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Sample records for ettevalmistusest salt lake

  1. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  2. Salting our freshwater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sarah L.; Burke, Samantha M.; Doubek, Jonathan P.; Krivak-Tetley, Flora E.; Skaff, Nicholas K.; Summers, Jamie C.; Farrell, Kaitlin J.; McCullough, Ian M.; Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Roberts, Derek C.; Ouyang, Zutao; Scordo, Facundo; Hanson, Paul C.; Weathers, Kathleen C.

    2017-01-01

    The highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L−1), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue. PMID:28396392

  3. Early Holocene Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Madsen, David B.; Miller, David; Thompson, Robert S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Shorelines and surficial deposits (including buried forest-floor mats and organic-rich wetland sediments) show that Great Salt Lake did not rise higher than modern lake levels during the earliest Holocene (11.5–10.2 cal ka BP; 10–9 14C ka BP). During that period, finely laminated, organic-rich muds (sapropel) containing brine-shrimp cysts and pellets and interbedded sodium-sulfate salts were deposited on the lake floor. Sapropel deposition was probably caused by stratification of the water column — a freshwater cap possibly was formed by groundwater, which had been stored in upland aquifers during the immediately preceding late-Pleistocene deep-lake cycle (Lake Bonneville), and was actively discharging on the basin floor. A climate characterized by low precipitation and runoff, combined with local areas of groundwater discharge in piedmont settings, could explain the apparent conflict between evidence for a shallow lake (a dry climate) and previously published interpretations for a moist climate in the Great Salt Lake basin of the eastern Great Basin.

  4. Monitoring Change in Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Carling, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Great Salt Lake is the largest hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest terminal lake in the world (Figure 1). The open water and adjacent wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere [Aldrich and Paul, 2002]. In addition, the area is of important economic value: Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) residing in Great Salt Lake support an aquaculture shrimp cyst industry with annual revenues as high as $60 million.

  5. Some Lake Level Control Alternatives for the Great Salt Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Marvin E.; Christensen, Ronald K.; Riley, J. Paul

    1983-01-01

    Fluctuations of the level of the Great Salt Lake cause large changes in both surface area and shoreline. Developments adjacent to the lake have been damaged by both high and low lake levels; and unless measures are implemented to regulate lake level fluctuations or otherwise to protect these developments, damages will continue. Various possible managment alternatives for mitigating potential damages from lake leve...

  6. Monitoring change in Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Angeroth, Cory E.; Freeman, Michael L.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Carling, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake, only limited water quality monitoring has occurred historically. To change this, new monitoring stations and networks—gauges of lake level height and rate of inflow, moored buoys, and multiple lake-bottom sensors—will provide important information that can be used to make informed decisions regarding future management of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem.

  7. Reactive halogen species above salt lakes and salt pans

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Salt lakes can be found on all continents and saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth (FAO, 2012). This thesis investigates the presence of reactive halogen species (RHS) above salt lakes and saline soils to evaluate their relevance for tropospheric chemistry of the planetary boundary layer. Ground-based MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS measurements were conducted at salt lakes and two other sites with high halogen content. Prior to this work, RHS were found at three salt ...

  8. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed

  9. BAIA VERDE - SLANIC PRAHOVA SALTED LAKES COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica SAVA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Baia Verde – Slanic Prahova Lakes Complex have been formed by water accumulation resulted out of infiltrated salted water from bell shaped surface salt mines dated XVII century (1685. Such lakes, as per their method of formation, can be also found in other places from the SubCarpathians area (Telega – Prahova, Ocnele Mari – Valcea, Transilvanian Depression (Ocna Sibiului, Turda, Sovata, Ocna Dejului, etc.. Water contact with diapires, in the places where have always existed such mining explorations and exploitation, has determined the formation of salted lakes having balneary and therapeutically qualities and sometimes the development of a heliothermic / mezothermic bed. At Slanic – Prahova besides the three lakes known as Baia Verde 1, 2 and 3, there is also the lake Baia Baciului situated at the border of “Salt Mountain” which represented the first objective for capitalization of the balnear and therapeutically potential of the area.

  10. Early Holocene Great Salt Lake, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Madsen, David B.; Miller, David M.; Thompson, Robert S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2015-07-01

    Shorelines and surficial deposits (including buried forest-floor mats and organic-rich wetland sediments) show that Great Salt Lake did not rise higher than modern lake levels during the earliest Holocene (11.5-10.2 cal ka BP; 10-9 14C ka BP). During that period, finely laminated, organic-rich muds (sapropel) containing brine-shrimp cysts and pellets and interbedded sodium-sulfate salts were deposited on the lake floor. Sapropel deposition was probably caused by stratification of the water column - a freshwater cap possibly was formed by groundwater, which had been stored in upland aquifers during the immediately preceding late-Pleistocene deep-lake cycle (Lake Bonneville), and was actively discharging on the basin floor. A climate characterized by low precipitation and runoff, combined with local areas of groundwater discharge in piedmont settings, could explain the apparent conflict between evidence for a shallow lake (a dry climate) and previously published interpretations for a moist climate in the Great Salt Lake basin of the eastern Great Basin.

  11. 75 FR 22892 - Environmental Impact Statement: Salt Lake County, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Salt Lake County, UT AGENCY: Federal... transportation improvement project in Salt Lake County, Utah. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Woolford, Environmental Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West 4700 South, Suite 9A, Salt Lake City...

  12. 75 FR 9476 - Environmental Impact Statement: Salt Lake County, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Salt Lake County, UT AGENCY: Federal... transportation improvement project in Salt Lake County, Utah. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bryan Dillon, Area Engineer, Federal Highway Administration, 2520 West 4700 South, Suite 9A, Salt Lake City, UT 84118...

  13. Microseisms from the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, K. J.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, V.

    2014-12-01

    Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA We performed frequency-dependent polarization and power analysis on continuous ambient seismic energy recorded by broadband seismic stations that were part of the Utah Regional Seismic Network (UU) for the years of 2001-2013. The number of broadband seismometers increased from 10 to 28 in this time period. As expected, at all 28 stations the single and double frequency peaks caused by microseisms were observed in the range of 3-20 s. At four of the stations located around the Great Salt Lake (BGU, HVU, NOQ, and SPU) an additional noise peak was intermittently observed in the period range of 0.8-1.2 s. This noise peak was strongest at SPU, a station located on the tip of a peninsula jutting into the lake from the north, and weakest at NOQ, a station located a few kilometers south of the lake in the Oquirrh Mountains. The noise peaks occur in both daytime and nighttime, and have durations lasting from a couple of hours to multiple days. They occur more frequently in the spring, summer, and fall, and less commonly in the winter. The occurrences of noise peaks in the summer show a day night pattern and seem to reach a peak during the night. The time dependence of this 1-s seismic noise was compared to records of wind speed measured at 1-hr intervals from nearby meteorological stations run by the NWS, and to lake level gage height measurements made by the USGS. Correlations with wind speed and lake level were done for every month of the year in 2013. Results showed that the correlations with wind varied throughout the year from a high of 0.49 in November to a low of 0.20 in the month of January. The correlation with lake level also varied throughout the year and the strongest correlation was found in the month of December with a correlation of 0.43. While these correlation values are statistically significant, neither wind nor lake level can completely explain the seismic observations

  14. Virus-host interactions in salt lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kate; Russ, Brendan E; Dyall-Smith, Michael L

    2007-08-01

    Natural hypersaline waters are widely distributed around the globe, as both continental surface waters and sea floor lakes, the latter being maintained by the large density difference between the hypersaline and overlying marine water. Owing to the extreme salt concentrations, close to or at saturation (approximately 35%, w/v), such waters might be expected to be devoid of life but, in fact, maintain dense populations of microbes. The majority of these microorganisms are halophilic prokaryotes belonging to the Domain Archaea, 'haloarchaea'. Viruses infecting haloarchaea are a vital part of hypersaline ecosystems, in many circumstances outnumbering cells by 10-100-fold. However, few of these 'haloviruses' have been isolated and even fewer have been characterised in molecular detail. In this review, we explore the methods used by haloviruses to replicate within their hosts and consider the implications of haloviral-haloarchaeal interactions for salt lake ecology.

  15. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?: e0144111

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James S White; Sarah E Null; David G Tarboton

    2015-01-01

      Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake...

  16. Stereo Pair, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This image pair provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  17. Salt Lake Community College Strategic Vision, September 2001-June 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt Lake Community Coll., UT.

    This document reviews July 2001 findings from a team of Salt Lake Community College administrators, faculty, and staff who were appointed by the college President to prepare a strategic plan that defines the strategic vision of Salt Lake Community College. The team utilized a planning process that began with an evaluation of the external and…

  18. SALT LAKES OF THE AFRICAN RIFT SYSTEM: A VALUABLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    ABSTRACT. The Tanzanian rift system salt lakes present significant cultural, ecological, recreational and economical values. Beyond the wealth of minerals, resources of these rift salt lakes include unique wildlife, for instance Lesser Flamingo (Phoenicopterus minor) and Cichlids (Alcolapia spp), which adapted chemically ...

  19. 78 FR 27872 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT...: This action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City... operations at Salt Lake City International Airport. This action also would adjust the geographic coordinates...

  20. 77 FR 49712 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment to Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City... modifies the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B airspace to contain aircraft conducting Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) instrument approach procedures to Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC), Salt Lake City, UT...

  1. Production of magnesium from Great Salt Lake, Utah USA

    OpenAIRE

    Tripp, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium metal has been commercially produced from the waters of Great Salt Lake since 1972. Worldwide use of magnesium has markedly increased over the last twenty years due to its unique properties of low density and high strength. Great Salt Lake is a valuable resource for the recovery of magnesium minerals due to its chemical composition, natural geography/climate and proximity to transportation and markets. US Magnesium LLC and its predecessors have overcome various technical challenges ...

  2. Great Salt Lake basins study unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Baskin, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began implementing a full-scale National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program.The long-term goals of the NAWQA Program are to describe the status and trends in the quality of a large, representative part of the Nation’s surface- and ground-water resources and to provide a sound, scientific understanding of the primary natural and human factors that affect the quality of these resources. In meeting these goals, the program will produce a wealth of water-quality information that will be useful to policy makers and managers at Federal, State, and local levels.A major design feature of the NAWQA Program will enable water-quality information at different areal scales to be integrated. A major component of the program is study-unit investigations, which ae the principal building blocks of the program upon which national-level assessment activities will be based. The 60 study-unit investigations that make up the program are hydrologic systems that include principal river basins and aquifer systems throughout the Nation. These study units cover areas from less than 1.000 to greater than 60,000 mi2 and incorporate from about 60 to 70 percent of the Nation’s water use and population served by public water supply. In 1993, assessment activities began in the Great Salt Lake Basins NAWQA study unit.

  3. The effects of restricted circulation on the salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Bolke, E.L.

    1973-01-01

    During the 1970-1972 water years a net load of dissolved solids of 0.26 billion tons moved from the south to north part of Great Salt Lake, Utah, through the causeway of the Southern Pacific Transportation Co. The load loss from the south part during the 1972 water year was only 0.01 billion tons, thus indicating that the salt balance between the two parts of the lake was near equilibrium for inflow conditions such as those of 1972.

  4. Great Salt Lake Past and Present: Elevation and Salinity Changes to Utah's Great Salt Lake from Railroad Causeway Alterations

    OpenAIRE

    White, James S.

    2015-01-01

    In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway bisecting Utah’s Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide culverts installed during original construction, an 88 meter breach opening installed in 1984, and the semi porous boulder and gravel causeway material. The south arm receives nearly all streamflows entering Great Salt Lake and a salinity gradient between the two arms developed over time...

  5. [Microbial diversity of salt lakes in Badain Jaran desert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Hao, Chunbo; Wang, Lihua; Pei, Lixin

    2015-04-04

    We characterized procaryotic biodiversity, community structure and the relationship between the community structure and environmental factors of salt lakes in Badain Jaran desert, Inner Mongolia, China. We constructed 16S rRNA gene clone libraries by molecular biology techniques to analyze the procaryotic phylogenetic relationships, and used R language to compare the community structure of haloalkalophiles in the salt lakes. Water in this region has a high salinity ranging from 165 to 397 g/L. The water is strongly alkaline with pH value above 10. The microbial diversity and community structure of the salt lakes are obviously different. The diversity of bacteria is more abundant than that of archaea. The main categories of bacteria in the samples are Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Alphaproteobacteria, Firmicute and Verrucomicrobia, whereas all archaea only belong to Halobacteriaceae of Euryarchaeota. Salinity is the most important environmental factor influencing the bacterial community structure, whereas the archaea community structure was influenced comprehensively by multiple environmental factors.

  6. Draft Mercury Aquatic Wildlife Benchmarks for Great Salt Lake ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the EPA Region 8's rationale for selecting aquatic wildlife dietary and tissue mercury benchmarks for use in interpreting available data collected from the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands. EPA Region 8 has conducted a literature review to update and refine the aquatic wildlife dietary and tissue benchmarks for mercury that may be used for data assessment until water quality criteria can be derived. The document describes how aquatic wildlife dietary and tissue benchmarks for mercury have been compiled for existing literature sources and the approach for how they will be used to evaluate whether the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands meet its designated use for aquatic wildlife.

  7. Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICF Kaiser

    1999-05-20

    Since its designation as a national Clean City in 1994, Salt Lake Clean Cities has put more than 2,600 alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) on community streets. The 82 business, nonprofit, and government agencies that comprise the coalition are all dedicated to cleaning the air by reducing vehicle exhaust. Salt Lake Clean Cities has the third largest compressed natural gas and propane-refueling infrastructure in the country, with 98 locations available. They sponsor an annual ''Spring Soiree'' to increase public awareness about the program and educate the public about the benefits of alternative fuel and AFVs.

  8. Investigations on boron isotopic geochemistry of salt lakes in Qaidam basin, Qinghai

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Xiao, Y.K.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Liu, W.G.; Wang, Y.H.; Jin, L.

    The isotopic compositions of boron in salt lakes located in Qaidam Basin, Qinghai, have been determined using the procedure of thermal ionization mass spectrometry of cesium borate with graphite loading. The salt lakes were controlled by evaporation...

  9. 75 FR 73983 - Proposed Modification of the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Modification of the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B... Terminal, 397 North 2370 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84116. (3) The meeting on Thursday, February 3, 2011... Lake City TRACON, Salt Lake City ATCT/TRACON, 1201 North 4000 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84116. (801) 325...

  10. 78 FR 76781 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ...; Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Salt Lake City Class B surface area and the Hill Air Force Base (AFB) Class D airspace area. This... north and south through the Salt Lake Valley over Interstate 15. DATES: Comments must be received on or...

  11. 78 FR 2434 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT..., Salt Lake City, UT 84108, telephone (801) 581-3876. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in..., Salt Lake City, UT 84108, telephone (801) 581-3876, before February 11, 2013. Repatriation of the human...

  12. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT... February 11, 2013. ADDRESSES: Duncan Metcalfe, Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake... funerary objects should contact Duncan Metcalfe, Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake...

  13. 78 FR 45848 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY... airspace at Salt Lake City, UT, to accommodate aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning... procedures at Salt Lake City International Airport. This improves the safety and management of Instrument...

  14. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake... Natural History, 1390 E. Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, telephone (801) 581-3876, before...

  15. 76 FR 52905 - Proposed Amendment to Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to modify Salt Lake City, UT, Class B airspace to contain aircraft conducting Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) instrument approach procedures to Salt Lake City International Airport (SCL), Salt Lake City, UT. The FAA is taking this action to improve the flow of air traffic...

  16. Salt Lake City, Utah: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Salt Lake City, UT, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  17. Salt Lake hospital survives close brush with twister, power outage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, C J

    1999-01-01

    LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City found that dealing with wounded and casualties from a natural disaster is just one problem; dealing with the natural disaster itself can be a whole other problem. A great success story in the midst of this summer's terrible tornado which hit Utah's capitol.

  18. Conceptual Model for Selenium Cycling in the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. P.; Conover, M. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Adams, J.

    2006-12-01

    The conceptual model for Selenium cycling in the Great Salt Lake was developed to guide investigations in support of determining an open water selenium standard for the Great Salt Lake. The motivation to determine this particular selenium standard derives from public concern for a plan to allow disposal of reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate in the GSL, which would contain elevated concentrations of major and trace elements, including selenium. The development of an open water standard for selenium requires a working knowledge of the biological significance of existing selenium concentrations in the Great Salt Lake, as well as a working understanding of the likely changes of these concentrations over time given existing and proposed loads to the system. This working knowledge" is being represented in a conceptual model that accounts for selenium in various stocks" in the system (e.g. water, sediment, biota) and the flow" of selenium between stocks (e.g., precipitation and settling, volatilization, bioconcentration). It illustrates the critical pathway of selenium in the Great Salt Lake from water, to microorganisms, to brine shrimp and brine flies, to birds, and to their eggs. It also addresses the complexity of the GSL system: a) Spatially diverse, being comprised by four distinct bays and two layers, with major differences in salinity among their waters. b) Temporally dynamic, due to seasonal and inter-annual variations in runoff. The conceptual model is presently descriptive, but will serve as the basis for a semi-quantitative model that will be fed by data accumulated during subsequent investigations.

  19. Volatile Selenium Flux in the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Volatilization of selenium has been proven to be the major source of selenium vapor from oceans and estuaries and it may be the major mechanism of permanent selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake (other than brine shrimp harvest). However, the volatilization flux of selenium from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hyper-saline environment. This work presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of volatile selenium (geographical and with depth) in the South Arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of volatile selenium in a cryo-focusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryo-trapped volatile selenium was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-MS. The results show concentrations of volatile selenium that are much greater than values reported for marine estuaries and oceans. Volatile selenium flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport equations corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the South Arm of the Great Salt Lake.

  20. RadNet Air Data From Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Salt Lake City, UT from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  1. Physico-chemical and Microbiological Monitoring of Solotvino Salt Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonka Y.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Healing properties of salt lakes are due to physico-chemical and bacterial composition. So important is the study of physical and chemical properties of the water for the development of medical technologies and treatments of monitoring observations of the properties in terms of environmental issues.

  2. Disaster Preparedness: Lessons from the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, Richard A.

    Between February 7 and February 24, 2002, Utah and Salt Lake City hosted the Winter Olympics. Due to the bombing at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta and the emotional fallout that resulted, it was recommended that the Utah Psychological Association and Utah Red Cross plan for such an occurrence and organize a coordinated Disaster Mental Health…

  3. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Steven R.; Thomas, Blakemore E.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1997-01-01

    The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of a causeway constructed during 1957-59 that divides the lake into the south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway originally included two culverts, each 15 feet wide, and the permeable rock-fill material.During 1980-86, the salt balance changed as a result of record high inflow that averaged 4,627,000 acre-feet annually and modifications made to the conveyance properties of the causeway that included opening a 300-foot-wide breach. In this study, a model developed in 1973 by Waddell and Bolke to simulate the water and salt balance of the lake was revised to accommodate the high water-surface altitude and modifications made to the causeway. This study, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of State Lands and Forestry, updates the model with monitoring data collected during 1980-86. This report describes the calibration of the model and presents the results of simulations for three hypothetical 10-year periods.During January 1, 1980, to July 31, 1984, a net load of 0.5 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the south to the north part of the lake primarily as a result of record inflows. From August 1, 1984, when the breach was opened, to December 31,1986, a net load of 0.3 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the north to the south part of the lake primarily as a result of the breach.For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in the water-surface altitude decreasing from about 4,200 to 4,192 feet, there was a net movement of about 1.0 billion tons of dissolved salt from the south to the north part, and about 1.7 billion tons of salt precipitated in the north part. For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in a rise in water-surface altitude from about 4,200 to 4

  4. The ways of transformation of salt production from the saline lakes of Apsheron peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    В. А. Мамедов; Х. Х. Халилова

    2016-01-01

    The issues of salt production at salt lakes of Apsheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan are reviewed here. The paper objective is to examine the brine formation process and analyze the ways of transformation of salt extraction from the lakes of Apsheron Peninsula under ever increasing industrial development and urbanization. The research on ecological state of salt lakes at the peninsula have shown that the decades-long development of oil and gas and other industries had a dramatical impact on the na...

  5. Method for estimating road salt contamination of Norwegian lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitterød, Nils-Otto; Wike Kronvall, Kjersti; Turtumøygaard, Stein; Haaland, Ståle

    2013-04-01

    Consumption of road salt in Norway, used to improve winter road conditions, has been tripled during the last two decades, and there is a need to quantify limits for optimal use of road salt to avoid further environmental harm. The purpose of this study was to implement methodology to estimate chloride concentration in any given water body in Norway. This goal is feasible to achieve if the complexity of solute transport in the landscape is simplified. The idea was to keep computations as simple as possible to be able to increase spatial resolution of input functions. The first simplification we made was to treat all roads exposed to regular salt application as steady state sources of sodium chloride. This is valid if new road salt is applied before previous contamination is removed through precipitation. The main reasons for this assumption are the significant retention capacity of vegetation; organic matter; and soil. The second simplification we made was that the groundwater table is close to the surface. This assumption is valid for major part of Norway, which means that topography is sufficient to delineate catchment area at any location in the landscape. Given these two assumptions, we applied spatial functions of mass load (mass NaCl pr. time unit) and conditional estimates of normal water balance (volume of water pr. time unit) to calculate steady state chloride concentration along the lake perimeter. Spatial resolution of mass load and estimated concentration along the lake perimeter was 25 m x 25 m while water balance had 1 km x 1 km resolution. The method was validated for a limited number of Norwegian lakes and estimation results have been compared to observations. Initial results indicate significant overlap between measurements and estimations, but only for lakes where the road salt is the major contribution for chloride contamination. For lakes in catchments with high subsurface transmissivity, the groundwater table is not necessarily following the

  6. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway, 1987-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Brian L.; Miller, Craig W.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Pacific Transportation Company completed a rock-fill causeway across Great Salt Lake in 1959. The effect of the causeway was to change the water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake by creating two separate but interconnected parts of the lake, with more than 95 percent of freshwater surface inflow entering the lake south of the causeway.The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of the causeway that divides the lake into south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway consist of two 15-foot-wide culverts, a 290-foot-wide breach, and permeable rock-fill material.

  7. The Younger Dryas phase of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Miller, D.M.; McGeehin, J.P.; Zachary, C.; Mahan, S.

    2005-01-01

    Field investigations at the Public Shooting Grounds (a wildlife-management area on the northeastern shore of Great Salt Lake) and radiocarbon dating show that the Great Salt Lake rose to the Gilbert shoreline sometime between 12.9 and 11.2 cal ka. We interpret a ripple-laminated sand unit exposed at the Public Shooting Grounds, and dated to this time interval, as the nearshore sediments of Great Salt Lake deposited during the formation of the Gilbert shoreline. The ripple-laminated sand is overlain by channel-fill deposits that overlap in age (11.9-11.2 cal ka) with the sand, and by wetland deposits (11.1 to 10.5 cal ka). Consistent accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon ages were obtained from samples of plant fragments, including those of emergent aquatic plants, but mollusk shells from spring and marsh deposits yielded anomalously old ages, probably because of a variable radiocarbon reservoir effect. The Bonneville basin was effectively wet during at least part of the Younger Dryas global-cooling interval, however, conflicting results from some Great Basin locations and proxy records indicate that the regional effects of Younger Dryas cooling are still not well understood. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbial Biogeography of Six Salt Lakes in Inner Mongolia, China, and a Salt Lake in Argentina ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaling, Eulyn; Wang, Huanzhi; Venables, Madeleine; Wallace, Andrew; Grant, William D.; Cowan, Don A.; Jones, Brian E.; Ma, Yanhe; Ventosa, Antonio; Heaphy, Shaun

    2009-01-01

    We used cultivation-independent methods to investigate the prokaryotic biogeography of the water column in six salt lakes in Inner Mongolia, China, and a salt lake in Argentina. These lakes had different salt compositions and pH values and were at variable geographic distances, on both local and intercontinental scales, which allowed us to explore the microbial community composition within the context of both contemporary environmental conditions and geographic distance. Fourteen 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed, and over 200 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained. These sequences were used to construct biotic similarity matrices, which were used in combination with environmental similarity matrices and a distance matrix in the Mantel test to discover which factors significantly influenced biotic similarity. We showed that archaeal biogeography was influenced by contemporary environmental factors alone (Na+, CO32−, and HCO3− ion concentrations; pH; and temperature). Bacterial biogeography was influenced both by contemporary environmental factors (Na+, Mg2+, and HCO3− ion concentrations and pH) and by geographic distance. PMID:19648369

  9. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S White

    Full Text Available Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  10. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James S; Null, Sarah E; Tarboton, David G

    2015-01-01

    Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach) installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  11. Great Salt Lake Microbial Communities: The Foundation of a Terminal Lake Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, B. K.; Acord, M.; Riddle, M. R.; Avery, B.

    2006-12-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is a natural hypersaline ecosystem and a terminal lake of substantial size. The dramatic fluctuation in water levels and salinity creates an ecological backdrop selective for organisms with a high degree of adaptability. At the macro level, the biodiversity of the GSL ecosystem is simple, due to the limitations of an extreme saline environment: Birds eat the two invertebrates of the lake, and the invertebrates eat phytoplankton. However, analysis of the microbial level reveals an enormous diversity of species interacting with one another and the ecosystem as a whole. Our cultivation, biochemical tests, microscopy and DNA sequencing yielded data on dozens of isolates. These data demonstrate novel species, and possibly genera, living in the lake. In addition, we have discovered viruses (bacteriophage) that prey on the microorganisms. Preliminary data on bacteria dwelling in the gut of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, link these prokaryotic organisms to the food chain for the first time. All of these results taken together open the door for the discussion of the significance of the microbial level of terminal lake ecosystem, particularly in light of lake water contamination and bioremediation possibilities.

  12. 77 FR 56608 - Designation for the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Designation for the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection....... 10/1/2012 9/30/2015 Ohio Valley Evansville, IN (812) 423-9010... 10/1/2012 9/30/2015 Utah Salt Lake...

  13. Effect of Dried Lake Salt (Kanwa) on Lipid profile and Heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peripatum cardiomyopathy is a devastating form of cardiac failure affecting women mainly in their last month of pregnancy or early postpartum with high incidence in Northern Nigeria where the consumption of dried lake salt postpartum is high. The current work was designed to study the effect of dried lake salt on lipid ...

  14. Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Western Australian Salt Lake Sediments: Implications for Meridiani Planum on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, A; Schröder, C; Byrne, J; Weigold, P; Behrens, S; Kappler, A

    2016-07-01

    Hypersaline lakes are characteristic for Western Australia and display a rare combination of geochemical and mineralogical properties that make these lakes potential analogues for past conditions on Mars. In our study, we focused on the geochemistry and mineralogy of Lake Orr and Lake Whurr. While both lakes are poor in organic carbon (Lake Orr and from 5.4 to 6.3 in Lake Whurr sediments. Lake Whurr sediments were dominated by orange and red sediment zones in which the main Fe minerals were identified as hematite, goethite, and tentatively jarosite and pyrite. Lake Orr was dominated by brownish and blackish sediments where the main Fe minerals were goethite and another paramagnetic Fe(III)-phase that could not be identified. Furthermore, a likely secondary Fe(II)-phase was observed in Lake Orr sediments. The mineralogy of these two salt lakes in the sampling area is strongly influenced by events such as flooding, evaporation, and desiccation, processes that explain at least to some extent the observed differences between Lake Orr and Lake Whurr. The iron mineralogy of Lake Whurr sediments and the high salinity make this lake a suitable analogue for Meridiani Planum on Mars, and in particular the tentative identification of pyrite in Lake Whurr sediments has implications for the interpretation of the Fe mineralogy of Meridiani Planum sediments. Western Australia-Salt lakes-Jarosite-Hematite-Pyrite-Mars analogue. Astrobiology 16, 525-538.

  15. Analysis of Summer Ozone Concentration in the Salt Lake Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Katherine Ansley

    Observations and analyses of ozone concentrations and near-surface wind are examined during the latter half of June 2015 when the highest ozone levels of the 2015 summer were observed in the urban areas of northern Utah referred to locally as the Wasatch Front. A novel mix of ozone observations from sensors at fixed sites as well as mobile platforms (vehicles, light rail car, and news helicopter) help to define the spatiotemporal distribution of ozone along the Wasatch Front and the nearby Great Salt Lake. The ozone and wind observations are assimilated separately using a two-dimensional variational analysis system to obtain ozone and 10-m wind analyses at 1-km horizontal resolution every hour to determine the best representation of ozone distribution throughout the region. Two case studies are used to illustrate the diurnal evolution and transportation of ozone concentrations relative to local wind circulations driven primarily by lake-land and mountain-valley thermal contrasts. Ozone pollution roses at the fixed sensor locations for day and night periods and composites of the 1-km resolution analyses during the 15-day period as a function of time of day help to define common diurnal patterns. This study provides information on how ozone is distributed throughout the region and indicates that areas of high ozone concentrations are a function of the complex interaction of thermal flows in urban, rural, and lake boundary layers.

  16. 78 FR 6832 - Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT... of Land Management (BLM), Utah State Office, in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be changing from P.O. Box 45155-0155 to 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101-1345. The proposed date will be...

  17. Analysis of seasonal characteristics of Sambhar Salt Lake, India, from digitized Space Shuttle photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulla, Kamlesh P.; Helfert, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    Sambhar Salt Lake is the largest salt lake (230 sq km) in India, situated in the northwest near Jaipur. Analysis of Space Shuttle photographs of this ephemeral lake reveals that water levels and lake basin land-use information can be extracted by both the digital and manual analysis techniques. Seasonal characteristics captured by the two Shuttle photos used in this study show that additional land use/cover categories can be mapped from the dry season photos. This additional information is essential for precise cartographic updates, and provides seasonal hydrologic profiles and inputs for potential mesoscale climate modeling. This paper extends the digitization and mensuration techniques originally developed for space photography and applied to other regions (e.g., Lake Chad, Africa, and Great Salt Lake, USA).

  18. Salt Lake Community College Veterans Services: A Model of Serving Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Aaron; Foster, Michael; Head, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the birth and growth of a veterans' program in Salt Lake City, Utah, and discusses next steps in spurring additional innovations and advancements to improve service for student veterans in community colleges.

  19. Seepage study of six canals in Salt Lake County, Utah, 1982-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, L.R.; Cruff, R.W.; Waddell, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of selected reaches of the Utah and Salt Lake, Utah Lake Distributing, Provo Reservoir, Draper Irrigation, East Jordan, and Jordan and Salt Lake City Canals in Salt Lake County, Utah, was made to determine gains or losses of flow in those reaches. Three to five sets of seepage measurements were made on each canal during 1982 or 1983. Adjustments for fluctuations in flow were made from information obtained from water-stage recorders operated at selected locations during the time of each seepage run.The study showed an overall net loss of about 9.5 cubic feet per second in the Utah and Salt Lake Canal, 11.0 cubic feet per second in the Utah Lake Distributing canal, 20.5 cubic feet per second in the Provo Reservoir canal, 1.5 cubic feet per second in the Draper Irrigation Canal, and 4.0 cubic feet per second in the East Jordan canal. It also showed a net gain of about 6.0 cubic feet per second in the Jordan and Salt Lake City Canal. The gains and losses are attributed primarily to the relation of the canals to the depth of the water table near the canals.

  20. Added value from 576 years of tree-ring records in the prediction of the Great Salt Lake level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Gillies; Oi-Yu Chung; S.-Y. Simon Wang; R. Justin DeRose; Yan Sun

    2015-01-01

    Predicting lake level fluctuations of the Great Salt Lake (GSL) in Utah - the largest terminal salt-water lake in the Western Hemisphere - is critical from many perspectives. The GSL integrates both climate and hydrological variations within the region and is particularly sensitive to low-frequency climate cycles. Since most hydroclimate variable records cover...

  1. Tree-ring reconstruction of the level of Great Salt Lake, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; Shih-Yu Wang; Brendan M. Buckley; Matthew F. Bekker

    2014-01-01

    Utah's Great Salt Lake (GSL) is a closed-basin remnant of the larger Pleistocene-age Lake Bonneville. The modern instrumental record of the GSL-level (i.e. elevation) change is strongly modulated by Pacific Ocean coupled ocean/atmospheric oscillations at low frequency, and therefore reflects the decadalscale wet/dry cycles that characterize the region. A within-...

  2. Microbial Diversity of the Hypersaline Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes of the Algerian Sahara

    OpenAIRE

    Boutaiba, Saad; Hacene, Hocine; Bidle, Kelly A.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial populations within hypersaline lakes often exhibit high activities of photosynthesis, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and other processes and, thus, can have profound impacts on biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and other important elements within arid lands. To further understand these types of ecosystems, the physicochemical and biological properties of Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes in the Algerian Sahara were examined and compared. Both lakes were relativel...

  3. Arcellacea (testate amoebae) as bio-indicators of road salt contamination in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Helen M; Patterson, R Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Winter deicing operations occur extensively in mid- to high-latitude metropolitan regions around the world and result in a significant reduction in road accidents. Deicing salts can, however, pose a major threat to water quality and aquatic organisms. In this paper, we examine the utility of Arcellacea (testate amoebae) for monitoring lakes that have become contaminated by winter deicing salts, particularly sodium chloride. We analysed 50 sediment samples and salt-related water property variables (chloride concentrations; conductivity) from 15 lakes in the Greater Toronto Area and adjacent areas of southern Ontario, Canada. The sampled lakes included lakes in proximity to major highways and suburban roads and control lakes in forested settings away from road influences. Samples from the most contaminated lakes, with chloride concentrations in excess of 400 mg/l and conductivities of >800 μS/cm, were dominated by species typically found in brackish and/or inhospitable lake environments and by lower faunal diversities (lowest Shannon diversity index values) than samples with lower readings. Q-R-mode cluster analysis and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) resulted in the recognition of four assemblage groupings. These reflect varying levels of salt contamination in the study lakes, along with other local influences, including nutrient loading. The response to nutrients can, however, be isolated if the planktic eutrophic indicator species Cucurbitella tricuspis is removed from the counts. The findings show that the group has considerable potential for biomonitoring in salt-contaminated lakes, and their presence in lake sediment cores may provide significant insights into long-term benthic community health, which is integral for remedial efforts.

  4. Holiday CO2: Inference from the Salt Lake City data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, J.; Fung, I. Y.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Stephens, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    A network of high-frequency CO2 sensors has been established in Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah (http://co2.utah.edu/), and the annual/monthly pattern of CO2 variability is consistent with a priori estimates of CO2 fluxes (McKain et al., 2012). Here we ask if short-term changes in anthropogenic sources can be detected, and present a case study of Thanksgiving holiday, when traffic and energy use patterns are expected to be different from that during the rest of the month. CO2 mole fraction is much higher during the Thanksgiving holidays than the other days in November 2008 for all 5 sites in SLC, and a similar pattern is found in other years. Taking into account that the wind speed is relatively low in downtown SLC compared to the other SLC sites, the downtown site is further investigated to minimize the meteorological influence on CO2. In order to understand the relative contributions to the high level of CO2 during the Thanksgiving holidays, we carried out a multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of the rate of CO2 change against various sources. Mobile CO2 sources are assumed to be proportional to local traffic data and residential CO2 sources are assumed to depend exponentially on temperature. Vulcan data were used to specify the other anthropogenic sources (commercial, industrial, nonroad, electricity, aircraft, and cement). The MLR analysis shows that during the Thanksgiving holidays CO2 contributions from residential and commercial CO2 are larger than that during the rest of November, and mobile sources represent only a relatively small contribution. The study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting changes in urban source contributions using high-frequency measurements in combination with daily PBL height and local traffic volume data.

  5. Halomonas xiaochaidanensis sp. nov., isolated from a salt lake sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Zhang, Guojing; Xian, Wendong; Yang, Jian; Yang, Lingling; Xiao, Min; Jiang, Hongchen; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-10-01

    A short-rod-shaped moderately halophilic bacterium, designated CUG 00002(T), was isolated from the sediment of Xiaochaidan salt lake in Qinghai Province, China by using R2A medium. The cells were Gram-staining negative, aerobic, forming creamy and circular colonies with diameters of 2-3 mm on R2A agar when incubated at 30 °C for 3 days. 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain CUG 00002(T) belonged to the genus Halomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria, showing highest sequence similarity of 97.1 and 96.7 % to Halomonas mongoliensis Z-7009(T) (=DSM 17332=VKM B2353) and Halomonas shengliensis SL014B-85(T) (=CGMCC 1.6444(T)=LMG 23897(T)), respectively. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q9), and the major fatty acids were C16:0, summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c) and summed feature 8 (comprising C18:1 ω7c or C18:1 ω6c). The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CUG 00002(T) was 61.8 mol%. The above characteristics were consistent with the placement of the organism in the genus Halomonas. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between CUG 00002(T) and its most closely related strain H. mongoliensis Z-7009(T) was 41.0 ± 1.6 %. Based on the results of phenotypic, phylogenetic and biochemical analyses, strain CUG 00002(T) represents a novel species of the genus Halomonas, for which the name Halomonas xiaochaidanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CUG 00002(T) (=CCTCC AB 2014152(T)=KCTC 42685(T)).

  6. Quality and sources of ground water used for public supply in Salt Lake Valley, Salt Lake County, Utah, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Manning, Andrew H.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water supplies about one-third of the water used by the public in Salt Lake Valley, Utah. The occurrence and distribution of natural and anthropogenic compounds in ground water used for public supply in the valley were evaluated. Water samples were collected from 31 public-supply wells in 2001 and analyzed for major ions, trace elements, radon, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, methylene blue active substances, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. The samples also were analyzed for the stable isotopes of water (oxygen-18 and deuterium), tritium, chlorofluorocarbons, and dissolved gases to determine recharge sources and ground-water age.Dissolved-solids concentration ranged from 157 to 1,280 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in water from the 31 public-supply wells. Comparison of dissolved-solids concentration of water sampled from the principal aquifer during 1988-92 and 1998-2002 shows a reduction in the area where water with less than 500 mg/L occurs. Nitrate concentration in water sampled from 12 of the 31 public-supply wells was higher than an estimated background level of 2 mg/L, indicating a possible human influence. At least one pesticide or pesticide degradation product was detected at a concentration much lower than drinking-water standards in water from 13 of the 31 wells sampled. Chloroform was the most frequently detected volatile organic compound (17 of 31 samples). Its widespread occurrence in deeper ground water is likely a result of the recharge of chlorinated public-supply water used to irrigate lawns and gardens in residential areas of Salt Lake Valley.Environmental tracers were used to determine the sources of recharge to the principal aquifer used for public supply in the valley. Oxygen-18 values and recharge temperatures computed from dissolved noble gases in the ground water were used to differentiate between mountain and valley recharge. Maximum recharge temperatures in the eastern part of the valley generally are below the range

  7. Brine Shrimp Ecology In The Great Salt Lake, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersaline lakes are noted for their simple communities which facilitate understanding ecological interactions (Williams et al. 1990; Wurtsbaugh 1992; Jellison and Melack 1988). Nevertheless, we still cannot easily predict how environmental changes will effect the population dynamics in these lakes, at least in part because even these simple ecosystems may be more complex than we .realize. Many hypersaline lakes are dominated by the brine shrimp Artemia spp. The production of brine shrimp is...

  8. DIVERSITY OF CULTIVABLE MICROORGANISMS IN THE EASTERN PART OF URMIA SALT LAKE, IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Jookar Kashi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we employed culture techniques to study microbial diversity in Urmia Lake, a hypersaline lake in northwest of Iran. Water, soil and salt samples were taken from the Eastern part of Urmia Salt Lake in September 2011. A total of 11 water samples and 30 soil and salt samples were taken from 41 sites in the Lake. Bacterial isolates were cultured on different growth media and taxonomically affiliated based on their 16S rDNA gene sequence. Three hundred bacterial isolates were obtained from samples collected. Of these, 53 bacterial isolates were selected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, based on their growth characteristics and colony morphology. Results showed that these 53 isolates represented 39 species, belonging to 18 genera (Bacillus, Oceanobacillus, Thalassobacillus, Planomicrobium, Halobacillus, Planococcus, Terribacillus, Staphylococcus, Piscibacillus, Virgibacillus, Gracilibacillus, Ornithinibacillus, Halomonas, Pseudomonas, Providencia, Salicola, Psychrobacter, Kocuria and they were from 9 families (Bacillaceae, Planococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Halomonadaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Moraxellaceae, Alteromonadaceae, Micrococcaceae pertaining to three phyla (Actinobacteria 1.8%, Firmicutes 78.6%, Proteobacteria 21.4%. The present study showed that Urmia Lake is a rich source for moderately halophilic and halotolerant bacteria. The phylogenetic analysis of sequences from Urmia Lake had some common 16S rDNA sequences from other hypersaline lakes previously reported.

  9. Jeotgalicoccus halophilus sp. nov., isolated from salt lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Yan; Jiang, Lin-Lin; Guo, Chun-Jing; Yang, Su Sheng

    2011-07-01

    Two slightly halophilic bacterial strains, C1-52(T) and YD-9, were isolated from Daban and Aiding salt lakes in Xinjiang, China, respectively. The isolates were gram-positive, non-endospore-forming, non-motile, facultatively anaerobic cocci. Colonies were pale yellow, and a light pink, diffusible pigment was produced after a few additional days of incubation. The isolates grew optimally with 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl, at pH 7.5 and at 30-35 °C. The peptidoglycan type was L-Lys-Gly(3-4)-L-Ala(Gly). The menaquinones were MK-7 (83.2 %) and MK-6 (16.8 %). The major fatty acids (>10 %) were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). The DNA G+C content of strains C1-52(T) and YD-9 was 41.2 and 41.0 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains C1-52(T) and YD-9 were closely related to Jeotgalicoccus psychrophilus YKJ-115(T) (98.0 and 97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively), followed by Jeotgalicoccus halotolerans YKJ-101(T) (97.1 and 96.8 %). Strains C1-52(T) and YD-9 shared, respectively, 20 and 11 % DNA-DNA relatedness with J. halotolerans JCM 11198(T) and 8 and 13 % with J. psychrophilus JCM 11199(T). DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolates was 91 %. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strains C1-52(T) and YD-9 belonged to the same species, which should be placed in the genus Jeotgalicoccus as a novel species. The name Jeotgalicoccus halophilus sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain C1-52(T) ( = CGMCC 1.8911(T)  = NBRC 105788(T)).

  10. Streptomyces lonarensis sp. nov., isolated from Lonar Lake, a meteorite salt water lake in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Trupti K; Mawlankar, Rahul; Sonalkar, Vidya V; Shinde, Vidhya K; Zhan, Jing; Li, Wen-Jun; Rele, Meenakshi V; Dastager, Syed G; Kumar, Lalitha Sunil

    2016-02-01

    A novel alkaliphilic actinomycete, strain NCL716(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from the vicinity of Lonar Lake, an alkaline salt water meteorite lake in Buldhana district of Maharashtra State in India. The strain was characterised using a polyphasic taxonomic approach which confirmed that it belongs to the genus Streptomyces. Growth was observed over a pH range of 7-11 at 28 °C. The cell wall was found to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid and traces of meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acid components were identified as iso-C16:0 (46.8 %), C17:1 (12.4 %), anteiso-C15:0 (5.1 %) and anteiso-C17:1 (4.8 %). The major polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol. The major menaquinones were determined to be MK-9 (H6) (70.3 %), MK-9 (H4) (15.5 %) and MK-9 (H8) (7.2 %). The G+C content of the DNA of the type strain was determined to be 71.4 mol %. The 16S rRNA gene sequence has been deposited in GenBank with accession number FJ919811. Although the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain NCL716(T) shares >99 % similarity with that of Streptomyces bohaiensis strain 11A07(T), DNA-DNA hybridization revealed only 33.2 ± 3.0 % relatedness between them. Moreover, these two strains can be readily distinguished by some distinct phenotypic characteristics. Hence, on the basis of phenotypic and genetic analyses, it is proposed that strain NCL716(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces lonarensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is NCL 716(T) (=DSM 42084(T) = MTCC 11708(T) = KCTC 39684(T)).

  11. Speciation of cadmium mixed ligand complexes in salt water lakes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amalgam voltammetry has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 at 23 oC at concentration levels of genuine lake water. The hanging drop amalgam electrode was prepared in situ before exchanging the medium for the sample solution. Half-wave potentials at two metal ion concentrations ...

  12. Remote Sensing as a Tool to Track Algal Blooms in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, S. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Naftz, D.; Moore, T.; Haney, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake is a large hypersaline, terminal water body in northern Utah, USA. The lake has both a significant economic importance to the local community as a source of brine shrimp and mineral resources, as well as, an ecological importance to large numbers of migratory waterfowl. Due to nutrient input from sewage treatment plants, sections of the Great Salt Lake are subjected to highly eutrophic conditions. One of the main tributaries, Farmington Bay, experiences massive blooms of cyanobacteria which can reach concentrations in excess of 300 mg l-1 in the bay. Effects of these blooms can be observed stretching into the rest of the lake. The detrimental outcomes of the blooms include unsightly scums, foul odor and the danger of cyanobacterial toxins. While the blooms have an obvious effect on Farmington Bay, it is quite possible that the cyanobacteria impact a much wider area of the lake as currents move eutrophic water masses. Of particular interest is the reaction of brine shrimp to the plumes of cyanobacteria-rich water leaving Farmington Bay. We are employing remote sensing as a tool to map the distribution of algae throughout the lake and produce lake-wide maps of water quality on a regular basis. On-lake reflectance measurements have been coupled with MODIS satellite imagery to produce a time series of maps illustrating changes in algal distribution. The successes and shortcomings of our remote sensing technique will be a central topic of this presentation.

  13. Microbial Diversity of the Hypersaline Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes of the Algerian Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutaiba, Saad; Hacene, Hocine; Bidle, Kelly A; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A

    2011-10-01

    Microbial populations within hypersaline lakes often exhibit high activities of photosynthesis, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and other processes and, thus, can have profound impacts on biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and other important elements within arid lands. To further understand these types of ecosystems, the physicochemical and biological properties of Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes in the Algerian Sahara were examined and compared. Both lakes were relatively neutral in pH (7.2 to 7.4) and high in salt, at 12% and 20 % (w/v) salinity for Himalatt and Sidi Ameur Lakes, respectively, with dominant ions of sodium and chloride. The community compositions of microbes from all three domains (Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya) were surveyed through the use of 16S and 18S ribosomal gene amplification and clone library clustering using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) in conjunction with DNA sequencing and analysis. A high level of microbial diversity, particularly among the bacteria of the Himalatt Salt Lake and archaea of Sidi Ameur Lake, was found within these environments. Representatives from all known halophilic bacterial phyla as well as 6 different genera of halophilic archaea were identified. Moreover, several apparently novel phylotypes among both archaea and bacteria were revealed.

  14. Changes in lake levels, salinity and the biological community of Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA), 1847-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Great Salt Lake is the fourth largest terminal lake in the world, with an area of about 6000 square kilometers at its historic high elevation. Since its historic low elevation of 1277.52 meters in 1963, the lake has risen to a new historic high elevation of 1283.77 meters in 1986-1987, a net increase of about 6.25 meters. About 60 percent of this increase, 3.72 meters, has occurred since 1982 in response to greater than average precipitation and less than average evaporation. Variations in salinity have resulted in changes in the composition of the aquatic biological community which consists of bacteria, protozoa, brine shrimp and brine flies. These changes were particularly evident following the completion of a causeway in 1959 which divided the lake. Subsequent salinities in the north part of the lake have ranged from 16 to 29 percent and in the south part from 6 to 28 percent. Accompanying the rise in lake elevation from 1982 to 1987 have been large decreases in salinity of both parts of the lake. This has resulted in changes in the biota from obligate halophiles, such as Dunaliella salina and D. viridis, to opportunistic forms such as a blue-green alga (Nodularia spumigena). The distribution and abundance of brine shrimp (Artemia salina) in the lake also have followed closely the salinity. In 1986, when the salinity of the south part of the lake was about 6 percent, a population of brackish-water killifish (Lucania parva) was observed along the shore near inflow from a spring. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  15. 78 FR 65356 - Notice of Mailing/Street Address Change for the BLM-Utah West Desert District and Salt Lake Field...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... and Salt Lake Field Offices AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The mailing/street address for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), West Desert District and Salt Lake Field Offices will be changing from 2370 South 2300 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84119-2022, to 2370 South Decker...

  16. 76 FR 47613 - Board Meeting: September 13-14, 2011-Salt Lake City, UT; the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: September 13-14, 2011--Salt Lake City, UT; the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical... Technical Review Board will hold a public meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Tuesday, September 13, and....m. and will be held at the Little America Hotel; 500 South Main Street; Salt Lake City, Utah 84101...

  17. Highland High School Vocational Television; a Salt Lake Schools Exemplary Vocational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, LaMar C.

    The Highland High School (Salt Lake City, Utah) vocational television production program was designed to provide students with marketable skills in color television studio operation. Among the skills covered in the program were camera set-up and operation, video engineering, production switching, directing, television lighting, audio engineering,…

  18. A STUDY OF THE NEED FOR A JUNIOR COLLEGE IN THE SALT LAKE METROPOLITAN AREA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMITH, RALPH B.

    A POPULATION INCREASE OF 71 PERCENT IS EXPECTED IN UTAH BETWEEN 1960 AND 1980. THE GREATEST GROWTH IS EXPECTED IN THE SALT LAKE METROPOLITAN AREA. THE COLLEGE AGE GROUP (18 TO 21 YEARS) WILL INCREASE BY 80 PERCENT BETWEEN 1960 AND 1970. IF CONSERVATIVE ESTIMATES ARE USED, THE PROPOSED JUNIOR COLLEGE COULD EXPECT AN ENROLLMENT OF APPROXIMATELY…

  19. The aspen mortality summit; December 18 and 19, 2006; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale L. Bartos; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2010-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station sponsored an aspen summit meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, on December 18 and19, 2006, to discuss the rapidly increasing mortality of aspen (Populus tremuloides) throughout the western United States. Selected scientists, university faculty, and managers from Federal, State, and non-profit agencies with experience...

  20. Chemical quality of ground water in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, 1969-85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Seiler, R.L.; Solomon, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    During 1979-84, 35 wells completed in the principal aquifer in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, that had been sampled during 1962-67 were resampled to determine if water-quality changes had occurred. The dissolved-solids concentration of the water from 13 of the wells has increased by more than 10 percent since 1962-67.

  1. National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Great Salt Lake basins study unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kidd M.

    1999-01-01

    The Great Salt Lake Basins NAWQA study will increase the scientific understanding of the factors that influence surface- and ground-water quality. This information will benefit water-resources managers that need, but often lack, the data required to implement effective water-quality management actions and evaluate long-term changes in water quality.

  2. Textural variation within Great Salt Lake algal mounds: Chapter 8.5 in Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    This chapter discusses textural variation within the Great Salt Lake algal mounds. Great Salt Lake algal mounds contain: (1) a framework of non-skeletal, algally induced aragonite precipitates; (2) internal sediment; and (3) inorganic cement. These three elements create a variety of laminated, poorly laminated, and unlaminated internal textures. Interior framework precipitates bear little resemblance to the present living film of the mound surface. Internal texture of the mounds is believed to be largely relict and to have resulted from precipitation by algae different than those presently living at the surface. The most probable cause of local extinction of the algal flora is change in brine salinity. Precipitated blue-green algal structures in ancient rocks may indicate other than normal marine salinity and near shore sedimentation. Extreme variation of internal texture reflects extreme environmental variability typical of closed basin lakes. Recognition of mounds similar to those in the Great Salt Lake can be a first step toward recognition of ancient hyper-saline lake deposits, if such an interpretation is substantiated by consideration of the entire depositional milieu of precipitated algal mounds.

  3. Evolution and Growth Competition of Salt Fingers in Saline Lake with Slight Wind Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ray-Yeng; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Shugan, Igor

    2010-05-01

    Since the discover of double-diffusive convection by Stommel, Arons & Blanchard (1956), 'evidence has accumulated for the widespread presence of double-diffusion throughout the ocean' and for its 'significant effects on global water-mass structure and the thermohaline convection' (Schmitt, 1998). The salt-fingering form of double-diffusion has particularly attracted interest because of salt-finger convection being now widely recognized as an important mechanism for mixing heat and salt both vertically and laterally in the ocean and saline lake. In oceanographic situations or saline lake where salt fingers may be an important mechanism for the transport of heat and salt in the vertical, velocity shears may also be present. Salt finger convection is analogous to Bénard convection in that the kinetic energy of the motions is obtained from the potential energy stored in the unstable distribution of a stratifying component. On the basis of the thermal analogy it is of interest to discover whether salt fingers are converted into two-dimensional sheets by the wind shear, and how the vertical fluxes of heat and salt are changed by the wind shear. Salt finger convection under the effect of steady wind shear is theoretically examined in this paper. The evolution of developing in the presence of a vertical density gradient disturbance and the horizontal Couette flow is considered near the onset of salt fingers in the saline lake under a moderate rate of wind shear. We use velocity as the basic variable and solve the pressure Poisson equation in terms of the associated Green function. Growth competition between the longitudinal rolls (LR) and the transverse rolls (TR), whose axes are respectively in the direction parallel to and perpendicular to the Couette flow, is investigated by the weakly nonlinear analysis of coupled-mode equations. The results show that the TR mode is characterized in some range of the effective Rayleigh number, and that the stability is dominated by

  4. TOURISM PLANNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE SALT LAKES OF OCNELE MARI AND OCNIŢA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPESCU ANTOANETA-CARINA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism Planning Opportunities for The Salt Lakes of Ocnele Mari and Ocniţa. Ocnele Mari used to be a popular balneal tourism destination in the Southern region of Romania, Oltenia. Due to the hilly climate and the two balneal establishments of Ocnele Mari and Ocniţa, tourists could find the necessary natural cure factors for rheumatic and cardiovascular diseases. However, the salt from Ocnele Mari was also used for industrial purposes, being extracted through solution mining, which proved to be detrimental to the environment. Salt underground dissolution caused land subsidence and landslide in the area, together with the formation of large salt lakes. Security became an issue, the number of tourists diminished and the balneal equipment became obsolete because of lack of modernization investment. Under these circumstances, on the basis of field work, we have reached the conclusion that a better planning of the resort and of the salt lakes would contribute to the economic development of the region.

