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Sample records for etoricoxib improves pain

  1. Perioperative use of etoricoxib reduces pain and opioid side-effects after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Frenkl, Tara L; Hartrick, Craig T

    2012-01-01

    - to 10-point NRS) as well as Average Total Daily Dose of Morphine over Days 1 to 3. Clinical trial registration: This trial is registered on www.clinicaltrials.gpv (NCT00788710) Results: The Least Squares (LS) means (95% CI) for the primary endpoint were 3.26 (2.96, 3.55); 2.46 (2.16, 2.76); and 2.40 (2......-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, we evaluated postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy over 5 days in patients receiving placebo or etoricoxib administered 90 min prior to surgery and continuing postoperatively. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n...... as primary endpoints. Conclusion: In patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy, etoricoxib 90 and 120 mg dosed preoperatively and then continued postoperatively significantly reduces both resting and movement-related pain, as well as reduced opioid (morphine) consumption that led to more rapid bowel...

  2. The Cerebrospinal Fluid Distribution of Postoperatively Administred Dexketoprofen and Etoricoxib and Their Effect on Pain and Inflammatory Markers in Patients Undergoing Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Annika; Kokki, Merja; Hautajärvi, Heidi; Lehtonen, Marko; Miettinen, Hannu; Pulkki, Kari; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Based on earlier literature, etoricoxib may have a delayed analgesic effect in postoperative setting when analgesic efficacy of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug dexketoprofen is rapid. This may be caused by slow penetration of etoricoxib into the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore we decided to determine the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of dexketoprofen and etoricoxib in patients with hip arthroplasty. A total of 24 patients, scheduled for an elective primary hip arthroplasty were enrolled. After surgery, 12 subjects were randomized to received a single intravenous dose of dexketoprofen, and 12 subjects were given oral etoricoxib. Paired blood and CSF samples were taken up to 24 h for measurement of drug concentrations, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ra and blood for interleukin 10. In CSF the highest measured concentration (C max) of dexketoprofen was 4.0 (median) ng/mL (minimum-maximum 1.9-13.9) and time to the highest concentration (t max) 3 h (2-5), and for etoricoxib C max 73 ng/mL (36-127) and t max 5 h (1-24), respectively. Opioid consumption during the first 24 postoperative hours was similar in the two groups. Dexketoprofen and etoricoxib had a similar effect on the postoperative inflammatory response. No significant differences considering pain relief or adverse events were found between the two groups. Dexketoprofen and etoricoxib entered the CNS readily, already at 30 min after administration dexketoprofen was detected in the CSF in most subjects and etoricoxib after 60 min. A single dose of dexketoprofen and etoricoxib provided a similar anti-inflammatory and analgesic response after major orthopaedic surgery.

  3. Comparing etoricoxib and celecoxib for preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glabglay Prapakorn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of selective cox-2 inhibitors in postoperative pain reduction were usually compared with conventional non-selective conventional NSAIDs or other types of medicine. Previous studies also used selective cox-2 inhibitors as single postoperative dose, in continued mode, or in combination with other modalities. The purpose of this study was to compare analgesic efficacy of single preoperative administration of etoricoxib versus celecoxib for post-operative pain relief after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods One hundred and two patients diagnosed as anterior cruciate ligament injury were randomized into 3 groups using opaque envelope. Both patients and surgeon were blinded to the allocation. All of the patients were operated by one orthopaedic surgeon under regional anesthesia. Each group was given either etoricoxib 120 mg., celecoxib 400 mg., or placebo 1 hour prior to operative incision. Post-operative pain intensity, time to first dose of analgesic requirement and numbers of analgesic used for pain control and adverse events were recorded periodically to 48 hours after surgery. We analyzed the data according to intention to treat principle. Results Among 102 patients, 35 were in etoricoxib, 35 in celecoxib and 32 in placebo group. The mean age of the patients was 30 years and most of the injury came from sports injury. There were no significant differences in all demographic characteristics among groups. The etoricoxib group had significantly less pain intensity than the other two groups at recovery room and up to 8 hours period but no significance difference in all other evaluation point, while celecoxib showed no significantly difference from placebo at any time points. The time to first dose of analgesic medication, amount of analgesic used, patient's satisfaction with pain control and incidence of adverse events were also no significantly difference among three groups. Conclusions

  4. A randomised, double-blinded study comparing giving etoricoxib vs. placebo to female patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahagna, H; Amital, D; Amital, H

    2016-02-01

    Current therapeutic approaches to fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) do not provide satisfactory pain control to a high percentage of patients. This unmet need constantly fuels the pursuit for new modalities for pain relief. This randomised, double-blind, controlled study assessed the efficacy and safety of adding etoricoxib vs. placebo to the current therapeutic regimen of female patients with FMS. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, female patients were randomised to receive either 90 mg etoricoxib once daily or placebo for 6 weeks. Several physical and mental parameters were assessed throughout the study. The primary end-point was the response to treatment, defined as ≥ 30% reduction in the average Brief Pain Inventory score. Secondary outcomes were changes in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36 Quality of Life assessment questionnaire and Hamilton rating scales for anxiety and depression. Overall, 73 patients were recruited. Although many outcome measures improved throughout the study, no difference was recorded between the etoricoxib- and placebo-treated groups. The Brief Pain Inventory, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, The Hamilton Anxiety and Depression scores did not differ between the two groups. This is the first randomised, double-blind study assessing the effect of adding etoricoxib to pre-existing medications for female patients with FMS. Although being mildly underpowered this study clearly has shown that etoricoxib did not improve pain scores and did not lead to any beneficial mental or physical effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Postoperative Etoricoxib versus Ketoprofen Administration for Pain Management after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Cionac Florescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This randomized double-blind study compared the analgesic efficacy and tolerability of etoricoxib versus ketoprofen in 165 patients with elective total primary knee arthroplasty. Methods. After ethical committee approval, 165 patients were randomized in 3 groups: the etoricoxib group (E receiving etoricoxib 120 mg/day, at the end of surgery and in the first postoperative day; the ketoprofen group (K receiving ketoprofen 2 pills of 100 mg/day, the first at the end of surgery and then 1 pill every 12 hours in the surgery day and the first postoperative day; the placebo group (P. All groups received postoperatively the same analgesia protocol when NRS is over 3 with IV Perfalgan and morphine. The effectiveness was evaluated by the time from the initiation of spinal anesthesia until the first analgesic dose, the total amount of morphine administered in the surgery day and the first postoperative day, and the frequency of patients with side effects and necessary amount of adjuvant medication. Results. The baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the 3 groups. In both study days etoricoxib provided an analgesic effect superior to placebo and to ketoprofen, the total administered morphine being significantly lower in etoricoxib group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups regarding the side effects.

  6. Effectiveness of tramadol/paracetamol compared with etoricoxib as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choy Y. Choy

    fibroadenoma, with a total of 20 cases (Table 2). The mean duration of the surgical procedures for the etoricoxib group was 85.7 [standard deviation (SD) of 39.5] minutes and 72.7. (SD of 27.2) minutes for the tramadol/paracetamol group. (p-value 0.35). The sum of pain intensity differences for etoricoxib were 0.77.

  7. Density functional theory studies of etoricoxib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ritika; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, V. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Etoricoxib is a COX-2 selective inhibitor drug with molecular formula C18H15ClN2O2S. It is primarily used for the treatment of arthritis(rheumatoid, psoriatic, osteoarthritis), ankylosing spondylitis, gout and chronic low back pain. Theoretical studies of the molecule including geometry optimization and vibrational frequency calculations were carried out with the help of density functional theory calculations using 6-311++ g (d, p) basis set and B3LYP functional.

  8. A case report on toxic epidermal necrolysis with etoricoxib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameshwari, J S; Devde, Raju

    2015-01-01

    Etoricoxib is a selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme inhibitor and is exploited for its analgesic activity in various disease conditions like osteoarthritis, gouty arthritis, acute pain including postoperative dental pain and primary dysmenorrhea, etc. Although highly efficacious in pain management the safety profile of this COX-2 inhibitor is yet to be established in a broader sense. Short-term clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance have shown a very rare incidence of very serious skin reactions like Steven Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). In this case report, we summarize regarding a patient who developed TEN after treatment with etoricoxib for osteoarthritis that later resolved in 15 days after withdrawal and symptomatic treatment.

  9. The effect of etoricoxib premedication on postoperative analgesia requirement in orthopedic and trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Ahsan K.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Ismail, Salah A.; Sadat-Ali, M.; Al-Dakheel, Dakheel A.

    2008-01-01

    We have hypothesized that etoricoxib premedication would reduce the need for additional opioids following orthopedic trauma surgery. A double blind, controlled study, conducted in King Fahd University Hospital, King Faisal University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. After obtaining the approval of Research and Ethics Committee and written consent, 200 American Society of Anesthesiology grade I and II patients that underwent elective upper limb or lower limb fracture fixation surgeries during the period from August 2005 to October 2007 were studied. Patients were randomly premedicated using 120 mg of etoricoxib or placebo n=100, each. To alleviate postoperative pain, a patient controlled analgesia device was programmed to deliver one mg of morphine intravenously locked lockout time, 6 minutes. Visual analog scale and total postoperative morphine consumption over 24 hours and the adverse effects were recorded. One hundred patients in each group completed the study period. Etoricoxib premedication provides a statistically significant postoperative morphine sparing effect over 24 hours postoperatively. Total morphine consumption was 44.2 (8.2) in the placebo and 35.17 mg in the etoricoxib groups p<0.001. The incidence of nausea and vomiting requiring treatment was lower in the etoricoxib group. p=0.014. The postoperative blood loss was similar in both groups. Etoricoxib is a suitable premedication before traumatic orthopedic surgery as it enhanced postoperative analgesia and reduced the need for morphine. (author)

