U at the 'wobble' 34th position in tRNALeu causes mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS. The τm5U34 specifically recognizes UUG and UUA codons. Structural consequences of τm5U34 to read cognate codons have not been studied so far in detail at the atomic level. Hence, 50ns multiple molecular dynamics (MD simulations of various anticodon stem loop (ASL models of tRNALeu in presence and absence of τm5U34 along with UUG and UUA codons were performed to explore the dynamic behaviour of τm5U34 during codon recognition process. The MD simulation results revealed that τm5U34 recognizes G/A ending codons by 'wobble' as well as a novel 'single' hydrogen bonding interactions. RMSD and RMSF values indicate the comparative stability of the ASL models containing τm5U34 modification over the other models, lacking τm5U34. Another MD simulation study of 55S mammalian mitochondrial rRNA with tRNALeu showed crucial interactions between the A-site residues, A918, A919, G256 and codon-anticodon bases. Thus, these results could improve our understanding about the decoding efficiency of human mt tRNALeu with τm5U34 to recognize UUG and UUA codons.

  4. Novel and heteroplasmic mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes in Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah Tafti, Mahsasadat; Khatami, Mehri; Rezaei, Shiva; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi; Hadadzadeh, Mehdi

    2017-10-05

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare cardiac arrhythmia characterized by sudden death associated with electrocardiogram patterns characterized by incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevations in the anterior precordial leads. This syndrome predominantly is seen in younger males with structurally normal hearts. Mitochondrial variants particularly mt-tRNA mutations, are hot spots that lead to cardiological disorders. Previous studies have shown that mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes play an important causal or modifying role in BrS. The present study aims to evaluate the involvement of mitochondrial tRNA genes in arrhythmogenic BrS. In this study, 40 Iranian patients were investigated for the presence of the mutations in 6 mitochondrial tRNA genes (tRNA Ile, Met, Gln, Asn, Ala and Trp) by PCR-SSCP analysis. There were 4 mutations in tRNA genes, that for first time, were found in Brugada patients and these mutations were not in controls. Three of them were heteroplasmic and located in tRNAGln (T4377A) and tRNAMet (G4407A and C4456T) which were assessed as pathogenic mutations. A homoplasmic variant (5580T > C) in tRNATrp gene was located within the junction region between tRNATrp and tRNAAla genes. This mutation may disturb the processing of mt-tRNATrp. The results of this study suggest that mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes might lead to deficiencies in translational process of critical proteins of the respiratory chain and potentially lead to BrS in Iranian subjects.

  5. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  6. Movement of the 3'-end of tRNA through the peptidyl transferase centre and its inhibition by antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirillov, Stanislav; Porse, Bo Torben; Vester, Birthe

    1997-01-01

    experimental data and, especially, those relevant to substrate movements through the peptidyl transferase centre. With the exception of deacylated tRNA, which binds at the E-site, ribosomal interactions of the 3'-ends of the tRNA substrates generate only a small part of the total free energy of t...

  7. Predicting the pathogenicity of novel variants in mitochondrial tRNA with MitoTIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sonney

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel or rare variants in mitochondrial tRNA sequences may be observed after mitochondrial DNA analysis. Determining whether these variants are pathogenic is critical, but confirmation of the effect of a variant on mitochondrial function can be challenging. We have used available databases of benign and pathogenic variants, alignment between diverse tRNAs, structural information and comparative genomics to predict the impact of all possible single-base variants and deletions. The Mitochondrial tRNA Informatics Predictor (MitoTIP is available through MITOMAP at www.mitomap.org. The source code for MitoTIP is available at www.github.com/sonneysa/MitoTIP.

  8. Biophysical analysis of Arabidopsis protein-only RNase P alone and in complex with tRNA provides a refined model of tRNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Franziska; Schelcher, Cédric; Fernandez-Millan, Pablo; Gobert, Anthony; Birck, Catherine; Thureau, Aurélien; Roblin, Pierre; Giegé, Philippe; Sauter, Claude

    2017-08-25

    RNase P is a universal enzyme that removes 5' leader sequences from tRNA precursors. The enzyme is therefore essential for maturation of functional tRNAs and mRNA translation. RNase P represents a unique example of an enzyme that can occur either as ribonucleoprotein or as protein alone. The latter form of the enzyme, called protein-only RNase P (PRORP), is widespread in eukaryotes in which it can provide organellar or nuclear RNase P activities. Here, we have focused on Arabidopsis nuclear PRORP2 and its interaction with tRNA substrates. Affinity measurements helped assess the respective importance of individual pentatricopeptide repeat motifs in PRORP2 for RNA binding. We characterized the PRORP2 structure by X-ray crystallography and by small-angle X-ray scattering in solution as well as that of its complex with a tRNA precursor by small-angle X-ray scattering. Of note, our study reports the first structural data of a PRORP-tRNA complex. Combined with complementary biochemical and biophysical analyses, our structural data suggest that PRORP2 undergoes conformational changes to accommodate its substrate. In particular, the catalytic domain and the RNA-binding domain can move around a central hinge. Altogether, this work provides a refined model of the PRORP-tRNA complex that illustrates how protein-only RNase P enzymes specifically bind tRNA and highlights the contribution of protein dynamics to achieve this specific interaction. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... were incubated in cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli or rat liver, it was shown that the amino acids ... in the aqueous phase after phenol treatment of cellular extracts. Thus, the biochemical challenge is ..... the pseudoknot, allows building of a tRNA acceptor stem with a single strand of RNA (Rietveld et al ...

  10. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  11. Caveolin 3 gene and mitochondrial tRNA methionin gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Results gave further proof to decreased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA, which leads to increased expression in caveolin 3 mRNA in lymphocytes of DMD patients compared to controls. However using SSCP, there was no evidence for tRNA (Met) gene mutation among DMD patients and ...

  12. Protozoan ALKBH8 Oxygenases Display both DNA Repair and tRNA Modification Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn

    2014-01-01

    , interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function...

  13. Evolution of a tRNA operon in gamma purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, S; Cedergren, R

    1989-01-01

    Genomic DNA from eubacteria belonging to the gamma-3 subdivision of purple bacteria, as classified by Woese (C.R. Woese, Microbiol. Rev. 51:221-271, 1987), were probed with the argT operon of Escherichia coli encoding 5'-tRNA(Arg)-tRNA(His)-tRNA(Leu)-tRNA(Pro)-3'. The homologous operon from Vibrio harveyi was isolated and sequenced. Comparison of the five available sequences of this tRNA cluster from members of the families Enterobacteriaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae led to the conclusion that variations in different versions of this operon arose not only by point mutations but also by duplication and addition-deletion of entire tRNA genes. This data base permitted the formulation of a proposal dealing with the evolutionary history of this operon and suggested that DNA regions containing tRNA genes are active centers (hot spots) of recombination. Finally, since the operon from V. harveyi was not highly repetitive and did not contain tRNA pseudogenes, as in the Photobacterium phosphoreum operon, hybridization of genomic DNAs from different photobacterial strains with probes specific for the repeated pseudogene element was performed. We conclude that the phylogenetic distribution of the repetitive DNA is restricted to strains of P. phosphoreum. Images PMID:2687235

  14. Selection of tRNA charging quality control mechanisms that increase mistranslation of the genetic code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadavalli, Srujana S; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mistranslation can follow two events during protein synthesis: production of non-cognate amino acid:transfer RNA (tRNA) pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and inaccurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. Many aaRSs actively edit non-cognate amino acids, but editing mechanisms...

  15. Machine News and Volatility: The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the TRNA Sentiment Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper features an analysis of the relationship between the volatility of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Index and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA) provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry

  16. tRNA sequence data, annotation data and curation data - tRNADB-CE | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us tRNA...DB-CE tRNA sequence data, annotation data and curation data Data detail Data name tRNA s...equence data, annotation data and curation data DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00720-001 Description of data contents Data of tRNA... search results and curation data. Three prediction programs (tRNAScan-SE, Aragorn and tRNA fi...nder) were used together to search tRNA genes. If the prediction results did not

  17. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  18. Structural similarities and functional differences clarify evolutionary relationships between tRNA healing enzymes and the myelin enzyme CNPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2017-05-16

    Eukaryotic tRNA splicing is an essential process in the transformation of a primary tRNA transcript into a mature functional tRNA molecule. 5'-phosphate ligation involves two steps: a healing reaction catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) in association with cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase), and a sealing reaction catalyzed by an RNA ligase. The enzymes that catalyze tRNA healing in yeast and higher eukaryotes are homologous to the members of the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily, in particular to the vertebrate myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). We employed different biophysical and biochemical methods to elucidate the overall structural and functional features of the tRNA healing enzymes yeast Trl1 PNK/CPDase and lancelet PNK/CPDase and compared them with vertebrate CNPase. The yeast and the lancelet enzymes have cyclic phosphodiesterase and polynucleotide kinase activity, while vertebrate CNPase lacks PNK activity. In addition, we also show that the healing enzymes are structurally similar to the vertebrate CNPase by applying synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. We provide a structural analysis of the tRNA healing enzyme PNK and CPDase domains together. Our results support evolution of vertebrate CNPase from tRNA healing enzymes with a loss of function at its N-terminal PNK-like domain.

  19. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown......Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...

  20. Protein Synthesis in E. coli: Dependence of Codon-Specific Elongation on tRNA Concentration and Codon Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorf, Sophia; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    To synthesize a protein, a ribosome moves along a messenger RNA (mRNA), reads it codon by codon, and takes up the corresponding ternary complexes which consist of aminoacylated transfer RNAs (aa-tRNAs), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and GTP. During this process of translation elongation, the ribosome proceeds with a codon-specific rate. Here, we present a general theoretical framework to calculate codon-specific elongation rates and error frequencies based on tRNA concentrations and codon usages. Our theory takes three important aspects of in-vivo translation elongation into account. First, non-cognate, near-cognate and cognate ternary complexes compete for the binding sites on the ribosomes. Second, the corresponding binding rates are determined by the concentrations of free ternary complexes, which must be distinguished from the total tRNA concentrations as measured in vivo. Third, for each tRNA species, the difference between total tRNA and ternary complex concentration depends on the codon usages of the corresponding cognate and near-cognate codons. Furthermore, we apply our theory to two alternative pathways for tRNA release from the ribosomal E site and show how the mechanism of tRNA release influences the concentrations of free ternary complexes and thus the codon-specific elongation rates. Using a recently introduced method to determine kinetic rates of in-vivo translation from in-vitro data, we compute elongation rates for all codons in Escherichia coli. We show that for some tRNA species only a few tRNA molecules are part of ternary complexes and, thus, available for the translating ribosomes. In addition, we find that codon-specific elongation rates strongly depend on the overall codon usage in the cell, which could be altered experimentally by overexpression of individual genes.

  1. An evolutionary approach uncovers a diverse response of tRNA 2-thiolation to elevated temperatures in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alings, Fiona; Sarin, L Peter; Fufezan, Christian; Drexler, Hannes C A; Leidel, Sebastian A

    2015-02-01

    Chemical modifications of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules are evolutionarily well conserved and critical for translation and tRNA structure. Little is known how these nucleoside modifications respond to physiological stress. Using mass spectrometry and complementary methods, we defined tRNA modification levels in six yeast species in response to elevated temperatures. We show that 2-thiolation of uridine at position 34 (s(2)U34) is impaired at temperatures exceeding 30°C in the commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains S288C and W303, and in Saccharomyces bayanus. Upon stress relief, thiolation levels recover and we find no evidence that modified tRNA or s(2)U34 nucleosides are actively removed. Our results suggest that loss of 2-thiolation follows accumulation of newly synthesized tRNA that lack s(2)U34 modification due to temperature sensitivity of the URM1 pathway in S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Furthermore, our analysis of the tRNA modification pattern in selected yeast species revealed two alternative phenotypes. Most strains moderately increase their tRNA modification levels in response to heat, possibly constituting a common adaptation to high temperatures. However, an overall reduction of nucleoside modifications was observed exclusively in S288C. This surprising finding emphasizes the importance of studies that utilize the power of evolutionary biology, and highlights the need for future systematic studies on tRNA modifications in additional model organisms. © 2015 Alings et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Characterization of a whole set of tRNA molecules in an aerobic hyper-thermophilic Crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Syuji; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    The tRNA molecule has an important role in translation, the function of which is to carry amino acids to the ribosomes. It is known that tRNA is transcribed from tRNA genes, some of which, in Eukarya and Archaea, contain introns. A computational analysis of the complete genome of Aeropyrum pernix K1 predicted the presence of 14 intron-containing tRNA genes. To elucidate whether these introns are actually processed in living cells and what mechanism detects the intron regions, cDNAs for premature and mature forms of the tRNA molecules transcribed from the intron-containing tRNA genes in the model aerobic acidothermophilic crenarchaeon, A. pernix K1 were identified and analyzed. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of these two types of cDNAs indicated that the intron regions of the tRNA molecules were indeed processed in A. pernix K1 living cells. Some cDNA clones showed that the actual splicing positions were different from those predicted by computational analysis. However, the bulge-helix-bulge structure, which has been previously identified in exon-intron boundaries of archaeal tRNA genes, was evident in all boundary regions confirmed in this work. These results indicate that the generally described mechanism for tRNA processing in Archaea is utilized for processing the intron region of the tRNA molecules in A. pernix K1.

  3. Plant-Specific Preprotein and Amino Acid Transporter Proteins Are Required for tRNA Import into Mitochondria1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F.; Narsai, Reena; Ivanova, Aneta; Megel, Cyrille; Schock, Annette; Kraus, Sabrina; Glaser, Elzbieta; Philippar, Katrin; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Soll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A variety of eukaryotes, in particular plants, do not contain the required number of tRNAs to support the translation of mitochondria-encoded genes and thus need to import tRNAs from the cytosol. This study identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins, Tric1 and Tric2 (for tRNA import component), which on simultaneous inactivation by T-DNA insertion lines displayed a severely delayed and chlorotic growth phenotype and significantly reduced tRNA import capacity into isolated mitochondria. The predicted tRNA-binding domain of Tric1 and Tric2, a sterile-α-motif at the C-terminal end of the protein, was required to restore tRNA uptake ability in mitochondria of complemented plants. The purified predicted tRNA-binding domain binds the T-arm of the tRNA for alanine with conserved lysine residues required for binding. T-DNA inactivation of both Tric proteins further resulted in an increase in the in vitro rate of in organello protein synthesis, which was mediated by a reorganization of the nuclear transcriptome, in particular of genes encoding a variety of proteins required for mitochondrial gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The characterization of Tric1/2 provides mechanistic insight into the process of tRNA import into mitochondria and supports the theory that the tRNA import pathway resulted from the repurposing of a preexisting protein import apparatus. PMID:27789739

  4. tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, determine sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in HeLa cells.

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    Mayumi Okamoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonessential tRNA modifications by methyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved and have been reported to stabilize mature tRNA molecules and prevent rapid tRNA decay (RTD. The tRNA modifying enzymes, NSUN2 and METTL1, are mammalian orthologs of yeast Trm4 and Trm8, which are required for protecting tRNA against RTD. A simultaneous overexpression of NSUN2 and METTL1 is widely observed among human cancers suggesting that targeting of both proteins provides a novel powerful strategy for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that combined knockdown of NSUN2 and METTL1 in HeLa cells drastically potentiate sensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU whereas heat stress of cells revealed no effects. Since NSUN2 and METTL1 are phosphorylated by Aurora-B and Akt, respectively, and their tRNA modifying activities are suppressed by phosphorylation, overexpression of constitutively dephosphorylated forms of both methyltransferases is able to suppress 5-FU sensitivity. Thus, NSUN2 and METTL1 are implicated in 5-FU sensitivity in HeLa cells. Interfering with methylation of tRNAs might provide a promising rationale to improve 5-FU chemotherapy of cancer.

  5. Hydrophobic Properties of tRNA with Varied Conformations Evaluated by an Aqueous Two-Phase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Keishi; Tomita, Hibiki; Tanaka, Seishiro; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The surface properties of transfer RNA (tRNA) were analyzed using a poly(ethylene glycol)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), where the surface net hydrophobicity (HFS) and the local hydrophobicity (LH) were evaluated based on the partition coefficient of tRNA in the ATPS. According to the evaluated HFS values, the surface of the tRNA molecule was hydrophilic at 20° -40 °C, and it became hydrophobic at 50° -80 °C because of the exposure of the intrinsic nucleobases of tRNA. In contrast, the LH values were found to be maximal at 20° -40 °C. The conformation of tRNA was investigated by Raman and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, corroborating the results with the calculated prediction of its secondary structure (Mfold). It was shown that 66% of A-form structure existed at room temperature; the base stacking (θ265) was gradually decreased, and the A-form structure (θ208) was denatured along with a sigmoid curve against the temperature increase; the denatured secondary structures were observed above 50° C by Mfold prediction. The HFS value of the DNA duplex was found to be hydrophilic, compared to that of the single-stranded DNA, indicating that the exposure of nucleobases is a key factor of the hydrophobic properties of nucleotides. We conclude that the hydrophobic property of the tRNA surface was directly affected by its conformational transition. PMID:23091416

  6. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

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    Aneeshkumar G Arimbasseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(22G26 modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(22G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(22G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(22G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(22G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells.

  7. Characterization of the tRNA ligases of pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Coccidioides immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-10-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase (Trl1) is an essential trifunctional enzyme that repairs RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends. Trl1 is composed of C-terminal cyclic phosphodiesterase and central polynucleotide kinase domains that heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO4, and 5'-PO4 termini required for sealing by an N-terminal ligase domain. Trl1 enzymes are found in all human fungal pathogens and they are promising targets for antifungal drug discovery because: (i) their domain structures and biochemical mechanisms are unique compared to the mammalian RtcB-type tRNA splicing enzyme; and (ii) there are no obvious homologs of the Trl1 ligase domain in mammalian proteomes. Here we characterize the tRNA ligases of two human fungal pathogens: Coccidioides immitis and Aspergillus fumigatus The biological activity of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 was verified by showing that their expression complements a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trl1Δ mutant. Purified recombinant AfuTrl1 and CimTrl1 proteins were catalytically active in joining 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends in vitro, either as full-length proteins or as a mixture of separately produced healing and sealing domains. The biochemical properties of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 are similar to those of budding yeast Trl1, particularly with respect to their preferential use of GTP as the phosphate donor for the polynucleotide kinase reaction. Our findings provide genetic and biochemical tools to screen for inhibitors of tRNA ligases from pathogenic fungi. © 2016 Remus et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Preparation of Translationally Competent tRNA by Direct Chemical Acylation

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Noah H.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    Nonsense codon suppression for unnatural amino acid incorporation requires the preparation of a suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA. Chemical acylation strategies are general but inefficient and arduous. A recent report (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 15848) showed acylation of RNA mediated by lanthanum(III) using amino acid phosphate esters. The successful implementation of this methodology to full-length suppressor tRNA is described, and it is shown that the derived aminoacyl-tRNA is translationally co...

  9. Sequence-dependent base-stacking stabilities guide tRNA folding energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongzhong; Ge, Heming W; Cho, Samuel S

    2013-10-24

    The folding of bacterial tRNAs with disparate sequences has been observed to proceed in distinct folding mechanisms despite their structural similarity. To explore the folding landscapes of tRNA, we performed ion concentration-dependent coarse-grained TIS model MD simulations of several E. coli tRNAs to compare their thermodynamic melting profiles to the classical absorbance spectra of Crothers and co-workers. To independently validate our findings, we also performed atomistic empirical force field MD simulations of tRNAs, and we compared the base-to-base distances from coarse-grained and atomistic MD simulations to empirical base-stacking free energies. We then projected the free energies to the secondary structural elements of tRNA, and we observe distinct, parallel folding mechanisms whose differences can be inferred on the basis of their sequence-dependent base-stacking stabilities. In some cases, a premature, nonproductive folding intermediate corresponding to the Ψ hairpin loop must backtrack to the unfolded state before proceeding to the folded state. This observation suggests a possible explanation for the fast and slow phases observed in tRNA folding kinetics.

  10. Silent Polymorphisms: Can the tRNA Population Explain Changes in Protein Properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Fernández-Calero

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silent mutations are being intensively studied. We previously showed that the estrogen receptor alpha Ala87’s synonymous polymorphism affects its functional properties. Whereas a link has been clearly established between the effect of silent mutations, tRNA abundance and protein folding in prokaryotes, this connection remains controversial in eukaryotic systems. Although a synonymous polymorphism can affect mRNA structure or the interaction with specific ligands, it seems that the relative frequencies of isoacceptor tRNAs could play a key role in the protein-folding process, possibly through modulation of translation kinetics. Conformational changes could be subtle but enough to cause alterations in solubility, proteolysis profiles, functional parameters or intracellular targeting. Interestingly, recent advances describe dramatic changes in the tRNA population associated with proliferation, differentiation or response to chemical, physical or biological stress. In addition, several reports reveal changes in tRNAs’ posttranscriptional modifications in different physiological or pathological conditions. In consequence, since changes in the cell state imply quantitative and/or qualitative changes in the tRNA pool, they could increase the likelihood of protein conformational variants, related to a particular codon usage during translation, with consequences of diverse significance. These observations emphasize the importance of genetic code flexibility in the co-translational protein-folding process.

  11. Horizontal gene transfer of chlamydial-like tRNA genes into early vascular plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knie, Nils; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of lycophytes are surprisingly diverse, including strikingly different transfer RNA (tRNA) gene complements: No mitochondrial tRNA genes are present in the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii, whereas 26 tRNAs are encoded in the chondrome of the clubmoss Huperzia squarrosa. Reinvestigating the latter we found that trnL(gag) and trnS(gga) had never before been identified in any other land plant mitochondrial DNA. Sensitive sequence comparisons showed these two tRNAs as well as trnN(guu) and trnS(gcu) to be very similar to their respective counterparts in chlamydial bacteria. We identified homologs of these chlamydial-type tRNAs also in other lycophyte, fern, and gymnosperm DNAs, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) into mitochondria in the early vascular plant stem lineages. These findings extend plant mitochondrial HGT to affect individual tRNA genes, to include bacterial donors, and suggest that Chlamydiae on top of their recently proposed key role in primary chloroplast establishment may also have participated in early tracheophyte genome evolution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Crnković

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli, involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs and tRNAs (o-tRNAs. Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNASep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O-phosphoserine (Sep. The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase (iscS increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  13. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  14. A modified dinucleotide motif specifies tRNA recognition by TLR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Steffen; Rimbach, Katharina; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Dalpke, Alexander H; Helm, Mark

    2014-09-01

    RNA can function as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) whose recognition by the innate immune system alerts the body to an impending microbial infection. The recognition of tRNA as either self or nonself RNA by TLR7 depends on its modification patterns. In particular, it is known that the presence of a ribose methylated guanosine at position 18, which is overrepresented in self-RNA, antagonizes an immune response. Here, we report that recognition extends to the next downstream nucleotide and the effectively recognized molecular detail is actually a methylated dinucleotide. The most efficient nucleobases combination of this motif includes two purines, while pyrimidines diminish the effect of ribose methylation. The constraints of this motif stay intact when transposed to other parts of the tRNA. The results argue against a fixed orientation of the tRNA during interaction with TLR7 and, rather, suggest a processive type of inspection. © 2014 Kaiser et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. Fluorescent labeling of tRNA dihydrouridine residues: Mechanism and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jaskiran; Raj, Monika; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrouridine (DHU) positions within tRNAs have long been used as sites to covalently attach fluorophores, by virtue of their unique chemical reactivity toward reduction by NaBH4, their abundance within prokaryotic and eukaryotic tRNAs, and the biochemical functionality of the labeled tRNAs so produced. Interpretation of experiments employing labeled tRNAs can depend on knowing the distribution of dye among the DHU positions present in a labeled tRNA. Here we combine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI-MS) analysis of oligonucleotide fragments and thin layer chromatography to resolve and quantify sites of DHU labeling by the fluorophores Cy3, Cy5, and proflavin in Escherichia coli tRNAPhe and E. coli tRNAArg. The MALDI-MS results led us to re-examine the precise chemistry of the reactions that result in fluorophore introduction into tRNA. We demonstrate that, in contrast to an earlier suggestion that has long been unchallenged in the literature, such introduction proceeds via a substitution reaction on tetrahydrouridine, the product of NaBH4 reduction of DHU, resulting in formation of substituted tetrahydrocytidines within tRNA. PMID:21628433

  16. APOBEC3B cytidine deaminase targets the non-transcribed strand of tRNA genes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie; Roberts, Steven A; Sterling, Joan F; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2017-05-01

    Variations in mutation rates across the genome have been demonstrated both in model organisms and in cancers. This phenomenon is largely driven by the damage specificity of diverse mutagens and the differences in DNA repair efficiency in given genomic contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the single-strand DNA-specific cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) damages tRNA genes at a 1000-fold higher efficiency than other non-tRNA genomic regions in budding yeast. We found that A3B-induced lesions in tRNA genes were predominantly located on the non-transcribed strand, while no transcriptional strand bias was observed in protein coding genes. Furthermore, tRNA gene mutations were exacerbated in cells where RNaseH expression was completely abolished (Δrnh1Δrnh35). These data suggest a transcription-dependent mechanism for A3B-induced tRNA gene hypermutation. Interestingly, in strains proficient in DNA repair, only 1% of the abasic sites formed upon excision of A3B-deaminated cytosines were not repaired leading to mutations in tRNA genes, while 18% of these lesions failed to be repaired in the remainder of the genome. A3B-induced mutagenesis in tRNA genes was found to be efficiently suppressed by the redundant activities of both base excision repair (BER) and the error-free DNA damage bypass pathway. On the other hand, deficiencies in BER did not have a profound effect on A3B-induced mutations in CAN1, the reporter for protein coding genes. We hypothesize that differences in the mechanisms underlying ssDNA formation at tRNA genes and other genomic loci are the key determinants of the choice of the repair pathways and consequently the efficiency of DNA damage repair in these regions. Overall, our results indicate that tRNA genes are highly susceptible to ssDNA-specific DNA damaging agents. However, increased DNA repair efficacy in tRNA genes can prevent their hypermutation and maintain both genome and proteome homeostasis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement TY; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  18. Topological constraints are major determinants of tRNA tertiary structure and dynamics and provide basis for tertiary folding cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustoe, Anthony M; Brooks, Charles L; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that basic steric and connectivity constraints encoded at the secondary structure level are key determinants of 3D structure and dynamics in simple two-way RNA junctions. However, the role of these topological constraints in higher order RNA junctions remains poorly understood. Here, we use a specialized coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to directly probe the thermodynamic contributions of topological constraints in defining the 3D architecture and dynamics of transfer RNA (tRNA). Topological constraints alone restrict tRNA's allowed conformational space by over an order of magnitude and strongly discriminate against formation of non-native tertiary contacts, providing a sequence independent source of folding specificity. Topological constraints also give rise to long-range correlations between the relative orientation of tRNA's helices, which in turn provides a mechanism for encoding thermodynamic cooperativity between distinct tertiary interactions. These aspects of topological constraints make it such that only several tertiary interactions are needed to confine tRNA to its native global structure and specify functionally important 3D dynamics. We further show that topological constraints are conserved across tRNA's different naturally occurring secondary structures. Taken together, our results emphasize the central role of secondary-structure-encoded topological constraints in defining RNA 3D structure, dynamics and folding. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Examinations of tRNA Range of Motion Using Simulations of Cryo-EM Microscopy and X-Ray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Caulfield

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined tRNA flexibility using a combination of steered and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. Using Maxwell's demon algorithm, molecular dynamics was used to steer X-ray structure data toward that from an alternative state obtained from cryogenic-electron microscopy density maps. Thus, we were able to fit X-ray structures of tRNA onto cryogenic-electron microscopy density maps for hybrid states of tRNA. Additionally, we employed both Maxwell's demon molecular dynamics simulations and unbiased simulation methods to identify possible ribosome-tRNA contact areas where the ribosome may discriminate tRNAs during translation. Herein, we collected >500 ns of simulation data to assess the global range of motion for tRNAs. Biased simulations can be used to steer between known conformational stop points, while unbiased simulations allow for a general testing of conformational space previously unexplored. The unbiased molecular dynamics data describes the global conformational changes of tRNA on a sub-microsecond time scale for comparison with steered data. Additionally, the unbiased molecular dynamics data was used to identify putative contacts between tRNA and the ribosome during the accommodation step of translation. We found that the primary contact regions were H71 and H92 of the 50S subunit and ribosomal proteins L14 and L16.

  20. The TATA-binding protein participates in TFIIIB assembly on tRNA genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Huet, J.; Sentenac, A

    1992-01-01

    The TATA-binding protein TBP has been recently recognized as a general class III transcription factor. Using the gel shift assay to monitor initiation complex assembly on a yeast tRNA gene, we show that TBP is required for the TFIIIC-dependent assembly of TFIIIB. TFIIIB depleted of TBP by a simple chromatographic step does not bind stably to the TFIIIC-tDNA complex. Addition of yeast or human recombinant TBP allows the formation of a TFIIIB-TBP-TFIIIC-tDNA complex. The presence of TBP in the ...

  1. Preparation of translationally competent tRNA by direct chemical acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Noah H; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2010-09-03

    Nonsense codon suppression for unnatural amino acid incorporation requires the preparation of a suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA. Chemical acylation strategies are general but inefficient and arduous. A recent report (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 15848) showed acylation of RNA mediated by lanthanum(III) using amino acid phosphate esters. The successful implementation of this methodology to full-length suppressor tRNA is described, and it is shown that the derived aminoacyl-tRNA is translationally competent in Xenopus oocytes.

  2. A novel methyltransferase required for the formation of the hypermodified nucleoside wybutosine in eucaryotic tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhor, Hamid R; Penjwini, Mahmud; Clarke, Steven

    2005-08-26

    We demonstrate that the product of the yeast open reading frame YML005w is required for wybutosine (yW) formation in the phenylalanine-accepting tRNA of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. tRNA isolated from a deletion mutant of the YML005w gene accumulates 4-demethylwyosine (ImG-14), a precursor lacking three of the methyl groups of the yW hypermodified base. Since the amino acid sequence of the YML005w gene contains the signature motifs of the seven beta-strand methyltransferases, we now designate the gene TRM12 for tRNA methyltransferase. Using pulse-chase labeling of intact yeast cells with S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-(3)H]methionine, we show that the methylesterified form of yW is metabolically stable.

  3. Mouse Models Targeting Selenocysteine tRNA Expression for Elucidating the Role of Selenoproteins in Health and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolph L. Hatfield

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se deficiency has been known for many years to be associated with disease, impaired growth and a variety of other metabolic disorders in mammals. Only recently has the major role that Se-containing proteins, designated selenoproteins, play in many aspects of health and development begun to emerge. Se is incorporated into protein by way of the Se-containing amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec. The synthesis of selenoproteins is dependent on Sec tRNA for insertion of Sec, the 21st amino acid in the genetic code, into protein. We have taken advantage of this dependency to modulate the expression of Sec tRNA that in turn modulates the expression of selenoproteins by generating transgenic, conditional knockout, transgenic/standard knockout and transgenic/conditional knockout mouse models, all of which involve the Sec tRNA gene, to elucidate the intracellular roles of this protein class.

  4. Plant-Specific Preprotein and Amino Acid Transporter Proteins Are Required for tRNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcha, Monika W; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F; Gügel, Irene L; Kmiec, Beata; Narsai, Reena; Ivanova, Aneta; Megel, Cyrille; Schock, Annette; Kraus, Sabrina; Berkowitz, Oliver; Glaser, Elzbieta; Philippar, Katrin; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Soll, Jürgen; Whelan, James

    2016-12-01

    A variety of eukaryotes, in particular plants, do not contain the required number of tRNAs to support the translation of mitochondria-encoded genes and thus need to import tRNAs from the cytosol. This study identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins, Tric1 and Tric2 (for tRNA import component), which on simultaneous inactivation by T-DNA insertion lines displayed a severely delayed and chlorotic growth phenotype and significantly reduced tRNA import capacity into isolated mitochondria. The predicted tRNA-binding domain of Tric1 and Tric2, a sterile-α-motif at the C-terminal end of the protein, was required to restore tRNA uptake ability in mitochondria of complemented plants. The purified predicted tRNA-binding domain binds the T-arm of the tRNA for alanine with conserved lysine residues required for binding. T-DNA inactivation of both Tric proteins further resulted in an increase in the in vitro rate of in organello protein synthesis, which was mediated by a reorganization of the nuclear transcriptome, in particular of genes encoding a variety of proteins required for mitochondrial gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The characterization of Tric1/2 provides mechanistic insight into the process of tRNA import into mitochondria and supports the theory that the tRNA import pathway resulted from the repurposing of a preexisting protein import apparatus. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The concept of RNA-assisted protein folding: representation of amino acid kinetics at the tRNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Jan C; Biro, Josephine M K

    2013-01-21

    Transfer RNA molecules (tRNA) have the thermodynamic potential to interact with each other to form dimers (hybridization energy, dG=-33.2±6.7 kcal/mole, compared to the folding energy of the cloverleaf configuration, dG=-25±4.4 kcal/mole, p<0.0001). The dG values have a strong negative correlation with the frequency of co-locations and substitutions of associated amino acids. We suggest that tRNA interactions participate in determining amino acid interactions (co-locations) and consequently the 3D structures of peptides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diverse Mechanisms of Sulfur Decoration in Bacterial tRNA and Their Cellular Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chenkang; Black, Katherine A.; Dos Santos, Patricia C.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are ubiquitous biomolecules found in all organisms that possess a variety of functions. For decades, their roles in processes such as translation, structural stability, and cellular protection have been elucidated and appreciated. These thionucleosides are found in all types of bacteria; however, their biosynthetic pathways are distinct among different groups of bacteria. Considering that many of the thio-tRNA biosynthetic enzymes are absent in Gram-positive bacteria, recent studies have addressed how sulfur trafficking is regulated in these prokaryotic species. Interestingly, a novel proposal has been given for interplay among thionucleosides and the biosynthesis of other thiocofactors, through participation of shared-enzyme intermediates, the functions of which are impacted by the availability of substrate as well as metabolic demand of thiocofactors. This review describes the occurrence of thio-modifications in bacterial tRNA and current methods for detection of these modifications that have enabled studies on the biosynthesis and functions of S-containing tRNA across bacteria. It provides insight into potential modes of regulation and potential evolutionary events responsible for divergence in sulfur metabolism among prokaryotes. PMID:28327539

  7. Tdd-3, a tRNA gene-associated poly(A) retrotransposon from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, T; Tschepke, C; de Hostos, E L; Jendretzke, A; Dingermann, T

    1998-04-01

    The full-length 5218-bp sequence of the mobile genetic element Tdd-3 from Dictyostelium discoideum is described. Tdd-3 encodes two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) flanked by non-redundant, untranslated regions. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 is homologous to reverse transcriptases (RTs) encoded by the class of poly(A) retrotransposons. ORF2 also encodes a putative protein domain related to the family of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases, whose retroelement-encoded homologs have recently been proposed to represent the integrase function of poly(A) retrotransposons. Comparison of several genomic Tdd-3 copies revealed that element insertion is orientation specific and occurs about 100 bp downstream of tRNA genes in the D. discoideum genome. These properties of Tdd-3 suggest that the element is a tRNA gene-associated poly(A) retroelement present in the D. discoideum genome. Analysis of several cloned cDNAs derived from Tdd-3-specific plus strand RNAs indicate that the element is transcribed and polyadenylated during the growth of D. discoideum cells.

  8. Cross-Talk between Dnmt2-Dependent tRNA Methylation and Queuosine Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E. Ehrenhofer-Murray

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the Dnmt2 family of methyltransferases have yielded a number of unexpected discoveries. The first surprise came more than ten years ago when it was realized that, rather than being DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 enzymes actually are transfer RNA (tRNA methyltransferases for cytosine-5 methylation, foremost C38 (m5C38 of tRNAAsp. The second unanticipated finding was our recent discovery of a nutritional regulation of Dnmt2 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Significantly, the presence of the nucleotide queuosine in tRNAAsp strongly stimulates Dnmt2 activity both in vivo and in vitro in S. pombe. Queuine, the respective base, is a hypermodified guanine analog that is synthesized from guanosine-5’-triphosphate (GTP by bacteria. Interestingly, most eukaryotes have queuosine in their tRNA. However, they cannot synthesize it themselves, but rather salvage it from food or from gut microbes. The queuine obtained from these sources comes from the breakdown of tRNAs, where the queuine ultimately was synthesized by bacteria. Queuine thus has been termed a micronutrient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of Dnmt2 methylation and queuosine modification with respect to translation as well as the organismal consequences of the absence of these modifications. Models for the functional cooperation between these modifications and its wider implications are discussed.

  9. Cross-Talk between Dnmt2-Dependent tRNA Methylation and Queuosine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2017-02-10

    Enzymes of the Dnmt2 family of methyltransferases have yielded a number of unexpected discoveries. The first surprise came more than ten years ago when it was realized that, rather than being DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt2 enzymes actually are transfer RNA (tRNA) methyltransferases for cytosine-5 methylation, foremost C38 (m5C38) of tRNAAsp. The second unanticipated finding was our recent discovery of a nutritional regulation of Dnmt2 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Significantly, the presence of the nucleotide queuosine in tRNAAsp strongly stimulates Dnmt2 activity both in vivo and in vitro in S. pombe. Queuine, the respective base, is a hypermodified guanine analog that is synthesized from guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) by bacteria. Interestingly, most eukaryotes have queuosine in their tRNA. However, they cannot synthesize it themselves, but rather salvage it from food or from gut microbes. The queuine obtained from these sources comes from the breakdown of tRNAs, where the queuine ultimately was synthesized by bacteria. Queuine thus has been termed a micronutrient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of Dnmt2 methylation and queuosine modification with respect to translation as well as the organismal consequences of the absence of these modifications. Models for the functional cooperation between these modifications and its wider implications are discussed.