  5. Mercury in the Air, Water and Biota at the Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C.; Gustin, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake, Utah (USA), is the fourth largest terminal lake on Earth and a stop-over location for 35 million birds on the Pacific Flyway. Recently, the Utah Department of Health and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources issued tissue mercury (Hg) consumption advisories for several species of birds that consume the lake's brine shrimp. Sources of Hg to the lake are the watershed and the atmosphere, and we hypothesized that the chemistry of the air above the Great Salt Lake would facilitate atmospheric deposition of Hg to the water. Because little information was available on Hg at the Great Salt Lake, and to begin to test this hypothesis, we measured atmospheric elemental (Hg0) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) concentrations as well as Hg concentrations in water and brine shrimp five times over a year. Surrogate surfaces and a dry deposition model were applied to estimate the amount of Hg that could be input to the lake surface. We found that atmospheric Hg0 and RGM concentrations were comparable to global ambient background values and those measured in rural areas (respectively). Both Hg0 and RGM exhibited regular diel variability, and no consistent seasonal periods of depleted or elevated values were observed. Based on these findings, local factors are thought to be important in generating elevated RGM concentrations that could be deposited to the lake. Model estimated deposition velocities for RGM to the lake ranged from 0.9 to 3.0 cm sec-1, with an estimated 19 kg of Hg deposited annually. Total Hg and methyl Hg concentrations in surface waters of the lake were consistent throughout the year (3.8 ± 0.8 ng L- 1 and 0.93 ± 0.59 ng L-1, respectively) and not significantly elevated relative to natural waters; however, the percent methyl Hg to total Hg was high (25 to 50%). Brine shrimp Hg concentrations were 384 ppb and had a statistically significant increase from early summer to fall. Based on modeled dry deposition and estimated wet deposition, the

  6. Long-distance flights and high-risk breeding by nomadic waterbirds on desert salt lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedler, Reece D; Ribot, Raoul F H; Bennett, Andrew T D

    2018-02-01

    Understanding and conserving mobile species presents complex challenges, especially for animals in stochastic or changing environments. Nomadic waterbirds must locate temporary water in arid biomes where rainfall is highly unpredictable in space and time. To achieve this they need to travel over vast spatial scales and time arrival to exploit pulses in food resources. How they achieve this is an enduring mystery.  We investigated these challenges in the colonial-nesting Banded Stilt (Cladorhynchus leucocephalus), a nomadic shorebird of conservation concern. Hitherto, Banded Stilts were hypothesized to have only 1-2 chances to breed during their long lifetime, when flooding rain fills desert salt lakes, triggering mass-hatching of brine shrimp. Over 6 years, we satellite tagged 57 individuals, conducted 21 aerial surveys to detect nesting colonies on 14 Australian desert salt lakes, and analyzed 3 decades of Landsat and MODIS satellite imagery to quantify salt-lake flood frequency and extent. Within days of distant inland rainfall, Banded Stilts flew 1,000-2,000 km to reach flooded salt lakes. On arrival, females laid over half their body weight in eggs. We detected nesting episodes across the species' range at 7 times the frequency reported during the previous 80 years. Nesting colonies of thousands formed following minor floods, yet most were subsequently abandoned when the water rapidly evaporated prior to egg hatching. Satellite imagery revealed twice as many flood events sufficient for breeding-colony initiation as recorded colonies, suggesting that nesting at remote sites has been underdetected. Individuals took risk on uncertain breeding opportunities by responding to frequent minor flood events between infrequent extensive flooding, exemplifying the extreme adaptability and trade-offs of species exploiting unstable environments. The conservation challenges of nest predation by overabundant native gulls and anthropogenic modifications to salt lakes filling

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF THE SALT LAKES FROM OCNA ŞUGATAG BETWEEN RISK AND CAPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. ŞERBAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The diapir anticline microdepression of Ocna Şugatag underwent an accelerated transformation immediately after the end of salt mining (at the beginning of the 1960s. During this period of over 50 years of evolution, lake basins formed and disappeared, either naturally, in small sinkholes, or mostly due to the collapse of salt mine adits or chambers, which led to the creation of large-sized lake basins. There is an accelerated dynamics of these basins, as indicated by the sliding of part of the banks at a pace of 0.5-1.5 meters/year. The collapse of the mines is far from over, because the largest mines (Mihai and Dragoş are partly affected and the pillars supporting the ceiling of the adits have a small diameter. Given the present conditions, when the underground brine is used for bathing and treatment purposes, in short time it is possible that new lakes emerge, even larger than the already existing ones. From the point of view of the lake potential, there are important differences, according to the degree of salinity of the water and the more or less accelerated dynamics of the lake basins. The latest two years witnessed an important development of the tourism infrastructure in the analysed area, as well as arrangements of the lakes, which determined a significant increase in the number of tourists searching for outdoor bathing, especially during week-ends.

  8. Speciation of cadmium mixed ligand complexes in salt water lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Kituyi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam voltammetry has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 at 23 oC at concentration levels of genuine lake water. The hanging drop amalgam electrode was prepared in situ before exchanging the medium for the sample solution. Half-wave potentials at two metal ion concentrations were measured, one at the actual concentration in the lake while the other at a much lower one. The experimentally determined shifts in half-wave potentials are used to compute several formation constants. At the natural [CO32-] of 0.5 M in the lake, the main contributor to the speciation of cadmium is [Cd(CO3Cl2]2-. At high [Cd2+], the DPASV detects the presence of free Cd2+ ions, hence, potential polluting effect, while the amalgam reports [Cd(CO32Cl] 3- to be dominant above [CO32-] = 0.8 M. There is a variation in the number of complexes detected, their stabilities and percentage distribution in the two methods. Cd2+ ion concentration also affects the number of complexes formed and their stabilities.

  9. Microbial Composition and Preliminary Age of Ooids from the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, O.; Corsetti, F. A.; Stamps, B. W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Bardsley, A.; Hammond, D. E.; Nunn, H. S.; Berelson, W.; Spear, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Ooids (laminated coated grains) are common in the geologic record in lacustrine and marine systems. Traditionally interpreted as abiogenic precipitates, recent work suggests that microbial metabolism/byproducts may enhance the calcium carbonate precipitation of some ooids. Thus, the processes that govern ooid formation remain enigmatic, making it difficult to assess their significance as biosigntatures and environmental indicators in modern/ancient environments. The Great Salt Lake, Utah, provides a unique environment to assess the microbial community and growth rate of aragonitic ooids. Ooids collected near Antelope Island were first sieved into coarse, medium, and fine size fractions. One aliquot of each fraction was left untreated and another was washed with ethanol to remove the biomass/biofilm from the exterior. The microbial communities of each aliquot and the surrounding lake water were compared using small subunit rRNA gene sequencing. Since 50% of the ooids studied contain nuclei that were fecal pellets from the Great Salt Lake Artemia (brine shrimp), Artemia pellets were also collected and sequenced to compare to the ooids and the lake water. 228Ra/226Ra of ooids and lake water was measured to evaluate ooid age. Preliminary 228Ra/226Ra results indicate that ooid growth has occurred in the last few decades. Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteriodetes were the most abundant bacterial taxa present within ooid samples. In contrast, the lake water was significantly different in composition, dominated by the halophilic Halobacteria (Euryarchaeota). Both the treated and untreated ooids had a microbial community that more closely resembled the composition of the Artemia fecal pellets than the Great Salt Lake water. We conclude that 1) preliminary dating using a novel chronometer suggests very recent ooid formation, and 2) nuclei composition may skew the results when investigating ooid microbial communities.

  10. Microbial community structure and diversity within hypersaline Keke Salt Lake environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Jing; Long, Qifu; Chen, Laisheng; Liu, Deli; Zhu, Derui

    2017-11-01

    Keke Salt Lake is located in the Qaidamu Basin of China. It is a unique magnesium sulfate-subtype hypersaline lake that exhibits a halite domain ecosystem, yet its microbial diversity has remained unstudied. Here, the microbial community structure and diversity was investigated via high-throughput sequencing of the V3-V5 regions of 16S rRNA genes. A high diversity of operational taxonomic units was detected for Bacteria and Archaea (734 and 747, respectively), comprising 21 phyla, 43 classes, and 201 genera of Bacteria and 4 phyla, 4 classes, and 39 genera of Archaea. Salt-saturated samples were dominated by the bacterial genera Bacillus (51.52%-58.35% relative abundance), Lactococcus (9.52%-10.51%), and Oceanobacillus (8.82%-9.88%) within the Firmicutes phylum (74.81%-80.99%), contrasting with other hypersaline lakes. The dominant Archaea belonged to the Halobacteriaceae family, and in particular, the genera (with an abundance of >10% of communities) Halonotius, Halorubellus, Halapricum, Halorubrum, and Natronomonas. Additionally, we report the presence of Nanohaloarchaeota and Woesearchaeota in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau lakes, which has not been previously documented. Total salinity (especially Mg 2+ , Cl - , Na + , and K + ) mostly correlated with taxonomic distribution across samples. These results expand our understanding of microbial resource utilization within hypersaline lakes and the potential adaptations of dominant microorganisms that allow them to inhabit such environments.

  11. Sapropels in the Great Salt Lake basin: Indicators of massive groundwater-discharge events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    Two stratigraphic intervals of finely laminated, organic-rich muds (referred to as sapropels), which in places are interbedded with mirabilite (Na2SO4 10H2O) and/or halite (NaCl), are present in cores of sediments from the floor of Great Salt Lake, UT (GSL). The muds vary in thickness, including the interbedded salt, from less than 0.5 m to over 10 m (in the case of the younger sapropel in the north arm of GSL). They contain brine-shrimp cysts and well-defined laminations less than 1 mm thick. Immediately after recovery in cores, the muds are pure black, but they oxidize to brown colors after a few days of exposure to the atmosphere. Organic-carbon contents in the younger sapropel are 3-5 %, and nitrogen percentages range from about 0.2 to 0.4. The sapropels are overlain by muds deposited in shallow hypersaline lakes, and overlie sediments of deep, freshwater lakes. Independent evidence from radiocarbon ages and shoreline chronology indicates that the upper sapropel was deposited while the lake was shallow (less than 25 m deep; average maximum depth of modern GSL is ~10 m; maximum depth of Lake Bonneville is >300 m). The age of the upper sapropel is about 10-11.5 cal ka, and it was deposited immediately following the regression of Lake Bonneville, which filled the basin during marine oxygen-isotope stage 2. The older sapropel directly overlies sediments of a deep lake that is likely correlative with oxygen-isotope stage 6. A hypothesis to explain sapropel deposition is that groundwater that had been stored in mountain aquifers during the high-lake periods was discharged onto the basin floor where it ran into the lake and formed a freshwater cap on the saline water; organic matter that settled to the bottom of the lake from the surface exhausted dissolved oxygen and accumulated on the bottom of the stratified lake. The ages of spring and wetland deposits at numerous localities around the basin are consistent with this hypothesis. This hypothetical cause for sapropel

  12. Design and evaluation of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments for the I-15 reconstruction project, Salt Lake City, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The report discusses the design and 10-year performance evaluations of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) Geofoam embankment constructed for the I-15 Reconstruction Project in Salt Lake City, Utah between 1998 and 2002. It contains methods to evaluate the al...

  13. Sedimentary characteristics and depositional model of a Paleocene-Eocene salt lake in the Jiangling Depression, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaocan; Wang, Chunlian; Liu, Chenglin; Zhang, Zhaochong; Xu, Haiming; Huang, Hua; Xie, Tengxiao; Li, Haonan; Liu, Jinlei

    2015-11-01

    We studied the sedimentary characteristics of a Paleocene-Eocene salt lake in the Jiangling Depression through field core observation, thin section identification, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. On the basis of sedimentary characteristics we have summarized the petrological and mineralogical characteristics of the salt lake and proposed 9 types of grade IV salt rhythms. The deposition shows a desalting to salting order of halite-argillaceous-mudstone-mud dolostonemud anhydrock-glauberite-halite. The relationship among grade IV rhythms, water salinity and climate fluctuations was analyzed. Based on the analysis of the relationship between boron content and mudstone color and by combining the mineralogy and sedimentary environment characteristics, we propose that the early and late Paleocene Shashi Formation in the Jiangling Depression was a paleolacustrine depositional environment with a high salt content, which is a representation of the shallow water salt lake depositional model. The middle Paleocene Shashi Formation and the early Eocene Xingouzui Formation were salt and brackish sedimentary environments with low salt content in a deep paleolake, which represents a deep salt lake depositional model.

  14. Large branchiopods (Branchiopoda: Anostraca, Notostraca and Spinicaudata from the salt lakes of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudjéma SAMRAOUI

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a survey of large branchiopods (Crustacea, Branchiopoda of the major salt lakes of Algeria, particularly those of the eastern Hauts Plateaux. The aim of the survey was to complement a previous survey that focused on the freshwater habitats of Numidia, northeast Algeria. The study revealed 8 species, with one taxon new to Algeria and North Africa (Chirocephalus salinus. Data on the status, phenology and habitats of collected and previously known species are presented for 19 taxa. The distribution of many species has been greatly extended and the co-occurrence of Artemia tunisiana and Branchinella spinosa has been recorded. The studied salt lakes, owing to a large production of fairy shrimps, support a great number of wintering and breeding waterbirds, but are subject to increasing human pressure.

  15. Connections Between Cold Air Pools and Mountain Valley Fog Events in Salt Lake City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the connection between cold air pools and fog events in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. Statistical analyses are conducted using soundings and reported automated surface observing system data from Salt Lake International Airport for the last eighteen cold seasons (October to March, during 1997-2015). A Chi-square test of independence is performed on identified cold air pool, and fog events to determine whether the two events are correlated. Conditional probabilities are then computed to investigate the occurrence of fog, given the presence of a cold pool. These probabilities are compared against that of random fog generation in the mid-winter. It is concluded that the dependence between cold air pools and fog events is statistically significant. The presence of a cold pool makes the formation of fog more likely than random generation.

  16. Chronic toxicity of arsenic to the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Kevin V; Cardwell, Rick D; Adams, William J

    2003-02-01

    We determined the chronic toxicity of arsenic (sodium arsenate) to the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana. Chronic toxicity was determined by measuring the adverse effects of arsenic on brine shrimp growth, survival, and reproduction under intermittent flow-through conditions. The study commenced with shrimp growth rather than an arsenic effect. This study represents one of the few full life cycle toxicity tests conducted with brine shrimp.

  17. Food Habits of Wintering Waterfowl on the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Vest, Josh L.; Conover, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Two invertebrates, brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) and brine flies (Ephydridac), occur in great densities in the Great Salt Lake (GSL) but it is unknown whether ducks forage extensively on them during winter or rely on freshwater food. Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeala) and Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca) were collected from the GSL during winters 2004–05 and 2005–06 to evaluate their food habits. Brine shrimp and brine flies comprised more than 70% of...

  18. Large-eddy simulations of a Salt Lake Valley cold-air pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2017-09-01

    Persistent cold-air pools are often poorly forecast by mesoscale numerical weather prediction models, in part due to inadequate parameterization of planetary boundary-layer physics in stable atmospheric conditions, and also because of errors in the initialization and treatment of the model surface state. In this study, an improved numerical simulation of the 27-30 January 2011 cold-air pool in Utah's Great Salt Lake Basin is obtained using a large-eddy simulation with more realistic surface state characterization. Compared to a Weather Research and Forecasting model configuration run as a mesoscale model with a planetary boundary-layer scheme where turbulence is highly parameterized, the large-eddy simulation more accurately captured turbulent interactions between the stable boundary-layer and flow aloft. The simulations were also found to be sensitive to variations in the Great Salt Lake temperature and Salt Lake Valley snow cover, illustrating the importance of land surface state in modelling cold-air pools.

  19. A review on salt lake city, Kolkata, India: Master planning and realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tošković Dobrivoje

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation for construction of Salt Lake City comes from the circumstances characterizing life in Calcutta known by its social, political and cultural activities. Among many problems, the City was faced with poverty and overcrowding. West Bengal Government realized that serious steps have to be taken to resolve the situation. One of the biggest actions of the Government was creation of so called 'NEDECO' Plan for reclamation certain area of the Salted Lakes, followed by the tender for urban planning. The enterprise for water ways Ivan Milutinović was considered the most convenient for both: reclamation and planning. The Conceptualization covers the Main Aims and interests forming plan basis where three factors were selected: urban character, new vs old town, inhabitants and town growth. Follows Existing Land Use Pattern of the Municipal Area. The realization of the Salt Lake Master Plan, as a part of the Municipal Area, is shown through an Overview of Achieved Infrastructure covering Roads, Water Supply, Sewerage, Area Level Storm Water Drainage, Solid Waste Management and, finally, through the Other Municipal Services, such as: Administrative Infrastructure, Health Infrastructure, Greeneries, Water bodies, Socio-Cultural Infrastructure. .

  20. Biostrome communities and mercury and selenium bioaccumulation in the Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A; Gardberg, Jodi; Izdepski, Caleb

    2011-09-15

    The Great Salt Lake has a salinity near 150 g/L and is habitat for over 200 species of migratory birds. The diet of many of these birds is dependent on the food web of carbonaceous biostromes (stromatolites) that cover 260 km(2) of the lake's littoral zone. We investigated the biostrome community to understand their production processes and to assess whether they are a potential vector for bioconcentration of high mercury and selenium levels in the lake. The periphyton community of the biostromes was >99% colonial cyanobacteria. Periphyton chlorophyll levels averaged 900 mg m(-2) or nine times that of the lake's phytoplankton. Lake-wide estimates of chlorophyll suggest that their production is about 30% of that of the phytoplankton. Brine fly (Ephydra gracilis) larval densities on the biostromes increased from 7000 m(-2) in June to 20000m(-2) in December. Pupation and adult emergence halted in October and larvae of various instars overwintered at temperatures fly larvae, pupae, and adults were, respectively, 152, 189, 379 and 659 ηg g(-1) dry weight, suggesting that bioconcentration is only moderate in the short food web and through fly developmental stages. However, common goldeneye ducks (Bucephala clangula) that feed primarily on brine fly larvae at the Great Salt Lake had concentrations near 8000 ηg Hg g(-1) dry weight in muscle tissue. Data from a previous study indicated that selenium concentrations in periphyton, brine fly larvae and goldeneye liver tissue were high (1700, 1200 and 24,000 ηg g(-1), respectively) and Hg:Se molar ratios were birds and humans that consume them. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anthropogenic impacts on the water and salt budgets of St Lucia estuarine lake in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Robynne A.; Stretch, Derek D.

    2011-05-01

    Lake St Lucia in South Africa is part of a UNESCO World Heritage site and a Ramsar wetland of international importance. Like many coastal wetlands worldwide, anthropogenic activities including catchment land-use changes, water diversions/abstractions, and manipulation of the mouth state have significantly affected its functioning over the past century. Questions concerning its sustainability have motivated a re-evaluation of management decisions made in the past and of options for the future. A model for the water and salt budgets has therefore been used to investigate "what if" scenarios in terms of past anthropogenic interventions. In particular, simulations allow us to evaluate the effects of diverting the Mfolozi river from St Lucia on the functioning of the system and on the occurrence of various water level/salinity states that drive the biological functioning of the ecosystem. In the past, when the St Lucia estuary and the Mfolozi river had a combined inlet, the mouth was predominantly open. The lake had relatively stable water levels but variable salinities that increased during dry conditions due to evaporative losses and saltwater inflows from the sea. If the mouth closed, the Mfolozi flow was diverted into the lake which reduced salinities and maintained or increased water levels. Simulations indicate that without a link to the Mfolozi the lake system would naturally have a mainly closed inlet with lower average salinities but more variable water levels. During dry conditions water levels would reduce and result in desiccation of large areas of the lake as has recently occurred. We conclude that the artificial separation of the St Lucia and Mfolozi inlets underpins the most significant impacts on the water & salt budget of the lake and that its reversal is key to the sustainability of the system.

  2. Dealing with uncertainty and limited data availability at Lake Tiberias, Israel: Imaging salt diapir using hydrogeological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbar, Nimrod; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Flexer, Akiva; Möller, Peter; Siebert, Christian; Guttman, Joseph; Yellin-Dror, Annat; Magri, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Direct data of the Tiberias Basin (TB) deep-seated stratigraphy is limited. Therefore, imaging of suspected underlying salt deposits and their structure is carried out based on salt tectonics theory and shallow seismic data interpretation. It is supported by the geochemistry of surrounding springs and numerical modeling of fluid transport processes within the basin. The Tiberias Basin (TB) is a narrow pull-apart basin located along the Dead Sea Transform. It encompasses Lake Tiberias, which is the largest fresh water lake in the Levant. Saline onshore and offshore springs and seepages are known to contribute considerable amount of salt to the lake endangering its water quality. Since the early 1980's, deep-seated salt deposits are known to exist in the Tiberias basin subsurface as a result of one deep exploration borehole. Interpretation of onshore seismic data at the southern part of the basin reveals its structure and distribution. However, offshore seismic interpretation is debatable and leads to uncertainty regarding the structure and distribution of salt deposits under the lake. The results of the current study suggest that a salt diapir rises under the lake, piercing through the basin-fill adjacent to the western boundary fault of the basin. Chemical analyses show that some springs at the western shore of the Lake contain indications of dissolved halite. In addition, numerical modeling of brine flow suggests that shallow salt domes can allow brine plumes to reach the surface and discharge along the western coast. These results allow imaging and support the hypothesis regarding the occurrences of shallow salt structures in the vicinity of the lake and contribute valuable information for sustainable management of its water.

  3. Organic geochemistry and brine composition in Great Salt, Mono, and Walker Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, J.L.; Orem, W.H.; Eugster, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Recent sediments, representing up to 1000 years of accumulation, were collected from three closed basin lakes (Mono Lake, CA, Walker Lake, NV, and Great Salt Lake, UT) to assess the effects of brine composition on the accumulation of total organic carbon, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon, humic acid structure and diagenesis, and trace metal complexation. The Great Salt Lake water column is a stratified Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 brine with low alkalinity. Algal debris is entrained in the high density (1.132-1.190 g/cc) bottom brines, and in this region maximum organic matter decomposition occurs by anaerobic processes, with sulfate ion as the terminal electron acceptor. Organic matter, below 5 cm of the sediment-water interface, degrades at a very slow rate in spite of very high pore-fluid sulfate levels. The organic carbon concentration stabilizes at 1.1 wt%. Mono Lake is an alkaline (Na-CO3-Cl-SO4) system. The water column is stratified, but the bottom brines are of lower density relative to the Great Salt Lake, and sedimentation of algal debris is rapid. Depletion of pore-fluid sulfate, near l m of core, results in a much higher accumulation of organic carbon, approximately 6 wt%. Walker Lake is also an alkaline system. The water column is not stratified, and decomposition of organic matter occurs by aerobic processes at the sediment-water interface and by anaerobic processes below. Total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in Walker Lake sediments vary with location and depth due to changes in input and pore-fluid sulfate concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies (13C) of humic substances and dissolved organic carbon provide information on the source of the Recent sedimentary organic carbon (aquatic vs. terrestrial), its relative state of decomposition, and its chemical structure. The spectra suggest an algal origin with little terrestrial signature at all three lakes. This is indicated by the ratio of aliphatic to

  4. Sources of inflow and nature of redistribution of90Sr in the salt lakes of the Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyeva, N Yu; Arkhipova, S I; Kravchenko, N V

    2017-11-04

    At the first time for the period after the Chernobyl NPP accident the nature of the redistribution of the 90 Sr concentrations in components of the ecosystems of the salt lakes of the Crimea were identified and described. Concentration of 90 Sr in water of the salt lakes depends on the sources of the inflow this radionuclide into aquatic ecosystems and salinity level of lakes water. Until April 2014 the flow of the Dnieper river water through the Northern-Crimean canal was more important factor of contamination of salt lakes of the Crimea by 90 Sr, than atmospheric fallout of this radionuclide after the Chernobyl NPP accident. Concentrations of 90 Sr in water of the salt lakes of the Crimea exceeded 2.4-156.5 times its concentrations in their bottom sediments. The 90 Sr dose commitments to hydrophytes, which were sampled from the salt lakes of the Crimea have not reached values which could impact them during entire the after-accident period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Feeding spectra of Arctodiaptomus salinus (Calanoida, Copepoda) using fatty acid trophic markers in seston food in two salt lakes in South Siberia (Khakasia, Russia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolomeev, A.; Sushchik, N.N.; Gulati, R.D.; Makhutova, O.N.; Kalacheva, G.S.; Zotina, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    During two vegetation seasons (2004–2005), we compared feeding spectra of Arctodiaptomus salinus (Calanoida, Copepoda) populations inhabiting two neighboring salt lakes, Shira and Shunet, Khakasia, Russia, using fatty acid (FA) trophic markers. Sestonic FA composition in two lakes moderately

  6. Computer program to simulate the salt balance between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Bolke, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents a computer simulation program that was used by Waddell and Bolke (1973) to predict the salt balance between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, for either existing or modified culvert openings (fig. 1). The development of the program, its accuracy and limitations, are described in the above report, which was prepared as part of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Geological and Mineral Survey. Users of this program should consider it an addendum to the report by Waddell and Bolke (1973).Although this program has been tested by its contributor, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the contributor or the Government, as to the functioning of the program and related program material, nor shall the fact of distribution constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the contributor or the Government, in connection therewith.The FORTRAN IV program listing (table 1) defines the constants and variables necessary for understanding the mechanics and the output from the program.

  7. Actinomycetes Diversity among rRNA Gene Clones and Cellular Isolates from Sambhar Salt Lake, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical stratification of actinomycetes diversity in Sambhar salt lake (India’s largest salt lake was investigated by using cultivable and uncultivable approaches. The isolates from cultured approaches were clustered on the basis of cultural, morphological, biochemical, and cell wall characteristics, and results were further strengthened by 16S rDNA-RFLP into five major groups. 16S rDNA sequencing of the representative isolates from each clusters was identified as belonging to Streptomyces, Actinopolyspora, Microbispora, Saccharopolyspora, and Actinoplanes genera, while culture independent group was established as Streptomyces (130 clones, 20 OTUs, Micromonospora (96 clones, 7 OTUs, Streptosporangium (79 clones, 9 OTUs, Thermomonospora (46 clones, 8 OTUs, and Dactylosporangium (58 clones, 8 OTUs. The diversity assessment using Shannon and Wiener index was found to be 1.55, 1.52, 1.55, and 1.49 from surface lake water, at depth of 1.5 m, shallow layer of water with algal population, and finally at depth of 2.5 m, respectively. We observed diversity in terms of the species richness as Streptomyces is dominant genus in both culture dependent and culture independent techniques followed by Microbispora (culture dependent methods and Micromonospora (culture independent method genera, respectively.

  8. Mercury and selenium contamination in waterbird eggs and risk to avian reproduction at Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Hartman, Christopher A.; Isanhart, John P.; Herring, Garth; Vaughn, Sharon; Cavitt, John F.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Browers, Howard; Cline, Chris; Vest, Josh

    2015-01-01

    The wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem are recognized regionally, nationally, and hemispherically for their importance as breeding, wintering, and migratory habitat for diverse groups of waterbirds. Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge is the largest freshwater component of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem and provides critical breeding habitat for more than 60 bird species. However, the Great Salt Lake ecosystem also has a history of both mercury and selenium contamination, and this pollution could reduce the health and reproductive success of waterbirds. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of mercury and selenium contamination to birds breeding within Great Salt Lake, especially at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, and to identify the waterbird species and areas at greatest risk to contamination. We sampled eggs from 33 species of birds breeding within wetlands of Great Salt Lake during 2010 ̶ 2012 and focused on American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), Forster’s terns (Sterna forsteri), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) for additional studies of the effects of contaminants on reproduction.

  9. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Michail M; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-12-19

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [(14)C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

  10. Halotolerant extremophile bacteria from the Great Salt Lake for recycling pollutants in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattieri, Matteo; Suvira, Milomir; Hasan, Kamrul; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2017-07-01

    The treatment of hypersaline wastewater (approximately 5% of the wastewater worldwide) cannot be performed by classical biological techniques. Herein the halotolerant extremophile bacteria obtained from the Great Salt Lake (Utah) were explored in single chamber microbial fuel cells with Pt-free cathodes for more than 18 days. The bacteria samples collected in two different locations of the lake (Stansbury Bay and Antelope Island) showed different electrochemical performances. The maximum achieved power output of 36 mW m-2 was from the microbial fuel cell based on the sample originated from Stansbury Bay, at a current density of 820 mA m-2. The performances throughout the long-term operation are discussed and a bioelectrochemical mechanism is proposed.

  11. A multi-proxy record of volume in the Great Salt Lake over the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, K. E.; Bowen, G. J.; Toney, J. L.; Tarozo, R.; Huang, Y.; Bowen, B.

    2010-12-01

    Continental paleoclimate records for the Holocene are essential for understanding the influence of climate modes on terrestrial settings. Terminal lakes, like the Great Salt Lake, UT (GSL) are particularly well suited for examining changes in water balance in response to large scale climate change. We present records of lipid abundance and hydrogen isotope data; hydrogen and oxygen isotope variability in brine shrimp cysts; carbonate oxygen and carbon isotopes; and variability in mineralogy from reflectance spectrometry in a core spanning 9 to 2 ka bp from the GSL. The isotopic value of lake waters are inferred from the cyst isotope records. The oxygen isotopic composition of cysts decreases slowly by about 2 ‰ from the beginning of the record (approx. 9 ka bp) to about 6 ka, and is highly variable after about 4.5 ka bp. This gradual isotopic decrease suggests increased water input into the GSL up to the Mid-Holocene and more variable inputs after. Some portion of the decrease is likely attributable to a reestablishment of equilibrium with local precipitation sources following the rapid evaporation of Lake Bonneville at the end of the Pleistocene. Carbonate oxygen and carbon isotope ratios co-vary before 5.5 ka and after 4.5 ka, and are anti-correlated between, suggesting a major restructuring of the hydrologic regime in the Mid-Holocene. Distributions of lipid and n

  12. Revisiting the Salt Lake City Olympic scandal: Would the outcome be different today?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Dodds

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Many international sport organizations face bribery scandals resulting from its event bidding process. The International Olympic Committee (IOC faced this type of scandal with the 2002 Olympic Winter Games. Two members of the Salt Lake City Organizing Committee (SLOC faced 15 criminal charges from providing more than US$1.2 million in cash and gifts to entice IOC members to support its bid. Ultimately both SLOC members were acquitted of all charges. Can a new interpretation of the United States’ anti-bribery law, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA, be effective in preventing similar sport scandals?

  13. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Salt Lake City Olympics Venues, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This computer generated perspective image provides a northward looking 'view from space' that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling, and the nearby Snow Basin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City area ski resorts host the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and a Landsat 5 satellite image mosaic. Topographic expression is exaggerated four times.For a full-resolution, annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60

  14. Prokaryotic diversity in Aran-Bidgol salt lake, the largest hypersaline playa in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Kazemi, Bahram; Pašić, Lejla; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic diversity in Aran-Bidgol salt lake, a thalasohaline lake in Iran, was studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), cultivation techniques, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Viable counts obtained (2.5-4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1)) were similar to total cell abundance in the lake determined by DAPI direct count (3-4×10(7) cells mL(-1)). The proportion of Bacteria to Archaea in the community detectable by FISH was unexpectedly high and ranged between 1:3 and 1:2. We analyzed 101 archaeal isolates and found that most belonged to the genera Halorubrum (55%) and Haloarcula (18%). Eleven bacterial isolates obtained in pure culture were affiliated with the genera Salinibacter (18.7%), Salicola (18.7%) and Rhodovibrio (35.3%). Analysis of inserts of 100 clones from the eight 16S rRNA clone libraries constructed revealed 37 OTUs. The majority (63%) of these sequences were not related to any previously identified taxa. Within this sampling effort we most frequently retrieved phylotypes related to Halorhabdus (16% of archaeal sequences obtained) and Salinibacter (36% of bacterial sequences obtained). Other prokaryotic groups that were abundant included representatives of Haloquadratum, the anaerobic genera Halanaerobium and Halocella, purple sulfur bacteria of the genus Halorhodospira and Cyanobacteria.

  15. Physical Monitoring of Flow Into and Within Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, T. A.; Naftz, D. L.; Perschon, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is the hydrologic terminus for the eastern part of the Great Basin. As the largest inland waterbody in the Western United States, GSL plays a critical ecologic role for many migratory bird species. In terms of harvest quantity and quality, the brine shrimp (Artemia) fishery of GSL is among the strongest in the world. The characteristic of GSL as a hydrologic sink amplifies anthropogenic activities throughout the basin, most specifically activities that occur along its eastern and southern shores, the urban corridor of the Wasatch Front. In 1959 GSL was divided into north and south parts by a rock-fill railroad causeway. Since then, an extreme density gradient between the north and south part exists as a result of limited conveyance of water from the south part where more than 95 percent of the total freshwater input occurs (Loving, and others, 2000). To date, little is known about the loading and cycling of various chemical constituents associated with human activities including nutrients, selenium, and mercury. Hydroacoustic technology, specifically acoustic Doppler technology, is currently being used to obtain a better physical understanding of GSL. Since 1999, stratified bi-directional discharge has been measured at the causeway breach with an acoustic Doppler current profiler. From these measurements, net flow components to the north and south have been used to assess the movement of water and salt through the causeway. Low hydraulic gradients and variable backwater conditions at the two largest inflows to GSL required the deployment of in-situ acoustic Doppler velocity meters to accurately compute continuous discharge, critical for constituent loading analyses. These discharge records, computed using the index velocity method, show sensitivity to large wind events that can lead to a complete reversal of flow. Velocity profiles acquired during two multi-day water-quality synoptic sampling runs with acoustic Doppler current profilers have

  16. Composition and secondary formation of fine particulate matter in the Salt Lake Valley: winter 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprov, Roman; Eatough, Delbert J; Cruickshank, Tyler; Olson, Neal; Cropper, Paul M; Hansen, Jaron C

    2014-08-01

    Under the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), put in place as a result of the Clean Air Amendments of 1990, three regions in the state of Utah are in violation of the NAAQS for PM10 and PM2.5 (Salt Lake County, Ogden City, and Utah County). These regions are susceptible to strong inversions that can persist for days to weeks. This meteorology, coupled with the metropolitan nature of these regions, contributes to its violation of the NAAQS for PM during the winter. During January-February 2009, 1-hr averaged concentrations of PM10-2.5, PM2.5, NO(x), NO2, NO, O3, CO, and NH3 were measured. Particulate-phase nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate and gas-phase HONO, HNO3, and SO2 were also measured on a 1-hr average basis. The results indicate that ammonium nitrate averages 40% of the total PM2.5 mass in the absence of inversions and up to 69% during strong inversions. Also, the formation of ammonium nitrate is nitric acid limited. Overall, the lower boundary layer in the Salt Lake Valley appears to be oxidant and volatile organic carbon (VOC) limited with respect to ozone formation. The most effective way to reduce ammonium nitrate secondary particle formation during the inversions period is to reduce NO(x) emissions. However, a decrease in NO(x) will increase ozone concentrations. A better definition of the complete ozone isopleths would better inform this decision. Implications: Monitoring of air pollution constituents in Salt Lake City, UT, during periods in which PM2.5 concentrations exceeded the NAAQS, reveals that secondary aerosol formation for this region is NO(x) limited. Therefore, NO(x) emissions should be targeted in order to reduce secondary particle formation and PM2.5. Data also indicate that the highest concentrations of sulfur dioxide are associated with winds from the north-northwest, the location of several small refineries.

  17. Marinimicrobium haloxylanilyticum sp. nov., a new moderately halophilic, polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from Great Salt Lake, Utah

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh Møller, Mette; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2010-01-01

    A new moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, strain SX15T, was isolated from hypersaline surface sediment of the southern arm of Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA). The strain grew on a number of carbohydrates and carbohydrate polymers such as xylan, starch, carboxymethyl...

  18. 77 FR 13074 - Opportunity for Designation in the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Opportunity for Designation in the Pocatello, ID; Evansville, IN; and Salt Lake City, UT Areas; Request for Comments on the Official Agencies Servicing These...

  19. Differential Staffing Patterns with Job Analyses and Operational Procedures for Salt Lake City School District Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkin, Katherine Story

    Duties of the staff of media centers in the Salt Lake City School District and an analysis of task performances by position are listed. Positions included are: (1) head of the school media center/school media specialist, (2) school media center technician, (3) school media center aide, and (4) student aides. Twenty general district operational…

  20. Heterotrophic denitrification at extremely high salt and pH by haloalkaliphilic Gammaproteobacteria from hypersaline soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapovalova, A.A.; Khijniak, T.V.; Tourova, T.P.; Muyzer, G.; Sorokin, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe denitrification at extremely high salt and pH in sediments from hypersaline alkaline soda lakes and soda soils. Experiments with sediment slurries demonstrated the presence of acetate-utilizing denitrifying populations active at in situ conditions. Anaerobic enrichment

  1. Lateral spread hazard mapping of the northern Salt Lake Valley, Utah, for a M7.0 scenario earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M.J.; Bartlett, S.F.; Solomon, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used to develop a lateral spread-displacement hazard map for northern Salt Lake Valley, Utah, using a scenario M7.0 earthquake occurring on the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault. The mapping effort is supported by a substantial amount of geotechnical, geologic, and topographic data compiled for the Salt Lake Valley, Utah. ArcGIS?? routines created for the mapping project then input this information to perform site-specific lateral spread analyses using methods developed by Bartlett and Youd (1992) and Youd et al. (2002) at individual borehole locations. The distributions of predicted lateral spread displacements from the boreholes located spatially within a geologic unit were subsequently used to map the hazard for that particular unit. The mapped displacement zones consist of low hazard (0-0.1 m), moderate hazard (0.1-0.3 m), high hazard (0.3-1.0 m), and very high hazard (> 1.0 m). As expected, the produced map shows the highest hazard in the alluvial deposits at the center of the valley and in sandy deposits close to the fault. This mapping effort is currently being applied to the southern part of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, and probabilistic maps are being developed for the entire valley. ?? 2007, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  2. End-Permian mass extinction caused by high volatile halogenated gases from giant salt lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsyna, Lidia; Weissflog, Ludwig

    2010-05-01

    Climatic and paleotoxicological processes, which caused mass extinction (ME) approx. 250 Ma ago may also play a decisive role in the present day sixth large-scale ME of species, caused by mankind. The speed with which the currently ME is taking effect is higher by a factor of 1000 than that of 100 years ago (8th UN Conference on Biological Diversity in 2006, Djoghlaf, 2006). The worldwide increasing temperature and dryness incorporated in climate change are already leading to progressive desertification and to an increase in number and surface areas of hyper saline salt lakes, salt lagoons, saline marshlands and sabkhas. Furthermore the predicted sea level rise by approx. 1 m (even up to 6 m according to more recent assumptions) leads to an expansion or new formation of salt ecosystems caused by flooding of coastal areas and hinterland. Particularly in regions with current and/or future semiarid and arid climatic features this will lead, amongst others, to increased emissions of naturally formed phytotoxic VHCs. Additionally, wind and storms will transport large quantities of salt (dust) from surfaces of these parched hyper saline salt ecosystems for uptake in so far unsalinated soils. An example of this is currently apparent in Central Asia, where several hundred thousand metric tons of salt dust are picked up every year from the former sea floor of the drying-up Aral Sea, the Kara-Bogaz-Gol and saline marshlands of Caspian Sea and transported several thousand kilometers [Orlovsky and Orlovsky, 2001]. In combination with increasing temperatures, intensive radiation and increasing input of man-made pollutants, desert areas of Central Asia are expanding ever faster. In this context it has to be borne in mind that today's observations only refer to a timeframe of a few years or decades. The developments at end-Permian, on the other hand, encompass approx. 100,000 years. In this respect, the current state of art does not permit any definite statements as to what

  3. Simulation of Saline Groundwater Resources Surrounding Salt Lake in Fars Province of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyat Kholghi, Majid; Bastani, Mehrdad; Rakhshandeoroo, Gholamreza

    2010-05-01

    One of the most salty lakes in Iran is located in North-East of Fars province with Electrical Conductivities (EC) of up to 61420 μmhos/cm where water supply depends severely on groundwater resources. Increasing demand for freshwater and overexploitation of the aquifer has caused a drawdown in groundwater levels followed by a seawater intrusion into the coastal aquifer in the vicinity of salt lake. Because of invalid appropriate groundwater flow and solute transport parameter values of the coastal system, studying and modelling of saltwater intrusion in this region is in some way complicated. These unknown parameters are consisted of hydraulic conductivity, porosity, specific storage coefficient and longitudinal dispersivity. In this research, it is tried to facilitate study this problem by means of SEAWAT code, which is suitable for variable-density groundwater flow modelling. In the process of calibrating the simulation and estimating the required unknown parameters, an attempt at inverse modelling of a seawater intrusion system is made by using genetic algorithm method as the optimization procedure. The auto-calibration objective function is defined with the root mean square errors (RMSE) between the observed and the simulated values. The observed data are consisted of both hydraulic heads and concentrations obtained from observation wells. Firstly, the SEAWAT code has been used for forward solution part of salt water intrusion phenomena and then a program is written in MATLAB for coupling the forward and inverse processes. In the developed code, the flow and transport parameters are estimated simultaneously in steady and transient states. Using these estimated parameters in the structure of the simulation consequences more accurate results and more trustable model for next applications in management of the coastal aquifer. Key words seawater intrusion; saline groundwater resources; SEAWAT; genetic algorithm; Fars province

  4. Weather and eared grebe winter migration near the Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Augusta A; Laird, Neil F

    2017-10-18

    This study provides insight from the use of weather radar observations to understand the characteristics of the eared grebe migration near the Great Salt Lake (GSL) and provides unique information on weather conditions connected to these migration events. Doppler weather radar measurements from the Salt Lake City, Utah WSR-88D radar site (KMTX), along with meteorological surface and rawinsonde data, were used to identify and examine 281 eared grebe migration events across 15 winters from 1997/1998 through 2011/2012. An average of about 19 migration events occurred each winter with considerable interannual variability, as well as large variance in the spatial area and number of birds departing the GSL during each event. The migration events typically occurred during clear sky conditions in the presence of surface high pressure and colder than average surface temperatures. Migration events began 55 min after sunset, on average across the winter seasons, and in one case we demonstrate that an extended, nonstop flight was initiated of the departing eared grebes to northern Mexico. Eared grebes leaving the GSL largely flew above the freezing level with a mean northerly tailwind at flight altitude of 3.1 m s -1 and a westerly, cross-flight wind of 5.0 m s -1 while having an average flight speed at cruising altitude of 16.9 m s -1 , or 61 km h -1 . In addition to determining the variability of meteorological conditions during migration events across the 15 winters, atmospheric conditions during the largest migration event observed are presented and discussed.

  5. Weather and eared grebe winter migration near the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Augusta A.; Laird, Neil F.

    2017-10-01

    This study provides insight from the use of weather radar observations to understand the characteristics of the eared grebe migration near the Great Salt Lake (GSL) and provides unique information on weather conditions connected to these migration events. Doppler weather radar measurements from the Salt Lake City, Utah WSR-88D radar site (KMTX), along with meteorological surface and rawinsonde data, were used to identify and examine 281 eared grebe migration events across 15 winters from 1997/1998 through 2011/2012. An average of about 19 migration events occurred each winter with considerable interannual variability, as well as large variance in the spatial area and number of birds departing the GSL during each event. The migration events typically occurred during clear sky conditions in the presence of surface high pressure and colder than average surface temperatures. Migration events began 55 min after sunset, on average across the winter seasons, and in one case we demonstrate that an extended, nonstop flight was initiated of the departing eared grebes to northern Mexico. Eared grebes leaving the GSL largely flew above the freezing level with a mean northerly tailwind at flight altitude of 3.1 m s-1 and a westerly, cross-flight wind of 5.0 m s-1 while having an average flight speed at cruising altitude of 16.9 m s-1, or 61 km h-1. In addition to determining the variability of meteorological conditions during migration events across the 15 winters, atmospheric conditions during the largest migration event observed are presented and discussed.

  6. Reconnaissance of the shallow-unconfined aquifer in Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.; Waddell, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    The shallow-unconfined aquifer in Salt Lake (Jordan) Valley, Utah, seldom is used for domestic or industrial purposes because it yields water slowly and is readily contaminated. The water in the aquifer, however, can flood basements and is a potential source of contamination to other water supplies. In about one-half of the valley, water in the shallow-unconfined aquifer is less than 10 feet below land surface. The general direction of flow in the shallow aquifer is toward the Jordan River. Water levels in the north part of the valley and along the Jordan River are highest in March or April and in the south part of the valley are highest in late summer. The smallest concentrations of dissolved solids in water from wells along the east side of the valley, and the greatest concentrations are in the northwest part of the valley near the Great Salt Lake. Large dissolved-solids concentrations are found near some landfills and tailings areas. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations ranged from less than 0.1 to 86 milligrams per liter and nitrate-nitrogen concentrations from less than 0.02 to 0.85 milligram per liter. Some of the largest nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were found in water wells near animal pens. The greatest concentrations of trace elements generally came from wells near landfills and tailings area. The greatest measured concentration of cadmium was 200 microgram per liter, of mercury 0.1 microgram per liter, of lead 46 micrograms per liter, of iron 37,000 micrograms per liter and of arsenic 360 micrograms per liter. Synthetic organic chemicals were found in water from several wells. The greatest measured concentration of benzene was 400 micrograms per liter, of phenol 660 micrograms per liter, of 1,1 dichloroethane 20 micrograms per liter, of tichloroethylene 8 micrograms per liter , and of chloroethylene, 11 micrograms per liter. The greatest concentrations were in water from wells near landfills. (USGS)

  7. Reconstructing historical changes in the environmental health of watersheds by using sediment cores from lakes and reservoirs in Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Stephens, Doyle W.; Callender, Edward; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    The Great Salt Lake Basins study area of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program, which began in 1997, is increasing the scientific understanding of factors that affect surface-water quality within the study-area boundaries (fig. 1). One way to improve the understanding of these factors is to look at historical trends in existing water-quality data. Unfortunately, short record lengths, in- consistent analytical methods, numerous measurements at less than detection levels, and questionable accuracy limit the usefulness of historical monitoring data for most trace inorganic and organic contaminants found in streams, rivers, and lakes in the study area.

  8. Paleogeographic significance of the Cardium, Potamids and Foraminifera living in intra-continental salt lakes of North Africa (Sahara Quaternary, Egypt Present lakes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaziat, J.-C.

    The widespread Cardium ( Cerastoderma) fauna of Quaternary lakes of the Sahara gave rise to the "Saharian seas" hypothesis. Present Egyptian (Fayum, Siwa) and Algerian Holocene salt lakes show an evolution from a fresh water fauna to a Cardium, Potamids and Foraminifera fauna in spite of their considerable distance from the Mediterranean sea and their altitude above sea level. The inevitable conclusion is that thalassoid or so-called margino-littoral faunas cannot be used as indicative of sea connection, or even proximity, in ancient deposits.

  9. Estimating selenium removal by sedimentation from the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, W.; Fuller, C.; Naftz, D.L.; Johnson, W.P.; Diaz, X.

    2009-01-01

    The mass of Se deposited annually to sediment in the Great Salt Lake (GSL) was estimated to determine the significance of sedimentation as a permanent Se removal mechanism. Lake sediment cores were used to qualitatively delineate sedimentation regions (very high to very low), estimate mass accumulation rates (MARs) and determine sediment Se concentrations. Sedimentation regions were defined by comparison of isopach contours of Holocene sediment thicknesses to linear sedimentation rates determined via analysis of 210Pb, 226Ra, 7Be and 137Cs activity in 20 short cores (10 cm). These MARs in the upper 1-2 cm of each long core ranged from 0.019 to 0.105 gsed/cm2/a. Surface sediment Se concentrations in the upper 1 or 2 cm of each long core ranged from 0.79 to 2.47 mg/kg. Representative MARs and Se concentrations were used to develop mean annual Se removal by sedimentation in the corresponding sedimentation region. The spatially integrated Se sedimentation rate was estimated to be 624 kg/a within a range of uncertainty between 285 and 960 kg/a. Comparison to annual Se loading and other potential removal processes suggests burial by sedimentation is not the primary removal process for Se from the GSL. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Comparison of Radiocarbon Ages for Multiproxy Paleoclimate Reconstruction of the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, K. E.; Bowen, G. J.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2008-12-01

    Multiproxy paleoclimate reconstructions from high sedimentation-rate systems offer promising opportunities to deconvolve multiple aspects climate system response to past forcing. However, the time-equivalence of proxies must be established before such reconstructions can be usefully interpreted. Differences in source ages, transport pathways, and surface residence times for substrates may lead to differences in lag times between proxy formation and deposition, compromising comparative analysis of data from multiple proxies. We used multi-substrate radiocarbon dating to investigate the potential for multi-proxy reconstruction of Holocene changes in the volume of the Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, based on the stable isotope composition of organic and inorganic substrates in lake sediment cores. Among potential substrates for this work are normal alkanes of vascular higher plant and algal origin, fossil cysts of lake-dwelling brine shrimp (Artemia), and micritic aragonite. Radiocarbon ages for all organic substrates (alkanes, cysts) sampled at any given core depth are concordant within analytical uncertainty and are similar to ages determined on land-plant debris and filamentous algae isolated from the sediment. Inorganic carbonate, in contrast, is depleted in 14C compare to the organic proxies, giving ages that were apparently 2000 to 3000 years older, likely due to winnowing and re-deposition of carbonate at the core site. These results suggest that the maximum temporal resolution achievable through analysis of mineral substrates is on the order of several millennia. Although the limited precision of the radiocarbon analysis precludes precise determination of the maximum potential resolution of organic-proxy based climate reconstructions, the relatively high sedimentation rates (50--150 cm/kyr) and age-equivalence of the substrates analyzed implies that sub- centennial scale resolution should be achievable throughout much of the Holocene portion of the GSL

  11. Potential for Waterborne and Invertebrate Transmission of West Nile Virus in the Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Melissa; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Dusek, Robert J; Shivers, Jan; Hofmeister, Erik

    2017-07-15

    In November and December of 2013, a large mortality event involving 15,000 to 20,000 eared grebes ( Podiceps nigricollis ) occurred at the Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The onset of the outbreak in grebes was followed by a mortality event in >86 bald eagles ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ). During the die-off, West Nile virus (WNV) was detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) or viral culture in the carcasses of grebes and eagles submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center. However, no activity of mosquitoes, the primary vectors of WNV, was detected by the State of Utah's WNV monitoring program. The transmission of WNV has rarely been reported during the winter in North America in the absence of known mosquito activity; however, the size of this die-off, the habitat in which it occurred, and the species involved are unique. We experimentally investigated whether WNV could survive in water with a high salt content, as found at the GSL, and whether brine shrimp, the primary food of migrating eared grebes on the GSL, could have played a role in the transmission of WNV to feeding birds. We found that WNV can survive up to 72 h at 4°C in water containing 30 to 150 ppt NaCl, and brine shrimp incubated with WNV in 30 ppt NaCl may adsorb WNV to their cuticle and, through feeding, infect epithelial cells of their gut. Both mechanisms may have potentiated the WNV die-off in migrating eared grebes on the GSL. IMPORTANCE Following a major West Nile virus die-off of eared grebes and bald eagles at the Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT, in November to December 2013, this study assessed the survival of West Nile virus (WNV) in water as saline as that of the GSL and whether brine shrimp, the major food for migrating grebes, could have played a role as a vector for the virus. While mosquitoes are the major vector of WNV, under certain circumstances, transmission may occur through contaminated water and invertebrates as food. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Modelling water and salt balances in a deep, groundwater-throughflow lake-Lake Purrumbete, southeastern Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yihdego, Yohannes; Webb, John; Leahy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    .... A modified difference water budget method for lakes, that estimates net groundwater flux through the difference between the level of the lake and the water table, along with the specific yield...