  10. Pain Drawings Improve Subgrouping of Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüllemann, Philipp; Keller, Thomas; Kabelitz, Maria; Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas; Baron, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Subgrouping of low back pain (LBP) patients may be improved when pain drawings are combined with the painDETECT (PD-Q) questionnaire. We hypothesized that (1) different LBP subgroups determined by their pain radiation show different clinical patterns and (2) the occurrence of neuropathic symptoms depends on pain radiation. A total of 19,263 acute ( 3 months) LBP patients were allocated prospectively into 4 groups based on the location of pain drawings on a manikin and compared regarding neuropathic pain components, functionality, depression, pain intensity, and surgical interventions. All items were investigated at baseline and follow-up visits. Group I was composed of patients with axial LBP without radiating pain; group II, LBP with radiation into the thigh; group III, LBP with radiation into the shank; and group IV, LBP with radiation into the feet. Side-dependent pain radiation was assessed additionally. Depression, functionality, and pain intensity showed no clinically relevant differences, whereas PD-Q scores and the probability to rate positive for neuropathic pain increased with more distally radiating pain. Surgery and medication intake were most frequent in group IV. Follow-up analyses showed that only axial LBP became more neuropathic, whereas pain intensity decreased over time. Radicular patterns of pain drawings in LBP patients indicate severe pain conditions with the most neuropathic components, while axial LBP has the fewest. For the categorization of LBP, pain drawings help explain the underlying mechanism of pain, which might further improve mechanism-based treatment when used in clinical routines and research. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  11. Osteoarthritis patients with pain improvement are highly likely to also have improved quality of life and functioning. A post hoc analysis of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Paul M; Moore, R Andrew; Chen, Wen-Jer; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Gates, Davis F; Straus, Walter L; Popmihajlov, Zoran

    2016-10-01

    This analysis evaluated whether osteoarthritis patients achieving the greatest pain control and lowest pain states also have the greatest improvement in functioning and quality of life. Patients (n=419) who failed prior therapies and who were switched to etoricoxib 60mg were categorized as pain responders or non-responders at 4 weeks based on responder definitions established by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain (IMMPACT) criteria, including changes from baseline of ≥15%, ≥30%, ≥50%, ≥70% and a final pain status of ≤3/10 (no worse than mild pain). Pain was assessed at baseline and 4 weeks using 4 questions from the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) (worst pain, least pain, average pain, and pain right now), and also using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale. We examined the relationship between pain responses with changes from baseline in two functional measures (the BPI Pain Interference questions and the WOMAC Function Subscale) as well as changes from baseline in quality of life (assessed on the SF-36 Physical and Mental Component Summaries). We also sought to understand whether these relationships were influenced by the choice of the pain instrument used to assess response. We contrast the mean difference in improvements in the functional and quality of life instruments based on pain responder status (responder versus non-responder) and the associated 95% confidence limits around this difference. Patients with better pain responses were much more likely to have improved functional responses and improved quality of life, with higher mean changes in these outcomes versus pain non-responders, regardless of the choice of IMMPACT pain response definition (e.g., using any of 15%, 30%, 50%, 70% change from baseline) or the final pain state of ≤3/10. There was an evident gradient, where higher levels of pain response were associated with greater mean improvements in function and quality of life. The

  12. Improving pain assessment in the NICU: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Daphne A; Haney, Barbara M; Atchison, Linda; Anderson, Betsi; Sandritter, Tracy; Pallotto, Eugenia K

    2014-06-01

    Pain assessment documentation was inadequate because of the use of a subjective pain assessment strategy in a tertiary level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this study was to improve consistency of pain assessment documentation through implementation of a multidimensional neonatal pain and sedation assessment tool. The study was set in a 60-bed level IV NICU within an urban children's hospital. Participants included NICU staff, including registered nurses, neonatal nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, pharmacists, neonatal fellows, and neonatologists. The Plan Do Study Act method of quality improvement was used for this project. Baseline assessment included review of patient medical records 6 months before the intervention. Documentation of pain assessment on admission, routine pain assessment, reassessment of pain after an elevated pain score, discussion of pain in multidisciplinary rounds, and documentation of pain assessment were reviewed. Literature review and listserv query were conducted to identify neonatal pain tools. Survey of staff was conducted to evaluate knowledge of neonatal pain and also to determine current healthcare providers' practice as related to identification and treatment of neonatal pain. A multidimensional neonatal pain tool, the Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS), was chosen by the staff for implementation. Six months and 2 years following education on the use of the N-PASS and implementation in the NICU, a chart review of all hospitalized patients was conducted to evaluate documentation of pain assessment on admission, routine pain assessment, reassessment of pain after an elevated pain score, discussion of pain in multidisciplinary rounds, and documentation of pain assessment in the medical progress note. Documentation of pain scores improved from 60% to 100% at 6 months and remained at 99% 2 years following implementation of the N-PASS. Pain score documentation with ongoing nursing

  13. Multidisciplinary approach to improving pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura; Kelly, Mary Jo; Roosa, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    On a 30-bed trauma surgical unit in an academic medical center, a best practice group was established. For a first project, we worked on improving the patient's pain experience. The decision was driven by the units Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) pain scores. We had consistently been in the 1st percentile whereas best practice hospital scores were in the 68th percentile for pain. In addition, patients were expressing dissatisfaction with pain care during wound care with physicians. We reviewed the HCAHPS scores and brainstormed possible factors leading to patients' dissatisfaction with their pain care. Staff developed a teaching tool, which included a communication plan for the individual patient's pain plan. Next, we addressed the wound care with the trauma surgeons to develop a better understanding of the problem and identify a solution. The best practice group collaboration meeting became a springboard to address the pain issue for surgical patients through their hospital stays. The nurse manager, educator, pain relief attendant, anesthesia attendant, and 2 trauma surgeons met to discuss how to improve the surgical patient's pain experience. This trauma surgical unit now exceeds the top performers in HCAHPS scores. We have moved from the 1st percentile to the 90th percentile in 5 months.

  14. Effectiveness of tramadol/paracetamol compared with etoricoxib as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paracetamol combination when compared with etoricoxib as postoperative analgesia following day care surgery. Design: This was a prospective, randomised, single-blind study. Setting and subjects: Sixty-two patients were randomised to receive ...

  15. Improving pain management for pediatric patients undergoing nonurgent painful procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregin, Regina; Rappaport, Alisha S; Montagnino, Gina; Sabogal, Gonzalo; Moreau, Harry; Abularrage, Joseph J

    2008-04-15

    The development of a topical analgesia protocol to improve pain management for pediatric patients undergoing nonurgent painful procedures is described. Leadership from the departments of pediatrics, neonatology, obstetrics and gynecology, nursing, pharmacy, child life, and phlebotomy were chosen to develop and implement a new protocol for topical analgesia use for nonurgent painful procedures in pediatric patients. A review of the published literature on pain management in neonates, infants, children, and adolescents led to the replacement of lidocaine 2.5%-prilocaine 2.5% with liposomal lidocaine 4% topical cream on the formulary. In addition to topical analgesia, psychological and physical methods that enable children to cope successfully with anxiety-provoking and painful experiences were included as part of the education portion of implementation. Child life staff educated other staff, patients, and their parents on pain management techniques, including deep breathing, imagery, and the use of distraction tools. The protocol was transcribed onto preprinted prescriber order forms, which were made available to all pediatric inpatient units, the pediatric emergency department, and the pediatric ambulatory care clinic. A separate form was developed for neonatology. Data from before and after protocol implementation were collected and assessed. Only pediatric patients admitted to inpatient units or seen in ambulatory care clinics were included in the evaluation. The percentage of patients undergoing nonurgent painful procedures treated with topical analgesia or dorsal penile block for circumcisions rose from 2% (preimplementation of protocol) to 92% (postimplementation) (p < 0.0001, chi-square). A multidisciplinary approach to protocol development and implementation significantly increased compliance to a topical analgesia protocol for pediatric patients undergoing nonurgent painful procedures in a community medical center.

  16. Comparative preemptive analgesia evaluation of ibuprofen and etoricoxib in third molars surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Third molar surgery is a frequent procedure in dentistry related to variable degrees of postoperative pain. In this context, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been commonly used in studies that evaluated the efficacy of preemptive analgesia as a strategy for pain control. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the preemptive analgesic efficacy and anti-inflammatory effect of ibuprofen and etoricoxib in mandibular third molar surgery, compared with a placebo. A randomized,...

  17. Status of etoricoxib in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Expert panel opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Majdan, Maria; Mastalerz-Migas, Agnieszka; Niewada, Maciej; Skrzydło-Radomańska, Barbara; Mamcarz, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Pain is one of the most disabling symptoms of rheumatoid diseases. Patients with pain secondary to osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or gout require effective analgesic treatment, and the physician's task is to select a drug that is best suited for an individual patient. The choice of pharmacotherapy should be based both on drug potency and clinical efficacy, and its safety profile, particularly in the elderly population, as the number of comorbidities (and hence the risk of treatment complications and drug interactions) rises with age. In cases involving a high risk of gastrointestinal complications or concerns about hepatotoxicity, with a low cardiovascular risk, the first-line nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to consider should be coxibs including etoricoxib.

  18. Perioperative blood loss and gastrointestinal tolerability of etoricoxib and diclofenac in total hip arthroplasty (ETO-DIC study): a single-center, prospective double-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Sebastian H; Barta, Sabine; Kehl, Victoria; Schröter, Christoph; Wagner, Ferdinand; Grifka, Joachim; Springorum, Hans Robert; Craiovan, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Non-selective NSAIDs can cause serious gastrointestinal side-effects. Selective COX-2 blockers are a reasonable alternative for pain treatment. They do not seem to affect platelet function and consequently cause a lower perioperative blood loss than non-selective NSAIDs. This study compared etoricoxib and diclofenac during a perioperative (9 days) period after THA to investigate total blood loss and gastrointestinal tolerability. The hypothesis was that etoricoxib is superior to diclofenac. A total of 100 patients (50 in each group) were included in this trial. Etoricoxib (90 mg) was administered once and diclofenac sodium (75 mg) twice daily for 9 days. Total blood loss during and after primary cementless THA was detected. The rate of adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) was analyzed to detect gastrointestinal tolerability. The mean total blood loss (calculated) was 1548 ± SD 468 ml in the etoricoxib (ETO) group and 1649 (SD 547) ml in the diclofenac (DIC) group. The mean duration of THA was 81 min (SD 29) in the DIC and 75 min (SD 30) in the ETO group. Hence, the mean calculated total blood loss was 101 ml higher in the DIC group. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.334). Fifty-six patients (28 in each group) received a cell saver retransfusion, but only one patient (ETO group) needed an additional red blood cell transfusion. The hidden blood loss was 1067 ml (SD 603) in the DIC group and 999 ml (SD 378) in the ETO group. The gastrointestinal tolerability (number of adverse and serious adverse events) was not significantly different between groups. There was no statistically significant difference in perioperative blood loss after primary THA under etoricoxib (90 mg) compared to diclofenac (75 mg). Furthermore, no gastrointestinal superiority of etoricoxib could be detected during a short period of 9 days.