  10. Distinct kinetic determinants for the stepwise CCA addition to tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangbumn; Liu, Cuiping; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard B; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2009-10-01

    The universally conserved CCA sequence is present at the 3' terminal 74-76 positions of all active tRNA molecules as a functional tag to participate in ribosome protein synthesis. The CCA enzyme catalyzes CCA synthesis in three sequential steps of nucleotide addition at rapid and identical rates. However, the kinetic determinant of each addition is unknown, thus limiting the insights into the kinetic basis of CCA addition. Using our recently developed single turnover kinetics of Escherichia coli CCA enzyme as a model, we show here that the identical rate of the stepwise CCA addition is determined by distinct kinetic parameters. Specifically, the kinetics of C74 and C75 addition is controlled by the chemistry of nucleotidyl transfer, whereas the kinetics of A76 addition is controlled by a prechemistry conformational transition of the active site. In multiple turnover condition, all three steps are controlled by slow product release, indicating enzyme processivity from one addition to the next. However, the processivity decreases as the enzyme progresses to complete the CCA synthesis. Together, these results suggest the existence of a network of diverse kinetic parameters that determines the overall rate of CCA addition for tRNA maturation.

  11. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Deng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9 in tRNAArg(UCU and tRNAGlu(UUC and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell.

  12. Quantitative single cell monitoring of protein synthesis at subcellular resolution using fluorescently labeled tRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoom, Sima; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cooperman, Barry S.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Smilansky, Zeev; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique of using fluorescent tRNA for translation monitoring (FtTM). FtTM enables the identification and monitoring of active protein synthesis sites within live cells at submicron resolution through quantitative microscopy of transfected bulk uncharged tRNA, fluorescently labeled in the D-loop (fl-tRNA). The localization of fl-tRNA to active translation sites was confirmed through its co-localization with cellular factors and its dynamic alterations upon inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signals, generated when fl-tRNAs, separately labeled as a FRET pair occupy adjacent sites on the ribosome, quantitatively reflect levels of protein synthesis in defined cellular regions. In addition, FRET signals enable detection of intra-populational variability in protein synthesis activity. We demonstrate that FtTM allows quantitative comparison of protein synthesis between different cell types, monitoring effects of antibiotics and stress agents, and characterization of changes in spatial compartmentalization of protein synthesis upon viral infection. PMID:21795382

  13. The Pai-associated leuX specific tRNA5(Leu) affects type 1fimbriation in pathogenic Escherichia coli by control of FimB recombinase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, A.; Gally, D.; Olsen, Peter Bjarke

    1997-01-01

    The uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (06:K15:H31) carries two large chromosomalpathogenicity islands (Pais). Both Pais are flanked by tRNA genes. Spontaneous deletion of Pai IIresults in truncation of the leuX tRNA5Leu gene. This tRNA is required for the expression of type 1fimbriae (Fim...

  14. Examining tRNA 3'-ends in Escherichia coli: A teamwork between CCA-adding enzyme, RNase T and RNase R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, Karolin; Czech, Andreas; Ignatova, Zoya; Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2017-11-27

    tRNA maturation and quality control are crucial for proper functioning of these transcripts in translation. In several organisms, defective tRNAs were shown to be tagged by poly(A) or CCACCA tails and subsequently degraded by 3'-exonucleases. In a deep sequencing analysis of tRNA 3'-ends, we detected the CCACCA tag also in Escherichia coli. However, this tag closely resembles several 3'-trailers of tRNA precursors targeted for maturation and not for degradation. Here, we investigate the ability of two important exonucleases, RNase R and RNase T, to distinguish tRNA precursors with native 3' trailer from tRNAs with CCACCA tag. Our results show that the degrading enzyme RNase R breaks down both tRNAs primed for degradation as well as precursor transcripts, indicating that it is a rather non-specific RNase. RNase T, a main processing exonuclease involved in trimming of 3'-trailers, is very inefficient in converting the CCACCA-tagged tRNA into a mature transcript. Hence, while both RNases compete for trailer-containing tRNA precursors, the inability of RNase T to process CCACCA tails ensures that defective tRNAs cannot re-enter the functional tRNA pool, representing a safeguard to avoid detrimental effects of tRNAs with erroneous integrity on protein synthesis. Furthermore, these data indicate that the RNase T-mediated end turnover of the CCA sequence represents a means to deliver a tRNA to a repeated quality control performed by the CCA-adding enzyme. Hence, originally described as a futile side reaction, the tRNA end turnover seems to fulfil an important function in the maintenance of the tRNA pool in the cell. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. Long 5' leaders inhibit removal of a 3' trailer from a precursor tRNA by mammalian tRNA 3' processing endoribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashimoto, M; Wesemann, D R; Geary, S; Tamura, M; Kaspar, R L

    1999-01-01

    Mammalian tRNA 3' processing endoribonuclease (3' tRNase) can remove a 3' trailer from various pre-tRNAs without 5' leader nucleotides. To examine how 5[prime] leader sequences affect 3' processing efficiency, we performed in vitro 3' processing reactions with purified pig 3' tRNase and pre-tRNAArgs containing a 13-nt 3' trailer and a 5[prime] leader of various lengths. The 3' processing was slightly stimulated by 5[prime] leaders containing up to 7 nt, whereas leaders of 9 nt or longer severely inhibited the reaction. Structure probing indicated that the 5' leader sequences had little effect on pre-tRNA folding. Similar results were obtained using pre-tRNA(Val)s containing a 5' leader of various lengths. We also investigated whether 3'tRNase can remove 3' trailers that are stably base-paired with 5' leaders to form an extended acceptor stem. Even such small 5' leaders as 3 and 6 nt, when base-paired with a 3' trailer, severely hindered removal of the 3' trailer by 3' tRNase. PMID:10373595

  16. Direct Regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA Gene Transcription by Polo-like Kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairley, Jennifer A.; Mitchell, Louise E.; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S.; von Schubert, Conrad; Sillje, Herman H. W.; Medema, Rene H.; Nigg, Erich A.; White, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase Ill (pol Ill) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brit During interphase, Plk1 promotes

  17. An entropy based analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Index and the TRNA Sentiment series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper features an analysis of the relationship between the DOW JONES Industrial Average Index (DJIA) and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA)1 provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry Research Centre of the Asia Pacic).

  18. Archease from Pyrococcus abyssi improves substrate specificity and solubility of a tRNA m5C methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auxilien, Sylvie; El Khadali, Fatima; Rasmussen, Anette

    2007-01-01

    reading frame (PAB1947), which is shown here to encode a tRNA m(5)C methyltransferase. In vitro, the purified recombinant methyltransferase catalyzes m(5)C formation at several cytosines within tRNAs with preference for C49. The specificity of the methyltransferase is increased by the archease...

  19. Limited diagnostic value of enzyme analysis in patients with mitochondrial tRNA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrand, Flemming; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of respiratory chain (RC) enzyme analysis of muscle in adult patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM). RC enzyme activity was measured in muscle biopsies from 39 patients who carry either the 3243A>G mutation, other tRNA point mutations, or single, large......-scale deletions of mtDNA. Findings were compared with those obtained from asymptomatic relatives with the 3243A>G mutation, myotonic dystrophy patients, and healthy subjects. Plasma lactate concentration, maximal oxygen uptake, and ragged-red fibers/cytochrome c-negative fibers in muscle were also determined....... Only 10% of patients with the 3243A>G point mutation had decreased enzyme activity of one or more RC complexes, whereas this was the case for 83% of patients with other point mutations and 62% of patients with deletions. Abnormal muscle histochemistry was found in 65%, 100%, and 85% of patients...

  20. Insertion near the mitochondrial tyrosine tRNA gene in patients with mitochondrial diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Y.; Nonaka, I. [National Institute of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Horai, S. [National Institute of Genetics, Mishima (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    The 3243 mutation commonly found in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) has been occasionally detected in patients with chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia (CPEO). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon, an extensive mitochondrial (mt) DNA study was performed on such a patient (3243-CPEO). The newly discovered insertion was located in the noncoding region between cytrochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and tyrosine tRNA. The insertion was not found in 58 or 22 CPEO patients with or without mtDNA large-scale deletion but in another 3243-CPEO patient. In addition, the insertion was present in 1 of 116 normal Japanese, who had no 3243 mutation, and in 3 of 68 3243-MELAS patients. These results raise the possibility that the phenotypic expression of the 3243 mutation could be modulated or arranged by additional mtDNA mutations.

  1. Limited diagnostic value of enzyme analysis in patients with mitochondrial tRNA mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrand, Flemming; Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2010-01-01

    -scale deletions of mtDNA. Findings were compared with those obtained from asymptomatic relatives with the 3243A>G mutation, myotonic dystrophy patients, and healthy subjects. Plasma lactate concentration, maximal oxygen uptake, and ragged-red fibers/cytochrome c-negative fibers in muscle were also determined......We evaluated the diagnostic value of respiratory chain (RC) enzyme analysis of muscle in adult patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM). RC enzyme activity was measured in muscle biopsies from 39 patients who carry either the 3243A>G mutation, other tRNA point mutations, or single, large....... Only 10% of patients with the 3243A>G point mutation had decreased enzyme activity of one or more RC complexes, whereas this was the case for 83% of patients with other point mutations and 62% of patients with deletions. Abnormal muscle histochemistry was found in 65%, 100%, and 85% of patients...

  2. Side effects of extra tRNA supplied in a typical bacterial protein production scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karina Marie; Nørholm, Morten H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is at the core of biotechnology and numerous molecular tools and bacterial strains have been developed to make the process more efficient. One commonly used generic solution is to supply extra copies of low-abundance tRNAs to compensate for the presence of complemen...... on the same plasmid and not the tRNAs per se. These phenomena seem to have been largely overlooked despite the huge popularity of the T7/pET-based systems for bacterial protein production....... of complementary rare codons in genes-of-interest. Here we show that such extra tRNA, supplied by the commonly used pLysSRARE2 plasmid, can cause two side effects: (1) growth and gene expression can be impaired, and (2) apparent positive effects can be caused by differential expression of the lysozyme gene encoded...

  3. Maf1-mediated regulation of yeast RNA polymerase III is correlated with CCA addition at the 3' end of tRNA precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foretek, Dominika; Nuc, Przemysław; Żywicki, Marek; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Kudla, Grzegorz; Boguta, Magdalena

    2017-05-15

    In eukaryotic cells tRNA synthesis is negatively regulated by the protein Maf1, conserved from yeast to humans. Maf1 from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates repression of trna transcription when cells are transferred from medium with glucose to medium with glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source. The strain with deleted gene encoding Maf1 (maf1Δ) is viable but accumulates tRNA precursors. In this study tRNA precursors were analysed by RNA-Seq and Northern hybridization in wild type strain and maf1Δ mutant grown in glucose medium or upon shift to repressive conditions. A negative effect of maf1Δ mutant on the addition of the auxiliary CCA nucleotides to the 3' end of pre-tRNAs was observed in cells shifted to unfavourable growth conditions. This effect was reduced by overexpression of the yeast CCA1 gene encoding ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. The CCA sequence at the 3' end is important for export of tRNA precursors from the nucleus and essential for tRNA charging with amino acids. Data presented here indicate that CCA-addition to intron-containing end-processed tRNA precursors is a limiting step in tRNA maturation when there is no Maf1 mediated RNA polymerase III (Pol III) repression. The correlation between CCA synthesis and Pol III regulation by Maf1 could be important in coordination of tRNA transcription, processing and regulation of translation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  5. Computational identification of the selenocysteine tRNA (tRNASec in genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didac Santesmasses

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine (Sec is known as the 21st amino acid, a cysteine analogue with selenium replacing sulphur. Sec is inserted co-translationally in a small fraction of proteins called selenoproteins. In selenoprotein genes, the Sec specific tRNA (tRNASec drives the recoding of highly specific UGA codons from stop signals to Sec. Although found in organisms from the three domains of life, Sec is not universal. Many species are completely devoid of selenoprotein genes and lack the ability to synthesize Sec. Since tRNASec is a key component in selenoprotein biosynthesis, its efficient identification in genomes is instrumental to characterize the utilization of Sec across lineages. Available tRNA prediction methods fail to accurately predict tRNASec, due to its unusual structural fold. Here, we present Secmarker, a method based on manually curated covariance models capturing the specific tRNASec structure in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. We exploited the non-universality of Sec to build a proper benchmark set for tRNASec predictions, which is not possible for the predictions of other tRNAs. We show that Secmarker greatly improves the accuracy of previously existing methods constituting a valuable tool to identify tRNASec genes, and to efficiently determine whether a genome contains selenoproteins. We used Secmarker to analyze a large set of fully sequenced genomes, and the results revealed new insights in the biology of tRNASec, led to the discovery of a novel bacterial selenoprotein family, and shed additional light on the phylogenetic distribution of selenoprotein containing genomes. Secmarker is freely accessible for download, or online analysis through a web server at http://secmarker.crg.cat.

  6. Molecular investigation of tRNA genes integrity and its relation to pathogenicity islands in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains

    OpenAIRE

    Novais,Rogério Carlos; Chaves,Marcela Cassin; Gonzalez,Alice Gonçalves Martins; Andrade,João Ramos Costa

    2004-01-01

    tRNA genes are known target sites for the integration of pathogenicity islands (PAI) and other genetic elements, such as bacteriophages, into bacterial genome. In most STEC (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli), the PAI called LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement) is related to bacterial virulence and is mostly associated to the tRNA genes selC and pheU. In this work, we first investigated the relationship of LEE with tRNA genes selC and pheU in 43 STEC strains. We found that 28 strains (65...

  7. A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa A. Holmbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistasis in which a naturally occurring mutation in the Drosophila simulans simw501 mtDNA-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA for tyrosine (tRNATyr interacts with a mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrially localized tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the incompatible mitochondrial-nuclear combination results in locomotor defects, reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS enzyme activity and severe alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Transgenic rescue strains containing nuclear variants of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase are sufficient to rescue many of the deleterious phenotypes identified when paired with the simw501 mtDNA. However, the severity of this defective mito-nuclear interaction varies across traits and genetic backgrounds, suggesting that the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction might be tissue specific. Because mutations in mitochondrial tRNATyr are associated with exercise intolerance in humans, this mitochondrial-nuclear introgression model in Drosophila provides a means to dissect the molecular basis of these, and other, mitochondrial diseases that are a consequence of the joint genetic architecture of mitochondrial function.

  8. Effect of anoxia and Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the activity of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in isolated pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasauskas, Artūras; Rodovicius, Hiliaras; Viezeliene, Dale; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effect of anoxia and Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture on the activities of different tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in isolated pig heart. The isolated pig heart was perfused according to the modified method of Langendorf, using an artificial blood circulation apparatus. Anoxia 20 min in duration was performed by perfusion of isolated heart with Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer saturated with gas mixture (95% N(2) and 5% CO(2)). Control heart was perfused with the same buffer saturated with gas mixture (95% O(2) and 5% CO(2)). Effect of Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture was evaluated by perfusion of isolated heart with a buffer containing tincture. Total tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases were isolated from pig heart. Activities of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases were measured by the aminoacylation reaction using C(14)-amino acids. Anoxia 20 min in duration has caused a decrease in the acceptor activity of tRNA and increase in the activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases. Polyscias filicifolia Bailey tincture did not affect the acceptor activity of tRNA and activities aminacyl-tRNA synthetases. After 20-min anoxic perfusion with the buffer containing Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass tincture, the acceptor activities of tRNA increased to the control value and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases reached the control value. The acceptor activity of tRNA from isolated pig heart decreased and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases increased under anoxia. Perfusion with buffer containing tincture of Polyscias filicifolia Bailey biomass restored acceptor activities of tRNA and activities of aminacyl-tRNA synthetases.

  9. Identification of a rhodanese-like protein involved in thiouridine biosynthesis in Thermus thermophilus tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigi, Naoki; Asai, Shin-Ichi; Watanabe, Kimitsuna

    2016-12-01

    Incorporation of a sulfur atom into 2-thioribothymidine (s(2) T or 5-methyl-2-thiouridine) at position 54 in thermophile tRNA is accomplished by an elaborate system composed of many proteins which confers thermostability to the translation system. We identified ttuD (tRNA-two-thiouridine D) as a gene for the synthesis of s(2) T54 in Thermus thermophilus. The rhodanese-like protein TtuD enhances the activity of cysteine desulfurases and receives the persulfide generated by cysteine desulfurases in vitro. TtuD also enhances the formation of thiocarboxylated TtuB, the sulfur donor for the tRNA sulfurtransferase TtuA. Since cysteine desulfurases are the first enzymes in the synthesis of s(2) T and other sulfur-containing compounds, TtuD has a role to direct sulfur flow to s(2) T synthesis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes.

  11. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  12. Shared Sulfur Mobilization Routes for tRNA Thiolation and Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Leimkühler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of transfer RNA (tRNA have been shown to play critical roles in the biogenesis, metabolism, structural stability and function of RNA molecules, and the specific modifications of nucleobases with sulfur atoms in tRNA are present in pro- and eukaryotes. Here, especially the thiomodifications xm5s2U at the wobble position 34 in tRNAs for Lys, Gln and Glu, were suggested to have an important role during the translation process by ensuring accurate deciphering of the genetic code and by stabilization of the tRNA structure. The trafficking and delivery of sulfur nucleosides is a complex process carried out by sulfur relay systems involving numerous proteins, which not only deliver sulfur to the specific tRNAs but also to other sulfur-containing molecules including iron–sulfur clusters, thiamin, biotin, lipoic acid and molybdopterin (MPT. Among the biosynthesis of these sulfur-containing molecules, the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco and the synthesis of thio-modified tRNAs in particular show a surprising link by sharing protein components for sulfur mobilization in pro- and eukaryotes.

  13. Characterization of human GTPBP3, a GTP-binding protein involved in mitochondrial tRNA modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Magda; Prado, Silvia; Esteve, Juan M; Soriano, Miguel A; Aguado, Carmen; Pérez-Martínez, David; Martínez-Ferrandis, José I; Yim, Lucía; Victor, Victor M; Cebolla, Elvira; Montaner, Asunción; Knecht, Erwin; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2008-12-01

    Human GTPBP3 is an evolutionarily conserved, multidomain protein involved in mitochondrial tRNA modification. Characterization of its biochemical properties and the phenotype conferred by GTPBP3 inactivation is crucial to understanding the role of this protein in tRNA maturation and its effects on mitochondrial respiration. We show that the two most abundant GTPBP3 isoforms exhibit moderate affinity for guanine nucleotides like their bacterial homologue, MnmE, although they hydrolyze GTP at a 100-fold lower rate. This suggests that regulation of the GTPase activity, essential for the tRNA modification function of MnmE, is different in GTPBP3. In fact, potassium-induced dimerization of the G domain leads to stimulation of the GTPase activity in MnmE but not in GTPBP3. The GTPBP3 N-terminal domain mediates a potassium-independent dimerization, which appears as an evolutionarily conserved property of the protein family, probably related to the construction of the binding site for the one-carbon-unit donor in the modification reaction. Partial inactivation of GTPBP3 by small interfering RNA reduces oxygen consumption, ATP production, and mitochondrial protein synthesis, while the degradation of these proteins slightly increases. It also results in mitochondria with defective membrane potential and increased superoxide levels. These phenotypic traits suggest that GTPBP3 defects contribute to the pathogenesis of some oxidative phosphorylation diseases.

  14. Mutational switching of a yeast tRNA synthetase into a mammalian-like synthetase cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Ewalt, Karla L; Schimmel, Paul

    2002-12-03

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. A link was recently established between protein biosynthesis and cytokine signal transduction. Human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase can be split into two fragments, each of which has a distinct cytokine function. This activity is specific to the human enzyme. It is absent in the enzymes from lower organisms such as bacteria and yeast. Here, yeast tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which lacks cytokine activity, was used as a model to explore how a human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase during evolution acquired novel functions beyond aminoacylation. We found that a rationally designed mutant yeast TyrRS(ELR) gained cytokine function. The mutant yeast enzyme gained this function without sacrifice of aminoacylation activity. Therefore, relatively simple alteration of a basic structural motif imparts cytokine activity to a tRNA synthetase while preserving its canonical function. Further work established that mutational switching of a yeast protein to a mammalian-like cytokine was specific to this synthetase and not to just any yeast ortholog of a mammalian cytokine.

  15. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds) to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  16. Functional assignment of KEOPS/EKC complex subunits in the biosynthesis of the universal t6A tRNA modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrochia, Ludovic; Guetta, Dorian; Hecker, Arnaud; Forterre, Patrick; Basta, Tamara

    2013-11-01

    N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A) is a universal tRNA modification essential for normal cell growth and accurate translation. In Archaea and Eukarya, the universal protein Sua5 and the conserved KEOPS/EKC complex together catalyze t(6)A biosynthesis. The KEOPS/EKC complex is composed of Kae1, a universal metalloprotein belonging to the ASHKA superfamily of ATPases; Bud32, an atypical protein kinase and two small proteins, Cgi121 and Pcc1. In this study, we investigated the requirement and functional role of KEOPS/EKC subunits for biosynthesis of t(6)A. We demonstrated that Pcc1, Kae1 and Bud32 form a minimal functional unit, whereas Cgi121 acts as an allosteric regulator. We confirmed that Pcc1 promotes dimerization of the KEOPS/EKC complex and uncovered that together with Kae1, it forms the tRNA binding core of the complex. Kae1 binds l-threonyl-carbamoyl-AMP intermediate in a metal-dependent fashion and transfers the l-threonyl-carbamoyl moiety to substrate tRNA. Surprisingly, we found that Bud32 is regulated by Kae1 and does not function as a protein kinase but as a P-loop ATPase possibly involved in tRNA dissociation. Overall, our data support a mechanistic model in which the final step in the biosynthesis of t(6)A relies on a strictly catalytic component, Kae1, and three partner proteins necessary for dimerization, tRNA binding and regulation.

  17. Deep Sequencing of Serum Small RNAs Identifies Patterns of 5′ tRNA Half and YRNA Fragment Expression Associated with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Dhahbi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs circulating in the blood may serve as signaling molecules because of their ability to carry out a variety of cellular functions. We have previously described tRNA- and YRNA-derived small RNAs circulating as components of larger complexes in the blood of humans and mice; the characteristics of these small RNAs imply specific processing, secretion, and physiological regulation. In this study, we have asked if changes in the serum abundance of these tRNA and YRNA fragments are associated with a diagnosis of cancer. We used deep sequencing and informatics analysis to catalog small RNAs in the sera of breast cancer cases and normal controls. 5′ tRNA halves and YRNA fragments are abundant in both groups, but we found that a breast cancer diagnosis is associated with changes in levels of specific subtypes. This prompted us to look at existing sequence datasets of serum small RNAs from 42 breast cancer cases, taken at the time of diagnosis. We find significant changes in the levels of specific 5′ tRNA halves and YRNA fragments associated with clinicopathologic characteristics of the cancer. Although these findings do not establish causality, they suggest that circulating 5′ tRNA halves and YRNA fragments with known cellular functions may participate in breast cancer syndromes and have potential as circulating biomarkers. Larger studies with multiple types of cancer are needed to adequately evaluate their potential use for the development of noninvasive cancer screening.

  18. Targeting ribonucleic acids by toxic small molecules: structural perturbation and energetics of interaction of phenothiazinium dyes thionine and toluidine blue O to tRNA phe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Puja; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2013-12-15

    This study was designed to examine the toxic interaction of two phenothiazinium dyes thionine (TO) and toluidine blue O (TBO) with tRNA(phe) by spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. While phenothiazinium dye complexation with DNA is known, their bindings to RNA are not fully investigated. The non cooperative binding of both the dyes to tRNA was revealed from absorbance and fluorescence studies. From absorption, steady-state emission, the effect of ferrocyanide ion-induced steady-state fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism, the mode of binding of these dyes into the tRNA helix has been substantiated to be principally by intercalative in nature. Both dyes enhanced the thermal stability of tRNA. Circular dichroism studies provided evidence for the structural perturbations associated with the tRNA structure with induction of optical activity in the CD inactive dye molecules. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments suggested that the binding of both dyes was predominantly entropy driven with a smaller but favorable enthalpy term that increased with temperature. The binding was dependent on the Na(+) concentration, but had a larger non-electrostatic contribution to the Gibbs energy. A small heat capacity value and the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the energetics of the interaction characterized the binding of the dyes to tRNA. This study confirms that the tRNA(phe) binding affinity is greater for TO compared to TBO. The utility of the present work lies in understanding the potential binding and consequent damage to tRNA by these toxic dyes in their development as therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Why should cancer biologists care about tRNAs? tRNA synthesis, mRNA translation and the control of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Savraj S

    2015-07-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are essential for mRNA translation. They are transcribed in the nucleus by RNA polymerase III and undergo many modifications before contributing to cytoplasmic protein synthesis. In this review I highlight our understanding of how tRNA biology may be linked to the regulation of mRNA translation, growth and tumorigenesis. First, I review how oncogenes and tumour suppressor signalling pathways, such as the PI3 kinase/TORC1, Ras/ERK, Myc, p53 and Rb pathways, regulate Pol III and tRNA synthesis. In several cases, this regulation contributes to cell, tissue and body growth, and has implications for our understanding of tumorigenesis. Second, I highlight some recent work, particularly in model organisms such as yeast and Drosophila, that shows how alterations in tRNA synthesis may be not only necessary, but also sufficient to drive changes in mRNA translation and growth. These effects may arise due to both absolute increases in total tRNA levels, but also changes in the relative levels of tRNAs in the overall pool. Finally, I review some recent studies that have revealed how tRNA modifications (amino acid acylation, base modifications, subcellular shuttling, and cleavage) can be regulated by growth and stress cues to selectively influence mRNA translation. Together these studies emphasize the importance of the regulation of tRNA synthesis and modification as critical control points in protein synthesis and growth. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco V. José

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C, and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C. New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state.

  1. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  2. Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes: non-linkage with syndromes of Wolfram and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ouweland, J M; Bruining, G J; Lindhout, D; Wit, J M; Veldhuyzen, B F; Maassen, J A

    1992-01-01

    We have recently identified a point mutation in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene which associates with a combination of type II diabetes mellitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a large pedigree. To extend this finding to other syndromes which exhibit a combination of diabetes mellitus and hearing loss we have sequenced all mitochondrial tRNA genes from two patients with the Wolfram syndrome, a rare congenital disease characterized by diabetes mellitus, deafness, diabetes insipidus and optic atrophy. In each patient, a single different mutation was identified. One is an A to G transition mutation at np 12,308 in tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene in a region which is highly conserved between species during evolution. This mutation has been described by Lauber et al. (1) as associating with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). The other is a C to T transition mutation at np 15,904 in tRNA(Thr) gene. Both mutations are also present in the general population (frequency tRNA(Leu(CUN)) mutation 0.16, tRNA(Thr) mutation 0.015). These findings suggest that evolutionarily conserved regions in mitochondrial tRNA genes can exhibit a significant polymorphism in humans, and that the mutation at np 12,308 in the tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene is unlikely to be associated with CPEO and Wolfram syndrome. Images PMID:1542564

  3. Defects in tRNA modification associated with neurological and developmental dysfunctions in Caenorhabditis elegans elongator mutants.

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    Changchun Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Elongator is a six subunit protein complex, conserved from yeast to humans. Mutations in the human Elongator homologue, hELP1, are associated with the neurological disease familial dysautonomia. However, how Elongator functions in metazoans, and how the human mutations affect neural functions is incompletely understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, ELPC-1 and ELPC-3, components of the Elongator complex, are required for the formation of the 5-carbamoylmethyl and 5-methylcarboxymethyl side chains of wobble uridines in tRNA. The lack of these modifications leads to defects in translation in C. elegans. ELPC-1::GFP and ELPC-3::GFP reporters are strongly expressed in a subset of chemosensory neurons required for salt chemotaxis learning. elpc-1 or elpc-3 gene inactivation causes a defect in this process, associated with a posttranscriptional reduction of neuropeptide and a decreased accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. elpc-1 and elpc-3 mutations are synthetic lethal together with those in tuc-1, which is required for thiolation of tRNAs having the 5'methylcarboxymethyl side chain. elpc-1; tuc-1 and elpc-3; tuc-1 double mutants display developmental defects. Our results suggest that, by its effect on tRNA modification, Elongator promotes both neural function and development.

  4. GTP-independent tRNA delivery to the ribosomal P-site by a novel eukaryotic translation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Sergey E; Terenin, Ilya M; Andreev, Dmitri E; Ivanov, Pavel A; Dunaevsky, Jacov E; Merrick, William C; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2010-08-27

    During translation, aminoacyl-tRNAs are delivered to the ribosome by specialized GTPases called translation factors. Here, we report the tRNA binding to the P-site of 40 S ribosomes by a novel GTP-independent factor eIF2D isolated from mammalian cells. The binding of tRNA(i)(Met) occurs after the AUG codon finds its position in the P-site of 40 S ribosomes, the situation that takes place during initiation complex formation on the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site or on some other specific RNAs (leaderless mRNA and A-rich mRNAs with relaxed scanning dependence). Its activity in tRNA binding with 40 S subunits does not require the presence of the aminoacyl moiety. Moreover, the factor possesses the unique ability to deliver non-Met (elongator) tRNAs into the P-site of the 40 S subunit. The corresponding gene is found in all eukaryotes and includes an SUI1 domain present also in translation initiation factor eIF1. The versatility of translation initiation strategies in eukaryotes is discussed.

  5. Reduced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants that use reverse transcription primers other than the natural tRNA(3Lys)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Klaver, B.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses involves reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a double-stranded DNA. This reaction is primed by the cellular tRNA(3Lys) molecule, which binds to a complementary sequence in the viral genome, referred

  6. A universal RNA structural motif docking the elbow of tRNA in the ribosome, RNAse P and T-box leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jean; Jossinet, Fabrice; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The structure and function of conserved motifs constituting the apex of Stem I in T-box mRNA leaders are investigated. We point out that this apex shares striking similarities with the L1 stalk (helices 76-78) of the ribosome. A sequence and structure analysis of both elements shows that, similarly to the head of the L1 stalk, the function of the apex of Stem I lies in the docking of tRNA through a stacking interaction with the conserved G19:C56 base pair platform. The inferred structure in the apex of Stem I consists of a module of two T-loops bound together head to tail, a module that is also present in the head of the L1 stalk, but went unnoticed. Supporting the analysis, we show that a highly conserved structure in RNAse P formerly described as the J11/12-J12/11 module, which is precisely known to bind the elbow of tRNA, constitutes a third instance of this T-loop module. A structural analysis explains why six nucleotides constituting the core of this module are highly invariant among all three types of RNA. Our finding that major RNA partners of tRNA bind the elbow with a same RNA structure suggests an explanation for the origin of the tRNA L-shape.

  7. Role of the primer activation signal in tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome studied by single-molecule FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Beerens (Nancy); M.D.E. Jepsen (Mette); V. Nechyporuk-Zloy (Volodymyr); A.C. Krüger (Asger); J.-L. Darlix (Jean-Luc); J. Kjems (Jørgen); V. Birkedal (Victoria)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHIV-1 reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNAlys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS) in the genomic RNA. An additional interaction between the tRNA molecule and the primer activation signal (PAS) is thought to regulate the initiation of reverse transcription.

  8. Roles of Trm9- and ALKBH8-like proteins in the formation of modified wobble uridines in Arabidopsis tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leihne, Vibeke; Kirpekar, Finn; Vågbø, Cathrine B

    2011-01-01

    Uridine at the wobble position of tRNA is usually modified, and modification is required for accurate and efficient protein translation. In eukaryotes, wobble uridines are modified into 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm(5)U), 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm(5)U) or derivatives thereof. Here, we d...

  9. Variation in the Spacer Regions Separating tRNA Genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum Distinguishes Recent Clinical Isolates from the Same Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Sarah M.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Chambers, Edel M.; Cooper, Lynne F.; Barker, Gavin A.; Gilpin, Martyn L.

    2001-01-01

    A means for distinguishing between clinical isolates of Renibacterium salmoninarum that is based on the PCR amplification of length polymorphisms in the tRNA intergenic spacer regions (tDNA-ILPs) was investigated. The method used primers specific to nucleotide sequences of R. salmoninarum tRNA genes and tRNA intergenic spacer regions that had been generated by using consensus tRNA gene primers. Twenty-one PCR products were sequenced from five isolates of R. salmoninarum from the United States, England, and Scotland, and four complete tRNA genes and spacer regions were identified. Sixteen specific PCR primers were designed and tested singly and in all possible pairwise combinations for their potential to discriminate between isolates from recent clinical outbreaks of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the United Kingdom. Fourteen of the isolates were cultured from kidney samples taken from fish displaying clinical signs of BKD on five farms, and some of the isolates came from the same farm and at the same time. The tDNA-ILP profiles separated 22 clinical isolates into nine groups and highlighted that some farms may have had more than one source of infection. The grouping of isolates improved on the discriminatory power of previously reported typing methods based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and restriction fragment length profiles developed using insertion sequence IS994. Our method enabled us to make divisions between closely related clinical isolates of R. salmoninarum that have identical exact tandem repeat (ETR-A) loci, rRNA intergenic spacer sequences, and IS994 profiles. PMID:11136759

  10. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Aisyah Mualif

    Full Text Available Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef, HIV-1 p24 (ca, and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3 E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  11. In vitro substrate specificities of 3'-5' polymerases correlate with biological outcomes of tRNA 5'-editing reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yicheng; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-07-22

    Protozoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) are repaired by a process known as 5'-editing. Mt-tRNA sequencing revealed organism-specific patterns of editing G-U base pairs, wherein some species remove G-U base pairs during 5'-editing, while others retain G-U pairs in the edited tRNA. We tested whether 3'-5' polymerases that catalyze the repair step of 5'-editing exhibit organism-specific preferences that explain the treatment of G-U base pairs. Biochemical and kinetic approaches revealed that a 3'-5' polymerase from Acanthamoeba castellanii tolerates G-U wobble pairs in editing substrates much more readily than several other enzymes, consistent with its biological pattern of editing. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Global translational impacts of the loss of the tRNA modification t6A in yeast

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    Patrick C. Thiaville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The universal tRNA modification t6A is found at position 37 of nearly all tRNAs decoding ANN codons. The absence of t6A37 leads to severe growth defects in baker’s yeast, phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in mcm5s2U34 synthesis. Mutants in mcm5s2U34 can be suppressed by overexpression of tRNALysUUU, but we show t6A phenotypes could not be suppressed by expressing any individual ANN decoding tRNA, and t6A and mcm5s2U are not determinants for each other’s formation. Our results suggest that t6A deficiency, like mcm5s2U deficiency, leads to protein folding defects, and show that the absence of t6A led to stress sensitivities (heat, ethanol, salt and sensitivity to TOR pathway inhibitors. Additionally, L-homoserine suppressed the slow growth phenotype seen in t6A-deficient strains, and proteins aggregates and Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs were increased in the mutants. The global consequences on translation caused by t6A absence were examined by ribosome profiling. Interestingly, the absence of t6A did not lead to global translation defects, but did increase translation initiation at upstream non-AUG codons and increased frame-shifting in specific genes. Analysis of codon occupancy rates suggests that one of the major roles of t6A is to homogenize the process of elongation by slowing the elongation rate at codons decoded by high abundance tRNAs and I34:C3 pairs while increasing the elongation rate of rare tRNAs and G34:U3 pairs. This work reveals that the consequences of t6A absence are complex and multilayered and has set the stage to elucidate the molecular basis of the observed phenotypes.

  13. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  14. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

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    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  15. The cost of wobble translation in fungal mitochondrial genomes: integration of two traditional hypotheses

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    Xia Xuhua

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungal and animal mitochondrial genomes typically have one tRNA for each synonymous codon family. The codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis predicts that the wobble nucleotide of a tRNA anticodon should evolve towards maximizing Watson-Crick base pairing with the most frequently used codon within each synonymous codon family, whereas the wobble versatility hypothesis argues that the nucleotide at the wobble site should be occupied by a nucleotide most versatile in wobble pairing, i.e., the tRNA wobble nucleotide should be G for NNY codon families, and U for NNR and NNN codon families (where Y stands for C or U, R for A or G and N for any nucleotide. Results We here integrate these two traditional hypotheses on tRNA anticodons into a unified model based on an analysis of the wobble costs associated with different wobble base pairs. This novel approach allows the relative cost of wobble pairing to be qualitatively evaluated. A comprehensive study of 36 fungal genomes suggests very different costs between two kinds of U:G wobble pairs, i.e., (1 between a G at the wobble site of a tRNA anticodon and a U at the third codon position (designated MU3:G and (2 between a U at the wobble site of a tRNA anticodon and a G at the third codon position (designated MG3:U. Conclusion In general, MU3:G is much smaller than MG3:U, suggesting no selection against U-ending codons in NNY codon families with a wobble G in the tRNA anticodon but strong selection against G-ending codons in NNR codon families with a wobble U at the tRNA anticodon. This finding resolves several puzzling observations in fungal genomics and corroborates previous studies showing that U3:G wobble is energetically more favorable than G3:U wobble.

  16. Co-expression and co-purification of archaeal and eukaryal box C/D RNPs.

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    Yu Peng

    Full Text Available Box C/D ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs are 2'-O-methylation enzymes required for maturation of ribosomal and small nuclear RNA. Previous biochemical and structural studies of the box C/D RNPs were limited by the unavailability of purified intact RNPs. We developed a bacterial co-expression strategy based on the combined use of a multi-gene expression system and a tRNA-scaffold construct that allowed the expression and purification of homogeneous archaeal and human box C/D RNPs. While the co-expressed and co-purified archaeal box C/D RNP was found to be fully active in a 2'-O-methylation assay, the intact human U14 box C/D RNP showed no detectable catalytic activity, consistent with the earlier findings that assembly of eukaryotic box C/D RNPs is nonspontaneous and requires additional protein factors. Our systems provide a means for further biochemical and structural characterization of box C/D RNPs and their assembly factors.