  13. Development of a Site-specific Standard for Selenium in Open Waters of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellmer, W. O.; Miller, T.; Ohlendorf, H.; Denbleyker, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL) is a unique terminal lake located adjacent to a rapidly growing metropolitan area in the western United States. The open water of the GSL is protected for its current beneficial uses through the application of a narrative criteria clause in the state water quality standards. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) initiated a process in 2004 to develop a site-specific numeric water quality standard for selenium for the open waters of the GSL to balance protection of the GSL's unique ecology and beneficial uses with burgeoning development. The process the DEQ initiated included the formation of a Great Salt Lake Water Quality Steering Committee and a Science Panel to identify the studies required, manage the studies and finally recommend a site-specific standard. Great Salt Lake Water Quality Steering Committee. The DEQ established the GSL Water Quality Steering Committee (Steering Committee) to provide a forum for stakeholders to assist in guiding the process of developing numeric standards for the lake. This group consists of federal and state regulatory agencies, other public entities, conservation organizations, recreation groups, and industrial users of the lake. Great Salt Lake Science Panel. The DEQ established the GSL Science Panel (Science Panel) to advise the DEQ and Steering Committee and provide overall technical direction and review for the program. The Science Panel is composed of 9 members representing federal and state regulatory agencies, industry and academia. The purpose of the panel is to identify data gaps in the literature, design and oversee scientific investigations to fill critical data gaps, and finally recommend a numeric water quality standard to the Steering Committee. Studies Currently Underway. A partnership of researchers—including local and national experts from education and industry—are collaborating with the DEQ, the Steering Committee, and the Science Panel to complete the studies required

  14. Modeling the Dynamics of the Great Salt Lake as an Integrator of Regional Hydrologic and Climate Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, I. N.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, is the fourth largest, perennial, terminal lake in the world. The Great Salt Lake (GSL) level fluctuates due to the balance between inflows and outflows. These fluctuations are of interest whether they are high (flooding hazards) or low (economic impacts). Inflows are due to streamflow, primarily from the Bear River (54%), Weber River (18%) and Jordan/Provo River (28%) systems. Inflows also include precipitation directly on the lake and groundwater both from the East and West sides. The only outflow is evaporation that is controlled by the climate and area of the lake that changes with level. The GSL reached historic high levels above 1284 m in 1873 and 1986. A historic low at 1278 m occurred in 1963. These fluctuations represent the integrated effect of climate and hydrologic processes as well as the dynamic interaction between lake volume, area and salinity that impact evaporation from the lake. The topographic area-volume relationship in the GSL plays a role in the system dynamics because area is a control on the evaporation outflux. This paper examines the relationships between Basin climate (precipitation and temperature), Inflows to the lake (primarily streamflow) and outflows (evaporation). The role played by the topographic elevation-area-volume relationship on lake dynamics and the correspondence between modes in volume and area distributions and peaks in the area-volume derivative was examined. We derived, using a steady state approximation, the relationship between distributions of lake volume and lake area and the area-volume derivative from the topography/bathymetry. This analysis showed that both the topography/bathymetry and multimodality in the area distribution are required to explain the observed multimodality in the volume distribution. We also separated lake volume changes into increases in the spring (due to spring runoff) and declines in the fall (due to evaporation) and then related these volume changes to

  15. Inputs and internal cycling of nitrogen to a causeway influenced, hypersaline lake, Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen inputs to Great Salt Lake (GSL), located in the western USA, were quantified relative to the resident nitrogen mass in order to better determine numeric nutrient criteria that may be considered at some point in the future. Total dissolved nitrogen inputs from four surface-water sources entering GSL were modeled during the 5-year study period (2010–2014) and ranged from 1.90 × 106 to 5.56 × 106 kg/year. The railroad causeway breach was a significant conduit for the export of dissolved nitrogen from Gilbert to Gunnison Bay, and in 2011 and 2012, net losses of total nitrogen mass from Gilbert Bay via the Causeway breach were 9.59 × 105 and 1.51 × 106 kg. Atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) was a significant source of nitrogen to Gilbert Bay, exceeding the dissolved nitrogen load contributed via the Farmington Bay causeway surface-water input by >100,000 kg during 2 years of the study. Closure of two railroad causeway culverts in 2012 and 2013 likely initiated a decreasing trend in the volume of the higher density Deep Brine Layer and associated declines in total dissolved nitrogen mass contained in this layer. The large dissolved nitrogen pool in Gilbert Bay relative to the amount of nitrogen contributed by surface-water inflow sources is consistent with the terminal nature of GSL and the predominance of internal nutrient cycling. The opening of the new railroad causeway breach in 2016 will likely facilitate more efficient bidirectional flow between Gilbert and Gunnison Bays, resulting in potentially substantial changes in nutrient pools within GSL.

  16. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Enrique H; Stein, Ariel F

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons.

  17. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique H Bucher

    Full Text Available Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina, the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite, and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr, and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons.

  18. Aerosol Particles from Dried Salt-Lakes and Saline Soils Carried on Dust Storms over Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of individual particles from a super dust storm (DS on 20 March 2002, and those of non dust storm aero sols for Beijing (NDS and Duolun (DL (a desert area are determined using a variety of methods. In China, typically the source of aero sols in dust storms is thought to be deserts with alumino silicates being the main constituent particles; how ever, this does not reflect a complete analysis with our evidence indicating potential alternate dust sources along the storm's trans port path. Individual particle anal y sis of aero sols collected from a super dust storm on 20 March 2002 in Beijing shows that among all the 14 elements measured, only S and Cl have re mark able positive correlation. 82.5% of all particles measured contained both S and Cl, and the relative mass per cent age of S and Cl in these particles is much higher than the average of all particles. 62.0% of all particles contained S, Cl, and Na, in which the concentration of Na is 1.4 times higher than average. PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization anal y sis indicates that NaCl and Na2SO4 are major components of these particles with S and Cl showing significant positive correlation. More over, SO4 2- and Cl- also show significant positive correlation in bulk aero sol analysis. XPS (X-ray Pho to electron Spectros copy analysis of the surface of aero sols demonstrates that concentrations of Na and S on particles from the dust storm are higher than those from non-dust storm particles in Beijing and also for particles from. It is very likely that particles enriched with S, Cl, and Na is from the surface soils of dried salt-lakes and saline soils enriched with chloride and sulfate. This evidence demonstrates that be sides deserts, surface soils from dry salt-lakes and saline soils of arid and semi-arid areas are also sources of particulates in dust storms over Beijing.

  19. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  20. Water in the Oceanic Lithosphere: Salt Lake Crater Xenoliths, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizimis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Water can be present in nominally anhydrous minerals of peridotites in the form of hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen. Such water in the oceanic upper mantle could have a significant effect on its physical and chemical properties. However, the water content of the MORB source has been inferred indirectly from the compositions of basalts. Direct determinations on abyssal peridotites are scarce because they have been heavily hydrothermally altered. Here we present the first water analyses of minerals from spinel peridotite xenoliths of Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are exceptionally fresh. These peridotites are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. A few have unradiogenic Os and radiogenic Hf isotopes and may be fragments of an ancient (2 Ga) depleted and recycled lithosphere. Water contents in olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (Opx), and clinopyroxene (Cpx) were determined by FTIR spectrometry. Preliminary H_{2}O contents show ranges of 8-10 ppm for Ol, 151-277 ppm for Opx, and 337-603 ppm for Cpx. Reconstructed bulk rock H_{2}O contents range from 88-131 ppm overlapping estimates for the MORB source. Water contents between Ol minerals of the same xenolith are heterogeneous and individual OH infrared bands vary within a mineral with lower 3230 cm^{-1} and higher 3650-3400 cm^{-1} band heights from core to edge. This observation suggests disturbance of the hydrogen in Ol likely occurring during xenolith entrainment to the surface. Pyroxene water contents are higher than most water contents in pyroxenes from continental peridotite xenoliths and higher than those of abyssal peridotites. Cpx water contents decrease with increasing degree of depletion (e.g. increasing Fo in Ol and Cr# in spinel) consistent with an incompatible behavior of water. However Cpx water contents also show a positive correlation with LREE/HREE ratios and LREE concentrations consistent with refertilization. Opx water

  1. Metagenomic cloning and characterization of Na⁺ transporters from Huamachi Salt Lake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Miao; Tao, Li; Chen, Sanfeng

    2013-02-22

    Moderately halophilic bacteria are a kind of extreme environment microorganism that can tolerate moderate salt concentrations ranging from 0.5M to 2.5M. Here, via a metagenomic library screen, we identified four putative Na(+) transporters, designated H7-Nha, H16-Mppe, H19-Cap and H35-Mrp, from moderately halophilic community in the hypersaline soil of Huamachi Salt Lake, China. Functional complementation observed in a Na(+)(Ca(2+))/H(+) antiporter-defective Escherichia coli mutant (KNabc) suggests that the four putative Na(+) transporters could confer cells a capacity of Na(+) resistance probably by enhancing Na(+) or Ca(2+) efflux, but not Li(+) or K(+) exchange. Blastp analysis of the deduced amino-acid sequences indicates that H7-Nha has 71% identity to the NhaG Na(+)/H(+) antiporter of Bacillus subtilis, while H19-Cap shows 99% identity to Enterobacter cloacae Ca(2+) antiporter. Interestingly, H16-Mppe shares 59% identity to the metallophosphoesterase of Bacillus cellulosilyticus and H35-Mrp shows 68% identity to multidrug resistance protein of Lysinibacillus sphaericus. This is the first report that predicts a potential role of metallophosphoesterase in Na(+) resistance in halophilic bacteria. Furthermore, everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli cells harboring H7-Nha exhibit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity, but not Li(+) (K(+))/H(+) antiporter activity, confirming that H7-Nha supports Na(+) resistance mainly via Na(+)/H(+) antiport. Our report also demonstrates that metagenomic library screen is a convenient and effective way to explore more novel types of Na(+) transporters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Decadal-to-centennial-scale climate variability: Insights into the rise and fall of the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael E.; Lall, Upmanu; Saltzman, Barry

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate connections between decadal and secular global climatic variations, and historical variations in the volume of the Great Salt Lake. The decadal variations correspond to a low-frequency shifting of storm tracks which influence winter precipitation and explain nearly 18% of the interannual and longer-term variance in the record of monthly volume change. The secular trend accounts for a more modest approximately 1.5% of the variance.

  3. Energy Budgets of Eared Grebes on the Great Salt Lake and Implications for Harvest of Brine Shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, Michael R.; Caudell, Joe N.

    2009-01-01

    About 1.5-million eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis), representing half of the North American population, stage on Utah's Great Salt Lake, USA (GSL) during autumn migration to forage on brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana). Indirectly competing with birds for brine shrimp are commercial harvesters who annually collect >1 million kg (dry wt) of shrimp cysts (i.e., hardened eggs), an amount that during some years equals up to half of all brine shrimp cysts produced annually on the GSL. No inform...

  4. Simulations of a Cold-Air Pool in Utah's Salt Lake Valley: Sensitivity to Land Use and Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Christopher S.; Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2017-02-01

    Obtaining realistic land-surface states for initial and boundary conditions is important for the numerical weather prediction of many atmospheric phenomena. Here we investigate model sensitivity to land use and snow cover for a persistent wintertime cold-air pool in northern Utah during 1-8 January 2011. A Weather Research and Forecast model simulation using the 1993 United States Geological Survey land-use and North American Mesoscale model reanalysis snow-cover datasets is compared to an improved configuration using the modified 2011 National Land Cover Database and a more realistic representation of snow cover. The improved surface specification results in an increase (decrease) in urban land cover (Great Salt Lake surface area), and changes to the snow-cover initialization, depth, extent, and albedo. The results obtained from the model simulations are compared to observations collected during the Persistent Cold-Air Pool Study. The changes in land use and snow cover and the resulting impacts on the surface albedo and surface heat fluxes contributed to near-surface air temperature increases of 1-2°C in urban areas and decreases of 2-4°C in areas surrounding the Great Salt Lake. Although wind speeds in the boundary layer were overestimated in both simulations, shallow thermally-driven and terrain-forced flows were generally lessened in intensity and breadth in response to the decreased areal extent of the Great Salt Lake and increases in the urban footprint.

  5. Trend Analysis of Soil Salinity in Different Land Cover Types Using Landsat Time Series Data (case Study Bakhtegan Salt Lake)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadosi, M. M.; Hasanlou, M.

    2017-09-01

    Soil salinity is one of the main causes of desertification and land degradation which has negative impacts on soil fertility and crop productivity. Monitoring salt affected areas and assessing land cover changes, which caused by salinization, can be an effective approach to rehabilitate saline soils and prevent further salinization of agricultural fields. Using potential of satellite imagery taken over time along with remote sensing techniques, makes it possible to determine salinity changes at regional scales. This study deals with monitoring salinity changes and trend of the expansion in different land cover types of Bakhtegan Salt Lake district during the last two decades using multi-temporal Landsat images. For this purpose, per-pixel trend analysis of soil salinity during years 2000 to 2016 was performed and slope index maps of the best salinity indicators were generated for each pixel in the scene. The results of this study revealed that vegetation indices (GDVI and EVI) and also salinity indices (SI-1 and SI-3) have great potential to assess soil salinity trends in vegetation and bare soil lands respectively due to more sensitivity to salt features over years of study. In addition, images of May had the best performance to highlight changes in pixels among different months of the year. A comparative analysis of different slope index maps shows that more than 76% of vegetated areas have experienced negative trends during 17 years, of which about 34% are moderately and highly saline. This percent is increased to 92% for bare soil lands and 29% of salt affected soils had severe salinization. It can be concluded that the areas, which are close to the lake, are more affected by salinity and salts from the lake were brought into the soil which will lead to loss of soil productivity ultimately.

  6. Formation of aragonite cement by nannobacteria in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedone, Vicki A.; Folk, Robert L.

    1996-08-01

    Brine-shrimp egg cases in growth cavities in modern stromatolites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, are replaced by aragonite and cemented together by aragonite cement. The fabric of the cement changes dramatically as the distance from the egg case increases. The cement within 50 to 70 μm of the egg case exhibits a random fabric of 10 to 20 μm equant crystals. The surface of the cement is covered by bead-like bumps, 0.1 μm in diameter, interpreted as nannobacteria. Overlying the random, “beaded” fabric with a relatively abrupt transition are epitaxial, prismatic aragonite crystals that have smooth crystal surfaces lacking bead-like bodies. The smooth-surfaced prismatic aragonite crystals are interpreted to be “normal” abiotic precipitates, whereas the “beaded” microspar is interpreted to result from biotic processes, where the nannobacteria serve as catalysts for creation of the cement. A population explosion of bacteria occurs as the organic material of egg case rots, which alters the microchemical environment and induces a rapid precipitation of aragonite, enclosing tens of thousands of nannobacteria. As the organic material is destroyed, reproduction of bacteria slows and epitaxial, prismatic aragonite crystals nucleate and grow abiotically on the structureless, “biotic” layer.

  7. Halorientalis brevis sp. nov., Isolated from an Inland Salt Lake of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pan-Pan; Yin, Shuai; Han, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Halophilic archaeal strain YC89(T) was isolated from Yuncheng salt lake in Shanxi, China. Cells from strain YC89(T) were short rods, lysed in distilled water, stained Gram-negative and formed red-pigmented colonies on agar plate. Strain YC89(T) was able to grow at 25-50°C (optimum 37°C), at 1.4-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 2.6-3.1 M), at 0-1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.3 M) and at pH 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH 7.5). The major polar lipids are phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether and two unknown glycolipids. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that strain YC89(T) was phylogenetically related to Halorientalis persicus D108(T) (95.6% nucleotide identity) and H. regularis TNN28(T) (95.3% nucleotide identity). The rpoB' gene similarities between strain YC89(T) and H. persicus IBRC-M 10043(T) and H. regularis TNN28(T) were 88.1 and 88.0%, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain YC89(T) was determined to be 61.3 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggested that strain YC89(T) (=CGMCC 1.12125(T) = JCM 18366(T)) represents a new species of Halorientalis, for which the name H. brevis sp. nov. is proposed.

  8. Brevibacterium salitolerans sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from salt-lake sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Tong-Wei; Zhao, Ke; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Ying; Xia, Zhan-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Li-Li

    2010-12-01

    A novel bacterium, designated TRM 415(T), belonging to the genus Brevibacterium, was isolated from a sediment sample from a salt lake in Xinjiang province, China. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain TRM 415(T) was phylogenetically most closely related to Brevibacterium album YIM 90718(T) (98.4 % sequence similarity) and had low similarity (Brevibacterium; however, DNA-DNA hybridization studies between strain TRM 415(T) and B. album YIM 90718(T) showed only 41.3 % relatedness. Strain TRM 415(T) possessed meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic cell-wall diamino acid, MK-8(H(2)) as the major menaquinone and polar lipids including phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(17 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0). The genomic DNA G+C content was 69 mol%. Based on the evidence from this polyphasic study, strain TRM 415(T) represents a novel species of the genus Brevibacterium, for which the name Brevibacterium salitolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TRM 415(T) (=JCM 15900(T) =CCTCC AB 208328(T) =KCTC 19616(T)).

  9. Calculating salt loads to Great Salt Lake and the associated uncertainties for water year 2013; updating a 48 year old standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Christopher L.; Angeroth, Cory E.

    2015-01-01

    Effective management of surface waters requires a robust understanding of spatiotemporal constituent loadings from upstream sources and the uncertainty associated with these estimates. We compared the total dissolved solids loading into the Great Salt Lake (GSL) for water year 2013 with estimates of previously sampled periods in the early 1960s.We also provide updated results on GSL loading, quantitatively bounded by sampling uncertainties, which are useful for current and future management efforts. Our statistical loading results were more accurate than those from simple regression models. Our results indicate that TDS loading to the GSL in water year 2013 was 14.6 million metric tons with uncertainty ranging from 2.8 to 46.3 million metric tons, which varies greatly from previous regression estimates for water year 1964 of 2.7 million metric tons. Results also indicate that locations with increased sampling frequency are correlated with decreasing confidence intervals. Because time is incorporated into the LOADEST models, discrepancies are largely expected to be a function of temporally lagged salt storage delivery to the GSL associated with terrestrial and in-stream processes. By incorporating temporally variable estimates and statistically derived uncertainty of these estimates,we have provided quantifiable variability in the annual estimates of dissolved solids loading into the GSL. Further, our results support the need for increased monitoring of dissolved solids loading into saline lakes like the GSL by demonstrating the uncertainty associated with different levels of sampling frequency.

  10. Late quaternary geomorphology of the Great Salt Lake region, Utah, and other hydrographically closed basins in the western United States: A summary of observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currey, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Attributes of Quaternary lakes and lake basins which are often important in the environmental prehistory of semideserts are discussed. Basin-floor and basin-closure morphometry have set limits on paleolake sizes; lake morphometry and basin drainage patterns have influenced lacustrine processes; and water and sediment loads have influenced basin neotectonics. Information regarding inundated, runoff-producing, and extra-basin spatial domains is acquired directly from the paleolake record, including the littoral morphostratigraphic record, and indirectly by reconstruction. Increasingly detailed hypotheses regarding Lake Bonneville, the largest late Pleistocene paleolake in the Great Basin, are subjects for further testing and refinement. Oscillating transgression of Lake Bonneville began about 28,000 yr B.P.; the highest stage occurred about 15,000 yr B.P., and termination occurred abruptly about 13,000 yr B.P. A final resurgence of perennial lakes probably occurred in many subbasins of the Great Basin between 11,000 and 10,000 yr B.P., when the highest stage of Great Salt Lake (successor to Lake Bonneville) developed the Gilbert shoreline. The highest post-Gilbert stage of Great Salt Lake, which has been one of the few permanent lakes in the Great Basin during Holocene time, probably occurred between 3,000 and 2,000 yr B.P.

  11. Halopenitus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov., an archaeon from an inland salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Azarbaijani, Reza; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    A novel pale pink-pigmented halophilic archaeon, strain DC30(T), was isolated from Aran-Bidgol salt lake, a hypersaline playa in Iran. Cells of strain DC30(T) were non-motile and pleomorphic, from rods to triangular or disc-shaped. Strain DC30(T) required at least 1.7 M NaCl and 0.05 M MgCl(2) for growth (optimum, 3 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl(2)). The optimum pH and temperature for growth of strain DC30(T) were pH 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively, although it was capable of growth over pH and temperature ranges of 6.5-8.5 and 25-50 °C, respectively. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain DC30(T) was a member of the family Halobacteriaceae. However, it had low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 92.4%, 89.4% and 89.1% to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, the type species of the genera Halorubrum, Halogranum and Haloplanus, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 66.0 mol%. Phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, common phospholipids found in haloarchaea, were present. Three minor phospholipids and one unidentified glycolipid were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H(2)). The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain DC30(T) and other previously described genera of extremely halophilic archaea suggest that strain DC30(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halopenitus persicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halopenitus persicus is DC30(T) ( = IBRC 10041(T) = KCTC 4046(T)).

  12. Halobellus rarus sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon from an inland salt lake of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Han, Dong; Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Mou, Yun-Zhuang; Cui, Heng-Lin; Li, Zheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC21(T) and YC77, were isolated from an inland salt lake of China. Both have pleomorphic rod-shaped cells that lyse in distilled water, stain Gram-negative and form red-pigmented colonies. They are neutrophilic, require at least 2.1 M NaCl for growth under the optimum growth temperature of 37 °C. The major polar lipids of the two strains were phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), phosphatidylglycerol sulfate (PGS), two major glycolipids (GL1 and GL2) chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1) and mannosyl glucosyl diether (DGD-1), respectively. Trace amounts of two unidentified lipids (GL0-1 and GL0-2) were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains are 99.9 % identical, show 94.0-98.9 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC21(T) and YC77 is 99.8 % and show 90.3-95.3 % similarity to the closest relative members of Halobellus. The DNA G+C content of strains YC21(T) and YC77 were 66.1 and 66.2 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 89 %, and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halobellus limi TBN53(T), the most related member of Halobellus. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC21(T) and YC77 represent a novel species of the genus Halobellus, for which the name Halobellus rarus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC21(T) (=CGMCC 1.12121(T) = JCM 18362(T)).

  13. A SURVEY OF LANDNET SITES FOCUSING ON TUZ GÖLÜ SALT LAKE, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Gürbüz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric calibration is critical to ensure the accuracy, veracity, continuity and reliability of satellite data measured from multiple sensors and platforms, and is thus recognized as a key activity by all satellite operators. For imaging sensors, vicarious methods using natural targets (such as salt lakes, deserts, or flatlands that are well-characterized and preferably temporally and spatially stable as a reference are similarly well established. However, while selecting a target site, it is important that its quality and location are selected to minimize sources of uncertainty for any given sensor. To maximize the benefit from limited resources and minimize the impact on satellite operators, the Infrared Visible Optical Sensor (IVOS sub-group of Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV has selected a few, well-characterized, regularly instrumented target sites, which have since become known as LANDNET sites. Currently, there are eight LANDNET sites: 1 Dome C, Antarctica; 2 Dunhuang, China, Asia; 3 Lspec Frenchman Flat, NV, USA, North America; 4 Ivanpah, NV/CA, USA, North America; 5 La Crau, France, Europe; 6 Negev, Southern Israel, Asia; 7 Railroad Valley Playa, NV, USA, North America; 8 Tuz Gölü, Central Anatolia, Turkey, Asia. This work summarizes the key characteristics, and areas of application of each of the LANDNET sites, especially that of Tuz Gölü, to guide and inform researchers on site selection, and increase international awareness and collaboration in this field. Additionally, detailed information about the Tuz Gölü, Turkey test site is provided, including geographical characteristics, spatial uniformity qualities, and opportunities for international researchers to conduct experiments and measurements. Practical, technical, and logistical experience gained through the international field campaigns organized over the last few years at Tuz Gölü is also shared in

  14. Halovenus aranensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from Aran-Bidgol salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoumi-Kakhki, A; Amoozegar, M A; Ventosa, A

    2012-06-01

    A novel red-pigmented halophilic archaeon, strain EB27(T), was isolated from Aran-Bidgol salt lake, a hypersaline playa in Iran. Cells of strain EB27(T) were non-motile and pleomorphic (rods to triangular or disc-shaped). Strain EB27(T) required at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl(2) for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4 M NaCl and 0.5 M MgCl(2). The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 40 °C; it was able to grow at pH 6.0-8.0 and 25-50 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain EB27(T) is a member of the family Halobacteriaceae; however, levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were as low as 90.0, 89.3 and 89.1 % to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, namely Halalkalicoccus tibetensis DS12(T), Halosimplex carlsbadense 2-9-1(T) and Halorhabdus utahensis AX-2(T), respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain EB27(T) was 61 mol%. Strain EB27(T) contained phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, common phospholipids found in haloarchaea, together with two minor phospholipids. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H(2)). Physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain EB27(T) and recognized genera of extremely halophilic archaea suggest that this strain represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halovenus aranensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halovenus aranensis, the type species of the new genus, is strain EB27(T) ( = IBRC-M 10015(T) = CGMCC 1.11001(T)).

  15. Halopenitus malekzadehii sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Ventosa, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Strain CC65(T), a novel extremely halophilic archaeon, was isolated from a brine sample of a salt lake in Iran. The novel strain was light yellow-pigmented, non-motile, pleomorphic and required at least 1.7 M NaCl and 0.02 M MgCl₂ for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 3.5 M NaCl and 0.4 M MgCl₂. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH and a temperature range of pH 6.5-9.0 and 30-50 °C, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain CC65(T) clustered with the sole member of the genus Halopenitus, Halopenitus persicus DC30(T) with a sequence similarity of 98.0%. The polar lipid profile of strain CC65(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. An unidentified glycolipid and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H₂). The DNA G+C content of strain CC65(T) was 63.8 mol%. On the basis of the biochemical and physiological characteristics, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization (44% with Halopenitus persicus IBRC 10041(T)), strain CC65(T) is classified as a novel species of the genus Halopenitus, for which the name Halopenitus malekzadehii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC65(T) ( = IBRC-M 10418(T) =KCTC 4045(T)).

  16. Halorussus ruber sp. nov., isolated from an inland salt lake of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Han, Dong; Cui, Heng-Lin; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic archaeal strain YC25(T) was isolated from Yuncheng salt lake in Shanxi, China. Cells of strain YC25(T) were observed to be pleomorphic rods, stained Gram-negative, and formed red-pigmented colonies on solid media. Strain YC25(T) was found to be able to grow at 25-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 1.4-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 1.7 M), at 0-1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.01 M), and at pH 5.5-9.0 (optimum pH 6.5). The cells lysed in distilled water, and the minimal NaCl concentration to prevent cell lysis was found to be 8 % (w/v). The major polar lipids of the strain were phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), phosphatidylglycerol sulfate (PGS), sulfated galactosyl mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-TGD-1), sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1), galactosyl mannosyl glucosyl diether (TGD-1), mannosyl glucosyl diether (DGD-1), and an unknown diglycosyl diether (DGD-2) chromatographically identical to those of Halorussus rarus CGMCC 1.10122(T). The 16S rRNA gene and rpoB' gene of strain YC25(T) were phylogenetically related to the corresponding genes of Halorussus rarus CGMCC 1.10122(T) (94.3-95.4 and 91.5 % nucleotide identity, respectively). The DNA G+C content of strain YC25(T) was determined to be 63.3 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties suggested that strain YC25(T) (=CGMCC 1.12122(T) = JCM 18363(T)) represents a new species of Halorussus, for which the name Halorussus ruber sp. nov. is proposed.

  17. Islands in the desert: Species delimitation and evolutionary history of Pseudotetracha tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae: Megacephalini) from Australian salt lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Alejandro; Hudson, Peter; Galián, José

    2016-08-01

    The Australian salt lakes are a natural archipelago-like laboratory for investigating evolutionary and population processes. Their environmental conditions have not undergone relevant changes since the aridification of Australia 10-5 million years ago. The genus Pseudotetracha, a group of nocturnal tiger beetles found on these remote salt lakes, includes 20 described species. Recent studies based on molecular markers and cytogenetics hinted at the existence of cryptic species within this group. Here we use various species delimitation algorithms to detect a high number of cryptic and undescribed taxa, and challenge the validity of the taxonomic characters traditionally used for discerning species in this group. Our analyses show that the divergence dates of the clades, between 10 and 5 million years ago, correspond to the period in which Australia was undergoing an aridification process that probably isolated the ancestral Pseudotetracha populations to individual lakes or palaeodrainage basins. This implies an important role of the isolation, produced by the aridification of Australia, in the speciation and divergence of Pseudotetracha, which underwent a remarkable radiation as the populations became geographically restricted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Environmental imbalance in salt lake Urmia, NW Iran: Anthropogenic and climate impact on the largest lake in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, A.; Pourmand, A.; Peterson, L. C.; Haeri-Ardakani, O.; Pourkerman, M.; Lahijani, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Urmia is located at the lowest area of a closed-continental drainage basin in NW Iran. At an elevation of 1267m (amsl), it is the third largest saline lake on earth. The geological setting of the lake is quite diverse and its drainage basin is comprised of a variety of rock formations with different ages, ranging from Precambrian metamorphic complexes to Holocene mud deposits. Since 1995, onsite measurements and satellite altimetry have shown that the mean annual lake level has progressively dropped by as much as nine meters. Although most of the water loss has been attributed to the imbalance in the net annual flux from seven tributaries that drain to the lake, the primary cause(s) of such a drastic change in lake level in a relatively short period remains a matter of considerable debate. While naturally occurring imbalances that cause abrupt climate change are favored by local authorities, poor water management regulations and excessive damming throughout the drainage basin seem to have played a significant role in the lake's drastic loss of water over the last few decades. Instrumental climate data from the past 60 years, which show 9-year cyclicity in regional mean air temperature, does not correspond with the drastic drop in the lake's water level. In addition, a recent study of shoreline changes over 50 years shows several major episodes of reduced lake surface area in years with the highest number of rainy days since 1995. These observations suggest that the progressive imbalance in water availability to the lake is more likely caused by anthropogenic activities, rather than regional climate variability. The human impact on the Lake Urmia environment is not limited to reduced water input; imbalance in evaporation and sedimentation patterns quickly followed construction of a dike-type causeway across Lake Urmia in the early 1980s. In order to study the long-term impact of potential forcing factor(s), we have generated a high-resolution, multi proxy

  19. Biogeochemical and hydrologic processes controlling mercury cycling in Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, D.; Kenney, T.; Angeroth, C.; Waddell, B.; Darnall, N.; Perschon, C.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL), in the Western United States, is a terminal lake with a highly variable surface area that can exceed 5,100 km2. The open water and adjacent wetlands of the GSL ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere, as well as a brine shrimp industry with annual revenues exceeding 70 million dollars. Despite the ecologic and economic significance of GSL, little is known about the biogeochemical cycling of mercury (Hg) and no water-quality standards currently exist for this system. Whole water samples collected since 2000 were determined to contain elevated concentrations of total Hg (100 ng/L) and methyl Hg (33 ng/L). The elevated levels of methyl Hg are likely the result of high rates of SO4 reduction and associated Hg methylation in persistently anoxic areas of the lake at depths greater than 6.5 m below the water surface. Hydroacoustic equipment deployed in this anoxic layer indicates a "conveyor belt" flow system that can distribute methyl Hg in a predominantly southerly direction throughout the southern half of GSL (fig. 1, URL: http://users.o2wire.com/dnaftz/Dave/AGU-abs-figs- AUG06.pdf). Periodic and sustained wind events on GSL may result in transport of the methyl Hg-rich anoxic water and bottom sediments into the oxic and biologically active regions. Sediment traps positioned above the anoxic brine interface have captured up to 6 mm of bottom sediment during cumulative wind-driven resuspension events (fig. 2, URL:http://users.o2wire.com/dnaftz/Dave/AGU-abs-figs-AUG06.pdf). Vertical velocity data collected with hydroacoustic equipment indicates upward flow > 1.5 cm/sec during transient wind events (fig. 3, URL:http://users.o2wire.com/dnaftz/Dave/AGU-abs-figs-AUG06.pdf). Transport of methyl Hg into the oxic regions of GSL is supported by biota samples. The median Hg concentration (wet weight) in brine shrimp increased seasonally from the spring to fall time period and is likely a

  20. Phylogenetic appraisal of antagonistic, slow growing actinomycetes isolated from hypersaline inland solar salterns at Sambhar salt Lake, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polpass eArul Jose

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inland solar salterns established in the vicinity of Sambhar Lake are extreme saline environments with high salinity and alkalinity. In view of the fact that microbes inhabiting such extreme saline environments flourish the contemporary bioprospecting, it was aimed to selectively isolate slow growing and rare actinomycetes from the unexplored solar salterns. A total of 14 slow growing actinomycetes were selectively isolated from three composite soil samples of inland solar salterns. Among the isolates, four groups were formed according to similarity of the banding patterns obtained by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. A subset of representative isolates for each ARDRA group was identified using 16S rDNA sequence based phylogenetic analysis and subsequently the entire isolates were assigned under three different genera; Streptomyces, Pseudonocardia and Actinoalloteichus. The genus Streptomyces was found to be the dominant among the isolates. Furthermore, rare actinomycete genus Actinoalloteichus was isolated for the first time from solar saltern. Determination of salt-tolerance revealed that certain level of salt-tolerance and moderate halophilism occurs among the actinomycetes isolated from the inland salterns. In addition, all the acinomycetes were screened in two levels to unravel their ability to produce antimicrobial compounds. Significant antimicrobial activity was found among the actinomycetes against a range of bacteria and fungi to worth further characterization of these persuasive actinomycetes and their antimicrobial secondary metabolites. In a nutshell, this study offered a first interesting insight on occurrence of antagonistic rare actinomycetes and streptomycetes in inland solar salterns associated with Sambhar salt Lake.

  1. A MAP MASH-UP APPLICATION: INVESTIGATION THE TEMPORAL EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON SALT LAKE BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Kirtiloglu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to investigate climate change effects that have been occurred at the beginning of the twenty-first century at the Konya Closed Basin (KCB located in the semi-arid central Anatolian region of Turkey and particularly in Salt Lake region where many major wetlands located in and situated in KCB and to share the analysis results online in a Web Geographical Information System (GIS environment. 71 Landsat 5-TM, 7-ETM+ and 8-OLI images and meteorological data obtained from 10 meteorological stations have been used at the scope of this work. 56 of Landsat images have been used for extraction of Salt Lake surface area through multi-temporal Landsat imagery collected from 2000 to 2014 in Salt lake basin. 15 of Landsat images have been used to make thematic maps of Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI in KCB, and 10 meteorological stations data has been used to generate the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI, which was used in drought studies. For the purpose of visualizing and sharing the results, a Web GIS-like environment has been established by using Google Maps and its useful data storage and manipulating product Fusion Tables which are all Google’s free of charge Web service elements. The infrastructure of web application includes HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, Google Maps API V3 and Google Fusion Tables API technologies. These technologies make it possible to make effective “Map Mash-Ups” involving an embedded Google Map in a Web page, storing the spatial or tabular data in Fusion Tables and add this data as a map layer on embedded map. The analysing process and map mash-up application have been discussed in detail as the main sections of this paper.

  2. Issues of scale, location and geologic terrain related to Salt Lake City and Baltimore-Washington metropolitan areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaves, E.T.; Godfrey, A.E.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Planning and development of expanding metropolitan regions require consideration of earth science issues related to issues involving scale, space (location), geologic terrain and physiographic units, and information transfer. This paper explores these matters with examples from the Salt Lake City, Utah area and Mid-Atlantic region of Baltimore-Washington that include water supply and natural hazards (earthquakes, landslides, and sinkholes.) Information transfer methods using physiographic units at national, regional, local and site scales serve to communicate relevant geologic constraint and natural resource information.

  3. Guide to user modification of a three-dimensional digital ground-water model for Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.; Waddell, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    A digital-computer model was calibrated to simulate, in three dimensions, the ground-water flow in the principal and shallow-unconfined aquifers in Salt Lake Valley, Utah. The model can be used to predict water-level and waterbudget changes that would be caused by changes in well recharge or discharge. This report shows how a user can revise the input data so that recharging or discharging wells may be simulated and how stress-period intervals can be varied to simulate different periods of recharge or discharge.

  4. Late quaternary changes in lakes, vegetation, and climate in the Bonneville Basin reconstructed from sediment cores from Great Salt Lake: Chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S.; Oviatt, Charles G.; Honke, Jeffrey S.; McGeehin, John

    2016-01-01

    Sediment cores from Great Salt Lake (GSL) provide the basis for reconstructing changes in lakes, vegetation, and climate for the last ~ 40 cal ka. Initially, the coring site was covered by a shallow saline lake and surrounded by Artemisia steppe or steppe-tundra under a cold and dry climate. As Lake Bonneville began to rise (from ~ 30 to 28 cal ka), Pinus and subalpine conifer pollen percentages increased and Artemisia declined, suggesting the onset of wetter conditions. Lake Bonneville oscillated near the Stansbury shoreline between ~ 26 and ~ 24 cal ka, rose to the Bonneville shoreline by ~ 18 cal ka, and then fell to the Provo shoreline, which it occupied until ~ 15 cal ka. Vegetation changed during this time span, albeit not always with the same direction or amplitude as the lake. The pollen percentages of Pinus and subalpine conifers were high from ~ 25 to 21.5 cal ka, indicating cool and moist conditions during the Stansbury oscillation and for much of the rise toward the Bonneville shoreline. Pinus percentages then decreased and Artemisia became codominant, suggesting drier and perhaps colder conditions from ~ 21 to ~ 15 cal ka, when Lake Bonneville was at or near its highest levels.Lake Bonneville declined to a low level by ~ 13 cal ka, while Pinus pollen percentages increased, indicating that conditions remained cooler and moister than today. During the Younger Dryas interval, the brief Gilbert episode rise in lake level was followed by a shallow lake with a stratified water column. This lake rise occurred as Pinus pollen percentages were declining and those of Artemisia were rising (reflecting increasingly dry conditions), after which Artemisia pollen was at very high levels (suggesting cold and dry conditions) for a brief period.Since ~ 10.6 cal ka lacustrine conditions have resembled those of present-day GSL. Pollen spectra for the period from ~ 10.6 to 7.2 cal ka have low levels of conifer pollen and high (for the

  5. Halobellus inordinatus sp. nov., from a marine solar saltern and an inland salt lake of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xing-Xing; Mou, Yun-Zhuang; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Han, Dong; Ren, Min; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC20(T) and XD15, were isolated from a marine solar saltern and an inland salt lake in China. Both had pleomorphic cells that lysed in distilled water, stained Gram-negative and formed red-pigmented colonies. They were neutrophilic, requiring at least 100 g NaCl l(-1) and 0.5-95 g MgCl2 l(-1) for growth at the optimum growth temperature of 37 °C. The major polar lipids of the two strains were phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), phosphatidylglycerol sulfate (PGS) and two major glycolipids chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1) and mannosyl glucosyl diether (DGD-1), respectively. Trace amounts of two unidentified glycolipids were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains were 99.5 % identical and showed 94.0-95.9 % similarity to the most closely related members of the genus Halobellus of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene sequence similarity between strains YC20(T) and XD15 was 98.2 % and these sequences showed 89.6-92.8 % similarity to those of the most closely related members of the genus Halobellus. The DNA G+C contents of strains YC20(T) and XD15 were 65.8 mol% and 65.4 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain XD15 was 92 %, and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness to members of the genus Halobellus. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC20(T) and XD15 represent a novel species of the genus Halobellus, for which the name Halobellus inordinatus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC20(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12120(T) = JCM 18361(T)) and the other strain is XD15 ( = CGMCC 1.12236 = JCM 18648).

  6. Halobacillus dabanensis sp. nov. and Halobacillus aidingensis sp. nov., isolated from salt lakes in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W Y; Zeng, J; Wang, L; Dou, Y T; Yang, S S

    2005-09-01

    Two moderately halophilic spore-forming bacteria were isolated from salt lakes in the Xinjiang region of China. The two strains, designated AD-6(T) and D-8(T), were aerobic, Gram-positive, rod-shaped and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Strains AD-6(T) and D-8(T) grew in the presence of 0.5-20% and 0.5-25% (w/v) NaCl in complex medium, respectively. Their cell-wall peptidoglycan was of the L-Orn-D-Asp type. The major menaquinone found in both strains was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The fatty acid profile contained a large amount of branched fatty acids; the main fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(17:0), iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(16:0). The DNA G+C content of strains D-8(T) and AD-6(T) was 41.4 and 42.2 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains D-8(T) and AD-6(T) were located in the genus Halobacillus. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the isolated strains and the type strains of Halobacillus species were in the range 96.2-99.5%. DNA-DNA relatedness values of 17.0-52.2% were found between the two strains and other Halobacillus species. The DNA-DNA relatedness value between D-8(T) and AD-6(T) was 50.6%. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties, phylogenetic analysis and genomic distinctiveness, strains D-8(T) and AD-6(T) should be placed in the genus Halobacillus as two novel species, for which the names Halobacillus dabanensis sp. nov. (type strain=JCM 12772(T)=CGMCC 1.3704(T)) and Halobacillus aidingensis sp. nov. (type strain=JCM 12771(T)=CGMCC 1.3703(T)) are proposed, respectively.

  7. Halosiccatus urmianus gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloarchaeon from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi, Ali; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Farahani, Homa; Asadi, Basaer; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    A novel, orange-pigmented, halophilic archaeon, strain DC8T, was isolated from Urmia salt lake in north-west Iran. The cells of strain DC8T were non-motile and pleomorphic, from small rods to triangular or disc shaped. The novel strain needed at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.02 M MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4.0 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 45 °C, respectively, and it was able to grow over a pH range of 7.0 to 8.5 and a temperature range of 25 to 55 °C. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain DC8T was a member of the family Halobacteriaceae; however, its similarity was as low as 90.1 %, 89.3 % and 89.1 % to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, including type species of members of the genera Halosimplex, Halobaculum and Halomicrobium, respectively. The G+C content of its DNA was 68.1 mol%. Polar lipid analyses revealed that strain DC8T contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and phosphatidic acid. One unknown phospholipid, two major glycolipids and one minor glycolipid were also detected. The only quinone present was MK-8 (II-H2). The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain DC8T and other extremely halophilic archaeal genera with validly published names supported that this strain represents a novel species of a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, for which the name Halosiccatus urmianus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain DC8T ( = IBRC-M 10911T = CECT 8793T).

  8. Effect of salinity on mercury methylating benthic microbes and their activities in Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Eric S.; Yu, Ri-Qing; Barkay, Tamar; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Naftz, David L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Surface water and biota from Great Salt Lake (GSL) contain some of the highest documented concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the United States. In order to identify potential biological sources of MeHg and controls on its production in this ecosystem, THg and MeHg concentrations, rates of Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg degradation, and abundances and compositions of archaeal and bacterial 16 rRNA gene transcripts were determined in sediment along a salinity gradient in GSL. Rates of Hg(II)-methylation were inversely correlated with salinity and were at or below the limits of detection in sediment sampled from areas with hypersaline surface water. The highest rates of Hg(II)-methylation were measured in sediment with low porewater salinity, suggesting that benthic microbial communities inhabiting less saline environments are supplying the majority of MeHg in the GSL ecosystem. The abundance of 16S rRNA gene transcripts affiliated with the sulfate reducer Desulfobacterium sp. was positively correlated with MeHg concentrations and Hg(II)-methylation rates in sediment, indicating a potential role for this taxon in Hg(II)-methylation in low salinity areas of GSL. Reactive inorganic Hg(II) (a proxy used for Hg(II) available for methylation) and MeHg concentrations were inversely correlated with salinity. Thus, constraints imposed by salinity on Hg(II)-methylating populations and the availability of Hg(II) for methylation are inferred to result in higher MeHg production potentials in lower salinity environments. Benthic microbial MeHg degradation was also most active in lower salinity environments. Collectively, these results suggest an important role for sediment anoxia and microbial sulfate reducers in the production of MeHg in low salinity GSL sub-habitats and may indicate a role for salinity in constraining Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg degradation activities by influencing the availability of Hg(II) for methylation.

  9. The Great Salt Lake: A Barometer of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Lall, Upmanu; Mann, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Low frequency (interannual or longer period) climatic variability is of interest bacause of its sugnificance for the understanding and prediction of protracted climatic anomalies. Closed basin lakes are sensitive to long term climatic fluctuations and integrate out high frequency variability. It is thus natural to examine the records of such lakes to better understand long term climate dynamics. Here we use Singul...

  10. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  11. Use of Landsat Land Surface Temperature and Vegetation Indices for Monitoring Drought in the Salt Lake Basin Area, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Osman; Ekercin, Semih; Dadaser-Celik, Filiz

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate multitemporal land surface temperature (LST) changes by using satellite remote sensing data. The study included a real-time field work performed during the overpass of Landsat-5 satellite on 21/08/2011 over Salt Lake, Turkey. Normalized vegetation index (NDVI), vegetation condition index (VCI), and temperature vegetation index (TVX) were used for evaluating drought impact over the region between 1984 and 2011. In the image processing step, geometric and radiometric correction procedures were conducted to make satellite remote sensing data comparable with in situ measurements carried out using thermal infrared thermometer supported by hand-held GPS. The results showed that real-time ground and satellite remote sensing data were in good agreement with correlation coefficient (R 2) values of 0.90. The remotely sensed and treated satellite images and resulting thematic indices maps showed that dramatic land surface temperature changes occurred (about 2°C) in the Salt Lake Basin area during the 28-year period (1984–2011). Analysis of air temperature data also showed increases at a rate of 1.5–2°C during the same period. Intensification of irrigated agriculture particularly in the southern basin was also detected. The use of water supplies, especially groundwater, should be controlled considering particularly summer drought impacts on the basin. PMID:24587709

  12. Salt lakes of La Mancha (Central Spain): A hot spot for tiger beetle (Carabidae, Cicindelinae) species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Flores, Paula C; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Jorge; Aguirre-Ruiz, Ernesto F; García-París, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The tiger beetle assemblage of the wetlands of La Mancha (central Spain) comprises nine species: Calomera littoralis littoralis, Cephalota maura maura, Cephalota circumdata imperialis, Cephalota dulcinea, Cicindela campestris campestris, Cicindela maroccana, Cylindera paludosa, Lophyra flexuosa flexuosa, and Myriochila melancholica melancholica. This assemblage represents the largest concentration of tiger beetles in a single 1º latitude / longitude square in Europe. General patterns of spatial and temporal segregation among species are discussed based on observations of 1462 specimens registered during an observation period of one year, from April to August. The different species of Cicindelini appear to be distributed over space and time, with little overlapping among them. Three sets of species replace each other phenologically as the season goes on. Most of the species occupy drying or dried salt lakes and salt marshes, with sparse vegetation cover. Spatial segregation is marked in terms of substrate and vegetation use. Calomera littoralis and Myriochila melancholica have been observed mainly on wet soils; Cephalota circumdata on dry open saline flats; Cephalota dulcinea and Cylindera paludosa in granulated substrates with typical halophytic vegetation; Cephalota maura is often present in man-modified areas. Cephalota circumdata and Cephalota dulcinea are included as species of special interest in the list of protected species in Castilla-La Mancha. Conservation problems for the Cicindelini assemblage arise from agricultural activities and inadequate use of sport vehicles. Attempts at restoring the original habitat, supressing old semi-industrial structures, may affect the spatial heterogeneity of the lakes, and have an effect on Cicindelinae diversity.

  13. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  14. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  15. Relationships between lake-level changes and water and salt budgets in the Dead Sea during extreme aridities in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Yael; Goldstein, Steven L.; Garcia-Veigas, Javier; Levy, Elan; Kushnir, Yochanan; Stein, Mordechai; Lazar, Boaz

    2017-04-01

    Thick halite intervals recovered by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project cores show evidence for severely arid climatic conditions in the eastern Mediterranean during the last three interglacials. In particular, the core interval corresponding to the peak of the last interglacial (Marine Isotope Stage 5e or MIS 5e) contains ∼30 m of salt over 85 m of core length, making this the driest known period in that region during the late Quaternary. This study reconstructs Dead Sea lake levels during the salt deposition intervals, based on water and salt budgets derived from the Dead Sea brine composition and the amount of salt in the core. Modern water and salt budgets indicate that halite precipitates only during declining lake levels, while the amount of dissolved Na+ and Cl- accumulates during wetter intervals. Based on the compositions of Dead Sea brines from pore waters and halite fluid inclusions, we estimate that ∼12-16 cm of halite precipitated per meter of lake-level drop. During periods of halite precipitation, the Mg2+ concentration increases and the Na+/Cl- ratio decreases in the lake. Our calculations indicate major lake-level drops of ∼170 m from lake levels of 320 and 310 m below sea level (mbsl) down to lake levels of ∼490 and ∼480 mbsl, during MIS 5e and the Holocene, respectively. These lake levels are much lower than typical interglacial lake levels of around 400 mbsl. These lake-level drops occurred as a result of major decreases in average fresh water runoff, to ∼40% of the modern value (pre-1964, before major fresh water diversions), reflecting severe droughts during which annual precipitation in Jerusalem was lower than 350 mm/y, compared to ∼600 mm/y today. Nevertheless, even during salt intervals, the changes in halite facies and the occurrence of alternating periods of halite and detritus in the Dead Sea core stratigraphy reflect fluctuations between drier and wetter conditions around our estimated average. The halite intervals include

  16. Stable isotope record of Holocene climate and ecological change from brine shrimp cyst chitin for the Great Salt Lake, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, K. E.; Bowen, G. J.

    2009-12-01

    We present a record of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in brine shrimp cysts from the Great Salt Lake, a terminal lake in the Great Basin, US. Water balance for the region is influenced by strength of the El Niño in Pacific and by the strength of the summer monsoon. Brine shrimp cysts are a novel proxy for isotope reconstruction, and allow reconstruction of water isotopes (oxygen, hydrogen) and ecology (hydrogen). Oxygen isotopes in chitin respond to water, while both diet and growth water contribute to hydrogen isotopes, allowing reconstruction of both environmental and ecological information from a single molecule. Values of δ18O decrease from about +15‰ to about +11‰ over course of the 8000 year record. This may suggest the importance of snow melt increased over the Holocene, or it may suggest lake is larger today than it was in mid-Holocene. Hydrogen isotopes are relatively stable for most of record, fluctuating around -140‰. Modeled hydrogen isotopes in food, also stable in the beginning of the record at about -150‰, become much heavier, shifting toward about -75‰ starting about 5000 ybp. This may suggest a shift from a primarily aquatic diet in the Mid-Holocene to a diet with a greater contribution of terrestrial material later in the Holocene. These observations agree broadly with previous inferences of a warm Mid-Holocene and associated low terrestrial productivity, followed by a more moist, and consequently more productive Late Holocene.

  17. Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans sp. nov.,: a first acetate-oxidizing, extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphilic SRB from a hypersaline soda lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, D Y; Chernyh, N A; Poroshina, M N

    2015-09-01

    Recent intensive microbiological investigation of sulfidogenesis in soda lakes did not result in isolation of any pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) able to directly oxidize acetate. The sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation at haloalkaline conditions has, so far, been only shown in two syntrophic associations of novel Syntrophobacteraceae members and haloalkaliphilic hydrogenotrophic SRB. In the course of investigation of one of them, obtained from a hypersaline soda lake in South-Western Siberia, a minor component was observed showing a close relation to Desulfonatronobacter acidivorans--a "complete oxidizing" SRB from soda lakes. This organism became dominant in a secondary enrichment with propionate as e-donor and sulfate as e-acceptor. A pure culture, strain APT3, was identified as a novel member of the family Desulfobacteraceae. It is an extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphile, growing with butyrate at salinity up to 4 M total Na(+) with a pH optimum at 9.5. It can grow with sulfate as e-acceptor with C3-C9 VFA and also with some alcohols. The most interesting property of strain APT3 is its ability to grow with acetate as e-donor, although not with sulfate, but with sulfite or thiosulfate as e-acceptors. The new isolate is proposed as a new species Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans.

  18. Studies on the Biodiversity of Halophilic Microorganisms Isolated from El-Djerid Salt Lake (Tunisia under Aerobic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeljabbar Hedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and archaeal aerobic communities were recovered from sediments from the shallow El-Djerid salt lake in Tunisia, and their salinity gradient distribution was established. Six samples for physicochemical and microbiological analyses were obtained from 6 saline sites in the lake for physico-chemical and microbiological analyses. All samples studied were considered hypersaline with NaCl concentration ranging from 150 to 260 g/L. A specific halophilic microbial community was recovered from each site, and characterization of isolated microorganisms was performed via both phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. Only one extreme halophilic organism, domain Archaea, was isolated from site 4 only, whereas organisms in the domain Bacteria were recovered from the five remaining sampling sites that contained up to 250 g/L NaCl. Members of the domain Bacteria belonged to genera Salicola, Pontibacillus, Halomonas, Marinococcus, and Halobacillus, whereas the only member of domain Archaea isolated belonged to the genus Halorubrum. The results of this study are discussed in terms of the ecological significance of these microorganisms in the breakdown of organic matter in Lake El-Djerid and their potential for industry applications.

  19. Paleolimnological and geochronological studies of salt lakes of Crimea, the Black Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subetto, D. A.; Sapelko, T. V.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Ludikova, A. V.; Gerasimenko, N.; Stolba, V.; Bakhmutov, V.