  19. Improving the treatment of infant pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moultrie, Fiona; Slater, Rebeccah; Hartley, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Pain management presents a major challenge in neonatal care. Newborn infants who require medical treatment can undergo frequent invasive procedures during a critical period of neurodevelopment. However, adequate analgesic provision is infrequently and inconsistently provided for acute noxious procedures because of limited and conflicting evidence regarding analgesic efficacy and safety of most commonly used pharmacological agents. Here, we review recent advances in the measurement of infant pain and discuss clinical trials that assess the efficacy of pharmacological analgesia in infants. Recent findings Recently developed measures of noxious-evoked brain activity are sensitive to analgesic modulation, providing an objective quantitative outcome measure that can be used in clinical trials of analgesics. Summary Noxious stimulation evokes changes in activity across all levels of the infant nervous system, including reflex activity, altered brain activity and behaviour, and long-lasting changes in infant physiological stability. A multimodal approach is needed if we are to identify efficacious and well tolerated analgesic treatments. Well designed clinical trials are urgently required to improve analgesic provision in the infant population. PMID:28375883

  20. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Jorien; Berben, Sivera A.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2016-01-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre–post intervention study was performed as

  1. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, J.G.; Berben, S.A.A.; IJzerman, M.J.; Gaakeer, M.I.; Eenennaam, F.L. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Doggen, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre-post intervention study was performed as

  2. Cancer Pain Management Education Rectifies Patients' Misconceptions of Cancer Pain, Reduces Pain, and Improves Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su-Jin; Keam, Bhumsuk; Hyun, Min Kyung; Ju Seo, Jeong; Uk Park, Keon; Oh, Sung Yong; Ahn, Jinseok; Lee, Ja Youn; Kim, JinShil

    2018-03-26

    More than half of the patients have reported improper management of breakthrough cancer pain. Empirical evidence is lacking concerning the effectiveness of cancer pain education on breakthrough pain control. This study aimed to examine the effects of individual pain education on pain control, use of short-acting analgesics for breakthrough pain, quality of life outcomes, and rectification of patients' misconceptions regarding cancer pain. A quasi-experimental design was used. In total, 176 (102 inpatients and 74 outpatients) and 163 (93 inpatients and 70 outpatients) cancer patients completed questionnaires on pain intensity, quality of life, use of short-acting medication for breakthrough pain, and misconceptions about cancer pain and opioid use before and immediately and/or seven days after individual pain education. The mean age of the participants was 60.9 years (±11.2), and 56.3% were male. The most common cancers were lung cancer (17.0%), colon cancer (15.9%), and breast cancer (12.5%). The subjects' reasons for attrition were conditional deterioration, death, or voluntary withdrawal (N = 13, 7.4%). Following the education, there was a significant reduction in overall pain intensity over 24 hours (P misconceptions regarding cancer pain management. The present educational intervention was effective in encouraging short-acting analgesic use for breakthrough pain, improving quality of life outcomes, and rectifying patients' misconceptions about analgesic use.

  3. Adjunctive cognitive behavioural treatment for chronic pain couples improves marital satisfaction but not pain management outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, S; Sharpe, L; Newton-John, T

    2016-11-01

    Data have consistently shown that patient coping with chronic pain can be affected by various factors associated with the primary relationship, and hence efforts to include the patient's partner in the treatment process have merit. This study evaluated the benefit of adding an adjunctive, couples-based, cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for chronic pain to a standard cognitive behavioural pain management programme. Forty-five couples were randomly assigned to either an adjunctive couples intervention (n = 19) or the pain programme only (n = 26). All patient participants completed a 3-week multi-disciplinary pain management programme, to which their partners were invited to attend one full day. In addition, partners in the adjunctive condition received four, one hour treatment sessions focusing on pain education, patient-partner communication, operant behavioural principles and relapse prevention strategies. Partner sessions for the adjunctive intervention were provided over the telephone. By the completion of the pain programme the adjunctive couples intervention demonstrated significant improvements in marital satisfaction for the spouses over and above attendance at the pain management programme alone (p = 0.003). However, spouse involvement did not facilitate any additional response to treatment for pain patients on marital satisfaction, pain, disability or any indices of distress. All treatment gains were maintained at 1 month follow-up. These data demonstrate that a brief CBT intervention can significantly improve marital satisfaction for spouses of chronic pain patients, but the treatment does not translate to improvements in function on any outcomes, including marital satisfaction, for patients of chronic pain. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: A brief, telephone-based intervention for couples living with chronic pain is an acceptable format for intervention. This intervention can significantly improve marital satisfaction for partners of chronic pain

  4. Improvement in Pain After Lumbar Spine Surgery: The Role of Preoperative Expectations of Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Carol A; Reid, M C; Duculan, Roland; Girardi, Federico P

    2017-02-01

    Improvement in pain is a major expectation of patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Among 422 patients, the goal of this prospective study was to measure 2-year postoperative pain and to determine whether this outcome varied according to patient and clinical characteristics, including amount of pain relief expected preoperatively. Before surgery patients completed valid questionnaires that addressed clinical characteristics and expectations for pain improvement. Two years after surgery patients reported how much pain improvement they actually received. The mean age was 56 years old and 55% were men. Two years after surgery 11% of patients reported no improvement in pain, 28% reported a little to moderate improvement, 44% reported a lot of improvement, and 17% reported complete improvement. In multivariable analysis, patients reported less pain improvement if, before surgery, they expected greater pain improvement (odds ratio [OR] 1.4), had a positive screen for depression (OR 1.7), were having revision surgery (OR 1.6), had surgery at L4 or L5 (OR 2.5), had a degenerative diagnosis (OR 1.6), and if, after surgery, they had another surgery (OR 2.8) and greater back (OR 1.3) and leg (OR 1.1) pain (all variables P≤0.05). Pain is not uncommon after lumbar surgery and is associated with a network of clinical, surgical, and psychological variables. This study provides evidence that patients' expectations about pain are an independent variable in this network. Because expectations are potentially modifiable this study supports addressing pain-related expectations with patients before surgery through discussions with surgeons and through formal preoperative patient education.

  5. Leveraging Interactive Patient Care Technology to Improve Pain Management Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao-Gupta, Suma; Kruger, David; Leak, Lonna D; Tieman, Lisa A; Manworren, Renee C B

    2017-12-15

    Most children experience pain in hospitals; and their parents report dissatisfaction with how well pain was managed. Engaging patients and families in the development and evaluation of pain treatment plans may improve perceptions of pain management and hospital experiences. The aim of this performance improvement project was to engage patients and families to address hospitalized pediatric patients' pain using interactive patient care technology. The goal was to stimulate conversations about pain management expectations and perceptions of treatment plan effectiveness among patients, parents, and health care teams. Plan-Do-Study-Act was used to design, develop, test, and pilot new workflows to integrate the interactive patient care technology system with the automated medication dispensing system and document actions from both systems into the electronic health record. The pediatric surgical unit and hematology/oncology unit of a free-standing, university-affiliated, urban children's hospital were selected to pilot this performance improvement project because of the high prevalence of pain from surgeries and hematologic and oncologic diseases, treatments, and invasive procedures. Documentation of pain assessments, nonpharmacologic interventions, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness increased. The proportion of positive family satisfaction responses for pain management significantly increased from fiscal year 2014 to fiscal year 2016 (p = .006). By leveraging interactive patient care technologies, patients and families were engaged to take an active role in pain treatment plans and evaluation of treatment outcomes. Improved active communication and partnership with patients and families can effectively change organizational culture to be more sensitive to patients' pain and patients' and families' hospital experiences. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Is improved fitness associated with reduced pain intensity in patients with low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Budtz, Cecilie Rud; Krogsgaard, Lene Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) is a common global health problem and it causes more disability worldwide than any other disease. Despite this, knowledge concerning causes, prevention and effective treatments is lacking. It is a general assumption that LBP is associated with reduced physical...... capacity, but only few studies have examined this association. Objective: To examine the association between fitness and pain intensity in LBP-patients. Further to examine the association between clinically relevant improved fitness and clinically relevant reduced pain intensity at follow-up based...... and complete 3 months’ follow-up on fitness and pain. Clinically relevant improved fitness was defined as improved fitness ≥ 10% from baseline to follow-up. Clinically relevant change in pain intensity was defined as a reduction ≥ 30% on the Numerical Rating Scale. The association was examined by Spearman...

  7. A motivational therapeutic assessment improves pain, mood, and relationship satisfaction in couples with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa Renee; Cano, Annmarie; Wurm, Lee H

    2013-05-01

    The current study tested whether a therapeutic assessment improved pain and well-being in couples facing chronic pain. Couples (N = 47) in which 1 spouse had chronic pain completed surveys about pain, mood, marital satisfaction, and empathy, followed by an interview and an assessment session to which they were randomly assigned: a tailored assessment of their marriage and pain coping that incorporated motivational interviewing strategies, or a control condition that included education about the gate control theory of pain. Multilevel modeling revealed that couples in the motivational assessment group experienced significant decreases in pain severity and negative mood, and increases in marital satisfaction and positive mood from baseline to postassessment, relative to the education control group. All participants experienced increases in empathy toward their partner except for spouses in the control group, who experienced declines in spousal empathy. The motivational assessment and control groups did not experience differential change in any of the variables at 1-month follow-up. Moderators of improvement were also explored, including age, race, gender, education, pain duration, spouse pain status, and marriage duration. The results provide preliminary evidence for the short-term benefits of a brief motivational assessment to improve psychosocial functioning in both patients and spouses. This article presents preliminary evidence in support of a brief therapeutic psychosocial assessment for couples with chronic pain. Assessments such as this may potentially help patients and their spouses feel more optimistic about pain treatment and increase the likelihood of entering treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An acute pain service improves postoperative pain management for children undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigon, Chantal; Loetwiriyakul, Witthaya; Ranger, Manon; Otis, Annik

    2009-12-01

    A continuous epidural infusion of morphine is the pain treatment modality for children undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) in our institution. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of having an organized acute pain service (APS) on postoperative pain management of these children. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using anesthetic records and the APS database to compare the postoperative pain management of children undergoing SDR before and after the introduction of the APS at the Montreal Children's Hospital in April 2001. Ninety-two consecutive children who had their surgery between January 1997 and July 2006 were included. We collected data regarding postoperative pain, opioid-induced side effects, complications (sedation, desaturations improvements in general postoperative care and in length of stay, our study did show that having an organized APS allowed to significantly decrease the incidence of postoperative oxygen desaturation and to decrease the hospital length of stay by 1 day.