  17. RNA-Seq analyses reveal the order of tRNA processing events and the maturation of C/D box and CRISPR RNAs in the hyperthermophile Methanopyrus kandleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Andreas A H; Tripp, Vanessa; Randau, Lennart

    2013-07-01

    The methanogenic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri grows near the upper temperature limit for life. Genome analyses revealed strategies to adapt to these harsh conditions and elucidated a unique transfer RNA (tRNA) C-to-U editing mechanism at base 8 for 30 different tRNA species. Here, RNA-Seq deep sequencing methodology was combined with computational analyses to characterize the small RNome of this hyperthermophilic organism and to obtain insights into the RNA metabolism at extreme temperatures. A large number of 132 small RNAs were identified that guide RNA modifications, which are expected to stabilize structured RNA molecules. The C/D box guide RNAs were shown to exist as circular RNA molecules. In addition, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats RNA processing and potential regulatory RNAs were identified. Finally, the identification of tRNA precursors before and after the unique C8-to-U8 editing activity enabled the determination of the order of tRNA processing events with termini truncation preceding intron removal. This order of tRNA maturation follows the compartmentalized tRNA processing order found in Eukaryotes and suggests its conservation during evolution.

  18. Concerted action of two novel tRNA mtDNA point mutations in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, Cornelia; Zsurka, Gábor; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Schröder, Rolf; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2008-04-01

    CPEO (chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia) is a common mitochondrial disease phenotype in adults which is due to mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) point mutations in a subset of patients. Attributing pathogenicity to novel tRNA mtDNA mutations still poses a challenge, particularly when several mtDNA sequence variants are present. In the present study we report a CPEO patient for whom sequencing of the mitochondrial genome revealed three novel tRNA mtDNA mutations: G5835A, del4315A, T1658C in tRNATyr, tRNAIle and tRNAVal genes. In skeletal muscle, the tRNAVal and tRNAIle mutations were homoplasmic, whereas the tRNATyr mutation was heteroplasmic. To address the pathogenic relevance, we performed two types of functional tests: (i) single skeletal muscle fibre analysis comparing G5835A mutation loads and biochemical phenotypes of corresponding fibres, and (ii) Northern-blot analyses of mitochondrial tRNATyr, tRNAIle and tRNAVal. We demonstrated that both the G5835A tRNATyr and del4315A tRNAIle mutation have serious functional consequences. Single-fibre analyses displayed a high threshold of the tRNATyr mutation load for biochemical phenotypic expression at the single-cell level, indicating a rather mild pathogenic effect. In contrast, skeletal muscle tissue showed a severe decrease in respiratory-chain activities, a reduced overall COX (cytochrome c oxidase) staining intensity and abundant COX-negative fibres. Northern-blot analyses showed a dramatic reduction of tRNATyr and tRNAIle levels in muscle, with impaired charging of tRNAIle, whereas tRNAVal levels were only slightly decreased, with amino-acylation unaffected. Our findings suggest that the heteroplasmic tRNATyr and homoplasmic tRNAIle mutation act together, resulting in a concerted effect on the biochemical and histological phenotype. Thus homoplasmic mutations may influence the functional consequences of pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations.

  19. Identification and sequence analysis of metazoan tRNA 3'-end processing enzymes tRNase Zs.

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    Zhikang Wang

    Full Text Available tRNase Z is the endonuclease responsible for removing the 3'-trailer sequences from precursor tRNAs, a prerequisite for the addition of the CCA sequence. It occurs in the short (tRNase Z(S and long (tRNase Z(L forms. Here we report the identification and sequence analysis of candidate tRNase Zs from 81 metazoan species. We found that the vast majority of deuterostomes, lophotrochozoans and lower metazoans have one tRNase Z(S and one tRNase Z(L genes, whereas ecdysozoans possess only a single tRNase Z(L gene. Sequence analysis revealed that in metazoans, a single nuclear tRNase Z(L gene is likely to encode both the nuclear and mitochondrial forms of tRNA 3'-end processing enzyme through mechanisms that include alternative translation initiation from two in-frame start codons and alternative splicing. Sequence conservation analysis revealed a variant PxKxRN motif, PxPxRG, which is located in the N-terminal region of tRNase Z(Ss. We also identified a previously unappreciated motif, AxDx, present in the C-terminal region of both tRNase Z(Ss and tRNase Z(Ls. The AxDx motif consisting mainly of a very short loop is potentially close enough to form hydrogen bonds with the loop containing the PxKxRN or PxPxRG motif. Through complementation analysis, we demonstrated the likely functional importance of the AxDx motif. In conclusion, our analysis supports the notion that in metazoans a single tRNase Z(L has evolved to participate in both nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3'-end processing, whereas tRNase Z(S may have evolved new functions. Our analysis also unveils new evolutionarily conserved motifs in tRNase Zs, including the C-terminal AxDx motif, which may have functional significance.

  20. A model for mis-sense error in protein synthesis: mis-charged cognate tRNA versus mis-reading of codon

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Annwesha

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of amino acid monomers in the primary structure of protein is decided by the corresponding sequence of codons (triplets of nucleic acid monomers) on the template messenger RNA (mRNA). The polymerization of a protein, by incorporation of the successive amino acid monomers, is carried out by a molecular machine called ribosome. Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, each species of which is "charged" with a specific amino acid, enters the ribosome and participates in the reading of the codon by the ribosome. Both mis-reading of mRNA codon and prior mis-charging of a tRNA can lead to "mis-sense" error, i.e,. erroneous substitution of a correct amino acid monomer by an incorrect one during the synthesis of a protein. We develop a theoretical model of protein synthesis that allows for both types of contributions to the "mis-sense" error. We report exact analytical formulae for several quantities that characterize the interplay of mis-charging of tRNA and mis-reading of mRNA. The average rate of elongation of ...

  1. Molecular investigation of tRNA genes integrity and its relation to pathogenicity islands in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Carlos Novais

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available tRNA genes are known target sites for the integration of pathogenicity islands (PAI and other genetic elements, such as bacteriophages, into bacterial genome. In most STEC (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, the PAI called LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement is related to bacterial virulence and is mostly associated to the tRNA genes selC and pheU. In this work, we first investigated the relationship of LEE with tRNA genes selC and pheU in 43 STEC strains. We found that 28 strains (65% had a disrupted selC and/or pheU. Three of these strains (637/1, 650/5 and 654/3 were chosen to be submitted to a RAPD-PCR technique modified by the introduction of specific primers (corresponding to the 5'end of genes selC and pheU into the reaction, which we called "anchored RAPD-PCR". The PCR fragments obtained were transferred onto membranes, and those fragments which hybridized to selC and pheU probes were isolated. One of these fragments from strain 637/1 was partially sequenced. An 85-nucleotide sequence was found to be similar to the cfxA2 gene that encodes a beta-lactamase and is part of transposon Tn4555, a pathogenicity island originally integrated into the Bacteroides genome.

  2. Apple S-RNase triggers inhibition of tRNA aminoacylation by interacting with a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase in growing self-pollen tubes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Meng, Dong; Gu, Zhaoyu; Yang, Qing; Yuan, Hui; Li, Yang; Chen, Qiuju; Yu, Jie; Liu, Chunsheng; Li, Tianzhong

    2018-02-09

    Apple exhibits S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI), in which S-RNase plays a central role in rejecting self-pollen. It has been proposed that the arrest of pollen growth in SI of Solanaceae plants is a consequence of the degradation of pollen rRNA by S-RNase; however, the underlying mechanism in Rosaceae is still unclear. Here, we used S 2 -RNase as a bait to screen an apple pollen cDNA library and characterized an apple soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase (MdPPa) that physically interacted with S-RNases. When treated with self S-RNases, apple pollen tubes showed a marked growth inhibition, as well as a decrease in endogenous soluble pyrophosphatase activity and elevated levels of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). In addition, S-RNase was found to bind to two variable regions of MdPPa, resulting in a noncompetitive inhibition of its activity. Silencing of MdPPa expression led to a reduction in pollen tube growth. Interestingly, tRNA aminoacylation was inhibited in self S-RNase-treated or MdPPa-silenced pollen tubes, resulting in the accumulation of uncharged tRNA. Furthermore, we provide evidence showing that this disturbance of tRNA aminoacylation is independent of RNase activity. We propose an alternative mechanism differing from RNA degradation to explain the cytotoxicity of the S-RNase apple SI process. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. The highly conserved KEOPS/EKC complex is essential for a universal tRNA modification, t6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Madhusudhan; Mehta, Preeti; Yu, Yao; Prugar, Evelyn; Koonin, Eugene V; Karzai, A Wali; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2011-03-02

    The highly conserved Kinase, Endopeptidase and Other Proteins of small Size (KEOPS)/Endopeptidase-like and Kinase associated to transcribed Chromatin (EKC) protein complex has been implicated in transcription, telomere maintenance and chromosome segregation, but its exact function remains unknown. The complex consists of five proteins, Kinase-Associated Endopeptidase (Kae1), a highly conserved protein present in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, a kinase (Bud32) and three additional small polypeptides. We showed that the complex is required for a universal tRNA modification, threonyl carbamoyl adenosine (t6A), found in all tRNAs that pair with ANN codons in mRNA. We also showed that the bacterial ortholog of Kae1, YgjD, is required for t6A modification of Escherichia coli tRNAs. The ATPase activity of Kae1 and the kinase activity of Bud32 are required for the modification. The yeast protein Sua5 has been reported previously to be required for t6A synthesis. Using yeast extracts, we established an in vitro system for the synthesis of t6A that requires Sua5, Kae1, threonine, bicarbonate and ATP. It remains to be determined whether all reported defects of KEOPS/EKC mutants can be attributed to the lack of t6A, or whether the complex has multiple functions.

  4. Phylogenetic information from three mitochondrial genomes of Terebelliformia (Annelida) worms and duplication of the methionine tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Struck, Torsten H; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2008-06-15

    Mitochondrial genomes have been useful for inferring animal phylogeny across a wide range of clades, however they are still poorly sampled in some animal taxa, limiting our knowledge of mtDNA evolution. For example, despite being one of the most diverse animal phyla, only 5 complete annelid mitochrondial genomes have been published. To address this paucity of information, we obtained complete mitochondrial genomic sequences from Pista cristata (Terebellidae) and Terebellides stroemi (Trichobranchidae) as well as one nearly complete mitochondrial genome from Eclysippe vanelli (Ampharetidae). These taxa are within Terebelliformia (Annelida), which include spaghetti worms, icecream cone worms and their relatives. In contrast to the 37 genes found in most bilaterian metazoans, we recover 38 genes in the mitochondrial genomes of T. stroemi and P. cristata due to the presence of a second methionine tRNA (trnM). Interestingly, the two trnMs are located next to each other and are possibly a synapomorphy of these two taxa. The E. vanelli partial mitochondrial genome lacks this additional trnM at the same position, but it may be present in the region not sampled. Compared to other annelids, gene orders of these three mitochondrial genomes are generally conserved except for the atp6-mSSU region. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that mtDNA data strongly supports a Trichobranchidae/Terebellidae clade.

  5. Proteomic interrogation of androgen action in prostate cancer cells reveals roles of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases.

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    Adaikkalam Vellaichamy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men in United States, and there is no remedy currently available for the advanced stage hormone-refractory cancer. This is partly due to the incomplete understanding of androgen-regulated proteins and their encoded functions. Whole-cell proteomes of androgen-starved and androgen-treated LNCaP cells were analyzed by semi-quantitative MudPIT ESI- ion trap MS/MS and quantitative iTRAQ MALDI- TOF MS/MS platforms, with identification of more than 1300 high-confidence proteins. An enrichment-based pathway mapping of the androgen-regulated proteomic data sets revealed a significant dysregulation of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, indicating an increase in protein biosynthesis- a hallmark during prostate cancer progression. This observation is supported by immunoblot and transcript data from LNCaP cells, and prostate cancer tissue. Thus, data derived from multiple proteomics platforms and transcript data coupled with informatics analysis provides a deeper insight into the functional consequences of androgen action in prostate cancer.

  6. A novel pea mitochondrial in vitro transcription system recognizes homologous and heterologous mRNA and tRNA promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, S; Hatzack, F; Brennicke, A

    1995-09-22

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the transcription initiation process in mitochondria of dicotyledonous plants, an in vitro transcription system was established for pea (Pisum sativum L.). The partially purified mitochondrial protein extract initiates transcription on homologous pea templates as well as on heterologous mitochondrial DNA from other dicot plant species. In vitro transcription begins within the nonanucleotide 5'-(-7)CRTAAGAGA(+2)-3' (transcription start site is underlined) conserved at most of the identified transcription initiation sites in dicot plant mitochondria. The in vitro initiation at promoters of protein as well as of tRNA coding genes indicates a common mode of transcription initiation for different types of RNA. The competent recognition of different heterologous templates supports a general functional role of the conserved nonanucleotide within mitochondrial promoters of dicotyledonous plants. Initial studies of the promoter structure by deletion analysis in the 5' region of the pea atp9 promoter show that in addition to the conserved nonanucleotide, which is essential for transcription initiation in vitro, sequences up to 25 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site are necessary for an efficient initiation event.

  7. Improving target amino acid selectivity in a permissive aminoacyl tRNA synthetase through counter-selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungwienwong, Itthipol; Hostetler, Zachary M; Blizzard, Robert J; Porter, Joseph J; Driggers, Camden M; Mbengi, Lea Z; Villegas, José A; Speight, Lee C; Saven, Jeffery G; Perona, John J; Kohli, Rahul M; Mehl, Ryan A; Petersson, E James

    2017-05-03

    The amino acid acridon-2-ylalanine (Acd) can be a valuable probe of protein dynamics, either alone or as part of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or photo-induced electron transfer (eT) probe pair. We have previously reported the genetic incorporation of Acd by an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (RS). However, this RS, developed from a library of permissive RSs, also incorporates N-phenyl-aminophenylalanine (Npf), a trace byproduct of one Acd synthetic route. We have performed negative selections in the presence of Npf and analyzed the selectivity of the resulting AcdRSs by in vivo protein expression and detailed kinetic analyses of the purified RSs. We find that selection conferred a ∼50-fold increase in selectivity for Acd over Npf, eliminating incorporation of Npf contaminants, and allowing one to use a high yielding Acd synthetic route for improved overall expression of Acd-containing proteins. More generally, our report also provides a cautionary tale on the use of permissive RSs, as well as a strategy for improving selectivity for the target amino acid.

  8. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

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    Pengfei Fang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories.

  9. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  10. Complete mitochondrial genomes of the human follicle mites Demodex brevis and D. folliculorum: novel gene arrangement, truncated tRNA genes, and ancient divergence between species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palopoli, Michael F; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy; Satterly, Alicia; Endrizzi, Julie

    2014-12-16

    Follicle mites of the genus Demodex are found on a wide diversity of mammals, including humans; surprisingly little is known, however, about the evolution of this association. Additional sequence information promises to facilitate studies of Demodex variation within and between host species. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of two species of Demodex known to live on humans--Demodex brevis and D. folliculorum--which are the first such genomes available for any member of the genus. We analyzed these sequences to gain insight into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Acariformes. We also used relaxed molecular clock analyses, based on alignments of mitochondrial proteins, to estimate the time of divergence between these two species. Both Demodex genomes shared a novel gene order that differs substantially from the ancestral chelicerate pattern, with transfer RNA (tRNA) genes apparently having moved much more often than other genes. Mitochondrial tRNA genes of both species were unusually short, with most of them unable to encode tRNAs that could fold into the canonical cloverleaf structure; indeed, several examples lacked both D- and T-arms. Finally, the high level of sequence divergence observed between these species suggests that these two lineages last shared a common ancestor no more recently than about 87 mya. Among Acariformes, rearrangements involving tRNA genes tend to occur much more often than those involving other genes. The truncated tRNA genes observed in both Demodex species would seem to require the evolution of extensive tRNA editing capabilities and/or coevolved interacting factors. The molecular machinery necessary for these unusual tRNAs to function might provide an avenue for developing treatments of skin disorders caused by Demodex. The deep divergence time estimated between these two species sets a lower bound on the time that Demodex have been coevolving with their mammalian hosts, and supports the

  11. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takada

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon, within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons

  12. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)}Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-11-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8{+-}3.7 vs 11.0{+-}1.6 mm, p<0.001) than those without the mutation. Fractional shortening was lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than those without it (30.7{+-}7.0 vs 42.5{+-}6.6, p<0.001). MIBG uptake on the delayed MIBG image was significantly lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation (mean value of the heart to mediastinum ratio: 1.6{+-}0.2 vs 2.0{+-}0.4, p>0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)} gene. (author)

  13. MD SIMULATION STUDIES TO INVESTIGATE ISO-ENERGETIC CONFORMATIONAL BEHAVIOUR OF MODIFIED NUCLEOSIDES M2G AND M22G PRESENT IN tRNA

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    Rohit S Bavi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modified nucleic acid bases are most commonly found in tRNA. These may contain modifications from simple methylation to addition of bulky groups. Methylation of the four canonical nucleotide bases at a wide variety of positions is particularly prominent among the known modification. Methylation of N2 group of guanine is a relatively common modification in tRNA and rRNA. N2-methylguanosine (m2G is the second most often encountered nucleoside in E. coli tRNAs. N2, N2-dimethylguanosine (m22G is found in the majority of eukaryotic tRNAs and involved in forming base pair interactions with adjacent bases. Hence, in order to understand the structural significance of these methylated nucleic acid bases we have carried out molecular dynamics simulation to see the salvation effect. The results obtained shows iso-energetic conformational behaviors for m2G and m22G. The simulation trajectory of m2G shows regular periodical fluctuations suggesting that m2G is equally stable as either s-cis or s-trans rotamers. The two rotamers of m2G may interact canonically or non-canonically with opposite base as s-trans m2G26:C/A/U44 and s-cis m2G26:A/U44. The free rotations around the C-N bond could be the possible reason for these iso-energetic conformations. Dimethylation of G has almost no influence on base pairing with either A or U. Thus, these results reveal that modified nucleosides m2G and m22G may play an important role to prevent tRNA from adopting the unusual mitochondrial like conformation.

  14. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients

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    Abreu-Silva R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%, which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNA Ser(UCN did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190 of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  15. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Abreu-Silva

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%, which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNA Ser(UCN did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190 of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  16. Impact of P-Site tRNA and antibiotics on ribosome mediated protein folding: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

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    Surojit Mondal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ribosome, which acts as a platform for mRNA encoded polypeptide synthesis, is also capable of assisting in folding of polypeptide chains. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC that catalyzes peptide bond formation resides in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome. Proper positioning of the 3' -CCA ends of the A- and P-site tRNAs via specific interactions with the nucleotides of the PTC are crucial for peptidyl transferase activity. This RNA domain is also the center for ribosomal chaperoning activity. The unfolded polypeptide chains interact with the specific nucleotides of the PTC and are released in a folding competent form. In vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to this domain (bDV RNA also displays chaperoning activity. RESULTS: The present study explores the effects of tRNAs, antibiotics that are A- and P-site PTC substrate analogs (puromycin and blasticidin and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and josamycin on the chaperoning ability of the E. coli ribosome and bDV RNA. Our studies using mRNA programmed ribosomes show that a tRNA positioned at the P-site effectively inhibits the ribosome's chaperoning function. We also show that the antibiotic blasticidin (that mimics the interaction between 3'-CCA end of P/P-site tRNA with the PTC is more effective in inhibiting ribosome and bDV RNA chaperoning ability than either puromycin or the macrolide antibiotics. Mutational studies of the bDV RNA could identify the nucleotides U2585 and G2252 (both of which interact with P-site tRNA to be important for its chaperoning ability. CONCLUSION: Both protein synthesis and their proper folding are crucial for maintenance of a functional cellular proteome. The PTC of the ribosome is attributed with both these abilities. The silencing of the chaperoning ability of the ribosome in the presence of P-site bound tRNA might be a way to segregate these two important functions.

  17. A Generalized Michaelis-Menten Equation in Protein Synthesis: Effects of Mis-Charged Cognate tRNA and Mis-Reading of Codon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Annwesha; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2017-05-01

    The sequence of amino acid monomers in the primary structure of a protein is decided by the corresponding sequence of codons (triplets of nucleic acid monomers) on the template messenger RNA (mRNA). The polymerization of a protein, by incorporation of the successive amino acid monomers, is carried out by a molecular machine called ribosome. We develop a stochastic kinetic model that captures the possibilities of mis-reading of mRNA codon and prior mis-charging of a tRNA. By a combination of analytical and numerical methods, we obtain the distribution of the times taken for incorporation of the successive amino acids in the growing protein in this mathematical model. The corresponding exact analytical expression for the average rate of elongation of a nascent protein is a 'biologically motivated' generalization of the Michaelis-Menten formula for the average rate of enzymatic reactions. This generalized Michaelis-Menten-like formula (and the exact analytical expressions for a few other quantities) that we report here display the interplay of four different branched pathways corresponding to selection of four different types of tRNA.

  18. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

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    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E. [Kings College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A kinetic framework for tRNA ligase and enforcement of a 2'-phosphate requirement for ligation highlights the design logic of an RNA repair machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-05-01

    tRNA ligases are essential components of informational and stress-response pathways entailing repair of RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH ends. Plant and fungal tRNA ligases comprise three catalytic domains. Phosphodiesterase and kinase modules heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO₄, and 5'-PO₄ required for sealing by the ligase. We exploit RNA substrates with different termini to define rates of individual steps or subsets of steps along the repair pathway of plant ligase AtRNL. The results highlight rate-limiting transactions, how repair is affected by active-site mutations, and how mutations are bypassed by RNA alterations. We gain insights to 2'-PO₄ specificity by showing that AtRNL is deficient in transferring AMP to pRNAOH to form AppRNAOH but proficient at sealing pre-adenylylated AppRNAOH. This strategy for discriminating 2'-PO₄ versus 2'-OH ends provides a quality-control checkpoint to ensure that only purposeful RNA breaks are sealed and to avoid nonspecific "capping" of 5'-PO₄ ends.

  20. Domain movements during CCA-addition: a new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3'-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3'-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis.

  1. Association between allelic variation due to short tandem repeats in tRNA gene of Entamoeba histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Virendra; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Mittal, Balraj; Dhole, Tapan N; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2014-05-01

    Genotypes of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) may contribute clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis such as amoebic liver abscess (ALA), dysentery and asymptomatic cyst passers state. Hence, we evaluated allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. Asymptomatic cyst passers (n=24), patients with dysentery (n=56) and ALA (n=107) were included. Extracted DNA from stool (dysentery, asymptomatic cyst passers) and liver aspirate was amplified using 6 E. histolytica specific tRNA-linked STRs (D-A, A-L, N-K2, R-R, S-Q, and S(TGA)-D) primers. PCR products were subjected to sequencing. Association between allelic variation and clinical phenotypes was analyzed. A total of 9 allelic variations were found in D-A, 8 in A-L, 4 in N-K2, 5 in R-R, 10 in S(TAG)-D and 7 in S-Q loci. A significant association was found between allelic variants and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. This study reveals that allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica is associated different clinical outcome of amoebiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron–sulfur cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang-Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E.; Krishna, S. Sri; Rife, Christopher L.; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M.; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron–sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron–sulfur [4Fe–­4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an l-­tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe–4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x 22-C-x 6-C-x 2-C). It is speculated that the iron–sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon. PMID:20944229

  3. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E; Krishna, S Sri; Rife, Christopher L; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Elsliger, Marc André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron-sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron-sulfur [4Fe-4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an L-tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x₂₂-C-x₆-C-x₂-C). It is speculated that the iron-sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon.

  4. An uncommon clinical presentation of relapsing dilated cardiomyopathy with identification of sequence variations in MYNPC3, KCNH2 and mitochondrial tRNA cysteine

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    Maria J. Guillen Sacoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a young girl with dilated cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, and possible energy deficiency. Two major sequence changes were identified by whole exome sequencing (WES and mitochondrial DNA analysis that were interpreted as potentially causative. Changes were identified in the KCNH2 gene and mitochondrial tRNA for cysteine. A variation was also seen in MYPBC3. Since the launch of WES as a clinically available technology in 2010, there has been concern regarding the identification of variants unrelated to the patient's phenotype. However, in cases where targeted sequencing fails to explain the clinical presentation, the underlying etiology could be more complex than anticipated. In this situation, the extensive reach of this tool helped explain both her phenotype and family history.

  5. Improved tRNA prediction in the American house dust mite reveals widespread occurrence of extremely short minimal tRNAs in acariform mites

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    OConnor Barry M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical tRNAs are functional minimal tRNAs, lacking either the D- or T-arm. They are significantly shorter than typical cloverleaf tRNAs. Widespread occurrence of atypical tRNAs was first demonstrated for secernentean nematodes and later in various arachnids. Evidence started to accumulate that tRNAs of certain acariform mites are even shorter than the minimal tRNAs of nematodes, raising the possibility that tRNAs lacking both D- and T-arms might exist in these organisms. The presence of cloverleaf tRNAs in acariform mites, particularly in the house dust mite genus Dermatophagoides, is still disputed. Results Mitochondrial tRNAs of Dermatophagoides farinae are minimal, atypical tRNAs lacking either the T- or D-arm. The size (49-62, 54.4 ± 2.86 nt is significantly (p = 0.019 smaller than in Caenorhabditis elegans (53-63, 56.3 ± 2.30 nt, a model minimal tRNA taxon. The shortest tRNA (49 nt in Dermatophagoides is approaching the length of the shortest known tRNAs (45-49 nt described in other acariform mites. The D-arm is absent in these tRNAs, and the inferred T-stem is small (2-3 bp and thermodynamically unstable, suggesting that it may not exist in reality. The discriminator nucleotide is probably not encoded and is added postranscriptionally in many Dermatophagoides tRNAs. Conclusions Mitochondrial tRNAs of acariform mites are largely atypical, non-cloverleaf tRNAs. Among them, the shortest known tRNAs with no D-arm and a short and unstable T-arm can be inferred. While our study confirmed seven tRNAs in Dermatophagoides by limited EST data, further experimental evidence is needed to demonstrate extremely small and unusual tRNAs in acariform mites.

  6. The pheV phenylalanine tRNA gene Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates is an integration hotspot for possible niche-adaptation genomic islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Ou, Hong-Yu; van Aartsen, Jon Jurriaan; Jiang, XiaoFei; Li, Min; Yang, ZeHua; Wei, QuHao; Chen, XiaoYun; He, Xinyi; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Lu, Yuan

    2010-03-01

    Horizontally acquired genomic islands may allow bacteria to conquer and colonize previously uncharted niches. Four Klebsiella pneumoniae tRNA gene insertion hotspots (arg6, asn34, met56, and pheV) in 101 clinical isolates derived from blood, sputum, wound, bile or urine specimens were screened by long-range PCR for the presence or absence of integrated islands. The pheV phenylalanine tRNA gene was the most frequently occupied site and harbored at least three entirely distinct types of islands: (1) KpGI-1, a 3.7 kb island coding for four proteins, three of which showed high similarity to two hypothetical proteins and a Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase in Salmonella enterica, (2) KpGI-2, a 6.4 kb island coding for five proteins including a truncated phage-like integrase, two helicase-related proteins, and a homolog of the functionally elusive Fic protein, and (3) KpGI-3, a 12.6 kb island which carried seven fimbriae-related genes, first identified in MGH78578. Consistent with the niche-adaptation hypothesis, KpGI-1-like islands which coded for the putative acetyltransferase were significantly over-represented in sputum isolates as compared to urine (P coded for Fic were also found at undefined locations in six other clinical isolates, though none possessed the other KpGI-2 genes. We propose that the pheV-associated islands described in this study may contribute to fine tuning and adaptation of K. pneumoniae strains toward preferred infection and/or colonization pathways.

  7. Insights into the hyperthermostability and unusual region-specificity of archaeal Pyrococcus abyssi tRNA m1A57/58 methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelorget, Amandine; Roovers, Martine; Guérineau, Vincent; Barbey, Carole; Li, Xuan; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2010-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-l-methionine dependent methylation of adenine 58 in the T-loop of tRNAs is essential for cell growth in yeast or for adaptation to high temperatures in thermophilic organisms. In contrast to bacterial and eukaryotic tRNA m1A58 methyltransferases that are site-specific, the homologous archaeal enzyme from Pyrococcus abyssi catalyzes the formation of m1A also at the adjacent position 57, m1A57 being a precursor of 1-methylinosine. We report here the crystal structure of P. abyssi tRNA m1A57/58 methyltransferase (PabTrmI), in complex with S-adenosyl-l-methionine or S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine in three different space groups. The fold of the monomer and the tetrameric architecture are similar to those of the bacterial enzymes. However, the inter-monomer contacts exhibit unique features. In particular, four disulfide bonds contribute to the hyperthermostability of the archaeal enzyme since their mutation lowers the melting temperature by 16.5°C. His78 in conserved motif X, which is present only in TrmIs from the Thermococcocales order, lies near the active site and displays two alternative conformations. Mutagenesis indicates His78 is important for catalytic efficiency of PabTrmI. When A59 is absent in tRNAAsp, only A57 is modified. Identification of the methylated positions in tRNAAsp by mass spectrometry confirms that PabTrmI methylates the first adenine of an AA sequence. PMID:20483913

  8. The contribution of the C5 protein subunit of Escherichia coli ribonuclease P to specificity for precursor tRNA is modulated by proximal 5' leader sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niland, Courtney N; Anderson, David R; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E

    2017-10-01

    Recognition of RNA by RNA processing enzymes and RNA binding proteins often involves cooperation between multiple subunits. However, the interdependent contributions of RNA and protein subunits to molecular recognition by ribonucleoproteins are relatively unexplored. RNase P is an endonuclease that removes 5' leaders from precursor tRNAs and functions in bacteria as a dimer formed by a catalytic RNA subunit (P RNA) and a protein subunit (C5 in E. coli). The P RNA subunit contacts the tRNA body and proximal 5' leader sequences [N(-1) and N(-2)] while C5 binds distal 5' leader sequences [N(-3) to N(-6)]. To determine whether the contacts formed by P RNA and C5 contribute independently to specificity or exhibit cooperativity or anti-cooperativity, we compared the relative kcat/Km values for all possible combinations of the six proximal 5' leader nucleotides (n = 4096) for processing by the E. coli P RNA subunit alone and by the RNase P holoenzyme. We observed that while the P RNA subunit shows specificity for 5' leader nucleotides N(-2) and N(-1), the presence of the C5 protein reduces the contribution of P RNA to specificity, but changes specificity at N(-2) and N(-3). The results reveal that the contribution of C5 protein to RNase P processing is controlled by the identity of N(-2) in the pre-tRNA 5' leader. The data also clearly show that pairing of the 5' leader with the 3' ACCA of tRNA acts as an anti-determinant for RNase P cleavage. Comparative analysis of genomically encoded E. coli tRNAs reveals that both anti-determinants are subject to negative selection in vivo. © 2017 Niland et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Free-Energy Landscape of Reverse tRNA Translocation through the Ribosome Analyzed by Electron Microscopy Density Maps and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of reverse tRNA translocation in the ribosome, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the ribosome-tRNAs-mRNA-EFG complex were performed. The complex at the post-translocational state was directed towards the translocational and pre-translocational states by fitting the complex into cryo-EM density maps. Between a series of the fitting simulations, umbrella sampling simulations were performed to obtain the free-energy landscape. Multistep structural changes, such as a ratchet-like motion and rotation of the head of the small subunit were observed. The free-energy landscape showed that there were two main free-energy barriers: one between the post-translocational and intermediate states, and the other between the pre-translocational and intermediate states. The former corresponded to a clockwise rotation, which was coupled to the movement of P-tRNA over the P/E-gate made of G1338, A1339 and A790 in the small subunit. The latter corresponded to an anticlockwise rotation of the head, which was coupled to the location of the two tRNAs in the hybrid state. This indicates that the coupled motion of the head rotation and tRNA translocation plays an important role in opening and closing of the P/E-gate during the ratchet-like movement in the ribosome. Conformational change of EF-G was interpreted to be the result of the combination of the external motion by L12 around an axis passing near the sarcin-ricin loop, and internal hinge-bending motion. These motions contributed to the movement of domain IV of EF-G to maintain its interaction with A/P-tRNA. PMID:24999999

  10. Free-energy landscape of reverse tRNA translocation through the ribosome analyzed by electron microscopy density maps and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Ishida

    Full Text Available To understand the mechanism of reverse tRNA translocation in the ribosome, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the ribosome-tRNAs-mRNA-EFG complex were performed. The complex at the post-translocational state was directed towards the translocational and pre-translocational states by fitting the complex into cryo-EM density maps. Between a series of the fitting simulations, umbrella sampling simulations were performed to obtain the free-energy landscape. Multistep structural changes, such as a ratchet-like motion and rotation of the head of the small subunit were observed. The free-energy landscape showed that there were two main free-energy barriers: one between the post-translocational and intermediate states, and the other between the pre-translocational and intermediate states. The former corresponded to a clockwise rotation, which was coupled to the movement of P-tRNA over the P/E-gate made of G1338, A1339 and A790 in the small subunit. The latter corresponded to an anticlockwise rotation of the head, which was coupled to the location of the two tRNAs in the hybrid state. This indicates that the coupled motion of the head rotation and tRNA translocation plays an important role in opening and closing of the P/E-gate during the ratchet-like movement in the ribosome. Conformational change of EF-G was interpreted to be the result of the combination of the external motion by L12 around an axis passing near the sarcin-ricin loop, and internal hinge-bending motion. These motions contributed to the movement of domain IV of EF-G to maintain its interaction with A/P-tRNA.

  11. An RNA-binding complex involved in ribosome biogenesis contains a protein with homology to tRNA CCA-adding enzyme.

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    Jinzhong Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of proteins and small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs to direct their modification and processing and the assembly of ribosomal proteins. Utp22 and Rrp7, two interacting proteins with no recognizable domain, are components of the 90S preribosome or the small subunit processome that conducts early processing of 18S rRNA. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of Utp22 and Rrp7 complex at 1.97 Å resolution and the NMR structure of a C-terminal fragment of Rrp7, which is not visible in the crystal structure. The structure reveals that Utp22 surprisingly resembles a dimeric class I tRNA CCA-adding enzyme yet with degenerate active sites, raising an interesting evolutionary connection between tRNA and rRNA processing machineries. Rrp7 binds extensively to Utp22 using a deviant RNA recognition motif and an extended linker. Functional sites on the two proteins were identified by structure-based mutagenesis in yeast. We show that Rrp7 contains a flexible RNA-binding C-terminal tail that is essential for association with preribosomes. RNA-protein crosslinking shows that Rrp7 binds at the central domain of 18S rRNA and shares a neighborhood with two processing H/ACA snoRNAs snR30 and snR10. Depletion of snR30 prevents the stable assembly of Rrp7 into preribosomes. Our results provide insight into the evolutionary origin and functional context of Utp22 and Rrp7.