    2009-04-01

    1. Crimea is one of the few places in the northern Black Sea region with mineral lakes with sediments that can give information about paleoclimate and environmental changes over a long time period. All of these lakes are shallow (c. 1-1.5 m), saline of marine origin (former marine bays and lagoons), the emergence of which took place in ‘historical' time (c. 5000 yrs ago). 2. The thickness of sediments is reaching up to 20-25 m. The recovery of long sediment sequences permits comparative study of the complex interactions among humans, climate and environment in the Crimea. Moreover, it provides an opportunity to establish a direct chronological link between major ethno-historical and economic processes on the one hand and climatic changes such as wet-dry circles that affected the whole area on the other. 3. Two lake sediment sequences have been recovered from the Crimean Peninsula ((Lake Saki (45° 06',8N; 33° 33',2E, water depth ca 0.8 m, recovered sediments 4.2 m) and Lake Dzharylgach(45° 34',7N; 32° 51',7E, water depth ca 0.8 m, recovered sediments 4.15 m)) during the field campaign 2005, as part of the Joint Danish-Russian-Ukraine project called "Northern Black Sea in the 1st millennium BC: human history and climate changes". In 2006, a detailed examination of the cores was carried out by the team members from the Institute of Limnology, RAS, St Petersburg, the National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, and the Institute of Physics of the Earth, NASU, Kiev. The detailed examination of the cores, which includes varve counting, lithostratigraphy, geochemistry, pollen, diatom and ostracods analyses is presently being carried out. The AMS 14C dating is being processed by the Radiocarbon Laboratory, Institute of Physics and Astronomy. 4. In the both studied lakes, marine sediments overlain by mineralized lake sediments were recovered. The oldest dates from marine sediment from both studied sequences are 5500-5370 cal BP (L.Saki) and 7200-7050 cal BP (L

  20. Halorubrum rubrum sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a Chinese salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Han, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Cui, Heng-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Two halophilic archaeal strains, YC87(T) and YCA11, were isolated from Yuncheng salt lake in Shanxi, China. Cells of the two strains were observed to be pleomorphic rod-shaped, stained Gram-negative and produced red-pigmented colonies. Strain YC87(T) was able to grow at 20-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 1.4-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 2.1 M NaCl), at 0.05-1.0 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.3 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0) while strain YCA11 was able to grow at 20-50 °C (optimum 37 °C), at 2.1-4.8 M NaCl (optimum 3.1 M NaCl), at 0.01-0.7 M MgCl2 (optimum 0.1 M MgCl2) and at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.5). The cells of both isolates were observed to lyse in distilled water. The minimum NaCl concentrations that prevented cell lysis were determined to be 8 % (w/v) for strain YC87(T) and 12 % (w/v) for strain YCA11. The major polar lipids of the two strains were identified as phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and one major glycolipid chromatographically identical to sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether; another major glycolipid and trace amounts of several unidentified lipids were also detected. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains were 99.8 % identical, showing 93.2-98.2 % similarity to members of the genus Halorubrum of the family Halobacteriaceae. The rpoB' gene similarity between strains YC87(T) and YCA11 was 99.3 % and showed 87.5-95.2 % similarity to the closest relative members of the genus Halorubrum. The DNA G+C content of strains YC87(T) and YCA11 were determined to be 64.9 and 64.5 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain YC20(T) and strain YC77 was 87 % and the two strains showed low DNA-DNA relatedness with Halorubrum cibi JCM 15757(T) and Halorubrum aquaticum CGMCC 1.6377(T), the most related members of the genus Halorubrum. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties suggest that strains YC87(T) and YCA11 represent a novel species of the

  1. [Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Wetlands and Wildlife: A prospectus for a mini-joint venture

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a general approach towards a mini-joint venture between Near River Migratory Bird Refuge and Utah State University. It is focused on the Great Salt...

  2. Ground-water resources and simulated effects of withdrawals in the East Shore area of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David W.; Appel, Cynthia L.; Lambert, Patrick M.; Puryear, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    The ground-water resources in the East Shore area of Great Salt Lake, Utah, were studied to better define the ground-water system; to document changes in ground-water levels, quality, and storage; and to simulate effects of an increase in ground-water withdrawals. The East Shore aquifer system is in basin-fill deposits, and is primarily a confined system with unconfined parts near the mountain front.Recharge to and discharge from the East Shore aquifer system were estimated to average about 160,000 acre-feet per year during 1969-84, with minor amounts of water being removed from storage during that period.  Major sources of ground-water recharge are seepage from surface water in natural channels and irrigation canals, and subsurface inflow from consolidated rock to the basin-fill deposits. Discharge of ground water is primarily to wells, water courses, springs, and as diffuse seepage to Great Salt Lake. Average annual surface-water inflow to the study area was estimated to be 860,000 acre-feet for the period 1969-84. Annual withdrawal of ground water for municipal and industrial use increased from about 10,000 acre-feet in 1960 to more than 30,000 acre-feet in 1980 to supply a population that increased from 175,000 in 1960 to 290,000 in 1980.Long-term trends of ground-water levels indicate a steady decline at most observation wells since 1952, despite near normal or increased precipitation since the late 1960's.  Water levels declined as much as 50 feet near the principal pumping center in the east-central part of the study area. They declined as much as 35 feet more than five miles from the pumping center.  The increase in withdrawals and subsequent water-level declines have caused about 700 wells within 30 square miles to cease flowing since 1954.A numerical model of the East Shore aquifer system in the Weber Delta area was constructed and calibrated using water-level data and changes in ground-water withdrawals for 1955-85. Predictive simulations were made

  3. Great Salt Lake halophilic microorganisms as models for astrobiology: evidence for desiccation tolerance and ultraviolet irradiation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Bonnie K.; Eddington, Breanne; Riddle, Misty R.; Webster, Tabitha N.; Avery, Brian J.

    2007-09-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is home to halophiles, salt-tolerant Bacteria and Archaea, which live at 2-5M NaCl. In addition to salt tolerance, GSL halophiles exhibit resistance to both ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and desiccation. First, to understand desiccation resistance, we sought to determine the diversity of GSL halophiles capable of surviving desiccation in either recently formed GSL halite crystals or GSL Artemia (brine shrimp) cysts. From these desiccated environments, surviving microorganisms were cultured and isolated, and genomic DNA was extracted from the individual species for identification by 16S rRNA gene homology. From the surface-sterilized cysts we also extracted DNA of the whole microbial population for non-cultivation techniques. We amplified the archaeal or bacterial 16S rRNA gene from all genomic DNA, cloned the cyst population amplicons, and sequenced. These sequences were compared to gene databases for determination of closest matched species. Interestingly, the isolates from the crystal dissolution are distinct from those previously isolated from GSL brine. The cyst population results reveal species not found in crystals or brine, and may indicate microorganisms that live as endosymbionts of this hypersaline arthropod. Second, we explored UV resistance in a GSL haloarchaea species, "H. salsolis." This strain resists UV irradiation an order of magnitude better than control species, all of which have intact repair systems. To test the hypothesis that halophiles have a photoprotection system, which prevents DNA damage from occurring, we designed an immunoassay to detect thymine dimers following UV irradiation. "H. salsolis" showed remarkable resistance to dimer formation. Evidence for both UV and desiccation resistance in these salt-tolerant GSL halophiles makes them well-suited as models for Astrobiological studies in pursuit of questions about life beyond earth.

  4. Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Carbon Dioxide In The Urban Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA: Source And Long-Term Monitoring Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehleringer, J.; Lai, C.; Strong, C.; Pataki, D. E.; Bowling, D. R.; Schauer, A. J.; Bush, S.

    2011-12-01

    A high-precision, decadal record of carbon isotope ratios in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been produced for the urbanized Salt Lake Valley, Utah USA. These data complement a similar time series of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations for different locations in the same urban region. This isotopic record includes diurnal and nocturnal observations based on flask (IRMS-based) and continuous (TDL-based) measurement systems. These data reveal repeatable diurnal and seasonal variations in the anthropogenic and biogenic carbon sources that can be used to reconstruct different source inputs. As the Salt Lake Valley is an isolated urban region, the impacts of local anthropogenic inputs can be distinguished from regional patterns as measured by NOAA at the rural Wendover monitoring station 200 km to the west of the Salt Lake Valley. Complementary data, such as vehicle exhaust, emission from power plants and household furnaces, plant and soil organic matter, are also provided to quantify the carbon isotope ratios of the predominant anthropogenic and biogenic sources within the Salt Lake Valley. The combined source and long-term observational values will be made freely available and their utility is discussed for modeling efforts including urban metabolism modeling and atmospheric trace gas modeling.

  5. Detecting agricultural to urban land use change from multi-temporal MSS digital data. [Salt Lake County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridd, M. K.; Merola, J. A.; Jaynes, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Conversion of agricultural land to a variety of urban uses is a major problem along the Wasatch Front, Utah. Although LANDSAT MSS data is a relatively coarse tool for discriminating categories of change in urban-size plots, its availability prompts a thorough test of its power to detect change. The procedures being applied to a test area in Salt Lake County, Utah, where the land conversion problem is acute are presented. The identity of land uses before and after conversion was determined and digital procedures for doing so were compared. Several algorithms were compared, utilizing both raw data and preprocessed data. Verification of results involved high quality color infrared photography and field observation. Two data sets were digitally registered, specific change categories internally identified in the software, results tabulated by computer, and change maps printed at 1:24,000 scale.

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  7. Density-stratified flow events in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA: implications for mercury and salinity cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Carling, Gregory T.; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Pazmiño, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Density stratification in saline and hypersaline water bodies from throughout the world can have large impacts on the internal cycling and loading of salinity, nutrients, and trace elements. High temporal resolution hydroacoustic and physical/chemical data were collected at two sites in Great Salt Lake (GSL), a saline lake in the western USA, to understand how density stratification may influence salinity and mercury (Hg) distributions. The first study site was in a causeway breach where saline water from GSL exchanges with less saline water from a flow restricted bay. Near-surface-specific conductance values measured in water at the breach displayed a good relationship with both flow and wind direction. No diurnal variations in the concentration of dissolved (total and MeHg loadings was observed during periods of elevated salinity. The second study site was located on the bottom of GSL where movement of a high-salinity water layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is restricted to a naturally occurring 1.5-km-wide “spillway” structure. During selected time periods in April/May, 2012, wind-induced flow reversals in a railroad causeway breach, separating Gunnison and Gilbert Bays, were coupled with high-velocity flow pulses (up to 55 cm/s) in the DBL at the spillway site. These flow pulses were likely driven by a pressure response of highly saline water from Gunnison Bay flowing into the north basin of Gilbert Bay. Short-term flow reversal events measured at the railroad causeway breach have the ability to move measurable amounts of salt and Hg from Gunnison Bay into the DBL. Future disturbance to the steady state conditions currently imposed by the railroad causeway infrastructure could result in changes to the existing chemical balance between Gunnison and Gilbert Bays. Monitoring instruments were installed at six additional sites in the DBL during October 2012 to assess impacts from any future modifications to the railroad causeway.

  8. West Nile Virus transmission in winter: the 2013 Great Salt Lake Bald Eagle and Eared Grebes Mortality event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Hon S.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; McFarlan, Leslie; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dickson, Sammie L.; Baker, JoDee; Hatch, Gary; Cavender, Kimberly; Long, Renee Romaine; Bodenstein, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) infection has been reported in over 300 species of birds and mammals. Raptors such as eagles, hawks and falcons are remarkably susceptible, but reports of WNV infection in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are rare and reports of WNV infection in grebes (Podicipediformes) even rarer. We report an unusually large wild bird mortality event involving between 15,000-20,000 Eared Grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) and over 40 Bald Eagles around the Great Salt Lake, Utah, in November-December 2013. Mortality in grebes was first reported in early November during a period when the area was unseasonably warm and the grebes were beginning to gather and stage prior to migration. Ten out of ten Eared Grebes collected during this period were WNV RT-PCR and/or isolation positive. This is the first report of WNV infection in Eared Grebes and the associated mortality event is matched in scale only by the combined outbreaks in American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) colonies in the north central states in 2002-2003. We cannot be sure that all of the grebes were infected by mosquito transmission; some may have become infected through contact with WNV shed orally or cloacally from other infected grebes. Beginning in early December, Bald Eagles in the Great Salt Lake area were observed to display neurological signs such as body tremors, limb paralysis and lethargy. At least 43 Bald Eagles had died by the end of the month. Nine of nine Bald Eagles examined were infected with WNV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single raptor mortality event since WNV became endemic in the USA. Because the majority of the eagles affected were found after onset of below-freezing temperatures, we suggest at least some of the Bald Eagles were infected with WNV via consumption of infected Eared Grebes or horizontal transmission at roost sites.

  9. Limnological studies on the Pretoria Salt Pan, a hypersaline maar lake

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ashton, PJ

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pretoria Salt pan is shallow and alkaline with pronounced mesothermy at a depth of between 0.55 and 0.7 metres. Secchi disc transparencies ranged from 7 to 19 cm. Endorheic or closed drainage basins are widely distributed in many climate...

  10. Patterns and determinants of halophilic archaea (class halobacteria) diversity in tunisian endorheic salt lakes and sebkhet systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Afef; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Cherif, Ameur; Youssef, Noha H

    2015-07-01

    We examined the diversity and community structure of members of the halophilic Archaea (class Halobacteria) in samples from central and southern Tunisian endorheic salt lakes and sebkhet (also known as sebkha) systems using targeted 16S rRNA gene diversity survey and quantitative PCR (qPCR) approaches. Twenty-three different samples from four distinct locations exhibiting a wide range of salinities (2% to 37%) and physical characteristics (water, salt crust, sediment, and biofilm) were examined. A total of 4,759 operational taxonomic units at the 0.03 (species-level) cutoff (OTU0.03s) belonging to 45 currently recognized genera were identified, with 8 to 43 genera (average, 30) identified per sample. In spite of the large number of genera detected per sample, only a limited number (i.e., 2 to 16) usually constituted the majority (≥80%) of encountered sequences. Halobacteria diversity showed a strong negative correlation to salinity (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.92), and community structure analysis identified salinity, rather than the location or physical characteristics of the sample, as the most important factor shaping the Halobacteria community structure. The relative abundance of genera capable of biosynthesis of the compatible solute(s) trehalose or 2-sulfotrehalose decreased with increasing salinities (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.80). Indeed, qPCR analysis demonstrated that the Halobacteria otsB (trehalose-6-phosphatase)/16S rRNA gene ratio decreases with increasing salinities (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.87). The results highlight patterns and determinants of Halobacteria diversity at a previously unexplored ecosystem and indicate that genera lacking trehalose biosynthetic capabilities are more adapted to growth in and colonization of hypersaline (>25% salt) ecosystems than trehalose producers. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The fate of minor alkali elements in the chemical evolution of salt lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline earth elements and alkali metals (Mg, Ca, Na and K) play an important role in the geochemical evolution of saline lakes as the final brine type is defined by the abundance of these elements. The role of major ions in brine evolution has been studied in great detail, but little has been done to investigate the behaviour of minor alkali elements in these systems despite their similar chemical affinities to the major cations. We have examined three major anionic brine types, chloride, sulphate, and bicarbonate-carbonate, in fifteen lakes in North America and Antarctica to determine the geochemical behaviour of lithium, rubidium, strontium, and barium. Lithium and rubidium are largely conservative in all water types, and their concentrations are the result of long-term solute input and concentration through evaporation and/or sublimation. Strontium and barium behaviours vary with anionic brine type. Strontium can be removed in sulphate and carbonate-rich lakes by the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Barium may be removed in chloride and sulphate brines by either the precipitation of barite and perhaps biological uptake. PMID:21992434

  12. A theoretical study of a direct contact membrane distillation system coupled to a salt-gradient solar pond for terminal lakes reclamation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Francisco; Tyler, Scott W; Childress, Amy E

    2010-08-01

    Terminal lakes are water bodies that are located in closed watersheds with the only output of water occurring through evaporation or infiltration. The majority of these lakes, which are commonly located in the desert and influenced by human activities, are increasing in salinity. Treatment options are limited, due to energy costs, and many of these lakes provide an excellent opportunity to test solar-powered desalination systems. This paper theoretically investigates utilization of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) coupled to a salt-gradient solar pond (SGSP) for sustainable freshwater production at terminal lakes. A model for heat and mass transport in the DCMD module and a thermal model for an SGSP were developed and coupled to evaluate the feasibility of freshwater production. The construction of an SGSP outside and inside of a terminal lake was studied. As results showed that freshwater flows are on the same order of magnitude as evaporation, these systems will only be successful if the SGSP is constructed inside the terminal lake so that there is little or no net increase in surface area. For the study site of this investigation, water production on the order of 2.7 x 10(-3) m(3) d(-1) per m(2) of SGSP is possible. The major advantages of this system are that renewable thermal energy is used so that little electrical energy is required, the coupled system requires low maintenance, and the terminal lake provides a source of salts to create the stratification in the SGSP. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Potential for water borne and invertebrate transmission of West Nile virus in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Melissa; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dusek, Robert; Shivers, Jan; Hofmeister, Erik K.

    2017-01-01

    In November and December of 2013, a large mortality event involving 15,000 - 20,000 eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) occurred at the Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The onset of the outbreak in grebes was followed by a mortality event in > 86 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). During the die-off, West Nile virus (WNV) was detected by RT-PCR or viral culture in carcasses of grebes and eagles submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center. However, no mosquito activity, the primary vector of WNV, was detected by the State of Utah's WNV monitoring program. Transmission of WNV has rarely been reported during the winter in North America in the absence of known mosquito activity; however, the size of this die-off, the habitat in which it occurred, and the species involved are unique. We experimentally investigated whether WNV could survive in water with a high saline content, as found at the GSL, and whether brine shrimp, the primary food of migrating eared grebes on the GSL, could have played a role in transmission of WNV to feeding birds. We found that WNV can survive up to 72 h at 4°C in water containing 30 — 150 ppt NaCl and brine shrimp, incubated with WNV in 30 ppt NaCl, may adsorb WNV to their cuticle and, through feeding, may infect epithelial cells of their gut. Both mechanisms may have potentiated the WNV die-off in migrating eared grebes on the GSL.

  14. Enrichment of arsenic transforming and resistant heterotrophic bacteria from sediments of two salt lakes in Northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, José; Escudero González, Lorena; Ferrero, Marcela; Chong Díaz, Guillermo; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2012-05-01

    Microbial populations are involved in the arsenic biogeochemical cycle in catalyzing arsenic transformations and playing indirect roles. To investigate which ecotypes among the diverse microbial communities could have a role in cycling arsenic in salt lakes in Northern Chile and to obtain clues to facilitate their isolation in pure culture, sediment samples from Salar de Ascotán and Salar de Atacama were cultured in diluted LB medium amended with NaCl and arsenic, at different incubation conditions. The samples and the cultures were analyzed by nucleic acid extraction, fingerprinting analysis, and sequencing. Microbial reduction of As was evidenced in all the enrichments carried out in anaerobiosis. The results revealed that the incubation factors were more important for determining the microbial community structure than arsenic species and concentrations. The predominant microorganisms in enrichments from both sediments belonged to the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla, but most of the bacterial ecotypes were confined to only one system. The occurrence of an active arsenic biogeochemical cycle was suggested in the system with the highest arsenic content that included populations compatible with microorganisms able to transform arsenic for energy conservation, accumulate arsenic, produce H(2), H(2)S and acetic acid (potential sources of electrons for arsenic reduction) and tolerate high arsenic levels.

  15. Natronospira proteinivora gen. nov., sp. nov, an extremely salt-tolerant, alkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium from hypersaline soda lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Kublanov, Ilya V; Khijniak, Tatiana V

    2017-08-01

    Brine samples from Kulunda Steppe soda lakes (Altai, Russia) were inoculated into a hypersaline alkaline mineral medium with β-keratin (chicken feather) as a substrate. The micro-organisms dominating the enrichment culture were isolated by limiting serial dilution on the same medium with casein as a substrate. The cells of strain BSker1T were motile, curved rods. The strain was an obligately aerobic heterotroph utilizing proteins and peptides as growth substrates. The isolate was an obligate alkaliphile with a pH range for growth from pH 8.5 to 10.25 (optimum at pH 9.5), and it was extremely salt tolerant, growing with between 1 and 4.5 M total Na+ (optimally at 2-2.5 M). BSker1T had a unique composition of polar lipid fatty acids, dominated by two C17 species. The membrane polar lipids included multiple unidentified phospholipids and two aminolipids. According to phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, the isolate forms a novel branch within the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae (class Gammaproteobacteria) with the highest sequence similarity to the members of this family being 91 %. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain BSker1T (=JCM 31341T=UNIQEM U1008T) is proposed to be classified as a representative of a novel genus and species, Natronospira proteinivora gen. nov., sp. nov.

  16. Terminal Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic eruptions at Zuni Salt Lake, west-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Jill; Forman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Zuni Salt Lake (ZSL) is a large maar in the Red Hill-Quemado volcanic field located in west-central New Mexico in the southwestern USA. Stratigraphic analysis of sections in and around the maar, coupled with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, indicate that ZSL volcanic activity occurred between ˜13.4 and 9.9 ka and was most likely confined to a ≤500-year interval sometime between ˜12.3 and 11.0 ka. The basal volcanic unit consists of locally widespread basaltic ash fallout interpreted to represent a violent or wind-aided strombolian eruption tentatively attributed to Cerro Pomo, a scoria cone ˜10 km south of ZSL. Subsequent eruptions emanated from vents near or within the present-day ZSL maar crater. Strombolian eruptions of multiple spatter and scoria cones produced basaltic lava and scoria lapilli fallout. Next, a phreatomagmatic eruption created the maar crater and surrounding tephra rim and apron. ZSL eruptions ended with strombolian eruptions that formed three scoria cones on the crater floor. The revised age range of ZSL is younger and more precise than the 190-24 ka 2-sigma age range derived from previous argon dating. This implies that other morphologically youthful, argon-dated volcanoes on the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau might be substantially younger than previously reported.

  17. Numerical Simulations of an Inversion Fog Event in the Salt Lake Valley during the MATERHORN-Fog Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2018-01-01

    An advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is employed to simulate a wintertime inversion fog event in the Salt Lake Valley during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) field campaign during January 2015. Simulation results are compared to observations obtained from the field program. The sensitivity of numerical simulations to available cloud microphysical (CM), planetary boundary layer (PBL), radiation, and land surface models (LSMs) is evaluated. The influence of differing visibility algorithms and initialization times on simulation results is also examined. Results indicate that the numerical simulations of the fog event are sensitive to the choice of CM, PBL, radiation, and LSM as well as the visibility algorithm and initialization time. Although the majority of experiments accurately captured the synoptic setup environment, errors were found in most experiments within the boundary layer, specifically a 3° warm bias in simulated surface temperatures compared to observations. Accurate representation of surface and boundary layer variables are vital in correctly predicting fog in the numerical model.

  18. Effects of urbanization on benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in contrasting environmental settings: Boston, Massachusetts; Birmingham, Alabama; and Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, T.F.; Zappia, H.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Coles, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Responses of invertebrate assemblages along gradients of urban intensity were examined in three metropolitan areas with contrasting climates and topography (Boston, Massachusetts; Birmingham, Alabama; Salt Lake City, Utah). Urban gradients were defined using an urban intensity index (UII) derived from basin-scale population, infrastructure, land-use, land-cover, and socioeconomic characteristics. Responses based on assemblage metrics, indices of biotic integrity (B-IBI), and ordinations were readily detected in all three urban areas and many responses could be accurately predicted simply using regional UIIs. Responses to UII were linear and did not indicate any initial resistance to urbanization. Richness metrics were better indicators of urbanization than were density metrics. Metrics that were good indicators were specific to each study except for a richness-based tolerance metric (TOLr) and one B-IBI. Tolerances to urbanization were derived for 205 taxa. These tolerances differed among studies and with published tolerance values, but provided similar characterizations of site conditions. Basin-scale land-use changes were the most important variables for explaining invertebrate responses to urbanization. Some chemical and instream physical habitat variables were important in individual studies, but not among studies. Optimizing the study design to detect basin-scale effects may have reduced the ability to detect local-scale effects. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  19. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the first is the Surface Project, and the second is the Ground Water Project. For the UMTRA Project site known as the Vitro site, near Salt Lake City, Utah, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1985 to 1987. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and determines a strategy for ground water compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. A risk assessment is the process of describing a source of contamination and showing how that contamination may reach people and the environment. The amount of contamination people or the environment may be exposed to is calculated and used to characterize the possible health or environmental effects that may result from this exposure. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Vitro site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Vitro site will be used to determine what is necessary, if anything, to protect human health and the environment while complying with EPA standards.

  20. Water-quality investigations of the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah, 1980-82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Water-quality studies were conducted on the Jordan River, Utah, to investigate specific problems: dissolved oxygen, toxic substances, sanitary quality, and turbidity and suspended sediment. The dissolved oxygen decreased from 8 milligrams per liter at the Jordan Narrows to less than 5 milligrams per liter at 500 North Street. Chemical oxygen demand increased about 23 percent and biochemical oxygen demand increased 90 percent. Nearly 78 percent of the water samples analyzed for total mercury exceeded the State intended-use standard of 0.05 microgram per liter. Concentrations of ammonia, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc exceeded the standards periodically. The pesticides DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, methoxychlor, and 2,4-D were occasionally detected in bottom materials. Most were present in quantities of less than 15 micrograms per kilogram. Concentrations of three indicator bacteria (total coliform, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococcus) increased in a downstream direction. Concentrations of total coliform bacteria often exceeded 5,000 colonies per 100 milliliters and concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria often exceeded 2,000 colonies per 100 milliliters. The primary sources of turbidity in the Jordan River are Utah Lake and discharges from the wastewater-treatment plants. Large values of turbidity were measured at the Jordan Narrows with a summer mean value of 88 nephelometer turbidity units (NTU) and a winter mean value of 43 NTU. (USGS)

  1. Pontibacter aydingkolensis sp. nov., isolated from soil of a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ghenijan; Zhang, Tao; Lou, Kai; Gao, Yan; Chang, Wei; Lin, Qing; Yang, Hong-Mei; Huo, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, short rod-shaped and light-red-pigmented bacterium, designated XAAS-1T, was isolated from the soil of Aydingkol Lake near the Turpan City, Xinjiang, China. The isolate was positive for oxidase, catalase and hydrolysis of starch, casein, gelatin and aesculin. The sole respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the principal cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and C15 : 0 3-OH. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospholipid and two unidentified polar lipids. The polyamine pattern was found to contain mainly sym-homospermidine. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain XAAS-1T belongs to the genus Pontibacter in the family Cytophagaceae, with sequence similarities ranging from 93.8 to 96.7 % with other type species of the genus Pontibacter. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, strain XAAS-1T represents a novel species of the genus Pontibacter, for which the name Pontibacter aydingkolensis sp. nov. (type strain XAAS-1T=CCTCC AB 2016134T=JCM 31442T) is proposed.

  2. Anthropogenic influences on the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and mercury in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, D.; Angeroth, C.; Kenney, T.; Waddell, B.; Darnall, N.; Silva, S.; Perschon, C.; Whitehead, J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake (GSL), little is known about the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the lake. In response to increasing public concern regarding anthropogenic inputs to the GSL ecosystem, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) initiated coordinated studies to quantify and evaluate the significance of nutrient and Hg inputs into GSL. A 6??? decrease in ??15N observed in brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) samples collected from GSL during summer time periods is likely due to the consumption of cyanobacteria produced in freshwater bays entering the lake. Supporting data collected from the outflow of Farmington Bay indicates decreasing trends in ??15N in particulate organic matter (POM) during the mid-summer time period, reflective of increasing proportions of cyanobacteria in algae exported to GSL on a seasonal basis. The C:N molar ratio of POM in outflow from Farmington Bay decreases during the summer period, supportive of the increased activity of N fixation indicated by decreasing ??15N in brine shrimp and POM. Although N fixation is only taking place in the relatively freshwater inflows to GSL, data indicate that influx of fresh water influences large areas of the lake. Separation of GSL into two distinct hydrologic and geochemical systems from the construction of a railroad causeway in the late 1950s has created a persistent and widespread anoxic layer in the southern part of GSL. This anoxic layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has high rates of SO42 - reduction, likely increasing the Hg methylation capacity. High concentrations of methyl mercury (CH3Hg) (median concentration = 24 ng/L) were observed in the DBL with a significant proportion (31-60%) of total Hg in the CH3Hg form. Hydroacoustic and sediment-trap evidence indicate that turbulence introduced by internal waves generated during sustained wind events can temporarily mix the

  3. Anthropogenic influences on the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and mercury in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naftz, David [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States)], E-mail: dlnaftz@usgs.gov; Angeroth, Cory; Kenney, Terry [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States); Waddell, Bruce; Darnall, Nathan [US Fish and Wildlife Service, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silva, Steven [US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Perschon, Clay [Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Whitehead, John [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake (GSL), little is known about the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the lake. In response to increasing public concern regarding anthropogenic inputs to the GSL ecosystem, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) initiated coordinated studies to quantify and evaluate the significance of nutrient and Hg inputs into GSL. A 6 per mille decrease in {delta}{sup 15}N observed in brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) samples collected from GSL during summer time periods is likely due to the consumption of cyanobacteria produced in freshwater bays entering the lake. Supporting data collected from the outflow of Farmington Bay indicates decreasing trends in {delta}{sup 15}N in particulate organic matter (POM) during the mid-summer time period, reflective of increasing proportions of cyanobacteria in algae exported to GSL on a seasonal basis. The C:N molar ratio of POM in outflow from Farmington Bay decreases during the summer period, supportive of the increased activity of N fixation indicated by decreasing {delta}{sup 15}N in brine shrimp and POM. Although N fixation is only taking place in the relatively freshwater inflows to GSL, data indicate that influx of fresh water influences large areas of the lake. Separation of GSL into two distinct hydrologic and geochemical systems from the construction of a railroad causeway in the late 1950s has created a persistent and widespread anoxic layer in the southern part of GSL. This anoxic layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has high rates of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} reduction, likely increasing the Hg methylation capacity. High concentrations of methyl mercury (CH{sub 3}Hg) (median concentration = 24 ng/L) were observed in the DBL with a significant proportion (31-60%) of total Hg in the CH{sub 3}Hg form. Hydroacoustic and sediment-trap evidence indicate that turbulence introduced by internal waves

  4. Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi, Ali; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Asadi, Basaer; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain DA50T, was isolated from a brine sample of Urmia lake, a hypersaline environment in north-west Iran. Strain DA50T was orange-pigmented, motile, pleomorphic and required at least 2.5 M NaCl but not MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4.0 M NaCl and 0.3 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 45 °C, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-8.0 and a temperature range of 25-50 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain DA50T is a member of the family Halobacteriaceae, showing a low level of similarity with other members of this family. Highest similarities, 94.4, 94.0 and 93.9 %, were obtained with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains of Natrialba aegyptia, Halobiforma lacisalsi and Halovivax asiaticus, respectively. Polar lipid analyses revealed that strain DA50T contains phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. Four unidentified glycolipids and two minor phospholipids were also observed. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H2). The G+C content of its DNA was 62.3 mol%. On the basis of the data obtained, the new isolate could not be classified in any recognized genus. Strain DA50T is thus considered to represent a novel species of a new genus within the family Halobacteriaceae, order Halobacteriales, for which the name Halovarius luteus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Halovarius luteus is DA50T ( = IBRC-M 10912T = CECT 8510T).

  5. Oceanobacillus longus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, long rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain T9BT, was isolated from a brine sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain T9BT were motile and produced colonies with a brown pigment. Growth occurred between 1.0 and 20 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 5.0 % (v/w) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6.0-9.0 and 25-45 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on the comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain T9BT is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus. The closest relative to this strain was Oceanobacillus rekensis PT-11T with a similarity of 97.4 %, followed by Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28T and Oceanobacillus polygoni SA9T with 97.3 and 97.1 % similarity, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipids of strain T9BT consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three phospholipids and one aminoglycolipid. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 42.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data and phenotypic characteristics allowed strain T9BT to be differentiated from other members of the genus Oceanobacillus. A novel species, Oceanobacillus longus sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate this strain. The type strain is T9BT (=IBRC-M 10703T=LMG 29250T).

  6. Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Bagheri, Maryam; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Didari, Maryam; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped, strictly aerobic, moderately halophilic bacterium, designated strain H9B(T), was isolated from a mud sample of the hypersaline lake Aran-Bidgol in Iran. Cells of strain H9B(T) were motile and produced colonies with a yellowish-grey pigment. Growth occurred between 2.5 and 10 % (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally at 7.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6-10 and 25-45 °C, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain H9B(T) is a member of the genus Oceanobacillus. The closest relative to this strain was Oceanobacillus profundus CL-MP28(T) with 97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequences similarity. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and this phylogenetically related species was 17 %. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipid pattern of strain H9B(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, four phospholipids and an aminolipid. It contained MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of this strain was 37.1 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus limi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Oceanobacillus limi is strain H9B(T) ( = IBRC-M 10780(T) = KCTC 13823(T) = CECT 7997(T)).

  7. Halorientalis persicus sp. nov., an extremely halophilic archaeon isolated from a salt lake and emended description of the genus Halorientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Spröer, Cathrin; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    An extremely halophilic archaeon, strain D108(T), was isolated from a brine sample of Aran-Bidgol salt lake in Iran. The novel strain was cream-pigmented, motile, pleomorphic rod-shaped and required at least 2.5 M NaCl but not MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved with 4.3 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively, and the strain was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5 to 9.0, and a temperature range of 30 to 50 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain D108(T) clustered with the type strain of the sole species of the genus Halorientalis, Halorientalis regularis TNN28(T), with a sequence similarity of 98.8 %. The polar lipid pattern of strain D108(T) consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, one phosphoglycolipid and two glycolipids. The only quinone present was MK-8(II-H2). The DNA G+C content of strain D108(T) was 62.8 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies (45 % with Halorientalis regularis IBRC-M 10760(T)), as well as biochemical and physiological characterization, allowed strain D108(T) to be differentiated from Halorientalis regularis. A novel species of the genus Halorientalis, Halorientalis persicus sp. nov., is therefore proposed to accommodate this strain. The type strain is D108(T) ( = IBRC-M 10043(T) = CECT 8375(T)). An emended description of the genus Halorientalis is also proposed.

  8. Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from Lop Nur salt lake in Xinjiang province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhou, Yu; Ja, Man; Shi, Rong; Chun-Yu, Wei-Xun; Yang, Ling-Ling; Tang, Shu-Kun; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-positive, moderately halophilic, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated YIM 93624(T), was isolated from a salt lake in Xinjiang province of China and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain YIM 93624(T) grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 25-30 °C), 1-17% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 5-10 %, w/v) and pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.0). The predominant menaquinone was found to be MK-7. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0) and C(16:0). The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, a glycolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain YIM 93624(T) was a member of the genus Virgibacillus and exhibited the highest similarity of 97.0 % to Virgibacillus koreensis KCTC 3823(T). However, the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YIM 93624(T) and V. koreensis KCTC 3823(T) was 32.5 %. On the basis of phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analysis data, the isolate is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Virgibacillus, for which the name Virgibacillus albus sp. nov., is proposed, with type strain of YIM 93624(T) (=DSM 23711(T) = JCM 17364(T)).

  9. Sociologie d’une dispute dans l’arbitrage en patinage artistique : le cas de Salt Lake City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Collinet

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Notre travail se penche sur les problèmes d’arbitrage en patinage et danse sur glace en prenant appui sur l’affaire de Salt Lake City (affaire internationale. L’arbitrage en patinage artistique ne peut être soumis à une mesure complètement objective, une part de subjectivité reste importante. Nous montrons que cette caractéristique du patinage est à l’origine des disputes relatives à l’arbitrage. Autrement dit, loin de constituer un effet périphérique, surajouté, à ce sport, les problèmes d’arbitrage sont le résultat normal d’un positionnement ambigu et de la confrontation de principes (Boltanski & Thévenot, 1991 difficilement conciliables ouvrant la brèche à un espace de plainte. Le mode de jugement artistique en patinage s’accorde mal avec les valeurs sportives créant ainsi des discordances débouchant sur de véritables affaires. Enfin, nous envisageons comment s’est construite la clôture de la dispute en insistant sur le fait que ce n’est pas l’objectivité du jugement qui est visée par les modifications (nouveau code qui ont suivi l’affaire, mais l’espace de plainte qui se réduit. Ce travail est fondé sur l’analyse d’articles de presse, de témoignages écrits et d’entretiens. Il se centre sur le point de vue français d’une affaire internationale et mobilise des approches sociologiques issues de la sociologie pragmatique, la sociologie de l’art et la sociologie du sport.Our work looks into the judging issues in ice skating and ice dancing, based on the Salt Lake City scandal (an international scandal. Judging in figure skating cannot be entirely objective as a large part of subjectivity remains inherent to the process. We will demonstrate that the controversy surrounding judging decisions originates in this particular feature of ice skating. In other words, judging issues – far from being an extraneous addition to this sport – are the natural consequence of an ambiguous

  10. Geology, selected geophysics, and hydrogeology of the White River and parts of the Great Salt Lake Desert regional groundwater flow systems, Utah and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Peter D.; Dixon, Gary L.; Watrus , James M.; Burns, Andrews G.; Mankinen, Edward A.; McKee, Edwin H.; Pari, Keith T.; Ekren, E. Bartlett; Patrick , William G.; Comer, John B.; Inkenbrandt, Paul C.; Krahulec, K.A.; Pinnell, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The east-central Great Basin near the Utah-Nevada border contains two great groundwater flow systems. The first, the White River regional groundwater flow system, consists of a string of hydraulically connected hydrographic basins in Nevada spanning about 270 miles from north to south. The northernmost basin is Long Valley and the southernmost basin is the Black Mountain area, a valley bordering the Colorado River. The general regional groundwater flow direction is north to south. The second flow system, the Great Salt Lake Desert regional groundwater flow system, consists of hydrographic basins that straddle

  11. Geophysical, geochemical and hydrological analyses of water-resource vulnerability to salinization: case of the Uburu-Okposi salt lakes and environs, southeast Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukpai, S. N.; Okogbue, C. O.

    2017-11-01

    Until this study, the location and depth of the saline units in Uburu-Okposi salt lake areas and environs have been unknown. This study aimed at delineating the saline lithofacies and dispersal configurations to water bodies, using electrical geophysical methods such as constant separation traversing (CST) and vertical electrical sounding (VES). Results showed weathered zones that represent aquifers mostly at the fourth geoelectric layer: between upper layered aquitards and underlying aquitards at depths 30-140 m. Lateral distribution of resistivity variance was defined by the CST, whereas the VES tool, targeted at low-resistivity zones, detected isolated saline units with less than 10 ohm-m at depths generally >78 m. The saline lithofacies were suspected to link freshwater zones via shear zones, which steer saline water towards the salt lakes and influence the vulnerability of groundwater to salinization. The level of salinization was verified by water sampling and analysis, and results showed general alkaline water type with a mean pH of 7.66. Water pollution was indicated: mean total dissolved solids (TDS) 550 mg/l, electrical conductivity (EC) 510 μS/cm, salinity 1.1‰, Cl- 200 mg/l, N03 -35.5 mg/l, Na+ 19.6 mg/l and Ca2+ 79.3 mg/l. The salinity is controlled by NaCl salt, as deduced from correlation analysis using the software package Statistical Product for Service Solutions (SPSS). Generally, concentrations of dissolved ions in the water of the area are enhanced via mechanisms such as evaporation, dissociation of salts, precipitation run off and leaching of dissolved rock minerals.

  12. Geophysical, geochemical and hydrological analyses of water-resource vulnerability to salinization: case of the Uburu-Okposi salt lakes and environs, southeast Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukpai, S. N.; Okogbue, C. O.

    2017-06-01

    Until this study, the location and depth of the saline units in Uburu-Okposi salt lake areas and environs have been unknown. This study aimed at delineating the saline lithofacies and dispersal configurations to water bodies, using electrical geophysical methods such as constant separation traversing (CST) and vertical electrical sounding (VES). Results showed weathered zones that represent aquifers mostly at the fourth geoelectric layer: between upper layered aquitards and underlying aquitards at depths 30-140 m. Lateral distribution of resistivity variance was defined by the CST, whereas the VES tool, targeted at low-resistivity zones, detected isolated saline units with less than 10 ohm-m at depths generally >78 m. The saline lithofacies were suspected to link freshwater zones via shear zones, which steer saline water towards the salt lakes and influence the vulnerability of groundwater to salinization. The level of salinization was verified by water sampling and analysis, and results showed general alkaline water type with a mean pH of 7.66. Water pollution was indicated: mean total dissolved solids (TDS) 550 mg/l, electrical conductivity (EC) 510 μS/cm, salinity 1.1‰, Cl- 200 mg/l, N03 -35.5 mg/l, Na+ 19.6 mg/l and Ca2+ 79.3 mg/l. The salinity is controlled by NaCl salt, as deduced from correlation analysis using the software package Statistical Product for Service Solutions (SPSS). Generally, concentrations of dissolved ions in the water of the area are enhanced via mechanisms such as evaporation, dissociation of salts, precipitation run off and leaching of dissolved rock minerals.

  13. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Ng, Tzi Bun; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-02-26

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications.

  14. Metagenome cloning and functional analysis of Na⁺/H⁺ antiporter genes from Keke Salt Lake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Maio; Wang, Lei; Chen, San-Feng

    2012-02-01

    Na⁺/H⁺ antiporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins and play a central role in cell homeostasis including pH regulation, osmoregulation, and Na⁺/Li⁺ tolerance in bacteria. The microbial communities in extremely hypersaline soil are an important resource for isolating Na⁺/H⁺ antiporter genes. A metagenomic library containing 35,700 clones was constructed by using genomic DNA obtained from the hypersaline soil samples of Keke Salt Lake in Northwest of China. Two Na⁺/H⁺ antiporters, K1-NhaD, and K2-NhaD belonging to NhaD family, were screened and cloned from this metagenome by complementing the triple mutant Escherichia coli strain KNabc (nhaA⁻, nhaB⁻, chaA⁻) in medium containing 0.2 M NaCl. K1-NhaD and K2-NhaD have 75.5% identity at the predicted amino acid sequence. K1-NhaD has 78% identity with Na⁺/H⁺ antiporter NhaD from Halomonas elongate at the predicted amino acid sequence. The predicted K1-NhaD is a 53.5 kDa protein (487 amino acids) with 13 transmembrane helices. K2-NhaD has 73% identity with Alkalimonas amylolytica NhaD. The predicted K2-NhaD is a 55 kDa protein (495 amino acids) with 12 transmembrane helices. Both K1-NhaD and K2-NhaD could make the triple mutant E. coli KNabc (nhaA⁻, nhaB⁻, chaA⁻) grow in the LBK medium containing 0.2-0.6 M Na⁺ or with 0.05-0.4 M Li⁺. Everted membrane vesicles prepared from E. coli KNabc cells carrying K1-NhaD or K2-NhaD exhibited Na⁺/H⁺ and Li⁺/H⁺ antiporter activities which were pH-dependent with the highest activity at pH 9.5. Little K⁺/H⁺ antiporter activity was also detected in vesicles form E. coli KNabc carrying K1-NhaD or K2-NhaD.

  15. Halomonas qijiaojingensis sp. nov. and Halomonas flava sp. nov., two moderately halophilic bacteria isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Shi, Rong; Liu, Bing-Bing; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Sun, Hong-Zhuan; Li, Chang-Tian; Tang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Li-Li; Li, Wen-Jun

    2011-10-01

    Two moderately halophilic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, designated YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T), were isolated from a salt lake in Xinjiang province, north-west China. The two strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T) grew at 20-40°C, pH 6-9, 0.5-24% (w/v) NaCl and at 20-40°C, pH 6-9, 0.5-23% (w/v) NaCl, respectively. No growth occurred in absence of NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T) were phylogenetically affiliated to the genus Halomonas and exhibited sequence similarity of 97.5% and 97.4% to the type strain Halomonas anticariensis DSM 16096(T), respectively. The strains possessed chemotaxonomic markers that were consistent with their classification in the genus Halomonas (Q-9 as predominant respiratory quinine; C18:1ω7c, C16:0 and C16:1 ω7c/iso-C15:02-OH as the major fatty acids). The DNA-DNA hybridization values for strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T), YIM 93003(T) and DSM 16096(T), YIM 94343(T) and DSM 16096(T) were 38.1 ± 3.0, 18.3 ± 4.7, and 20.8 ± 4.6%, respectively. The G+C contents of the strains YIM 93003(T) and YIM 94343(T) were 63.4 and 64.0 mol%, respectively. Based on comparative analysis of physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic data, including low DNA-DNA hybridization results, two novel species, Halomonas qijiaojingensis sp. nov., and Halomonas flava sp. nov., are proposed. The type strains are YIM 93003(T) (=CCTCC AB 208133(T) =KCTC 22228(T)) and YIM 94343(T) (=CCTCC AB 2010382(T) =KCTC 23356(T)), respectively.

  16. Decadal-scale changes in dissolved-solids concentrations in groundwater used for public supply, Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Spangler, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Basin-fill aquifers are a major source of good-quality water for public supply in many areas of the southwestern United States and have undergone increasing development as populations have grown over time. During 2005, the basin-fill aquifer in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, provided approximately 75,000 acre-feet, or about 29 percent of the total amount of water used by a population of 967,000. Groundwater in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits that make up the aquifer occurs under unconfined and confined conditions. Water in the shallow unconfined part of the groundwater system is susceptible to near-surface contamination and generally is not used as a source of drinking water. Groundwater for public supply is withdrawn from the deeper unconfined and confined parts of the system, termed the principal aquifer, because yields generally are greater and water quality is better (including lower dissolved-solids concentrations) than in the shallower parts of the system. Much of the water in the principal aquifer is derived from recharge in the adjacent Wasatch Range (mountain-block recharge). In many areas, the principal aquifer is separated from the overlying shallow aquifer by confining layers of less permeable, fine-grained sediment that inhibit the downward movement of water and any potential contaminants from the surface. Nonetheless, under certain hydrologic conditions, human-related activities can increase dissolved-solids concentrations in the principal aquifer and result in groundwater becoming unsuitable for consumption without treatment or mixing with water having lower dissolved-solids concentrations. Dissolved-solids concentrations in areas of the principal aquifer used for public supply typically are less than 500 milligrams per liter (mg/L), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) secondary (nonenforceable) drinking-water standard. However, substantial increases in dissolved-solids concentrations in the principal aquifer have been documented in some

  17. Spatial analysis of groundwater electrical conductivity using ordinary kriging and artificial intelligence methods (Case study: Maharlu-Bakhtegan and Tashk salt lakes basin, Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghader, Fatemeh; Aljoumani, Basem; Tröger, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The main resources of fresh water are the groundwater. In Iran, the quality and quantity of groundwater is affected significantly by rapid population growth and unsustainable water management in the agricultural and industrial sectors. in Maharlu-Bakhtegan and Tashk salt lakes basin, the overexploitation of groundwater for irrigation purpose caused the salt water intrusion from the lakes to the area's aquifers, moreover, the basin is located in south of Iran with semiarid climate, faces a significant decline in rainfall. All these reasons cause the degradation of ground water quality. For this study, geographical coordinates of 406 observation wells will be defined as inputs and groundwater electrical conductivities (EC) will be set as output. Ordinary kriging (OK) and artificial neural networks (ANN) will be investigated for modeling groundwater salinity. Eighty percent of data will be randomly selected to train and develop mentioned models and twenty percent of data will be used for testing and validating. Finally, the outputs of models will be compared with the corresponding measured values in observation wells.

  18. Hydrology and water quality of an urban stream reach in the Great Basin - Little Cottonwood Creek near Salt Lake City, Utah, water years 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Steven J.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrology and water quality of an urbanized reach of Little Cottonwood Creek near Salt Lake City, Utah, were examined as part of the Great Salt Lake Basins study, part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program. Physical and chemical properties of the stream were referenced to established aquatic-life criteria as available. Two fixed sampling sites were established on Little Cottonwood Creek with the purpose of determining the influence of urbanization on the water quality of the stream. The fixed-site assessment is a component of the National Water-Quality Assessment surface-water study design used to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of selected water-quality constituents.The occurrence and distribution of major ions, nutrients, trace elements, dissolved and suspended organic carbon, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and suspended sediment were monitored during this study. From October 1998 to September 2000, stream samples were collected at regular intervals at the two fixed sites. Additional samples were collected at these sites during periods of high flow, which included runoff from snowmelt in the headwaters and seasonal thunderstorms in the lower basin.

  19. A Three-Component Microbial Consortium from Deep-Sea Salt-Saturated Anoxic Lake Thetis Links Anaerobic Glycine Betaine Degradation with Methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta La Cono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities inhabiting the deep-sea salt-saturated anoxic lakes of the Eastern Mediterranean operate under harsh physical-chemical conditions that are incompatible with the lifestyle of common marine microorganisms. Here, we investigated a stable three-component microbial consortium obtained from the brine of the recently discovered deep-sea salt-saturated Lake Thetis. The trophic network of this consortium, established at salinities up to 240, relies on fermentative decomposition of common osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB. Similarly to known extreme halophilic anaerobic GB-degrading enrichments, the initial step of GB degradation starts with its reductive cleavage to trimethylamine and acetate, carried out by the fermenting member of the Thetis enrichment, Halobacteroides lacunaris TB21. In contrast to acetate, which cannot be easily oxidized in salt-saturated anoxic environments, trimethylamine represents an advantageous C1-substrate for methylotrophic methanogenic member of the Thetis enrichment, Methanohalophilus sp. TA21. This second member of the consortium likely produces hydrogen via methylotrophic modification of reductive acetyl-CoA pathway because the initial anaerobic GB cleavage reaction requires the consumption of reducing equivalents. Ecophysiological role of the third member of the Thetis consortium, Halanaerobium sp. TB24, which lacks the capability of either GB or trimethylamine degradation, remains yet to be elucidated. As it is true for cultivated members of family Halanaerobiaceae, the isolate TB24 can obtain energy primarily by fermenting simple sugars and producing hydrogen as one of the end products. Hence, by consuming of TB21 and TA21 metabolites, Halanaerobium sp. TB24 can be an additional provider of reducing equivalents required for reductive degradation of GB. Description of the Thetis GB-degrading consortium indicated that anaerobic degradation of osmoregulatory molecules may play important role in the

  20. Highly-resolved Modeling of Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Fine Particulate Matter in Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate, high-resolution data on air pollutant emissions and concentrations are needed to understand human exposures and for both policy and pollutant management purposes. An important step in this process is also quantification of uncertainties. We present a spatially explicit and highly resolved emissions inventory for Salt Lake County, Utah, and trace gas concentration estimates for carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and fine particles (PM2.5) within Salt Lake City. We assess the validity of this approach by comparing measured concentrations against simulated values derived from combining the emissions inventory with an atmospheric model. The emissions inventory for the criteria pollutants was constructed using the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The spatial and temporal allocation methods from the Emission Modeling Clearinghouse data set are used to downscale the NEI data from annual to hourly scales and from county-level to 500 m x 500 m resolution. Onroad mobile source emissions were estimated by combining a bottom-up emissions calculation approach for large roadway links with a top-down spatial allocation approach for other roadways. Vehicle activity data for road links were derived from automatic traffic responder data. The emissions inventory for CO2 was obtained from the Hestia emissions data product at an hourly, building, facility, and road link resolution. The AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to transport emissions and estimate air pollutant concentrations at an hourly temporal and 500 m x 500 m spatial resolution. Modeled results were compared against measurements from a mobile lab equipped with trace gas measurement equipment traveling on pre-determined routes in the Salt Lake City area. The comparison between both approaches to concentration estimation highlights spatial locations and hours of high variability/uncertainty. Results presented here will inform understanding of variability and

  1. Conference Proceedings: Seed Ecology III - The Third International Society for Seed Science Meeting on Seeds and the Environment - "Seeds and Change"; June 20-June 24, 2010; Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemary Pendleton; Susan Meyer; Bitsy Schultz

    2010-01-01

    Seed Ecology III was held in Salt Lake City, Utah in June 2010, sharing the latest research on all aspects of seed ecology. Our meeting was organized around the theme "Seeds and Change." We welcomed contributions in any area of seed ecology. Our agenda also aimed to create bridges between seed ecology and plant conservation, restoration ecology, and global...

  2. An investigation of several aspects of LANDSAT-5 data quality. [Palmer County, Shelby, mt; White sands, NM; Great Salt Lake, UT; San Matted Bridge and Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Band-to-band registration, geodetic registration, interdector noise, and the modulation transfer function (MTE) are discussed for the Palmer County; TX scene. Band combinations for several LANDSAT 4 and LANDSAT 5 scenes; the geodetic registration test for the Sacramento, CA area; periodic noise components in TM band 5; and grey level measurements by detector for Great Salt Lake (UT) dark water forescans and backscans are considered. Results of MTF analyses of the San Mateo Bridge and of TM high resolution and aerial Daedalus scanner imagery are consistent and appear to be repeatable. An oil-on-sand target was constructed on the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The two-image analysis procedure used is summarized.