  9. Improving patient satisfaction with pain management using Six Sigma tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPree, Erin; Martin, Lisa; Anderson, Rebecca; Kathuria, Navneet; Reich, David; Porter, Carol; Chassin, Mark R

    2009-07-01

    Patient satisfaction as a direct and public measure of quality of care is changing the way hospitals address quality improvement. The feasibility of using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) methodology to improve patient satisfaction as it relates to pain management was evaluated. This project used the DMAIC methodology to improve patients' overall satisfaction with pain management on two inpatient units in an urban academic medical center. Pre- and postintervention patient surveys were conducted. The DMAIC methodology provided a data-driven structure to determine the optimal improvement strategies, as well as a long-term plan for maintaining any improvements. In addition, the Change Acceleration Process (CAP) was used throughout the project's various DMAIC stages to further the work of the team by creating a shared need to meet the objectives of the project. Overall satisfaction with pain management "excellent" ratings increased from 37% to 54%. Both units surpassed the goal of at least 50% of responses in the "excellent" category. Several key drivers of satisfaction with pain management were uncovered in the Analyze phase of the project, and each saw rating increases from the pre-intervention to postintervention surveys. Ongoing monitoring by the hospital inpatient satisfaction survey showed that the pain satisfaction score improved in subsequent quarters as compared with the pre-intervention period. The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology can be used successfully to improve patient satisfaction. The project led to measurable improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management, which have endured past the duration of the Six Sigma project. The Control phase of DMAIC allows the improvements to be incorporated into daily operations.

  10. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile.

  11. Implementation of a Hydrotherapy Protocol to Improve Postpartum Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Meghann; Stevenson, Eleanor; Zimmermann, Deb; Isaacs, Christine

    2017-03-01

    A growing number of women are seeking alternatives to traditional pharmacologic pain management during birth. While there has been an extensive array of nonpharmacologic options developed for labor, there are limited offerings in the postpartum period. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement a hydrotherapy protocol in the early postpartum period to improve pain management for women choosing a nonmedicated birth. The postpartum hydrotherapy protocol was initiated in a certified nurse-midwife (CNM) practice in an urban academic medical center. All women who met criteria were offered a 30-minute warm water immersion bath at one hour postpartum. Pain scores were assessed prior to the bath, at 15 minutes after onset, and again at the conclusion (30 minutes). Women who completed the bath were also asked to complete a brief survey on their experience with postpartum hydrotherapy. In women who used the bath (N = 45), there was a significant reduction in pain scores (P hydrotherapy protocol as an alternative or adjunct to medication for early postpartum pain management that significantly reduced pain and improved the birth experience for those who used it. It offers a nonpharmacologic alternative where there have traditionally been limited options. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. Improving Pain Care with Project ECHO in Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren; Zlateva, Ianita; Davis, Bennet; Bifulco, Lauren; Giannotti, Tierney; Coman, Emil; Spegman, Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Pain is an extremely common complaint in primary care, and patient outcomes are often suboptimal. This project evaluated the impact of Project ECHO Pain videoconference case-based learning sessions on knowledge and quality of pain care in two Federally Qualified Health Centers. Quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention, with comparison group. Two large, multisite federally qualified health centers in Connecticut and Arizona. Intervention (N = 10) and comparison (N = 10) primary care providers. Primary care providers attended 48 weekly Project ECHO Pain sessions between January and December 2013, led by a multidisciplinary pain specialty team. Surveys and focus groups assessed providers' pain-related knowledge and self-efficacy. Electronic health record data were analyzed to evaluate opioid prescribing and specialty referrals. Compared with control, primary care providers in the intervention had a significantly greater increase in pain-related knowledge and self-efficacy. Providers who attended ECHO were more likely to use formal assessment tools and opioid agreements and refer to behavioral health and physical therapy compared with control providers. Opioid prescribing decreased significantly more among providers in the intervention compared with those in the control group. Pain is an extremely common and challenging problem, particularly among vulnerable patients such as those cared for at the more than 1,200 Federally Qualified Health Centers in the United States. In this study, attendance at weekly Project ECHO Pain sessions not only improved knowledge and self-efficacy, but also altered prescribing and referral patterns, suggesting that knowledge acquired during ECHO sessions translated into practice changes. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  13. Trends in celecoxib and etoricoxib prescribing following removal of prior authorization requirement in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo-Martínez, E; Pia-Morandeira, A; Figueiras, A

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies indicate that the implementation of a prior authorization requirement for coxibs was followed by a sharp decline in their use. There are no studies showing what happens if coxib prior authorization is removed. The objective of this study is to assess the trend in the use of coxibs marketed in Spain, following removal of their respective prior authorization requirements in November 2006 for celecoxib and February 2007 for etoricoxib. We calculated the monthly number of defined daily doses per thousand inhabitants per day (DDD/TID) of coxibs dispensed in a health area of Spain from mid-2005 to December 2007. Data were analysed both graphically and by means of a segmented regression model. At the start of the study period, use of coxibs showed no growth. At the date when prior authorization of celecoxib was removed (November 2006), however, DDD/TID of the coxib whose prior authorization had not been removed - namely etoricoxib - remained unchanged, whereas consumption of celecoxib increased significantly (by the end of the study period, celecoxib use displayed a relative increase of 615% in terms of the DDD/TID prescribed before the removal of its prior authorization requirement). Similarly, etoricoxib use remained unchanged until its prior authorization was removed (February 2007), from which time DDD/TID of etoricoxib also underwent a considerable increase (by the end of the study period, etoricoxib use displayed a relative increase of 793% in terms of the DDD/TID prescribed before the removal of its prior authorization). Segmented regression analysis showed a sharp, statistically significant rise and change in slope in both celecoxib and etoricoxib use immediately after removal of their respective prior authorizations. Use of celecoxib and etoricoxib rose sharply after removal of their respective prior authorizations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Improvement in pain severity category in clinical trials of pregabalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Parsons,1 Charles E Argoff,2 Andrew Clair,1 Birol Emir1 1Pfizer, New York, NY, USA; 2Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY, USA Background: Pregabalin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, and neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Approval was based on clinical trial data demonstrating statistically significant differences in pain scores versus placebo. However, statistically significant pain relief may not always equate to clinically meaningful pain relief. To further characterize the clinical benefit of pregabalin, this analysis examined shifts in pain severity categories in patients with FM, DPN/PHN (pooled in this analysis, and SCI treated with pregabalin.Methods: Data were pooled from 23 placebo-controlled trials in patients with FM (1,623 treated with pregabalin, 937 placebo, DPN/PHN (2,867 pregabalin, 1,532 placebo, or SCI (181 pregabalin, 175 placebo. Pain scores were assessed on an 11-point numeric rating scale and categorized as mild (0 to <4, moderate (4 to <7, or severe (7 to 10. Only patients with mean score ≥4 at baseline were randomized to treatment. The percentage of patients shifting pain category from baseline to endpoint for pregabalin and placebo was analyzed using a modified ridit transformation with the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel procedure.Results: A higher proportion of patients shifted to a less severe pain category at endpoint with pregabalin compared with placebo. With flexible-dose pregabalin, the percentage of patients improving from: severe to mild (pregabalin versus placebo was 15.8 versus 13.4 in FM patients, 36.0 versus 16.6 in DPN/PHN patients, 14.3 versus 7.7 in SCI patients; severe to moderate was 28.7 versus 28.2 in FM patients, 32.5 versus 28.2 in DPN/PHN patients, 35.7 versus 28.2 in SCI patients; and moderate to mild was 38.3 versus 26.4 in FM patients, 59.5 versus 41.4 in

  15. Research improves hospitals' approach to children's pain in Thailand

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Learn more about the Global Health Research Initiative. Read more about this project: Improving management of pediatric pain in urban and rural Thailand. Read more about research supported by the Teasdale-Corti Global Health Research Partnership: Addressing the social roots of disease · Listening to the animals in ...

  16. An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Deepitha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others. Results We have developed an improved assay which overcomes these confounding factors and enables studying USVs in freely moving mice repetitively over several weeks. Using this improved assay, we report here that USVs increase significantly in mice with bone metastases-induced cancer pain or neuropathic pain for several weeks, in comparison to sham-treated mice. Importantly, analgesic drugs which are known to alleviate tumour pain or neuropathic pain in human patients significantly reduce USVs as well as mechanical allodynia in corresponding mouse models. Conclusions We show that studying USVs and mechanical allodynia in the same cohort of mice enables comparing the temporal progression of on-going pain (i.e. stimulus-independent pain and stimulus-evoked pain in these clinically highly-relevant forms of chronic pain.

  17. Safety of Etoricoxib, Celecoxib, and Nonselective Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs in Ankylosing Spondylitis and Other Spondyloarthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L E; Jakobsen, A K; Askling, J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Safety data regarding the use of etoricoxib and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients are rather limited. Our objective was to estimate and compare rates of gastrointestinal, renovascular, and cardio......OBJECTIVE: Safety data regarding the use of etoricoxib and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients are rather limited. Our objective was to estimate and compare rates of gastrointestinal, renovascular...... exposure was assessed time dependently based on the prescription drug register from 2006-2009, adjusting for sociodemographics and comorbidities derived from national population-based registers. RESULTS: Exposure to etoricoxib, celecoxib, and nonselective NSAIDs was 7.6%, 3.9%, and 71.2%, respectively...