  12. New pleiotropic effects of eliminating a rare tRNA from Streptomyces coelicolor, revealed by combined proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of liquid cultures

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    Hotchkiss Graham

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Streptomyces coelicolor, bldA encodes the only tRNA for a rare leucine codon, UUA. This tRNA is unnecessary for growth, but is required for some aspects of secondary metabolism and morphological development. We describe a transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of the effects of deleting bldA on cellular processes during submerged culture: conditions relevant to the industrial production of antibiotics. Results At the end of rapid growth, a co-ordinated transient up-regulation of about 100 genes, including many for ribosomal proteins, was seen in the parent strain but not the ΔbldA mutant. Increased basal levels of the signal molecule ppGpp in the mutant strain may be responsible for this difference. Transcripts or proteins from a further 147 genes classified as bldA-influenced were mostly expressed late in culture in the wild-type, though others were significantly transcribed during exponential growth. Some were involved in the biosynthesis of seven secondary metabolites; and some have probable roles in reorganising metabolism after rapid growth. Many of the 147 genes were "function unknown", and may represent unknown aspects of Streptomyces biology. Only two of the 147 genes contain a TTA codon, but some effects of bldA could be traced to TTA codons in regulatory genes or polycistronic operons. Several proteins were affected post-translationally by the bldA deletion. There was a statistically significant but weak positive global correlation between transcript and corresponding protein levels. Different technical limitations of the two approaches were a major cause of discrepancies in the results obtained with them. Conclusion Although deletion of bldA has very conspicuous effects on the gross phenotype, the bldA molecular phenotype revealed by the "dualomic" approach has shown that only about 2% of the genome is affected; but this includes many previously unknown effects at a variety of different levels, including post

  13. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation study of archaeal leucyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with different mischarged tRNA in editing conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayevsky, A V; Sharifi, M; Tukalo, M A

    2017-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play important roles in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis. Some aaRSs accomplish this via editing mechanisms, among which leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) edits non-cognate amino acid norvaline mainly by post-transfer editing. However, the molecular basis for this pathway for eukaryotic and archaeal LeuRS remain unclear. In this study, a complex of archaeal P. horikoshii LeuRS (PhLeuRS) with misacylated tRNALeu was modeled wherever tRNA's acceptor stem was oriented directly into the editing site. To understand the distinctive features of organization we reconstructed a complex of PhLeuRS with tRNA and visualize post-transfer editing interactions mode by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. To study molecular basis for substrate selectivity by PhLeuRS's editing site we utilized MD simulation of the entire LeuRS complexes using a diverse charged form of tRNAs, namely norvalyl-tRNALeu and isoleucyl-tRNALeu. In general, the editing site organization of LeuRS from P.horikoshii has much in common with bacterial LeuRS. The MD simulation results revealed that the post-transfer editing substrate norvalyl-A76, binds more strongly than isoleucyl-A76. Moreover, the branched side chain of isoleucine prevents water molecules from being closer and hence the hydrolysis reaction slows significantly. To investigate a possible mechanism of the post-transfer editing reaction, by PhLeuRS we have determined that two water molecules (the attacking and assisting water molecules) are localized near the carbonyl group of the amino acid to be cleaved off. These water molecules approach the substrate from the opposite side to that observed for Thermus thermophilus LeuRS (TtLeuRS). Based on the results obtained, it was suggested that the post-transfer editing mechanism of PhLeuRS differs from that of prokaryotic TtLeuRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of green plant tRNA 3'-end processing enzyme tRNase Zs, homologs of the candidate prostate cancer susceptibility protein ELAC2

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    Wang Zhikang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background tRNase Z removes the 3'-trailer sequences from precursor tRNAs, which is an essential step preceding the addition of the CCA sequence. tRNase Z exists in the short (tRNase ZS and long (tRNase ZL forms. Based on the sequence characteristics, they can be divided into two major types: bacterial-type tRNase ZS and eukaryotic-type tRNase ZL, and one minor type, Thermotoga maritima (TM-type tRNase ZS. The number of tRNase Zs is highly variable, with the largest number being identified experimentally in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. It is unknown whether multiple tRNase Zs found in A. thaliana is common to the plant kingdom. Also unknown is the extent of sequence and structural conservation among tRNase Zs from the plant kingdom. Results We report the identification and analysis of candidate tRNase Zs in 27 fully sequenced genomes of green plants, the great majority of which are flowering plants. It appears that green plants contain multiple distinct tRNase Zs predicted to reside in different subcellular compartments. Furthermore, while the bacterial-type tRNase ZSs are present only in basal land plants and green algae, the TM-type tRNase ZSs are widespread in green plants. The protein sequences of the TM-type tRNase ZSs identified in green plants are similar to those of the bacterial-type tRNase ZSs but have distinct features, including the TM-type flexible arm, the variant catalytic HEAT and HST motifs, and a lack of the PxKxRN motif involved in CCA anti-determination (inhibition of tRNase Z activity by CCA, which prevents tRNase Z cleavage of mature tRNAs. Examination of flowering plant chloroplast tRNA genes reveals that many of these genes encode partial CCA sequences. Based on our results and previous studies, we predict that the plant TM-type tRNase ZSs may not recognize the CCA sequence as an anti-determinant. Conclusions Our findings substantially expand the current repertoire of the TM-type tRNase ZSs and hint

  15. Peptidyl-CCA deacylation on the ribosome promoted by induced fit and the O3'-hydroxyl group of A76 of the unacylated A-site tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonović, Miljan; Steitz, Thomas A

    2008-11-01

    The last step in ribosome-catalyzed protein synthesis is the hydrolytic release of the newly formed polypeptide from the P-site bound tRNA. Hydrolysis of the ester link of the peptidyl-tRNA is stimulated normally by the binding of release factors (RFs). However, an unacylated tRNA or just CCA binding to the ribosomal A site can also stimulate deacylation under some nonphysiological conditions. Although the sequence of events is well described by biochemical studies, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. Two new structures of the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui complexed with a peptidyl-tRNA analog in the P site and two oligonucleotide mimics of unacylated tRNA, CCA and CA, in the A site show that the binding of either CA or CCA induces a very similar conformational change in the peptidyl-transferase center as induced by aminoacyl-CCA. However, only CCA positions a water molecule appropriately to attack the carbonyl carbon of the peptidyl-tRNA and stabilizes the proper orientation of the ester link for hydrolysis. We, thus, conclude that both the ability of the O3'-hydroxyl group of the A-site A76 to position the water and the A-site CCA induced conformational change of the PTC are critical for the catalysis of the deacylation of the peptidyl-tRNA by CCA, and perhaps, an analogous mechanism is used by RFs.

  16. Archaeal Tuc1/Ncs6 homolog required for wobble uridine tRNA thiolation is associated with ubiquitin-proteasome, translation, and RNA processing system homologs.

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    Nikita E Chavarria

    Full Text Available While cytoplasmic tRNA 2-thiolation protein 1 (Tuc1/Ncs6 and ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (Urm1 are important in the 2-thiolation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U at wobble uridines of tRNAs in eukaryotes, the biocatalytic roles and properties of Ncs6/Tuc1 and its homologs are poorly understood. Here we present the first report of an Ncs6 homolog of archaea (NcsA of Haloferax volcanii that is essential for maintaining cellular pools of thiolated tRNA(LysUUU and for growth at high temperature. When purified from Hfx. volcanii, NcsA was found to be modified at Lys204 by isopeptide linkage to polymeric chains of the ubiquitin-fold protein SAMP2. The ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA was required for this covalent modification. Non-covalent protein partners that specifically associated with NcsA were also identified including UbaA, SAMP2, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN-A/1, translation elongation factor aEF-1α and a β-CASP ribonuclease homolog of the archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 1 family (aCPSF1. Together, our study reveals that NcsA is essential for growth at high temperature, required for formation of thiolated tRNA(LysUUU and intimately linked to homologs of ubiquitin-proteasome, translation and RNA processing systems.

  17. How a CCA sequence protects mature tRNAs and tRNA precursors from action of the processing enzyme RNase BN/RNase Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanmay; Malhotra, Arun; Deutscher, Murray P

    2013-10-18

    In many organisms, 3' maturation of tRNAs is catalyzed by the endoribonuclease, RNase BN/RNase Z, which cleaves after the discriminator nucleotide to generate a substrate for addition of the universal CCA sequence. However, tRNAs or tRNA precursors that already contain a CCA sequence are not cleaved, thereby avoiding a futile cycle of removal and readdition of these essential residues. We show here that the adjacent C residues of the CCA sequence and an Arg residue within a highly conserved sequence motif in the channel leading to the RNase catalytic site are both required for the protective effect of the CCA sequence. When both of these determinants are present, CCA-containing RNAs in the channel are unable to move into the catalytic site; however, substitution of either of the C residues by A or U or mutation of Arg(274) to Ala allows RNA movement and catalysis to proceed. These data define a novel mechanism for how tRNAs are protected against the promiscuous action of a processing enzyme.

  18. How a CCA Sequence Protects Mature tRNAs and tRNA Precursors from Action of the Processing Enzyme RNase BN/RNase Z*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanmay; Malhotra, Arun; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2013-01-01

    In many organisms, 3′ maturation of tRNAs is catalyzed by the endoribonuclease, RNase BN/RNase Z, which cleaves after the discriminator nucleotide to generate a substrate for addition of the universal CCA sequence. However, tRNAs or tRNA precursors that already contain a CCA sequence are not cleaved, thereby avoiding a futile cycle of removal and readdition of these essential residues. We show here that the adjacent C residues of the CCA sequence and an Arg residue within a highly conserved sequence motif in the channel leading to the RNase catalytic site are both required for the protective effect of the CCA sequence. When both of these determinants are present, CCA-containing RNAs in the channel are unable to move into the catalytic site; however, substitution of either of the C residues by A or U or mutation of Arg274 to Ala allows RNA movement and catalysis to proceed. These data define a novel mechanism for how tRNAs are protected against the promiscuous action of a processing enzyme. PMID:24022488

  19. Familial dysautonomia (FD) patients have reduced levels of the modified wobble nucleoside mcm(5)s(2)U in tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsborn, Tony; Tükenmez, Hasan; Chen, Changchun; Byström, Anders S

    2014-11-21

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a recessive neurodegenerative genetic disease. FD is caused by a mutation in the IKBKAP gene resulting in a splicing defect and reduced levels of full length IKAP protein. IKAP homologues can be found in all eukaryotes and are part of a conserved six subunit protein complex, Elongator complex. Inactivation of any Elongator subunit gene in multicellular organisms cause a wide range of phenotypes, suggesting that Elongator has a pivotal role in several cellular processes. In yeast, there is convincing evidence that the main role of Elongator complex is in formation of modified wobble uridine nucleosides in tRNA and that their absence will influence translational efficiency. To date, no study has explored the possibility that FD patients display defects in formation of modified wobble uridine nucleosides as a consequence of reduced IKAP levels. In this study, we show that brain tissue and fibroblast cell lines from FD patients have reduced levels of the wobble uridine nucleoside 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U). Our findings indicate that FD could be caused by inefficient translation due to lower levels of wobble uridine nucleosides. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Cassie J; Berg, Tracy J; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R; Norman, Jim C

    2016-03-21

    Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAi(Met) expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAi(Met) expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAi(Met) in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAi(Met) contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAi(Met) gene (2+tRNAi(Met) mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAi(Met) mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAi(Met) mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAi(Met) significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAi(Met)-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAi(Met)-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAi(Met) mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAi(Met) levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of Sep (O-phosphoserine) tRNA: Sec (selenocysteine) synthase (SEPSECS) in proliferation, apoptosis and hormone secretion of trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H-D; Zhang, W-G; Sun, M-N; Duan, Q-F; Li, F-L; Li, H

    2013-11-01

    To investigate whether Sep (O-phosphoserine) tRNA: Sec (selenocysteine) synthase (SEPSECS), which plays an essential role in the synthesis of selenoprotein, affects proliferation, apoptosis and hormone secretion of human trophoblast cells. Human trophoblast JEG-3 cells were divided into four groups: control group, SEPSECS silenced-expression group, empty vector group and SEPSECS over-expression group. Over-expression and silenced-expression were achieved by transfection with plasmid DNA or RNA oligonucleotide, respectively. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl] -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony formation assays were performed to investigate cell proliferation, while apoptosis was tested by annexin V-FITC, PI double staining and caspases-3 activation assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the level of progesterone (PG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). SEPSECS silenced-expression clearly inhibited proliferation of JEG-3 cells (p < 0.05), significantly induced cell apoptosis (p < 0.01) and reduced the production of PG and hCG (p < 0.05). On the contrary, SEPSECS over-expression significantly promoted both cell proliferation (p < 0.01) and secretion of PG and hCG (p < 0.05). SEPSECS significantly affects proliferation, apoptosis and hormone secretion of human trophoblast cells, suggesting that a potential relationship exists among SEPSECS, cell proliferation, apoptosis and hormone production of human placental trophoblast cells. Furthermore, this may provide a clue to uncover the relationship between selenium and human placental in association with an emphasis on the importance of selenium adequacy during pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of Selenoproteins Is Maintained in Mice Carrying Mutations in SECp43, the tRNA Selenocysteine 1 Associated Protein (Trnau1ap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassin Mahdi

    Full Text Available Selenocysteine tRNA 1 associated protein (Trnau1ap has been characterized as a tRNA[Ser]Sec-binding protein of 43 kDa, hence initially named SECp43. Previous studies reported its presence in complexes containing tRNA[Ser]Sec implying a role of SECp43 as a co-factor in selenoprotein expression. We generated two conditionally mutant mouse models targeting exons 3+4 and exons 7+8 eliminating parts of the first RNA recognition motif or of the tyrosine-rich domain, respectively. Constitutive inactivation of exons 3+4 of SECp43 apparently did not affect the mice or selenoprotein expression in several organs. Constitutive deletion of exons 7+8 was embryonic lethal. We therefore generated hepatocyte-specific Secp43 knockout mice and characterized selenoprotein expression in livers of mutant mice. We found no significant changes in the levels of 75Se-labelled hepatic proteins, selenoprotein levels as determined by Western blot analysis, enzymatic activity or selenoprotein mRNA abundance. The methylation pattern of tRNA[Ser]Sec remained unchanged. Truncated Secp43 Δ7,8mRNA increased in Secp43-mutant livers suggesting auto-regulation of Secp43 mRNA abundance. We found no signs of liver damage in Secp433-mutant mice, but neuron-specific deletion of exons 7+8 impaired motor performance, while not affecting cerebral selenoprotein expression or cerebellar development. These findings suggest that the targeted domains in the SECp43 protein are not essential for selenoprotein biosynthesis in hepatocytes and neurons. Whether the remaining second RNA recognition motif plays a role in selenoprotein biosynthesis and which other cellular process depends on SECp43 remains to be determined.

  3. The 3' addition of CCA to mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) is specifically impaired in patients with mutations in the tRNA nucleotidyl transferase TRNT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasarman, Florin; Thiffault, Isabelle; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Salomon, Steven; Maftei, Catalina; Gauthier, Julie; Ellazam, Benjamin; Webb, Neil; Antonicka, Hana; Janer, Alexandre; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Elpeleg, Orly; Mitchell, Grant; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2015-05-15

    Addition of the trinucleotide cytosine/cytosine/adenine (CCA) to the 3' end of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) is essential for translation and is catalyzed by the enzyme TRNT1 (tRNA nucleotidyl transferase), which functions in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Exome sequencing revealed TRNT1 mutations in two unrelated subjects with different clinical features. The first presented with acute lactic acidosis at 3 weeks of age and developed severe developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, seizures, progressive cortical atrophy, neurosensorial deafness, sideroblastic anemia and renal Fanconi syndrome, dying at 21 months. The second presented at 3.5 years with gait ataxia, dysarthria, gross motor regression, hypotonia, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia and had abnormal signals in brainstem and dentate nucleus. In subject 1, muscle biopsy showed combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects, but there was no OXPHOS deficiency in fibroblasts from either subject, despite a 10-fold-reduction in TRNT1 protein levels in fibroblasts of the first subject. Furthermore, in normal controls, TRNT1 protein levels are 10-fold lower in muscle than in fibroblasts. High resolution northern blots of subject fibroblast RNA suggested incomplete CCA addition to the non-canonical mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), but no obvious qualitative differences in other mitochondrial or cytoplasmic tRNAs. Complete knockdown of TRNT1 in patient fibroblasts rendered mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)) undetectable, and markedly reduced mitochondrial translation, except polypeptides lacking Ser(AGY) codons. These data suggest that the clinical phenotypes associated with TRNT1 mutations are largely due to impaired mitochondrial translation, resulting from defective CCA addition to mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), and that the severity of this biochemical phenotype determines the severity and tissue distribution of clinical features. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  4. Peptidyl transferase antibiotics perturb the relative positioning of the 3'-terminal adenosine of P/P'-site-bound tRNA and 23S rRNA in the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirillov, S V; Porse, B T; Garrett, R A

    1999-01-01

    A range of antibiotic inhibitors that act within the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome were examined for their capacity to perturb the relative positioning of the 3' end of P/P'-site-bound tRNA and the Escherichia coli ribosome. The 3'-terminal adenosines of deacylated tRNA and N......-Ac-Phe-tRNA were derivatized at the 2 position with an azido group and the tRNAs were cross-linked to the ribosome on irradiation with ultraviolet light at 365 nm. The cross-links were localized on the rRNA within extended versions of three previously characterized 23S rRNA fragments F1', F2', and F4......' at nucleotides C2601/A2602, U2584/U2585 (F1'), U2506 (F2'), and A2062/C2063 (F4'). Each of these nucleotides lies within the peptidyl transferase loop region of the 23S rRNA. Cross-links were also formed with ribosomal proteins L27 (strong) and L33 (weak), as shown earlier. The antibiotics sparsomycin...

  5. Unassigned Codons, Nonsense Suppression, and Anticodon Modifications in the Evolution of the Genetic Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.S. van der Gulik (Peter); W.D. Hoff (Wouter)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe origin of the genetic code is a central open problem regarding the early evolution of life. Here, we consider two undeveloped but important aspects of possible scenarios for the evolutionary pathway of the translation machinery: the role of unassigned codons in early stages

  6. Cleavage of intron from the standard or non-standard position of the precursor tRNA by the splicing endonuclease of Aeropyrum pernix, a hyper-thermophilic Crenarchaeon, involves a novel RNA recognition site in the Crenarchaea specific loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akira; Kitajima, Tsubasa; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    In Crenarchaea, several tRNA genes are predicted to express precursor-tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) with canonical or non-canonical introns at various positions. We initially focused on the tRNA(Thr) species of hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, Aeropyrum pernix (APE) and found that in the living APE cells three tRNA(Thr) species were transcribed and subsequently matured to functional tRNAs. During maturation, introns in two of them were cleaved from standard and non-standard positions. Biochemical studies revealed that the APE splicing endonuclease (APE-EndA) removed both types of introns, including the non-canonical introns, without any nucleotide modification. To clarify the underlying reasons for broad substrate specificity of APE-EndA, we determined the crystal structure of wild-type APE-EndA and subsequently compared its structure with that of Archaeaoglobus fulgidus (AFU)-EndA, which has narrow substrate specificity. Remarkably, structural comparison revealed that APE-EndA possesses a Crenarchaea specific loop (CSL). Introduction of CSL into AFU-EndA enhanced its intron-cleaving activity irrespective of the position or motif of the intron. Thus, our biochemical and crystallographic analyses of the chimera-EndA demonstrated that the CSL is responsible for the broad substrate specificity of APE-EndA. Furthermore, mutagenesis studies revealed that Lys44 in CSL functions as the RNA recognition site.

  7. Characterization of the human laminin beta2 chain locus (LAMB2): linkage to a gene containing a nonprocessed, transcribed LAMB2-like pseudogene (LAMB2L) and to the gene encoding glutaminyl tRNA synthetase (QARS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Jäger, A C; Khurana, T S

    1999-01-01

    The laminin beta2 chain is an important constituent of certain kidney and muscle basement membranes. We have generated a detailed physical map of a 110-kb genomic DNA segment surrounding the human laminin beta2 chain gene (LAMB2) on chromosome 3p21.3-->p21.2, a region paralogous with the chromosome...... 7q22-->q31 region that contains the laminin beta1 chain gene locus (LAMB1). Several CpG islands and a novel polymorphic microsatellite marker (D3S4594) were identified. The 3' end of LAMB2 lies 16 kb from the 5' end of the glutaminyl tRNA synthetase gene (QARS). About 20 kb upstream of LAMB2 we...... found a gene encoding a transcribed, non-processed LAMB2-like pseudogene (LAMB2L). The sequence of 1.75 kb of genomic DNA at the 3' end of LAMB2L was similar to exons 8-12 of the laminin beta2 chain gene. The LAMB2L-LAMB2-QARS cluster lies telomeric to the gene encoding the laminin-binding protein...

  8. The contributions of wobbling and superwobbling to the reading of the genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibah Alkatib

    Full Text Available Reduced bacterial genomes and most genomes of cell organelles (chloroplasts and mitochondria do not encode the full set of 32 tRNA species required to read all triplets of the genetic code according to the conventional wobble rules. Superwobbling, in which a single tRNA species that contains a uridine in the wobble position of the anticodon reads an entire four-fold degenerate codon box, has been suggested as a possible mechanism for how tRNA sets can be reduced. However, the general feasibility of superwobbling and its efficiency in the various codon boxes have remained unknown. Here we report a complete experimental assessment of the decoding rules in a typical prokaryotic genetic system, the plastid genome. By constructing a large set of transplastomic knock-out mutants for pairs of isoaccepting tRNA species, we show that superwobbling occurs in all codon boxes where it is theoretically possible. Phenotypic characterization of the transplastomic mutant plants revealed that the efficiency of superwobbling varies in a codon box-dependent manner, but--contrary to previous suggestions--it is independent of the number of hydrogen bonds engaged in codon-anticodon interaction. Finally, our data provide experimental evidence of the minimum tRNA set comprising 25 tRNA species, a number lower than previously suggested. Our results demonstrate that all triplets with pyrimidines in third codon position are dually decoded: by a tRNA species utilizing standard base pairing or wobbling and by a second tRNA species employing superwobbling. This has important implications for the interpretation of the genetic code and will aid the construction of synthetic genomes with a minimum-size translational apparatus.

  9. Genetic code in evolution: switching species-specific aminoacylation with a peptide transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasugi, K; Quinn, C L; Tao, N; Schimmel, P

    1998-01-02

    The genetic code is established in aminoacylation reactions whereby amino acids are joined to tRNAs bearing the anticodons of the genetic code. Paradoxically, while the code is universal there are many examples of species-specific aminoacylations, where a tRNA from one taxonomic domain cannot be acylated by a synthetase from another. Here we consider an example where a human, but not a bacterial, tRNA synthetase charges its cognate eukaryotic tRNA and where the bacterial, but not the human, enzyme charges the cognate bacterial tRNA. While the bacterial enzyme has less than 10% sequence identity with the human enzyme, transplantation of a 39 amino acid peptide from the human into the bacterial enzyme enabled the latter to charge its eukaryotic tRNA counterpart in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, substitution of the corresponding peptide of the bacterial enzyme for that of the human enabled the human enzyme to charge bacterial tRNA. This peptide element discriminates a base pair difference in the respective tRNA acceptor stems. Thus, functionally important co-adaptations of a synthetase to its tRNA act as small modular units that can be moved across taxonomic domains and thereby preserve the universality of the code.

  10. The UGG Isoacceptor of tRNAPro Is Naturally Prone to Frameshifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard B. Gamper

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Native tRNAs often contain post-transcriptional modifications to the wobble position to expand the capacity of reading the genetic code. Some of these modifications, due to the ability to confer imperfect codon-anticodon pairing at the wobble position, can induce a high propensity for tRNA to shift into alternative reading frames. An example is the native UGG isoacceptor of E. coli tRNAPro whose wobble nucleotide U34 is post-transcriptionally modified to cmo5U34 to read all four proline codons (5ʹ-CCA, 5ʹ-CCC, 5ʹ-CCG, and 5ʹ-CCU. Because the pairing of the modified anticodon to CCC codon is particularly weak relative to CCA and CCG codons, this tRNA can readily shift into both the +1 and +2-frame on the slippery mRNA sequence CCC-CG. We show that the shift to the +2-frame is more dominant, driven by the higher stability of the codon-anticodon pairing at the wobble position. Kinetic analysis suggests that both types of shifts can occur during stalling of the tRNA in a post-translocation complex or during translocation from the A to the P-site. Importantly, while the +1-frame post complex is active for peptidyl transfer, the +2-frame complex is a poor peptidyl donor. Together with our recent work, we draw a mechanistic distinction between +1 and +2-frameshifts, showing that while the +1-shifts are suppressed by the additional post-transcriptionally modified m1G37 nucleotide in the anticodon loop, the +2-shifts are suppressed by the ribosome, supporting a role of the ribosome in the overall quality control of reading-frame maintenance.

  11. Insights into substrate promiscuity of human seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Kaitlyn M; Puppala, Anupama K; Lee, Jonathan W; Lee, Hyun; Simonović, Miljan

    2017-11-01

    Seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) attaches L-serine to the cognate serine tRNA (tRNA Ser ) and the noncognate selenocysteine tRNA (tRNA Sec ). The latter activity initiates the anabolic cycle of selenocysteine (Sec), proper decoding of an in-frame Sec UGA codon, and synthesis of selenoproteins across all domains of life. While the accuracy of SerRS is important for overall proteome integrity, it is its substrate promiscuity that is vital for the integrity of the selenoproteome. This raises a question as to what elements in the two tRNA species, harboring different anticodon sequences and adopting distinct folds, facilitate aminoacylation by a common aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. We sought to answer this question by analyzing the ability of human cytosolic SerRS to bind and act on tRNA Ser , tRNA Sec , and 10 mutant and chimeric constructs in which elements of tRNA Ser were transposed onto tRNA Sec We show that human SerRS only subtly prefers tRNA Ser to tRNA Sec , and that discrimination occurs at the level of the serylation reaction. Surprisingly, the tRNA mutants predicted to adopt either the 7/5 or 8/5 fold are poor SerRS substrates. In contrast, shortening of the acceptor arm of tRNA Sec by a single base pair yields an improved SerRS substrate that adopts an 8/4 fold. We suggest that an optimal tertiary arrangement of structural elements within tRNA Sec and tRNA Ser dictate their utility for serylation. We also speculate that the extended acceptor-TΨC arm of tRNA Sec evolved as a compromise for productive binding to SerRS while remaining the major recognition element for other enzymes involved in Sec and selenoprotein synthesis. © 2017 Holman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. Untangling Heteroplasmy, Structure, and Evolution of an Atypical Mitochondrial Genome by PacBio Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccoud, Jean; Chebbi, Mohamed Amine; Cormier, Alexandre; Moumen, Bouziane; Gilbert, Clément; Marcadé, Isabelle; Chandler, Christopher; Cordaux, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The highly compact mitochondrial (mt) genome of terrestrial isopods (Oniscidae) presents two unusual features. First, several loci can individually encode two tRNAs, thanks to single nucleotide polymorphisms at anticodon sites. Within-individual variation (heteroplasmy) at these loci is thought to have been maintained for millions of years because individuals that do not carry all tRNA genes die, resulting in strong balancing selection. Second, the oniscid mtDNA genome comes in two conformations: a ∼14 kb linear monomer and a ∼28 kb circular dimer comprising two monomer units fused in palindrome. We hypothesized that heteroplasmy actually results from two genome units of the same dimeric molecule carrying different tRNA genes at mirrored loci. This hypothesis, however, contradicts the earlier proposition that dimeric molecules result from the replication of linear monomers-a process that should yield totally identical genome units within a dimer. To solve this contradiction, we used the SMRT (PacBio) technology to sequence mirrored tRNA loci in single dimeric molecules. We show that dimers do present different tRNA genes at mirrored loci; thus covalent linkage, rather than balancing selection, maintains vital variation at anticodons. We also leveraged unique features of the SMRT technology to detect linear monomers closed by hairpins and carrying noncomplementary bases at anticodons. These molecules contain the necessary information to encode two tRNAs at the same locus, and suggest new mechanisms of transition between linear and circular mtDNA. Overall, our analyses clarify the evolution of an atypical mt genome where dimerization counterintuitively enabled further mtDNA compaction. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the tRNA-modification enzyme GidA from Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Takuo; Inanaga, Hideko; Numata, Tomoyuki

    2009-05-01

    The 5-carboxymethylaminomethyl modification of uridine at the first position of the tRNA anticodon is crucial for accurate protein synthesis by stabilizing the correct codon-anticodon pairing on the ribosome. Two conserved enzymes, GidA and MnmE, are involved in this modification process. Aquifex aeolicus GidA was crystallized in two different crystal forms: forms I and II. These crystals diffracted to 3.2 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. These crystals belonged to space groups I2(1)2(1)2(1) and P2(1) with unit-cell parameters a = 101.6, b = 213.3, c = 231.7 A and a = 119.4, b = 98.0, c = 129.6 A, beta = 90.002 degrees , respectively. The asymmetric units of these crystals are expected to contain two and four molecules, respectively.

  14. Evolution of the genetic code through progressive symmetry breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Reijer

    2014-04-21

    paralogous tRNA evolution expands the anticodon repertoire, which is divided into anticodon blocks matching the codon blocks under the stage-specific ribosomal basepairing rules. Contemporaneously an expanding family of primitive aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) divides the tRNA diversities into various different and overlapping subsets: each aaRS accepts some tRNAs but rejects all others and several aaRSs may accept the same tRNA species. Selection favoring less ambiguous codes eliminates these overlaps and also imposes the ribosomal anticodon block division as ambiguity arises when different aaRSs accept tRNAs of the same anticodon block. Only when the tRNAs of one or several anticodon blocks are accepted by a unique aaRS does the code become specific. This coding pattern is observed in the standard code and the evolution of amino acid assignments by primitive aaRSs onto tRNAs is traced back via tRNA trees that picture a gradual division of tRNA diversities into blocks with increasingly specific amino acid assignments. Symmetry breaking combined with continuous selection for codes carrying more information evolves increasingly specific codes and efficiently traverses an immense space of all possible codes (>10(84)) to give rise to the standard code. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F. [UCSC

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  16. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J. Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets. PMID:26999216

  17. Coevolution Theory of the Genetic Code at Age Forty: Pathway to Translation and Synthetic Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Tze-Fei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Mat, Wai-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Xue, Hong

    2016-03-16

    The origins of the components of genetic coding are examined in the present study. Genetic information arose from replicator induction by metabolite in accordance with the metabolic expansion law. Messenger RNA and transfer RNA stemmed from a template for binding the aminoacyl-RNA synthetase ribozymes employed to synthesize peptide prosthetic groups on RNAs in the Peptidated RNA World. Coevolution of the genetic code with amino acid biosynthesis generated tRNA paralogs that identify a last universal common ancestor (LUCA) of extant life close to Methanopyrus, which in turn points to archaeal tRNA introns as the most primitive introns and the anticodon usage of Methanopyrus as an ancient mode of wobble. The prediction of the coevolution theory of the genetic code that the code should be a mutable code has led to the isolation of optional and mandatory synthetic life forms with altered protein alphabets.

  18. Gene organization and sequence analyses of transfer RNA genes in Trypanosomatid parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myler Peter J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protozoan pathogens Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi (the Tritryps are parasites that produce devastating human diseases. These organisms show very unusual mechanisms of gene expression, such as polycistronic transcription. We are interested in the study of tRNA genes, which are transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. To analyze the sequences and genomic organization of tRNA genes and other Pol III-transcribed genes, we have performed an in silico analysis of the Tritryps genome sequences. Results Our analysis indicated the presence of 83, 66 and 120 genes in L. major, T. brucei and T. cruzi, respectively. These numbers include several previously unannotated selenocysteine (Sec tRNA genes. Most tRNA genes are organized into clusters of 2 to 10 genes that may contain other Pol III-transcribed genes. The distribution of genes in the L. major genome does not seem to be totally random, like in most organisms. While the majority of the tRNA clusters do not show synteny (conservation of gene order between the Tritryps, a cluster of 13 Pol III genes that is highly syntenic was identified. We have determined consensus sequences for the putative promoter regions (Boxes A and B of the Tritryps tRNA genes, and specific changes were found in tRNA-Sec genes. Analysis of transcription termination signals of the tRNAs (clusters of Ts showed differences between T. cruzi and the other two species. We have also identified several tRNA isodecoder genes (having the same anticodon, but different sequences elsewhere in the tRNA body in the Tritryps. Conclusion A low number of tRNA genes is present in Tritryps. The overall weak synteny that they show indicates a reduced importance of genome location of Pol III genes compared to protein-coding genes. The fact that some of the differences between isodecoder genes occur in the internal promoter elements suggests that differential control of the expression of some

  19. Human tRNA(Lys3)(UUU) is pre-structured by natural modifications for cognate and wobble codon binding through keto-enol tautomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendeix, Franck A P; Murphy, Frank V; Cantara, William A; Leszczyńska, Grażyna; Gustilo, Estella M; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F

    2012-03-02

    Human tRNA(Lys3)(UUU) (htRNA(Lys3)(UUU)) decodes the lysine codons AAA and AAG during translation and also plays a crucial role as the primer for HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) reverse transcription. The posttranscriptional modifications 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U(34)), 2-methylthio-N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ms(2)t(6)A(37)), and pseudouridine (Ψ(39)) in the tRNA's anticodon domain are critical for ribosomal binding and HIV-1 reverse transcription. To understand the importance of modified nucleoside contributions, we determined the structure and function of this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop (ASL) domain with these modifications at positions 34, 37, and 39, respectively (hASL(Lys3)(UUU)-mcm(5)s(2)U(34);ms(2)t(6)A(37);Ψ(39)). Ribosome binding assays in vitro revealed that the hASL(Lys3)(UUU)-mcm(5)s(2)U(34);ms(2)t(6)A(37);Ψ(39) bound AAA and AAG codons, whereas binding of the unmodified ASL(Lys3)(UUU) was barely detectable. The UV hyperchromicity, the circular dichroism, and the structural analyses indicated that Ψ(39) enhanced the thermodynamic stability of the ASL through base stacking while ms(2)t(6)A(37) restrained the anticodon to adopt an open loop conformation that is required for ribosomal binding. The NMR-restrained molecular-dynamics-derived solution structure revealed that the modifications provided an open, ordered loop for codon binding. The crystal structures of the hASL(Lys3)(UUU)-mcm(5)s(2)U(34);ms(2)t(6)A(37);Ψ(39) bound to the 30S ribosomal subunit with each codon in the A site showed that the modified nucleotides mcm(5)s(2)U(34) and ms(2)t(6)A(37) participate in the stability of the anticodon-codon interaction. Importantly, the mcm(5)s(2)U(34)·G(3) wobble base pair is in the Watson-Crick geometry, requiring unusual hydrogen bonding to G in which mcm(5)s(2)U(34) must shift from the keto to the enol form. The results unambiguously demonstrate that modifications pre-structure the anticodon as a key

  20. Ensemble cryo-EM elucidates the mechanism of translation fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Anna B.; Demo, Gabriel; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Korostelev, Andrei A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Faithful gene translation depends on accurate decoding, whose structural mechanism remains a matter of debate. Ribosomes decode mRNA codons by selecting cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs delivered by EF-Tu. We present high-resolution structural ensembles of ribosomes with cognate or near-cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs delivered by EF-Tu. Both cognate and near-cognate tRNA anticodons explore the A site of an open 30S subunit, while inactive EF-Tu is separated from the 50S subunit. A transient conformation of decoding-center nucleotide G530 stabilizes the cognate codon-anticodon helix, initiating step-wise “latching” of the decoding center. The resulting 30S domain closure docks EF-Tu at the sarcin-ricin loop of the 50S subunit, activating EF-Tu for GTP hydrolysis and ensuing aminoacyl-tRNA accommodation. By contrast, near-cognate complexes fail to induce the G530 latch, thus favoring open 30S pre-accommodation intermediates with inactive EF-Tu. This work unveils long-sought structural differences between the pre-accommodation of cognate and near-cognate tRNA that elucidate the mechanism of accurate decoding. PMID:28538735

  1. Discovery of ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of tRNAIle Lysidine Synthetase (TilS) by High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Plant, Helen; Walsh, Jarrod; Sylvester, Mark; Hu, Jun; Gao, Ning; Livchak, Stephania; Tentarelli, Sharon; Thresher, Jason

    2014-09-01

    A novel, ultrahigh-throughput, fluorescence anisotropy-based assay was developed and used to screen a 1.4-million-sample library for compounds that compete with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for binding to Escherichia coli tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase (TilS), an essential, conserved, ATP-dependent, tRNA-modifying enzyme of bacterial pathogens. TilS modifies a cytidine base in the anticodon loop of Ile2 tRNA by attaching lysine, thereby altering codon recognition of the CAU anticodon from AUG (methionine) to AUA (isoleucine). A scintillation proximity assay for the incorporation of lysine into Ile2 tRNA was used to eliminate false positives in the initial screen resulting from detection artifacts as well as compounds competitive with the fluorescent label instead of ATP, and to measure inhibitor potencies against E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TilS isozymes. The tRNA(Ile) substrate for P. aeruginosa TilS was identified for the first time to enable these measurements. ATP-competitive binding of inhibitors was confirmed by one-dimensional ligand-observe nuclear magnetic resonance. A preliminary structure-activity relationship is shown for two inhibitor series. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. The Mitochondrial Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetases: Genes and Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Diodato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases. This is because protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondria, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication, transcription, and translation, require nuclear-encoded genes. In the past decade, a growing number of syndromes associated with dysfunction of mtDNA translation have been reported. This paper reviews the current knowledge of mutations affecting mitochondrial aminoacyl tRNAs synthetases and their role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the different clinical presentations.

  3. Roles of tRNA in cell wall biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dare, Kiley; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent research into various aspects of bacterial metabolism such as cell wall and antibiotic synthesis, degradation pathways, cellular stress, and amino acid biosynthesis has elucidated roles of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (aa-tRNA) outside of translation. Although the two enzyme families...... responsible for cell wall modifications, aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthases (aaPGSs) and Fem, were discovered some time ago, they have recently become of intense interest for their roles in the antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic microorganisms. The addition of positively charged amino acids...... to phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by aaPGSs neutralizes the lipid bilayer making the bacteria less susceptible to positively charged antimicrobial agents. Fem transferases utilize aa-tRNA to form peptide bridges that link strands of peptidoglycan. These bridges vary among the bacterial species in which they are present...

  4. Human tRNA genes function as chromatin insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Jesse R; Chiu, Jonathan; Zhu, Jingchun; Katzman, Sol; Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu; Wade, Paul A; Haussler, David; Kamakaka, Rohinton T

    2012-01-01

    Insulators help separate active chromatin domains from silenced ones. In yeast, gene promoters act as insulators to block the spread of Sir and HP1 mediated silencing while in metazoans most insulators are multipartite autonomous entities. tDNAs are repetitive sequences dispersed throughout the human genome and we now show that some of these tDNAs can function as insulators in human cells. Using computational methods, we identified putative human tDNA insulators. Using silencer blocking, transgene protection and repressor blocking assays we show that some of these tDNA-containing fragments can function as barrier insulators in human cells. We find that these elements also have the ability to block enhancers from activating RNA pol II transcribed promoters. Characterization of a putative tDNA insulator in human cells reveals that the site possesses chromatin signatures similar to those observed at other better-characterized eukaryotic insulators. Enhanced 4C analysis demonstrates that the tDNA insulator makes long-range chromatin contacts with other tDNAs and ETC sites but not with intervening or flanking RNA pol II transcribed genes. PMID:22085927

  5. A tRNA-derived fragment competes with mRNA for ribosome binding and regulates translation during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebetsberger, Jennifer; Wyss, Leander; Mleczko, Anna M; Reuther, Julia; Polacek, Norbert

    2017-10-03

    Posttranscriptional processing of RNA molecules is a common strategy to enlarge the structural and functional repertoire of RNomes observed in all 3 domains of life. Fragmentation of RNA molecules of basically all functional classes has been reported to yield smaller non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that typically possess different roles compared with their parental transcripts. Here we show that a valine tRNA-derived fragment (Val-tRF) that is produced under certain stress conditions in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii is capable of binding to the small ribosomal subunit. As a consequence of Val-tRF binding mRNA is displaced from the initiation complex which results in global translation attenuation in vivo and in vitro. The fact that the archaeal Val-tRF also inhibits eukaryal as well as bacterial protein biosynthesis implies a functionally conserved mode of action. While tRFs and tRNA halves have been amply identified in recent RNA-seq project, Val-tRF described herein represents one of the first functionally characterized tRNA processing products to date.