  3. Relationships between Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing program and hydropower operations at Salt Lake City area integrated projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselka, T.D.; Folga, S.; Poch, L.A. [and others

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum provides background information on the Western Area Power Administration (Western) and the physical characteristics of the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) hydropower plants, which include the Colorado River Storage Project, the Rio Grande Project, and the Collbran Project. In addition, the history, electrical capacity, storage capacity, and flow restrictions at each dam are presented. An overview of Western`s current programs and services, including a review of statutory authorities, agency discretion, and obligations, is also provided. The variability of SLCA/IP hourly generation under various alternative marketing strategies and purchasing programs is discussed. The effects of Western`s services, such as area load control, outage assistance, and transmission, on SLCA/IP power plant operations are analyzed.

  4. Testing a high resolution CO2 and CO emission inventory against atmospheric observations in Salt Lake City, Utah for policy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Mallia, D. V.; Fasoli, B.; Bares, R.; Catharine, D.; O'Keeffe, D.; Song, Y.; Huang, J.; Horel, J.; Crosman, E.; Hoch, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We address the need for robust highly-resolved emissions and trace gas concentration data required for planning purposes and policy development aimed at managing pollutant sources. Adverse health effects resulting from urban pollution exposure are the result of proximity to emission sources and atmospheric mixing, necessitating models with high spatial and temporal resolution. As urban emission sources co-emit carbon dioxide (CO2) and criteria air pollutants (CAPs), efforts to reduce specific pollutants would synergistically reduce others. We present a contemporary (2010-2015) emissions inventory and modeled CO2 and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations for Salt Lake County, Utah. We compare emissions transported by a dispersion model against stationary measurement data and present a systematic quantification of uncertainties. The emissions inventory for CO2 is based on the Hestia emissions data inventory that resolves emissions at hourly, building and road-link resolutions, as well as on an hourly gridded scale. The emissions were scaled using annual Energy Information Administration (EIA) fuel consumption data. We derived a CO emissions inventory using methods similar to Hestia, downscaling total county emissions from the 2011 Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The gridded CO emissions were compared against the Hestia CO2 gridded data to characterize spatial similarities and differences between them. Correlations were calculated at multiple scales of aggregation. The Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Trasport (STILT) dispersion model was used to transport emissions and estimate pollutant concentrations at an hourly resolution. Modeled results were compared against stationary measurements in the Salt Lake County area. This comparison highlights spatial locations and hours of high variability and uncertainty. Sensitivity to biological fluxes as well as to specific economic sectors was tested by varying their contributions to

  5. Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William P.; Swanson, Neil; Black, Brooks; Rudd, Abigail; Carling, Gregory; Fernandez, Diego P.; Luft, John; Van Leeuwen, Jim; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    We examined mercury (Hg) speciation in water and sediment of the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands, a locale spanning fresh to hypersaline and oxic to anoxic conditions, in order to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal variations in Hg concentration and methylation rates correspond to observed spatial and temporal trends in Hg burdens previously reported in biota. Water column, sediment, and pore water concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg), as well as related aquatic chemical parameters were examined. Inorganic Hg(II)-methylation rates were determined in selected water column and sediment subsamples spiked with inorganic divalent mercury (204Hg(II)). Net production of Me204Hg was expressed as apparent first-order rate constants for methylation (kmeth), which were also expanded to MeHg production potential (MPP) rates via combination with tin reducible ‘reactive’ Hg(II) (Hg(II)R) as a proxy for bioavailable Hg(II). Notable findings include: 1) elevated Hg concentrations previously reported in birds and brine flies were spatially proximal to the measured highest MeHg concentrations, the latter occurring in the anoxic deep brine layer (DBL) of the Great Salt Lake; 2) timing of reduced Hg(II)-methylation rates in the DBL (according to both kmeth and MPP) coincides with reduced Hg burdens among aquatic invertebrates (brine shrimp and brine flies) that act as potential vectors of Hg propagation to the terrestrial ecosystem; 3) values ofkmeth were found to fall within the range reported by other studies; and 4) MPP rates were on the lower end of the range reported in methodologically comparable studies, suggesting the possibility that elevated MeHg in the anoxic deep brine layer results from its accumulation and persistence in this quasi-isolated environment, due to the absence of light (restricting abiotic photo demethylation) and/or minimal microbiological demethylation.

  6. Position paper on the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Uranium Mill Tailings Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the results of the evaluation of the potential applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer underlying the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing Site, Salt Lake City, Utah. There are two goals for this evaluation: provide the landowner with information to make an early qualitative decision on the possible use of the Vitro property, and evaluate the proposed application of supplemental standards as the ground water compliance strategy at the site. Justification of supplemental standards is based on the contention that the uppermost aquifer is of limited use due to wide-spread ambient contamination not related to the previous site processing activities. In support of the above, this report discusses the site conceptual model for the uppermost aquifer and related hydrogeological systems and establishes regional and local background water quality. This information is used to determine the extent of site-related and ambient contamination. A risk-based evaluation of the contaminants` effects on current and projected land uses is also provided. Reports of regional and local studies and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site investigations provided the basis for the conceptual model and established background ground water quality. In addition, a limited field effort (4 through 28 March 1996) was conducted to supplement existing data, particularly addressing the extent of contamination in the northwestern portion of the Vitro site and site background ground water quality. Results of the field investigation were particularly useful in refining the conceptual site model. This was important in light of the varied ground water quality within the uppermost aquifer. Finally, this report provides a critical evaluation, along with the related uncertainties, of the applicability of supplemental standards to the uppermost aquifer at the Salt Lake City Vitro processing site.

  7. Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William P; Swanson, Neil; Black, Brooks; Rudd, Abigail; Carling, Greg; Fernandez, Diego P; Luft, John; Van Leeuwen, Jim; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2015-04-01

    We examined mercury (Hg) speciation in water and sediment of the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands, a locale spanning fresh to hypersaline and oxic to anoxic conditions, in order to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal variations in Hg concentration and methylation rates correspond to observed spatial and temporal trends in Hg burdens previously reported in biota. Water column, sediment, and pore water concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg), as well as related aquatic chemical parameters were examined. Inorganic Hg(II)-methylation rates were determined in selected water column and sediment subsamples spiked with inorganic divalent mercury (204Hg(II)). Net production of Me204Hg was expressed as apparent first-order rate constants for methylation (kmeth), which were also expanded to MeHg production potential (MPP) rates via combination with tin reducible 'reactive' Hg(II) (Hg(II)R) as a proxy for bioavailable Hg(II). Notable findings include: 1) elevated Hg concentrations previously reported in birds and brine flies were spatially proximal to the measured highest MeHg concentrations, the latter occurring in the anoxic deep brine layer (DBL) of the Great Salt Lake; 2) timing of reduced Hg(II)-methylation rates in the DBL (according to both kmeth and MPP) coincides with reduced Hg burdens among aquatic invertebrates (brine shrimp and brine flies) that act as potential vectors of Hg propagation to the terrestrial ecosystem; 3) values of kmeth were found to fall within the range reported by other studies; and 4) MPP rates were on the lower end of the range reported in methodologically comparable studies, suggesting the possibility that elevated MeHg in the anoxic deep brine layer results from its accumulation and persistence in this quasi-isolated environment, due to the absence of light (restricting abiotic photo demethylation) and/or minimal microbiological demethylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationships of surface water, pore water, and sediment chemistry in wetlands adjacent to Great Salt Lake, Utah, and potential impacts on plant community health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Gregory T; Richards, David C; Hoven, Heidi; Miller, Theron; Fernandez, Diego P; Rudd, Abigail; Pazmino, Eddy; Johnson, William P

    2013-01-15

    We collected surface water, pore water, and sediment samples at five impounded wetlands adjacent to Great Salt Lake, Utah, during 2010 and 2011 in order to characterize pond chemistry and to compare chemistry with plant community health metrics. We also collected pore water and sediment samples along multiple transects at two sheet flow wetlands during 2011 to investigate a potential link between wetland chemistry and encroachment of invasive emergent plant species. Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace and major elements, nutrients, and relevant field parameters. The extensive sampling campaign provides a broad assessment of Great Salt Lake wetlands, including a range of conditions from reference to highly degraded. We used nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) to characterize the wetland sites based on the multiple parameters measured in surface water, pore water, and sediment. NMS results showed that the impounded wetlands fall along a gradient of high salinity/low trace element concentrations to low salinity/high trace element concentrations, whereas the sheet flow wetlands have both elevated salinity and high trace element concentrations, reflecting either different sources of element loading or different biogeochemical/hydrological processes operating within the wetlands. Other geochemical distinctions were found among the wetlands, including Fe-reducing conditions at two sites and sulfate-reducing conditions at the remaining sites. Plant community health metrics in the impounded wetlands showed negative correlations with specific metal concentrations in sediment (THg, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sb, Pb, Ag, Tl), and negative correlations with nutrient concentrations in surface water (nitrite, phosphate, nitrate). In the sheet flow wetlands, invasive plant species were inversely correlated with pore water salinity. These results indicate that sediment and pore water chemistry play an important role in wetland plant community health, and that monitoring and

  9. Geographic scale matters in detecting the relationship between neighbourhood food environments and obesity risk: an analysis of driver license records in Salt Lake County, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jessie X; Hanson, Heidi A; Zick, Cathleen D; Brown, Barbara B; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Smith, Ken R

    2014-08-19

    Empirical studies of the association between neighbourhood food environments and individual obesity risk have found mixed results. One possible cause of these mixed findings is the variation in neighbourhood geographic scale used. The purpose of this paper was to examine how various neighbourhood geographic scales affected the estimated relationship between food environments and obesity risk. Cross-sectional secondary data analysis. Salt Lake County, Utah, USA. 403,305 Salt Lake County adults 25-64 in the Utah driver license database between 1995 and 2008. Utah driver license data were geo-linked to 2000 US Census data and Dun & Bradstreet business data. Food outlets were classified into the categories of large grocery stores, convenience stores, limited-service restaurants and full-service restaurants, and measured at four neighbourhood geographic scales: Census block group, Census tract, ZIP code and a 1 km buffer around the resident's house. These measures were regressed on individual obesity status using multilevel random intercept regressions. Obesity. Food environment was important for obesity but the scale of the relevant neighbourhood differs for different type of outlets: large grocery stores were not significant at all four geographic scales, limited-service restaurants at the medium-to-large scale (Census tract or larger) and convenience stores and full-service restaurants at the smallest scale (Census tract or smaller). The choice of neighbourhood geographic scale can affect the estimated significance of the association between neighbourhood food environments and individual obesity risk. However, variations in geographic scale alone do not explain the mixed findings in the literature. If researchers are constrained to use one geographic scale with multiple categories of food outlets, using Census tract or 1 km buffer as the neighbourhood geographic unit is likely to allow researchers to detect most significant relationships. Published by the BMJ

  10. Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans sp. nov., : A first acetate-oxidizing, extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphilic SRB from a hypersaline soda lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Chernyh, N.A.; Poroshina, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent intensive microbiological investigation of sulfidogenesis in soda lakes did not result in isolation of any pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) able to directly oxidize acetate. The sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation at haloalkaline conditions has, so far, been only shown in two

  11. Holocene and latest Pleistocene paleoseismology of the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, at the Penrose Drive Trench Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Hylland, Michael D.; McDonald, Greg N.; Crone, Anthony J.; Personius, Stephen F.; Gold, Ryan D.; Mahan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    The Salt Lake City segment (SLCS) of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) and the West Valley fault zone (WVFZ) compromise Holocene-active normal faults that bound a large intrabasin graben in northern Salt Lake Valley and have evidence of recurrent, large-magnitude (M ~6-7) surface-faulting earthquakes. However, at the time of this investigation, questions remained regarding the timing, displacement, and recurrence of latest Pleistocene and Holocene earthquakes on the northern SLCS and WVFZ , and whether the WVFZ is seismically independent of, or moves coseismically with, the SLCS. To improve paleoseismic data for the SLCS, we conducted a fault-trench investigation at the Penrose Drive site on the northern SLCS. Two trenches, excavated across an 11-m-high scarp near the northern end of the East Bench fault, exposed colluvial-wedge evidence for fize of six (preferred) surface-faulting earthquakes postdating to Provo-phase shoreline of Lake Bonneville (~14-18 ka). Radiocarbon and luminescence ages support earthquake times at 4.0 ± 0.5 ka (2σ) (PD1), 5.9 ± 0.7 ka (PD2), 7.5 ± 0.8 ka (PD3a), 9.7 ± 1.1 ka (PD3b), 10.9 ± 0.2 ka (PD4), and 12.1 ± 1.6 ka (PD5). At least one additional earthquake occurred at 16.5 ± 1.9 ka (PD6) based on an erosional unconformity that separates deformed Lake Bonneville sily and flat-lying Provo-phase shoreline gravel. Earthquakes PD5-PD1 yield latest Pleistocene (post-Provo) and Holocene mean recurrence intervals of ~1.6 kyr and ~1.7-1.9 kyr, respectively. Using 1.0-1.4 m of per-event vertical displacement for PD5-PD3b corroborate previously identified SLCS earthquakes at 4-10 ka. PD4 and PD5 occurred within an ~8-kyr *17-9 ka) time interval on the SLCS previously interpreted as a period of seismic quiescence, and PD6 possibly corresponds with a previously identified earthquake at ~17 ka (although both events have large timing uncertainties). The Penrose data, when combined with previous paleoseismic results, improve the latest Pleistocene

  12. Trace elements and organic compounds in sediment and fish tissue from the Great Salt Lake basins, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1998-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Giddings, Elise M.

    2004-01-01

    A study to determine the occurrence and distribution of trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment and in fish tissue was conducted in the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program during 1998-99. Streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were collected concurrently at 11 sites and analyzed for trace-element concentration. An additional four sites were sampled for streambed sediment only and one site for fish tissue only. Organic compounds were analyzed from streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples at 15 sites concurrently.Bed-sediment cores from lakes, reservoirs, and Farmington Bay collected by the NAWQA program in 1998 and by other researchers in 1982 were used to examine historical trends in trace-element concentration and to determine anthropogenic sources of contaminants. Cores collected in 1982 from Mirror Lake, a high-mountain reference location, showed an enrichment of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, tin, and zinc in the surface sediments relative to the deeper sediments, indicating that enrichment likely began after about 1900. This enrichment was attributed to atmospheric deposition during the period of metal-ore mining and smelting. A core from Echo Reservoir, in the Weber River Basin, however, showed a different pattern of trace-element concentration that was attributed to a local source. This site is located downstream from the Park City mining district, which is the most likely historical source of trace elements. Cores collected in 1998 from Farmington Bay show that the concentration of lead began to increase after 1842 and peaked during the mid-1980s and has been in decline since. Recent sediments deposited during 1996-98 indicate a 41- to 62-percent reduction since the peak in the mid-1980s.The concentration of trace elements in streambed sediment was greatest at sites that have been affected by historic mining

  13. Analysis of nitrate and volatile organic compound data for ground water in the Great Salt Lake Basins, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1980-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, ground water was the source of drinking water to about 52 percent of the population served by public drinking water systems in the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit, which includes parts of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming. Existing nitrate and volatile organic compound data for ground water collected in the study unit were compiled and summarized as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program’s objective to describe water-quality conditions in the Nation’s aquifers. Prerequisites for the inclusion of nitrate and volatile organic compound data into this retrospective analysis are that the data set is available in electronic form, the data were collected during 1980-98, the data set is somewhat regional in coverage, and the locations of the sampled sites are known. Ground-water data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System and the Idaho and Utah Public Drinking Water Systems databases were reviewed. Only the most recent analysis was included in the data sets if more than one analysis was available for a site.The National Water Information System data set contained nitrate analyses for water from 480 wells. The median concentration of nitrate was 1.30 milligrams per liter for the 388 values above minimum reporting limits. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate as established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was exceeded in water from 10 of the 200 wells less than or equal to 150 feet deep and in water from 3 of 280 wells greater than 150 feet deep. The Public Drinking Water Systems data set contained nitrate analyses for water from 587 wells. The median concentration of nitrate was 1.12 milligrams per liter for the 548 values above minimum reporting limits. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate was exceeded at 1 site and 22 sites had concentrations equal to or greater than 5 milligrams per liter. The types of land use surrounding a well and the well depth were related to measured nitrate

  14. Insights from the metagenome of an acid salt lake: the role of biology in an extreme depositional environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Stewart Johnson

    Full Text Available The extremely acidic brine lakes of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia are home to some of the most biologically challenging waters on Earth. In this study, we employed metagenomic shotgun sequencing to generate a microbial profile of the depositional environment associated with the sulfur-rich sediments of one such lake. Of the 1.5 M high-quality reads generated, 0.25 M were mapped to protein features, which in turn provide new insights into the metabolic function of this community. In particular, 45 diverse genes associated with sulfur metabolism were identified, the majority of which were linked to either the conversion of sulfate to adenylylsulfate and the subsequent production of sulfide from sulfite or the oxidation of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate via the sulfur oxidation (Sox system. This is the first metagenomic study of an acidic, hypersaline depositional environment, and we present evidence for a surprisingly high level of microbial diversity. Our findings also illuminate the possibility that we may be meaningfully underestimating the effects of biology on the chemistry of these sulfur-rich sediments, thereby influencing our understanding of past geobiological conditions that may have been present on Earth as well as early Mars.

  15. Spatiotemporal comparison of highly-resolved emissions and concentrations of carbon dioxide and criteria pollutants in Salt Lake City, Utah for health and policy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Fasoli, B.; Bares, R.; o'Keefe, D.; Song, T.; Huang, J.; Horel, J.; Crosman, E.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the need for robust highly-resolved emissions and concentration data required for planning purposes and policy development aimed at managing pollutant sources. Adverse health effects resulting from urban pollution exposure are dependent on proximity to emission sources and atmospheric mixing, necessitating models with high spatial and temporal resolution. As urban emission sources co-emit carbon dioxide (CO2) and criteria pollutants (CAPs), efforts to reduce specific pollutants would synergistically reduce others. We present emissions inventories and modeled concentrations for CO2 and CAPs: carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10), and sulfur oxides (SOx) for Salt Lake County, Utah. We compare the resulting concentrations against stationary and mobile measurement data and present a systematic quantification of uncertainties. The emissions inventory for CO2 is based on the Hestia emissions data inventory that resolves emissions at an hourly, building and road link resolution as well as hourly gridded emissions with a 0.002o x 0.002o spatial resolution. Two methods for deriving criteria pollutant emission inventories were compared. One was constructed using methods similar to Hestia but downscales total emissions based on the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The other used Emission Modeling Clearinghouse spatial and temporal surrogates to downscale the NEI data from annual and county-level resolution to hourly and 0.002o x 0.002o grid cells. The gridded emissions from both criteria pollutant methods were compared against the Hestia CO2 gridded data to characterize spatial similarities and differences between them. Correlations were calculated at multiple scales of aggregation. The CALPUFF dispersion model was used to transport emissions and estimate air pollutant concentrations at an hourly 0.002o x 0.002o resolution. The resulting concentrations were spatially compared in the same manner

  16. Marsh wrens as bioindicators of mercury in wetlands of Great Salt Lake: do blood and feathers reflect site-specific exposure risk to bird reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C Alex; Ackerman, Joshua T; Herring, Garth; Isanhart, John; Herzog, Mark

    2013-06-18

    Nonlethal sampling of bird blood and feathers are among the more common ways of estimating the risk of mercury exposure to songbird reproduction. The implicit assumption is that mercury concentrations in blood or feathers of individuals captured in a given area are correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs from the same area. Yet, this assumption is rarely tested. We evaluated mercury concentrations in blood, feathers, and eggs of marsh wrens in wetlands of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and, at two spatial scales, specifically tested the assumption that mercury concentrations in blood and feather samples from birds captured in a defined area were predictive of mercury concentrations in eggs collected in the same area. Mercury concentrations in blood were not correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs collected within the same wetland unit, and were poorly correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs collected at the smaller home range spatial scale of analysis. Moreover, mercury exposure risk, as estimated via tissue concentrations, differed among wetland units depending upon whether blood or egg mercury concentrations were sampled. Mercury concentrations in feathers also were uncorrelated with mercury concentrations in eggs, and were poorly correlated with mercury concentrations in blood. These results demonstrate the potential for contrasting management actions that may be implemented based solely on the specific avian tissue that is sampled, and highlight the importance of developing avian tissues as biomonitoring tools for assessing local risk of mercury exposure to bird reproduction.

  17. Novel Halomonas sp. B15 isolated from Larnaca Salt Lake in Cyprus that generates vanillin and vanillic acid from ferulic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyrides, Ioannis; Agathangelou, Maria; Dimitriou, Rodothea; Souroullas, Konstantinos; Salamex, Anastasia; Ioannou, Aristostodimos; Koutinas, Michalis

    2015-08-01

    Vanillin is a high value added product with many applications in the food, fragrance and pharmaceutical industries. A natural and low-cost method to produce vanillin is by microbial bioconversions through ferulic acid. Until now, limited microorganisms have been found capable of bioconverting ferulic acid to vanillin at high yield. This study aimed to screen halotolerant strains of bacteria from Larnaca Salt Lake which generate vanillin and vanillic acid from ferulic acid. From a total of 50 halotolenant/halophilic strains 8 grew in 1 g/L ferulic acid and only 1 Halomonas sp. B15 and 3 Halomonas elognata strains were capable of bioconverting ferulic acid to vanillic acid at 100 g NaCl/L. The highest vanillic acid (365 mg/L) at these conditions generated by Halomonas sp. B15 which corresponds to ferulic acid bioconversion yield of 36.5%. Using the resting cell technique with an initial ferulic acid concentration of 0.5 g/L at low salinity, the highest production of vanillin (245 mg/L) took place after 48 h, corresponding to a bioconversion yield of 49%. This is the first reported Halomonas sp. with high yield of vanillin production from ferulic acid at low salinity.

  18. Marsh wrens as bioindicators of mercury in wetlands of Great Salt Lake: do blood and feathers reflect site-specific exposure risk to bird reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C. Alex; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herring, Garth; Isanhart, John; Herzog, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlethal sampling of bird blood and feathers are among the more common ways of estimating the risk of mercury exposure to songbird reproduction. The implicit assumption is that mercury concentrations in blood or feathers of individuals captured in a given area are correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs from the same area. Yet, this assumption is rarely tested. We evaluated mercury concentrations in blood, feathers, and eggs of marsh wrens in wetlands of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and, at two spatial scales, specifically tested the assumption that mercury concentrations in blood and feather samples from birds captured in a defined area were predictive of mercury concentrations in eggs collected in the same area. Mercury concentrations in blood were not correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs collected within the same wetland unit, and were poorly correlated with mercury concentrations in eggs collected at the smaller home range spatial scale of analysis. Moreover, mercury exposure risk, as estimated via tissue concentrations, differed among wetland units depending upon whether blood or egg mercury concentrations were sampled. Mercury concentrations in feathers also were uncorrelated with mercury concentrations in eggs, and were poorly correlated with mercury concentrations in blood. These results demonstrate the potential for contrasting management actions that may be implemented based solely on the specific avian tissue that is sampled, and highlight the importance of developing avian tissues as biomonitoring tools for assessing local risk of mercury exposure to bird reproduction.

  19. A combined noble gas and {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar study of Salt Lake Crater xenolith SL322 from Oahu, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trieloff, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Rocholl, A. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Inst.; Jessberger, E.K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Planetologie

    1998-12-31

    The microdistribution of noble gases in a garnet pyroxenite nodule from Salt Lake Crater (SLC), Oahu, Hawaii, was investigated by a detailed step-heating and -crushing analysis and a {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar-study. A noble gas component with MORB type argon, helium and neon resides in CO{sub 2}-rich fluid inclusions trapped in <30 km depth. This component was most probably derived from the nephelinitic SLC host magma and confirms the dominance of MORB type noble gases in the late post-erosional magmatic stages of Hawaiian volcanism, as suggested previsouly (Kurz et al., 1983; Valbracht et al., 1996). A second previously detected (Rocholl et al., 1996) low {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar ({proportional_to}5000) component turned out to be associated with two different reservoirs. The larger reservoir is most probably related to garnet, the other one is associated with low retentive sites containing few K and Cl and could not yet be adequately identified. The low {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar ({proportional_to}5000) component hosted by garnet can be interpreted as a mixture of MORB and plume type noble gas components with specific {sup 4}He/{sup 40}Ar ratios. The results demonstrate the complexity of the microdistribution of noble gases in ultramafic nodules and allow insight into plume induced metasomatism of the Hawaiian lithosphere. (orig.)

  20. Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

    1993-11-01

    Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

  1. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Lake Cadagno (26 ha) is a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the Swiss Alps at 1921 m asl with a maximum depth of 21 m. The presence of crystalline rocks and a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the catchment area makes the lake a typical “sulphuretum ” dominated by coupled carbon and sulphur...... cycles. The chemocline lies at about 12 m depth, stabilized by density differences of salt-rich water supplied by sub-aquatic springs to the monimolimnion and of electrolyte-poor surface water feeding the mixolimnion. Steep sulphide and light gradients in the chemocline support the growth of a large...... in the chemocline. Small-celled PSB together with the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes sp. form stable aggregates in the lake, which represent small microenvironments with an internal sulphur cycle. Eukaryotic primary producers in the anoxic zones are dominated by Cryptomonas phaseolus...

  2. Halls Lake 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salt marsh habitats along the shoreline of Halls Lake are threatened by wave erosion, but the reconstruction of barrier islands to reduce this erosion will modify or...

  3. Reclassification of Bacillus saliphilus as Alkalicoccus saliphilus gen. nov., comb. nov., and description of Alkalicoccus halolimnae sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baisuo; Lu, Weidong; Zhang, Shanshan; Liu, Kang; Yan, Yanchun; Li, Jun

    2017-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, cocci-shaped, non-spore-forming and moderately halophilic bacterium, designed BZ-SZ-XJ29T, was isolated from a salt lake of China. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relatives were Bacillus saliphilus 6AGT (97.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and five other species of the genus Bacillus(95.4-96.3 %). However, strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T shared only 89.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis DSM 10T, indicating that this isolate might not be a member of the genus Bacillus. The genomic DNA G+C content was 40.0 mol% (Tm). The DNA-DNA relatedness value with B. saliphilus 6AGT was 45±2 %. Strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T formed yellow pigment and grew in the presence of 0.74-4.15 M Na+ [optimum 1.42-2.10 M Na+], at pH 6.0-10.5 (optimum pH 7.5), and at 5-41 °C (optimum 33 °C). The predominant (>10 %) fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The dominant polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol and the respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). The peptidoglycan type of the cell wall was A1γ, based on meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. On the basis of the combined phylogenetic data, phenotypic features and chemotaxonomic properties, it is proposed that B. saliphilus and strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T should be assigned to a single novel genus as two separate species. Bacillus. saliphilus is reclassified in a new genus, Alkalicoccus gen. nov., as Alkalicoccus saliphilus comb. nov., and is the type species of the new genus; the type strain of the type species is 6AGT (=DSM 15402T=ATCC BAA-957T). Strain BZ-SZ-XJ29T (=DSM 29191T=JCM 30193T=CGMCC 1.12936T) is placed in the genus Alkalicoccus as a novel species, Alkalicoccus halolimnae sp. nov.

  4. Radiocarbon-insights into temporal variations in the sources and concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the Los Angeles and Salt Lake City Metropolitan Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czimczik, Claudia; Mouteva, Gergana; Simon, Fahrni; Guaciara, Santos; James, Randerson

    2014-05-01

    Increased fossil fuel consumption and biomass burning are contributing to significantly larger emissions of black carbon (BC) aerosols to the atmosphere. Together with organic carbon (OC), BC is a major constituent of fine particulate matter in urban air, contributes to haze and has been linked to a broad array of adverse health effects. Black carbon's high light absorption capacity and role in key (in-)direct climate feedbacks also lead to a range of impacts in the Earth system (e.g. warming, accelerated snow melt, changes in cloud formation). Recent work suggests that regulating BC emissions can play an important role in improving regional air quality and reducing future climate warming. However, BC's atmospheric transport pathways, lifetime and magnitudes of emissions by sector and region, particularly emissions from large urban centers, remain poorly constrained by measurements. Contributions of fossil and modern sources to the carbonaceous aerosol pool (corresponding mainly to traffic/industrial and biomass-burning/biogenic sources, respectively) can be quantified unambiguously by measuring the aerosol radiocarbon (14C) content. However, accurate 14C-based source apportionment requires the physical isolation of BC and OC, and minimal sample contamination with extraneous carbon or from OC charring. Compound class-specific 14C analysis of BC remains challenging due to very small sample sizes (5-15 ug C). Therefore, most studies to date have only analyzed the 14C content of the total organic carbonaceous aerosol fraction. Here, we present time-series 14C data of BC and OC from the Los Angeles (LA) metropolitan area in California - one of two megacities in the United States - and from Salt Lake City (SLC), UT. In the LA area, we analyzed 48h-PM10 samples near the LA port throughout 2007 and 2008 (with the exception of summer). We also collected monthly-PM2.5 samples at the University of California - Irvine, with shorter sampling periods during regional wildfire

  5. Volcano crisis response at Yellowstone volcanic complex - after-action report for exercise held at Salt Lake City, Utah, November 15, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    A functional tabletop exercise was run on November 14-15, 2011 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to test crisis response capabilities, communication protocols, and decision-making by the staff of the multi-agency Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) as they reacted to a hypothetical exercise scenario of accelerating volcanic unrest at the Yellowstone caldera. The exercise simulated a rapid build-up of seismic activity, ground deformation, and hot-spring water-chemistry and temperature anomalies that culminated in a small- to moderate-size phreatomagmatic eruption within Yellowstone National Park. The YVO scientific team's responses to the unfolding events in the scenario and to simulated requests for information by stakeholders and the media were assessed by (a) the exercise organizers; (b) several non-YVO scientists, who observed and queried participants, and took notes throughout the exercise; and (c) the participants themselves, who kept logs of their actions during the exercise and later participated in a group debriefing session and filled out detailed questionnaires. These evaluations were tabulated, interpreted, and summarized for this report, and on the basis of this information, recommendations have been made. Overall, the YVO teams performed their jobs very well. The exercise revealed that YVO scientists were able to successfully provide critical hazards information, issue information statements, and appropriately raise alert levels during a fast-moving crisis. Based on the exercise, it is recommended that several measures be taken to increase YVO effectiveness during a crisis: 1. Improve role clarification within and between YVO science teams. 2. Improve communications tools and protocols for data-sharing and consensus-building among YVO scientists, who are geographically and administratively dispersed among various institutions across the United States. 3. Familiarize YVO staff with Incident Command System (ICS) procedures and protocols, and provide more in

  6. Salinibacter iranicus sp. nov. and Salinibacter luteus sp. nov., isolated from a salt lake, and emended descriptions of the genus Salinibacter and of Salinibacter ruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Two Gram-staining-negative, red- and orange-pigmented, non-motile, rod-shaped, extremely halophilic bacteria, designated strains CB7(T) and DGO(T), were isolated from Aran-Bidgol salt lake, Iran. Growth occurred at NaCl concentrations of between 2 and 5 M NaCl and the isolates grew optimally with 3 M NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the two strains were pH 7.5 and 37 °C, and they were able to grow over pH and temperature ranges of pH 6-8 and 25-50 °C. The predominant fatty acids of the two isolates were C(18:1)ω7c, iso-C(15:0) and summed feature 3 (C(16:1)ω7c and/or iso-C(15:0) 2-OH). The polar lipid pattern of the two isolates consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, three unidentified lipids, one unidentified aminolipid and three unidentified glycolipids. The only quinone present was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of strains CB7(T) and DGO(T) were 64.8 and 65.6 mol%, respectively. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strains CB7(T) and DGO(T) were related to Salinibacter ruber in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strains CB7(T) and DGO(T) and Salinibacter ruber DSM 13855(T) were 93.2 and 93.6%, respectively. The two novel strains shared 98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between strains CB7(T) and DGO(T) and Salinibacter ruber DSM 13855(T) indicated levels of relatedness of 44 and 52%, respectively, while the level of relatedness between the two new isolates was 53%. Chemotaxonomic data supported the placement of strains CB7(T) and DGO(T) in the genus Salinibacter. DNA-DNA hybridization studies and biochemical and physiological characterization allowed strains CB7(T) and DGO(T) to be differentiated from Salinibacter ruber and from each other. They are therefore considered to represent two novel species of the genus Salinibacter, for which the names Salinibacter iranicus sp. nov. (type strain CB7(T

  7. Microbial diversity in the hypersaline Lake Meyghan, Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naghoni, A.; Emtiazi, G.; Amoozegar, M.A.; Cretoiu, M.S.; Stal, L.J.; Etemadifar, Z.; Shahzadeh Fazeli, S.A.; Bolhuis, H.

    2017-01-01

    Lake Meyghan is one of the largest and commercially most important salt lakes in Iran. Despite its inland location and high altitude, Lake Meyghan has a thalassohaline salt composition suggesting a marine origin. Inputs of fresh water by rivers and rainfall formed various basins characterized by

  8. Bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) from the soil, sea, and salt lakes enlighten molecular mechanisms of electrical signaling and pharmacology in the brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandeh, Jian; Minor, Daniel L

    2015-01-16

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) provide the initial electrical signal that drives action potential generation in many excitable cells of the brain, heart, and nervous system. For more than 60years, functional studies of Na(V)s have occupied a central place in physiological and biophysical investigation of the molecular basis of excitability. Recently, structural studies of members of a large family of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (BacNa(V)s) prevalent in soil, marine, and salt lake environments that bear many of the core features of eukaryotic Na(V)s have reframed ideas for voltage-gated channel function, ion selectivity, and pharmacology. Here, we analyze the recent advances, unanswered questions, and potential of BacNa(V)s as templates for drug development efforts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. INNER SALTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a...Products that have been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a mesomeric inner salt . (Author)...Novel phosphonium and phosphorane compounds ere prepared by a variety of m hods from triphenylphosphine and methylene bromide. Products that have

  10. Influence of salts and pH on growth and activity of a novel facultatively alkaliphilic, extremely salt-tolerant, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sufur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacterium Thioalkalibacter halophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. from South-Western Siberian soda lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banciu, Horia L; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatyana P; Galinski, Erwin A; Muntyan, Maria S; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2008-05-01

    A chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) strain ALCO 1 capable of growing at both near-neutral and extremely alkaline pH was isolated from hypersaline soda lakes in S-W Siberia (Altai, Russia). Strain ALCO 1 represents a novel separate branch within the halothiobacilli in the Gammaproteobacteria, which, so far, contained only neutro-halophilic SOB. On the basis of its unique phenotypic properties and distant phylogeny, strain ALCO 1 is proposed as a new genus and species Thioalkalibacter halophilus gen. nov. sp. nov. ALCO 1 was able to grow within a broad range of salinity (0.5-3.5 M of total sodium) with an optimum at around 1 M Na+, and pH (7.2-10.2, pHopt at around 8.5). Na+ was required for sulfur-dependent respiration in ALCO 1. The neutral (NaCl)-grown chemostat culture had a much lower maximum growth rate (micromax), respiratory activity and total cytochrome c content than its alkaline-grown counterpart. The specific concentration of osmolytes (ectoine and glycine-betaine) produced at neutral pH and 3 M NaCl was roughly two times higher than at pH 10 in soda. Altogether, strain ALCO 1 represents an interesting chemolithoautotrophic model organism for comparative investigations of bacterial adaptations to high salinity and pH.

  11. Salt budget for West Pond, Utah, April 1987 to June 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, S.R.; Waddell, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    During operation of the West Desert pumping project, April 10. 1987, to June 30, 1989, data were collected as part of a monitoring program to evaluate the effects of pumping brine from Great Salt Lake into West Pond in northern Utah. The removal of brine from Great Sail was part of an effort to lower the level of Great Salt Lake when the water level was at a high in 1986. These data were used to prepare a salt budget that indicates about 695 million tons of salt or about 14.2 percent of salt contained in Great Salt Lake was pumped into West Pond. Of the 695 million tons of salt pumped into West Pond, 315 million tons (45 percent) were dissolved in West Pond, 71 million tons (10.2 percent) formed a salt crust at the bottom of the pond, 10 million tons (1.4 percent) infiltrated the subsurface areas inundated by storage in the pond, 88 million tons (12.7 percent) were withdrawn by American Magnesium Corporation, and 123 million tons (17.7 percent) discharged from the pond through the Newfoundland weir. About 88 million tons (13 percent) of the salt pumped from the lake could not be accounted for in the salt budget. About 94 million tons of salt (1.9 percent of the total salt in Great Salt Lake) flowed back to Great Salt Lake.

  12. Coupling between Chemical and Meteorological Processes under Persistent Cold-Air Pool Conditions: Evolution of Wintertime PM2.5 Pollution Events and N2O5 Observations in Utah's Salt Lake Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Hoch, Sebastian W; Bares, Ryan; Lin, John C; Brown, Steven S; Millet, Dylan B; Martin, Randal; Kelly, Kerry; Zarzana, Kyle J; Whiteman, C David; Dube, William P; Tonnesen, Gail; Jaramillo, Isabel Cristina; Sohl, John

    2017-06-06

    The Salt Lake Valley experiences severe fine particulate matter pollution episodes in winter during persistent cold-air pools (PCAPs). We employ measurements throughout an entire winter from different elevations to examine the chemical and dynamical processes driving these episodes. Whereas primary pollutants such as NOx and CO were enhanced twofold during PCAPs, O3 concentrations were approximately threefold lower. Atmospheric composition varies strongly with altitude within a PCAP at night with lower NOx and higher oxidants (O3) and oxidized reactive nitrogen (N2O5) aloft. We present observations of N2O5 during PCAPs that provide evidence for its role in cold-pool nitrate formation. Our observations suggest that nighttime and early morning chemistry in the upper levels of a PCAP plays an important role in aerosol nitrate formation. Subsequent daytime mixing enhances surface PM2.5 by dispersing the aerosol throughout the PCAP. As pollutants accumulate and deplete oxidants, nitrate chemistry becomes less active during the later stages of the pollution episodes. This leads to distinct stages of PM2.5 pollution episodes, starting with a period of PM2.5 buildup and followed by a period with plateauing concentrations. We discuss the implications of these findings for mitigation strategies.

  13. [Diversity of diazotrophs in the sediments of hypersaline salt and soda lakes analyzed with the use of the nifH gene as a molecular marker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turova, T P; Slobodova, N V; Bumazhkin, B K; Sukhacheva, M V; Sorokin, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the nifH genes, encoding the Fe protein of the nitrogenas enzymatic complex, was carried out for pure cultures of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria of diverse origin, as well as for heterotrophic alkaliphilic sulfate reducers isolated from saline and soda lakes. Topology of the nitrogenase tree correlated with that of the 16S rRNAgene tree to a considerable degree; which niade it possible to use the nifH gene as a molecular marker for investigation of diazotrophic bacterialcommunities in silty sediments of saline and sodalakes. Although diazotrophs were revealed in all environmentalsamples, their phylogenetic diversity was relatively low. Sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria and photo- and chemotrophicgammaproteobacteria were predominant in samples integrated over sediment thickness. Analysis of samples fromthe upper sediment layers revealed predominance of phototrophic diazotrophs of various phyla, including purple sulfur and nonsulfur proteobacteria, green nonsulfur bacteria, heliobacteria; and cyanobacteria. Some phylotypes could not be identified, probably indicating the presence of bacterial groups which have not yet been studied by conventional microbiological techniques.

  14. 3D ground‐motion simulations of Mw 7 earthquakes on the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault zone: Variability of long‐period (T≥1  s) ground motions and sensitivity to kinematic rupture parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hartzell, Stephen; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Frankel, Arthur; Angster, Stephen J.; Stephenson, William J.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the variability of long‐period (T≥1  s) earthquake ground motions from 3D simulations of Mw 7 earthquakes on the Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault zone, Utah, from a set of 96 rupture models with varying slip distributions, rupture speeds, slip velocities, and hypocenter locations. Earthquake ruptures were prescribed on a 3D fault representation that satisfies geologic constraints and maintained distinct strands for the Warm Springs and for the East Bench and Cottonwood faults. Response spectral accelerations (SA; 1.5–10 s; 5% damping) were measured, and average distance scaling was well fit by a simple functional form that depends on the near‐source intensity level SA0(T) and a corner distance Rc:SA(R,T)=SA0(T)(1+(R/Rc))−1. Period‐dependent hanging‐wall effects manifested and increased the ground motions by factors of about 2–3, though the effects appeared partially attributable to differences in shallow site response for sites on the hanging wall and footwall of the fault. Comparisons with modern ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs) found that the simulated ground motions were generally consistent, except within deep sedimentary basins, where simulated ground motions were greatly underpredicted. Ground‐motion variability exhibited strong lateral variations and, at some sites, exceeded the ground‐motion variability indicated by GMPEs. The effects on the ground motions of changing the values of the five kinematic rupture parameters can largely be explained by three predominant factors: distance to high‐slip subevents, dynamic stress drop, and changes in the contributions from directivity. These results emphasize the need for further characterization of the underlying distributions and covariances of the kinematic rupture parameters used in 3D ground‐motion simulations employed in probabilistic seismic‐hazard analyses.

  15. Waterbirds of alkaline lakes in Western Uganda | Pomeroy | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uganda's only alkaline lakes are found in the Queen Elizabeth Conservation Area and the adjoining Kyambura Wildlife Reserve. ... The lakes are important scenically, for ecotourism, and for the conservation of waterbirds and plants; whilst Lake Katwe's traditional production of salt is of considerable economic significance.

  16. New explorations along the northern shores of Lake Bonneville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Miller, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    This field trip begins in Salt Lake City and makes a clockwise circuit of Great Salt Lake, with primary objectives to observe stratigraphie and geomorphic records of Lake Bonneville. Stops include Stansbury Island, Puddle Valley, gravel pits at Lakeside and the south end of the Hogup Mountains, several stops in Curlew Valley and Hansel Valley, and a final stop at the north end of Great Salt Lake east of the Promontory Mountains. Stratigraphie observations at gravel-pit and natural exposures will be linked to interpretations of lake-level change, which were caused by climate change. Evidence of paleoseismic and volcanic activity will be discussed at several sites, and will be tied to the lacustrine stratigraphic record. The trip provides an overview of the history of Lake Bonneville and introduces participants to some new localities with excellent examples of Lake Bonneville landforms and stratigraphy.

  17. Salamander colonization of Chase Lake, Stutsman County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; McLean, Kyle I.; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Salt concentrations in lakes are dynamic. In the western United States, water diversions have caused significant declines in lake levels resulting in increased salinity, placing many aquatic species at risk (Galat and Robinson 1983, Beutel et al. 2001). Severe droughts can have similar effects on salt concentrations and aquatic communities (Swanson et al. 2003). Conversely, large inputs of water can dilute salt concentrations and contribute to community shifts (Euliss et al. 2004).

  18. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  19. Lake Afdera: a threatened saline lake in Ethiopia | Getahun | SINET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... for salt extraction. This paper gives some insight on the most probable dangers on the ecology of the lake if such activity is allowed to take place before environmental impact assessment was conducted. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science Vol. 24, No. 1 (June 2001), pp. 127-131. Key words/phrases: Afdera, conservation ...

  20. Water Chemistry in the Confluence Zone Downstream a Limestone Treated Lake and an Acid Tributary: Principal Component Analyses Including Warm and Cold Winters and an Episode High in Sea-Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Dag Olav; Christy, Alfred A.

    2010-01-01

    Published version of an article from the journal:International Journal of Arts and Sciences. Also available from the publisher: http://www.openaccesslibrary.org/images/XEW244_Alfred_A._Christy_II_.pdf. Open Access Extensive limestone treatment of lakes and watercourses has been carried out especially in Norway and Sweden to counteract effects of acidification. Lakes have been the most commonly treated part of the water systems. However, treatment of lakes upstream acid tributaries may intr...

  1. Great Salt Lake Minerals Source Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Salt Lake Cityst Torinoni / Olev Remsu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Remsu, Olev, 1947-

    2006-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm Eesti suusameeskonna valmistumisest Torino olümpiamängudeks "Tiim" : idee autorid Peep Puks, Hans Roosipuu : režissöör Peep Puks : F-Seitse 2006. Esilinastus toimus 26. mail Otepääl, ETVs 31. mail

  3. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Lake Cadagno (26 ha) is a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the Swiss Alps at 1921 m asl with a maximum depth of 21 m. The presence of crystalline rocks and a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the catchment area makes the lake a typical “sulphuretum ” dominated by coupled carbon and sulphur cyc...

  4. LIMNOLOGY, LAKE BASINS, LAKE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre GÂŞTESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Limnology is a border discipline between geography, hydrology and biology, and is also closely connected with other sciences, from it borrows research methods. Physical limnology (the geography of lakes, studies lake biotopes, and biological limnology (the biology of lakes, studies lake biocoenoses. The father of limnology is the Swiss scientist F.A. Forel, the author of a three-volume entitled Le Leman: monographie limnologique (1892-1904, which focuses on the geology physics, chemistry and biology of lakes. He was also author of the first textbook of limnology, Handbuch der Seenkunde: allgemeine Limnologie,(1901. Since both the lake biotope and its biohydrocoenosis make up a single whole, the lake and lakes, respectively, represent the most typical systems in nature. They could be called limnosystems (lacustrine ecosystems, a microcosm in itself, as the American biologist St.A. Forbes put it (1887.

  5. Decline of the world's saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.; Miller, Craig; Null, Sarah E.; Derose, R. Justin; Wilcock, Peter; Hahnenberger, Maura; Howe, Frank; Moore, Johnnie

    2017-11-01

    Many of the world's saline lakes are shrinking at alarming rates, reducing waterbird habitat and economic benefits while threatening human health. Saline lakes are long-term basin-wide integrators of climatic conditions that shrink and grow with natural climatic variation. In contrast, water withdrawals for human use exert a sustained reduction in lake inflows and levels. Quantifying the relative contributions of natural variability and human impacts to lake inflows is needed to preserve these lakes. With a credible water balance, causes of lake decline from water diversions or climate variability can be identified and the inflow needed to maintain lake health can be defined. Without a water balance, natural variability can be an excuse for inaction. Here we describe the decline of several of the world's large saline lakes and use a water balance for Great Salt Lake (USA) to demonstrate that consumptive water use rather than long-term climate change has greatly reduced its size. The inflow needed to maintain bird habitat, support lake-related industries and prevent dust storms that threaten human health and agriculture can be identified and provides the information to evaluate the difficult tradeoffs between direct benefits of consumptive water use and ecosystem services provided by saline lakes.

  6. Determination of hydrologic properties needed to calculate average linear velocity and travel time of ground water in the principal aquifer underlying the southeastern part of Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freethey, G.W.; Spangler, L.E.; Monheiser, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    A 48-square-mile area in the southeastern part of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, was studied to determine if generalized information obtained from geologic maps, water-level maps, and drillers' logs could be used to estimate hydraulic conduc- tivity, porosity, and slope of the potentiometric surface: the three properties needed to calculate average linear velocity of ground water. Estimated values of these properties could be used by water- management and regulatory agencies to compute values of average linear velocity, which could be further used to estimate travel time of ground water along selected flow lines, and thus to determine wellhead protection areas around public- supply wells. The methods used to estimate the three properties are based on assumptions about the drillers' descriptions, the depositional history of the sediments, and the boundary con- ditions of the hydrologic system. These assump- tions were based on geologic and hydrologic infor- mation determined from previous investigations. The reliability of the estimated values for hydro- logic properties and average linear velocity depends on the accuracy of these assumptions. Hydraulic conductivity of the principal aquifer was estimated by calculating the thickness- weighted average of values assigned to different drillers' descriptions of material penetrated during the construction of 98 wells. Using these 98 control points, the study area was divided into zones representing approximate hydraulic- conductivity values of 20, 60, 100, 140, 180, 220, and 250 feet per day. This range of values is about the same range of values used in developing a ground-water flow model of the principal aquifer in the early 1980s. Porosity of the principal aquifer was estimated by compiling the range of porosity values determined or estimated during previous investigations of basin-fill sediments, and then using five different values ranging from 15 to 35 percent to delineate zones in the study area that were assumed to

  7. Technologies for lake restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut KLAPPER

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are suffering from different stress factors and need to be restored using different approaches. The eutrophication remains as the main water quality management problem for inland waters: both lakes and reservoirs. The way to curb the degradation is to stop the nutrient sources and to accelerate the restoration with help of in-lake technologies. Especially lakes with a long retention time need (eco- technological help to decrease the nutrient content in the free water. The microbial and other organic matter from sewage and other autochthonous biomasses, causes oxygen depletion, which has many adverse effects. In less developed countries big reservoirs function as sewage treatment plants. Natural aeration solves problems only partly and many pollutants tend to accumulate in the sediments. The acidification by acid rain and by pyrite oxidation has to be controlled by acid neutralizing technologies. Addition of alkaline chemicals is useful only for soft waters, and technologies for (microbial alkalinization of very acidic hardwater mining lakes are in development. The corrective measures differ from those in use for eutrophication control. The salinization and water shortage mostly occurs if more water is used than available. L. Aral, L. Tschad, the Dead Sea or L. Nasser belong to waters with most severe environmental problems on a global scale. Their hydrologic regime needs to be evaluated. The inflow of salt water at the bottom of some mining lakes adds to stability of stratification, and thus accumulation of hydrogen sulphide in the monimolimnion of the meromictic lakes. Destratification, which is the most used technology, is only restricted applicable because of the dangerous concentrations of the byproducts of biological degradation. The contamination of lakes with hazardous substances from industry and agriculture require different restoration technologies, including subhydric isolation and storage, addition of nutrients for better self

  8. Makgadikgadi Salt Pan, Botswana, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Makgadikgadi Salt Pan of Botswana, an ancient lake bed, (19.0S, 26.0E) is one of the largest features in Botswana visible from orbit. Any water that spills out of the Okavango Swamplands flows into the Makagadikgadi where it evaporates. An ancient beach line can be seen as a smooth line around the west side of the pan and to the south, the Orapa diamond mine is seen as a small rectangle. Far to the east, can be seen the Great Dike of Zimbabwe.

  9. Isolation and identification of phenol degrading bacteria from Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to isolate and identify phenol degrading bacteria from Lake Parishan and to assay their kinetic growth. Sixty samples of water and sedimentation of different area of Lake Parishan were collected. In order to isolate phenol degrading bacteria, samples were cultured on salt base phenol broth media.

  10. Past, present and future of saline lakes: research for global sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, Nickolai; Zheng, Mianping; Oren, Aharon

    2015-11-01

    The 12th International Conference on Salt Lake Research was held in Langfang City, China from July 14 to 18, 2014. Fifteen manuscripts of presentations have been retained for publication in this special issue. They are very diverse, covering the biology, physics, chemistry and geology of salt lakes, the history of hydrological research on the Dead Sea, the effects of socioeconomic and environmental policies by stakeholders on human populations, and the increasing salinization of freshwater lakes around the world.

  11. Update of “Biodiversity of the Hypersaline Urmia Lake National Park (NW Iran”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Asem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Urmia Lake, an endorheic salt lake in northwestern Iran, was registered in the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands as a wetland of international importance, also a UNESCO biosphere reserve. In this review, we have updated our last checklist in 2014 with available information on the biodiversity of the lake.

  12. Playa Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the spatial distribution of soil units associated with playa lakes. Specific soil types have been designated by the...

  13. White Lake AOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  14. Salt on roads and the environment (VB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessberg, Philipp von; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2000-01-01

    This report descripes the extent of use of salt on roads in Denmark and the environmental consequences of this. Alternative strategies for reducing the risk of greasy roads and different ways of alleviating the vegetation are also discussed.The different consequences for the environment that this...... that this report discusses are:- The ground water.- Lakes and streams.- Plants and trees along roads.The consequences for the economy through usage of salt on roads has not been carried out.......This report descripes the extent of use of salt on roads in Denmark and the environmental consequences of this. Alternative strategies for reducing the risk of greasy roads and different ways of alleviating the vegetation are also discussed.The different consequences for the environment...

  15. Kobs (Kobus kob Erxleber, 1777) activities at salt-lick spots in Kainji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kobs (Kobus kob Erxleber, 1777) activities at salt-lick spots in Kainji Lake National Park, Nigeria. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... Activities (foraging, ruminating, resting, salt-licking, walking, playing, agonistic, mating, vigilant and standing) of kobs (Kobus kob Erxleber, 1777) visiting two different sizes ...

  16. Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  17. Salt stress induced changes in germination, lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seeds of four lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) genotypes viz., Great Lakes (GL), Paris Island cos, Kagraner Sommer (KS) and Isadora were assessed for their response to salt at the germination and seedling stages. The germination rate of the four varieties was comparatively studied under 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mM sodium ...

  18. The behaviour of salt and salt caverns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Salts are mined for both storage and extraction purposes, either via dry or solution mining techniques. For operational, environmental and geological purposes, it is important to understand and predict the in situ behaviour of salt, in particular the creep and strength characteristics. A

  19. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivit...