  18. Improvement in Anxiety and Pain After Whole Body Whirlpool Hydrotherapy Among Patients With Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the Whirlpool hydrotherapy on pain and anxiety in chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) patients, compared to the conventional hydrocollator pack therapy. Methods Forty-one subjects who have MPS in the upper trapezius muscles without depression were recruited. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the whirlpool therapy group whose bodies were immersed in a whirlpool bath at 34℃-36℃ for 30 minutes; the hydrocollator group who took a 30-minute application of a standard hot hydrocollator pack. Patients in both groups received therapy three days a week for 2 weeks and underwent several evaluations at baseline and after treatment. The variables we analyzed during evaluations were as follows: the primary outcome we considered was pain severity using a visual analogue scale. And the secondary outcomes examined included anxiety using the Korean version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and quality of life (QoL) using the Korean version of the World Health Organization QoL Assessment, Brief Form. All follow-up values were compared with the baseline values. Results The baseline parameters did not show significant differences between two groups. And after 2-week treatment, both groups revealed significant improvement in anxiety levels and QoL, as well as in pain. However, the improvement on pain (p=0.002) and anxiety (p=0.010) was significantly greater in the whirlpool group, compared to the hydrocollator group. Conclusion The whirlpool hydrotherapy can be used as a more effective therapeutic method to reduce pain and anxiety in chronic MPS patients without depression. PMID:24020034

  19. Pain physiology education improves health status and endogenous pain inhibition in fibromyalgia: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Meeus, Mira; Paul, Lorna; De Schryver, Mieke; Pascal, Aurelie; Lambrecht, Luc; Nijs, Jo

    2013-10-01

    There is evidence that education on pain physiology can have positive effects on pain, disability, and catastrophization in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders. A double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed to examine whether intensive pain physiology education is also effective in fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and whether it is able to influence the impaired endogenous pain inhibition of these patients. Thirty FM patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental (receiving pain physiology education) or the control group (receiving pacing self-management education). The primary outcome was the efficacy of the pain inhibitory mechanisms, which was evaluated by spatially accumulating thermal nociceptive stimuli. Secondary outcome measures included pressure pain threshold measurements and questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, behavior, and health status. Assessments were performed at baseline, 2 weeks, and 3 months follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAS were used to reveal possible therapy effects and effect sizes were calculated. After the intervention the experimental group had improved knowledge of pain neurophysiology (Pphysiology. Pain physiology education seems to be a useful component in the treatment of FM patients as it improves health status and endogenous pain inhibition in the long term.

  20. Improvement after chiropractic care in cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and subjective pain intensity in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J; Sandström, Peter J; Lundqvist, Fredrik J; Heikkilä, Hannu

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine alteration in head repositioning accuracy (HRA), range of motion, and pain intensity in patients with chronic cervical pain syndrome without a history of cervical trauma. The study was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Forty-one patients with chronic cervical pain were randomly assigned to either a control group or a chiropractic treatment group. All patients were clinically examined, given general information on cervical pain, and provided with training instructions based on the clinical evaluation. The treatment included sessions with high-velocity and low-amplitude manipulation, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, ischemic compression of myofascial trigger points, and spinal rehabilitation exercises aiming to normalize cervical range of motion (CROM) and HRA. Subjective pain intensity, cervical kinesthetic sensibility, and CROM were recorded before and after the study period. There was no difference between the treatment patients and the control subjects at the beginning with regard to age, sex, subjective pain intensity, range of motion, and HRA. At the 5-week follow-up, the treatment patients showed significant reductions in pain and improvement of all HRA aspects measured whereas the control subjects did not show any reduction in pain and improvement in only one HRA aspect. No significant difference was detected in CROM. The results of this study suggest that chiropractic care can be effective in influencing the complex process of proprioceptive sensibility and pain of cervical origin. Short, specific chiropractic treatment programs with proper patient information may alter the course of chronic cervical pain.

  1. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A Quality Improvement Collaborative Program for Neonatal Pain Management in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoo, Kyoko; Funaba, Yuuki; Fukushima, Sayo; Fukuhara, Rie; Uchida, Mieko; Aiba, Satoru; Doi, Miki; Nishimura, Akira; Hayakawa, Masahiro; Nishimura, Yutaka; Oohira, Mitsuko

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neonatal pain management guidelines have been released; however, there is insufficient systematic institutional support for the adoption of evidence-based pain management in Japan. Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a collaborative quality improvement program on the implementation of pain management improvements in Japanese neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods: Seven Japanese level III NICUs participated in a neonatal pain management quality improvement program based on an Institute for Healthcare Improvement collaborative model. The NICUs developed evidence-based practice points for pain management and implemented these over a 12-month period. Changes were introduced through a series of Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, and throughout the process, pain management quality indicators were tracked as performance measures. Jonckheere's trend test and the Cochran-Armitage test for trend were used to examine the changes in quality indicator implementations over time (baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months). Findings: Baseline pain management data from the 7 sites revealed substantial opportunities for improvement of pain management, and testing changes in the NICU setting resulted in measurable improvements in pain management. During the intervention phase, all participating sites introduced new pain assessment tools, and all sites developed electronic medical record forms to capture pain score, interventions, and infant responses to interventions. Implications for Practice: The use of collaborative quality improvement techniques played a key role in improving pain management in the NICUs. Implications for Research: Collaborative improvement programs provide an attractive strategy for solving evidence-practice gaps in the NICU setting. PMID:28114148

  3. Challenge of improving postoperative pain management: case studies of three acute pain services in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, A E; Davies, H T O; Bannister, J; Macrae, W A

    2009-06-01

    Previous national survey research has shown significant deficits in routine postoperative pain management in the UK. This study used an organizational change perspective to explore in detail the organizational challenges faced by three acute pain services in improving postoperative pain management. Case studies were conducted comprising documentary review and semi-structured interviews (71) with anaesthetists, surgeons, nurses, other health professionals, and managers working in and around three broadly typical acute pain services. Although the precise details differed to some degree, the three acute pain services all faced the same broad range of inter-related challenges identified in the organizational change literature (i.e. structural, political, cultural, educational, emotional, and physical/technological challenges). The services were largely isolated from wider organizational objectives and activities and struggled to engage other health professionals in improving postoperative pain management against a background of limited resources, turbulent organizational change, and inter- and intra-professional politics. Despite considerable efforts they struggled to address these challenges effectively. The literature on organizational change and quality improvement in health care suggests that it is only by addressing the multiple challenges in a comprehensive way across all levels of the organization and health-care system that sustained improvements in patient care can be secured. This helps to explain why the hard work and commitment of acute pain services over the years have not always resulted in significant improvements in routine postoperative pain management for all surgical patients. Using this literature and adopting a whole-organization quality improvement approach tailored to local circumstances may produce a step-change in the quality of routine postoperative pain management.

  4. Neck pain: manipulating the upper back helps lessen pain and improve neck motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Neck pain is very common. In the United States, between 30% and 50% of people suffer from an aching neck each year. Although neck pain can be caused by injury, most of this pain results from more gradual stresses, such as particular sitting, standing, or work postures, lifting patterns, or sleeping positions. Typical neck pain can also cause headaches, pain between your shoulders, or a feeling of knots in your neck and upper back muscles. Although manual therapy, sometimes called "manipulation," is a common treatment for many types of spine pain, some people are uncomfortable having their necks manipulated. Recently, though, researchers have tested the benefits of a thrust manipulation of the upper back to treat neck pain. A study published in the September 2011 issue of JOSPT provides new insight and an evidence-based summary of the benefits of manipulating the upper back to ease and eliminate neck pain.

  5. Research improves hospitals' approach to children's pain in Thailand

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-03-04

    Mar 4, 2013 ... Dr Allen Finley of Dalhousie University is collaborating with Thai specialists on better pain management for children. Stephen Dale ... Less tangible — but equally real — is that untreated pain in children causes great suffering for family members and debilitating stress for nursing staff. “Seeing a child in pain ...

  6. Economic evaluation of etoricoxib versus non-selective NSAIDs in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jeroen P; Pellissier, James; Choy, Ernest H; Ostor, Andrew; Nash, Julian T; Bacon, Paul; Hunsche, Elke

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of etoricoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitor, versus non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs) in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The cost-effectiveness of etoricoxib versus nsNSAIDs was evaluated from the UK National Health Service (NHS) and society perspective with a decision-analytic model. Patients stayed on initial therapy throughout 52 weeks unless they experienced an adverse event (AE) or lacked efficacy, in which case they switched to another nsNSAID or a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist. Efficacy data were obtained from a 1-year etoricoxib clinical trial in AS. Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) data were translated into Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) weights using a published data on the relation between BASFI and Short-form (SF) 36 Quality of life scores, as well as the relation between SF-36 and utility. Safety data were based on meta-analyses of etoricoxib trials. Information on treatment pathways, resource consumption, and absenteeism from work was obtained from literature and experts. Model outcomes included QALYs, perforations, ulcers, or bleeds, cardiovascular events, and costs. Etoricoxib was cost-effective compared to nsNSAIDs in terms of cost per QALY saved ( pound5611). Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found a 77% probability of the incremental cost per QALY saved being within a threshold for cost-effectiveness of pound20 000. The expected direct costs over the 52-week period were pound1.23 (95% uncertainty distribution pound1.10; pound1.39) and pound1.13 per day ( pound0.78; pound1.55) for patients starting with etoricoxib and nsNSAIDs, respectively. When costs related to absenteeism were taken into account, the cost per QALY saved was pound281. Given the underlying assumptions and data used, this economic evaluation demonstrated that, compared to nsNSAIDs, etoricoxib is a cost-effective therapy for AS patients in the UK.