  6. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation introduces an m1G37 modification into tRNAMet, altering its structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Xue, Ling; Chen, Yaru; Li, Haiying; He, Qiufen; Wang, Bibin; Meng, Feilong; Wang, Meng; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-12-08

    Defective nucleotide modifications of mitochondrial tRNAs have been associated with several human diseases, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the pathogenic molecular mechanism underlying a hypertension-associated 4435A>G mutation in mitochondrial tRNAMet The m.4435A>G mutation affected a highly conserved adenosine at position 37, 3' adjacent to the tRNA's anticodon, which is important for the fidelity of codon recognition and stabilization. We hypothesized that the m.4435A>G mutation introduced an m1G37 modification of tRNAMet, altering its structure and function. Primer extension and methylation activity assays indeed confirmed that the m.4435A>G mutation created a tRNA methyltransferase 5 (TRMT5)-catalyzed m1G37 modification of tRNAMet We found that this mutation altered the tRNAMet structure, indicated by an increased melting temperature and electrophoretic mobility of the mutated tRNA compared with the wild-type molecule. We demonstrated that cybrid cell lines carrying the m.4435A>G mutation exhibited significantly decreased efficiency in aminoacylation and steady-state levels of tRNAMet, as compared with those of control cybrids. The aberrant tRNAMet metabolism resulted in variable decreases in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded polypeptides in the mutant cybrids. Furthermore, we found that the m.4435A>G mutation caused respiratory deficiency, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in mutant cybrids. These results demonstrated that an aberrant m1G37 modification of mitochondrial tRNAMet affected the structure and function of its tRNA and consequently altered mitochondrial function. Our findings provide critical insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension, which is manifested by the deficient tRNA nucleotide modification. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two green lacewings, Chrysoperla nipponensis (Okamoto, 1914) and Apochrysa matsumurae Okamoto, 1912 (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Naoto; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Sato, Yukie; Naka, Hideshi; Nomura, Masashi

    2011-06-01

    We describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of the green lacewing species Chrysoperla nipponensis (Okamoto, 1914) and Apochrysa matsumurae Okamoto 1912 (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). The genomes were 16,057 and 16,214 bp in size, respectively, and comprised 37 genes (13 protein coding genes, 22 tRNA genes and two rRNA genes). A major noncoding (control) region was 1,244 bp in C. nipponensis and 1,407 in A. matsumurae, and the structure was simpler than that reported in other Neuroptera, lacking conserved blocks or long tandem repeats. The overall arrangement of genes was almost the same as that found in most arthropod mitochondrial genomes, with the one exception of a tRNA rearrangement to tRNA-Cys-tRNA-Trp-tRNA-Tyr, rather than the plesiomorphic tRNA-Trp-tRNA-Cys-tRNA-Tyr. A high A + T content (78.89 and 79.02%, respectively), A + T-rich codon bias, and a mismatch between the most-used codon and its corresponding tRNA anticodon were observed as a typical feature of the insect mitochondrial genome.

  8. Formation of the chlorophyll precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid in cyanobacteria requires aminoacylation of a tRNAGlu species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, G P; Peterson, D M; Schön, A; Chen, M W; Söll, D

    1988-09-01

    In the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, the biosynthesis of the chlorophyll precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) involves at least three enzymes and a tRNA species. Here we demonstrate that in cell extracts of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 ALA was formed from glutamate in a series of reactions in which activation of glutamate by glutamyl-tRNAGlu formation was the first step. The activated glutamate was reduced by a dehydrogenase which displayed tRNA sequence specificity. Fractionation of strain 6803 tRNA by reverse-phase chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis yielded two pure tRNAGlu species which stimulated ALA synthesis in vitro. These tRNAs had identical primary sequences but differed in the nucleotide modification of their anticodon. The 6803 tRNAGlu was similar to the sequences of tRNAGlu species or tRNAGlu genes from Escherichia coli and from chloroplasts of Euglena gracilis and higher plants. Southern blot analysis revealed at least two tRNAGlu gene copies in the 6803 chromosome. A glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase, the terminal enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to ALA in chloroplasts, was detected in 6803 cell extracts by the conversion of glutamate-1-semialdehyde to ALA and by the inhibition of this reaction by gabaculin.

  9. Formation of the First Peptide Bond: The Structure of EF-P Bound to the 70S Ribosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaha, Gregor; Stanley, Robin E.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Yale

    2009-10-21

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is an essential protein that stimulates the formation of the first peptide bond in protein synthesis. Here we report the crystal structure of EF-P bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome along with the initiator transfer RNA N-formyl-methionyl-tRNAi (fMet-tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet}) and a short piece of messenger RNA (mRNA) at a resolution of 3.5 angstroms. EF-P binds to a site located between the binding site for the peptidyl tRNA (P site) and the exiting tRNA (E site). It spans both ribosomal subunits with its amino-terminal domain positioned adjacent to the aminoacyl acceptor stem and its carboxyl-terminal domain positioned next to the anticodon stem-loop of the P site-bound initiator tRNA. Domain II of EF-P interacts with the ribosomal protein L1, which results in the largest movement of the L1 stalk that has been observed in the absence of ratcheting of the ribosomal subunits. EF-P facilitates the proper positioning of the fMet-tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet} for the formation of the first peptide bond during translation initiation.

  10. The "periodic table" of the genetic code: A new way to look at the code and the decoding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Anton A

    2016-01-01

    Henri Grosjean and Eric Westhof recently presented an information-rich, alternative view of the genetic code, which takes into account current knowledge of the decoding process, including the complex nature of interactions between mRNA, tRNA and rRNA that take place during protein synthesis on the ribosome, and it also better reflects the evolution of the code. The new asymmetrical circular genetic code has a number of advantages over the traditional codon table and the previous circular diagrams (with a symmetrical/clockwise arrangement of the U, C, A, G bases). Most importantly, all sequence co-variances can be visualized and explained based on the internal logic of the thermodynamics of codon-anticodon interactions.

  11. A geometric model for codon recognition logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halitsky, D

    1994-06-01

    Known types of pairings between mRNA bases and tRNA nucleosides are shown to be consistent with the notion of a translation space TS constructed such that certain wobble-pairings cannot be used in the same translation system without engendering confusion between keto-final codon twins like AAU(ASN)/AAG(LYS) and between amino-final codon twins like AAC(ASN)/AAA(LYS). When TS is abstractly formalized using Coxeter's face-first three-dimensional projection of a four-dimensional hypercube, the resulting model suggests a specific configurational logic for codon recognition by cognate tRNAs. Although this logic will in general permit codons and anticodons to form matching configurations whose loci are six lines parallel to the axis of a cylinder, confusion of keto-final and amino-final codon twins may result from wobble-pairings whose loci are the two of these lines off the surface of the cylinder.

  12. Structural insights into the translational infidelity mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2015-06-01

    The decoding of mRNA on the ribosome is the least accurate process during genetic information transfer. Here we propose a unified decoding mechanism based on 11 high-resolution X-ray structures of the 70S ribosome that explains the occurrence of missense errors during translation. We determined ribosome structures in rare states where incorrect tRNAs were incorporated into the peptidyl-tRNA-binding site. These structures show that in the codon-anticodon duplex, a G.U mismatch adopts the Watson-Crick geometry, indicating a shift in the tautomeric equilibrium or ionization of the nucleobase. Additional structures with mismatches in the 70S decoding centre show that the binding of any tRNA induces identical rearrangements in the centre, which favours either isosteric or close to the Watson-Crick geometry codon-anticodon pairs. Overall, the results suggest that a mismatch escapes discrimination by preserving the shape of a Watson-Crick pair and indicate that geometric selection via tautomerism or ionization dominates the translational infidelity mechanism.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the onychophoran Epiperipatus biolleyi reveals a unique transfer RNA set and provides further support for the ecdysozoa hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsiadlowski, Lars; Braband, Anke; Mayer, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Onychophora (velvet worms) play a crucial role in current discussions on position of arthropods. The ongoing Articulata/Ecdysozoa debate is in need of additional ground pattern characters for Panarthropoda (Arthropoda, Tardigrada, and Onychophora). Hence, Onychophora is an important outgroup taxon in resolving the relationships among arthropods, irrespective of whether morphological or molecular data are used. To date, there has been a noticeable lack of mitochondrial genome data from onychophorans. Here, we present the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of an onychophoran, Epiperipatus biolleyi (Peripatidae), which shows several characteristic features. Specifically, the gene order is considerably different from that in other arthropods and other bilaterians. In addition, there is a lack of 9 tRNA genes usually present in bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. All these missing tRNAs have anticodon sequences corresponding to 4-fold degenerate codons, whereas the persisting 13 tRNAs all have anticodons pairing with 2-fold degenerate codons. Sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes provides a robust support for a clade consisting of Onychophora, Priapulida, and Arthropoda, which confirms the Ecdysozoa hypothesis. However, resolution of the internal ecdysozoan relationships suffers from a cluster of long-branching taxa (including Nematoda and Platyhelminthes) and a lack of data from Tardigrada and further nemathelminth taxa in addition to nematodes and priapulids.

  14. Four-base codon mediated mRNA display to construct peptide libraries that contain multiple nonnatural amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Norihito; Hohsaka, Takahiro; Sisido, Masahiko

    2006-01-01

    In vitro selection and directed evolution of peptides from mRNA display are powerful strategies to find novel peptide ligands that bind to target biomolecules. In this study, we expanded the mRNA display method to include multiple nonnatural amino acids by introducing three different four-base codons at a randomly selected single position on the mRNA. Another nonnatural amino acid may be introduced by suppressing an amber codon that may appear from a (NNK)n nucleotide sequence on the mRNA. The mRNA display was expressed in an Escherichia coli in vitro translation system in the presence of three types of tRNAs carrying different four-base anticodons and a tRNA carrying an amber anticodon, the tRNAs being chemically aminoacylated with different nonnatural amino acids. The complexity of the starting mRNA-displayed peptide library was estimated to be 1.1 × 1012 molecules. The effectiveness of the four-base codon mediated mRNA display method was demonstrated in the selection of biocytin-containing peptides on streptavidin-coated beads. Moreover, a novel streptavidin-binding nonnatural peptide containing benzoylphenylalanine was obtained from the nonnatural peptide library. The nonnatural peptide library from the four-base codon mediated mRNA display provides much wider functional and structural diversity than conventional peptide libraries that are constituted from 20 naturally occurring amino acids. PMID:16397292

  15. The human mitochondrial tRNAMet: structure/function relationship of a unique modification in the decoding of unconventional codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbille, Yann; Gustilo, Estella M; Harris, Kimberly A; Jones, Christie N; Lusic, Hrvoje; Kaiser, Robert J; Delaney, Michael O; Spremulli, Linda L; Deiters, Alexander; Agris, Paul F

    2011-02-18

    Human mitochondrial mRNAs utilize the universal AUG and the unconventional isoleucine AUA codons for methionine. In contrast to translation in the cytoplasm, human mitochondria use one tRNA, hmtRNA(Met)(CAU), to read AUG and AUA codons at both the peptidyl- (P-), and aminoacyl- (A-) sites of the ribosome. The hmtRNA(Met)(CAU) has a unique post-transcriptional modification, 5-formylcytidine, at the wobble position 34 (f(5)C(34)), and a cytidine substituting for the invariant uridine at position 33 of the canonical U-turn in tRNAs. The structure of the tRNA anticodon stem and loop domain (hmtASL(Met)(CAU)), determined by NMR restrained molecular modeling, revealed how the f(5)C(34) modification facilitates the decoding of AUA at the P- and the A-sites. The f(5)C(34) defined a reduced conformational space for the nucleoside, in what appears to have restricted the conformational dynamics of the anticodon bases of the modified hmtASL(Met)(CAU). The hmtASL(Met)(CAU) exhibited a C-turn conformation that has some characteristics of the U-turn motif. Codon binding studies with both Escherichia coli and bovine mitochondrial ribosomes revealed that the f(5)C(34) facilitates AUA binding in the A-site and suggested that the modification favorably alters the ASL binding kinetics. Mitochondrial translation by many organisms, including humans, sometimes initiates with the universal isoleucine codons AUU and AUC. The f(5)C(34) enabled P-site codon binding to these normally isoleucine codons. Thus, the physicochemical properties of this one modification, f(5)C(34), expand codon recognition from the traditional AUG to the non-traditional, synonymous codons AUU and AUC as well as AUA, in the reassignment of universal codons in the mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural changes of yeast tRNA(Tyr) caused by the binding of divalent ions in the presence of spermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöthig-Laslo, V; Weygand-Durasević, I; Kućan, Z

    1985-02-01

    The existence of specific sites in tRNA for the binding of divalent cations has been seriously questioned by electrostatic considerations [Leroy & Guéron (1979) Biopolymers, 16, 2429-2446]. However, our earlier studies of the binding of Mg2+ and Mn2+ to yeast tRNA(Tyr) have indicated that spermine creates new binding sites for divalent cations [Weygand-Durasević et al. (1977) Biochim. Biophys, Acta, 479, 332-344; Nöthig-Laslo et al. (1981) Eur. J. Biochem. 117, 263-267]. We have now used yeast tRNA(Tyr), spin labeled at the hypermodified purine (i6A-37) in the anticodon loop, to study the effect of spermine on the binding of manganese ions. The presence of eight spermine molecules per tRNA(Tyr) at high ionic strength (0.2 M NaCl, 0.05 M triethanolamine.HCl) and at low temperature (7 degrees C) enhances the binding of manganese to tRNA(Tyr). This effect could not be explained by electrostatic binding. The initial binding of manganese to tRNA(Tyr) affects the motional properties of the spin label indicating a change of the conformation of the anticodon loop. From the absence of the paramagnetic effect of manganese on the ESR spectra of the spin label one can conclude that the first binding site for manganese is at a distance from i6A-37, influencing the spin label motion through a long-range effect. The enhancement of the binding of manganese to tRNA(Tyr) by spermine is lost upon destruction of its specific macromolecular structure and it does not occur in single stranded or in double-stranded polynucleotides. The observed effect can be explained by the binding of Mn2+ to new sites, created by the binding of spermine, which are specific for the macromolecular structure of tRNA.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Epinephelus polyphekadion (Teleostei, Serranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqing; Chen, Mengmeng; Luo, Jian; Chen, Guohua

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the Epinephelus polyphekadion has been sequenced by the next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques strategy. The mitochondrial genome is 16,691 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand are 27.90% A, 29.05% T, 27.48% G and 15.58% C. With the exception of ND6 and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy-strand (H-strand). All the tRNAs have clover secondary structure with conservative anticodon arm, TΨC arm and D arm except for tRNA-Ser(GCT) and tRNA-Pro(TGG), which D arm consists of 13 bp and 7 bp single-base, respectively. Phylogenetic tree showed that E. latifasciatus, E. polyphekadion, E. epistictus, E. akaara and E. stictus of the Epinephelus formed a monophyletic group, whereas E. latifasciatus, E. polyphekadion and E. epistictus formed a sister group.

  18. Unique Characteristics of the Pyrrolysine System in the 7th Order of Methanogens: Implications for the Evolution of a Genetic Code Expansion Cassette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Borrel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolysine (Pyl, the 22nd proteogenic amino acid, was restricted until recently to few organisms. Its translational use necessitates the presence of enzymes for synthesizing it from lysine, a dedicated amber stop codon suppressor tRNA, and a specific amino-acyl tRNA synthetase. The three genomes of the recently proposed Thermoplasmata-related 7th order of methanogens contain the complete genetic set for Pyl synthesis and its translational use. Here, we have analyzed the genomic features of the Pyl-coding system in these three genomes with those previously known from Bacteria and Archaea and analyzed the phylogeny of each component. This shows unique peculiarities, notably an amber   tRNAPyl with an imperfect anticodon stem and a shortened tRNAPyl synthetase. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that a Pyl-coding system was present in the ancestor of the seventh order of methanogens and appears more closely related to Bacteria than to Methanosarcinaceae, suggesting the involvement of lateral gene transfer in the spreading of pyrrolysine between the two prokaryotic domains. We propose that the Pyl-coding system likely emerged once in Archaea, in a hydrogenotrophic and methanol-H2-dependent methylotrophic methanogen. The close relationship between methanogenesis and the Pyl system provides a possible example of expansion of a still evolving genetic code, shaped by metabolic requirements.

  19. Nearly complete mitogenome of hairy sawfly, Corynis lateralis (Brullé, 1832) (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae): rearrangements in the IQM and ARNS1EF gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Özgül; Korkmaz, E Mahir

    2017-10-01

    The Cimbicidae is a small family of the primitive and relatively less diverse suborder Symphyta (Hymenoptera). Here, nearly complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of hairy sawfly, Corynis lateralis (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) was sequenced using next generation sequencing and comparatively analysed with the mitogenome of Trichiosoma anthracinum. The sequenced length of C. lateralis mitogenome was 14,899 bp with an A+T content of 80.60%. All protein coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons and all are terminated with TAR or T- stop codon. All tRNA genes preferred usual anticodons. Compared with the inferred insect ancestral mitogenome, two tRNA rearrangements were observed in the IQM and ARNS1EF gene clusters, representing a new event not previously reported in Symphyta. An illicit priming of replication and/or intra/inter-mitochondrial recombination and TDRL seem to be responsible mechanisms for the rearrangement events in these gene clusters. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the position of Corynis within Cimbicidae and recovered a relationship of Tenthredinoidea + (Cephoidea + Orussoidea) in Symphyta.

  20. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

  1. The yfhQ gene of Escherichia coli encodes a tRNA:Cm32/Um32 methyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Hirotada

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturally occurring tRNAs contain numerous modified nucleosides. They are formed by enzymatic modification of the primary transcripts during the complex RNA maturation process. In model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae most enzymes involved in this process have been identified. Interestingly, it was found that tRNA methylation, one of the most common modifications, can be introduced by S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet-dependent methyltransferases (MTases that belong to two structurally and phylogenetically unrelated protein superfamilies: RFM and SPOUT. Results As a part of a large-scale project aiming at characterization of a complete set of RNA modification enzymes of model organisms, we have studied the Escherichia coli proteins YibK, LasT, YfhQ, and YbeA for their ability to introduce the last unassigned methylations of ribose at positions 32 and 34 of the tRNA anticodon loop. We found that YfhQ catalyzes the AdoMet-dependent formation of Cm32 or Um32 in tRNASer1 and tRNAGln2 and that an E. coli strain with a disrupted yfhQ gene lacks the tRNA:Cm32/Um32 methyltransferase activity. Thus, we propose to rename YfhQ as TrMet(Xm32 according to the recently proposed, uniform nomenclature for all RNA modification enzymes, or TrmJ, according to the traditional nomenclature for bacterial tRNA MTases. Conclusion Our results reveal that methylation at position 32 is carried out by completely unrelated TrMet(Xm32 enzymes in eukaryota and prokaryota (RFM superfamily member Trm7 and SPOUT superfamily member TrmJ, respectively, mirroring the scenario observed in the case of the m1G37 modification (introduced by the RFM member Trm5 in eukaryota and archaea, and by the SPOUT member TrmD in bacteria.

  2. Anti-tumor effects of an engineered 'killer' transfer RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lee, Jiyoung; Frankenberger, Casey [Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Geslain, Renaud, E-mail: rgeslain@depaul.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Department of Biology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States); Rosner, Marsha, E-mail: m-rosner@uchicago.edu [Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pan, Tao, E-mail: taopan@uchicago.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA with anti-cancer effects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA induced protein misfolding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA as anti-tumor agent. -- Abstract: A hallmark of cancer cells is their ability to continuously divide; and rapid proliferation requires increased protein translation. Elevating levels of misfolded proteins can elicit growth arrest due to ER stress and decreased global translation. Failure to correct prolonged ER stress eventually results in cell death via apoptosis. tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) is an engineered human tRNA{sup Ser} with an anticodon coding for isoleucine. Here we test the possibility that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) can be an effective killing agent of breast cancer cells and can effectively inhibit tumor-formation in mice. We found that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) exert strong effects on breast cancer translation activity, cell viability, and tumor formation. Translation is strongly inhibited by tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) in both tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) significantly decreased the number of viable cells over time. A short time treatment with tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) was sufficient to eliminate breast tumor formation in a xenograft mouse model. Our results indicate that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) can inhibit breast cancer metabolism, growth and tumor formation. This RNA has strong anti-cancer effects and presents an opportunity for its development into an anti-tumor agent. Because tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) corrupts the protein synthesis mechanism that is an integral component of the cell, it would be extremely difficult for tumor cells to evolve and develop resistance against this anti-tumor agent.

  3. Design of short external guide sequences (EGSs) for cleavage of target molecules with RNase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, M; Rosa, E; George, S T

    1997-01-01

    The minimal substrate for human RNase P consists of the 5' leader sequence, aminoacyl acceptor stem, T-stem and T-loop of tRNA. The sequences corresponding to the D-stem, anticodon stem and loop and variable loop are replaced by a bulge which can be as small as 1 nt, but requires > 4 nt for optimal cleavage by RNase P. We found that a trans construct in which the T loop is opened between G57 and A58 (tRNA numbering system) is still processed by RNase P. The strand that is cleaved can be considered the target RNA while the other strand serves as an External Guide Sequence (EGS). We were also able to delete the nucleotides corresponding to nt 58 to 60 in the T-loop without affecting cleavage of the substrate. We propose that the sequence UUCG or UUCA (nucleotide 55 to 57 in the T-loop) positioned 3' to a double helical region of 12 to 13 basepairs containing a bulge of > 4 nt can form a structure that is recognized by human RNase P. The four nucleotides UUCR probably form a structure that resembles the uridine turn in the Tloop of tRNA. Since recognition by RNase P seems to be independent of the helical sequence, we suggest that this motif can be used for targeting RNA molecules for EGS-directed cleavage by RNase P. Based on these results, several 13-mer EGSs targeted to the 2.1 Kb surface antigen mRNA of hepatitis B virus (HBV) were designed and tested using a co-transcriptional cleavage assay with a 2.1 Kb HBV transcript. Some of these were capable of inducing cleavage of the HBV RNA by RNase P. The use of such small EGSs for the inactivation of various genes will be discussed.

  4. Synonymous codon ordering: a subtle but prevalent strategy of bacteria to improve translational efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Qing Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In yeast coding sequences, once a particular codon has been used, subsequent occurrence of the same amino acid tends to use codons sharing the same tRNA. Such a phenomenon of co-tRNA codons pairing bias (CTCPB is also found in some other eukaryotes but it is not known whether it occurs in prokaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we focused on a total of 773 bacterial genomes to investigate their synonymous codon pairing preferences. After calculating the actual frequencies of synonymous codon pairs and comparing them with their expected values, we detected an obvious pairing bias towards identical codon pairs. This seems consistent with the previously reported CTCPB phenomenon, since identical codons are certainly read by the same tRNA. However, among co-tRNA but non-identical codon pairs, only 22 were often found overrepresented, suggesting that many co-tRNA codons actually do not preferentially pair together in prokaryotes. Therefore, the previously reported co-tRNA codons pairing rule needs to be more rigorously defined. The affinity differences between a tRNA anticodon and its readable codons should be taken into account. Moreover, both within-gene-shuffling tests and phylogenetic analyses support the idea that translational selection played an important role in shaping the observed synonymous codon pairing pattern in prokaryotes. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, a high level of synonymous codon pairing bias was detected in 73% investigated bacterial species, suggesting the synonymous codon ordering strategy has been prevalently adopted by prokaryotes to improve their translational efficiencies. The findings in this study also provide important clues to better understand the complex dynamics of translational process.

  5. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    somewhat variable , all the cultures have exhibited a sustained 2 to 4-fold elevation subsequently, similar to that seen in 8X nonessential amino acids...queuine to mice relieves modified nucleoside queuosine deficiency in Ehrlich ascites tumor tRN1A, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comnun. 96:313 (1980). TiPo ...conditions prescribed in this investigation. Although a significant elevation in saturation density was induced by TPA, some variability was observed in

  6. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    the resolution and quantitation of modified ucleosides in the urine of cancer patients would not be particularly useful for the cell culture studies...Comparison of nucleic acid catabolism by normal human fibroblasts and fibroblasts transformed with methylazoxymethyl alcohol ( MAMA ),an activated...catabolite in long-term, pulse-chase experiments. However, the kinetics of catabolism differed, in that only the MAMA -transformed cells had generated

  7. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... Author Affiliations. Richard Giegé1. Département `Machineries Traductionnelles', UPR 9002 `Architecture et Réactivité de l'ARN', Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg cedex, France ...

  8. Extensive microheterogeneity of serine tRNA genes from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, D L; Leung, J; Newton, C H; Hayashi, S; Miller, R C; Tener, G M

    1987-10-05

    The nucleotide sequences of nine genes corresponding to tRNA(Ser)4 or tRNA(Ser)7 of Drosophila melanogaster were determined. Eight of the genes compose the major tRNA(Ser)4,7 cluster at 12DE on the X chromosome, while the other is from 23E on the left arm of chromosome 2. Among the eight X-linked genes, five different, interrelated, classes of sequence were found. Four of the eight genes correspond to tRNA(Ser)4 and tRNA(Ser)7 (which are 96% homologous), two appear to result from single crossovers between tRNA(Ser)4 and tRNA(Ser)7 genes, one is an apparent double crossover product, and the last differs from a tRNA(Ser)4 gene by a single C to T transition at position 50. The single autosomal gene corresponds to tRNA(Ser)7. Comparison of a pair of genes corresponding to tRNA(Ser)4 from D. melanogaster and Drosophila simulans showed that, while gene flanking sequences may diverge considerably by accumulation of point changes, gene sequences are maintained intact. Our data indicate that recombination occurs between non-allelic tRNA(Ser) genes, and suggest that at least some recombinational events may be intergenic conversions.

  9. Molecular phylogenetics, tRNA evolution, and historical biogeography in anguid lizards and related taxonomic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, J R; Schulte, J A; Larson, A; Tuniyev, B S; Orlov, N; Papenfuss, T J

    1999-08-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among lizards of the families Anguidae, Anniellidae, Xenosauridae, and Shinisauridae are investigated using 2001 aligned bases of mitochondrial DNA sequence from the genes encoding ND1 (subunit one of NADH dehydrogenase), tRNA(Ile), tRNA(Gln), tRNA(Met), ND2, tRNA(Trp), tRNA(Ala), tRNA(Asn), tRNA(Cys), tRNA(Tyr), and COI (subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase), plus the origin for light-strand replication (O(L)) between the tRNA(Asn) and the tRNA(Cys) genes. The aligned sequences contain 1013 phylogenetically informative characters. A well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis is obtained. Because monophyly of the family Xenosauridae (Shinisaurus and Xenosaurus) is statistically rejected, we recommend placing Shinisaurus in a separate family, the Shinisauridae. The family Anniellidae and the anguid subfamilies Gerrhonotinae and Anguinae each form monophyletic groups receiving statistical support. The Diploglossinae*, which appears monophyletic, is retained as a metataxon (denoted with an asterisk) because its monophyly is statistically neither supported nor rejected. The family Anguidae appears monophyletic in analyses of the DNA sequence data, and statistical support for its monophyly is provided by reanalysis of previously published allozymic data. Anguid lizards appear to have had a northern origin in Laurasia. Taxa currently located on Gondwanan plates arrived there by dispersal from the north in two separate events, one from the West Indies to South America and another from a Laurasian plate to Morocco. Because basal anguine lineages are located in western Eurasia and Morocco, formation of the Atlantic Ocean (late Eocene) is implicated in the separation of the Anguinae from its North American sister taxon, the Gerrhonotinae. Subsequent dispersal of anguine lizards to East Asia and North America appears to have followed the Oligocene drying of the Turgai Sea. The alternative hypothesis, that anguine lizards originated in North America and dispersed to Asia via the Bering land bridge with subsequent colonization of Europe and Morocco, requires a phylogenetic tree seven steps longer than the most parsimonious hypothesis. North African, European, and West Asian anguines were isolated from others by the rapid uplift of Tibet in the late Oligocene to Miocene. Phylogenetic analysis of evolutionary changes in the gene encoding tRNA(Cys) suggests gradual reduction of dihydrouridine (D) stems by successive deletion of bases in some lineages. This evolutionary pattern contrasts with the one observed for parallel elimination of the D-stem in mitochondrial tRNAs of eight other reptile groups, in which replication slippage produces direct repeats. An unusual, enlarged TpsiC (T) stem is inferred for tRNA(Cys) in most species. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. The search for mitochondrial tRNA A3243G mutation among type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... This further search will help to fully appreciate the prevalence of maternal inheritance and diabetic deafness (MIDD) as extensively reported in other populations. Key words: Maternal diabetes, mitochondrial gene, maternal Inheritance and diabetic deafness, Nigeria, sub-. Saharan Africa. INTRODUCTION.

  11. Entrapping ribosomes for viral translation: tRNA mimicry as a molecular Trojan horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, Sharief; Bink, Hugo H J; van den Worm, Sjoerd H E; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Kraal, Barend

    2003-01-10

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) has a genomic plus-strand RNA with a 5' cap followed by overlapping and different reading frames for the movement protein and polyprotein, while the distal coat protein cistron is translated from a subgenomic RNA. The 3'-untranslated region harbors a tRNA-like structure (TLS) to which a valine moiety can be added and it is indispensable for virus viability. Here, we report about a surprising interaction between TYMV-RNA-programmed ribosomes and 3'-valylated TLS that yields polyprotein with the valine N terminally incorporated by a translation mechanism resistant to regular initiation inhibitors. Disruption of the TLS exclusively abolishes polyprotein synthesis, which can be restored by adding excess TLS in trans. Our observations imply a novel eukaryotic mechanism for internal initiation of mRNA translation.

  12. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-10-07

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation.

  13. Chemical and Conformational Diversity of Modified Nucleosides Affects tRNA Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Y. P. Väre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNAs are central to all gene expression through the control of protein synthesis. Four major nucleosides, adenosine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine, compose RNAs and provide sequence variation, but are limited in contributions to structural variation as well as distinct chemical properties. The ability of RNAs to play multiple roles in cellular metabolism is made possible by extensive variation in length, conformational dynamics, and the over 100 post-transcriptional modifications. There are several reviews of the biochemical pathways leading to RNA modification, but the physicochemical nature of modified nucleosides and how they facilitate RNA function is of keen interest, particularly with regard to the contributions of modified nucleosides. Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are the most extensively modified RNAs. The diversity of modifications provide versatility to the chemical and structural environments. The added chemistry, conformation and dynamics of modified nucleosides occurring at the termini of stems in tRNA’s cloverleaf secondary structure affect the global three-dimensional conformation, produce unique recognition determinants for macromolecules to recognize tRNAs, and affect the accurate and efficient decoding ability of tRNAs. This review will discuss the impact of specific chemical moieties on the structure, stability, electrochemical properties, and function of tRNAs.

  14. The search for mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) A3243G mutation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to compare the incidence of the pathogenic point mutation A3243G in the gene tRNALeu(UUR) indicating sub-type 2 diabetes mellitus conducted within the Nigerian population with that reported in other populations. 112 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus according to the World Health ...

  15. tRNA and Its Activation Targets as Biomarkers and Regulators of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Dev 18: 1227–1240. Kadaba S, Wang X, Anderson JT. 2006. Nuclear RNA surveillance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : Trf4p-dependent polyadenylation of na...1× medium (Thermo Scientific HyClone) supplemented with 10% FBS and 1% Penicillin/Streptomycin. To generate stable cell lines, cells were transfected...using Amaxa Nucleofector technology (LonzaBio). After 48 h, medium was sup- plemented with 500 μg/mL G418 (Sigma) for selection. After 2–4 wk, G418

  16. Cytonuclear Interactions in the Evolution of Animal Mitochondrial tRNA Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of mitochondrial information processing pathways, including replication, transcription and translation, is characterized by the gradual replacement of mitochondrial-encoded proteins with nuclear-encoded counterparts of diverse evolutionary origins. Although the ancestral enzymes involved in mitochondrial transcription and replication have been replaced early in eukaryotic evolution, mitochondrial translation is still carried out by an apparatus largely inherited from the α-proteobacterial ancestor. However, variation in the complement of mitochondrial-encoded molecules involved in translation, including transfer RNAs (tRNAs), provides evidence for the ongoing evolution of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we investigate the evolution of the mitochondrial translational machinery using recent genomic and transcriptomic data from animals that have experienced the loss of mt-tRNAs, including phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora, as well as some representatives of all four classes of Porifera. We focus on four sets of mitochondrial enzymes that directly interact with tRNAs: Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase, tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase, and RNase P. Our results support the observation that the fate of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins is influenced by the evolution of molecules encoded in mitochondrial DNA, but in a more complex manner than appreciated previously. The data also suggest that relaxed selection on mitochondrial translation rather than coevolution between mitochondrial and nuclear subunits is responsible for elevated rates of evolution in mitochondrial translational proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. How Old is the Genetic Code? Statistical Geometry of tRNA Provides an Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, Manfred; Lindemann, Bjorn F.; Tietze, Manfred; Winkler-Oswatitsch, Ruthild; Dress, Andreas; von Haeseler, Arndt

    1989-05-01

    The age of the molecular organization of life as expressed in the genetic code can be estimated from experimental data. Comparative sequence analysis of transfer RNA by the method of statistical geometry in sequence space suggests that about one-third of the present transfer RNA sequence divergence was present at the urkingdom level about the time when archaebacteria separated from eubacteria. It is concluded that the genetic code is not older than, but almost as old as our planet. While this result may not be unexpected, it was not clear until now that interpretable data exist that permit inferences about such early stages of life as the establishment of the genetic code.

  18. Structural context for mobilization of a human tRNA synthetase from its cytoplasmic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Pengfei; Zhang, Hui-Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Marshall, Alan G; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Guo, Min

    2011-05-17

    Human lysyl-tRNA synthetase is bound to the multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) that maintains and regulates the aminoacylation and nuclear functions of LysRS. The p38 scaffold protein binds LysRS to the MSC and, only with the appropriate cue, mobilizes LysRS for redirection to the nucleus to interact with the microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). In recent work, an (α(2))(2) LysRS tetramer crystallized to yield a high-resolution structure and raised the question of how LysRS is arranged (dimer or tetramer) in the MSC to interact with p38. To understand the structural organization of the LysRS-p38 complex that regulates LysRS mobilization, we investigated the complex by use of small angle X-ray scattering and hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry in solution. The structure revealed a surprising α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2) organization in which a dimeric p38 scaffold holds two LysRS α(2) dimers in a parallel configuration. Each of the N-terminal 48 residues of p38 binds one LysRS dimer and, in so doing, brings two copies of the LysRS dimer into the MSC. The results suggest that this unique geometry, which reconfigures the LysRS tetramer from α(2):α(2) to α(2)β(1):β(1)α(2), is designed to control both retention and mobilization of LysRS from the MSC.

  19. Protein degradation and dynamic tRNA thiolation fine-tune translation at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kshitiz; Pedrioli, Patrick G A

    2015-05-19

    Maintenance of protein quality control has implications in various processes such as neurodegeneration and ageing. To investigate how environmental insults affect this process, we analysed the proteome of yeast continuously exposed to mild heat stress. In agreement with previous transcriptomics studies, amongst the most marked changes, we found up-regulation of cytoprotective factors; a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to fermentation; and down-regulation of translation. Importantly, we also identified a novel, post-translationally controlled, component of the heat shock response. The abundance of Ncs2p and Ncs6p, two members of the URM1 pathway responsible for the thiolation of wobble uridines in cytoplasmic tRNAs tK(UUU), tQ(UUG) and tE(UUC), is down-regulated in a proteasomal dependent fashion. Using random forests we show that this results in differential translation of transcripts with a biased content for the corresponding codons. We propose that the role of this pathway in promoting catabolic and inhibiting anabolic processes, affords cells with additional time and resources needed to attain proper protein folding under periods of stress. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Descripción del ARN de transferencia mitocondrial para Serina (UCN de Lutzomyia columbiana (Diptera, Psychodidae Description of the mitochondrial serine transfer RNA (UCN of Lutzomyia columbiana (Diptera, Psychodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alveiro Pérez-Doria

    2008-01-01

    putative secondary structure of the mitochondrial serine transfer RNA that recognizes the codon UCN of Lu. columbiana (tRNA Ser. DNA was extracted, amplified and sequenced from six individuals collected in human biting activity. The secondary structure of the tRNA Ser was inferred using the program tRNAscan-SE 1.21. The tRNA Ser gene length was 67 pair of bases (pb, and a single haplotype was detected among the six specimens sequenced. In the inferred secondary structure of the tRNA Ser of Lu. columbiana, the acceptor arm consisted of 7 bp, the dihydrouridine (DHU arm of 3 pb, the anticodon arm of 5 pb, and the ribothymidine-pseudouridine-cytosine (TøC arm of 5 pb. Similarity, the estimated size of the loops was 5 nucleotides in the DHU, 7 in the anticodon, 4 in the variable, and 7 in the TøC. Lu. columbiana differs from other Lutzomyia and Phlebotomus species sequenced to date by the presence of guanine in the nucleotide position 64, which induce a non-canonical base pair conformation type uracil-guanine in the acceptor arm. More studies are necessary to confirm the usefulness of the tRNA Ser as a suitable molecular tool for sand fly species identification.