  20. Low-salt diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-sodium diet; Salt restriction ... control many functions. Too much sodium in your diet can be bad for you. For most people, ... you limit salt. Try to eat a balanced diet. Buy fresh vegetables and fruits whenever possible. They ...

  1. Cryptanalysis of the LAKE Hash Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biryukov, Alex; Gauravaram, Praveen; Guo, Jian

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the security of the cryptographic hash function LAKE-256 proposed at FSE 2008 by Aumasson, Meier and Phan. By exploiting non-injectivity of some of the building primitives of LAKE, we show three different collision and near-collision attacks on the compression function. The first attack...... uses differences in the chaining values and the block counter and finds collisions with complexity 233. The second attack utilizes differences in the chaining values and salt and yields collisions with complexity 242. The final attack uses differences only in the chaining values to yield near...

  2. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  3. Bathymetry of Lake Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Michigan has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  4. Bathymetry of Lake Huron

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  5. Bathymetry of Lake Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Ontario has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  6. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and...

  7. Bathymetry of Lake Superior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Superior has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  8. 21 CFR 82.51 - Lakes (FD&C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lakes (FD&C). 82.51 Section 82.51 Food and Drugs... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics § 82.51 Lakes (FD&C). (a)(1) General... extending the aluminum salt prepared from FD&C Blue No. 1 upon the substratum would be FD&C Blue No. 1...

  9. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  10. Longevity and effectiveness of aluminum addition to reduce sediment phosphorus release and restore lake water quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huser, Brian J; Egemose, Sara; Harper, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    114 lakes treated with aluminum (Al) salts to reduce internal phosphorus (P) loading were analyzed to identify factors driving longevity of post-treatment water quality improvements. Lakes varied greatly in morphology, applied Al dose, and other factors that may have affected overall treatment ef...

  11. Bacterial growth tolerance to concentrations of chlorate and perchlorate salts relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Soudi, Amer F.; Farhat, Omar; Chen, Fei; Clark, Benton C.; Schneegurt, Mark A.

    2017-07-01

    The Phoenix lander at Mars polar cap found appreciable levels of (per)chlorate salts, a mixture of perchlorate and chlorate salts of Ca, Fe, Mg and Na at levels of ~0.6% in regolith. These salts are highly hygroscopic and can form saturated brines through deliquescence, likely producing aqueous solutions with very low freezing points on Mars. To support planetary protection efforts, we have measured bacterial growth tolerance to (per)chlorate salts. Existing bacterial isolates from the Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma (NaCl-rich) and Hot Lake in Washington (MgSO4-rich) were tested in high concentrations of Mg, K and Na salts of chlorate and perchlorate. Strong growth was observed with nearly all of these salinotolerant isolates at 1% (~0.1 M) (per)chlorate salts, similar to concentrations observed in bulk soils on Mars. Growth in perchlorate salts was observed at concentrations of at least 10% (~1.0 M). Greater tolerance was observed for chlorate salts, where growth was observed to 2.75 M (>25%). Tolerance to K salts was greatest, followed by Mg salts and then Na salts. Tolerances varied among isolates, even among those within the same phylogenetic clade. Tolerant bacteria included genera that also are found in spacecraft assembly facilities. Substantial microbial tolerance to (per)chlorate salts is a concern for planetary protection since tolerant microbes contaminating spacecraft would have a greater chance for survival and proliferation, despite the harsh chemical conditions found near the surface of Mars.

  12. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  13. Analysis of Subfossil Molecular Remains of Purple Sulfur Bacteria in a Lake Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Overmann, Jörg

    1998-01-01

    Molecular remains of purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were detected in Holocene sediment layers of a meromictic salt lake (Mahoney Lake, British Columbia, Canada). The carotenoid okenone and bacteriophaeophytin a were present in sediments up to 11,000 years old. Okenone is specific for only a few species of Chromatiaceae, including Amoebobacter purpureus, which presently predominates in the chemocline bacterial community of the lake. With a primer set specific for Chromatiaceae in combi...

  14. Analysis of elements in lake sediment samples by PIXE spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelarescu, E. D.; Radulescu, C.; Stihi, C.; Bretcan, P.; Tanislav, D.; Dulama, I. D.; Stirbescu, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Bucurica, I. A.; Andrei, R.; Morarescu, C.

    2017-09-01

    This work aims to determine the concentrations of several elements (e.g. Pb, Ni, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe) from lake sediments, in order to characterize their origin and evolution. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique using the 3 MV Tandetron™ particle accelerator from National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering ;Horia Hulubei; (IFIN-HH), Magurele-Bucharest, Romania, was applied. Sediment cores from different salt lakes from Romania (i.e. Amara Lake, Caineni Lake, and Movila Miresii Lake) were collected, in August 2015. The content of Pb, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni from sediment samples show similarities with other data presented in literature and international regulation. The Zn was the only element with a higher content in all samples (e.g. maximum 401.7-517.3 mg/kg d.w.).

  15. A multi-temporal analysis for change assessment and estimation of algal bloom in Sambhar Lake, Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Pinto, Shannon M; Kushwaha, Vikash K; Pal, Sukdeb; Nandy, Tapas

    2016-09-01

    Sambhar Lake in Rajasthan, India is the major inland salt water lake producing salt for centuries. The present study addresses the monitoring changes in and around the lake and its consequent effect on the lake water ecology. For this, satellite images of the years 1976, 1981, 1997, and 2013 are analyzed for land use land cover classes. Significant reduction in the water body is observed in contrast with the increase in salt pan around the periphery of lake and wetland classes. Further, the extent of water body and algae in the lake are delineated as per normalized difference water index and normalized difference vegetation index. Rainfall data do not indicate any major change in the pattern, but drastic decrease in the extent of water body and significant increase in algal bloom are serious concerns for the lake's existence. This may be due to surrounding anthropogenic activities and construction of check dams and anicuts in the lake catchment which curtail the runoff into the lake and provide favorable growth of algae. Sambhar Lake, being declared as a wetland according to the Ramsar Convention, is necessary to protect and conserve the ecological importance of the lake through sustainable planning and management.

  16. [Ecosystem services valuation of Qinghai Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Lu; Ouyang, Zhi-yun

    2015-10-01

    Qinghai Lake is the largest inland and salt water lake in China, and provides important ecosystem services to beneficiaries. Economic valuation of wetland ecosystem services from Qinghai Lake can reveal the direct contribution of lake ecosystems to beneficiaries using economic data, which can advance the incorporation of wetland protection of Qinghai Lake into economic tradeoffs and decision analyses. In this paper, we established a final ecosystem services valuation system based on the underlying ecological mechanisms and regional socio-economic conditions. We then evaluated the eco-economic value provided by the wetlands at Qinghai Lake to beneficiaries in 2012 using the market value method, replacement cost method, zonal travel cost method, and contingent valuation method. According to the valuation result, the total economic values of the final ecosystem services provided by the wetlands at Qinghai Lake were estimated to be 6749.08 x 10(8) yuan RMB in 2012, among which the value of water storage service and climate regulation service were 4797.57 x 10(8) and 1929.34 x 10(8) yuan RMB, accounting for 71.1% and 28.6% of the total value, respectively. The economic value of the 8 final ecosystem services was ranked from greatest to lowest as: water storage service > climate regulation service > recreation and tourism service > non-use value > oxygen release service > raw material production service > carbon sequestration service > food production service. The evaluation result of this paper reflects the substantial value that the wetlands of Qinghai Lake provide to beneficiaries using monetary values, which has the potential to help increase wetland protection awareness among the public and decision-makers, and inform managers about ways to create ecological compensation incentives. The final ecosystem service evaluation system presented in this paper will offer guidance on separating intermediate services and final services, and establishing monitoring programs for

  17. Trace Elements concentration and distribution across the Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndunguru, G. G.; Goni, I. B.; Mulugeta, V.; Grindley, J.; Banks, M. L.; Lee, J.; Adegoke, J. O.

    2009-12-01

    The Lake Chad, which is the largest Lake in West Africa, is situated between the latitude 12 ½ and 14 ½ north and longitude 130 east of the Southern fringe of the Sahara Desert. About 25 % of the Lake Chad lies within Nigeria, while the Republic of Cameroon, Chad and Niger share the rest of it. Lake Chad is completely landlocked and has no outlets; therefore loss of water is mainly through high rates of evaporation unlike similar Lakes in other parts of the World. The Lake Chad waters are fresh and of good quality with very low salt content which makes it suitable for irrigated agriculture. This study was carried out from upper stream to lower stream leading from Kano to the Damaturu region which is one of several water bodies that supply Lake Chad. Soil samples were collected from over seventy five sites and analyzed for ten Trace Elements(Be, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn,Fe, Mo, Pb, Zn, and Cr) using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP)-OES. Assessment and Monitoring of Trace Elements concentrations are vital because they impact environment and can affect the human healthy. Since little is known about the Trace Elements status in Lake Chad Basin. The result in this study provides baseline information on the distribution and concentration of Trace Elements along the Lake Chad Basin.

  18. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  19. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  20. Limnology of Eifel maar lakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scharf, Burkhard W; Björk, Sven

    1992-01-01

    ... & morphometry - Physical & chemical characteristics - Calcite precipitation & solution in Lake Laacher See - Investigations using sediment traps in Lake Gemundener Maar - Phytoplankton of Lake Weinfelder Maar...

  1. Lake salinity variations resulting from wind direction, Gobi Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. C.; Cartwright, I.; Currell, M.

    2010-12-01

    The southern reaches of the Gobi desert, central China, host a large number (~50) of shallow (water table. The resultant lakes are of particular interest, not only because they are host to a number of unique ecosystems, including several rare species, but also because they are very susceptible to environmental disturbances. Physical development of the lakes is a clear threat, but also small scale withdrawal of groundwater in proximity to the lakes can cause a drop in the water table, forcing it below the lake floor, and consequently causing many lakes to dry up. Due to their inaccessibility, many of these lakes have remained relatively untouched by development, and only those lakes closest to the eastern edge of the desert have been utilized directly for either salt harvesting or tourism. This paper reports on research from both pristine and developed lakes, and reveals a higher TDS (20-50mS/cm compared to 0.5-5mS/cm) in the northern end relative to the southern end for undisturbed lakes. Water entering the southern end of the lakes is chemically identical to the local groundwater (TDS ~0.5mS/cm). This geographic difference in lake properties is remarkable, not only in terms of chemical variation, but also in terms of plant variety and abundance. Stable isotopes show a clear evaporation trend for these lakes, increasing from the southern tip, to the northern tip of individual lakes (-3 to -1‰ in the south, compared with 2-8‰ in the north, and -6 to -3‰ in the groundwater for δ2H). TDS likewise increases with increasing isotopic fractionation. The primary wind direction fluctuates from the southeast to the east, causing the movement of water from the southern end of the lake to the northern, and aiding in the evaporation. Once at the northern end of the lake, the water’s increased density causes it to sink back into the groundwater. In this way, the prevailing wind effectively keeps the fresh and saline waters separate, even though they are part of the same

  2. Resedimented salt deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaczka, A.; Kolasa, K. (Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland))

    1988-08-01

    Carparthian foredeep's Wieliczka salt mine, unique gravity deposits were lately distinguished. They are mainly built of salt particles and blocks with a small admixture of fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks, deposited on precipitated salt. The pattern of sediment distribution is similar to a submarine fan. Gravels are dominant in the upper part and sands in lower levels, creating a series of lobes. Coarse-grained deposits are represented by disorganized, self-supported conglomerates passing into matrix-supported ones, locally with gradation, and pebbly sandstones consisting of salt grains and scattered boulder-size clasts. The latter may show in the upper part of a single bed as indistinct cross-bedding and parallel lamination. These sediments are interpreted as debris-flow and high-density turbidity current deposits. Salt sandstones (saltstones) which build a lower part of the fan often show Bouma sequences and are interpreted as turbidity-current deposits. The fan deposits are covered by a thick series of debrites (olistostromes) which consist of clay matrix with salt grains and boulders. The latter as represented by huge (up to 100,000 m{sup 3}) salt blocks, fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks. These salt debrites represent slumps and debris-flow deposits. The material for resedimented deposits was derived from the southern part of the salt basin and from the adjacent, advancing Carpathian orogen. The authors believe the distinct coarsening-upward sequence of the series is the result of progressive intensification of tectonic movements with paroxysm during the sedimentation of salt debrites (about 15 Ma).

  3. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  4. Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and...

  5. Progress report: chemical character of surface waters in the Devils Lake Basin, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Herbert A.

    1950-01-01

    Devils Lake in northeastern North Dakota was at one time the most popular summer resort in the state. With decline in lake level the lake has become a shallow body pf vary saline water, which scenic value and recreational appeal completely destroyed. Under the Missouri River development program, it is proposed to restore the lake level to an altitude of 1,425 feet by diversion of Missouri River water. The chemical character of the water in Devils Lake and in other surface bodies in Devils Lake Basin is determined from the analyses of 95 samples. The physical and chemical properties of lake bed deposits are also shown. Lake water in the basin vary considerable in both concentration and composition, ranging from fresh bicarbonate waters of 300 parts per million dissolved solids to sulfate waters of over 100,000 parts per million of soluble salts. Twenty-four samples indicates the chemical character of water in the Red River of the North and its tributaries. The probable concentration of dissolved solids in water of Devils Lake at altitude 1,425 feet has been estimated as ranging from 3,000 to 7,600 parts per million. Final concentration will largely depend upon the percentage of deposited salts reentering solution and the quality of the inflow water. The possible effects of lake effluents on downstream developments, with particular reference to sanitation and pollution problems, are also discussed in this report.

  6. THE LAKES OF THE TRANSYLVANIAN PLAIN: GENESIS, EVOLUTION AND TERRITORIAL REPARTITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor SOROCOVSCHI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the genesis of the Transylvanian Plain lakes’ basins and their evolution in time and space. Natural lakes in this area are reduced in point of their types of geneses (pseudokarst and lanslide lakes and number. Their evolution in time is quite fast, especially of the pseudokarst lakes. Among the anthropic lakes, the ponds represent the most frequent genetic type, which gives a particular aspect to the landscape of the Transylvanian Plain. They used to be much more numerous in the past than at present. Those whose dimensions are not significant, situated on the tributaries of the main rivers, have a rapid evolution. The anthropic salt lakes formed following the exploitation of salt in the western area of the country had a fast evolution and they are not numerous today

  7. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  8. Amine salts of nitroazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1993-10-26

    Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

  9. What Are Bath Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reports of people becoming psychotic (losing touch with reality) and violent. Although it is rare, there have ... in bath salts can produce: feelings of joy increased social interaction increased sex drive paranoia nervousness hallucinations ( ...

  10. Iodized Salt Use and Salt Iodine Content among Household Salts from Six Districts of Eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, S; Gelal, B; Tamang, M K; Kc, R; Singh, S; Lamsal, M; Baral, N

    2014-01-01

    Universal salt iodization is considered the best strategy for controlling iodine deficiency disorders in Nepal. This study was done to find iodized salt use among Nepalese population and the iodine content of household salts. Six districts (Siraha, Saptari, Jhapa, Udayapur, Ilam and Panchthar) were chosen randomly from 16 districts of eastern Nepal for the study. In each district, three schools (private and government) were chosen randomly for sample collection. A total of 1803 salt samples were collected from schools of those districts. For sample collection a clean air tight plastic pouch was provided to each school child and was asked to bring approximately 15 gm of their kitchen salt. The information about type of salt used; 'two child logo' iodized salt or crystal salt was obtained from each child and salt iodine content was estimated using iodometric titration. At the time of study, 85% (n=1533) of Nepalese households were found to use iodized salt whereas 15% (n=270) used crystal salt. The mean iodine content in iodized and crystal salt was 40.8±12.35 ppm and 18.43±11.49 ppm respectively. There was significant difference between iodized and crystal salts use and salt iodine content of iodized and crystal salt among different districts (p value <0.001 at confidence level of 95%). Of the total samples, only 169 samples (9.4% of samples) have iodine content<15 ppm. Most Nepalese households have access to iodized salt most salt samples have sufficient iodine content.

  11. Not salt taste perception but self-reported salt eating habit predicts actual salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hajeong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Excessive dietary salt intake is related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although dietary salt restriction is essential, it is difficult to achieve because of salt palatability. However, the association between salt perception or salt eating habit and actual salt intake remains uncertain. In this study, we recruited 74 healthy young individuals. We investigated their salt-eating habits by questionnaire and salt taste threshold through a rating scale that used serial dilution of a sodium chloride solution. Predicted 24-hr urinary salt excretions using Kawasaki's and Tanaka's equations estimated dietary salt intake. Participants' mean age was 35 yr, and 59.5% were male. Salt sense threshold did not show any relationship with actual salt intake and a salt-eating habit. However, those eating "salty" foods showed higher blood pressure (P for trend=0.048) and higher body mass index (BMI; P for trend=0.043). Moreover, a salty eating habit was a significant predictor for actual salt intake (regression coefficient [β] for Kawasaki's equation 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-2.69, P=0.048; β for Tanaka's equation 0.66, 95% CI 0.01-1.31, P=0.047). In conclusion, a self-reported salt-eating habit, not salt taste threshold predicts actual salt intake.

  12. Calcium Biomineralization in Sediment of Lake Acigol, an Hypersaline Lake in SW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik Balci, Nurgul; Menekse, Meryem; Sonmez, Seref; Gul Karaguler, Nevin

    2010-05-01

    The study of biomineralization in (hyper) saline environments is important for two reasons, 1-it can extend our knowledge about the earliest microbial life on Earth which may have been halophilic 2-because of the presence of hypersaline conditions on Mars, the analog environments in Earth may have implications for the possibility of life on Mars. We examine calcium biomineralization in Lake Acigol, a unique hypersaline lake in southwest Turkey by integrating geochemical and microbiological approaches. Lake Acigol is a perennial lake with a maximum salinity of about 200 g/L and covers an area of 55-60 km2and is one of the main salt reservoirs of Turkey. Water, sediment and core samples were taken from the lake and salty ponds around the lake during the field excursion. The water chemistry revealed relatively high Na and SO4 concentrations both in the lake (30 gr/L, 33.36 gr/L), and the ponds (100 mg/L, 123 mg/L). The mineralogical analyses of sediments showed gypsum, halite, carbonate (aragonite, huntite) precipitation in the lake and ponds. We employed culture-dependent (16s rRNA cloning method, enrichment culture), and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Aci gol. Sediment samples were used to isolate Halophilic sp. (e.g. salinicoccus roseus , Dunella sp.) under salinities that were similar to those measured in the lake water to further use in the laboratory Ca-precipitation experiments. For the precipitation experiments, liquid and solid culture media with various salinities ( 6-25 %) in addition to one similar to the lake water were prepared. In order to determine effect of Mg2+-Ca2+ molar ratio on mineralogy and the rate of precipitation, media with different Ca2+and Mg2+ concentrations were also prepared. Our preliminary results indicate that the halophilic bacteria play active role in the precipitation of Ca-minerals but the geochemical conditions are clearly influential. The results also point out that in the Lake Aci gol C, N, P, Ca

  13. Description of Salilacibacter albus gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from a dried salt lake, and reclassification of Paraglycomyces xinjiangensis Luo et al. 2015 as a later heterotypic synonym of Salininema proteolyticum Nikou et al. 2015 with emended descriptions of the genus Salininema and Salininema proteolyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Jia-Meng; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Li, Jing; Liu, Shao-Wei; Wu, Gang; Hu, Lin; Chen, Li; Huang, Da-Lin; Li, Rong-Feng; Sun, Cheng-Hang

    2016-07-01

    A novel halophilic actinomycete, designated strain J11Y309 T , was isolated from a soil sample collected from a dried salt lake in China. This isolate grew optimally at 28‒37 °C, with 3‒5 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.0‒7.5. It contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and glucose, ribose and xylose were present in the whole-cell hydrolysates. MK-10(H4) was detected as the predominant menaquinone. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. Polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, phosphoglycolipids, glycolipids, an unidentified phospholipid and additional unidentified lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 63.0 mol%. The novel strain shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Salininema proteolyticum Miq-4 T (95.80 %), Paraglycomyces xinjiangensis TRM 49201 T (95.77 %) and Haloglycomyces albus YIM 92370 T (94.84 %). Phylogenetic trees showed that it could not be clearly assigned to any known genus within the family Glycomycetaceae and formed a distinct phylogenetic line in the clade comprising members of the genera Salininema, Paraglycomyces and Haloglycomyces. Based on data from the present polyphasic taxonomic study, strain J11Y309 T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Glycomycetaceae, for which the name Salilacibacter albus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed with Salilacibacter albus sp. nov. as the type species. The type strain of Salilacibacter albus is J11Y309 T (=DSM 46875 T =CGMCC 4.7242 T =LMG 29297 T ). Reclassification of Paraglycomyces xinjiangensis Luo et al. 2015 as a later heterotypic synonym of Salininema roteolyticum Nikou et al. 2015 is also discussed in this study.

  14. National Lakes Assessment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) is a first-ever statistically-valid survey of the biological condition of lakes and reservoirs throughout the U.S. The U.S....

  15. DNR 24K Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Medium scale lake polygons derived from the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) polygons and MnDOT Basemap lake delineations. Integrated with the DNR 24K Streams...

  16. The Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Great Lakes form the largest surface freshwater system on Earth. The U.S. and Canada work together to restore and protect the environment in the Great Lakes Basin. Top issues include contaminated sediments, water quality and invasive species.

  17. Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1984-02-01

    Feb 1, 1984 ... Salisbury. COCHRANE, K.L. 1978. Seasonal fluctuations in the catches of Lim- nothrissa miodon (Boulenger) in Lake Kariba. Lake Kariba Fish. Res. Inst. Proj. Rept. 29: 1-163 (cyclostyled). DONNELLY, B.G. 1971. The fish population changes on Lake. Kariba between 1960 and 1968. Part I Cichlidae.

  18. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% Females, 16% Blacks, BMI 28.5±4.2 Kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared to high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dl, 10.8±7.3 mIU/L and 2.6±1.9) as compared to high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dl, 9.4±5.8 mIU/L and 2.1±1.4) (p salt sensitive (N=193) versus salt resistant (N=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in HOMA on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt resistant subjects (p=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in HOMA after including age, BMI, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:25185125

  19. Salt Lake City's peeti IUFRO maailmakongressi / Hardi Tullus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tullus, Hardi, 1956-

    2014-01-01

    Kongress toimus 6.-11. oktoobrini 2014. Eestit esindasid viis metsateadlast: Hardi Tullus, Tea Tullus ja Reimo Lutter maaülikoolist, Tartu Ülikooli vanemteadur Arvo Tullus ning keskkonnaagentuuri metsaseire osakonnajuhataja Kalle Karoles

  20. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  1. Salt works and their impact on soil and groundwater. The cases of Anghelohori and Kitros, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christodoulos Angelopoulos

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soil and groundwater caused to salt works occurs due to infiltration of a part of seawater from the lakes of salt works through the soil and into phreatic aquifers and from there percolating to artesian aquifers. In the same time, while salt remaining in place is washed out by rain, contaminating soil and both phreatic and artesian aquifers. In the areas of Angelohori and Kitros this contamination of soil has been detected through chemical analysis while groundwater contamination has been suggested through pressure level contours.

  2. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  3. Gas releases from salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  4. Salt-affected soils of the Barguzin Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernousenko, G. I.; Pankova, E. I.; Kalinina, N. V.; Ubugunova, V. I.; Rukhovich, D. I.; Ubugunov, V. L.; Tsyrempilov, E. G.

    2017-06-01

    Factual materials on salt-affected soils in the Barguzin Depression (Buryat Republic) are generalized. A geomorphic map of the depression has been developed. The distribution of salt-affected soils and the specificity of salinization in different geomorphic regions are characterized. These soils tend to be developed within the low lacustrine-alluvial plain of the depression, on the floodplain of the Barguzin River and its tributaries. Smaller areas of salt-affected soils are found on the river terraces. They are virtually absent on ancient sandy ridged terraces (kuituns). The genesis and chemistry of soil salinization are mainly related to the discharge of slightly saline deep water along tectonic faults and fissures. An additional source of soil salinity is represented by surface water flows. The presence of permafrost preventing the leaching of salts and the cryoarid climate favoring the migration of salts toward the soil surface during the dry spring and early summer periods and during the soil freezing in the winter contribute to the soil salinization. Slightly saline hydromorphic solonchakous soils predominate among salt-affected soils of the depression; the portion of semihydromorphic saline soils is smaller. Automorphic saline soils rarely occur in the depression. Strongly saline soils— solonchaks—are widespread within lacustrine depressions around salt lakes. Soils of the soda and sulfate salinization predominate. The content of chlorides is small; their increased amounts, as well as the presence of sulfates, are indicative of the discharge of dee ground water onto the surface. The soda type of salinization is also related to the discharge of deep stratal water with further transformation of salt solutions during freeze-thaw cycles. Under anaerobic conditions, the formation of soda is favored the processes of sulfate reduction.

  5. Limnological study of a Pantanal saline lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Medina-Júnior

    Full Text Available Limnological studies involving physical, chemical and biological aspects, with emphasis on the zooplankton community, were carried out in a saline lake of the Pantanal floodplain, in the subregion of Nhecolândia (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, during the dry and wet seasons of the local hydrological cycle. The results show that the lake is not directly affected by the flood-pulse through superficial coalescence, probably receiving groundwater instead. Most of the measured variables showed extremely high values, particularly dissolved salts, pH, conductivity, nutrients and chlorophyll a. These values were highest during the dry period due to the system's low water volume. The zooplankton community was basically represented by Metacyclops mendocinus, which displayed high population densities throughout the periods studied. The low diversity recorded is congruent with other studies on continental saline water-bodies.

  6. Limnological study of a Pantanal saline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Júnior, P B; Rietzler, A C

    2005-11-01

    Limnological studies involving physical, chemical and biological aspects, with emphasis on the zooplankton community, were carried out in a saline lake of the Pantanal floodplain, in the subregion of Nhecolândia (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil), during the dry and wet seasons of the local hydrological cycle. The results show that the lake is not directly affected by the flood-pulse through superficial coalescence, probably receiving groundwater instead. Most of the measured variables showed extremely high values, particularly dissolved salts, pH, conductivity, nutrients and chlorophyll a. These values were highest during the dry period due to the system's low water volume. The zooplankton community was basically represented by Metacyclops mendocinus, which displayed high population densities throughout the periods studied. The low diversity recorded is congruent with other studies on continental saline water-bodies.

  7. Mechanism for salt scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  8. Oxygen sparging of residue salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E.; Griego, W.J.; Owens, S.D.; Thorn, C.W.; Vigil, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    Oxygen sparge is a process for treating salt residues at Los Alamos National Laboratory by sparging oxygen through molten salts. Oxygen reacts with the plutonium trichloride in these salts to form plutonium dioxide. There is further reaction of the plutonium dioxide with plutonium metal and the molten salt to form plutonium oxychloride. Both of the oxide plutonium species are insoluble in the salt and collect atthe bottom of the crucible. This results in a decrease of a factor of 2--3 in the amount of salt that must be treated, and the amount of waste generated by aqueous treatment methods.

  9. Unusual Holocene and late Pleistocene carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, W.; Rosenbaum, J.; Skipp, G.; Colman, S.; Forester, R.; Liu, A.; Simmons, K.; Bischoff, J.

    2006-01-01

    Bear Lake (Utah-Idaho, USA) has been producing large quantities of carbonate minerals of varying mineralogy for the past 17,000 years. The history of sedimentation in Bear Lake is documented through the study of isotopic ratios of oxygen, carbon, and strontium, percent organic carbon, percent CaCO3, X-ray diffraction mineralogy, HCl-leach inorganic geochemistry, and magnetic properties on samples from three piston cores. Historically, the Bear River, the main source of water for Great Salt Lake, did not enter Bear Lake until it was artificially diverted into the lake at the beginning of the 20th century. However, during the last glacial interval, the Bear River did enter Bear Lake depositing red, calcareous, silty clay. About 18,000 years ago, the Bear River became disconnected from Bear Lake. A combination of warmer water, increased evaporation, and increased organic productivity triggered the precipitation of calcium carbonate, first as calcite. As the salinity of the lake increased due to evaporation, aragonite began to precipitate about 11,000 years ago. Aragonite is the dominant mineral that accumulated in bottom sediments of the lake during the Holocene, comprising an average of about 70 wt.% of the sediments. Aragonite formation in a large, cold, oligotrophic, high latitude lake is highly unusual. Lacustrine aragonite usually is found in small, saline lakes in which the salinity varies considerably over time. However, Bear Lake contains endemic ostracodes and fish, which indicate that the chemistry of the lake has remained fairly constant for a long time. Stable isotope data from Holocene aragonite show that the salinity of Bear Lake increased throughout the Holocene, but never reached highly evolved values of ??18O in spite of an evaporation-dominated water balance. Bear Lake hydrology combined with evaporation created an unusual situation that produced large amounts of aragonite, but no evaporite minerals.

  10. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized...

  11. STS-55 Earth observation of Lake Natron, Tanzania, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows Lake Natron. Taken with color infrared (CIR) film, the typical red-colored water appears greenish. The drying soda salts in the lakebed are seen in greater detail in this CIR view. From the signatures seen in this photograph, the lake appears to be highly saline and to contain aquatic biota with little or no chlorophyll. The biomass over the rift valley escarpment is clearly defined by the reddish color in this CIR photo. Refer to STS055-93-037 for a comparative view photographed in regular color.

  12. Learning SaltStack

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Colton

    2015-01-01

    If you are a system administrator who manages multiple servers, then you know how difficult it is to keep your infrastructure in line. If you've been searching for an easier way, this book is for you. No prior experience with SaltStack is required.

  13. Sedimentology of the saline lakes of the Cariboo Plateau, Interior British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaut, Robin W.; Long, Peter R.

    1989-10-01

    There are several hundred saline lakes in Interior British Columbia, including muddy siliciclastic playas, saline playas, perennial lakes (including meromictic sulphate lakes), and ephemeral lakes, some with permanent salts. The lake waters have highly variable compositions, with Na-CO 3-Cl, Na-CO 3-(SO 4)-Cl, Mg-Na-SO 4 and Na-Mg-SO 4, the dominant types of brine. On the Cariboo Plateau, where they are most abundant, the saline lakes are small, shallow, and occupy depressions within glacial and glacio-fluvial deposits. Most are groundwater-fed. The region is characterized by extremely cold winters and short hot summers. Dense coniferous forest mantles much of the plateau and surrounds most of the lakes. Most basins comprise three main subenvironments—hillslope, mudflat (saline and dry) and lake (ephemeral or perennial). Fluvial sediments are of little significance. Mudflats are primarily a zone of extensive interstitial carbonate precipitation from shallow groundwaters, including abundant magnesite and hydromagnesite. The amount of carbonate formed varies with groundwater composition. Some mudflats are carbonate-dominated; others are predominantly siliciclastic with only highly soluble interstitial salts forming. Sedimentary structures are disrupted by carbonate precipitation and displacive salt crystallization. Springs and ephemeral seepages are locally present. Microbial mats form extensively along many littoral zones and around springs; laminates are preserved in some cores. Efflorescent salt crusts cover saline mudflats around most lakes and playas. Subaqueous salts (including natron, epsomite, bloedite, mirabilite) are precipitated during late summer, autumn and winter in several hypersaline lakes, some by evaporative concentration, others by brine cooling and freeze-out. Several hypersaline, ephemeral lakes have an unusual "spotted" morphology, with hundreds of individual brine pools within carbonate-siliciclastic muds. Most recent sedimentation in the

  14. Geo- and biogeochemical processes in a heliothermal hypersaline lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10-cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by X-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- whereas sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth, reaching saturation with epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O) that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiological communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect that creates temperatures in excess of 60 °C in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic in volume and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the metalimnion, more rapid heat exchange, and lower winter lake temperatures. Solubility calculations indicate seasonal biogenic and thermogenic aragonite

  15. Western Alaska ESI: LAKES (Lake Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing lakes and land masses used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Western Alaska. The...

  16. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Lowering Salt in Your Diet Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... and can be used by individuals to replace salt in their diet. There are no known undesirable effects in healthy ...

  17. Carpinteria Salt Marsh Habitat Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We identified five common habitat types in Carpinteria Salt Marsh: channels, pans (flats), marsh, salt flat and upland. We then drew polygons around each habitat...

  18. Salt ingestion caves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundquist Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vertebrate herbivores, when they find a salt-bearing layer of rock, say in a cliff face, can produce sizable voids where, overgenerations, they have removed and consumed salty rock. The cavities formed by this natural animal process constitute a uniqueclass of caves that can be called salt ingestion caves. Several examples of such caves are described in various publications. Anexample in Mississippi U.S.A., Rock House Cave, was visited by the authors in 2000. It seems to have been formed by deer orbison. Perhaps the most spectacular example is Kitum Cave in Kenya. This cave has been excavated to a length over 100 metersby elephants. An ancient example is La Cueva del Milodon in Chile, which is reported to have been excavated by the now extinctmilodon, a giant ground sloth. Still other possible examples can be cited. This class of caves deserves a careful definition. First, thecavity in rock should meet the size and other conventions of the locally accepted definition of a cave. Of course this requirement differsin detail from country to country, particularly in the matter of size. The intent is to respect the local conventions. The characteristicthat human entry is possible is judged to be a crucial property of any recognized cave definition. Second, the cavity should besignificantly the result of vertebrate animal consumption of salt-bearing rock. The defining process is that rock removed to form thecave is carried away in the digestive track of an animal. While sodium salts are expected to be the norm, other salts for which thereis animal hunger are acceptable. Also some other speleogenesis process, such as solution, should not be excluded as long as it issecondary in formation of a cave in question.

  19. Microbial Diversity of Culinary Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Muske, Galen; Baxter, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Extremophiles are exceptional microorganisms that live on this planet in extraordinarily harsh environments. One such extremophiles are Halophiles, salt-loving microorganisms that can survive in extreme salinity levels, and have been found to survive inside salt crystals. We were curious is about the potential diversity of halophiles surviving in salts harvested from around the world. For this experiment various culinary salts were suspended in a 23 % NaCL growth media broth and allowed to gr...

  20. Geologic investigation of the Virgin River Valley salt deposits, Clark County, southeastern Nevada, to investigate their suitability for possible storage of radioactive waste material as of September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-12-31

    The results from a geologic investigation of the Virgin River Valley salt deposits, Clark County, southeastern Nevada, to examine their suitability for further study and consideration in connection with the possible storage of radioactive waste material are given. The results indicate that (1) approximately one-half of the salt body underlies the Overton Arm of Lake Mead and that the dry land portion of the salt body that has a thickness of 1,000 feet or more covers an area of about four and one-half square miles; (2) current tectonic activity in the area of the salt deposits is believed to be confined to seismic events associated with crustal adjustments following the filling of Lake Mead; (3) detailed information on the hydrology of the salt deposit area is not available at present but it is reported that a groundwater study by the U.S. Geological Survey is now in progress; (4) there is no evidence of exploitable minerals in the salt deposit area other than evaporites such as salt, gypsum, and possibly sand and gravel; (5) the salt deposit area is located inside the Lake Mead Recreation Area, outlined on the accompanying Location Plat, and several Federal, State, and Local agencies share regulatory responsibilities for the activities in the area; (6) other salt deposit areas of Arizona and Nevada, such as the Detrital Valley, Red Lake Dome, Luke Dome, and Mormon Mesa area, and several playa lake areas of central Nevada may merit further study; and (7) additional information, as outlined, is needed to more thoroughly evaluate the salt deposits of the Virgin River Valley and other areas referred to above.

  1. Lake Mead, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Lake Mead, Nevada, (36.0N, 114.5E) where the water from the Colorado River empties after it's 273 mile journey through the Grand Canyon of Arizona is the subject of this photo. Other features of interest are Hoover Dam on the south shore of Lake Mead where cheap hydroelectric power is secondary to the water resources made available in this northern desert region and the resort city of Las Vegas, just to the west of Lake Mead.

  2. Biogeochemical conversion of sulfur species in saline lakes of Steppe Altai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzenko, Svetlana V.; Kolpakova, Marina N.; Shvartsev, Stepan L.; Isupov, Vitaly P.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present research is to identify the main mechanisms of sulfur behavior in saline lakes in the course of time and followed transformations in their chemical composition. The influence of water on chemical composition of biochemical processes involved in decomposition of organic matter was determined by the study of behavior of reduced forms of sulfur in lakes. The determination of reduced forms of sulfur was carried out by successive transfer of each form of sulfur to hydrogen sulfide followed by photometric measurements. The other chemical components were determined by standard methods (atomic absorption, potentiometric method, titration method and others). The salt lakes of the Altai steppe were studied in summer season 2013-2015. Analysis of the chemical composition of the saline lakes of Altai Krai has shown that carbonate-, hydrocarbonate- and chloride ions dominate among anions; sodium is main cation; sulfates are found in subordinate amounts. Reduced forms of sulfur occur everywhere: hydrogen and hydrosulfide sulfur S2- prevail in the bottom sediments; its derivative—elemental S0—prevails in the lakes water. The second important species in water of soda lakes is hydrosulfide sulfur S2-, and in chloride lakes is thiosulfate sulfur S2O3 2- . The lag in the accumulation of sulfates in soda lakes in comparison to chloride lakes can be explained by their bacterial reduction, followed by the formation and deposition of iron sulfides in sediments. In chloride lakes gypsum is a predominantly barrier for sulfates.

  3. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  4. Recovery from acidification of lakes in Finland, Norway and Sweden 1990–1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Skjelkvåle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulphate deposition has decreased by about 60% in the Nordic countries since the early 1980s. Nitrogen deposition has been roughly constant during the past 20 years, with only a minor decrease in the late 1990s. The resulting changes in the chemistry of small lakes have been followed by national monitoring programmes initiated in the 1980s in Finland (163 lakes, Norway (100 lakes and Sweden (81 lakes. These lakes are partly a subset from the survey of 5690 lakes in the Northern European lake survey of 1995. Trend analyses on data for the period 1990-1999 show that the non-marine sulphate concentrations in lakes have decreased significantly in 69% of the monitored lakes. Changes were largest in lakes with the highest mean concentrations. Nitrate concentrations, on the other hand, were generally low and showed no systematic changes. Concentrations of non-marine base cations decreased in 26% of the lakes, most probably an ionic-strength effect due to the lower concentrations of mobile strong-acid anions. Acid neutralising capacity increased in 32% of the lakes. Trends in recovery were in part masked by large year-to-year variations in sea-salt inputs and by increases in total organic carbon concentrations. These changes were most probably the result of climatic variations. Nordic lakes, therefore, show clear signs of recovery from acidification. Recovery began in the 1980s and accelerated in the 1990s. Reductions in sulphur deposition are the major "driving force" in the process of recovery from acidification. Further recovery can be expected in the next 10 years if the Gothenburg protocol on emissions of acidifying pollutants is implemented. Keywords: Nordic countries, sulphur deposition, lakes, recovery

  5. Reinterpretation of the exposed record of the last two cycles of Lake Bonneville, Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W.E.; McCoy, W.D.; Shroba, R.R.; Rubin, M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantially modified history of the last two cycles of Lake Bonneville is proposed. The Bonneville lake cycle began prior to 26,000 yr B.P.; the lake reached the Bonneville shoreline about 16,000 yr B.P. Poor dating control limits our knowledge of the timing of subsequent events. Lake level was maintained at the Bonneville shoreline until about 15,000 yr B.P., or somewhat later, when catastrophic downcutting of the outlet caused a rapid drop of 100 m. The Provo shoreline was formed as rates of isostatic uplift due to this unloading slowed. By 13,000 yr B.P., the lake had fallen below the Provo level and reached one close to that of Great Salt Lake by 11,000 yr B.P. Deposits of the Little Valley lake cycle are identified by their position below a marked unconformity and by amino acid ratios of their fossil gastropods. The maximum level of the Little Valley lake was well below the Bonneville shoreline. Based on degree of soil development and other evidence, the Little Valley lake cycle may be equivalent in age to marine oxygenisotope stage 6. The proposed lake history has climatic implications for the region. First, because the fluctuations of Lake Bonneville and Lake Lahontan during the last cycle of each were apparently out of phase, there may have been significant local differences in the timing and character of late Pleistocene climate changes in the Great Basin. Second, although the Bonneville and Little Valley lake cycles were broadly synchronous with maximum episodes of glaciation, environmental conditions necessary to generate large lakes did not exist during early Wisconsin time. ?? 1983.

  6. Limnology of Eifel maar lakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scharf, Burkhard W; Björk, Sven

    1992-01-01

    ... : Species composition & seasonal periodicity - Qualitative & quantitative investigations on cladoceran zooplankton of oligotrophic maar lakes - Population dynamics of pelagic copepods in maar lakes - Population dynamics...

  7. Microbial Diversity in a Hypersaline Sulfate Lake: A Terrestrial Analog of Ancient Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Pontefract

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Life can persist under severe osmotic stress and low water activity in hypersaline environments. On Mars, evidence for the past presence of saline bodies of water is prevalent and resulted in the widespread deposition of sulfate and chloride salts. Here we investigate Spotted Lake (British Columbia, Canada, a hypersaline lake with extreme (>3 M levels of sulfate salts as an exemplar of the conditions thought to be associated with ancient Mars. We provide the first characterization of microbial structure in Spotted Lake sediments through metagenomic sequencing, and report a bacteria-dominated community with abundant Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, as well as diverse extremophiles. Microbial abundance and functional comparisons reveal similarities to Ace Lake, a meromictic Antarctic lake with anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters. Our analysis suggests that hypersaline-associated species occupy niches characterized foremost by differential abundance of Archaea, uncharacterized Bacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Potential biosignatures in this environment are discussed, specifically the likelihood of a strong sulfur isotopic fractionation record within the sediments due to the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria. With its high sulfate levels and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles, Spotted Lake is an analog for ancient paleolakes on Mars in which sulfate salt deposits may have offered periodically habitable environments, and could have concentrated and preserved organic materials or their biomarkers over geologic time.

  8. Mixed salt crystallisation fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Helalizadeh, A

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation was to study the mechanisms of mixed salt crystallisation fouling on heat transfer surfaces during convective heat transfer and sub-cooled flow boiling conditions. To-date no investigations on the effects of operating parameters on the deposition of mixtures of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate, which are the most common constituents of scales formed on heat transfer surfaces, have been reported. As part of this research project, a substantial number of experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms controlling deposition. Fluid velocity, heat flux, surface and bulk temperatures, concentration of the solution, ionic strength, pressure and heat transfer surface material were varied systematically. After clarification of the effect of these parameters on the deposition process, the results of these experiments were used to develop a mechanistic model for prediction of fouling resistances, caused by crystallisation of mixed salts, under convective heat transfer...

  9. Thermochemical Properties of Nicotine Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs DM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results presented in this report clearly show that the thermal stability and the endothermic peak nicotine release temperatures are different for different nicotine salts and these temperatures appear to be linked to the general microstructural details of the salt itself. In addition, the peak nicotine release temperatures are highly dependent upon the sample size used. The heat of vaporization for neat (non-protonated nicotine is also sample-size dependent. The TGA data showed that the least stable of the salts tested at elevated temperatures was the liquid salt nicotine triacetate followed by the crystalline materials (e.g., nicotine gallate and finally, the amorphous salts (e.g., nicotine alginate. The DSC results revealed that the liquid and crystalline salts exhibit nicotine release endotherms that are strongly related to the sample weight being tested. The amorphous salts show nicotine endotherm peak temperatures that are nearly independent of the sample weight. The range of peak nicotine release temperatures varied depending upon the specific salts and the sample size from 83 oC to well over 200 oC. Based on these results, the evolution of nicotine from the nicotine salt should be expected to vary based on the composition of the salt, the details of its microstructure, and the amount of nicotine salt tested.

  10. Geo- and Biogeochemical Processes in a Heliothermal Hypersaline Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-03-17

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake, originally studied by Anderson (1958), contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10 cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) at a consistent location during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by x-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- while sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth to reach saturation with epsomite that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion containing phyto- and zooplankton; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiologic communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect which creates temperatures in excess of 60 oC in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this ephemeral layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the volume-stable lower mixolimnion, more rapid heat

  11. Microemulsion of Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    then to an oil-rich, upper phase as salinity increases in a system of brine/octane/ TRS surfactant/tertiary amyl alcohol . Borkovec et al. (1988) have...11 4. Partial Pseudotemary Phase Diagram .................................. 12 5. Micrograph of Molten Salts/SDS/Pentanol/Decane System...negligible interfacial tension between microdomains. Theoretical work in ternary and pseudotemary systems has shown that the middle phase is a

  12. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6)…

  13. Evaporation From Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, C.; Blanken, P.; Hedstrom, N.; Leshkevich, G.; Fortin, V.; Charpentier, D.; Haywood, H.

    2009-05-01

    Evaporation is a critical component of the water balance of each of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and understanding the magnitude and physical controls of evaporative water losses are important for several reasons. Recently, low water levels in Lakes Superior and Michigan/Huron have had socioeconomic, ecological, and even meteorological impacts (e.g. water quality and quantity, transportation, invasive species, recreation, etc.). The recent low water levels may be due to increased evaporation, but this is not known as operational evaporation estimates are currently calculated as the residual of water or heat budgets. Perhaps surprisingly, almost nothing is known about evaporation dynamics from Lake Superior and few direct measurements of evaporation have been made from any of the Laurentian Great Lakes. This research is the first to attempt to directly measure evaporation from Lake Superior by deploying eddy covariance instrumentation. Results of evaporation rates, their patterns and controlling mechanisms will be presented. The direct measurements of evaporation are used with concurrent satellite and climate model data to extrapolate evaporation measurements across the entire lake. This knowledge could improve predictions of how climate change may impact the lake's water budget and subsequently how the water in the lake is managed.

  14. Lake Superior revisited 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Wayne R.; Selgeby, James H.

    1987-01-01

    The Lake Superior fish community has changed substantially since the early 1960s, when control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) became effective. Self-reproducing stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have been reestablished in many inshore areas, although they have not yet reached pre-sea lamprey abundance; offshore lake trout are probably at or near pre-sea lamprey abundance. Stocks of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) appear to have fully recovered; commercial catches are at or above historical levels. Lake herring (Coregonus artedii) are recovering rapidly in U.S. waters and are abundant in western Canadian waters. The population of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which declined in the 1970s, is recovering. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) are becoming more abundant as a result of increased stocking in U.S. waters and are reproducing in most suitable tributaries; they have become significant in anglers' creels.

  15. Salt supply to and significance of asymmetric salt diapirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Burliga, S.; Chemia, Zurab

    2012-01-01

    Salt diapirs can be asymmetric both internally and externally reflecting their evolution history. As such, this asymmetry bear a significant amount of information about the differential loading (± lateral forces) and in turn the salt supply that have shaped the diapir. In two dimensions...... southeastern overhang due to salt extrusion during Middle Cretaceous followed by its burial in Tertiary. This external asymmetry is also reflected in the internal configuration of the diapir which shows different rates of salt flow on the two halves of the structure. The asymmetric external and internal...... sediments, the diapir extruded an overhang. Using the asymmetric Klodawa Salt Structure (KSS) in central Poland as a prototype, a series of analogue models were carried out to investigate the evolution history and salt supply driven by asymmetric differential loading. During extension of the model, a daipir...

  16. Juliana Lake: A Benghazi Wetland In Distress!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsamad, Esam O.; Elbabour, Mansour M.

    2013-04-01

    Of all the remaining natural habitats of Benghazi's urban area (NE Libya), perhaps the most threatened are its karst lakes and coastal salt marshes (locally known as Sebkhas). Juliana Lake stands out as one example of a fragile ecosystem that is steadily shrinking and exposed to dredging and, consequently, possible damage to its aquatic organisms, and the inevitable loss of its renowned biodiversity. Several 19th & 20th-century traveler's sketches and maps, soil maps, photographs and satellite images provide the bases for change in the size and magnitude of the lake and its adjacent areas over time. The study also includes an assessment of the sediment composition and texture of material accumulating at the bottom of the lake. These sediments are composed essentiality of mixtures of Sebkha sediments such as salty clay, silt, and clayey sand. The sediments at the surface and around the Juliana Lake, however, are represented by quite soft whitish to yellowish and scattered patchy limestones of unknown affinity. Terra-rossa (reddish soil) and Quaternary caliche are present also but calcarenites (clastic limestone) cover considerable part of the studied area. The bio-micro components of these sediments are described and a number of small-sized benthic foraminifera have been identified. Macrofauna, which are primarily presented by recent benthic seashells belonging to phylum mollusca, have also been investigated and several species have been identified to the species level wherever possible. Other calcareous biotic components are predominantly shell fragments of molluscs, bryozoans, echinoderms and calcareous coralline red algae. It is concluded that the distribution, diversity and abundance of the total benthic organisms recovered in this survey reflect that the local habitat of the Juliana Lake were rich in nutrients and consequently providing an important food source for fishes, birds, and mammals. In fact, without these benthic organisms, these larger animals would

  17. Lake metabolism scales with lake morphometry and catchment conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Båstrup-Spohr, Lars; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2012-01-01

    We used a comparative data set for 25 lakes in Denmark sampled during summer to explore the influence of lake morphometry, catchment conditions, light availability and nutrient input on lake metabolism. We found that (1) gross primary production (GPP) and community respiration (R) decline with la...... in lake morphometry and catchment conditions when comparing metabolic responses of lakes to human impacts....... area, water depth and drainage ratio, and increase with algal biomass (Chl), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorus (TP); (2) all lakes, especially small with less incident light, and forest lakes with high DOC, have negative net ecosystem production (NEP

  18. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception

    OpenAIRE

    Tournier, Carole; Knoop, Janine E.; Kooyman, Gonnie; Smit, Gerrit

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise m...

  19. Microbial diversity in the hypersaline Lake Meyghan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghoni, Ali; Emtiazi, Giti; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Stal, Lucas J; Etemadifar, Zahra; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Bolhuis, Henk

    2017-09-14

    Lake Meyghan is one of the largest and commercially most important salt lakes in Iran. Despite its inland location and high altitude, Lake Meyghan has a thalassohaline salt composition suggesting a marine origin. Inputs of fresh water by rivers and rainfall formed various basins characterized by different salinities. We analyzed the microbial community composition of three basins by isolation and culturing of microorganisms and by analysis of the metagenome. The basins that were investigated comprised a green ~50 g kg-1 salinity brine, a red ~180 g kg-1 salinity brine and a white ~300 g kg-1 salinity brine. Using different growth media, 57 strains of Bacteria and 48 strains of Archaea were isolated. Two bacterial isolates represent potential novel species with less than 96% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to known species. Abundant isolates were also well represented in the metagenome. Bacteria dominated the low salinity brine, with Alteromonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) as a particularly important taxon, whereas the high salinity brines were dominated by haloarchaea. Although the brines of Lake Meyghan differ in geochemical composition, their ecosystem function appears largely conserved amongst each other while being driven by different microbial communities.

  20. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  1. Rheology of rock salt for salt tectonics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerical modeling of salt tectonics is a rapidly evolving field; however, the constitutive equations to model long-term rock salt rheology in nature still remain controversial. Firstly, we built a database about the strain rate versus the differential stress through collecting the data from salt creep experiments at a range of temperatures (20–200 °C in laboratories. The aim is to collect data about salt deformation in nature, and the flow properties can be extracted from the data in laboratory experiments. Moreover, as an important preparation for salt tectonics modeling, a numerical model based on creep experiments of rock salt was developed in order to verify the specific model using the Abaqus package. Finally, under the condition of low differential stresses, the deformation mechanism would be extrapolated and discussed according to microstructure research. Since the studies of salt deformation in nature are the reliable extrapolation of laboratory data, we simplified the rock salt rheology to dislocation creep corresponding to power law creep (n = 5 with the appropriate material parameters in the salt tectonic modeling.

  2. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  3. Chemical quality of surface waters in Devils Lake basin North Dakota, 1952-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Hugh T.; Rosene, Philip G. Scott; Chester, H.

    1968-01-01

    enough to harm fish. Data on alpha and beta particle activities in Devils Lake were insufficient to determine if present activities are less than, equal to, or more than activities before nuclear tests began. Miscellaneous surface waters not in the Devils Lake chain contained dissolved solids that ranged from 239 to 61,200 ppm. The lakes that spill infrequently and have little or no ground-water inflow and outflow generally contain high concentrations of dissolved solids. Salt balance computations for Devils Lake for 1952-60 indicate that a net of as much as 89,000 tons of salt was removed from the bed by the water in some years and as much as 35,000 tons was added to the bed in other years. For the 9-year period, the tons removed exceeded the tons added; the net removed averaged 2.7 tons per acre per year. Pickup of these salts from the bed increased the dissolved solids in the lake water an average of 193 ppm per year. Between 1952 and 1960, 201,000 tons of salt was added to the bed of East Devils Lake, 15,100 tons to the bed of western Stump Lake, and 421,000 tons to the bed of eastern Stump Lake. Laboratory examination of shore and bed material indicated that the shore contained less weight of salt per unit weight of dry, inorganic material than the bed. Calcium and bicarbonate were the chief constituents dissolved from bed material of Devils Lake, whereas sodium and sulfate were the chief constituents dissolved from bed material of East Bay, East Devils Lake, and eastern and western Stump Lakes. Generally, calcium and bicarbonate were the chief constitutents dissolved from shore material of all these lakes. Evidence indicates that not more than 20 percent of the salt that 'disappeared' from the water of Devils Lake west of State Route 20 as the lake altitudes decreased years ago will redissolve if the lake altitude is restored.