  7. Improvement in the Spatial Distribution of Pain, Somatic Symptoms, and Depression After a Weight Loss Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrepf, Andrew; Harte, Steven E; Miller, Nicole; Fowler, Christine; Nay, Catherine; Williams, David A; Clauw, Daniel J; Rothberg, Amy

    2017-12-01

    Weight loss is known to improve pain localized to weight-bearing joints but it is not known how weight loss affects the spatial distribution of pain and associated somatic symptoms like fatigue. We sought to determine if weight loss using a low-calorie diet improves pain, affect, and somatic symptoms commonly associated with chronic pain conditions in an observational study. We also documented changes in inflammatory markers in serum before and after weight loss. Participants were 123 obese individuals undergoing a 12- to 16-week calorie restriction weight loss intervention. The spatial distribution of pain, symptom severity (eg, fatigue, sleep difficulties), depression, and total fibromyalgia scale scores were measured before and after weight loss. Pain (P = . 022), symptom severity (P = .004), depression (P weight loss; men showed greater improvement than women on somatic symptoms and fibromyalgia scores (both P weight showed greater improvement than those who lost Weight loss may improve diffuse pain and comorbid symptoms commonly seen in chronic pain participants. This article presents the effect of a weight loss intervention on characteristics of chronic pain, including the spatial distribution of pain and comorbid somatic symptoms. Weight loss appeared to produce larger improvements in somatic symptoms for men. Copyright © 2017 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The design of a theory-based intervention to improve medication adherence in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Leon; Stronks, Dirk L; Huygen, Frank J P M

    2017-07-01

    Non-adherence to pain medication is common in chronic pain patients and may result in unfavorable treatment outcomes. Interventions to improve adherence behavior often fail to significantly change medication use. In this report, we describe the application of a theoretical psychological model of behavior change in order to design an intervention to improve medication adherence in chronic pain patients. This study applies the Behavior Change Wheel framework and the Behavior Change Techniques Taxonomy to design a theory-based intervention to improve pain medication use. Available literature was used to extract determinants of adherence in chronic pain patients. Selected target behaviors to improve medication adherence are: share agreement on follow up policy, monitor medication adherence, provide patient education routinely, discuss attitudes and concerns towards pain medication, develop medication taking habits and use medication reminders. The intervention consists of three components in which relevant behavior change techniques are applied: (1) changes in the electronic patient data management systems to enable medical staff to apply target behaviors; (2) bi-annual education of medical staff to commit the team to the proposed intervention and provide feedback; (3) routine and mandatory education of chronic pain patients following prescription of pain medication. To improve medication adherence in chronic pain patients, most interventions should be focused on providers of pain therapy. Prescribing chronic pain medication should be seen as part of a larger treatment regimen including adequate follow-up, adherence monitoring and patient education during the course of treatment.

  9. Improving the Treatment and Assessment of Moderate and Severe Pain in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Chafe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Janeway Children’s Hospital previously enacted a number of measures to improve pain management for patients in its emergency department (ED. While improvements were demonstrated, rates for the timely assessment and treatment of pain remain below standards of care. Objectives. The study objectives are to investigate the impact of the previous attempts to improve the treatment of pain and to explore ways to further improve pain management in the ED. Methods. Key informant interviews and a focus group were conducted with nurses, physicians, and parents whose children were identified as having severe pain. Results. Interviews were conducted with 31 parents or children, 9 physicians, and 8 nurses. The focus group was attended by 15 nurses. Previous initiatives were viewed as improvements. Continued barriers include difficulties in accurately capturing the level of pain, issues in treating pain for specific types of patients, and inadequacy in addressing patients in severe pain. Conclusion. Changes in pain treatment protocols can result in positive impacts but are likely insufficient on their own to achieve desired standards of care. Consistent measurement and engagement with staff can identify additional opportunities for improving pain management within an ED setting.

  10. Associations between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis and improvements with etanercept therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Mohammed; Zack, Debra J; Li, Wenzhi; Stewart, V Michelle; Koenig, Andrew S

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationships between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and the impact of 12 weeks' etanercept treatment versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Data were combined from four clinical trials for patients with AS who received at least one dose of etanercept, sulfasalazine or placebo and had at least one postbaseline assessment value. Linear regression was performed (controlling for site, protocol and demographics), to explore the relationship between inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP]), nocturnal back pain (visual analog scale [VAS] 0-100 mm) and fatigue (VAS 0-100 mm Bath AS Disease Activity Index fatigue item). Out of 1283 patients (etanercept, n = 867; sulfasalazine, n = 187; placebo, n = 229), improvement in nocturnal back pain was a significant predictor of improvement in fatigue. Significant correlations were found between nocturnal back pain and fatigue, but not CRP levels. Etanercept provided significantly greater pain/fatigue improvement than sulfasalazine or placebo. Improvements in nocturnal back pain and fatigue had weak relationships with improvement in inflammation (CRP level). AS patients treated with etanercept demonstrated superior improvement in nocturnal back pain and fatigue versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Decrease in nocturnal back pain can improve fatigue. Assessing treatment response using CRP levels alone may be misleading without also examining patient-reported outcomes such as back pain and fatigue.

  11. Acidosis and Formaldehyde Secretion as a Possible Pathway of Cancer Pain and Options for Improved Cancer Pain Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, D Graeme; Han, Bo; Fang, Josephine Y; Nimni, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer pain in patients with cancer is high. The majority of efforts are spent on research in cancer treatment, but only a small fraction focuses on cancer pain. Pain in cancer patients, viewed predominantly as a secondary issue, is considered to be due to the destruction of tissues, compression of the nerves, inflammation, and secretion of biological mediators from the necrotic tumor mass. As a result, opioid drugs have remained as the primary pharmacological therapy for cancer pain for the past hundred years. This report reviews evidence that cancer pain may be produced by the metabolic effects of two byproducts of cancer-high acidity in the cancer microenvironment and the secretion of formaldehyde and its metabolites. We propose the research and development of therapeutic approaches for preemptive, short- and long-term management of cancer pain using available drugs or nutraceutical agents that can suppress or neutralize lactic acid production in combination with formaldehyde scavengers. We believe this approach may not only improve cancer pain control but may also enhance the quality of life for patients.

  12. Improving pain relief for children in Thailand | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Children are more at risk than adults for untreated or undertreated pain from surgery, injury, and infections. This can include negative physical, psychological, and social consequences for both the young patients and their families. Children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) often have limited access to pain care.

  13. Can we improve parents' management of their children's postoperative pain at home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren Chorney, Jill; Twycross, Alison; Mifflin, Katherine; Archibald, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of children undergo surgery each year, and a shift toward same-day surgeries and decreased lengths of hospital stay results in parents being increasingly responsible for their child's postoperative care. Recent studies have tested interventions designed to improve parent management of their children's postoperative pain at home, but progress in this area has been limited by a lack of synthesis of these findings. To conduct a systematic review of interventions to improve parent management of children's postoperative pain at home. Articles evaluating interventions to improve management of their children's postoperative pain were identified using a library scientist-designed search strategy applied in EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Two independent raters assessed each study for eligibility and extracted data. Of the 147 articles identified for the review, eight met the inclusion criteria. Interventions included pain education, training in pain assessment, education on distraction, instruction in around-the-clock dosing and nurse coaching. Overall, results of comparisons of pain intensity and analgesic administration were modest. The intervention with the largest effect size was instruction in around-the-clock dosing, either alone or in combination with nurse coaching. Results of studies investigating pain assessment, pain education and distraction trials revealed small to medium effect sizes. Results of trials investigating interventions to improve parent management of their children's postoperative pain at home were modest. Future studies should further examine barriers and facilitators to pain management to design more effective interventions.

  14. Chronic Pain in Canada: Have We Improved Our Management of Chronic Noncancer Pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Boulanger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP is a global issue, not only affecting individual suffering, but also impacting the delivery of health care and the strength of local economies.

  15. Strength Training Improves Fatigue Resistance and Self-Rated Health in Workers with Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual...... (Spearman's rho = -0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267.......-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P

  16. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson DR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Daren R Anderson,1 Ianita Zlateva,1 Emil N Coman,2 Khushbu Khatri,1 Terrence Tian,1 Robert D Kerns3 1Weitzman Institute, Community Health Center, Inc., Middletown, 2UCONN Health Disparities Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, 3VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Purpose: Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods: The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results: Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009. There was no

  17. Obesity impedes functional improvement in youth with chronic pain: An initial investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, A M; Jastrowski Mano, K E; Weisman, S J; Hainsworth, K R

    2017-10-01

    Youth with chronic pain are at higher risk for obesity than the general population. In youth with chronic pain, obesity exacerbates pain-specific activity limitations, and in adults with chronic pain, obesity perpetuates a cycle of disability. The current study examined whether weight status predicts functional disability outcomes over time in youth with chronic pain. Data were obtained from a retrospective chart review of patients who consented to participate in a longitudinal outcomes study. The Child Activity Limitations Questionnaire was used to assess functional disability at intake, 1-, and 3-month follow-up. Height and weight were measured at intake. A linear mixed model was used to test whether weight status and time predicted functional disability. Trend analysis with polynomial contrasts was used to test whether improvements in functional disability showed a linear trend over time. The linear mixed model analysis showed a main effect of weight, suggesting that youth with higher BMI demonstrated less improvement in functional disability over time. The trend analysis suggested that improvements in functional disability were consistent with a linear trend for both healthy weight and overweight participants, but not for obese participants. These findings demonstrate that obesity impedes improvement in functioning for youth with chronic pain. Despite multidisciplinary pain treatment, youth with comorbid chronic pain and obesity demonstrate greater functional disability at follow-up and little improvement over time. These results support the need for interventions specifically tailored to the unique challenges faced by youth with comorbid chronic pain and obesity. This study shows that obesity impedes improvement in functioning for youth with chronic pain. On the basis of these findings, interventions should be tailored to the unique challenges of this population. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. Improving pain relief for children in Thailand | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-21

    Apr 21, 2016 ... Children are more at risk than adults for untreated or undertreated pain from surgery, injury, and infections. This can include negative physical, psychological, and social consequences for both the young patients and their families. Children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) often have limited ...