  1. Human tRNALys3UUU is Pre-Structured by Natural Modifications for Cognate and Wobble Codon Binding through Keto-EnolTautomerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendeix, Franck A. P.; Murphy, Frank V.; Cantara, William A.; Leszczyńska, Grażyna; Gustilo, Estella M.; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Human tRNALys3UUU (htRNALys3UUU) decodes the lysine codons AAA and AAG during translation, and also plays a crucial role as the primer for HIV-1 reverse transcription. The post-transcriptional modifications 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U34), 2-methylthio-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ms2t6A37)and pseudouridine (ψ39) in the tRNA'santicodon loop are critical for ribosomal binding and HIV-1 reverse transcription. To understand the importance of modified nucleoside contributions, the structure and function of this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop domain were determined with these modifications at positions 34, 37 and 39, respectively (hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U37;ms2t6A37;ψ39). Ribosome binding assays in vitrorevealed that the hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A37;ψ39bound AAA and AAG codons, whereas binding of the unmodified ASLLys3UUU was barely detectable. The UV hyperchromicity, the circular dichroism and the structural analyses indicated that ψ39 enhanced the thermodynamic stability of the ASL through base stacking while ms2t6A37 restrained the anticodon to adopt an open loop conformation that is required for ribosomal binding. The NMR-restrained molecular dynamics derived solution structure revealed that the modifications provided an open, ordered loop for codon binding. The crystal structures of the hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A37;ψ39 bound to the 30S ribosomal subunit with each codon in the A site showed that the modified nucleotides mcm5s2U34 and ms2t6A37 participate in the stability of the anticodon/codon interaction. Importantly, the mcm5s2U34•G3 wobble base pair is in the Watson-Crick geometry, requiring unusual hydrogen bonding to G in which mcm5s2U34 must shift from the keto to enol form. The results unambiguously demonstrate that modifications pre-structurethe anticodonas a key prerequisite for efficient and accurate recognition of cognate and wobble codons. PMID:22227389

  2. The Australian fresh water isopod (Phreatoicidea: Isopoda) allows insights into the early mitogenomic evolution of isopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpert, Fabian; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2010-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of the Australian fresh water isopod Eophreatoicus sp.-14 has been determined. The new species is a member of the taxon Phreatoicidea, a clade of particular interest, as it is often regarded as the sister group to all other Isopoda. Although the overall genome organization of Eophreatoicus sp.-14 conforms to the typical state of Metazoa--it is a circular ring of DNA hosting the usual 37 genes and one major non-coding region--it bears a number of derived characters that fall within the scope of "genome morphology". Earlier studies have indicated that the isopod mitochondrial gene order is not as conserved as that of other crustaceans. Indeed, the mt genome of Eophreatoicus sp.-14 shows an inversion of seven genes (including cox1), which is as far as we know unique. Even more interesting is the derived arrangement of nad1, trnL(CUN), rrnS, control region, cob, trnT, nad5 and trnF that is shared by nearly all available isopod mt genomes. A striking feature is the close proximity of the rearranged genes to the mt control region. Inferable gene translocation events are, however, more suitable to trace the evolution of mt genomes. Genes like nad1/trnL(CUN) and nad5/trnF, which retained their adjacent position after being rearranged, were most likely translocated together. A very good example for the need to understand the mechanisms of translocations is the remolding of trnL(UUR) to trnL(CUN). Both tRNA genes are adjacent and have a high sequence similarity, probably the result of a gene duplication and subsequent anticodon mutation. Modified secondary structures were found in three tRNAs of Eophreatoicus sp.-14, which are all characterized by the loss of the DHU-arm. This is common to crustaceans for tRNA Serine(AGY), while the arm-loss in tRNA Cysteine within Malacostraca is only shared by other isopods. Modification of the third tRNA, Isoleucine, is not known from any other related species. Nucleotide frequencies of

  3. A semi-synthetic organism that stores and retrieves increased genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yorke; Ptacin, Jerod L; Fischer, Emil C; Aerni, Hans R; Caffaro, Carolina E; San Jose, Kristine; Feldman, Aaron W; Turner, Court R; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2017-11-29

    Since at least the last common ancestor of all life on Earth, genetic information has been stored in a four-letter alphabet that is propagated and retrieved by the formation of two base pairs. The central goal of synthetic biology is to create new life forms and functions, and the most general route to this goal is the creation of semi-synthetic organisms whose DNA harbours two additional letters that form a third, unnatural base pair. Previous efforts to generate such semi-synthetic organisms culminated in the creation of a strain of Escherichia coli that, by virtue of a nucleoside triphosphate transporter from Phaeodactylum tricornutum, imports the requisite unnatural triphosphates from its medium and then uses them to replicate a plasmid containing the unnatural base pair dNaM-dTPT3. Although the semi-synthetic organism stores increased information when compared to natural organisms, retrieval of the information requires in vivo transcription of the unnatural base pair into mRNA and tRNA, aminoacylation of the tRNA with a non-canonical amino acid, and efficient participation of the unnatural base pair in decoding at the ribosome. Here we report the in vivo transcription of DNA containing dNaM and dTPT3 into mRNAs with two different unnatural codons and tRNAs with cognate unnatural anticodons, and their efficient decoding at the ribosome to direct the site-specific incorporation of natural or non-canonical amino acids into superfolder green fluorescent protein. The results demonstrate that interactions other than hydrogen bonding can contribute to every step of information storage and retrieval. The resulting semi-synthetic organism both encodes and retrieves increased information and should serve as a platform for the creation of new life forms and functions.

  4. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1 (FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA1831GUA1834G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG1831GUG1834G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG1831GUG1834G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites in F. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69 PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs. PUK1 orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides. Furthermore, F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing in F. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  5. Predicting the Minimal Translation Apparatus: Lessons from the Reductive Evolution of Mollicutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Tardy, Florence; Thiaucourt, François; Citti, Christine; Barré, Aurélien; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Fourmy, Dominique; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Blanchard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Mollicutes is a class of parasitic bacteria that have evolved from a common Firmicutes ancestor mostly by massive genome reduction. With genomes under 1 Mbp in size, most Mollicutes species retain the capacity to replicate and grow autonomously. The major goal of this work was to identify the minimal set of proteins that can sustain ribosome biogenesis and translation of the genetic code in these bacteria. Using the experimentally validated genes from the model bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as input, genes encoding proteins of the core translation machinery were predicted in 39 distinct Mollicutes species, 33 of which are culturable. The set of 260 input genes encodes proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, tRNA maturation and aminoacylation, as well as proteins cofactors required for mRNA translation and RNA decay. A core set of 104 of these proteins is found in all species analyzed. Genes encoding proteins involved in post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins and translation cofactors, post-transcriptional modifications of t+rRNA, in ribosome assembly and RNA degradation are the most frequently lost. As expected, genes coding for aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, ribosomal proteins and initiation, elongation and termination factors are the most persistent (i.e. conserved in a majority of genomes). Enzymes introducing nucleotides modifications in the anticodon loop of tRNA, in helix 44 of 16S rRNA and in helices 69 and 80 of 23S rRNA, all essential for decoding and facilitating peptidyl transfer, are maintained in all species. Reconstruction of genome evolution in Mollicutes revealed that, beside many gene losses, occasional gains by horizontal gene transfer also occurred. This analysis not only showed that slightly different solutions for preserving a functional, albeit minimal, protein synthetizing machinery have emerged in these successive rounds of reductive evolution but also has broad implications in guiding the reconstruction of a

  6. Horizontal transfer of archaeal genes into the deinococcaceae: detection by molecular and computer-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendzenski, L.; Liu, L.; Zhaxybayeva, O.; Murphey, R.; Shin, D. G.; Gogarten, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the Deinococcaceae (e.g., Thermus, Meiothermus, Deinococcus) contain A/V-ATPases typically found in Archaea or Eukaryotes which were probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Two methods were used to quantify the extent to which archaeal or eukaryotic genes have been acquired by this lineage. Screening of a Meiothermus ruber library with probes made against Thermoplasma acidophilum DNA yielded a number of clones which hybridized more strongly than background. One of these contained the prolyl tRNA synthetase (RS) gene. Phylogenetic analysis shows the M. ruber and D. radiodurans prolyl RS to be more closely related to archaeal and eukaryal forms of this gene than to the typical bacterial type. Using a bioinformatics approach, putative open reading frames (ORFs) from the prerelease version of the D. radiodurans genome were screened for genes more closely related to archaeal or eukaryotic genes. Putative ORFs were searched against representative genomes from each of the three domains using automated BLAST. ORFs showing the highest matches against archaeal and eukaryotic genes were collected and ranked. Among the top-ranked hits were the A/V-ATPase catalytic and noncatalytic subunits and the prolyl RS genes. Using phylogenetic methods, ORFs were analyzed and trees assessed for evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Of the 45 genes examined, 20 showed topologies in which D. radiodurans homologues clearly group with eukaryotic or archaeal homologues, and 17 additional trees were found to show probable evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Compared to the total number of ORFs in the genome, those that can be identified as having been acquired from Archaea or Eukaryotes are relatively few (approximately 1%), suggesting that interdomain transfer is rare.

  7. [Sequencing and analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of Podoces hendersoni (Ave, Corvidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yang; Huang, Yuan; Lei, Fu-Min

    2010-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of a China endemic bird, Podoces hendersoni, was sequenced using La-PCR and conserved primer walking approaches. The mtDNA seqnence is 16 867 bp in length and deposited in GenBank with accession number GU592504. The mitochondrial genomic organization of P. hendersoni is the same with that in chicken, which contains 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA, and a control region. Except for COI gene, which uses GTG as the initiation codon, all other 12 PCGs of the P. hendersoni mtDNA start with the typical ATG codon. Codons TAA, AGG, and AGA were used in 11 PCGs as usual termination codons; however, the COIII and ND4 had incomplete termination codon T. The secondary structures of 20 tRNAs formed typical cloverleaf, except for tRNASer (AGY) that had an absence of the DHU arm and tRNALeu (CUN) in which anticodon-loop consisted of 9 bases, rather than the standard 7 bases. The secondary structures of rRNA were predicted. There are 4 domains, 43 helices structures in 12S rRNA, and 6 domains, 55 helices structures in 16S rRNA. Besides, F-box, D-box, C-box, B-box, Bird similarity-box and CSB1-box, which were found in the control region of other birds, also existed in the P. hendersoni.

  8. The Queuine Micronutrient: Charting a Course from Microbe to Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Fergus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients from the diet and gut microbiota are essential to human health and wellbeing. Arguably, among the most intriguing and enigmatic of these micronutrients is queuine, an elaborate 7-deazaguanine derivative made exclusively by eubacteria and salvaged by animal, plant and fungal species. In eubacteria and eukaryotes, queuine is found as the sugar nucleotide queuosine within the anticodon loop of transfer RNA isoacceptors for the amino acids tyrosine, asparagine, aspartic acid and histidine. The physiological requirement for the ancient queuine molecule and queuosine modified transfer RNA has been the subject of varied scientific interrogations for over four decades, establishing relationships to development, proliferation, metabolism, cancer, and tyrosine biosynthesis in eukaryotes and to invasion and proliferation in pathogenic bacteria, in addition to ribosomal frameshifting in viruses. These varied effects may be rationalized by an important, if ill-defined, contribution to protein translation or may manifest from other presently unidentified mechanisms. This article will examine the current understanding of queuine uptake, tRNA incorporation and salvage by eukaryotic organisms and consider some of the physiological consequence arising from deficiency in this elusive and lesser-recognized micronutrient.

  9. Asymmetric structure of five and six membered DNA hairpin loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, U.; Chang, S.

    1995-01-01

    The tertiary structure of nucleic acid hairpins was elucidated by means of the accessibility of the single-strand-specific nuclease from mung bean. This molecular probe has proven especially useful in determining details of the structural arrangement of the nucleotides within a loop. In this study 3'-labeling is introduced to complement previously used 5'-labeling in order to assess and to exclude possible artifacts of the method. Both labeling procedures result in mutually consistent cleavage patterns. Therefore, methodological artifacts can be excluded and the potential of the nuclease as structural probe is increased. DNA hairpins with five and six membered loops reveal an asymmetric loop structure with a sharp bend of the phosphate-ribose backbone between the second and third nucleotide on the 3'-side of a loop. These hairpin structures differ from smaller loops with 3 or 4 members, which reveal this type of bend between the first and second 3' nucleotide, and resemble with respect to the asymmetry anticodon loops of tRNA.

  10. Kinetics of Ribosome-Catalyzed Polymerization Using Artificial Aminoacyl-tRNA Substrates Clarifies Inefficiencies and Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfan; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Forster, Anthony C

    2015-10-16

    Ribosomal synthesis of polymers of unnatural amino acids (AAs) is limited by low incorporation efficiencies using the artificial AA-tRNAs, but the kinetics have yet to be studied. Here, kinetics were performed on five consecutive incorporations using various artificial AA-tRNAs with all intermediate products being analyzed. Yields within a few seconds displayed similar trends to our prior yields after 30 min without preincubation, demonstrating the relevance of fast kinetics to traditional long-incubation translations. Interestingly, the two anticodon swaps were much less inhibitory in the present optimized system, which should allow more flexibility in the engineering of artificial AA-tRNAs. The biggest kinetic defect was caused by the penultimate dC introduced from the standard, chemoenzymatic, charging method. This prompted peptidyl-tRNA drop-off, decreasing processivities during five consecutive AA incorporations. Indeed, two tRNA charging methods that circumvented the dC dramatically improved efficiencies of ribosomal, consecutive, unnatural AA incorporations to give near wild-type kinetics.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the large-headed frog, Limnonectes bannaensis (Amphibia: Anura), and a novel gene organization in the vertebrate mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Feng; Nie, Liu-Wang; Wang, Yang; Hu, Li-Li

    2009-08-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the large-headed frog, Limnonectes bannaensis (Amphibia, Anura) by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The entire mtDNA sequence is 16,867 bp in length with a novel case of tRNAs in vertebrates. This mt genome is characterized by three distinctive features: (1) a tandem duplication of tRNA(Met) gene is observed, (2) the tRNA(Ala), tRNA(Asn), tRNA(Cys) and tRNA(Glu) genes coded on the L-strand are absent from the L. bannaensis mtDNA, the tRNA(Cys) and tRNA(Glu) genes change into tRNA pseudogenes by reason of degenerative anticodon, and a noncoding sequence of 206 nt long (NC1) has replaced the original position of other two tRNAs, (3) besides NC1, another three noncoding spacers (NC2-4) longer than 50 bp are found in the broken WANCY region and the region NC3-ND5-NC4-ND6-PsiE-Cytb-CR of the new sequence. These features could be explained by a model of gene duplication and deletion. The new sequence data was used to assess the phylogenetic relationships among 25 species of Anura using neighbor-joining, Bayesian, and maximum likelihood methods, and the phylogenetic tree shows the rice frog Fejervarya limnocharis is closest to L. bannaensis in the study.

  12. Evidence for the horizontal transfer of an integrase gene from a fusellovirus to a pRN-like plasmid within a single strain of Sulfolobus and the implications for plasmid survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu

    2008-01-01

    seven ORFs, three of which encode an atypical RepA, a PlrA and a CopG protein. A fourth ORF exhibits a high nucleotide sequence identity to the SSV4 integrase gene, which suggests that it has been transferred to the plasmid from SSV4. A single point mutation within an otherwise identical 500 bp region...... infectivity. The virus and plasmid carry genomes of 15 135 and 6970 bp, respectively. For SSV4, 33 predicted ORFs are compactly organized with a strong preference for UGA stop codons, three-quarters of which overlap with either the Shine-Dalgarno motif or the start codon of the following gene. pXZ1 carries...... of the integrase gene occurs in the viral attachment site (attP), which corresponds to the anticodon region of the targeted tRNA gene in the host chromosome. This point mutation confers on pXZ1 the ability to integrate into the tRNA(Glu)[CUC] gene, which differs from the integration site of SSV4, t...

  13. What RNA World? Why a Peptide/RNA Partnership Merits Renewed Experimental Attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Carter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We review arguments that biology emerged from a reciprocal partnership in which small ancestral oligopeptides and oligonucleotides initially both contributed rudimentary information coding and catalytic rate accelerations, and that the superior information-bearing qualities of RNA and the superior catalytic potential of proteins emerged from such complexes only with the gradual invention of the genetic code. A coherent structural basis for that scenario was articulated nearly a decade before the demonstration of catalytic RNA. Parallel hierarchical catalytic repertoires for increasingly highly conserved sequences from the two synthetase classes now increase the likelihood that they arose as translation products from opposite strands of a single gene. Sense/antisense coding affords a new bioinformatic metric for phylogenetic relationships much more distant than can be reconstructed from multiple sequence alignments of a single superfamily. Evidence for distinct coding properties in tRNA acceptor stems and anticodons, and experimental demonstration that the two synthetase family ATP binding sites can indeed be coded by opposite strands of the same gene supplement these biochemical and bioinformatic data, establishing a solid basis for key intermediates on a path from simple, stereochemically coded, reciprocally catalytic peptide/RNA complexes through the earliest peptide catalysts to contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. That scenario documents a path to increasing complexity that obviates the need for a single polymer to act both catalytically and as an informational molecule.

  14. A genetic code alteration is a phenotype diversity generator in the human pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The discovery of genetic code alterations and expansions in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes abolished the hypothesis of a frozen and universal genetic code and exposed unanticipated flexibility in codon and amino acid assignments. It is now clear that codon identity alterations involve sense and non-sense codons and can occur in organisms with complex genomes and proteomes. However, the biological functions, the molecular mechanisms of evolution and the diversity of genetic code alterations remain largely unknown. In various species of the genus Candida, the leucine CUG codon is decoded as serine by a unique serine tRNA that contains a leucine 5'-CAG-3'anticodon (tRNA(CAG(Ser. We are using this codon identity redefinition as a model system to elucidate the evolution of genetic code alterations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have reconstructed the early stages of the Candida genetic code alteration by engineering tRNAs that partially reverted the identity of serine CUG codons back to their standard leucine meaning. Such genetic code manipulation had profound cellular consequences as it exposed important morphological variation, altered gene expression, re-arranged the karyotype, increased cell-cell adhesion and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides the first experimental evidence for an important role of genetic code alterations as generators of phenotypic diversity of high selective potential and supports the hypothesis that they speed up evolution of new phenotypes.

  15. Parallel evolution of the genetic code in arthropod mitochondrial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Abascal

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code provides the translation table necessary to transform the information contained in DNA into the language of proteins. In this table, a correspondence between each codon and each amino acid is established: tRNA is the main adaptor that links the two. Although the genetic code is nearly universal, several variants of this code have been described in a wide range of nuclear and organellar systems, especially in metazoan mitochondria. These variants are generally found by searching for conserved positions that consistently code for a specific alternative amino acid in a new species. We have devised an accurate computational method to automate these comparisons, and have tested it with 626 metazoan mitochondrial genomes. Our results indicate that several arthropods have a new genetic code and translate the codon AGG as lysine instead of serine (as in the invertebrate mitochondrial genetic code or arginine (as in the standard genetic code. We have investigated the evolution of the genetic code in the arthropods and found several events of parallel evolution in which the AGG codon was reassigned between serine and lysine. Our analyses also revealed correlated evolution between the arthropod genetic codes and the tRNA-Lys/-Ser, which show specific point mutations at the anticodons. These rather simple mutations, together with a low usage of the AGG codon, might explain the recurrence of the AGG reassignments.

  16. Mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR)C3275T, tRNAGlnT4363C and tRNALysA8343G mutations may be associated with PCOS and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Xia, Bo-Hou; Zhang, Cai-Juan; Zhuo, Guang-Chao

    2018-02-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a very prevalent endocrine disease affecting reproductive women. Clinically, patients with this disorder are more vulnerable to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular events, as well as metabolic syndrome (MetS). To date, the molecular mechanism underlying PCOS remains largely unknown. Previously, we showed that mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation was an important cause for PCOS. In the current study, we described the clinical and biochemical features of a three-generation pedigree with maternally transmitted MetS, combined with PCOS. A total of three matrilineal relatives exhibited MetS including obesity, high triglyceride (TG) and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, and hypertension. Whereas one patient from the third generation manifestated PCOS. Mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial genes from the affected individuals identified a set of genetic variations belonging to East Asia haplogroup B4b1c. Among these variants, the homoplasmic C3275T mutation disrupted a highly evolutionary conserved base-pairing (28A-46C) on the variable region of tRNA Leu(UUR) , whereas the T4363C mutation created a new base-pairing (31T-37A) in the anticodon stem of tRNA Gln , furthermore, the A8343G mutation occurred at the very conserved position of tRNA Lys and may result the failure in mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) metabolism. Biochemical analysis revealed the deficiency in mitochondrial functions including lower levels of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), ATP production and mtDNA copy number, while a significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in polymononuclear leukocytes (PMNs) from the individuals carrying these mt-tRNA mutations, suggesting that these mutations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction that was responsible for the clinical phenotypes. Taken together, our data indicated that mt-tRNA mutations were associated with MetS and PCOS in this

  17. A genomically modified Escherichia coli strain carrying an orthogonal E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase•tRNAHispair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Markus; Vargas-Rodriguez, Oscar; Reynolds, Noah M; Wang, Yane-Shih; Söll, Dieter; Umehara, Takuya

    2017-11-01

    Development of new aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS)•tRNA pairs is central for incorporation of novel non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins via genetic code expansion (GCE). The Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus histidyl-tRNA synthetases (HisRS) evolved divergent mechanisms of tRNA His recognition that prevent their cross-reactivity. Although the E. coli HisRS•tRNA His pair is a good candidate for GCE, its use in C. crescentus is limited by the lack of established genetic selection methods and by the low transformation efficiency of C. crescentus. E. coli was genetically engineered to use a C. crescentus HisRS•tRNA His pair. Super-folder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were used as reporters for read-through assays. A library of 313 ncAAs coupled with the sfGFP reporter system was employed to investigate the specificity of E. coli HisRS in vivo. A genomically modified E. coli strain (named MEOV1) was created. MEVO1 requires an active C. crescentus HisRS•tRNA His pair for growth, and displays a similar doubling time as the parental E. coli strain. sfGFP- and CAT-based assays showed that the E. coli HisRS•tRNA His pair is orthogonal in MEOV1 cells. A mutation in the anticodon loop of E. coli tRNA His CUA elevated its suppression efficiency by 2-fold. The C. crescentus HisRS•tRNA His pair functionally complements an E. coli ΔhisS strain. The E. coli HisRS•tRNA His is orthogonal in MEOV1 cells. E. coli tRNA His CUA is an efficient amber suppressor in MEOV1. We developed a platform that allows protein engineering of E. coli HisRS that should facilitate GCE in E. coli. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA genes are hotspots for mutations in a cohort of patients with exercise intolerance and mitochondrial myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Zhao, D.; Yao, S.; Wu, S.; Hong, D.; Wang, Q.; Liu, J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Yuan, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial myopathy (MM) is a relatively rare type of mitochondrial disorder characterized by predominant skeletal muscle involvement. Both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutations have been reported as the genetic causes of this disease. Here, we described the

  19. Syntheses of stable, synthetic diadenosine polyphosphate analogues using recombinant histidine-tagged lysyl tRNA synthetase (LysU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael; Azhar, M Ameruddin; Kamal, Ahmed; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-05-15

    Recombinant Escherichia coli lysyl-tRNA synthase (LysU) has been previously utilised in the production of stabile, synthetic diadenosine polyphosphate (ApnA) analogues. Here we report on the extended use of a new recombinant histidine residue-tagged LysU as a tool for highly controlled phosphatephosphate bond formation between nucleotides, avoiding the need for complex protecting group chemistries. Resulting high yielding tandem LysU-based biosynthetic-synthetic/synthetic-biosynthetic strategies emerge for the preparation of varieties of ApnA analogues directly from inexpensive natural nucleotides and nucleosides. Analogues so formed make a useful small library with which to probe ApnA activities in vitro and in vivo leading to the discovery of new, potentially potent biopharmaceuticals active against chronic pain and other chronic, high-burden disease states. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Facile synthesis of N-acyl-aminoacyl-pCpA for preparation of mischarged fully ribo tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Marek; Wang, Jinfan; Forster, Anthony C

    2014-11-19

    Chemical synthesis of N-acyl-aminoacyl-pdCpA and its ligation to tRNA(minus CA) is widely used for the preparation of unnatural aminoacyl-tRNA substrates for ribosomal translation. However, the presence of the unnatural deoxyribose can decrease incorporation yield in translation and there is no straightforward method for chemical synthesis of the natural ribo version. Here, we show that pCpA is surprisingly stable to treatment with strong organic bases provided that anhydrous conditions are used. This allowed development of a facile method for chemical aminoacylation of pCpA. Preparative synthesis of pCpA was also simplified by using t-butyl-dithiomethyl protecting group methodology, and a more reliable pCpA postpurification treatment method was developed. Such aminoacyl-pCpA analogues ligated to tRNA(minus CA) transcripts are highly active in a purified translation system, demonstrating utility of our synthetic method.

  1. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the conventional AAtRS, through closely related paralogous AAtRS dedicated to certain pathways, to highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domain like the CDPSs. Both the conventional AAtRS and their closely related paralogs often provide aminoacylated tRNAs for peptide ligations by MprF/Fem/MurM-type acetyltransferase fold ligases in the synthesis of peptidoglycan, N-end rule modifications of proteins, lipid aminoacylation or biosynthesis of antibiotics, such as valinamycin. Alternatively they might supply aminoacylated tRNAs for other biosynthetic pathways like that for tetrapyrrole or directly function as peptide ligases as in the case of mycothiol and those identified here. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Andrei Osterman and Igor Zhulin.

  2. Queuine-containing isoacceptor of tyrosine tRNA in Drosophila melanogaster - alteration of levels by divalent cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, N.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Owenby, R.K.; Jacobson, K.B.; Hiatt, V.S.; Farkas, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Dietary cadmium causes the queuine-containing, Q(+), isoacceptors to increase relative to the guanine-containing, Q(-), ones of tRNA/sup Tyr/, tRNA/sup His/ and tRNA/sup Asp/ of Drosophila melanogaster. Of the other divalent cations examined, Sr/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Cu/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/, only Hg/sup 2 +/ failed to cause an increase in Q(+)tRNA/sup Tyr/. For these results, all pre-adult stages of the organism were spent on media containing the divalent ions. Adult flies that had developed on a normal diet also responded to divalent ions; Hg/sup 2 +/ as well as Cd/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/ and Zn/sup 2 +/ caused an increase in Q(+)tRNA/sup Tyr/ in 4 days. Using adult flies, the rate of the response was measured; when placed on a Cd/sup 2 +/ -containing diet, they formed significantly more Q(+)tRNA/sup Tyr/ within 24 h as compared to adults on a normal diet. Whether the queuine is derived from the diet or from de novo synthesis is yet to be determined. Since the metal ions represent a range of values in the 'hard-soft' classification, different sites of reaction are expected, yet for Drosophila a common result is an alteration in the ratio of Q(+) and Q(-) isoacceptors of these tRNAs. The transition to Q(+)tRNA may be an early indication of the metabolic imbalances resulting from the presence of the divalent cation.

  3. On-enzyme refolding permits small RNA and tRNA surveillance by the CCA-adding enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Claus-D; Wilusz, Jeremy E; Zheng, Yuxuan; Beal, Peter A; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2015-02-12

    Transcription in eukaryotes produces a number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Two of these, MALAT1 and Menβ, generate a tRNA-like small RNA in addition to the mature lncRNA. The stability of these tRNA-like small RNAs and bona fide tRNAs is monitored by the CCA-adding enzyme. Whereas CCA is added to stable tRNAs and tRNA-like transcripts, a second CCA repeat is added to certain unstable transcripts to initiate their degradation. Here, we characterize how these two scenarios are distinguished. Following the first CCA addition cycle, nucleotide binding to the active site triggers a clockwise screw motion, producing torque on the RNA. This ejects stable RNAs, whereas unstable RNAs are refolded while bound to the enzyme and subjected to a second CCA catalytic cycle. Intriguingly, with the CCA-adding enzyme acting as a molecular vise, the RNAs proofread themselves through differential responses to its interrogation between stable and unstable substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of upstream sequences in selecting the reading frame on tmRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewey Jonathan D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background tmRNA acts first as a tRNA and then as an mRNA to rescue stalled ribosomes in eubacteria. Two unanswered questions about tmRNA function remain: how does tmRNA, lacking an anticodon, bypass the decoding machinery and enter the ribosome? Secondly, how does the ribosome choose the proper codon to resume translation on tmRNA? According to the -1 triplet hypothesis, the answer to both questions lies in the unique properties of the three nucleotides upstream of the first tmRNA codon. These nucleotides assume an A-form conformation that mimics the codon-anticodon interaction, leading to recognition by the decoding center and choice of the reading frame. The -1 triplet hypothesis is important because it is the most credible model in which direct binding and recognition by the ribosome sets the reading frame on tmRNA. Results Conformational analysis predicts that 18 triplets cannot form the correct structure to function as the -1 triplet of tmRNA. We tested the tmRNA activity of all possible -1 triplet mutants using a genetic assay in Escherichia coli. While many mutants displayed reduced activity, our findings do not match the predictions of this model. Additional mutagenesis identified sequences further upstream that are required for tmRNA function. An immunoblot assay for translation of the tmRNA tag revealed that certain mutations in U85, A86, and the -1 triplet sequence result in improper selection of the first codon and translation in the wrong frame (-1 or +1 in vivo. Conclusion Our findings disprove the -1 triplet hypothesis. The -1 triplet is not required for accommodation of tmRNA into the ribosome, although it plays a minor role in frame selection. Our results strongly disfavor direct ribosomal recognition of the upstream sequence, instead supporting a model in which the binding of a separate ligand to A86 is primarily responsible for frame selection.

  5. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniewicz Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed.

  6. The novel A4435G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNAMet may modulate the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated ND4 G11778A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jia; Li, Ronghua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Tong, Yi; Lu, Fan; Qian, Yaping; Hu, Yongwu; Mo, Jun Qin; West, Constance E; Guan, Min-Xin

    2006-02-01

    To investigating the role of mitochondrial haplotypes in the development of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) associated with the ND4 G11778A mutation in Chinese families. A three-generation Chinese family with LHON was studied by clinical and genetic evaluation as well as molecular and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial (mt)DNA. This family exhibits a high penetrance and expressivity of visual impairment. The average age at onset was 13.9 years in this family. Of the family members, 86% of the male and 29% of the female matrilineal relatives had visual loss, with a wide range of severity, from blindness to nearly normal vision. Molecular analysis of mtDNA identified the homoplasmic ND4 G11778A mutation and 35 other variants, belonging to the Asian haplogroup D5. Of other variants, the novel homoplasmic A4435G mutation absent in 164 Chinese controls is localized at 3' end adjacent to the anticodon, at conventional position 37 (A37), of tRNAMet. The adenine (A37) at this position of tRNAMet is extraordinarily conserved from bacteria to human mitochondria. This modified A37 was shown to contribute to the high fidelity of codon recognition and to the structural formation and stabilization of functional tRNAs. In fact, the significant reduction of the steady state levels in tRNAMet was observed in cells carrying the both the A4435G and G11778A mutations but not cells carrying only the G11778A mutation. Thus, a failure in mitochondrial tRNA metabolism, caused by the A4435G mutation, may worsen the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with the primary G11778A mutation. The novel tRNAMet A4435G mutation has a potential modifier role in increasing the penetrance and expressivity of the primary LHON-associated G11778A mutation in this Chinese family.

  7. Revisiting GNRA and UNCG folds: U-turns versus Z-turns in RNA hairpin loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Leonarski, Filip; Vicens, Quentin; Auffinger, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    When thinking about RNA three-dimensional structures, coming across GNRA and UNCG tetraloops is perceived as a boon since their folds have been extensively described. Nevertheless, analyzing loop conformations within RNA and RNP structures led us to uncover several instances of GNRA and UNCG loops that do not fold as expected. We noticed that when a GNRA does not assume its "natural" fold, it adopts the one we typically associate with a UNCG sequence. The same folding interconversion may occur for loops with UNCG sequences, for instance within tRNA anticodon loops. Hence, we show that some structured tetranucleotide sequences starting with G or U can adopt either of these folds. The underlying structural basis that defines these two fold types is the mutually exclusive stacking of a backbone oxygen on either the first (in GNRA) or the last nucleobase (in UNCG), generating an oxygen-π contact. We thereby propose to refrain from using sequences to distinguish between loop conformations. Instead, we suggest using descriptors such as U-turn (for "GNRA-type" folds) and a newly described Z-turn (for "UNCG-type" folds). Because tetraloops adopt for the largest part only two (inter)convertible turns, we are better able to interpret from a structural perspective loop interchangeability occurring in ribosomes and viral RNA. In this respect, we propose a general view on the inclination for a given sequence to adopt (or not) a specific fold. We also suggest how long-noncoding RNAs may adopt discrete but transient structures, which are therefore hard to predict. © 2017 D'Ascenzo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. The Rodin-Ohno hypothesis that two enzyme superfamilies descended from one ancestral gene: an unlikely scenario for the origins of translation that will not be dismissed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Because amino acid activation is rate-limiting for uncatalyzed protein synthesis, it is a key puzzle in understanding the origin of the genetic code. Two unrelated classes (I and II) of contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) now translate the code. Observing that codons for the most highly conserved, Class I catalytic peptides, when read in the reverse direction, are very nearly anticodons for Class II defining catalytic peptides, Rodin and Ohno proposed that the two superfamilies descended from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. This unusual hypothesis languished for a decade, perhaps because it appeared to be unfalsifiable. Results The proposed sense/antisense alignment makes important predictions. Fragments that align in antiparallel orientations, and contain the respective active sites, should catalyze the same two reactions catalyzed by contemporary synthetases. Recent experiments confirmed that prediction. Invariant cores from both classes, called Urzymes after Ur = primitive, authentic, plus enzyme and representing ~20% of the contemporary structures, can be expressed and exhibit high, proportionate rate accelerations for both amino-acid activation and tRNA acylation. A major fraction (60%) of the catalytic rate acceleration by contemporary synthetases resides in segments that align sense/antisense. Bioinformatic evidence for sense/antisense ancestry extends to codons specifying the invariant secondary and tertiary structures outside the active sites of the two synthetase classes. Peptides from a designed, 46-residue gene constrained by Rosetta to encode Class I and II ATP binding sites with fully complementary sequences both accelerate amino acid activation by ATP ~400 fold. Conclusions Biochemical and bioinformatic results substantially enhance the posterior probability that ancestors of the two synthetase classes arose from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. The remarkable acceleration by short peptides of the

  9. The Rodin-Ohno hypothesis that two enzyme superfamilies descended from one ancestral gene: an unlikely scenario for the origins of translation that will not be dismissed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W; Li, Li; Weinreb, Violetta; Collier, Martha; Gonzalez-Rivera, Katiria; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Mariel; Erdogan, Ozgün; Kuhlman, Brian; Ambroggio, Xavier; Williams, Tishan; Chandrasekharan, S Niranj

    2014-06-14

    Because amino acid activation is rate-limiting for uncatalyzed protein synthesis, it is a key puzzle in understanding the origin of the genetic code. Two unrelated classes (I and II) of contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) now translate the code. Observing that codons for the most highly conserved, Class I catalytic peptides, when read in the reverse direction, are very nearly anticodons for Class II defining catalytic peptides, Rodin and Ohno proposed that the two superfamilies descended from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. This unusual hypothesis languished for a decade, perhaps because it appeared to be unfalsifiable. The proposed sense/antisense alignment makes important predictions. Fragments that align in antiparallel orientations, and contain the respective active sites, should catalyze the same two reactions catalyzed by contemporary synthetases. Recent experiments confirmed that prediction. Invariant cores from both classes, called Urzymes after Ur = primitive, authentic, plus enzyme and representing ~20% of the contemporary structures, can be expressed and exhibit high, proportionate rate accelerations for both amino-acid activation and tRNA acylation. A major fraction (60%) of the catalytic rate acceleration by contemporary synthetases resides in segments that align sense/antisense. Bioinformatic evidence for sense/antisense ancestry extends to codons specifying the invariant secondary and tertiary structures outside the active sites of the two synthetase classes. Peptides from a designed, 46-residue gene constrained by Rosetta to encode Class I and II ATP binding sites with fully complementary sequences both accelerate amino acid activation by ATP ~400 fold. Biochemical and bioinformatic results substantially enhance the posterior probability that ancestors of the two synthetase classes arose from opposite strands of the same ancestral gene. The remarkable acceleration by short peptides of the rate-limiting step in uncatalyzed

  10. The Escherichia coli COG1738 Member YhhQ Is Involved in 7-Cyanodeazaguanine (preQ0 Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Zallot

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Queuosine (Q is a complex modification of the wobble base in tRNAs with GUN anticodons. The full Q biosynthesis pathway has been elucidated in Escherichia coli. FolE, QueD, QueE and QueC are involved in the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP to 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine (preQ0, an intermediate of increasing interest for its central role in tRNA and DNA modification and secondary metabolism. QueF then reduces preQ0 to 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1. PreQ1 is inserted into tRNAs by tRNA guanine(34 transglycosylase (TGT. The inserted base preQ1 is finally matured to Q by two additional steps involving QueA and QueG or QueH. Most Eubacteria harbor the full set of Q synthesis genes and are predicted to synthesize Q de novo. However, some bacteria only encode enzymes involved in the second half of the pathway downstream of preQ0 synthesis, including the signature enzyme TGT. Different patterns of distribution of the queF, tgt, queA and queG or queH genes are observed, suggesting preQ0, preQ1 or even the queuine base being salvaged in specific organisms. Such salvage pathways require the existence of specific 7-deazapurine transporters that have yet to be identified. The COG1738 family was identified as a candidate for a missing preQ0/preQ1 transporter in prokaryotes, by comparative genomics analyses. The existence of Q precursor salvage was confirmed for the first time in bacteria, in vivo, through an indirect assay. The involvement of the COG1738 in salvage of a Q precursor was experimentally validated in Escherichia coli, where it was shown that the COG1738 family member YhhQ is essential for preQ0 transport.