  4. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  5. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eClingenpeel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1,349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels. However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (70 pyrosequencing reads was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  6. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  7. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  8. Relationship Between Salt Intake, Salt-Taste Threshold and Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many studies have found an association between sodium intake and blood pressure. Salt taste threshold is thought to be another marker of sodium intake. Objective: This study sought to assess two markers of sodium intake, 24-hour-urinary sodium and salt-taste threshold. We also determined the relationship ...

  9. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, J.L.H.C.; Tournier, C.; Knoop, J.E.; Kooyman, G.; Smit, G.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various

  10. Experiments in connection with Salt Domes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escher, B.G.; Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1928-01-01

    The different theories concerning the origin of Salt Domes in Roumania, Germany, Texas, Louisiana, Colorado and Utah are discussed. In Roumania the salt occurs in cores of “Diapir” anticlines. The existance of hills of salt indicates, that the salt is still pushing upwards. In Germany the salt

  11. Sodium: How to Tame Your Salt Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same amount of sodium as table salt. Use salt substitutes wisely. Some salt substitutes or light salts contain a mixture of table ... substitute — and get too much sodium. Also, many salt substitutes contain potassium chloride. Although potassium can lessen some ...

  12. Lake Level Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past lake levels, mostly related to changes in moisture balance (evaporation-precipitation). Parameter keywords describe what was measured in this data...

  13. Great Lakes Ice Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Charts show ice extent and concentration three times weekly during the ice season, for all lakes except Ontario, from the 1973/74 ice season through the 2001/2002...

  14. CESM Lakes Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains monthly aggregates of 2D near-surface fields from the WRF model simulations labeled "default" (using WRF default approach to setting lake...

  15. History of Lake Andes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information about the history and management of Lake Andes is compiled in this report. It is intended to help future refuge managers become acquainted with the facts...

  16. Sunk Lake Natural Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Sunk Lake Natural Area Management Plan guides the long-range development of the Natural Area by identifying and integrating appropriate habitats, management...

  17. Challenges to the Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the past decade we have extensively studied coastal ecosystems in the Great Lakes. Some research efforts have linked coastal receiving systems to conditions in their contributing watersheds; others have focused on developing invasive species detection and monitoring strat...

  18. COMPARISON OF GEO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WHITE ROCK SALT AND PINK ROCK SALT IN KŁODAWA SALT DIAPIR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malwina Kolano; Danuta Flisiak

    2013-01-01

    .... The present article introduces strength-strain properties of white rock salt, building the nucleus of northeastern edge anticline, and pink rock salt that belongs to the series of youngest rock salt...

  19. Chase Lake Wetland Management District, Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Chase Lake Prairie Project: Annual narrative report: 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Chase Lake WMD, Chase Lake NWR, Chase Lake Prairie Project, and Halfway Lake NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997...

  20. [Distribution of zooplankton community in Mediterranean-climate lakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherbi, Malika; Lek-Ang, Sithan; Lek, Sovan; Arab, Abdeslem

    2008-09-01

    The sometimes sharp thermal variations and irregular precipitations and force concentrated over short periods characterize the Mediterranean climate. The structure of the zooplanktonic settlement was analyzed during one year in three Algerian reservoirs (lakes) with different geographical and climatic situation, in relation to abiotic factors (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, suspended matter, carbonates, nitrogenized and phosphorated nutritive salts). A canonical correspondence analysis was used to estimate the influence of the abiotic factors on the temporal distribution. The studied lakes are located, on the one hand, in northern Algeria, in a sub-humid area (Lake Boukourdane) and, on the other hand, in the South of the country, in the arid region (Foum El Ghorza and Djorf Torba). Analysis of the environmental parameters indicates that there is a seasonal variation in the three reservoirs. In Lake Foum El Ghorza, the temperature and hydrology variations, linked with the arid climate, affects the concentration of dissolved oxygen, which strongly decreases (1.5 mg/l), involving a pH reduction; suspended matters are sometimes high, coming from the stripped catchment area, causing a turbidity in this not very deep lake. The study of the distribution of the species allowed us to highlight a seasonal temporal variation. Lake Boukourdane, in the sub-humid zone, has an increased specific richness (SR=13). The various species evolve in alternation during the annual cycle. The representative species of this lake is Copidodiaptomus numidicus, characteristic of the rainy and endemic zone of the western Mediterranean; it is dominant (67%) in the spring. The Stenothermal species Diaphanosoma brachyurum, endemic of hot waters, is common to the two lakes; it evolves particularly in the summer (51.3%) at Boukourdane, whereas it is perennial and dominant (55%) in the spring at Djorf Torba. The specific richness is lower in Djorf Torba (SR=7) and in Foum El Ghorza (SR=6). The

  1. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an iconic ultra-oligotrophic lake in the central Sierra Nevada, has been studied intensively since 1968, with the goal of understanding and ultimately controlling its eutrophication and loss of clarity. Research on the lake has included a) periodic profiles of primary productivity, nutrients, temperature, and plankton; b) Secchi depth; c) nutrient limitation experiments; d) analysis of sediment cores; e) radiocarbon dating of underwater in-place tree stumps; g) analysis of long-term temperature trends. Work in its watershed has included a) monitoring of stream discharge, sediment and nutrients at up to 20 stream gaging stations; b) monitoring of urban runoff water quality at selected sites; c) development of a GIS data base, including soils, vegetation, and land use. Based on these studies, we know that a) primary productivity in the lake is limited by phosphorus, and continues to increase; b) the loss of clarity continues, but at a declining rate; c) the lake has been warming since 1970, and its resistance to deep mixing is increasing; d) historically the lake level drops below the outlet elevation about one year in seven; e) 6300 to 4300 yrs BP lake level was below the present outlet elevation long enough for large trees to grow; f) the date of the peak snowmelt runoff is shifting toward earlier dates; g) after accounting for annual runoff, loads of nutrients and suspended sediment have declined significantly in some basin streams since 1980. Downscaled outputs from GCM climatic models have recently been used to drive hydrologic models and a lake clarity model, projecting future trends in the lake and watersheds. Results show a) the temperature and thermal stability will likely continue to increase, with deep mixing shutting down in the latter half of this century; b) the lake may drop below the outlet for an extended period beginning about 2085; c) the annual snowpack will continue to decline, with earlier snowmelt and shift from snowfall to rain; d

  2. Sediment salt-load in the St Lucia Estuary during the severe drought of 2002 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, G. C.; Taylor, R. H.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a sufficiently high residual salt load in the dry sediments of the St Lucia Estuary to cause salinity problems should it later fill up with either freshwater or seawater. The estuary lakes have suffered the effects of a severe drought since 2002 with the result that many areas were dry, and the salinity of the residual water varied between 4 psu and up to five times that of seawater. Measurements of the salts content in the sediments to a depth of 20 cm showed that more than 2 million tonnes of salt was held in this layer of the sediment in 2006. Recent management of the estuary (since 1970) has ensured that the mouth was not artificially opened. This was to prevent the inflow of seawater, with its salts, that would otherwise enter while the drought was in place. The results of the sediment salinity data showed that if the drought had been broken and the lake area filled with rain and river water, the resulting salinity would be about 6 psu. In March 2007, Cyclone Gamede in the Indian Ocean off the east coast of South Africa produced a wave climate at sea that resulted in the mouth breaching; thus introducing an estimated 12 million tonnes of salts. The high salinity in the system resulting from this breach is expected to have an adverse effect on the ecology of the system, whereas the residual salinity in the sediments would not have caused an environmental problem. If the estuary and lake system were to fill completely with seawater, the residual salts together with seawater will raise the salinity to an initial value higher than 40 psu, which will have the effect of suppressing much of the important submerged vegetation that is vital for sustaining juvenile fish in the system. Many of the large fauna will also suffer from a shortage of freshwater.

  3. Dragon Lake, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Nicknamed 'Dragon Lake,' this body of water is formed by the Bratskove Reservoir, built along the Angara river in southern Siberia, near the city of Bratsk. This image was acquired in winter, when the lake is frozen. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on December 19, 1999. This is a natural color composite image made using blue, green, and red wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  4. Chemical quality of surface waters in Devils Lake basin, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Herbert; Colby, Bruce R.

    1955-01-01

    fallen slowly. Hydrologic changes that may have caused Devils Lake to alter from a very large, moderately deep lake of fresh water to a small, shallow body of brackish water are discussed and evaluated on the basis of scanty information. During several years of average precipitation, temperature, and evaporation, Devils Lake and lakes upstream should receive nearly a quarter of an inch of runoff annually from the drainage area of about 3,000 square miles. Approximately 55 square miles of tributary area would be required to maintain each square mile of lake surface. However, runoff, expressed as percentage of the average, differs greatly from year to year. The amount of runoff retained in upstream lakes also Varies greatly. For these two reasons, annual inflow to Devils Lake is extremely variable. Because many waterways in this basin have no surface outlets at normal stages, runoff collects in depressions, is concentrated by evaporation, and forms saline or alkaline lakes. The chemical and physical properties of the lake waters vary chiefly with changes in lake stage and volume of inflow. Scattered records from 1899 to 1923 and more comprehensive data from 1948 to 1952 show a range of salt concentration from 6,130 to 25,000 parts per million (ppm) in the water of Devils Lake. Although concentration has varied, the chemical composition of the dissolved solids has not changed appreciably. Lake waters are more concentrated in the lower part of the basin, downstream from Devils Lake. For periods of record the salt concentration ranged from 14,932 to 62,000 ppm in East Devils Lake and from 19,000 to 106,000 ppm in east Stump Lake. Current and past tonnages of dissolved solids in Devils Lake, East Bay Devils Lake, East Devils Lake, and east and west Stump Lakes were computed from concentrations and from altitude-capacity curves for each lake. Neither the average rate of diversion of water to restore Devils Lake to a higher level nor the quality of the divert

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans response to salt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.O. Umuerri (Oluwatoroti Omowayewa)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes my work, where I used genetic methods to identify new genes involved in salt taste in C. elegans. In addition, I used calcium imaging to characterize the cellular response of C. elegans to salt. The thesis is divided into five sections and each section is summarized

  6. Bile salts secretion in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, J P; Areias, E; Meneses, L; Tiago, E

    1977-02-01

    The bile salts secretion was studied in ten normal subjects and sixteen patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, in a basal period and during 60 minutes after Secretin injection. Total bile salts were measured by a modification of the enzymatic method of Iwata and Yamasaki and the individual bile salts were separated by silica gel thin-layer chromatography. During the 60 minutes after Secretin the mean concentration was 2.88 +/- 2.58 muM/ml in normals and 1.96 +/- 1.25 muM/ml in cirrhotics. The difference is not significant. During the first 20 minutes however the concentration was higher than 3 muM/ml in 8 out of 10 normals and lower than 2 muM/ml in 10 out 16 cirrhotics. The ratios of tri-to dihydroxy bile salts was similar in both groups. The ratios between bile salts conjugated with glycine and with taurine was higher in normals, and the ratio between free to conjugated bile salts was higher in cirrhotics. The lower concentration of total bile salts immediatly after Secretin, the higher proportion of taurin conjugates and of free bile salts could be important factors in the difficulties of fact digestion and absorption frequently found in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.

  7. Compressibility of granulated rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinebaugh, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Crushed rock salt will be used extensively at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as a material for backfilling underground openings. This document addresses one of the characteristics of crushed salt which must be known to assess the consequences of its usage, namely, compressibility.

  8. Resilience and Restoration of Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Carpenter

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Lake water quality and ecosystem services are normally maintained by several feedbacks. Among these are nutrient retention and humic production by wetlands, nutrient retention and woody habitat production by riparian forests, food web structures that cha nnel phosphorus to consumers rather than phytoplankton, and biogeochemical mechanisms that inhibit phosphorus recycling from sediments. In degraded lakes, these resilience mechanisms are replaced by new ones that connect lakes to larger, regional economi c and social systems. New controls that maintain degraded lakes include runoff from agricultural and urban areas, absence of wetlands and riparian forests, and changes in lake food webs and biogeochemistry that channel phosphorus to blooms of nuisance al gae. Economic analyses show that degraded lakes are significantly less valuable than normal lakes. Because of this difference in value, the economic benefits of restoring lakes could be used to create incentives for lake restoration.

  9. Salt resistant crop plants

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Stuart J.

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker- assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement.

  10. History Leaves Salts Behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    These plots, or spectra, show that a rock dubbed 'McKittrick' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars, has higher concentrations of sulfur and bromine than a nearby patch of soil nicknamed 'Tarmac.' These data were taken by Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which uses curium-244 to assess the elemental composition of rocks and soil. Only portions of the targets' full spectra are shown to highlight the significant differences in elemental concentrations between 'McKittrick' and 'Tarmac.' Intensities are plotted on a logarithmic scale.A nearby rock named Guadalupe similarly has extremely high concentrations of sulfur, but very little bromine. This 'element fractionation' typically occurs when a watery brine slowly evaporates and various salt compounds are precipitated in sequence.

  11. Salt resistant crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Stuart J; Negrão, Sónia; Tester, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker-assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Is Lake Chabot Eutrophic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, K.; Logan, J.; Esterlis, P.; Lew, A.; Nguyen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction/Abstract: Lake Chabot is an integral part of the East Bay watershed that provides habitats for animals and recreation for humans year-round. Lake Chabot has been in danger of eutrophication due to excessive dumping of phosphorous and nitrogen into the water from the fertilizers of nearby golf courses and neighboring houses. If the lake turned out to be eutrophified, it could seriously impact what is currently the standby emergency water supply for many Castro Valley residents. Eutrophication is the excessive richness of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in a lake, usually as a result of runoff. This buildup of nutrients causes algal blooms. The algae uses up most of the oxygen in the water, and when it dies, it causes the lake to hypoxify. The fish in the lake can't breathe, and consequently suffocate. Other oxygen-dependant aquatic creatures die off as well. Needless to say, the eutrophication of a lake is bad news for the wildlife that lives in or around it. The level of eutrophication in our area in Northern California tends to increase during the late spring/early summer months, so our crew went out and took samples of Lake Chabot on June 2. We focused on the area of the lake where the water enters, known on the map as Honker Bay. We also took readings a ways down in deeper water for comparison's sake. Visually, the lake looked in bad shape. The water was a murky green that glimmered with particulate matter that swirled around the boat as we went by. In the Honker Bay region where we focused our testing, there were reeds bathed in algae that coated the surface of the lake in thick, swirling patterns. Surprisingly enough, however, our test results didn't reveal any extreme levels of phosphorous or nitrogen. They were slightly higher than usual, but not by any significant amount. The levels we found were high enough to stimulate plant and algae growth and promote eutrophication, but not enough to do any severe damage. After a briefing with a

  13. Anthropogenic activities affecting Arreo Lake (N Spain) during the last 2500 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corella, J.; Valero-Garces, B. L.; Stefanova, I.; El Amrani, A.; Morellón, M.; Rico, E.; González-Sampériz, P.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Giralt, S.; Sigro, J.

    2010-12-01

    Arreo Lake is a small (288 ha surface area) karstic lake 25 m deep located at the northwestern edge of the Ebro Basin (NE Spain). The integration of sedimentary facies, element geochemistry, mineralogy, and biological proxies (pollen and diatoms), together with a robust chronological model provided by 15 AMS radiocarbon dating, 137Cs analyses, and varve counting, permitted a reconstruction of the main phases of anthropogenic activity affecting the Arreo Lake dynamic in the context of the climate variability in the Iberian Peninsula during the last two millennia. A high-resolution study of the lacustrine facies and diatoms, combined with their detailed comparison with recent regional instrumental climatic data (1952-2007), limnological monitoring of the lake (1992-2008), and recent land-use changes affecting the lake watershed show the strong influence of human activities in lake dynamics during the last 60 years. The main impacts are a large increase in sediment delivery to the lake after the 1980s, fluctuations in lake level caused by water extraction for irrigation, and changes in the mixing status of the lake. Littoral and distal sediment cores record the long history of the use of natural resources (salt, water, forest and farming) and their significant impacts in the lake during the last 2500 years. Periods of higher anthropogenic activities linked to increased salt production in the nearby Salinas de Añana during the Roman Period and the Early Middle Ages were coincident with deforestation and increased sediment delivery to the lake. The Modern period was characterized by an abrupt increase in the sedimentation rate. Forest expansion and reduced clastic input to the lake were synchronous with documented depopulation of the area during the Late Middle Ages and the 20th century. The synergy between climate and human activities is shown by the correspondence of increased human pressure and more favourable climate conditions, such as it is recorded during the

  14. Genesis of Tuzla salt basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sušić, Amir; Baraković, Amir; Komatina, Snezana

    2017-04-01

    Salt is condition for the survival of the human race, and holds a special place in the exploitation of mineral resources. It is the only mineral raw material used in direct feeding, and therefore has its own specialty. Salt is a crystalline mineral that is found in seawater, as well as in underground areas where it is formed by deposition of salt sediments. Occurrences of salt water near Tuzla and Gornja Tuzla have been known since the time of the Romans as "ad salinas". The name itself connects Bosnia with its richness in salt, because the word barefoot, which is preserved in a north-Albanian dialect, means a place where boiling salted water are obtained. At the time of the Bosnian kings, these regions are named Soli, which is in connection with occurences of saline sources. Geological studies of rock salt in the area of Tuzla basin are practically began after the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in the period from 1878 to 1918. Geological field work was conducted K. Paul, H. Hefer, E. Tietze and F. Katzer. Monomineral deposit of rock salt Tetima is made of halite and anhydrite mixed with marl belt, while the bay of salt in Tuzla is polymineral and contains a considerable amount of thenardite (Na2SO4) and rare minerals: nortupit, nahkolit, bradleit, probertit, glauberite and others. Both salt deposits were created as a product of chemical sedimentation in the lower Miocene Badenian sediments. The main objective of this paper is to show the genesis of the deposits and the spatial and genetic connection. In addition, genesis of geological research in the areas of Tuzla basin will be presented.

  15. Glacial lake inventory and lake outburst potential in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Maxim A; Sabitov, Timur Y; Tomashevskaya, Irina G; Glazirin, Gleb E; Chernomorets, Sergey S; Savernyuk, Elena A; Tutubalina, Olga V; Petrakov, Dmitriy A; Sokolov, Leonid S; Dokukin, Mikhail D; Mountrakis, Giorgos; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-08-15

    Climate change has been shown to increase the number of mountain lakes across various mountain ranges in the World. In Central Asia, and in particular on the territory of Uzbekistan, a detailed assessment of glacier lakes and their evolution over time is, however lacking. For this reason we created the first detailed inventory of mountain lakes of Uzbekistan based on recent (2002-2014) satellite observations using WorldView-2, SPOT5, and IKONOS imagery with a spatial resolution from 2 to 10m. This record was complemented with data from field studies of the last 50years. The previous data were mostly in the form of inventories of lakes, available in Soviet archives, and primarily included localized in-situ data. The inventory of mountain lakes presented here, by contrast, includes an overview of all lakes of the territory of Uzbekistan. Lakes were considered if they were located at altitudes above 1500m and if lakes had an area exceeding 100m2. As in other mountain regions of the World, the ongoing increase of air temperatures has led to an increase in lake number and area. Moreover, the frequency and overall number of lake outburst events have been on the rise as well. Therefore, we also present the first outburst assessment with an updated version of well-known approaches considering local climate features and event histories. As a result, out of the 242 lakes identified on the territory of Uzbekistan, 15% are considered prone to outburst, 10% of these lakes have been assigned low outburst potential and the remainder of the lakes have an average level of outburst potential. We conclude that the distribution of lakes by elevation shows a significant influence on lake area and hazard potential. No significant differences, by contrast, exist between the distribution of lake area, outburst potential, and lake location with respect to glaciers by regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molten Salt Promoting Effect in Double Salt CO2 Absorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Chen, Haobo; Singh, Prabhakar; King, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the concept of molten salts as catalysts for CO2 absorption by MgO, and extend these observations to the MgO-containing double salt oxides. We will show that the phenomena involved with CO2 absorption by MgO and MgO-based double salts are similar and general, but with some important differences. This paper focuses on the following key concepts: i) identification of conditions that favor or disfavor participation of isolated MgO during double salt absorption, and investigation of methods to increase the absorption capacity of double salt systems by including MgO participation; ii) examination of the relationship between CO2 uptake and melting point of the promoter salt, leading to the recognition of the role of pre-melting (surface melting) in these systems; and iii) extension of the reaction pathway model developed for the MgO-NaNO3 system to the double salt systems. This information advances our understanding of MgO-based CO2 absorption systems for application with pre-combustion gas streams.

  17. amoA-encoding archaea and thaumarchaeol in the lakes on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eYang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available All known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA belong to the phylum Thaumarchaeota within the domain Archaea. AOA possess the diagnostic amoA gene (encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase and produce lipid biomarker thaumarchaeol. Although the abundance and diversity of AEA in freshwater lakes have been well-studied, little is known about amoA gene-encoding archaea (AEA ecology in saline/hypersaline lakes. In this study, the distribution of the archaeal amoA gene and thaumarchaeol were investigated in nine Qinghai-Tibetan lakes with a salinity range from freshwater to salt-saturation (salinity: 325 g/L. The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was present in hypersaline lakes with salinity up to 160 g/L. The archaeal amoA gene diversity in Tibetan lakes was different from those in other lakes worldwide, suggesting Tibetan lakes (high elevation, strong ultraviolet, and dry climate may host a unique AEA population of different evolutionary origin from those in other lakes. Thaumarchaeol was present in all of the studied hypersaline lakes, even in those where no AEA amoA gene was observed. Future research is needed to determine the ecological function of AEA and possible sources of thaumarchaeol in the Qinghai-Tibetan hypersaline lakes.

  18. Geology and geomorphology of Bear Lake Valley and upper Bear River, Utah and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheis, M.C.; Laabs, B.J.C.; Kaufman, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake, on the Idaho-Utah border, lies in a fault-bounded valley through which the Bear River flows en route to the Great Salt Lake. Surficial deposits in the Bear Lake drainage basin provide a geologic context for interpretation of cores from Bear Lake deposits. In addition to groundwater discharge, Bear Lake received water and sediment from its own small drainage basin and sometimes from the Bear River and its glaciated headwaters. The lake basin interacts with the river in complex ways that are modulated by climatically induced lake-level changes, by the distribution of active Quaternary faults, and by the migration of the river across its fluvial fan north of the present lake. The upper Bear River flows northward for ???150 km from its headwaters in the northwestern Uinta Mountains, generally following the strike of regional Laramide and late Cenozoic structures. These structures likely also control the flow paths of groundwater that feeds Bear Lake, and groundwater-fed streams are the largest source of water when the lake is isolated from the Bear River. The present configuration of the Bear River with respect to Bear Lake Valley may not have been established until the late Pliocene. The absence of Uinta Range-derived quartzites in fluvial gravel on the crest of the Bear Lake Plateau east of Bear Lake suggests that the present headwaters were not part of the drainage basin in the late Tertiary. Newly mapped glacial deposits in the Bear River Range west of Bear Lake indicate several advances of valley glaciers that were probably coeval with glaciations in the Uinta Mountains. Much of the meltwater from these glaciers may have reached Bear Lake via groundwater pathways through infiltration in the karst terrain of the Bear River Range. At times during the Pleistocene, the Bear River flowed into Bear Lake and water level rose to the valley threshold at Nounan narrows. This threshold has been modified by aggradation, downcutting, and tectonics. Maximum lake

  19. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  20. Underground water in the valleys of Utah Lake and Jordan River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, George Burr

    1906-01-01

    The valleys of Utah Lake and Jordan River are situated in north-central Utah, in the extreme eastern part of the Great Basin. The lofty Wasatch Range (Pl. I), the westernmost of the Rocky Mountain system, limits the valleys on the east, and relatively low basin ranges - the Oquirrh, Lake, and East Tintic mountains - determine them on the west. The valleys trend north and south, and are almost separated by the low east-west Traverse Range, the slopes of which constitute a dam for Utah Lake, which drains through Jordan River to Great Salt Lake.The area under consideration is the most populous and flourishing part of the State, Salt Lake City and Provo, the first and third cities in the State, and many other thriving settlements are there located. At Bingham Junction and Murray a number of smelters treat the ores from near-by mines, but agriculture is the main industry. Water for irrigation is supplied by mountain streams, and intensive farming is successfully pursued. The practice of irrigation was begun by the Mormon pioneers in 1847, and has been discussed in several publications; little attention, however, has been given to the underground water resources, and, so far as the writer is aware, they have not before been described. The present paper outlines conditions of occurrence of the subterranean waters and describes their development in the valleys of Utah Lake and Jordan River.

  1. Collaborative modelling and integrated decision support system analysis of a developed terminal lake basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niswonger, Richard G.; Allander, Kip K.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-09-01

    A terminal lake basin in west-central Nevada, Walker Lake, has undergone drastic change over the past 90 yrs due to upstream water use for agriculture. Decreased inflows to the lake have resulted in 100 km2 decrease in lake surface area and a total loss of fisheries due to salinization. The ecologic health of Walker Lake is of great concern as the lake is a stopover point on the Pacific route for migratory birds from within and outside the United States. Stakeholders, water institutions, and scientists have engaged in collaborative modeling and the development of a decision support system that is being used to develop and analyze management change options to restore the lake. Here we use an integrated management and hydrologic model that relies on state-of-the-art simulation capabilities to evaluate the benefits of using integrated hydrologic models as components of a decision support system. Nonlinear feedbacks among climate, surface-water and groundwater exchanges, and water use present challenges for simulating realistic outcomes associated with management change. Integrated management and hydrologic modeling provides a means of simulating benefits associated with management change in the Walker River basin where drastic changes in the hydrologic landscape have taken place over the last century. Through the collaborative modeling process, stakeholder support is increasing and possibly leading to management change options that result in reductions in Walker Lake salt concentrations, as simulated by the decision support system.

  2. Collaborative modelling and integrated decision support system analysis of a developed terminal lake basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niswonger, Richard G.; Allander, Kip K.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    A terminal lake basin in west-central Nevada, Walker Lake, has undergone drastic change over the past 90 yrs due to upstream water use for agriculture. Decreased inflows to the lake have resulted in 100 km2 decrease in lake surface area and a total loss of fisheries due to salinization. The ecologic health of Walker Lake is of great concern as the lake is a stopover point on the Pacific route for migratory birds from within and outside the United States. Stakeholders, water institutions, and scientists have engaged in collaborative modeling and the development of a decision support system that is being used to develop and analyze management change options to restore the lake. Here we use an integrated management and hydrologic model that relies on state-of-the-art simulation capabilities to evaluate the benefits of using integrated hydrologic models as components of a decision support system. Nonlinear feedbacks among climate, surface-water and groundwater exchanges, and water use present challenges for simulating realistic outcomes associated with management change. Integrated management and hydrologic modeling provides a means of simulating benefits associated with management change in the Walker River basin where drastic changes in the hydrologic landscape have taken place over the last century. Through the collaborative modeling process, stakeholder support is increasing and possibly leading to management change options that result in reductions in Walker Lake salt concentrations, as simulated by the decision support system.

  3. Iodized Salt Sales in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Maalouf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iodized salt has been an important source of dietary iodine, a trace element important for regulating human growth, development, and metabolic functions. This analysis identified iodized table salt sales as a percentage of retail salt sales using Nielsen ScanTrack. We identified 1117 salt products, including 701 salt blends and 416 other salt products, 57 of which were iodized. When weighted by sales volume in ounces or per item, 53% contained iodized salt. These findings may provide a baseline for future monitoring of sales of iodized salt.

  4. Crater Lake revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  5. Does stress induce salt intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Susan J; Turner, Anne I; Nowson, Caryl A

    2010-06-01

    Psychological stress is a common feature of modern day societies, and contributes to the global burden of disease. It was proposed by Henry over 20 years ago that the salt intake of a society reflects the level of stress, and that stress, through its effect on increasing salt intake, is an important factor in the development of hypertension. This review evaluates the evidence from animal and human studies to determine if stress does induce a salt appetite and increase salt consumption in human subjects. Findings from animal studies suggest that stress may drive salt intake, with evidence for a potential mechanism via the sympatho-adrenal medullary system and/or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. In contrast, in the few laboratory studies conducted in human subjects, none has found that acute stress affects salt intake. However, one study demonstrated that life stress (chronic stress) was associated with increased consumption of snack foods, which included, but not specifically, highly salty snacks. Studies investigating the influence of chronic stress on eating behaviours are required, including consumption of salty foods. From the available evidence, we can conclude that in free-living, Na-replete individuals, consuming Na in excess of physiological requirements, stress is unlikely to be a major contributor to salt intake.

  6. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Alan L; Liu, Bo; Rogers, Troy D; Sartor, R Balfour; Miao, Edward A

    2017-08-01

    The Western diet is characterized by high protein, sugar, fat, and low fiber intake, and is widely believed to contribute to the incidence and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, high sodium chloride salt content, a defining feature of processed foods, has not been considered as a possible environmental factor that might drive IBD. We set out to bridge this gap. We examined murine models of colitis on either a high salt diet (HSD) or a low salt diet. We demonstrate that an HSD exacerbates inflammatory pathology in the IL-10-deficient murine model of colitis relative to mice fed a low salt diet. This was correlated with enhanced expression of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Surprisingly, sodium accumulated in the colons of mice on an HSD, suggesting a direct effect of salt within the colon. Similar to the IL-10-deficient model, an HSD also enhanced cytokine expression during infection by Salmonella typhimurium This occurred in the first 3 d of infection, suggesting that an HSD potentiates an innate immune response. Indeed, in cultured dendritic cells we found that high salt media potentiates cytokine expression downstream of TLR4 activation via p38 MAPK and SGK1. A third common colitis model, administration of dextran sodium sulfate, was hopelessly confounded by the high sodium content of the dextran sodium sulfate. Our results raise the possibility that high dietary salt is an environmental factor that drives increased inflammation in IBD. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  8. satellite lakes of lake victoria basin (tanzanian side)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on phytoplankton species diversity and abundance were carried out in 8 selected satellite lakes within the Lake Victoria ... cyanobacteria occurrence and their unforeseen effects such as toxin production and oxygen depletion during nights that may ..... Species extinction and concomitant ecological changes in Lake.

  9. Methane emissions from permafrost thaw lakes limited by lake drainage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huissteden, J.; Berrittella, C.; Parmentier, F.J.W.; Mi, Y.; Maximov, T.C.; Dolman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Thaw lakes in permafrost areas are sources of the strong greenhouse gas methane. They develop mostly in sedimentary lowlands with permafrost and a high excess ground ice volume, resulting in large areas covered with lakes and drained thaw-lake basins (DTLBs; refs,). Their expansion is enhanced by

  10. Quantitative assessment of Urmia Lake water using spaceborne multisensor data and 3D modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeihouni, Mehrdad; Toomanian, Ara; Alavipanah, Seyed Kazem; Hamzeh, Saeid

    2017-10-18

    Preserving aquatic ecosystems and water resources management is crucial in arid and semi-arid regions for anthropogenic reasons and climate change. In recent decades, the water level of the largest lake in Iran, Urmia Lake, has decreased sharply, which has become a major environmental concern in Iran and the region. The efforts to revive the lake concerns the amount of water required for restoration. This study monitored and assessed Urmia Lake status over a period of 30 years (1984 to 2014) using remotely sensed data. A novel method is proposed that generates a lakebed digital elevation model (LBDEM) for Urmia Lake based on time series images from Landsat satellites, water level field measurements, remote sensing techniques, GIS, and 3D modeling. The volume of water required to restore the Lake water level to that of previous years and the ecological water level was calculated based on LBDEM. The results indicate a marked change in the area and volume of the lake from its maximum water level in 1998 to its minimum level in 2014. During this period, 86% of the lake became a salt desert and the volume of the lake water in 2013 was just 0.83% of the 1998 volume. The volume of water required to restore Urmia Lake from benchmark status (in 2014) to ecological water level (1274.10 m) is 12.546 Bm 3 , excluding evaporation. The results and the proposed method can be used by national and international environmental organizations to monitor and assess the status of Urmia Lake and support them in decision-making.

  11. Great Lakes Environmental Database (GLENDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Great Lakes Environmental Database (GLENDA) houses environmental data on a wide variety of constituents in water, biota, sediment, and air in the Great Lakes area.

  12. Great Lakes Initiative (GLI) Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Great Lakes Initiative Toxicity Clearinghouse is a central location for information on criteria, toxicity data, exposure parameters and other supporting documents used in developing water quality standards in the Great Lakes watershed.

  13. Freshwater lake seabird surveys 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Peninsula/Becharof NWR complex hosts Becharof Lake, the largest lake within a National Wildlife Refuge system. In addition to this distinction, Becharof...

  14. Lake Erie Fish Community Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Lake Erie Biological Station (LEBS), located in Sandusky, Ohio, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). LEBS is the primary federal agency...

  15. Functional microbiology of soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Banciu, H.L.; Muyzer, G.

    2015-01-01

    Soda lakes represent unique permanently haloalkaline system. Despite the harsh conditions, they are inhabited by abundant, mostly prokaryotic, microbial communities. This review summarizes results of studies of main functional groups of the soda lake prokaryotes responsible for carbon, nitrogen and

  16. Br anchiopoda and Copepoda (Crustacea in Mongolian Saline Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Alonso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thi s paper presents a very complete inventory of the branchiopods and copepods that inhabit the salt lakes (salinity >3‰ of Mongolia. The inventory was based on samples collected from 108 salt lakes over the course of seven limnological expeditions in most of the Mongolian territory between 2005 and 2009. The salinity of the lakes ranged from 3.4 to 76‰ S. A total of 43 taxa were identifi ed: 7 Anostraca, 1 Spinicaudata, 1 Notostraca, 1 Leptodoridae, 1 Ctenopoda, 15 Anomopoda and 17 Copepoda. Thirteen taxa are limited to the Asiatic portion and the rest are known throughout the Palearctic region. One taxon, Phallocryptus sp. has not yet been described in scientifi c literature. The taxonomic position of Artemia sp. in Mongolia has still not been clarifi ed. All of the species are eurysaline and, except for Artemia sp. and Cletocamptus retrogressus , which are the most halophile, they can live in waters with less than 10‰ S. Thirty-three species appear only in mesosaline waters (3–20‰ S, fi ve do not exceed the mesosaline level (50‰ S and fi ve can live in hypersaline waters (>50‰ S.

  17. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Johanneke L H C; Tournier, Carole; Knoop, Janine E; Kooyman, Gonnie; Smit, Gerrit

    2009-05-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise method or by a gustometer. The impact of concentration variations and frequency of concentration changes was further investigated with the gustometer method. Five second boosts and 2 s pulses were delivered during 3 sequential 10-s intervals, whereas the delivered total salt content was the same for all conditions. Two second pulses were found to increase saltiness perception, but only when the pulses were delivered during the first seconds of stimulation. Results suggest that the frequency, timing, and concentration differences of salt stimuli can affect saltiness. Specifically, a short and intense stimulus can increase salt perception, possibly through a reduction of adaptation.

  18. Salt intake, plasma sodium, and worldwide salt reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Macgregor, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that a reduction in salt intake from the current level of approximately 9-12 g/d in most countries of the world to the recommended level of 5-6 g/d lowers blood pressure (BP) in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals. A further reduction to 3-4 g/d has a greater effect. Prospective studies and outcome trials have demonstrated that a lower salt intake is related to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Cost-effectiveness analyses have documented that salt reduction is more or at the very least just as cost-effective as tobacco control in reducing cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The mechanisms whereby salt raises blood pressure and increases cardiovascular risk are not fully understood. The existing concepts focus on the tendency for an increase in extracellular fluid volume. Increasing evidence suggests that small increases in plasma sodium may have a direct effect on BP and the cardiovascular system, independent of extracellular volume. All countries should adopt a coherent and workable strategy to reduce salt intake in the whole population. Even a modest reduction in population salt intake will have major beneficial effects on health, along with major cost savings.

  19. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On the origin of salt in the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esin, Nikolay; Esin, Nikolay V.; Yanko-Hombach, Valentina

    2017-04-01

    salt turned into a evaporites. A similar phenomenon occurred in the Mediterranean Sea at the beginning of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (Yesin (Esin), 1987). Thus there was the accumulation of salt in the Caspian Sea and in the lakes of Elton and Baskunchak. Later the continental salt (with continental runoff) accumulated in the Caspian Sea. And same time there was a gradual periodically washout of salt. In the periods of melting of the continental glaciations the level of the Caspian Sea rose and there was the salt outflow in the Black Sea, and then into the Mediterranean Sea. References 1. Svitoch, A.A. Bol'shoi Kaspii: stroenie i istoriia razvitiia [The Great Caspian Sea: Structure and History]. Moskovskii gosudarstvennyi universitet imeni M.V. Lomonosova [MSU], Moscow, - 2014, - 271 p. (In Russian) 2. Yesin (Esin) N.V., Dmitriyev V.A. On the possible mechanism of formation of the Messinian evaporites in the Mediterranean Sea // International Geology Review. USA. - DOI:10.1080/00206818709466143. - 1987, - pp. 258-263.

  1. Sanctuaries for lake trout in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jon G.; Eshenroder, Randy L.; Hartman, Wilbur L.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of lake trout, severely depleted in Lake Superior and virtually extirpated from the other Great Lakes because of sea lamprey predation and intense fishing, are now maintained by annual plantings of hatchery-reared fish in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario and parts of Lake Superior. The extensive coastal areas of the Great Lakes and proximity to large populations resulted in fishing pressure on planted lake trout heavy enough to push annual mortality associated with sport and commercial fisheries well above the critical level needed to reestablish self-sustaining stocks. The interagency, international program for rehabilitating lake trout includes controlling sea lamprey abundance, stocking hatchery-reared lake trout, managing the catch, and establishing sanctuaries where harvest is prohibited. Three lake trout sanctuaries have been established in Lake Michigan: the Fox Island Sanctuary of 121, 500 ha, in the Chippewa-Ottawa Treaty fishing zone in the northern region of the lake; the Milwaukee Reef Sanctuary of 160, 000 ha in midlake, in boundary waters of Michigan and Wisconsin; and Julian's Reef Sanctuary of 6, 500 ha, in Illinois waters. In northern Lake Huron, Drummond Island Sanctuary of 55, 000 ha is two thirds in Indian treaty-ceded waters in Michigan and one third in Ontario waters of Canada. A second sanctuary, Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef Sanctuary, in central Lake Huron contains 168, 000 ha. Sanctuary status for the Canadian areas remains to be approved by the Provincial government. In Lake Superior, sanctuaries protect the spawning grounds of Gull Island Shoal (70, 000 ha) and Devils Island Shoal (44, 000 ha) in Wisconsin's Apostle Island area. These seven sanctuaries, established by the several States and agreed upon by the States, Indian tribes, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Province of Ontario, contribute toward solving an interjurisdictional fishery problem.

  2. Saline Lakes: Platforms for Place-Based Scientific Inquiry by K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsey, H. S.; Chapman, D. S.; Hynek, S. A.; Jarrell, E.; Johnson, W. P.; Naftz, D. L.; Neuman, C. R.; Uno, K.

    2006-12-01

    WEST (Water, the Environment, Science and Teaching) is an NSF-funded GK-12 program at the University of Utah. WEST partners graduate students in the sciences with K-12 teachers to enhance inquiry and place- based science teaching in the Salt Lake City urban area. This region is unique in that habitats relating to the entire local hydrologic cycle are accessible within 30 minutes drive of the city. Great Salt Lake, a large closed-basin lake northwest of the city, generates lake-effect snows that fall on the mountains to the east and serves as the terminal point for rivers and streams that drain over 89,000 km2. The lake's salinity ranges from 14-25% and only a few halophilic species are able to survive in its waters. Despite the low diversity, brine shrimp, brine flies, algae and bacteria are abundant in Great Salt Lake and provide the basis of the food chain for millions of migratory shorebirds and waterfowl that feed in the open water, wetlands and saline flats. WEST has teamed up with researchers from the University of Utah, the USGS, the Utah State Dept. of Environmental Quality, local advocacy groups and a private consulting firm to develop a series of projects that involve K-12 students in an actual research project to study the effects of anthropogenic influences on the lake. The study will produce site-specific water-quality standards to protect the invertebrates, shorebirds, and waterfowl that utilize Great Salt Lake. Students will participate in a research cruise on the lake, collecting samples and data to contribute to an online database that will be shared among participating schools. Students will learn about navigation tools, collect and examine brine shrimp, and measure concentrations of optical brighteners and cyanobacteria as indicators of anthropogenic influences to Great Salt Lake. Parts of the southern arm of the lake are stratified into an upper and lower brine layer and the interface between the two layers can be identified by abrupt changes in

  3. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes,…

  4. Red Lake Forestry Greenhouse Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria Whitefeather-Spears

    2002-01-01

    In 1916, The Red Lake Indian Forest Act was created. The Red Lake Band of Chippewa in Minnesota stood alone and refused to consent to allotment. Consequently, The Red Lake Band is the only tribe in Minnesota for which a congressional act was passed to secure a permanent economic foundation for the band and its future.

  5. Salting-in and salting-out of water-soluble polymers in aqueous salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Jahani, Farahnaz

    2012-05-03

    To obtain further experimental evidence for the mechanisms of the salting effect produced by the addition of salting-out or sating-in inducing electrolytes to aqueous solutions of water-soluble polymers, systematic studies on the vapor-liquid equilibria and liquid-liquid equilibria of aqueous solutions of several polymers are performed in the presence of a large series of electrolytes. Polymers are polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME250), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2000 (PEGDME2000), and polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), and the investigated electrolytes are KCl, NH(4)Cl, MgCl(2), (CH(3))(4)NCl, NaCl, NaNO(3), Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit (tri-sodium citrate). Aqueous solutions of PPG400 form aqueous two-phase systems with all the investigated salts; however, other investigated polymers form aqueous two-phase systems only with Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit. A relation was found between the salting-out or sating-in effects of electrolyte on the polymer aqueous solutions and the slopes of the constant water activity lines of ternary polymer-salt aqueous solutions, so that, in the case of the salting-out effect, the constant water activity lines had a concave slope, but in the case of the salting-in effects, the constant water activity lines had a convex slope. The effect of temperature, anion of electrolyte, cation of electrolyte, and type and molar mass of polymers were studied and the results interpreted in terms of the solute-water and solute-solute interactions. The salting-out effect results from the formation of ion (specially anion)-water hydration complexes, which, in turn, decreases hydration, and hence, the solubility of the polymer and the salting-in effect results from a direct binding of the cations to the ether oxygens of the polymers.

  6. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Great Lakes Region 4 HUC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic...

  7. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  8. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  9. Homolytic reduction of onium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensterbank, Louis; Goddard, Jean-Philippe; Malacria, Max; Ollivier, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Onium salts have proved to be efficient sources of carbon-centered radicals. They can undergo homolytic reduction by single electron transfer (SET) and participate in subsequent synthetic transformations. This review aims to provide an overview on the behavior of onium salts including diazonium, sulfonium, selenonium, telluronium, phosphonium and iodonium cations toward various reductive methods such as radiolysis, electrolysis, photolysis or the use of SET reagents. Mechanistic and synthetic aspects are presented. Applications in polymers and materials science are not covered.

  10. Microplastics in Spanish Table Salt

    OpenAIRE

    I?iguez, Maria E.; Conesa, Juan A.; Fullana, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Marine debris is widely recognized as a global environmental problem. One of its main components, microplastics, has been found in several sea salt samples from different countries, indicating that sea products are irremediably contaminated by microplastics. Previous studies show very confusing results, reporting amounts of microparticles (MPs) in salt ranging from zero to 680 MPs/kg, with no mention of the possible causes of such differences. Several errors in the experimental procedures use...

  11. Lakes on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrol, Nathalie A

    2014-01-01

    On Earth, lakes provide favorable environments for the development of life and its preservation as fossils. They are extremely sensitive to climate fluctuations and to conditions within their watersheds. As such, lakes are unique markers of the impact of environmental changes. Past and current missions have now demonstrated that water once flowed at the surface of Mars early in its history. Evidence of ancient ponding has been uncovered at scales ranging from a few kilometers to possibly that of the Arctic ocean. Whether life existed on Mars is still unknown; upcoming missions may find critic

  12. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  13. Reclaiming the lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2016-01-01

    belonging during a weeklong uprising in defense of Lake Conococha. Highlighting the collective actions and personal narratives from participants in the region-wide blockade, the article therefore seeks to understand how dispossessions of environmental resources perceived as common property are cast in terms...... of individual rights that move well beyond the site of conflict. It is therefore argued that the actions to reclaim Lake Conococha were not only a battle for natural resources and clean water, but more fundamentally an attempt to repossess a citizenship that may be constitutionally secured but all too oft en...

  14. Megasplash at Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. G.; Schweickert, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Backwash from a major ~10 km3 landslide in Lake Tahoe washed away Tioga age (21 ka) moraines (Schweickert, et al 2000; Howle, 2012). Coring in the lake demonstrates a 7700-8000 yr Mt. Mazama ash is widely distributed in lake sediments that overlie the landslide blocks. Moreover, core stratigraphy and radiocarbon ages indicate that all of the sediments cored (to about 3 m depth reaching back 12 ka) were deposited after the landslide (Smith et al., 2013). The age of the landslide is hence constrained at 12-21 ka. Fifteen major subaqueous sand wave channels 2.5 to 10.2 km in length originate from subaqueous delta-terraces at depths of 5-28 m on the margins of the lake. The channels, apparently formed by turbidity currents, are distinctly erosional in their upper part, and transform to deposition aprons in their lower part as they approach the flat lake floor at 500 m depth. The channels contain wave forms (giant ripple marks) convex upstream with maximum wavelengths of 450 m. The lower depositional aprons are surfaced by sand waves convex downstream with maximum wavelengths of 100-300 m. Sand wave convexity mimics the contour of the substrate. The sand wave channel systems are mantled by the post-slide 12 ka sediments and hence have been inactive since that time. These channel-fan structures were apparently produced by backwash from the giant Tahoe landslide, which splashed ~5 km3 of water onto the surrounding countryside thereby lowering lake level by ~10 m. The sediment-charged backwash first deposited the delta-terraces at the lowered lake level and then partly eroded them to generate the sand wave channels, within minutes or hours, while seiche activity resurfaced the delta-terraces. A remarkably similar, though smaller, presently-forming system of turbidity sand wave channels has been imaged at the mouth of the Squamish River in British Columbia (Hughes Clark et al., 2012). The Tahoe splash-induced backwash was briefly equivalent to more than fifteen Squamish

  15. Maturity schedules of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    We determined maturity schedules of male and female lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan from nearshore populations and from an offshore population on Sheboygan Reef, which is located in midlake. Gill nets and bottom trawls were used to catch lake trout in fall 1994 and 1995 from two nearshore sites and Sheboygan Reef. Each lake trout was judged immature or mature, based on visual examination of gonads. Probit analysis, coupled with relative potency testing, revealed that age-at-maturity and length-at-maturity were similar at the two nearshore sites, but that lake trout from the nearshore sites matured at a significantly earlier age than lake trout from Sheboygan Reef. However, length at maturity for the nearshore populations was nearly identical to that for the offshore population, suggesting that rate of lake trout maturation in Lake Michigan was governed by growth rather than age. Half of the lake trout males reached maturity at a total length of 580 mm, whereas half of the females were mature at a length of 640 mm. Over half of nearshore males were mature by age 5, and over half the nearshore females matured by age 6. Due to a slower growth rate, maturity was delayed by 2 years on Sheboygan Reef compared with the nearshore populations. Documentation of this delay in maturation may be useful in deciding stocking allocations for lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Michigan.

  16. Terrestrial CDOM in Lakes of Yamal Peninsula: Connection to Lake and Lake Catchment Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Dvornikov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyze interactions in lake and lake catchment systems of a continuous permafrost area. We assessed colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM absorption at 440 nm (a(440CDOM and absorption slope (S300–500 in lakes using field sampling and optical remote sensing data for an area of 350 km2 in Central Yamal, Siberia. Applying a CDOM algorithm (ratio of green and red band reflectance for two high spatial resolution multispectral GeoEye-1 and Worldview-2 satellite images, we were able to extrapolate the a(λCDOM data from 18 lakes sampled in the field to 356 lakes in the study area (model R2 = 0.79. Values of a(440CDOM in 356 lakes varied from 0.48 to 8.35 m−1 with a median of 1.43 m−1. This a(λCDOM dataset was used to relate lake CDOM to 17 lake and lake catchment parameters derived from optical and radar remote sensing data and from digital elevation model analysis in order to establish the parameters controlling CDOM in lakes on the Yamal Peninsula. Regression tree model and boosted regression tree analysis showed that the activity of cryogenic processes (thermocirques in the lake shores and lake water level were the two most important controls, explaining 48.4% and 28.4% of lake CDOM, respectively (R2 = 0.61. Activation of thermocirques led to a large input of terrestrial organic matter and sediments from catchments and thawed permafrost to lakes (n = 15, mean a(440CDOM = 5.3 m−1. Large lakes on the floodplain with a connection to Mordy-Yakha River received more CDOM (n = 7, mean a(440CDOM = 3.8 m−1 compared to lakes located on higher terraces.

  17. Liking, salt taste perception and use of table salt when consuming reduced-salt chicken stews in light of South Africa's new salt regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kock, H L; Zandstra, E H; Sayed, N; Wentzel-Viljoen, E

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of salt reduction on liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt when consuming chicken stew in light of South Africa's new salt recommendations. In total, 432 South-African consumers (aged 35.2 ± 12.3 years) consumed a full portion of a chicken stew meal once at a central location. Four stock cube powders varying in salt content were used to prepare chicken stews: 1) no reduction - 2013 Na level; regular salt level as currently available on the South African market (24473 mg Na/100 g), 2) salt reduction smaller than 2016 level, i.e. 10%-reduced (22025 mg Na/100 g), 3) 2016 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (18000 mg Na/100 g), 4) 2019 salt level, as per regulatory prescriptions (13000 mg Na/100 g). Consumers were randomly allocated to consume one of the four meals. Liking, salt taste perception, and use of table salt and pepper were measured. Chicken stews prepared with reduced-salt stock powders were equally well-liked as chicken stews with the current salt level. Moreover, a gradual reduction of the salt in the chicken stews resulted in a reduced salt intake, up to an average of 19% for the total group compared to the benchmark 2013 Na level stew. However, 19% of consumers compensated by adding salt back to full compensation in some cases. More salt was added with increased reductions of salt in the meals, even to the point of full compensation. Further investigation into the impacts of nutrition communication and education about salt reduction on salt taste perception and use is needed. This research provides new consumer insights on salt use and emphasises the need for consumer-focused behaviour change approaches, in addition to reformulation of products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A closer look at salt loaded microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, M.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Many walls of ancient buildings are covered with plaster layers. Amongst the most recurrent causes of damage of plasters and substrates are moisture and salt decay processes. To combat these salt problems, special salt resistant plasters have been developed for application on salt loaded substrates.