  19. Pain Management After Outpatient Shoulder Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrender, William J; Syed, Usman Ali M; Hammoud, Sommer; Emper, William; Ciccotti, Michael G; Abboud, Joseph A; Freedman, Kevin B

    2017-06-01

    Effective postoperative pain management after shoulder arthroscopy is a critical component to recovery, rehabilitation, and patient satisfaction. This systematic review provides a comprehensive overview of level 1 and level 2 evidence regarding postoperative pain management for outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Systematic review. We performed a systematic review of the various modalities reported in the literature for postoperative pain control after outpatient shoulder arthroscopy and analyzed their outcomes. Analgesic regimens reviewed include regional nerve blocks/infusions, subacromial/intra-articular injections or infusions, cryotherapy, and oral medications. Only randomized control trials with level 1 or level 2 evidence that compared 2 or more pain management modalities or placebo were included. We excluded studies without objective measures to quantify postoperative pain within the first postoperative month, subjective pain scale measurements, or narcotic consumption as outcome measures. A combined total of 40 randomized control trials met our inclusion criteria. Of the 40 included studies, 15 examined nerve blocks, 4 studied oral medication regimens, 12 studied subacromial infusion, 8 compared multiple modalities, and 1 evaluated cryotherapy. Interscalene nerve blocks (ISBs) were found to be the most effective method to control postoperative pain after shoulder arthroscopy. Increasing concentrations, continuous infusions, and patient-controlled methods can be effective for more aggressively controlling pain. Dexamethasone, clonidine, intrabursal oxycodone, and magnesium have all been shown to successfully improve the duration and adequacy of ISBs when used as adjuvants. Oral pregabalin and etoricoxib administered preoperatively have evidence supporting decreased postoperative pain and increased patient satisfaction. On the basis of the evidence in this review, we recommend the use of ISBs as the most effective analgesic for outpatient arthroscopic

  20. Improvements in Neck and Arm Pain Following an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, Dustin H; Mayo, Benjamin C; Bohl, Daniel D; Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Fineberg, Steven J; Louie, Philip K; Basques, Bryce A; Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective analysis. The aim of this study was to quantify improvements in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short Form-12 (SF-12) Mental (MCS) and Physical (PCS) Composite scores following an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is evaluated with patient-reported outcomes. However, the extent to which these outcomes improve following ACDF remains poorly defined. A surgical registry of patients who underwent primary, one- or two-level ACDF during 2013 to 2015 was reviewed. Comparisons of VAS neck and arm, NDI, and SF-12 MCS and PCS scores were performed using paired t tests from preoperative to each postoperative time point. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to estimate the reduction in neck and arm pain over the first postoperative year. Subgroup analyses were performed for patients with predominant neck (pNP) or arm (pAP) pain, as well as for one- versus two-level ACDF. Eighty-nine patients were identified. VAS neck and arm, NDI, and SF-12 PCS improved from preoperative scores at all postoperative time points (P arm pain (P arm pain over the first 6 months and 12 weeks postoperatively, respectively (P arm pain over the first postoperative year (P arm, respectively (P arm pain following ACDF regardless of presenting symptom. In addition, patients undergoing one-level ACDF report greater reductions in neck and arm pain than patients undergoing two-level fusion. 4.

  1. Comprehensive care of pain: Developing systems and tools to improve patient care and resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickert, Julie; Devlin, Kwanza; Krohn, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a common condition associated with tremendous risk for morbidity and mortality. In many settings, the management of chronic non-cancer pain by primary care providers, although customary, can be difficult due to inadequate training and conflicts between patient expectations and best practices. Resident physicians, faculty, and staff of this family medicine residency program developed a comprehensive chronic pain management program to address these issues while improving patient outcomes. The program was aligned with evidence-based chronic non-cancer pain management strategies yet tailored to the needs of the providers and patients and the strengths of the clinic. In the end, the societal demand for improved chronic non-cancer pain management resulted in a massive curricular and clinical practice overhaul for this residency program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Five Herbs Plus Thiamine Reduce Pain and Improve Functional Mobility in Patients With Pain: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedaya, Robert

    2017-01-01

    sites (18.5%), with 11 miscellaneous locations (40.7%) making up the rest of the sites, including the neck, jaw, foot, heel, and coccyx. The mean disease duration was 5.61 y, with a range of 4 mo to 20 y. The average VAS pain subscale score was 58.04 at baseline and 23.33 at follow-up. The mean difference between the 2 scores was 34.71 (confidence interval [CI], 26.16-47.01). A significant reduction in the pain scores had occurred by the follow-up assessment (t = 7.23, P mobility was 56.67 at baseline and 28.70 at follow-up. The mean difference between the 2 mobility scores was 27.97 (CI, 17.86-38.88). A significant improvement in the ability to move had occurred in the affected areas by the follow-up assessment (t = 5.97, P mobility had occurred for the intervention group as related to their chronic joint, back, and muscle pain. The complex of 5 herbs, plus vitamin B1, was well tolerated, and the results suggest that the blend should be considered to be a valuable alternative treatment in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  3. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadosky, Alesia; Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Nieshoff, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181) or placebo (n=172) for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT)-based thresholds of pain reduction (Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for the pooled studies. Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (Ppain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory Interference Index and most individual items (Ppain reduction. Pregabalin resulted in shifts from placebo toward greater functional improvement with greater pain relief.

  4. A decade of improvement in pain education and clinical practice in developing countries: IASP initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Michael

    2012-05-01

    1. Epidemiological studies, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, on the extent of pain in the community of western countries revealed a prevalence of around 18%, with significant effects on work and social activities despite 30 years of pain education programmes. 2. A survey by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Developing Countries on the extent of pain education and clinical training, and the barriers to them, was published as report in 2007 and confirmed significant deficiencies and problems in all areas. 3. An IASP Developing Countries Taskforce was established in 2002 to facilitate improvements in pain education and management in developing countries through a grants support programme for bottom-up projects from developing country members. 4. Clinical training posts in centres in Thailand, South America and South Africa have been established to improve the clinical training of pain clinicians and, through them, to develop pain services in their countries of origin in which services are poorly developed or absent. 5. There has been a major surge in the demand for and development of programmes and clinical training in developing countries since 2002, reflected in greatly increased local activity in various regions of the world. 6. Based on the ethical/moral belief that pain treatment is a human right, the IASP has recently increased its levels of advocacy to support this belief.

  5. Pilot study: rapidly cycling hypobaric pressure improves pain after 5 days in adiposis dolorosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Karen L; Rutledge, Thomas

    2010-08-20

    Adiposis dolorosa (AD) is a rare disorder of painful nodular subcutaneous fat accompanied by fatigue, difficulty with weight loss, inflammation, increased fluid in adipose tissue (lipedema and lymphedema), and hyperalgesia. Sequential compression relieves lymphedema pain; we therefore hypothesized that whole body cyclic pneumatic hypobaric compression may relieve pain in AD. To avoid exacerbating hyperalgesia, we utilized a touch-free method, which is delivered via a high-performance altitude simulator, the Cyclic Variations in Altitude Conditioning™ (CVAC™) process. As a pilot study, 10 participants with AD completed pain and quality of life questionnaires before and after 20-40 minutes of CVAC process daily for 5 days. Participants lost weight (195.5 ± 17.6-193.8 ± 17.3 lb; P = 0.03), and bioimpedance significantly decreased (510 ± 36-490 ± 38 ohm; P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (P = 0.039), in average (P = 0.002), highest (P = 0.029), lowest (P = 0.04), and current pain severity (P = 0.02) on the Visual Analogue Scale, but there was no change in pain quality by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. There were no significant changes in total and physical SF-36 scores, but the mental score improved significantly (P = 0.049). There were no changes in the Pain Disability Index or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. These data present a potential, new, noninvasive means of treating pain in AD by whole body pneumatic compression as part of the CVAC process. Although randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these data, the CVAC process could potentially help in treating AD pain and other chronic pain disorders.

  6. Minimizing pain during childhood vaccination injections: improving adherence to vaccination schedules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden LM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lacey M Eden, Janelle LB Macintosh, Karlen E Luthy, Renea L Beckstrand College of Nursing, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA Abstract: Pain experienced in childhood can lead to long-term and psychologically detrimental effects. Unfortunately, the most common pain experienced in childhood is caused by vaccinations and may lead to non-adherence to the recommended vaccination schedule. As a result, it is the health care provider's responsibility to take measures to reduce vaccination pain; however, there are a plethora of pain relieving interventions during immunizations and it is unclear which interventions are most cost efficient, timely, and effective. Studies have been conducted to investigate the efficacy of different pain management interventions during vaccinations. This review evaluates various pain relieving interventions and provide health care providers age appropriate guidance on pain relieving interventions during vaccinations. Employment of these strategies may successfully reduce vaccination-associated pain in infants, children, and adolescents, and may improve compliance with the vaccination schedule. Keywords: immunization, intervention, effective, compliance

  7. Outcomes of Prolotherapy in Chondromalacia Patella Patients: Improvements in Pain Level and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Hauser MD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of prolotherapy in resolving pain, stiffness, and crepitus, and improving physical activity in consecutive chondromalacia patients from February 2008 to September 2009. Sixty-nine knees that received prolotherapy in 61 patients (33 female and 36 male who were 18–82 years old (average, 47.2 years were enrolled. Patients received 24 prolotherapy injections (15% dextrose, 0.1% procaine, and 10% sarapin with a total of 40 cc in the anterior knee. At least 6 weeks after their last prolotherapy session, patients provided self-evaluation of knee pain upon rest, activities of daily living (ADL and exercise, range of motion (ROM, stiffness, and crepitus. Symptom severity, sustained improvement of symptoms, number of pain pills needed, and patient satisfaction before treatment and improvement after treatment were recorded. Following prolotherapy, patients experienced statistically significant decreases in pain at rest, during ADL, and exercise. Stiffness and crepitus decreased after prolotherapy, and ROM increased. Patients reported improved walking ability and exercise ability after prolotherapy. For daily pain level, ROM, daily stiffness, crepitus, and walking and exercise ability, sustained improvement of over 75% was reported by 85% of patients. Fewer patients required pain medication. No side effects of prolotherapy were noted. The average length of time from last prolotherapy session was 14.7 months (range, 6 months to 8 years. Only 3 of 16 knees were still recommended for surgery after prolotherapy. Prolotherapy ameliorates chondromalacia patella symptoms and improves physical ability. Patients experience long-term improvement without requiring pain medications. Prolotherapy should be considered a first-line, conservative therapy for chondromalacia patella.