  11. Gclust Server: 36262 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 36262 Rpa4_RPB_3054 Cluster Sequences - 401 Anticodon nuclease PrrC 3 1.00e-45 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.67 6.45...Sequence length 401 Representative annotation Anticodon nuclease PrrC Number of Sequences 3 Homologs 3

  12. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGR185C, YPL013C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available interacts with positions 34 and 35 of the tRNATyr anticodon; mutations in human ortholog YARS are associated...interacts with positions 34 and 35 of the tRNATyr anticodon; mutations in human ortholog YARS are associated

  13. Comparative and functional analysis of the rRNA-operons and their tRNA gene complement in different lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de M.C.; Siezen, R.J.; Wijman, J.G.E.; Zhao, Y.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Vaughan, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, and Lactobacillus johnsonii were used to compare location, sequence, organisation, and regulation of the ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons. All rrn operons of the examined LAB diverge from the

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in skeletal muscle from patients with mitochondrial DNA encoded tRNA gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paepe, B. De; Smet, J.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Seneca, S.; Martin, J.J.; Bleecker, J. De; Meirleir, L. de; Lissens, W.; Coster, R. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial diseases display a heterogeneous spectrum of clinical phenotypes and therefore the identification of the underlying gene defect is often a difficult task. AIMS: To develop an immunohistochemical approach to stain skeletal muscle for the five multi-protein complexes that

  15. Implicación de las modificaciones de tRNA y del metabolismo de los folatos en la respuesta inmune de Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    González García, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Throughout evolution, plants have developed a sophisticated network of signaling pathways allowing the activation and regulation of immune responses. The identification of metabolic pathways which are involved in modulating the intensity of that immune responses is an important challenge in the field of plant-pathogen interaction. With this aim, we performed two genetic approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana against the disease caused by the hemibiotroph bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC...

  16. Osteo-chondroprogenitor-specific deletion of the selenocysteine tRNA gene, Trsp, leads to chondronecrosis and abnormal skeletal development: a putative model for Kashin-Beck disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M Downey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck disease, a syndrome characterized by short stature, skeletal deformities, and arthropathy of multiple joints, is highly prevalent in specific regions of Asia. The disease has been postulated to result from a combination of different environmental factors, including contamination of barley by mold mycotoxins, iodine deficiency, presence of humic substances in drinking water, and, importantly, deficiency of selenium. This multifunctional trace element, in the form of selenocysteine, is essential for normal selenoprotein function, including attenuation of excessive oxidative stress, and for the control of redox-sensitive molecules involved in cell growth and differentiation. To investigate the effects of skeletal selenoprotein deficiency, a Cre recombinase transgenic mouse line was used to trigger Trsp gene deletions in osteo-chondroprogenitors. Trsp encodes selenocysteine tRNA([Ser]Sec, required for the incorporation of selenocysteine residues into selenoproteins. The mutant mice exhibited growth retardation, epiphyseal growth plate abnormalities, and delayed skeletal ossification, as well as marked chondronecrosis of articular, auricular, and tracheal cartilages. Phenotypically, the mice thus replicated a number of the pathological features of Kashin-Beck disease, supporting the notion that selenium deficiency is important to the development of this syndrome.

  17. Evidence of tRNA cleavage in apicomplexan parasites: half-tRNAs as new potential regulatory molecules of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium berghei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several lines of evidence demonstrated that organisms ranging from bacteria to higher animals possess a regulated endonucleolytic cleavage pathway producing half-tRNA fragments. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of this phenomenon in two distantly related apicomplexan parasites, T...

  18. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Navarro-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs. Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological phenotype, which must be taken into consideration in exploring specific therapeutic interventions.

  19. The archaeal TFIIE homologue facilitates transcription initiation by enhancing TATA-box recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, S.D.; Brinkman, A.B.; Oost, van der J.; Jackson, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Transcription from many archaeal promoters can be reconstituted in vitro using recombinant TATA-box binding protein (TBP) and transcription factor B (TFB)—homologues of eukaryal TBP and TFIIB—together with purified RNA polymerase (RNAP). However, all archaeal genomes sequenced to date reveal the

  20. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  1. Revealing genetic diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms in aquatic environments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannen, E.J. van; Agterveld, M.P. van; Gons, H.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new Eucarya-specific 18S rDNA primer set was constructed and tested using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to analyze the genetic diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms in aquatic environments. All eukaryal lines of descent exhibited four or fewer nucleotide mismatches in the forward

  2. Revealing genetic diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms in aquatic environments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hannen, E.J.; Van Agterveld, M.P.; Gons, H.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new Eucarya-specific 18S rDNA primer set was constructed and tested using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to analyze the genetic diversity of eukaryotic microorganisms in aquatic environments. All eukaryal lines of descent exhibited four or fewer nucleotide mismatches in the forward primer

  3. Bacillus subtilis strain deficient for the protein-tyrosine kinase PtkA exhibits impaired DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petranovic, Dina; Michelsen, Ole; Zahradka, K

    2007-01-01

    A/PtpZ was previously shown to regulate the phosphorylation state of UDP-glucose dehydrogenases and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. This promiscuity towards substrates is reminiscent of eukaryal kinases and has prompted us to investigate possible physiological effects of ptkA and ptpZ gene inactivations...

  4. Stabilizing contributions of sulfur-modified nucleotides: crystal structure of a DNA duplex with 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl]-2-thiothymidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diop-Frimpong, Benjamin; Prakash, Thazha P.; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Egli, Martin (Isis Pharm.); (Alnylam Pharm.); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-03-05

    Substitution of oxygen atoms by sulfur at various locations in the nucleic acid framework has led to analogs such as the DNA phosphorothioates and 4'-thio RNA. The phosphorothioates are excellent mimics of DNA, exhibit increased resistance to nuclease degradation compared with the natural counterpart, and have been widely used as first-generation antisense nucleic acid analogs for applications in vitro and in vivo. The 4'-thio RNA analog exhibits significantly enhanced RNA affinity compared with RNA, and shows potential for incorporation into siRNAs. 2-Thiouridine (s{sup 2}U) and 5-methyl-2-thiouridine (m{sup 5}s{sup 2}U) are natural nucleotide analogs. s{sup 2}U in tRNA confers greater specificity of codon-anticodon interactions by discriminating more strongly between A and G compared with U. 2-Thio modification preorganizes the ribose and 2'-deoxyribose sugars for a C3'-endo conformation, and stabilizes heteroduplexes composed of modified DNA and complementary RNA. Combination of the 2-thio and sugar 2'-O-modifications has been demonstrated to boost both thermodynamic stability and nuclease resistance. Using the 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl]-2-thiothymidine (m{sup 5}s{sup 2}Umoe) analog, we have investigated the consequences of the replacement of the 2-oxygen by sulfur for base-pair geometry and duplex conformation. The crystal structure of the A-form DNA duplex with sequence GCGTAT*ACGC (T* = m{sup 5}s{sup 2}Umoe) was determined at high resolution and compared with the structure of the corresponding duplex with T* = m{sup 5}Umoe. Notable changes as a result of the incorporation of sulfur concern the base-pair parameter 'opening', an improvement of stacking in the vicinity of modified nucleotides as measured by base overlap, and a van der Waals interaction between sulfur atoms from adjacent m{sup 5}s{sup 2}Umoe residues in the minor groove. The structural data indicate only minor adjustments in the water structure as a result of

  5. Dgroup: DG00402 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cin calcium (USAN); Mupirocin calcium hydrate (JP17) ... ATC code: D06AX09 R01AX06 t-RNA synthetase inhibition antibiotics isoleucine tRNA ligase, ptotein synthesis [KO:K01870] ...

  6. InterProScan Result: FS867702 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Threonyl/alanyl tRNA synthetase, SAD Molecular Function: ATP binding (GO:0005524)|Cellular Component: cytoplasm (GO:0005737)|Biolog...ical Process: translation (GO:0006412)|Biological Process: tRNA aminoacylation (GO:0043039) ...

  7. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1001665 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1001665 SRR001077.26701 Coral... Stressors, viral fraction from whole Porites compressa tissue extracts; Hawai'i Marine Laboratory Refuge Point Reef Corals (SRP000165) + Pro TGG ...

  8. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1005432 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available arctic Lake Limnopolar in spring and summer? (SRP000593) - Leu TAG ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1005432 SRR013521.4214 Viral metagenome of the Ant

  9. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1005417 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available arctic Lake Limnopolar in spring and summer? (SRP000593) - Met CAT ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1005417 SRR013519.8116 Viral metagenome of the Ant

  10. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1005419 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iral metagenome of the Antarctic Lake Limnopolar in spring and summer? (SRP000593) - Ser GCT ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1005419 SRR013519.13559 V

  11. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1005434 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available arctic Lake Limnopolar in spring and summer? (SRP000593) + Met CAT ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1005434 SRR013521.4453 Viral metagenome of the Ant

  12. Charging Levels of Four tRNA Species in Escherichia coli Rel+ and REL- Strains during Amino Acid Starvation: A Simple Model for the Effect of ppGpp on Translational Accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    fivefold lower in the Rel- strain compared to the Rel+ strain. Together with other data from the literature, these new data suggest a simple model in which mis-incorporation increases as the substrate availability decreases and that ppGpp has no direct effect on enhancing translational accuracy...

  13. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000426 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000426 ABMD01054065 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Leu TAA ...

  14. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000424 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000424 ABMD01052865 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) + Gln TTG ...

  15. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000444 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000444 ABMD01074784 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Asn GTT ...

  16. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000357 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000357 ABMB01023544 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Kingman Atoll (Northern Line Islands) + Arg TCT ...

  17. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000411 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000411 ABMD01044064 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Gly TCC ...

  18. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000460 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000460 ABMD01099117 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Val TAC ...

  19. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000468 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000468 ABMD01125009 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Leu CAA ...

  20. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000431 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000431 ABMD01058081 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) + Lys TTT ...

  1. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000490 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000490 ABMD01161169 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Met CAT ...

  2. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000409 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000409 ABMD01041478 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Gln TTG ...

  3. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000483 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000483 ABMD01150870 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Thr TGT ...

  4. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000388 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000388 ABMD01003445 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Thr GGT ...

  5. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000364 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000364 ABMB01044773 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Kingman Atoll (Northern Line Islands) - Lys TTT ...

  6. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000403 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000403 ABMD01031318 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) + Met CAT ...

  7. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000505 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000505 ABMD01195932 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Val TAC ...

  8. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000475 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000475 ABMD01135842 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Ser GGA ...

  9. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000418 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000418 ABMD01048404 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Glu TTC ...

  10. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000433 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000433 ABMD01060353 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) + Ser GCT ...

  11. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08000511 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08000511 ABMD01229791 viral fraction from water below the bounda...ry layer (eg, crevices and benthic surfaces) of Christmas Atoll (Kirtimati; Northern Line Islands) - Ala GGC ...

  12. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1016660 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nalysis of diversity of coastal microbial mats using 454 technology (SRP001219) + His GTG ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1016660 SRR027369.54189 A

  13. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1016619 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nalysis of diversity of coastal microbial mats using 454 technology (SRP001219) + His GTG ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1016619 SRR027367.19135 A

  14. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1016603 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nalysis of diversity of coastal microbial mats using 454 technology (SRP001219) + His GTG ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1016603 SRR027367.10410 A

  15. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1016634 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nalysis of diversity of coastal microbial mats using 454 technology (SRP001219) - Leu TAA ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1016634 SRR027369.39125 A

  16. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >SRA1016658 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nalysis of diversity of coastal microbial mats using 454 technology (SRP001219) + His GTG ... ...Environmental sample (ENV) from Sequence Read Archive >SRA1016658 SRR027369.52527 A

  17. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001691 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001691 ABNY01015907 saltern metagenome; microbial... fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA + Ser GGA ...

  18. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001689 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001689 ABNY01011527 saltern metagenome; microbial... fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA - Gln TTG ...

  19. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001706 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001706 ABNY01038212 saltern metagenome; microbial... fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA + Ala TGC ...

  20. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001704 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001704 ABNY01034507 saltern metagenome; microbial... fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA - Met CAT ...

  1. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001573 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001573 ABNJ01020371 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA + Leu CAA ...

  2. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002180 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002180 ABOL01499795 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + His GTG ...

  3. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001967 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001967 ABOK01126755 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Gly GCC ...

  4. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002113 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002113 ABOL01199944 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ile GAT ...

  5. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001627 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001627 ABNJ01138625 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA - Asn GTT ...

  6. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001984 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001984 ABOK01188926 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Lys TTT ...

  7. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002167 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002167 ABOL01400565 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Ile GAT ...

  8. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001969 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001969 ABOK01128653 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Arg CCT ...

  9. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002123 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002123 ABOL01227977 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ile GAT ...

  10. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001609 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001609 ABNJ01088362 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA + Met CAT ...

  11. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002046 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002046 ABOL01030261 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  12. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002049 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002049 ABOL01033247 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Leu TAA ...

  13. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002056 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002056 ABOL01048092 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  14. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001980 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001980 ABOK01160481 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Gly GCC ...

  15. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002028 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002028 ABOL01020878 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + His GTG ...

  16. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002121 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002121 ABOL01220726 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ile GAT ...

  17. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002041 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002041 ABOL01024917 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + His GTG ...

  18. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001923 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001923 ABOK01029271 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Tyr GTA ...

  19. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002062 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002062 ABOL01054589 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  20. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001619 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001619 ABNJ01117100 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA - Leu CAG ...

  1. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002115 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002115 ABOL01202194 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ile GAT ...

  2. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001617 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001617 ABNJ01112088 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA - Phe GAA ...

  3. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001925 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001925 ABOK01030181 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Arg CCT ...

  4. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002064 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002064 ABOL01058741 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Arg CCT ...

  5. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002005 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002005 ABOK01308326 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Val GAC ...

  6. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002131 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002131 ABOL01253080 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ile GAT ...

  7. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002182 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002182 ABOL01536926 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + His GTG ...

  8. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001632 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001632 ABNJ01146666 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA + Arg CCG ...

  9. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002098 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002098 ABOL01173441 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Gly CCC ...

  10. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001982 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001982 ABOK01169651 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Leu CAG ...

  11. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001933 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001933 ABOK01048051 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Gly GCC ...

  12. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001908 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001908 ABOK01003484 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Leu TAA ...

  13. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001624 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001624 ABNJ01130619 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected at Buena Vista Lagoon in Oceanside, CA - Met CAT ...

  14. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002100 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002100 ABOL01173734 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ile GAT ...

  15. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002039 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002039 ABOL01024134 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  16. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001990 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001990 ABOK01217516 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Val GAC ...

  17. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002110 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002110 ABOL01197437 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Ile GAT ...

  18. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001974 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001974 ABOK01144549 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Leu TAG ...

  19. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001910 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001910 ABOK01004780 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Asp GTC ...

  20. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002047 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002047 ABOL01030601 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  1. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002054 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002054 ABOL01045613 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  2. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001918 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001918 ABOK01017030 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Arg CCT ...

  3. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002178 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002178 ABOL01471453 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Asn GTT ...

  4. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002172 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002172 ABOL01426301 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Glu TTC ...

  5. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002157 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002157 ABOL01346421 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - Ala TGC ...

  6. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002037 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002037 ABOL01023835 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA - His GTG ...

  7. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001959 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001959 ABOK01092151 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from Mung bean nuclease digestion of DNA from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Ile GAT ...

  8. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08002136 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08002136 ABOL01260546 mosquito metageno...me; viral fraction from mixed species mosquitoes collected in Mission Valley in San Diego, CA + Glu TTC ...

  9. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001681 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001681 ABNY01004105 saltern metagenom...e; microbial fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA + Leu TAG ...

  10. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001696 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001696 ABNY01024252 saltern metagenom...e; microbial fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA + Leu TAG ...

  11. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001714 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001714 ABNY01072206 saltern metagenom...e; microbial fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA + Asn GTT ...

  12. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001699 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001699 ABNY01027832 saltern metagenom...e; microbial fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA - Tyr GTA ...

  13. tRNA配列、アノテーション及びキュレーションのデータ: >ENV08001683 [tRNADB-CE (tRNA gene database curated manually by experts)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Environmental sample (ENV) from GenBank >ENV08001683 ABNY01007198 saltern metagenom...e; microbial fraction from plasmids from marine microbial community in low salinity saltern in San Diego, CA - Met CAT ...

  14. Sequence Classification: 389657 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|31794168|ref|NP_856661.1| PROBABLE GLUT...AMYL-TRNA SYNTHETASE GLTS (GLUTAMATE--TRNA LIGASE) (GLUTAMYL-TRNA SYNTHASE) (GLURS) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/31794168 ...

  15. Sequence Classification: 399422 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|57117041|ref|YP_177915.1| PROBABLE GLUT...AMYL-TRNA SYNTHETASE GLTS (GLUTAMATE--TRNA LIGASE) (GLUTAMYL-TRNA SYNTHASE) (GLURS) || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/57117041 ...

  16. Exceptionally diverse morphotypes and genomes of crenarchaeal hyperthermophilic viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D; Garrett, R A

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable diversity of the morphologies of viruses found in terrestrial hydrothermal environments with temperatures >80 degrees C is unprecedented for aquatic ecosystems. The best-studied viruses from these habitats have been assigned to novel viral families: Fuselloviridae, Lipothrixviridae...... no significant matches to sequences in public databases. This suggests that these hyperthermophilic viruses have exceptional biochemical solutions for biological functions. Specific features of genome organization, as well as strategies for DNA replication, suggest that phylogenetic relationships exist between...... crenarchaeal rudiviruses and the large eukaryal DNA viruses: poxviruses, the African swine fever virus and Chlorella viruses. Sequence patterns at the ends of the linear genome of the lipothrixvirus AFV1 are reminiscent of the telomeric ends of linear eukaryal chromosomes and suggest that a primitive telomeric...

  17. Pseudoknot in domain II of 23 S rRNA is essential for ribosome function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, G; Hansen, L H; Douthwaite, S

    1995-01-01

    of these base-pairs is disrupted, and it is completely abolished upon disruption of both base-pairs. Each mutant 23 S rRNA is assembled into 50 S subunits, but the mutant subunits do not stably interact with 30 S to engage in protein synthesis. Enzymatic and chemical probing of ribosomal particles reveals...... and ribosomes, but is rendered unreactive when either the pseudoknot is broken or when the r-proteins are removed. The structure of the pseudoknot region is possibly influenced by interaction of an r-protein at or close to the pseudoknot. Re-establishing the pseudoknot Watson-Crick interactions with one...... "eukaryal" (1005G.1138C or 1006U.1137A) pair and one "bacterial" C.G pair largely restores the structure and function of the rRNA. Bacterial ribosomes containing both these eukaryal pairs also participate in protein synthesis, although at much reduced efficiency, and the structure of their pseudoknot region...

  18. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  19. tRNA’s Modifications Bring Order to Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustilo, Estella M.; Vendeix, Franck A.P.; Agris, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The posttranscriptional modification of RNA is a significant investment in genes, enzymes, substrates, and energy. Advances in molecular genetics and structural biology indicate strongly that modifications of tRNA’s anticodon domain control gene expression. Modifications at the anticodon’s wobble position are required for recognition of rarely used codons, and restrict or expand codon recognition depending on their chemistries. A shift of the translational reading frame occurs in the absence of modifications at either wobble position-34 or the conserved purine-37, 3’-adjacent to the anticodon, causing expression of alternate protein sequences. These modifications have in common their contribution of order to tRNA’s anticodon. PMID:18378185

  20. Mitochondrial rRNA secondary structures and genome arrangements distinguish chelicerates: comparisons with a harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones: Phalangium opilio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masta, Susan E

    2010-01-01

    Arachnids are a highly diverse group of arthropods, and many of the mitochondrial genomes that have been sequenced from arachnids possess unusual features in their inferred gene structures and genome organization. The first complete sequence of a mitochondrial genome from the arachnid order Opiliones (harvestmen) is presented here. Secondary structures of the two mitochondrial ribosomal subunits of Phalangium opilio are inferred and compared to mitochondrial rRNA structures of a hexapod and a chelicerate. The large subunit rRNA of P. opilio is found to have more helices conserved than in other arthropods, while the small subunit rRNA shows a complexity similar to that of other arthropods. These comparisons suggest that a reduction in rRNA complexity occurred in Pancrustacea after the divergence of Pancrustacea and Chelicerata from a common ancestor. The gene arrangement of the mitochondrial genome of P. opilio is compared with the gene order of taxa from all seven other orders of arachnids for which representative mitochondrial genomes have been sequenced. Taxa from five of these seven orders possess gene arrangements identical to that of Limulus polyphemus, and P. opilio is found to have a similar arrangement. However, in P. opilio, some genes near the putative control region are rearranged, with the suite of genes encoding tRNA(Gln), the control region, and tRNA(Ile) located downstream of the two ribosomal RNA genes, and upstream of where they are typically located in chelicerates. The genome encodes only 21 of the typical 22 mitochondrial tRNA genes and lacks the gene for tRNA(Leu(CUN)). The protein-coding genes in the mitochondrial genome of P. opilio show a significantly decreased use of codons recognized by tRNA(Leu(CUN)), likely due to selection to utilize the more specific tRNA(Leu(UUR)) anticodon. The gene arrangement and lack of a tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene in P. opilio is most parsimoniously explained by the occurrence of at least two translocation events, one

  1. The genetic code – Thawing the 'frozen accident'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... The early studies of DNA and RNA synthesis had led to the discovery of DNA polymerase, .... with changes in 10 codons in nuclear codes and 16 codons in mitochondrial codes (reviewed in Osawa et al 1992; .... in crystal structures of codon-anticodon pairs in the decoding site of the 30S ribosomal subunit ...

  2. Editing and methylation at a single site by functionally interdependent activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rubio, M.A.T.; Gaston, K.W.; McKenney, K. M.; Fleming, I.M.C.; Paris, Zdeněk; Limbach, P.A.; Alfonzo, J. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 542, č. 7642 (2017), s. 494-497 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21450Y Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : encoded transfer-rnas * Leishmania tarentolae * Trypanosoma brucei * DNA deamination * anticodon loop * mitochondria * marsupials * discovery Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 40.137, year: 2016

  3. Bacterial Growth Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Mette

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) mediates the translation of the code, transiently stored in the messenger RNA (mRNA), to the final protein. The entity of tRNA has for decades been assumed to be stable for hours in any circumstance, but my supervisor Michael A. Sørensen noticed during his work with charging...... that the TLRs were not involved in starvation-induced down regulation of tRNA. As such, my project was subdivided into the following segments:...

  4. Synthesis and biological incorporation of icons into macromolecules for NMR study. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, D.M.

    1977-02-01

    Progress is reported on methods to synthesize novel /sup 13/C-labeled materials for incorporation into macromolecules. Gram quantities (9 grams) of labeled uracil have been synthesized and incorporated, by means of a mutant bacterial strain into t-RNA. The bulk t-RNA has been isolated, purified, and carbon-13 T/sub 1/ studies completed. Work now in progress is directed towards the production of greater quantities of t-RNA from E. coli instead of Salmonella and the ultimate isolation of individual t-RNA molecules.

  5. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  6. Function and ribosomal localization of aIF6, a translational regulator shared by archaea and eukarya

    OpenAIRE

    Benelli, Dario; Marzi, Stefano; Mancone, Carmine; Alonzi, Tonino; La Teana, Anna; Londei, Paola

    2008-01-01

    The translation factor IF6 is shared by the Archaea and the Eukarya, but is not found in Bacteria. The properties of eukaryal IF6 (eIF6) have been extensively studied, but remain somewhat elusive. eIF6 behaves as a ribosome-anti-association factor and is involved in miRNA-mediated gene silencing; however, it also seems to participate in ribosome synthesis and export. Here we have determined the function and ribosomal localization of the archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus) IF6 homologue (aIF6)....

  7. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  8. Roles of DNA methyltransferases in Arabidopsis development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... RNA-dependent tRNA polymerase; ROS1, repressor of silencing 1; SET, histone methyltransferase; SDC, suppressor of drm1/2 cmt3; siRNA, small interfering RNA; SUP, superman;. SUVH4, su(var)3-9 homolog 4; TRDMT1, tRNA aspartic acid methyltransferase 1; TGS, transcriptional gene silencing; UBA,.

  9. Sequence Classification: 288478 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e tRNA synthetase; also charges selenocystein tRNA with serine || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/16128860 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|16128860|ref|NP_415413.1| serin

  10. Sequence Classification: 54906 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -tRNA synthetase ; also charges selenocystein tRNA with serine || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/50085962 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|50085962|ref|YP_047472.1| seryl

  11. Sequence Classification: 292928 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e tRNA synthetase; also charges selenocystein tRNA with serine || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/15800756 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|15800756|ref|NP_286770.1| serin

  12. Gene Synthesis with HG Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana. Marvin H Caruthers. General Article Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp ... Keywords. Chemical synthesis of genes for yeast alanine tRNA and E. coli supressor tRNA; Khorana's philosophy on science.

  13. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML014W, YBR059C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YML014W TRM9 tRNA methyltransferase, catalyzes esterification of modified uridine nucleotides in tRNA(Arg3)...description tRNA methyltransferase, catalyzes esterification of modified uridine nucleotides in tRNA(Arg3)

  14. Resonance 2012

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    cGMP (12) 1125 (GA). Chemical affinity (5) 454 (GA). Chemical synthesis of genes for yeast alanine. tRNA and E. coli suppressor tRNA. (12) 1143 (GA). Chica red (10) 928 (SA). Chirality (8) 768 (GA). Cholera toxin (10) 943 (GA). Chord function (1) 44 (GA). Chowla–Pillai correspondence (9) 855 (GA). Class number (9) 855 ...

  15. The essential function of the Trypanosoma brucei Trl1 homolog in procyclic cells is maturation of the intron-containing tRNATyr

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lopes, R.R.S.; Silveira, G. de O.; Eitler, R.; Vidal, R.S.; Kessler, A.; Hinger, S.; Paris, Zdeněk; Alfonzo, J. D.; Polycarpo, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 8 (2016), s. 1190-1199 ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21450Y Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma * tRNA * tRNA editing * splicing * intron Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.605, year: 2016

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0247 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0247 ref|YP_550024.1| tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase [Polar...omonas sp. JS666] gb|ABE45126.1| tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase [Polaromonas sp. JS666] YP_550024.1 1e-107 64% ...

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12529-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 0.96 1 ( DQ066515 ) Azolla microphylla voucher Reid & Peters 80 tRNA-... 48 0.96 1 ( DQ066511 ) Azolla mic...rophylla voucher Reid & Peters 79 tRNA-... 48 0.96 1 ( DQ066508 ) Azolla mexicana voucher Reid & Peters 71 t

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0247 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0247 ref|YP_987312.1| tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase [Acido...vorax sp. JS42] gb|ABM43236.1| tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase [Acidovorax sp. JS42] YP_987312.1 1e-119 71% ...

  19. Gclust Server: 114179 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sequences Related Sequences(32) 550 similar to tRNA modification enzyme; Trm5p, closer 1 1.00e-14 14.29 0.0 0...550 Representative annotation similar to tRNA modification enzyme; Trm5p, closer Number of Sequences 1

  20. Transfer RNA's latest port of call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Manuel A S; Orellana, Omar; Ibba, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Transfer RNA, or tRNA, has the dubious honor of being a recurring historical figure in molecular biology. Much like the lead character in Woody Allen's movie Zelig, tRNA keeps on turning up in history at the right place at the right time. In this respect the timing of the 23rd installment...

  1. An analysis of five serine transfer ribonucleic acids from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B N; Dunn, R; Gillam, I; Tener, G M; Armstrong, D J; Skoog, F; Frihart, C R; Leonard, N J

    1975-01-25

    Crude tRNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster was fractionated on bensoylated-diethylaminoethyl cellulose columns. The eluate was assayed for both amino acid acceptance and cytokinin activity. Most of the cytokinin activity was associated with a peak of serine acceptance. The five major serine tRNAs were purified by chromatography on benzoylated-dietyhlaminoethyl cellulose and reversed phase chromatography-5 columns. The major species, tRNA7-Ser was isolated from this tRNA and was shown to be N-6-(delta-2-isopentenyl)adenosine (i-6A) on the basis of ultraviolet and mass spectral data. The nucleoside somposition of all five serine tRNAs was determined directly and by the 3-H derivative method. They all contain pseudouridine, ribothymidine, 1-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytosine, N-2-dimethylguanosine, 5, 6-hydrouridine, and 3-methylcytosine, while two contain an unidentified nucleoside, and one containes 1-methylguanosine. These techniques also confirmed the presence of i-6A in tRNA7-Ser as well as showing its presence in tRNA6-Ser and tRNA4-Ser. These three tRNA-Ser species exhibit marked changes in elution from reversed phase chromatography-5 columns as a function of temperature and this may be related to their minor base composition. The tRNAs-Ser were bound to ribosomes in response to the following triplets: tRNA2-Ser, AGU, AGC; tRNA4-Ser, UCG; tRNA5-Ser, AGU, AGC; tRNA7-Ser, UCG.

  2. Specificity and Function of Archaeal DNA Replication Initiator Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Y. Samson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7 via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the single chromosome of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus are specified by distinct initiation factors. While two origins are dependent on archaeal homologs of eukaryal Orc1 and Cdc6, the third origin is instead reliant on an archaeal Cdt1 homolog. We exploit the nonessential nature of the orc1-1 gene to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels the protein’s structure rather than that of the DNA template.

  3. Function and ribosomal localization of aIF6, a translational regulator shared by archaea and eukarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Dario; Marzi, Stefano; Mancone, Carmine; Alonzi, Tonino; la Teana, Anna; Londei, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The translation factor IF6 is shared by the Archaea and the Eukarya, but is not found in Bacteria. The properties of eukaryal IF6 (eIF6) have been extensively studied, but remain somewhat elusive. eIF6 behaves as a ribosome-anti-association factor and is involved in miRNA-mediated gene silencing; however, it also seems to participate in ribosome synthesis and export. Here we have determined the function and ribosomal localization of the archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus) IF6 homologue (aIF6). We find that aIF6 binds specifically to the 50S ribosomal subunits, hindering the formation of 70S ribosomes and strongly inhibiting translation. aIF6 is uniformly expressed along the cell cycle, but it is upregulated following both cold- and heat shock. The aIF6 ribosomal binding site lies in the middle of the 30-S interacting surface of the 50S subunit, including a number of critical RNA and protein determinants involved in subunit association. The data suggest that the IF6 protein evolved in the archaeal-eukaryal lineage to modulate translational efficiency under unfavourable environmental conditions, perhaps acquiring additional functions during eukaryotic evolution.

  4. Effects of Disinfection on Legionella spp., Eukarya, and Biofilms in a Hot Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moletta-Denat, Marina; Frère, Jacques; Onillon, Séverine; Trouilhé, Marie-Cécile; Robine, Enric

    2012-01-01

    Legionella species are frequently detected in hot water systems, attached to the surface as a biofilm. In this work, the dynamics of Legionella spp. and diverse bacteria and eukarya associated together in the biofilm, coming from a pilot scale 1 system simulating a real hot water system, were investigated throughout 6 months after two successive heat shock treatments followed by three successive chemical treatments. Community structure was assessed by a fingerprint technique, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). In addition, the diversity and dynamics of Legionella and eukarya were investigated by small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal cloning and sequencing. Our results showed that pathogenic Legionella species remained after the heat shock and chemical treatments (Legionella pneumophila and Legionella anisa, respectively). The biofilm was not removed, and the bacterial community structure was transitorily affected by the treatments. Moreover, several amoebae had been detected in the biofilm before treatments (Thecamoebae sp., Vannella sp., and Hartmanella vermiformis) and after the first heat shock treatment, but only H. vermiformis remained. However, another protozoan affiliated with Alveolata, which is known as a host cell for Legionella, dominated the eukaryal species after the second heat shock and chemical treatment tests. Therefore, effective Legionella disinfection may be dependent on the elimination of these important microbial components. We suggest that eradicating Legionella in hot water networks requires better study of bacterial and eukaryal species associated with Legionella in biofilms. PMID:22820326

  5. Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases from Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya Share a Common Evolutionary Origin Deeply Rooted in the Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancik, Ivan Andreas; Šestak, Martin Sebastijan; Ji, Boyang; Axelson-Fisk, Marina; Franjevic, Damjan; Jers, Carsten; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2018-01-05

    The main family of serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinases present in eukarya was defined and described by Hanks et al. in 1988 (Science, 241, 42-52). It was initially believed that these kinases do not exist in bacteria, but extensive genome sequencing revealed their existence in many bacteria. For historical reasons, the term "eukaryotic-type kinases" propagated in the literature to describe bacterial members of this protein family. Here, we argue that this term should be abandoned as a misnomer, and we provide several lines of evidence to support this claim. Our comprehensive phylostratigraphic analysis suggests that Hanks-type kinases present in eukarya, bacteria and archaea all share a common evolutionary origin in the lineage leading to the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). We found no evidence to suggest substantial horizontal transfer of genes encoding Hanks-type kinases from eukarya to bacteria. Moreover, our systematic structural comparison suggests that bacterial Hanks-type kinases resemble their eukaryal counterparts very closely, while their structures appear to be dissimilar from other kinase families of bacterial origin. This indicates that a convergent evolution scenario, by which bacterial kinases could have evolved a kinase domain similar to that of eukaryal Hanks-type kinases, is not very likely. Overall, our results strongly support a monophyletic origin of all Hanks-type kinases, and we therefore propose that this term should be adopted as a universal name for this protein family. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Nucleotide sequences of three tRNA(Ser) from Drosophila melanogaster reading the six serine codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, D L; Gillam, I C; Tener, G M

    1987-10-05

    The nucleotide sequences of three serine tRNAs from Drosophila melanogaster, together capable of decoding the six serine codons, were determined. tRNA(Ser)2b has the anticodon GCU, tRNA(Ser)4 has CGA and tRNA(Ser)7 has IGA. tRNA(Ser)2b differs from the last two by about 25%. However, tRNA(Ser)4 and tRNA(Ser)7 are 96% homologous, differing only at the first position of the anticodon and two other sites. This unusual sequence relationship suggests, together with similar pairs in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that eukaryotic tRNA(Ser)UCN may be undergoing concerted evolution.

  7. Characterizing Expression and Processing of Precursor and Mature Human tRNAs by Hydro-tRNAseq and PAR-CLIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasos Gogakos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The participation of tRNAs in fundamental aspects of biology and disease necessitates an accurate, experimentally confirmed annotation of tRNA genes and curation of tRNA sequences. This has been challenging because RNA secondary structure, nucleotide modifications, and tRNA gene multiplicity complicate sequencing and mapping efforts. To address these issues, we developed hydro-tRNAseq, a method based on partial alkaline RNA hydrolysis that generates fragments amenable for sequencing. To identify transcribed tRNA genes, we further complemented this approach with photoactivatable crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP of SSB/La, a conserved protein involved in pre-tRNA processing. Our results show that approximately half of all predicted tRNA genes are transcribed in human cells. We also report nucleotide modification sites and their order of introduction, and we identify tRNA leaders, trailers, and introns. By using complementary sequencing-based methodologies, we present a human tRNA atlas and determine expression levels of mature and processing intermediates of tRNAs in human cells.

  8. A cluster of transfer RNA genes (TRM1, TRR3, and TRAN) on the short arm of human chromosome 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland, R.A.; Maule, J.C.; Sealey, P.G. [Western General Hospital, Ediniburgh (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    We have isolated two lambda clones that contain three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes (TRM1, TRR3, and TRAN). Both clones map to the same region (6p21.2-p22.3) of the short arm of chromosome 6. One clone contains a methionine tRNA gene and also an arginine tRNA gene, the first such human gene to be described. The other clone contains an alanine tRNA gene, again the first such human gene to be reported, and it differs from the species of human alanine tRNA transcripts sequenced to date. These clones have been used to investigate the structure at this location. The other clone is not located within this domain and appears to be a unique segment of DNA. Nevertheless, we also show that at least half of the methionine tRNA genes are located on the short arm of this chromosome, and if these are also located at 6p21.2-p22.3, and if these are also located at 6p21.2-p22.3, this would constitute another major tRNA locus in human. 55 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Frozen Accident Pushing 50: Stereochemistry, Expansion, and Chance in the Evolution of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-05-23

    Nearly 50 years ago, Francis Crick propounded the frozen accident scenario for the evolution of the genetic code along with the hypothesis that the early translation system consisted primarily of RNA. Under the frozen accident perspective, the code is universal among modern life forms because any change in codon assignment would be highly deleterious. The frozen accident can be considered the default theory of code evolution because it does not imply any specific interactions between amino acids and the cognate codons or anticodons, or any particular properties of the code. The subsequent 49 years of code studies have elucidated notable features of the standard code, such as high robustness to errors, but failed to develop a compelling explanation for codon assignments. In particular, stereochemical affinity between amino acids and the cognate codons or anticodons does not seem to account for the origin and evolution of the code. Here, I expand Crick's hypothesis on RNA-only translation system by presenting evidence that this early translation already attained high fidelity that allowed protein evolution. I outline an experimentally testable scenario for the evolution of the code that combines a distinct version of the stereochemical hypothesis, in which amino acids are recognized via unique sites in the tertiary structure of proto-tRNAs, rather than by anticodons, expansion of the code via proto-tRNA duplication, and the frozen accident.

  10. AcEST: BP914486 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p|Q55C52|GTPB3_DICDI tRNA modification GTPase gtpbp3, mitochondrial OS=Dictyostelium discoideum Align length...alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q55C52|GTPB3_DICDI tRNA modification GTPase gtpbp3, mitochond... 33 0.89 sp|Q8S2...DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 2 OS=Zea... 30 9.8 >sp|Q55C52|GTPB3_DICDI tRNA modification GTPase gtpbp3..., mitochondrial OS=Dictyostelium discoideum GN=gtpbp3 PE=3 SV=1 Length = 512 Score = 33.5 bits (75), Expect

  11. Cutaneous Effects of Sea Buckthorn Oil Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipic Mihailo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ulje pasjeg trna (Hippophae rhamnoides L. se u medicinske svrhe upotrebljava kako za eksternu tako i za internu primenu, pri čemu je eksterna primena nepogodna usled njegove tečne konzistencije, lipofi lne prirode i intenzivne obojenosti. Navedeni nedostaci bi se mogli prevazići formulacijom polučvrstih emulzija sa uljem pasjeg trna. Prethodna ispitivanja ove formulacije su pokazala da poseduje znatno veći potencijal za zarastanje rana u odnosu na ulje pasjeg trna, unapređenu strukturu tečnih kristala, stabilnost i pogodnost za lokalnu primenu.