  19. Spatiotemporal Variability of Lake Water Quality in the Context of Remote Sensing Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Hyatt Hansen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates a number of methods for using field sampling and observed lake characteristics and patterns to improve techniques for development of algae remote sensing models and applications. As satellite and airborne sensors improve and their data are more readily available, applications of models to estimate water quality via remote sensing are becoming more practical for local water quality monitoring, particularly of surface algal conditions. Despite the increasing number of applications, there are significant concerns associated with remote sensing model development and application, several of which are addressed in this study. These concerns include: (1 selecting sensors which are suitable for the spatial and temporal variability in the water body; (2 determining appropriate uses of near-coincident data in empirical model calibration; and (3 recognizing potential limitations of remote sensing measurements which are biased toward surface and near-surface conditions. We address these issues in three lakes in the Great Salt Lake surface water system (namely the Great Salt Lake, Farmington Bay, and Utah Lake through sampling at scales that are representative of commonly used sensors, repeated sampling, and sampling at both near-surface depths and throughout the water column. The variability across distances representative of the spatial resolutions of Landsat, SENTINEL-2 and MODIS sensors suggests that these sensors are appropriate for this lake system. We also use observed temporal variability in the system to evaluate sensors. These relationships proved to be complex, and observed temporal variability indicates the revisit time of Landsat may be problematic for detecting short events in some lakes, while it may be sufficient for other areas of the system with lower short-term variability. Temporal variability patterns in these lakes are also used to assess near-coincident data in empirical model development. Finally, relationships

  20. Deeply Frozen Lakes in a Terrestrial Peri-Glacial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, P. T.; Fritsen, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    , which is indicative of prolonged exposure to a thermal gradient. At 15.8 m in the profile, wet saline ice was encountered at -11.6C (logged upon collection). The brine was later determined to be NaCl with an inferred concentration of 600 ppt, or about 17x seawater. Based on the GPR survey this brine would have been 3-4 in from the ice/liquid water interface. The GPR results show parabolic reflections in the ice starting at 16 m, which we now interpret as the start of the briny ice. A meteorological station at the west end of the lake recorded a mean annual temperature at Lake Vida of -26C. This is about 9'C colder than annual averages in Taylor and Wright Valleys during the same period. The difference occurs entirely during the winter, with the summers being very similar. The reason for the cold Victoria Valley winters appears to be a lack of foehn winds. Since local topography does not seem to be blocking these winds, we suggest that a strong winter temperature inversion in the valley forces the foehn winds to stay off the valley floor. The meteorological record thus shows that the environment at Lake Vida provides greater freezing potential than the environment of other dry valley lakes. We used these meteorological data to model the annual thermal wave in Lake Vida ice without considering the influence of the underlying water body. The modeled temperatures are compared against the actual first year's data. From this comparison it is clear that the actual temperature profile gets warmer toward the bottom, suggesting a heat source at depth. There are three probable, not mutually exclusive, candidates for this heat source: (1) localized geothermal heating, (2) ice growth at the base of the ice cover with the resultant release of latent heat, and (3) additional cooling of the water column and the release of specific heat associated with ice growth and concomitant rejection of salts, which would depress the freezing temperature of the solution in front of the advancing

  1. THE HYDROLOGIC CYCLE, UNIDIRECTIONAL CHARTER OF THE DISSOLVED SALTS AND SUSPENDED LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Florea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is underlined that the hydrologic cycle in nature, reversible and regenerating of fresh water, carries out also an unidirectional and irreversible circulation – by means of a fragment of the hydrologic cycle – of the dissolved salts and stream’s suspended load, entailed by the water drained from continents to ocean. The trend is to transfer soluble salts from land to ocean in the same time with the running water on land in the portion of the hydrologic cycle which refers to the water transfer from continents to ocean in order to equilibrate the annual water balance of the hydrologic cycle. But, one can realize here and there some local salt accumulations in salt soils or in salt lakes within areas without drainage in arid climate; these salts accumulations are cases of local hydrologic cycles „grafted” along the way of water on land (to ocean. The energy necessary to the hydrologic cycle in nature is delivered by the Sun, and the entropy remains at a low level as a consequence of the elimination in this cycle of water vapors with high entropy, and of the receiving of liquid or solid water with low entropy, so that the annual level of entropy is maintained at a low level.

  2. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This booklet introduces an environmental curriculum for use in a variety of elementary subjects. The lesson plans provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into the subjects of history, social studies, and environmental sciences. Each of these sections contains background information, discussion points, and a…

  3. Lake Guiers, North Senegal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. This is a study of the environmental conditions and primary phytoplankton production in a Sahelian shallow lake of Senegal, West Africa. Environmental descriptors (nutrient, water transparency, temperature and hydrochemistry) and their effects on primary production were studied. Samples were collected ...

  4. Bishoftu crater lakes, Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bottles and completely filled and tightened with double-sealed caps. Samples from wells were collected using a Klyen Downhole Sampler. water samples from the lakes were collected using a water sampling apparatus designed to collect samples at different depths. Water samples for isotope analysis were collected from ...

  5. IN LAKE CHAMO, ETHIOPIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and dieta protein and cellulose levels on the growth 0 Tilapia nilotica. Mem. I-"ac. ish, 36:7-15. 14. Yirgaw Teferi, Demeke Admassu and Seyoum Men ' tou -(2000). The food and feeding habit of Oreochromis niloticus L. Pisces: Cichlidae) in Lake. Chamo, Ethiopia. SINET: Ethiop. I. Sci. 23(1):1-12. Yirgaw Teferi, Demeke ...

  6. Lake Chivero, Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    overriding the effect of nutrients in determining the lack of. M. aeruginosa ..... (b) Enclosure. Figure 7. The relative abundances of the most abundant phytoplankton species based on phytoplankton biomass estimations in the lake and the enclosures at the .... Cyclotella sp. showed that diatoms can exhibit a wide spectrum.

  7. Utilization of GIS modeling in geoenvironmental studies of Qaroun Lake, El Fayoum Depression, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Abdelaal H.; El-Sayed, Salah Abdelwahab; El-Sabagh, Moustafa E.

    2018-02-01

    Qaroun Lake, the study area, is a natural protectorate located at the northern part of El Fayoum Depression, Egypt. An integrated approach including hydrochemistry, mineralogy of sediments and GIS analysis and modeling was conducted in order to determine the different geoenvironmental parameters affecting the lake environmental system. Forty two environmental water and sediment samples were collected from the lake and relevant drains in 2013. The water samples were analyzed for major ions and trace elements and the sediment ones were analyzed for clay and non-clay minerals. This study showed that the saline water of the lake (31490 Mg2+ > Ca2+ > K+ - Cl- > SO42- > HCO3- > CO32-. The water salt assemblages were KCl - NaCl - Na2SO4 - MgSO4 - CaSO4 - Ca(HCO3)2 reflecting a mixed water type. The contents of NaCl, Na2SO4 and MgSO4 salts were found to be fully controlled with the lake depths. The hydrogeochemical investigations revealed that the evaporation concentration is the primary process of the lake water evolution. The presence of trace elements in the lake water is essentially of allochtonous origin. The GIS-based maps indicated that the concentrations of Zn, Co, Mo, Pb, F and Cd elements in water had increased in the eastern part of the lake; meanwhile, the contents of NO3- ions had increased in the southwestern part indicating that these parts were the most vulnerable to the potential pollution with such elements. The XRD analysis revealed the existence of different mineral assemblages (quartz, kaolinite, goethite, calcite, halite, hematite, feldspar, gypsum, dolomite and saponite) in bottom sediments. The mineral concentrations varied greatly from place to another place along the lake and their distributions were asymmetric. The dominant minerals were the quartz and calcite. The mineralogical compositions of sediments were highly affected by the natural and man-mad activities. The most effective processes were the type of the water and solid materials coming

  8. Aerosol Emissions from Great Lakes Harmful Algal Blooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Nathaniel W. [Department; Olson, Nicole E. [Department; Panas, Mark [Department; Axson, Jessica L. [Department; Tirella, Peter S. [Department; Kirpes, Rachel M. [Department; Craig, Rebecca L. [Department; Gunsch, Matthew J. [Department; China, Swarup [William; Laskin, Alexander [William; Ault, Andrew P. [Department; Department; Pratt, Kerri A. [Department; Department

    2017-12-20

    In freshwater lakes, harmful algal blooms (HABs) of Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) produce toxins that impact human health. However, little is known about the chemical species present in lake spray aerosol (LSA) produced from wave-breaking in freshwater HABs. In this study, a laboratory LSA generator produced aerosols from freshwater samples collected from Lake Michigan and Lake Erie during HAB and non-bloom conditions. Particles were analyzed for size and chemical composition by single particle mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy, with three distinct types of LSA identified with varying levels of organic carbon and biological material associated with calcium salts. LSA autofluorescence increases with blue-green algae concentration, showing that organic molecules of biological origin are incorporated in LSA from HABs. The number fraction of LSA with biological mass spectral markers also increases with particle diameter (greater than 0.5 μm), showing that HABs have size-dependent impacts on aerosol composition. The highest number fraction of LSA enriched in organic carbon were observed in particles less than 0.5 μm in diameter. Understanding the transfer of organic and biogenic material from freshwater to the atmosphere via LSA particles is crucial for determining health and climate effects due to HABs.

  9. Holocene depositional environments and surface-level changes at Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, T.E.; Hall, B.L.; Hendy, C.H.; Spaulding, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on Holocene surface-level variations of Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, as determined from multi-proxy analyses of 18 sediment cores. During this time accumulating sediments were predominantly aeolian sand with algal and carbonate laminae. Based on stratigraphy, mineralogy and diatom assemblages we suggest some carbonate laminae were deposited when lake level dropped, leading to concentration and subsequent precipitation of salts. Although lake level appears to have remained relatively stable throughout the Holocene, minor (<4.5 m below present) lowstands occurred at approximately 6400, 4700, 3800 and ??? 1600 cal. yr BP. The stability of Lake Fryxell during the Holocene contrasts with large-scale variability at other Dry Valleys lakes (eg, Lake Vanda) and with suggestions from chemical diffusion models of a near-desiccation at ???1200 cal. yr BP. The reason for the comparative stability of Lake Fryxell is uncertain, but may be the result of basin morphology and the number, aspect and proximity of meltwater sources. ?? 2008 SAGE Publications.

  10. Modelling density-dependent flow and solute transport at the Lake Tutchewop saline disposal complex, Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Craig T.; Narayan, Kumar A.

    1998-05-01

    Intercepted saline groundwaters and drainage effluent from irrigation are commonly stored in both natural and artificial saline disposal basins throughout the Murray-Darling Basin of Australia. Their continued use as wastewater evaporation sites requires an understanding of existing groundwater dynamics. The useful of individual basins, their sustainability and possible environmental impacts remain largely unknown. In this work, the movement of salt to the underlying groundwater system from Lake Tutchewop, a saline disposal complex in north-central Victoria, was modelled in cross-section. Due to the salinity contrast between the hypersaline basin waters and the regional groundwater, it was necessary to simulate density-dependent flow behaviour. Under certain conditions, these density-stratified systems may become unstable leading to the onset of convective behaviour, which greatly increases the movement of salt from the basin to the groundwater system. Modelled concentration profiles in the aquifer system and calculated seepage rates from the basin show that Lake Tutchewop is stable under its present operating regime. The downward movement of salt is mainly controlled by diffusion and dispersion. The calibrated model was used to assess the impact of several management scenarios using time-dependent boundary conditions for lake salinity and water levels. The influence of heterogeneous basin linings on ensuing salt flux rates is examined, and results show that increased solute transport will occur under such conditions. A sensitivity analysis performed on governing variables showed that salt fluxes were most sensitive to lake salinity levels. A solute Rayleigh number defined in terms of basin salinity and hydrogeologic parameters is seen to be an effective tool for predicting the long term behaviour of such saline disposal basins. The models and concepts developed in this work may find application in the design and management of saline disposal complexes.

  11. Intentional introduction of Artemia sinica (Anostraca) in the high-altitude Tibetan lake Dangxiong Co: the new population and consequences for the environment and for humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qinxian; Anufriieva, Elena; Liu, Xifang; Kong, Fanjing; Shadrin, Nickolai

    2015-11-01

    The imbalance between supply and demand of Artemia cysts in China and around the world is increasing now. Salt lakes in Tibet may contribute to the solution of the problem. In Northern Tibet there are 26 saline lakes whose salinity and temperature may support Artemia survival at an altitude of 4 000-5 100 m. We found Artemia in 15 of these lakes. The saline lakes with Artemia populations mainly belong to the shallow basin lakes, and the majority of these lakes are small in area. The total area of lakes without Artemia is more than 1 000 km2. Lake Dangxiong Co (Co means lake in Tibet) was chosen for the intentional introduction of Artemia sinica. In 2004, 850 g of A. sinica cysts, originating from Qinghai, were introduced in the lake. Surveys in 2006-2014 showed that the average abundance of Artemia adults in the lake gradually increased from 20 ind./m3 in 2006 to 1950 ind./m3 in 2013. We assume that two subpopulations of A. sinica, separated by depth, may exist in the lake. The new Artemia population caused an increase in the number of species of phytoplankton and heterotrophic protozoa with a decrease of their total abundance. Water transparency also increased. Dominance in phytoplankton passed from cyanobacteria to diatoms. Changes occurred not only in the lake ecosystem; the number of water birds using the lakes also dramatically increased. Preliminary calculations showed that is it possible to harvest at least about 150 t cysts per year from the lake as well as 3.2 thousand tons of frozen or 350 t of dried biomass of adult Artemia.

  12. Evolution of alkaline lakes - Lake Van case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman Meyer, Felix; Viehberg, Finn; Bahroun, Sonya; Wolf, Annabel; Immenhauser, Adrian; Kwiecien, Ola

    2017-04-01

    Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) is the largest terminal soda lake on Earth. The lake sedimentary profile covers ca. 600 ka (Stockhecke et al. 2014) Based on lithological changes, the presence of freshwater microfossils and close-to-freshwater pH value in the pore water, members of ICDP PALEOVAN concluded that Lake Van might have started as an open lake. Here we show paleontological and geochemical evidence in favour of this idea and constrain the time, when Lake Van likely transformed into a closed lake. Additionally we provide the first conceptual model of how this closure may have happened. Our archives of choice are inorganic and biogenic carbonates, separated by wet sieving. We identified microfossil assemblages (fraction > 125 µm) and performed high-resolution oxygen isotope (delta18O) and elemental (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) analyses of the fraction plants growing in the photic zone as food supply. These two aspects point to an increasing salinity in a shallowing lake. The delta18O values of inorganic carbonates are relatively low during the initial phase of Lake Van and increase abruptly (ca. 7‰) after 530 ka BP. At approximately the same time combination of Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca data suggest first occurrence of aragonite. Again, these findings suggest geochemical changes of the lake water concurrent with transition documented by microfossils. Comparison between Lake Van and Lake Ohrid (Lacey et al. 2016) delta18O data, precludes regional climate change (e.g.: increased evaporation) as the main driver of observed changes. With no evidence for increased volcanic or tectonic activity (e.g.: tephra layers, deformation structures, slumping) in the Lake Van sedimentary profile around 530 ka, it seems unlikely that a pyroclastic flow blocked the outflow of the lake. Alternatively, a portion of inflow has been diverged which might have caused a change in the hydrological balance and lake level falling below its outlet. However, as no geomorphological data confirming this

  13. Lake Mead--clear and vital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessells, Stephen M.; Rosen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Lake Mead – Clear and Vital” is a 13 minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

  14. First Fourteen Years of Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Harold E.

    1954-01-01

    correspondingly greater. Construction of upstream reservoirs to capture some of the inflowing sediment, or transportation of sediment in the outflow through Hoover Dam, would also increase the life of the reservoir. In the first 12 years of Lake Mead, the dissolved mineral matter in the outflowing water was significantly greater than the average in the in flowing water, owing in part to solution of gypsum and rock salt from the bed of the reservoir. Currently the increased dissolved solids in the outflowing water can be accounted for almost entirely by evaporation from the reservoir, which is about 5 fo 7 percent of the annual inflow. The water from Lake Mead is habitually of better quality than that diverted from the river for irrigation prior to regulation by Hoover Dam, because it represents an average of the poor water of low stages and the excellent water from melting snow. Geodetic surveys of the Lake Mead area show that the weight of water has caused subsidence of the earth's crust amounting to about 120 millimeter at Hoover Dam, and an even greater amount in the principal area of storage in the reservoir.

  15. The Volume of Earth's Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cael, B. B.

    How much water do lakes on Earth hold? Global lake volume estimates are scarce, highly variable, and poorly documented. We develop a mechanistic null model for estimating global lake mean depth and volume based on a statistical topographic approach to Earth's surface. The volume-area scaling prediction is accurate and consistent within and across lake datasets spanning diverse regions. We applied these relationships to a global lake area census to estimate global lake volume and depth. The volume of Earth's lakes is 199,000 km3 (95% confidence interval 196,000-202,000 km3) . This volume is in the range of historical estimates (166,000-280,000 km3) , but the overall mean depth of 41.8 m (95% CI 41.2-42.4 m) is significantly lower than previous estimates (62 - 151 m). These results highlight and constrain the relative scarcity of lake waters in the hydrosphere and have implications for the role of lakes in global biogeochemical cycles. We also evaluate the size (area) distribution of lakes on Earth compared to expectations from percolation theory. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. 2388357.

  16. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  17. Monitoring and modeling water temperature and trophic status of a shallow Mediterranean lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Bueche, Thomas; Pulina, Silvia; Marrosu, Roberto; Padedda, Bachisio Mario; Mariani, Maria Antonietta; Vetter, Mark; Cohen, Denis; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello; Lugliè, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Lakes are sensitive to changes in climate and human activities. Over the last few decades, Mediterranean lakes have experienced various problems due to the current climate change (drought, flood, warming, salt accumulation, water quality changes, etc.), often amplified by water use, intensification of land use activities, and pollution. The overall impact of these changes on water resources is still an open question. In this study we monitor the trophic status and the dynamics of water temperature of Lake Baratz, the only natural lake in Sardinia, Italy, characterized by high salinity and shallow depth. We extend the research carried out in the past 8 years by integrating new physical, chemical and biological data using a multidisciplinary approach that combines hydrological and biological dynamics. In particular, the lake water balance and the thermal and hydrochemical regime are studied with a lake dynamic model (the General Lake Model or GLM) which combine the energy budget method for estimating lake evaporation, and a physically-based rainfall-runoff simulator for estimating lake inflow, calibrated with measurements at the cross section of the main inlet stream. The trophic state of the lake was evaluated applying the OCDE Probability Distribution Diagrams method, which requires nutrient concentrations in the lake (total phosphorus), phytoplankton chlorophyll a and Secchi disk transparency data. We collected field data from a raft station and a land station, measuring net solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, precipitation, wind velocity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature from thermistors submerged in the uppermost three centimeters of water and beneath the lake surface at depths of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 m. Samples for nutrients and chlorophyll a analyses were collected at the same above mentioned depths close to the raft station using a Niskin bottle. Temperature, salinity, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured using a multi

  18. The promotion of geomorphosites on salt from Sovata - Praid and Turda using cultural and scientific tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, B.; Irimus, I.; Petrea, D.

    2012-04-01

    The paper highlights the role of geomorphosites on salt, in experts and specialists training, in geography of tourism and planning, namely, the involvement of educational factor in defining managerial and marketing skills of future specialists in training. Geographical area of investigation belongs to the Transylvanian tectonic basin, overlapped to saliferous tectonic area from eastern Transylvania, represented by Praid - Sovata - Corund anticline and Sic -Cojocna - Turda anticline, analysis is focused on the Praid - Sovata and Turda diapirs. Saliferous area Praid - Sovata - Corund is situated on the contact area of the Transylvanian Basin with neo-eruptiv mountain chain of Eastern Carpathians, Calimani - Gurghiu - Harghita, and at the contact of Târnavelor Plateau with the orogen alignment of Gurghiu - Harghita Mountains. The salt body, in the horizontal plane, has a quasi-circular shape, slightly ellipsoidal, with diameters of 1.2 and 1.4 km, and is estimated to have a burial depth of 2.6 to 2.8 km. The salt massif from Praid, pierce the Mio-Pliocene blanket around and appears at the surface as diapir, flanked by sedimentary rocks that are partially covered by extrusive post-Pliocene volcanic formations and Quaternary deposits. Evaporitic deposits presents a varied lithology represented by gypsum, anhydrite, salt rock, potassium salt and celestine. The salt massif from Turda develops on the anticline Sic -Cojocna - Turda, oriented NE - SW, 2 km NE of Turda's downtown. It has an elongated shape, about 4 km, with widths ranging from 700 m to 200 m and also with a thickness ranging from 750 m to over 1000 m. In terms of stratigraphy, the salt massif is surrounded by deposits belonging to Badenian, Sarmatian and Quaternary. Due to salt dissolution by meteoric waters, carsto-saline lakes were formed, and due to ceiling collapse, because of an intensive exploitation, and infiltrations of rainwater and rivers, antropo-salted lakes were formed. The water and mud of

  19. Management Plan for Protection and Monitoring of Lake Ladora, Lake Mary and Lower Derby Lake During RMA Remediation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan further defines the conditions that are required to be maintained in Lake Ladora, Lake Mary, and Lower Derby Lake to meet the requirements of...

  20. Salt effects in electromembrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seip, Knut Fredrik; Jensen, Henrik; Kieu, Thanh Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) was performed on samples containing substantial amounts of NaCl to investigate how the presence of salts affected the recovery, repeatability, and membrane current in the extraction system. A group of 17 non-polar basic drugs with various physical chemical...... this loss and the physical chemical properties of these substances was seen. The recovery loss was hypothesized to be caused by ion pairing in the SLM, and a mathematical model for the extraction recovery in the presence of salts was made according to the experimental observations. Some variations...... improves the theoretical understanding of the extraction process, and can contribute to the future development and optimization of the technique....

  1. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a promising future nuclear fission reactor technology with excellent performance in terms of safety and reliability, sustainability, proliferation resistance and economics. For the design and safety assessment of this concept, it is extremely important to have a

  2. Salt tectonics in Santos Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, David G.; Nielsen, Malene; Raven, Madeleine [Maersk Oil and Gas, Copenhagen (Denmark); Menezes, Paulo [Maersk Oil and Gas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    From Albian to end Cretaceous times, the inboard part of the Santos Basin in Brazil was affected by extension as salt flowed basinwards under the effect of gravity. Salt rollers, flip-flop salt diapirs and the famous Albian Gap were all formed by this process. Outboard of these extensional structures, contraction was taken up in a wide zone of thickened salt where salt collected. The overburden was carried on top of the salt as it flowed down-dip, with up to 40 km of translation recorded in Albian strata. (author)

  3. Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Lake Edku Water, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. OKBAH

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to evaluate the quality of Lake Edku water. Regional and seasonal variations of some physico-chemical parameters (nutrient salts, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and silicate, in addition to pH, total alkalinity, chlorosity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand and oxidizable organic matter that were determined during the period from January to December 2000. Important variations have occurred in the investigated area as a result of human activity and the discharge of wastewater to the lake. The relatively low pH values reflect the decreased productivity of the Lake as a result of the polluted water discharged into the lake. Total alkalinity varied between 2.25 ± 0.35 to 8.38 ± 0.9 meq/l. In comparison with previous decades chlorosity content (586-1562 mg/l showed the general decreasing trend. Dissolved oxygen varied (2.37 ± 0.72 - 4.47 ± 0.94 mg/l. The ratios of BOD/ OOM values indicate that the lake water has a biodegradable nature. There was a noticeable variation in ammonia levels; a lower ammonia content was recorded in summer and spring. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in Lake Edku water showed values ranging from 3.7±1.4 to 7.8±1.9 ΜM and from 15.2±2.9 to 45.9±11.8 ΜM, respectively. The total nitrogen of the lake exhibited higher levels (53.1±12.2 – 164.2±30.7 ΜM. The ratio of NH4/TIN (0.09-0.45 seems to be highly representative of the microbial nitrification rate as well as of the varying agricultural inflows. It is interesting to note that increasing values of reactive phosphate (11.6±1.8 – 14.7±2.5 ΜM were determined in autumn and winter respectively. The higher concentrations of reactive silicate were directly proportional to drainage water discharged into the Lake. It is clear from the mean ratio of N/P (2.4-8.8 nitrogen is the limiting factor. The lower values of N/P ratio could be related to an allochthonous condition.

  4. Lake Urmia is disappearing

    OpenAIRE

    Khatami, Sina

    2015-01-01

    The present article is a translation—to Farsi—of an article by Dr. Ali Mirchi (postdoctoral research associate at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan Technological University), Dr. Kaveh Madani (lecturer in Environmental Management at the Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London) and Dr. Amir Aghakouchak (assistant professor at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine), entitled "Lake Urmia: how Ir...

  5. Archaea in Yellowstone Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Gorby, Yuri; McDermott, Timothy R; Nealson, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex has yielded foundational discoveries that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the Archaea. This study continues on this theme, examining Yellowstone Lake and its lake floor hydrothermal vents. Significant Archaea novelty and diversity were found associated with two near-surface photic zone environments and two vents that varied in their depth, temperature and geochemical profile. Phylogenetic diversity was assessed using 454-FLX sequencing (~51,000 pyrosequencing reads; V1 and V2 regions) and Sanger sequencing of 200 near-full-length polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clones. Automated classifiers (Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and Greengenes) were problematic for the 454-FLX reads (wrong domain or phylum), although BLAST analysis of the 454-FLX reads against the phylogenetically placed full-length Sanger sequenced PCR clones proved reliable. Most of the archaeal diversity was associated with vents, and as expected there were differences between the vents and the near-surface photic zone samples. Thaumarchaeota dominated all samples: vent-associated organisms corresponded to the largely uncharacterized Marine Group I, and in surface waters, ~69-84% of the 454-FLX reads matched archaeal clones representing organisms that are Nitrosopumilus maritimus-like (96-97% identity). Importance of the lake nitrogen cycling was also suggested by >5% of the alkaline vent phylotypes being closely related to the nitrifier Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. The Euryarchaeota were primarily related to the uncharacterized environmental clones that make up the Deep Sea Euryarchaeal Group or Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Group-6. The phylogenetic parallels of Yellowstone Lake archaea to marine microorganisms provide opportunities to examine interesting evolutionary tracks between freshwater and marine lineages.

  6. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J. Iwan [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  7. Bear Lake-Minidoka - Phragmites Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bear Lake: Phragmites patches were sprayed on the refuge & north of the lake proper. Minidoka: patches along the Snake River & Lake Walcott were treated with...

  8. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Lakes Assessments - Attaining

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This layer shows only attaining lakes of the Integrated List. The Lakes Integrated List represents lake assessments in an integrated format for the Clean Water Act...

  9. Sources of household salt in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Pieter L

    2005-01-01

    Marketing of non-iodized salt through unconventional distribution channels is one of the factors weakening the national salt iodization program in South Africa. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the various sources of household salt, and to relate this information to socio-economic status. Questionnaire information was collected by personal interview during home visits from a multistage, cluster, probability sample of 2164 adults representative of the adult population. Nationally 77.7% of households obtained their table salt from the typical food shops distributing iodized salt. However, in the nine different provinces between 8 and 37.3% of households used unconventional sources, distributing mainly non-iodized salt, to obtain their household salt. These alternative sources include distributors of agricultural salt, small general dealer shops called spaza shops, in peri-urban and rural townships, street vendors and salt saches placed in the packaging of maize meal bags. Country-wide around 30% of low socio-economic households obtained their salt from unconventional sources compared to less than 5% in high socio-economic households, emphasizing the vulnerability of low socio-economic groups to the use of non-iodized salt. Intervention strategies should mobilize all role players involved in unconventional marketing channels of household salt to provide only iodized salt to consumers, as required by law.

  10. Ultrasonic characterization of pork meat salting

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, J. V.; De Prados, M.; Pérez-Muelas, N.; Cárcel, J. A.; Benedito, J.

    2012-12-01

    Salting process plays a key role in the preservation and quality of dry-cured meat products. Therefore, an adequate monitoring of salt content during salting is necessary to reach high quality products. Thus, the main objective of this work was to test the ability of low intensity ultrasound to monitor the salting process of pork meat. Cylindrical samples (diameter 36 mm, height 60±10 mm) of Biceps femoris were salted (brine 20% NaCl, w/w) at 2 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. During salting and at each experimental time, three cylinders were taken in order to measure the ultrasonic velocity at 2 °C. Afterwards, the cylinders were split in three sections (height 20 mm), measuring again the ultrasonic velocity and determining the salt and the moisture content by AOAC standards. In the whole cylinders, moisture content was reduced from 763 (g/kg sample) in fresh samples to 723 (g/kg sample) in samples salted for 7 days, while the maximum salt gain was 37.3 (g/kg sample). Although, moisture and salt contents up to 673 and 118 (g/kg sample) were reached in the sections of meat cylinders, respectively. During salting, the ultrasonic velocity increased due to salt gain and water loss. Thus, significant (pmeat salting processes carried out in the food industry.

  11. Dramatic and long-term lake level changes in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau from Cryosat-2 altimeter: validation and augmentation by results from repeat altimeter missions and satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Huang, YongRuei; Cheng, Ys; Shen, WenBin; Pan, Yuanjin

    2017-04-01

    The mean elevation of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) exceeds 4000 m. Lake levels in the QTP are less affected by human activities than elsewhere, and may better reflect the state of contemporary climate change. Here ground-based lake level measurements are rare. Repeat altimeter missions, particularly those from the TOPEX and ERS series of altimetry, have provided long-term lake level observations in the QTP, but their large cross-track distances allow only few lakes to be monitored. In contrast, the Cryosat-2 altimeter, equipped with the new sensor SIRAL (interferometric/ synthetic aperture radar altimeter), provides a much better ranging accuracy and a finer spatial coverage than these repeated missions, and can detect water level changes over a large number of lakes in the QTP. In this study, Cryosat-2 data are used to determine lake level changes over 75˚E-100˚E and 28˚N-37.5˚N, where Cryosat-2 covers 60 lakes and SARAL/ AltiKa covers 32 lakes from 2013 to 2016. Over a lake, Cryosat-2 in different cycles can pass through different spots of the lake, making the numbers of observations non-uniform and requiring corrections for lake slopes. Four cases are investigated to cope with these situations: (1) neglecting inconsistency in data volume and lake slopes (2) considering data volume, (3) considering lake slopes only, and (4) considering both data volume and lake slopes. The CRYOSAT-2 result is then compared with the result from the SARAL to determine the best case. Because Cryosat-2 is available from 2010 to 2016, Jason-2 data are used to fill gaps between the time series of Cryosat-2 and ICESat (2003-2009) to obtain >10 years of lake level series. The Cryosat-2 result shows dramatic lake level rises in Lakes Kusai, Zhuoaihu and Salt in 2011 caused by floods. Landsat satellite imagery assists the determination and interpretation of such rises.

  12. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface of this lake within a specified time and under specified conditions.

  13. INVESTIGATION ON THE URMIA LAKE DROUGHT USING SATELLITE ALTIMETRY AND WEATHER REANALYSIS PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sabzehee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Urmia Lake is located in northwestern Iran. It is the sixth largest salt lake in the world. In the past 14 years, this lake strongly faced to the water level decrease and surface water reduction. Several space-borne techniques have been employed for detecting the hydrological cycle and its inter-annual changes. The goal of this paper is to investigate weather reanalysis products such as specific humidity of NCEP model and a total column water vapor extracted from ECMWF model and other techniques such as satellite altimetry that have been powerful for the identification of some drought factors of the Urmia Lake. In this study, we used satellite altimetry data from ENVISAT and CryoSat-2 to monitor the Lake water level and optical satellite imagery to determine the surface water extent of the lake during 2002 to 2014. Our altimetry and satellite imagery results reveal decrease in height and area of Urmia Lake over the last 14 years. The lake surface area and the water level decreased continuously at approximately 2666 km2 and 3.5 m respectively. Moreover, we employed the monthly 0.125°×0.125° datasets of the ECMWF data and 2.5°×2.5° datasets of the NCEP data to demonstrate amount of water vapor in the atmosphere over the lake. The total column water vapor extracted from ECMWF data and specific humidity of NCEP data show similar behavior. Results indicate that no meaningful correlation between the altimetry data and weather reanalysis models exists. The weather reanalysis models do not indicate descending variations during 2000 until 2014. For interpreting the situation and studying the climate change and man-made impacts on the drought in this region, we need to use ground-based data such as wind speed, precipitation, barometric pressure and temperature.

  14. Investigation on the Urmia Lake Drought Using Satellite Altimetry and Weather Reanalysis Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzehee, F.; Nafisi, V.; Iran Pour, S.

    2017-09-01

    The Urmia Lake is located in northwestern Iran. It is the sixth largest salt lake in the world. In the past 14 years, this lake strongly faced to the water level decrease and surface water reduction. Several space-borne techniques have been employed for detecting the hydrological cycle and its inter-annual changes. The goal of this paper is to investigate weather reanalysis products such as specific humidity of NCEP model and a total column water vapor extracted from ECMWF model and other techniques such as satellite altimetry that have been powerful for the identification of some drought factors of the Urmia Lake. In this study, we used satellite altimetry data from ENVISAT and CryoSat-2 to monitor the Lake water level and optical satellite imagery to determine the surface water extent of the lake during 2002 to 2014. Our altimetry and satellite imagery results reveal decrease in height and area of Urmia Lake over the last 14 years. The lake surface area and the water level decreased continuously at approximately 2666 km2 and 3.5 m respectively. Moreover, we employed the monthly 0.125°×0.125° datasets of the ECMWF data and 2.5°×2.5° datasets of the NCEP data to demonstrate amount of water vapor in the atmosphere over the lake. The total column water vapor extracted from ECMWF data and specific humidity of NCEP data show similar behavior. Results indicate that no meaningful correlation between the altimetry data and weather reanalysis models exists. The weather reanalysis models do not indicate descending variations during 2000 until 2014. For interpreting the situation and studying the climate change and man-made impacts on the drought in this region, we need to use ground-based data such as wind speed, precipitation, barometric pressure and temperature.

  15. Salt decay of Morley limestone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Salt weathering is one of the main causes of decay of natural stone, and by consequence a major problem to the conservation of cultural heritage. In the present case, the performance of Morley limestone from the Département Meuse, France, as a replacement stone under saltloaded conditions is

  16. THE RAW MINERAL SALTS USE IN COSMETICS FORMULATIONS: ASSORTMENT, MINERAL RAW MATERIALS CHARACTERISTICS AND COSMETICS FORMULATION TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Evseeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of mineral raw materials (brine lakes, thermal springs, sea water, bischofite in cosmetics is presented in this article. The assortment of cosmetics that contain mineral salts is presented. The technological characteristics of production of these cosmetic formulations, in particular the ability of mineral salts to influence the stability of formulation and the sensory properties of products are given. The main approaches of that formulation development are described.

  17. Genes and Salt Tolerance: Bringing Them Together

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rana Munns

    2005-01-01

    Salinity tolerance comes from genes that limit the rate of salt uptake from the soil and the transport of salt throughout the plant, adjust the ionic and osmotic balance of cells in roots and shoots...

  18. Plant salt tolerance: adaptations in halophytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flowers, Timothy J; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    ..., and to develop salt-tolerant crops. In this Preface to a Special Issue on halophytes and saline adaptations, the evolution of salt tolerance in halophytes, their life-history traits and progress in understanding...

  19. Dietary salt reduction for control of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In developed as well as developing countries, the four main factors affecting blood pressure are high salt intake, low potassium intake, overweight, and low physical activity level. This is also true for the increase in blood pressure with advancing age, occurring in all societies. It is now accepted that excess dietary salt raises blood pressure levels, whereas dietary salt reduction reduces blood pressure and prevents vascular complications.(1 The effect of salt on blood pressure is presumably due to the inability of the kidneys to excrete large amounts of salt, as humans are evolutionary adapted to ingest and excrete less than 1 gram of salt per day.(2 In this connection it should be noted that the more important element in common salt (sodium chloride is the sodium ion, and any restrictions applying to common salt also apply to all food items that contain sodium ions, such as sodium glutamate and baking soda.

  20. Lake Charles CCS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leib, Thomas [Leucadia Energy, LLC, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Cole, Dan [Denbury Onshore, LLC, Plano, TX (United States)

    2015-06-30

    In late September 2014 development of the Lake Charles Clean Energy (LCCE) Plant was abandoned resulting in termination of Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project which was a subset the LCCE Plant. As a result, the project was only funded through Phase 2A (Design) and did not enter Phase 2B (Construction) or Phase 2C (Operations). This report was prepared relying on information prepared and provided by engineering companies which were engaged by Leucadia Energy, LLC to prepare or review Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) for the Lake Charles Clean Energy Project, which includes the Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project in Lake Charles, Louisiana. The Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project was to be a large-scale industrial CCS project intended to demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. The Scope of work was divided into two discrete sections; 1) Capture and Compression prepared by the Recipient Leucadia Energy, LLC, and 2) Transport and Sequestration prepared by sub-Recipient Denbury Onshore, LLC. Capture and Compression-The Lake Charles CCS Project Final Technical Report describes the systems and equipment that would be necessary to capture CO2 generated in a large industrial gasification process and sequester the CO2 into underground formations. The purpose of each system is defined along with a description of its equipment and operation. Criteria for selection of major equipment are provided and ancillary utilities necessary for safe and reliable operation in compliance with environmental regulations are described. Construction considerations are described including a general arrangement of the CCS process units within the overall gasification project. A cost estimate is provided, delineated by system area with cost breakdown showing equipment, piping and materials

  1. Density-dependent groundwater flow and dissolution potential along a salt diapir in the Transylvanian Basin, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Eric; Danchiv, Alex; Dresmann, Horst; Mocuţa, Marius; Huggenberger, Peter; Scheidler, Stefan; Wiesmeier, Stefan; Popa, Iulian; Zlibut, Alexandru; Zamfirescu, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Salt diapirs and the surrounding sediments are often involved in a variety of human activities, such as salt mining, exploration and storage of hydrocarbons, and also storage of radioactive waste material. The presence of highly soluble evaporitic rocks, a complex tectonic setting related to salt diapirsm, and human activities can lead to significant environmental problems, e.g. land subsidence, sinkhole development, salt cavern collapse, and contamination of water resources with brines. In the Transylvanian town of Ocna Mures. rock salt of a near-surface diapir has been explored since the Roman ages in open excavations, and up to the 20th century in galleries and with solution mining. Most recently, in 2010 a sudden collapse in the adjacent Quaternary unconsolidated sediments led to the formation of a 70-90m wide salt lake with a max. depth of 23m. Over the last 3 years a Romanian-Swiss research project has led to the development of 3D geological and hydrogeological information systems in order to improve knowledge on possible hazards related to uncontrolled salt dissolution. One aspect which has been investigated is the possibility of density-driven flow along permeable subvertical zones next to the salt dome, and the potential for subsaturated groundwater to dissolve the upper sides of the diapir. Structural 3D models of the salt diapir, the adjacent basin sediments, and the mining galleries, led to the development of 2D numerical vertical density-dependent models of flow and transport along the diapir. Results show that (1) increased rock permeability due to diapirsm, regional tectonic thrusting and previous dissolution, and (2) more permeable sandstone layers within the adjacent basin sediments may lead to freshwater intrusion towards the top of the diapir, and, therefore, to increased potential for salt dissolution.

  2. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gadbury, Casey [USDOE Carlsbad Field Office, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  3. A closer look at salt loaded microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Rooij, M.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Many walls of ancient buildings are covered with plaster layers. Amongst the most recurrent causes of damage of plasters and substrates are moisture and salt decay processes. To combat these salt problems, special salt resistant plasters have been developed for application on salt loaded substrates. However, experience in the field has shown that failures regularly occur on these special mortars, making the situation little transparent for end-users. A European project called COMPASS has addr...

  4. Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, and Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A snowfall in the American West provides contrast to the landscape's muted earth tones and indicates changes in topography and elevation across (clockwise from top left) Nevada, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and California. In Utah, the southern ranges of the Wasatch Mountains are covered in snow, and the Colorado River etches a dark ribbon across the red rock of the Colorado Plateau. In the center of the image is the reservoir created by the Glen Canyon Dam. To the east are the gray-colored slopes of Navaho Mountain, and to the southeast, dusted with snow is the region called Black Mesa. Southwest of Glen Canyon, the Colorado enters the Grand Canyon, which cuts westward through Arizona. At a deep bend in the river, the higher elevations of the Keibab Plateau have held onto snow. At the end of the Grand Canyon lies another large reservoir, Lake Mead, which is formed by the Hoover Dam. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  5. Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT at Barrow, Alaska Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Schaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active layer thickness (ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost that is typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ temperature sensors, or other ground-based observations. Here we evaluated the Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT product that uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique to measure seasonal surface subsidence and infer ALT around Barrow, Alaska. We compared ReSALT with ground-based ALT obtained using probing and calibrated, 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar at multiple sites around Barrow. ReSALT accurately reproduced observed ALT within uncertainty of the GPR and probing data in ~76% of the study area. However, ReSALT was less than observed ALT in ~22% of the study area with well-drained soils and in ~1% of the area where soils contained gravel. ReSALT was greater than observed ALT in some drained thermokarst lake basins representing ~1% of the area. These results indicate remote sensing techniques based on InSAR could be an effective way to measure and monitor ALT over large areas on the Arctic coastal plain.

  6. Lake Vostok: From a Continental Margin to a Subglacial Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studinger, M.; Bell, R. E.; KArner, G. D.; Tikku, A. A.; Levin, V.; Raymond, C. A.; Lerner-Lam, A.

    2002-05-01

    Subglacial ecosystems, in particular subglacial lakes, represent the most oligothrophic environments on Earth. The geologic origin of Lake Vostok is a critical boundary condition for both the stability of the lake and energy fluxes into the lake. Microbial life may use geothermal energy, similar to life discovered at deep sea hydrothermal vents. Significant geothermal anomalies are often associated with active faulting. The topographic depression which forms the craddle for Lake Vostok is part of a regional tectonic structure ranging from the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains to the Aurora Subglacial Basin. This geologic boundary was formed by emplacement of a thrust sheet from the east over a pre-existing passive continental margin beneath the present-day Lake Vostok. No data exist to directly date either the timing of passive margin formation or the subsequent crustal shortening. Minor extensional reactivation of the thrust sheet explains a simple mechanism to explain the formation of the Lake Vostok basin. The steep slopes bounding this depression are likley being fault-controlled. Our recent discovery of microseismic activity suggest that this faults might be active and could act as conduits for convecting fluids. The tectonic processes can have an important influence on the ecosystem within the lake.

  7. Lake Evaporation: a Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amayreh, Jumah Ahmad

    1995-01-01

    Reliable evaporation data are an essential requirement in any water and/or energy budget studies. This includes operation and management of both urban and agricultural water resources. Evaporation from large, open water surfaces such as lakes and reservoirs may influence many agricultural and irrigation decisions. In this study evaporation from Bear Lake in the states of Idaho and Utah was measured using advanced research instruments (Bowen Ratio and Eddy Correlation). Actual over-lake evaporation and weather data measurements were used to understand the mechanism of evaporation in the lake, determine lake-related parameters (such as roughness lengths, heat storage, net radiation, etc.), and examine and evaluate existing lake evaporation methods. This enabled the development of a modified and flexible model incorporating the tested methods for hourly and daily best estimates of lake evaporation using nearby simple land-based weather data and, if available, remotely sensed data. Average evaporation from Bear Lake was about 2 mm/day during the summer season (March-October) of this two-year (1993-1994) study. This value reflects the large amount of energy consumed in heating the water body of the lake. Moreover, evaporation from the lake was not directly related to solar radiation. This observation was clear during night time when the evaporation continued with almost the same rate as daytime evaporation. This explains the vital role of heat storage in the lake as the main driving energy for evaporation during night time and day time cloudy sky conditions. When comparing over-lake and nearby land-based weather parameters, land-based wind speed was the only weather parameter that had a significant difference of about 50% lower than over-lake measurements. Other weather parameters were quite similar. The study showed that evaporation from the lake can be accurately estimated using Penman-type equations if related parameters such as net radiation, heat storage, and

  8. Can COSMOTherm Predict a Salting in Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivola, Martta; Prisle, Nønne L; Elm, Jonas; Waxman, Eleanor M; Volkamer, Rainer; Kurtén, Theo

    2017-08-24

    We have used COSMO-RS, a method combining quantum chemistry with statistical thermodynamics, to compute Setschenow constants (K S ) for a large array of organic solutes and salts. These comprise both atmospherically relevant solute-salt combinations, as well as systems for which experimental data are available. In agreement with previous studies on single salts, the Setschenow constants predicted by COSMO-RS (as implemented in the COSMOTherm program) are generally too large compared to experiments. COSMOTherm overpredicts salting out (positive K S ), and/or underpredicts salting in (negative K S ). For ammonium and sodium salts, K S values are larger for oxalates and sulfates, and smaller for chlorides and bromides. For chloride and bromide salts, K S values usually increase with decreasing size of the cation, along the series Pr 4 N + salting in is predicted only for oxalic acid in sodium and ammonium oxalate, and sodium sulfate, solutions. COSMOTherm was thus unable to replicate the experimentally observed salting in of glyoxal in sulfate solutions, likely due to the overestimation of salting out effects. By contrast, COSMOTherm does qualitatively predict the experimentally observed salting in of multiple organic solutes in solutions of alkylaminium salts.

  9. Salt loading affects cortisol metabolism in normotensive subjects : Relationships with salt sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; van der Kleij, FGH; Boonstra, AH; Sluiter, WJ; Koerts, J; Navis, G; Dullaart, RPF

    We studied cortisol metabolism together with insulin sensitivity [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)] and renal hemodynamics in 19 salt-resistant (sr) and nine salt-sensitive ( ss) normotensive subjects after a low-and high-salt diet. Results are described as high- vs. low-salt diet. Sum of urinary

  10. Effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after 1 week of high salt (200 mmol per day sodium) and 1 week of low salt (10 mmol per day sodium) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure>15 mm Hg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% women; 16% blacks; body mass index, 28.5±4.2 kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mm Hg) as compared with high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mm Hg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dL; 10.8±7.3 mIU/L; 2.6±1.9) as compared with high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dL; 9.4±5.8 mIU/L; 2.1±1.4; Psalt-sensitive (n=193) versus salt-resistant (n=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in homeostasis model assessment on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt-sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt-resistant subjects (P=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in homeostasis model assessment after including age, body mass index, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone, and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Modeling aluminum-silicon chemistries and application to Australian acidic playa lakes as analogues for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G.M.; Crowley, J.K.; Thomson, B.J.; Kargel, J.S.; Bridges, N.T.; Hook, S.J.; Baldridge, A.; Brown, A.J.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza, Filho C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Mars missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major relevant findings are the presence in Meridiani Planum sediments of the mineral jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt) and related minerals that require formation from an acid-salt brine and oxidizing environment. Similar mineralogies have been observed in acidic saline lake sediments in Western Australia (WA), and these lakes have been proposed as analogues for acidic sedimentary environments on Mars. The prior version of the equilibrium chemical thermodynamic FREZCHEM model lacked Al and Si chemistries that are needed to appropriately model acidic aqueous geochemistries on Earth and Mars. The objectives of this work were to (1) add Al and Si chemistries to the FREZCHEM model, (2) extend these chemistries to low temperatures (silicon mineral parameterizations were based on Gibbs free energy and enthalpy data. New aluminum and silicon parameterizations added 12 new aluminum/silicon minerals to this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO4-NO3-OH-HCO3-CO3-CO2-O2-CH4-Si-H2O system that now contain 95 solid phases. There were similarities, differences, and uncertainties between Australian acidic, saline playa lakes and waters that likely led to the Burns formation salt accumulations on Mars. Both systems are similar in that they are dominated by (1) acidic, saline ground waters and sediments, (2) Ca and/or Mg sulfates, and (3) iron precipitates such as jarosite and hematite. Differences include: (1) the dominance of NaCl in many WA lakes, versus the dominance of Fe-Mg-Ca-SO4 in Meridiani Planum, (2) excessively low K+ concentrations in Meridiani Planum due to jarosite precipitation, (3) higher acid production in the presence of high iron concentrations in Meridiani Planum, and probably lower rates of acid neutralization and hence, higher acidities on Mars owing to colder temperatures, and (4) lateral salt patterns in WA lakes. The WA playa lakes

  12. PCB concentrations in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) are correlated to habitat use and lake characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guildford, S J; Muir, D C G; Houde, M; Evans, M S; Kidd, K A; Whittle, D M; Drouillard, K; Wang, X; Anderson, M R; Bronte, C R; Devault, D S; Haffner, D; Payne, J; Kling, H J

    2008-11-15

    This study considers the importance of lake trout habitat as a factor determining persistent organochlorine (OC) concentration. Lake trout is a stenothermal, cold water species and sensitive to hypoxia. Thus, factors such as lake depth, thermal stratification, and phosphorus enrichment may determine not only which lakes can support lake trout but may also influence among-lake variability in lake trout population characteristics including bioaccumulation of OCs. A survey of 23 lakes spanning much of the natural latitudinal distribution of lake trout provided a range of lake trout habitat to test the hypothesis that lake trout with greater access to littoral habitat for feeding will have lower concentrations of OCs than lake trout that are more restricted to pelagic habitat. Using the delta13C stable isotope signature in lake trout as an indicator of influence of benthic littoral feeding, we found a negative correlation between lipid-corrected delta13C and sigmaPCB concentrations supporting the hypothesis that increasing accessto littoral habitat results in lower OCs in lake trout. The prominence of mixotrophic phytoplankton in lakes with more contaminated lake trout indicated the pelagic microbial food web may exacerbate the biomagnification of OCs when lake trout are restricted to pelagic feeding. A model that predicted sigmaPCB in lake trout based on lake area and latitude (used as proximate variables for proportion of littoral versus pelagic habitat and accessibility to littoral habitat respectively) explained 73% of the variability in sigmaPCBs in lake trout in the 23 lakes surveyed.

  13. Special Issue on Lake Victoria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity of benthic mollusks of Lake Victoria and Lake Burigi · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JA Mwambungu, 21-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tjs.v30i1.18384 ...

  14. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  15. L-Lake macroinvertebrate community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L.

    1996-06-01

    To characterize the present benthic macroinvertebrate community of L-Lake, Regions 5 and 7 of the reservoir were sampled in September 1995 at the same locations sampled in 1988 and 1989 during the L-Lake monitoring program. The macroinvertebrate community of 1995 is compared to that of 1988 and 1989. The species composition of L-Lake`s macroinvertebrate community has changed considerably since 1988-1989, due primarily to maturation of the reservoir ecosystem. L-Lake contains a reasonably diverse macroinvertebrate community that is capable of supporting higher trophic levels, including a diverse assemblage of fish species. The L-Lake macroinvertebrate community is similar to those of many other southeastern reservoirs, and there is no indication that the macroinvertebrate community is perturbed by chemical or physical stressors.

  16. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  17. Thermophysical properties of reconsolidating crushed salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Urquhart, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Reconsolidated crushed salt is being considered as a backfilling material placed upon nuclear waste within a salt repository environment. In-depth knowledge of thermal and mechanical properties of the crushed salt as it reconsolidates is critical to thermal/mechanical modeling of the reconsolidation process. An experimental study was completed to quantitatively evaluate the thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt as a function of porosity and temperature. The crushed salt for this study came from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In this work the thermal conductivity of crushed salt with porosity ranging from 1% to 40% was determined from room temperature up to 300°C, using two different experimental methods. Thermal properties (including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat) of single-crystal salt were determined for the same temperature range. The salt was observed to dewater during heating; weight loss from the dewatering was quantified. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt decreases with increasing porosity; conversely, thermal conductivity increases as the salt consolidates. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt for a given porosity decreases with increasing temperature. A simple mixture theory model is presented to predict and compare to the data developed in this study.

  18. Contribution of an ancient evaporitic-type reservoir to lake vostok chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, M.; Thiemens, M. H.; Savarino, J.; Petit, J. R.

    2003-04-01

    Accretion ice 1 (3538 to 3608 m) contents visible sediment inclusions likely incorporated into ice in a shallow bay upstream Vostok where glacier moves against a relief rise. Ion chromatography measurements indicate that elemental concentrations are linked to inclusions abundances. More than 80% of SO_42- is present as CaSO_4 or MgSO_4. While SO_42- concentrations and the relative proportion of CaSO_4 and MgSO_4 varies in a wide range in accreted ice, concentration profiles of Na and Cl, present as NaCl, are much more regular even along individual crystals. Question rises about the presence of such salts in lake water: The 17O anomaly of sulphate in one samples taken at 3570 m suggests that less than 10% of total sulphate comes from DMS oxidation, ruling out any significant contribution of glacer melt water. Fe concentrations are low (10 ppb) excluding sulphate production from the pyrite oxidation by biogenic in-situ activity. This conclusion is supported by the isotopic signature of 34S. Taken all together, these observations strongly suggest the contribution of an evaporitic-type basin to the lake salinity. Assuming that sediments accumulated in an isolated reservoir prior the lake formation, seismotectonic activated hydrothermal circulation may pulse NaCl rich water with sulphate salts through faults up to their vents in a shallow bay upstream Vostok, where they could be incorporated in the accreted ice and also contribute to lake salinity.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity of bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the saline Lake Red located in Sovata, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsodi, Andrea K; Felföldi, Tamás; Máthé, István; Bognár, Vivien; Knáb, Mónika; Krett, Gergely; Jurecska, Laura; Tóth, Erika M; Márialigeti, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Lake Red is one of the saline lakes which were formed as a consequence of salt massif dissolution at the foot of the Gurghiu Mountains (Central Romania) at the end of the nineteenth century. The lake water had approximately 15 % w/v salt content. Phylogenetic diversity of prokaryotes inhabiting the water and sediment of the lake was studied using cultivation and cultivation-independent methods following a sampling in spring 2009. According to the results of 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the richness of Bacteria was higher than Archaea on the basis of the number and position of dominant bands in the gel. Sequences from DGGE bands were affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria (Halomonas and Alkalilimnicola) and Bacteroidetes (Psychroflexus) as well as Euryarchaeota. Cultivation from five different saline media resulted in 101 bacterial strains of which Gammaproteobacteria (Halomonas, Marinobacter and Salinivibrio) were the most abundant. Firmicutes (Bacillus) and Alphaproteobacteria (Aurantimonas and Roseovarius) were also identified among the isolated strains. The 16S rRNA genes from 82 bacterial and 95 archaeal clones were also phylogenetically analyzed. Bacterial clones were related to various genera of Gammaproteobacteria (Alkalilimnicola, Alkalispirillum, Arhodomonas, Halomonas, Saccharospirillum), Bacteroidetes (Gracilimonas, Psychroflexus) and Alphaproteobacteria (Oceanicola, Roseinatronobacter, Roseovarius). All of the archaeal clones sequenced corresponded to a homologous cluster affiliated with Halopelagius.

  20. 76 FR 2579 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... blasting operations for the placement of a water intake pipe in Lake Mead during the first 6 months of 2011...