  12. Recognition of tRNAs with a long variable arm by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tukalo M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotic cells three tRNA species, tRNASer, tRNALeu and tRNATyr, possess a long variable arm of 11–20 nucleotides (type 2 tRNA rather than usual 4 or 5 nucleotides (type 1 tRNA. In this review we have summarized the results of our research on the structural basis for recognition and discrimination of type 2 tRNAs by Thermus thermophilus seryl-, tyrosyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, TyrRS and LeuRS obtained by X-ray crystallography and chemical probing tRNA in solution. Crystal structures are now known of all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases complexed with type 2 tRNAs and the different modes of tRNA recognition represented by these structures will be discussed. In particular, emphasis will be given to the results on recognition of characteristic shape of type 2 tRNAs by cognate synthetases. In tRNASer, tRNATyr and tRNALeu the orientation of the long variable arm with respect to the body of the tRNA is different and is controlled by different packing of the core. In the case of SerRS the N-terminal domain and in the case of TyrRS, the C-terminal domain, bind to the characteristic long variable arm of the cognate RNA, thus recognizing the unique shape of the tRNA. The core of T. thermophilus tRNALeu has several layers of unusual base-pairs, which are revealed by the crystal structure of tRNALeu complexed with T. thermophilus LeuRS and by probing a ligand-free tRNA by specific chemical reagents in solution. In the crystal structure of the LeuRS-tRNALeu complex the unique D-stem structure is recognized by the C-terminal domain of LeuRS and these data are in good agreement with those obtained in solution. LeuRS has canonical class I mode of tRNA recognition, approaching the tRNA acceptor stem from the D-stem and minor groove of the acceptor stem side. SerRS also has canonical class II mode of tRNA recognition and approaches tRNASer from opposite, variable stem and major groove of acceptor stem site. And finally, TyrRS in strong

  13. Undetected antisense tRNAs in mitochondrial genomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seligmann Hervé

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothesis that both mitochondrial (mt complementary DNA strands of tRNA genes code for tRNAs (sense-antisense coding is explored. This could explain why mt tRNA mutations are 6.5 times more frequently pathogenic than in other mt sequences. Antisense tRNA expression is plausible because tRNA punctuation signals mt sense RNA maturation: both sense and antisense tRNAs form secondary structures potentially signalling processing. Sense RNA maturation processes by default 11 antisense tRNAs neighbouring sense genes. If antisense tRNAs are expressed, processed antisense tRNAs should have adapted more for translational activity than unprocessed ones. Four tRNA properties are examined: antisense tRNA 5' and 3' end processing by sense RNA maturation and its accuracy, cloverleaf stability and misacylation potential. Results Processed antisense tRNAs align better with standard tRNA sequences with the same cognate than unprocessed antisense tRNAs, suggesting less misacylations. Misacylation increases with cloverleaf fragility and processing inaccuracy. Cloverleaf fragility, misacylation and processing accuracy of antisense tRNAs decrease with genome-wide usage of their predicted cognate amino acid. Conclusions These properties correlate as if they adaptively coevolved for translational activity by some antisense tRNAs, and to avoid such activity by other antisense tRNAs. Analyses also suggest previously unsuspected particularities of aminoacylation specificity in mt tRNAs: combinations of competition between tRNAs on tRNA synthetases with competition between tRNA synthetases on tRNAs determine specificities of tRNA amino acylations. The latter analyses show that alignment methods used to detect tRNA cognates yield relatively robust results, even when they apparently fail to detect the tRNA's cognate amino acid and indicate high misacylation potential. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Juergen Brosius, Dr Anthony M Poole and

  14. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chafe, Shawn C; Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  15. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking of NTF2, the Nuclear Import Receptor for the RanGTPase, Is Subjected to Regulation: e42501

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn C Chafe; Jacqueline B Pierce; Dev Mangroo

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK066574 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066574 J013070D13 (O25961) tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase (EC... 2.5.1.8) (IPP transferase) (Isopentenyl-diphosphate:tRNA isopentenyltransferase) (IPTase) (IPPT) MIAA_HELPY 5e-15 ...

  17. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C

    2002-01-01

    Reverse transcription of a retroviral genome takes place in the cytoplasm of an infected cell by a process primed by a producer-cell-derived tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer-binding site (PBS). By an assay involving primer complementation of PBS-mutated vectors we analyzed whether tRNA...... primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven...... by cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK071216 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071216 J023083F11 (O31795) tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase (EC... 2.5.1.8) (IPP transferase) (Isopentenyl-diphosphate:tRNA isopentenyltransferase) (IPTase) (IPPT) MIAA_BACSU 5e-17 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK066574 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066574 J013070D13 (P57632) tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase (EC... 2.5.1.8) (IPP transferase) (Isopentenyl-diphosphate:tRNA isopentenyltransferase) (IPTase) (IPPT) MIAA_BUCAI 3e-19 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK066574 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066574 J013070D13 (O30762) tRNA delta(2)-isopentenylpyrophosphate transferase (EC... 2.5.1.8) (IPP transferase) (Isopentenyl-diphosphate:tRNA isopentenyltransferase) (IPTase) (IPPT) MIAA_PSEPU 9e-22 ...

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 58162 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_07110176.1 1117:1058 1150:7067 1158:3950 272129:1687 tRNA dimethylallyltransfera...se Oscillatoria sp. PCC 6506 MSEVTTGLIVICGATATGKSGLALALAHRLESAILSADSRQVYREFNIGTAKPTKRDRELVPHYLIDICDPTETLTVAD

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 58141 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_08986385.1 1117:1058 1189:1983 1190:1983 741277:1983 tRNA dimethylallyltransfera...se Fischerella sp. JSC-11 MTRLIVICGATATGKSGLALALAMRLDTVILSADSRQVYREFNIGTAKPTVDEQKLVPHYLIDICDPTETMNVADYQVQAQA

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 546216125 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WP_021831129.1 ... 1117:3229 ... 1118:1110 1301283:1227 ... 263510:2463 263511:2463 ... Selen...ophosphate-dependent tRNA 2-selenouridine synthase Crocosphaera watsonii MRSLGKKIGASLIFNNISQQINQHFINKDPCYSPLIYCWRGGQRSQSLGFILDQIGWAVTVLKRGYKSYRYE

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495507877 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WP_008232523.1 ... 1117:3229 ... 1161:7558 ... 1162:6797 98443:1601 1164990:1601 ... Selen...ophosphate-dependent tRNA 2-selenouridine synthase Richelia intracellularis MEGNFIRMPPTIKYTKNIWDTNYTEIIDVRSP

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 546229767 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WP_021833796.1 ... 1117:3229 ... 1118:1110 1301283:1227 ... 263510:2463 263511:2463 ... Selen...ophosphate-dependent tRNA 2-selenouridine synthase Crocosphaera watsonii MILRTTNFSDFTLSGSQNEIIDVRSENEFAED

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of red-tailed knobby newt (Tylototriton kweichowensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Jiang, Ye; Li, Yan; Ni, Qingyong; Yao, Yongfang; Xu, Huailiang; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-11-01

    The entire mitogenome of Tylototriton kweichowensis is 16 727 bp in length. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGS), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (rRNA), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNA), and 1 control region (CR). Except for ND6 subunit and 8 tRNA genes are distributed on the L-strand, all the other PCGs and tRNA genes are located on the H-strand. "ATG" and "GTG" are the start codons of the PCGs, "TAA", "AGA", "TA-" and "T--" are the stop codons. Most of the tRNA genes can be folded into typical clover-leaf secondary structure. The genome of T. kweichowensis has two repeat sequences in the cob-noncoding region. Mitogenomic phylogenetic analysis (NJ tree) robustly resolved the genus-level relationship among the three genera Tylototriton, Echinotriton, and Pleurodeles, and which is congruent with the previous molecular phylogeny results.

  7. QUANTIFYING ELONGATION RHYTHM DURING FULL-LENGTH PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Chen, Chunlai; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Haibo; Asahara, Haruichi; Chong, Shaorong; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Pauses regulate the rhythm of ribosomal protein synthesis. Mutations disrupting even minor pauses can give rise to improperly formed proteins and human disease. Such minor pauses are difficult to characterize by ensemble methods, but can be readily examined by single-molecule (sm) approaches. Here we use smFRET to carry out real-time monitoring of the expression of a full-length protein, the green fluorescent protein variant Emerald GFP. We demonstrate significant correlations between measured elongation rates and codon and isoacceptor tRNA usage, and provide a quantitative estimate of the effect on elongation rate of replacing a codon recognizing an abundant tRNA with a synonymous codon cognate to a rarer tRNA. Our results suggest that tRNA selection plays an important general role in modulating the rates and rhythms of protein synthesis, potentially influencing simultaneous co-translational processes such as folding and chemical modification. PMID:23822614

  8. Absolute in vivo translation rates of individual codons in Escherichia coli: The two glutamic acid codons GAA and GAG are translated with a threefold difference in rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.; Pedersen, Steen

    1991-01-01

    .4-fold slower (6.4 codons/s). These two codons are read by the same tRNA species. Codon CCG and CGA are both read by abundant tRNA species but nevertheless we found them to be translated slowly with rates of 5.8 and 4.2 codons/second, respectively. The context of these codons were varied, but we found...

  9. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The t....... The integrity and functionality of the cloned tRNA(Ser(CGA)) gene was verified by in vitro transcription analysis in HeLa nuclear extracts....

  10. Transfer of primer binding site-mutated simian immunodeficiency virus vectors by genetically engineered artificial and hybrid tRNA-like primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A C; Grunwald, T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2001-01-01

    could be obtained by cotransfection of a gene for an engineered tRNA(Pro)-tRNA hybrid with a match to PBS-Pro. The importance of tRNA backbone identity was further analyzed by complementing the PBS-X2 vector with a gene for a matching x2 primer with a tRNA backbone, which led to three- to fourfold...

  11. Increasing the fidelity of noncanonical amino acid incorporation in cell-free protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qinglei; Fan, Chenguang

    2017-11-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis provides a robust platform for co-translational incorporation of noncanonical amino acid (ncAA) into proteins to facilitate biological studies and biotechnological applications. Recently, eliminating the activity of release factor 1 has been shown to increase ncAA incorporation in response to amber codons. However, this approach could promote mis-incorporation of canonical amino acids by near cognate suppression. We performed a facile protocol to remove near cognate tRNA isoacceptors of the amber codon from total tRNAs, and used the phosphoserine (Sep) incorporation system as validation. By manipulating codon usage of target genes and tRNA species introduced into the cell-free protein synthesis system, we increased the fidelity of Sep incorporation at a specific position. By removing three near cognate tRNA isoacceptors of the amber stop codon [tRNA Lys , tRNA Tyr , and tRNA Gln (CUG)] from the total tRNA, the near cognate suppression decreased by 5-fold without impairing normal protein synthesis in the cell-free protein synthesis system. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the fidelity of ncAA incorporation was improved. Removal of near cognate tRNA isoacceptors of the amber codon could increase ncAA incorporation fidelity towards the amber stop codon in release factor deficiency systems. We provide a general strategy to improve fidelity of ncAA incorporation towards stop, quadruplet and sense codons in cell-free protein synthesis systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Nanodiamond surfaces on Drug Delivery Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab R; Mamontov, Eugene; Chu, Xiang-qiang

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of RNA nanotechnology is increasing because of its numerous potential applications especially in medical science. The spherical Nanodiamonds (NDs) are becoming popular because of their lesser toxicity, desirable mechanical, optical properties, functionality and available surface areas. On other hand RNAs are stable, flexible and easy to bind to the NDs. In this work, we have studied the tRNA dynamics on ND surface by high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering spectroscopy and all atom molecular dynamics simulation technique to understand how the tRNA motion is affected by the presence of ND. The flexibly of the tRNA is analyzed by the Mean square displacement analysis that shows tRNA have a sharp increase around 230K in its hydrated form. The intermediate scattering function (ISF) representing the tRNA dynamics follows the logarithmic decay as proposed by the Mode Coupling theory (MCT). But most importantly the tRNA dynamics is found to be faster in presence of ND within 220K to 310K compar...

  13. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L.; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary (2°) structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we employ single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem loop or pseudoknot mRNA 2° structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% G-C base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit (E) site. Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both G-C and A-U pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, unfolding of mRNA 2° structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation. PMID:23542154

  14. Eukaryotic opportunists dominate the deep-subsurface biosphere in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgonie, G; Linage-Alvarez, B; Ojo, A O; Mundle, S O C; Freese, L B; Van Rooyen, C; Kuloyo, O; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C; Cason, E D; Vermeulen, J; Pienaar, C; Litthauer, D; Van Niekerk, H; Van Eeden, J; Sherwood Lollar, B; Onstott, T C; Van Heerden, E

    2015-11-24

    Following the discovery of the first Eukarya in the deep subsurface, intense interest has developed to understand the diversity of eukaryotes living in these extreme environments. We identified that Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida and Arthropoda are thriving at 1.4 km depths in palaeometeoric fissure water up to 12,300 yr old in South African mines. Protozoa and Fungi have also been identified; however, they are present in low numbers. Characterization of the different species reveals that many are opportunistic organisms with an origin due to recharge from surface waters rather than soil leaching. This is the first known study to demonstrate the in situ distribution of biofilms on fissure rock faces using video documentation. Calculations suggest that food, not dissolved oxygen is the limiting factor for eukaryal population growth. The discovery of a group of Eukarya underground has important implications for the search for life on other planets in our solar system.

  15. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network......% for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control...... motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles...

  16. CRISPR/Cas and Cmr modules, mobility and evolution of adaptive immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Shiraz Ali; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas and CRISPR/Cmr immune machineries of archaea and bacteria provide an adaptive and effective defence mechanism directed specifically against viruses and plasmids. Present data suggest that both CRISPR/Cas and Cmr modules can behave like integral genetic elements. They tend to be located...... in the more variable regions of chromosomes and are displaced by genome shuffling mechanisms including transposition. CRISPR loci may be broken up and dispersed in chromosomes by transposons with the potential for creating genetic novelty. Both CRISPR/Cas and Cmr modules appear to exchange readily between...... the significant barriers imposed by their differing conjugative, transcriptional and translational mechanisms. There are parallels between the CRISPR crRNAs and eukaryal siRNAs, most notably to germ cell piRNAs which are directed, with the help of effector proteins, to silence or destroy transposons...

  17. Serine/Threonine protein kinases from bacteria, archaea and eukarya share a common evolutionary origin deeply rooted in the tree of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stancik, Ivan Andreas; Šestak, Martin Sebastijan; Ji, Boyang

    2018-01-01

    The main family of serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinases present in eukarya was defined and described by Hanks et al. in 1988. It was initially believed that these kinases do not exist in bacteria, but extensive genome sequencing revealed their existence in many bacteria. For historical reasons......, the term "eukaryotic-type kinases" propagated in the literature to describe bacterial members of this protein family. Here, we argue that this term should be abandoned as a misnomer, and we provide several lines of evidence to support this claim. Our comprehensive phylostratigraphic analysis suggests......, our systematic structural comparison suggests that bacterial Hanks-type kinases resemble their eukaryal counterparts very closely, while their structures appear to be dissimilar from other kinase families of bacterial origin. This indicates that a convergent evolution scenario, by which bacterial...

  18. Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) Analysis to Assess Microbial Community Structure in Compost Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiquia, Sonia M.

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified genes is a widely used fingerprinting technique in composting systems. This analysis is based on the restriction endonuclease digestion of fluorescently end-labeled PCR products. The digested product is mixed with a DNA size standard, itself labeled with a distinct fluorescent dye, and the fragments are then separated by capillary or gel electrophoresis using an automated sequencer. Upon analysis, only the terminal end-labeled restriction fragments are detected. An electropherogram is produced, which shows a profile of compost microbial community as a series of peaks of varying height. This technique has also been effectively used in the exploration of complex microbial environments and in the study of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal populations in natural habitats.

  19. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins...... to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels...... the protein's structure rather than that of the DNA template....

  20. Can yeast systems biology contribute to the understanding of human disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a unicellular eukaryal microorganism that has traditionally been regarded either as a model system for investigating cellular physiology or as a cell factory for biotechnological use, for example for the production of fuels and commodity chemicals such as lactate or pharmaceuticals, including human insulin and HPV vaccines. Systems biology has recently gained momentum and has successfully been used for mapping complex regulatory networks and resolving the dynamics of signal transduction pathways. So far, yeast systems biology has mainly focused on the development of new methods and concepts. There are also some examples of the application of yeast systems biology for improving biotechnological processes. We discuss here how yeast systems biology could be used in elucidating fundamental cellular principles such as those relevant for the study of molecular mechanisms underlying complex human diseases, including the metabolic syndrome and ageing.

  1. Major and minor crRNA annealing sites facilitate low stringency DNA protospacer binding prior to Type I-A CRISPR-Cas interference in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousaei, Marzieh; Deng, Ling; She, Qunxin

    2016-01-01

    The stringency of crRNA-protospacer DNA base pair matching required for effective CRISPR-Cas interference is relatively low in crenarchaeal Sulfolobus species in contrast to that required in some bacteria. To understand its biological significance we studied crRNA-protospacer interactions...... in Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A which carries multiple, and functionally diverse, interference complexes. A range of mismatches were introduced into a vector-borne protospacer that was identical to spacer 1 of CRISPR locus 2, with a cognate CCN PAM sequence. Two important crRNA annealing regions were identified...... lacking type III-Bα and III-Bβ interference gene cassettes, which showed similar interference levels to those of the wild-type strain. Parallels are drawn to the involvement of two annealing sites for microRNAs on some eukaryal mRNAs which provide enhanced binding capacity and specificity. A biological...

  2. TRE5-A retrotransposition profiling reveals putative RNA polymerase III transcription complex binding sites on the Dictyostelium extrachromosomal rDNA element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Spaller

    Full Text Available The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has a haploid genome in which two thirds of the DNA encodes proteins. Consequently, the space available for selfish mobile elements to expand without excess damage to the host genome is limited. The non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon TRE5-A maintains an active population in the D. discoideum genome and apparently adapted to this gene-dense environment by targeting positions ~47 bp upstream of tRNA genes that are devoid of protein-coding regions. Because only ~24% of tRNA genes are associated with a TRE5-A element in the reference genome, we evaluated whether TRE5-A retrotransposition is limited to this subset of tRNA genes. We determined that a tagged TRE5-A element (TRE5-Absr integrated at 384 of 405 tRNA genes, suggesting that expansion of the current natural TRE5-A population is not limited by the availability of targets. We further observed that TRE5-Absr targets the ribosomal 5S gene on the multicopy extrachromosomal DNA element that carries the ribosomal RNA genes, indicating that TRE5-A integration may extend to the entire RNA polymerase III (Pol III transcriptome. We determined that both natural TRE5-A and cloned TRE5-Absr retrotranspose to locations on the extrachromosomal rDNA element that contain tRNA gene-typical A/B box promoter motifs without displaying any other tRNA gene context. Based on previous data suggesting that TRE5-A targets tRNA genes by locating Pol III transcription complexes, we propose that A/B box loci reflect Pol III transcription complex assembly sites that possess a function in the biology of the extrachromosomal rDNA element.

  3. Sequence/structure selective thermal and photochemical cleavage of yeast-tRNA(Phe) by UO(2)2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, N E

    1997-01-01

    suppressed except that strong cleavage at positions G10 and C48-U50 persists, indicating the presence of a high-affinity metal-ion binding site. It is proposed that these photocleavage sites reflect the tertiary structure of the yeast tRNA(Phe) molecule in terms of D-loop/T-loop interaction and anticodon...... loop conformation and that uranyl-mediated photocleavage of RNA may be used as a probe of RNA tertiary structure, and in particular for identifying binding sites for divalent metal ions. Thus a high-affinity metal-ion binding site is inferred in the "central pocket" formed by the D...

  4. Photo-dependent protein biosynthesis using a caged aminoacyl-tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Akiya; Doi, Yoshio; Sisido, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ohtsuki, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Translation systems with four-base codons provide a powerful strategy for protein engineering and protein studies because they enable site-specific incorporation of non-natural amino acids into proteins. In this study, a caged aminoacyl-tRNA with a four-base anticodon was synthesized. The caged aminoacyl-tRNA contains a photocleavable nitroveratryloxycarbonyl (NVOC) group. This study showed that the caged aminoacyl-tRNA was not deacylated, did not bind to EF-Tu, and was activated by light. Photo-dependent translation of an mRNA containing the four-base codon was demonstrated using the caged aminoacyl-tRNA.

  5. Pseudoscorpion mitochondria show rearranged genes and genome-wide reductions of RNA gene sizes and inferred structures, yet typical nucleotide composition bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudoscorpions are chelicerates and have historically been viewed as being most closely related to solifuges, harvestmen, and scorpions. No mitochondrial genomes of pseudoscorpions have been published, but the mitochondrial genomes of some lineages of Chelicerata possess unusual features, including short rRNA genes and tRNA genes that lack sequence to encode arms of the canonical cloverleaf-shaped tRNA. Additionally, some chelicerates possess an atypical guanine-thymine nucleotide bias on the major coding strand of their mitochondrial genomes. Results We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two divergent taxa from the chelicerate order Pseudoscorpiones. We find that these genomes possess unusually short tRNA genes that do not encode cloverleaf-shaped tRNA structures. Indeed, in one genome, all 22 tRNA genes lack sequence to encode canonical cloverleaf structures. We also find that the large ribosomal RNA genes are substantially shorter than those of most arthropods. We inferred secondary structures of the LSU rRNAs from both pseudoscorpions, and find that they have lost multiple helices. Based on comparisons with the crystal structure of the bacterial ribosome, two of these helices were likely contact points with tRNA T-arms or D-arms as they pass through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The mitochondrial gene arrangements of both pseudoscorpions differ from the ancestral chelicerate gene arrangement. One genome is rearranged with respect to the location of protein-coding genes, the small rRNA gene, and at least 8 tRNA genes. The other genome contains 6 tRNA genes in novel locations. Most chelicerates with rearranged mitochondrial genes show a genome-wide reversal of the CA nucleotide bias typical for arthropods on their major coding strand, and instead possess a GT bias. Yet despite their extensive rearrangement, these pseudoscorpion mitochondrial genomes possess a CA bias on the major coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses of all 13

  6. Eukaryotic tRNAs fingerprint invertebrates vis-à-vis vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sanga; Das, Pijush; Samadder, Arpa; Das, Smarajit; Betai, Rupal; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2015-01-01

    During translation, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases recognize the identities of the tRNAs to charge them with their respective amino acids. The conserved identities of 58,244 eukaryotic tRNAs of 24 invertebrates and 45 vertebrates in genomic tRNA database were analyzed and their novel features extracted. The internal promoter sequences, namely, A-Box and B-Box, were investigated and evidence gathered that the intervention of optional nucleotides at 17a and 17b correlated with the optimal length of the A-Box. The presence of canonical transcription terminator sequences at the immediate vicinity of tRNA genes was ventured. Even though non-canonical introns had been reported in red alga, green alga, and nucleomorph so far, fairly motivating evidence of their existence emerged in tRNA genes of other eukaryotes. Non-canonical introns were seen to interfere with the internal promoters in two cases, questioning their transcription fidelity. In a first of its kind, phylogenetic constructs based on tRNA molecules delineated and built the trees of the vast and diverse invertebrates and vertebrates. Finally, two tRNA models representing the invertebrates and the vertebrates were drawn, by isolating the dominant consensus in the positional fluctuations of nucleotide compositions.

  7. In vitro selection of external guide sequences for directing RNase P-mediated inhibition of viral gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianhong; Kim, Joseph; Kilani, Ahmed F; Kim, Kihoon; Dunn, Walter; Jo, Solomon; Nepomuceno, Edward; Liu, Fenyong

    2002-08-16

    External guide sequences (EGSs) are small RNA molecules that bind to a target mRNA, form a complex resembling the structure of a tRNA, and render the mRNA susceptible to hydrolysis by RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme. An in vitro selection procedure was used to select EGSs that direct human RNase P to cleave the mRNA encoding thymidine kinase (TK) of herpes simplex virus 1. One of the selected EGSs, TK17, was at least 35 times more active in directing RNase P in cleaving TK mRNA in vitro than the EGS derived from a natural tRNA sequence. TK17, when in complex with the TK mRNA sequence, resembles a portion of tRNA structure and exhibits an enhanced binding affinity to the target mRNA. Moreover, a reduction of 95 and 50% in the TK expression was found in herpes simplex virus 1-infected cells that expressed the selected EGS and the EGS derived from the natural tRNA sequence, respectively. Our study provides direct evidence that EGS molecules isolated by the selection procedure are effective in tissue culture. These results also demonstrate the potential for using the selection procedure as a general approach for the generation of highly effective EGSs for gene-targeting application.

  8. The effects of the context-dependent codon usage bias on the structure of the nsp1α of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao-zhong; You, Ya-nan; Sun, Dong-jie; Chen, Hao-tai; Wang, Yong-lu; Chang, Hui-yun; Pan, Li; Fang, Yu-zhen; Zhang, Zhong-wang; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jian-liang; Liu, Xin-sheng; Shao, Jun-jun; Zhao, Fu-rong; Lin, Tong; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Zhang, Yong-guang; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The information about the crystal structure of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader protease nsp1α is available to analyze the roles of tRNA abundance of pigs and codon usage of the nsp1 α gene in the formation of this protease. The effects of tRNA abundance of the pigs and the synonymous codon usage and the context-dependent codon bias (CDCB) of the nsp1 α on shaping the specific folding units (α-helix, β-strand, and the coil) in the nsp1α were analyzed based on the structural information about this protease from protein data bank (PDB: 3IFU) and the nsp1 α of the 191 PRRSV strains. By mapping the overall tRNA abundance along the nsp1 α, we found that there is no link between the fluctuation of the overall tRNA abundance and the specific folding units in the nsp1α, and the low translation speed of ribosome caused by the tRNA abundance exists in the nsp1 α. The strong correlation between some synonymous codon usage and the specific folding units in the nsp1α was found, and the phenomenon of CDCB exists in the specific folding units of the nsp1α. These findings provide an insight into the roles of the synonymous codon usage and CDCB in the formation of PRRSV nsp1α structure.

  9. The Effects of the Context-Dependent Codon Usage Bias on the Structure of the nsp1α of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-zhong Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The information about the crystal structure of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV leader protease nsp1α is available to analyze the roles of tRNA abundance of pigs and codon usage of the nsp1α gene in the formation of this protease. The effects of tRNA abundance of the pigs and the synonymous codon usage and the context-dependent codon bias (CDCB of the nsp1α on shaping the specific folding units (α-helix, β-strand, and the coil in the nsp1α were analyzed based on the structural information about this protease from protein data bank (PDB: 3IFU and the nsp1α of the 191 PRRSV strains. By mapping the overall tRNA abundance along the nsp1α, we found that there is no link between the fluctuation of the overall tRNA abundance and the specific folding units in the nsp1α, and the low translation speed of ribosome caused by the tRNA abundance exists in the nsp1α. The strong correlation between some synonymous codon usage and the specific folding units in the nsp1α was found, and the phenomenon of CDCB exists in the specific folding units of the nsp1α. These findings provide an insight into the roles of the synonymous codon usage and CDCB in the formation of PRRSV nsp1α structure.

  10. tRNA--the golden standard in molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barciszewska, Mirosława Z; Perrigue, Patrick M; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) represent a major class of RNA molecules. Their primary function is to help decode a messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence in order to synthesize protein and thus ensures the precise translation of genetic information that is imprinted in DNA. The discovery of tRNA in the late 1950's provided critical insight into a genetic machinery when little was known about the central dogma of molecular biology. In 1965, Robert Holley determined the first nucleotide sequence of alanine transfer RNA (tRNA(Ala)) which earned him the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Today, tRNA is one of the best described and characterized biological molecules. Here we review some of the key historical events in tRNA research which led to breakthrough discoveries and new developments in molecular biology.

  11. Comment on "Ribosome utilizes the minimum free energy changes to achieve the highest decoding rate and fidelity"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savir, Yonatan; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2016-05-01

    We examined [Y. Savir and T. Tlusty, Cell 153, 471 (2013), 10.1016/j.cell.2013.03.032] the decoding performance of tRNA by the ribosome. For this purpose, we specified the kinetics of tRNA decoding and the corresponding energy landscape, from which we calculated the steady-state decoding rate RC. Following our work, Xie reexamined [P. Xie, Phys. Rev. E 92, 022716 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.022716] the energy landscape of tRNA decoding. His analysis relies on an alternative expression for RC, while claiming that the expression we use is missing some terms. In this Comment we rederive in detail our expression for the steady-state decoding rate RC, show they hold, explain why the alternative expression for RC is inaccurate, and discuss the underlying intuition.

  12. Localization of human RNase Z isoforms: dual nuclear/mitochondrial targeting of the ELAC2 gene product by alternative translation initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Rossmanith

    Full Text Available RNase Z is an endonuclease responsible for the removal of 3' extensions from tRNA precursors, an essential step in tRNA biogenesis. Human cells contain a long form (RNase Z(L encoded by ELAC2, and a short form (RNase Z(S; ELAC1. We studied their subcellular localization by expression of proteins fused to green fluorescent protein. RNase Z(S was found in the cytosol, whereas RNase Z(L localized to the nucleus and mitochondria. We show that alternative translation initiation is responsible for the dual targeting of RNase Z(L. Due to the unfavorable context of the first AUG of ELAC2, translation apparently also starts from the second AUG, whereby the mitochondrial targeting sequence is lost and the protein is instead routed to the nucleus. Our data suggest that RNase Z(L is the enzyme involved in both, nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3' end maturation.

  13. 16S-23S rDNA spacer of Pectinatus, Selenomonas and Zymophilus reveal new phylogenetic relationships between these genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Y; Ogata, T

    2000-03-01

    The 16S-23S rDNA spacer regions of two Pectinatus species, two Zymophilus species and one Selenomonas species were cloned after PCR amplification. The results of PCR amplification showed that these species had two types of spacer regions which differ in molecular size (long and short). Only the long spacer regions in these bacteria contained one or two tRNA genes (alanine and/or isoleucine). The spacer regions in these bacteria had a relatively high level of homology. Homology was particularly high for bacteria belonging to the same genus. Interestingly, the order of the two tRNA genes present in the long spacer regions of Pectinatus and Selenomonas was the reverse of that which had been previously reported for other bacteria. The results of spacer homology analysis and the order of the tRNA genes suggest that the taxonomic classification of anaerobic bacteria isolated from the brewing process should be re-examined.

  14. A conserved RNA polymerase III promoter required for gammaherpesvirus TMER transcription and microRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Kevin W; Claypool, David J; van Dyk, Linda F

    2014-07-01

    Canonical RNA polymerase III (pol III) type 2 promoters contain a single A and B box and are well documented for their role in tRNA and SINE transcription in eukaryotic cells. The genome of Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) contains eight polycistronic tRNA-microRNA encoded RNA (TMER) genes that are transcribed from a RNA pol III type 2-like promoter containing triplicated A box elements. Here, we demonstrate that the triplicated A box sequences are required in their entirety to produce functional MuHV-4 miRNAs. We also identify that these RNA pol III type 2-like promoters are conserved in eukaryotic genomes. Human and mouse predicted tRNA genes containing these promoters also show enrichment of alternative RNA pol III transcription termination sequences and are predicted to give rise to longer tRNA primary transcripts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. tRNAs: cellular barcodes for amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Chen, Shawn; Dare, Kiley

    2010-01-01

    The role of tRNA in translating the genetic code has received considerable attention over the last 50 years, and we now know in great detail how particular amino acids are specifically selected and brought to the ribosome in response to the corresponding mRNA codon. Over the same period, it has...... also become increasingly clear that the ribosome is not the only destination to which tRNAs deliver amino acids, with processes ranging from lipid modification to antibiotic biosynthesis all using aminoacyl-tRNAs as substrates. Here we review examples of alternative functions for tRNA beyond...... translation, which together suggest that the role of tRNA is to deliver amino acids for a variety of processes that includes, but is not limited to, protein synthesis....

  16. Ribosomal targets for antibiotic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Feldman, Michael Brian; Wang, Leyi; Doudna Cate, James H.; Pulk, Arto; Altman, Roger B.; Wasserman, Michael R

    2016-09-13

    The present invention relates to methods to identify molecules that binds in the neomycin binding pocket of a bacterial ribosome using structures of an intact bacterial ribosome that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined by x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit (P/E) site. Additionally, the invention relates to various assays, including single-molecule assay for ribosome recycling, and methods to identify compounds that interfere with ribosomal function by detecting newly identified intermediate FRET states using known and novel FRET pairs on the ribosome. The invention also provides vectors and compositions with an N-terminally tagged S13 protein.

  17. The Stereochemical Basis of the Genetic Code and the (Mostly Autotrophic Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Fontecilla-Camps

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spark-tube experiments and analysis of meteorite contents have led to the widespread notion that abiotic organic molecules were the first life components. However, there is a contradiction between the abundance of simple molecules, such as the amino acids glycine and alanine, observed in these studies, and the minimal functional complexity that even the least sophisticated living system should require. I will argue that although simple abiotic molecules must have primed proto-metabolic pathways, only Darwinian evolving systems could have generated life. This condition may have been initially fulfilled by both replicating RNAs and autocatalytic reaction chains, such as the reductive citric acid cycle. The interactions between nucleotides and biotic amino acids, which conferred new functionalities to the former, also resulted in the progressive stereochemical recognition of the latter by cognate anticodons. At this point only large enough amino acids would be recognized by the primordial RNA adaptors and could polymerize forming the first peptides. The gene duplication of RNA adaptors was a crucial event. By removing one of the anticodons from the acceptor stem the new RNA adaptor liberated itself from the stereochemical constraint and could be acylated by smaller amino acids. The emergence of messenger RNA and codon capture followed.

  18. Ribosome utilizes the minimum free energy changes to achieve the highest decoding rate and fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The performance of ribosome translation can be characterized by two factors, the translation rate and fidelity. Here, we provide analytical studies of the effect of the near-cognate tRNAs on the two factors. It is shown that the increase of the concentration of the near-cognate tRNAs relative to that of the cognate tRNA has negative effects on the ribosome translation by reducing both the translation rate and the translation fidelity. The effect of the near-cognate ternary complexes on the translation rate results mainly from the initial selection phase, whereas the proofreading phase has a minor effect. By contrast, the effect of the near-cognate ternary complexes on the fidelity results almost equally from the two phases. By using two successive phases, the initial selection and the proofreading, the ribosome can achieve higher translation fidelity than the product of the fidelity when only the initial selection is included and when only the proofreading is included, especially at the large ratio of the concentration of the near-cognate tRNAs compared to that of the cognate tRNA. Moreover, we study the changes of the free energy landscape in the tRNA decoding step. It is found that the rate constants of the tRNA decoding step measured experimentally give the minimum energy changes for the ribosomal complex to attain the optimal performance with both the highest decoding rate and fidelity and/or with the maximum value of the decoding fitness function. This suggests that the ribosome has evolved to utilize the minimum free energy changes gained from the conformational changes of the ribosome, EF-Tu, and tRNA to achieve the optimal performance in the tRNA decoding.

  19. The Genomic Pattern of tDNA Operon Expression in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In fast-growing microorganisms, a tRNA concentration profile enriched in major isoacceptors selects for the biased usage of cognate codons. This optimizes translational rate for the least mass invested in the translational apparatus. Such translational streamlining is thought to be growth-regulated, but its genetic basis is poorly understood. First, we found in reanalysis of the E. coli tRNA profile that the degree to which it is translationally streamlined is nearly invariant with growth rate. Then, using least squares multiple regression, we partitioned tRNA isoacceptor pools to predicted tDNA operons from the E. coli K12 genome. Co-expression of tDNAs in operons explains the tRNA profile significantly better than tDNA gene dosage alone. Also, operon expression increases significantly with proximity to the origin of replication, oriC, at all growth rates. Genome location explains about 15% of expression variation in a form, at a given growth rate, that is consistent with replication-dependent gene concentration effects. Yet the change in the tRNA profile with growth rate is less than would be expected from such effects. We estimated per-copy expression rates for all tDNA operons that were consistent with independent estimates for rDNA operons. We also found that tDNA operon location, and the location dependence of expression, were significantly different in the leading and lagging strands. The operonic organization and genomic location of tDNA operons are significant factors influencing their expression. Nonrandom patterns of location and strandedness shown by tDNA operons in E. coli suggest that their genomic architecture may be under selection to satisfy physiological demand for tRNA expression at high growth rates.

  20. Discovery of permuted and recently split transfer RNAs in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background As in eukaryotes, precursor transfer RNAs in Archaea often contain introns that are removed in tRNA maturation. Two unrelated archaeal species display unique pre-tRNA processing complexity in the form of split tRNA genes, in which two to three segments of tRNAs are transcribed from different loci, then trans-spliced to form a mature tRNA. Another rare type of pre-tRNA, found only in eukaryotic algae, is permuted, where the 3' half is encoded upstream of the 5' half, and must be processed to be functional. Results Using an improved version of the gene-finding program tRNAscan-SE, comparative analyses and experimental verifications, we have now identified four novel trans-spliced tRNA genes, each in a different species of the Desulfurococcales branch of the Archaea: tRNAAsp(GUC) in Aeropyrum pernix and Thermosphaera aggregans, and tRNALys(CUU) in Staphylothermus hellenicus and Staphylothermus marinus. Each of these includes features surprisingly similar to previously studied split tRNAs, yet comparative genomic context analysis and phylogenetic distribution suggest several independent, relatively recent splitting events. Additionally, we identified the first examples of permuted tRNA genes in Archaea: tRNAiMet(CAU) and tRNATyr(GUA) in Thermofilum pendens, which appear to be permuted in the same arrangement seen previously in red alga. Conclusions Our findings illustrate that split tRNAs are sporadically spread across a major branch of the Archaea, and that permuted tRNAs are a new shared characteristic between archaeal and eukaryotic species. The split tRNA discoveries also provide new clues to their evolutionary history, supporting hypotheses for recent acquisition via viral or other mobile elements. PMID:21489296