  8. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadosky A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alesia Sadosky,1 Bruce Parsons,1 Birol Emir,1 Edward C Nieshoff2 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan, Detroit, MI, USA Background: Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. Methods: This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181 or placebo (n=172 for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT-based thresholds of pain reduction (<15%, 15% <30%, 30% to <50%, and ≥50%. Outcome measures included modified Brief Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS for the pooled studies. Results: Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (P<0.0001 and between pain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory

  9. [Improving the quality of cancer pain management in palliative care unit: Targeted clinical audit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricou, Colombe; Ruer, Murielle; Ledoux, Mathilde; Perceau-Chambard, Élise; Decrept, Dorothée; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    Goal This study aims to assess the quality of the cancer pain management in Palliative care unit. The method used was the targeted clinical audit. The audit grid was built according to the recommendations of the pilot Committee, and tested until the final version with 19 items was obtained. In this retrospective study, 60 consecutive patients were studied on 2 periods of time. The first one (T1) shows the gap between the patient's chart and the expected standard, and proposes corrective measures. The second one (T2) re-assesses, using the same items list, the efficacy of these measures. After the corrective measures, the patients' medical record documentation was significantly improved at T2 for: neuropathic pain assessment improved, from 3% (T1) to 67% (T2) (P<0.001), so did pain assessment during the titration, from 6.7% (T1) to 90% (T2) (P<0.001). The overdoses symptoms assessment improved from 17% at T1 to 93% at T2, (P=0.002) and breakthrough pain evaluation improved from 3% at T1 to 73% at T2, (P<0.001). The pain reassessment after the rescue doses improved from 10% at T1 to 73% at T2 (P<0.001). The other points improved but not significantly. The quality of the pain cancer management was improved during the audit, but some points (patient education and in patient medical record documentation) can be improved. We need to continue to implement the improvement measures in our unit. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Successful treatment of pain in melorheostosis with zoledronate, with improvement on bone scintigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Samy; Nezzar, Adlen; Makhloufi, Hachemi

    2013-01-01

    Melorheostosis is a very rare sclerosing bone disorder that involves frequently one limb. It may be asymptomatic, but pain and limb deformity may occur and can be very debilitating. Different reports have indicated efficacy of bisphosphonates (pamidronate and etidronate) on symptoms. We report an adult patient with a very painful melorheostosis, who  improved after treatment with zoledronate, either on symptoms or on bone scans. PMID:23813581

  11. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Suzuki

    Full Text Available Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined.To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain.A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38-85 years old with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan between September 2014 and March 2015.Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days.The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA. Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters.Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001, standing (P < 0.001 and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011 compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048 and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003.This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain.UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413.

  12. Pain and mobility improvement and MDA plasma levels in degenerative osteoarthritis, low back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis after infrared A-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siems, W.; Siems, R.; Kitzing, M.; Harting, H.; Bresgen, N.; Eckl, P.M.; Brenke, R.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared (IR)-A irradiation can be useful in back and musculoskeletal pain therapy. In this study joint and vertebral column pain and mobility were measured during two weeks of IR-A irradiation treatment of patients suffering from degenerative osteoarthritis of hip and knee, low back pain, or rheumatoid arthritis. Additionally, before and after IR-A treatment MDA serum levels were measured to check if MDA variations accompany changes in pain intensity and mobility. Two-hundred and seven patients were divided into verum groups getting IR-irradiation, placebo groups getting visible, but not IR irradiation, and groups getting no irradiation. In osteoarthritis significant pain reduction according to Visual Analogue Scale and mobility improvements occurred in the verum group. Even though beneficial mean value changes occurred in the placebo group, the improvements in the placebo and No Irradiation groups were without statistical significance. In low back pain, pain and mobility improvements (by 35 - 40 %) in the verum group were found, too. A delayed (2 nd week) mobility improvement in rheumatoid arthritis was seen. However, pain relief was seen immediately. In patients suffering from low back pain or rheumatoid arthritis, the pain and mobility improvements were accompanied by significant changes of MDA serum levels. However, MDA appears not a sensitive bio factor for changes of the pain intensity in degenerative osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, unaffected or lowered MDA levels during intensive IR-A therapy argue against previous reports on free radical formation upon infrared. In conclusion, rapid beneficial effects of IR-A towards musculoskeletal pain and joint mobility loss were demonstrated. (authors)

  13. Improving pain treatment with a smartphone app: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suso-Ribera, Carlos; Mesas, Ángela; Medel, Javier; Server, Anna; Márquez, Esther; Castilla, Diana; Zaragozá, Irene; García-Palacios, Azucena

    2018-02-27

    Chronic pain has become a major health problem across the world, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of medical interventions is modest. Some have argued that assessment strategies should be improved if the impact of medical interventions is to be improved. Ecological momentary assessment using smartphones is now considered the gold standard in monitoring in health settings, including chronic pain. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no randomized controlled trial to show that telemonitoring using a smartphone app can indeed improve the effectiveness of medical treatments in adults with chronic pain. The goal of this study will be to explore the effects of using a smartphone app for telemonitoring adults with chronic pain. The study will be a randomized controlled trial with three groups: treatment as usual (TAU), TAU+app, and TAU+app+alarms. All groups will receive the adequate treatment for their pain, which will be prescribed the first day of study according to clinical guidelines. Assessment in the TAU group will be the usual at the Pain Clinic, that is, a paper-and-pencil evaluation at the onset of treatment (beginning of study) and at follow up (end of study, 30 days later). The other two groups (TAU+app and TAU+app+alarms) will be assessed daily using Pain Monitor, a smartphone app developed by our multidisciplinary team. Telemonitoring will only be made in the TAU+app+alarms group. For this group, physicians at the Pain Clinic may decide to adjust pain treatment in response to alarms. Telemonitoring is not the usual practice at the Pain Clinic and will not occur in the other two groups (TAU and TAU+app), so no changes in treatment are expected in these groups after the first appointment. The total sample size will be 150, with 50 patients in each group. The assessment protocol will be the same in all groups and will include pain intensity and side effects of the medication (primary outcomes), together with several pain

  14. The Efficacy of Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Improving Function in People with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kurklinsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the efficacy of interdisciplinary rehabilitation for improving function in people with chronic pain. Design. Retrospective Chart Review. Setting. The Pain Rehabilitation Center (PRC at a medical center. Participants. Individuals admitted to the PRC. Interventions. The PRC operates a 3-week outpatient program that utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to treat people with chronic pain. The main treatment elements include physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, and medication management. Physical therapy groups focus on moderate exercise despite symptoms. Occupational therapists teach moderation, time management, and activity modification. CBT groups, led by a pain psychologist, address the psychosocial comorbidities of chronic pain. Medical staff oversee the tapering of opiate analgesics and other symptom targeted treatments. This integrated approach is indicated when conventional treatments have been ineffective. Outcome Measures. The objective outcome was the 6-minute walk test (6 mWT distance. The subjective outcomes were performance (COPM-PER and satisfaction (COPM-SAT as measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. Results. Average 6 mWT distances improved by 39% from 375 m to 523 m. Average COPM-PER scores increased from 3.4 to 7.5. Average COPM-SAT scores increased from 2.4 to 7.5. Conclusions. Comprehensive interdisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation can significantly improve function in people with chronic pain.

  15. Pilot study: rapidly cycling hypobaric pressure improves pain after 5 days in adiposis dolorosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Herbst

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Karen L Herbst1, Thomas Rutledge21Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, California, USAAbstract: Adiposis dolorosa (AD is a rare disorder of painful nodular subcutaneous fat ­accompanied by fatigue, difficulty with weight loss, inflammation, increased fluid in ­adipose ­tissue (lipedema and lymphedema, and hyperalgesia. Sequential compression relieves ­lymphedema pain; we therefore hypothesized that whole body cyclic pneumatic hypobaric compression may relieve pain in AD. To avoid exacerbating hyperalgesia, we utilized a touch-free method, which is delivered via a high-performance altitude simulator, the Cyclic Variations in Altitude ConditioningTM (CVACTM process. As a pilot study, 10 participants with AD completed pain and quality of life questionnaires before and after 20–40 minutes of CVAC process daily for 5 days. Participants lost weight (195.5 ± 17.6–193.8 ± 17.3 lb; P = 0.03, and bioimpedance significantly decreased (510 ± 36–490 ± 38 ohm; P = 0.01. There was a significant decrease in scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (P = 0.039, in average (P = 0.002, highest (P = 0.029, lowest (P = 0.04, and current pain severity (P = 0.02 on the Visual Analogue Scale, but there was no change in pain quality by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. There were no significant changes in total and physical SF-36 scores, but the mental score improved significantly (P = 0.049. There were no changes in the Pain Disability Index or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. These data present a potential, new, noninvasive means of treating pain in AD by whole body pneumatic compression as part of the CVAC process. Although randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these data, the CVAC process could potentially help in treating AD pain and other chronic pain disorders.Keywords: bioimpedance, chronic pain, lipedema

  16. Putting it all together: recommendations for improving pain management in plastic surgical procedures: hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Frank P; Fleury, Christopher; Higgins, James P

    2014-10-01

    Approaches to upper extremity anesthesia in hand surgery include regional blocks, wide-awake hand surgery with local anesthesia, and stellate ganglion blocks. Retrospective review of the literature from 2000 to 2014 published on the delivery of local and regional anesthesia during hand surgery. Included studies describe techniques of administration and treatment outcomes to identify common practices of pain management in hand surgery. Regional blocks provide sufficient anesthesia for hand surgery and have been found to improve postoperative pain and measured outcome scores. Wide-awake surgery offers many advantages including minimizing anesthetic risk and expense, permitting patient participation in operative evaluation, decreasing hospital time, and improving functional outcomes scores. Pain management in hand surgery can be achieved through regional blocks and wide-awake techniques that do not necessitate general anesthesia in an effort to improve safety, convenience, cost savings, and efficiency.

  17. Propionyl-L-carnitine improves endothelial function, microcirculation and pain management in critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, S; Zecchetto, S; Rigoni, A; Prior, M; Fondrieschi, L; Scuro, A; Rulfo, F; Arosio, E

    2012-10-01

    Chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a severe condition of hypo-perfusion of lower limbs, which is associated with inflammation and a pro-coagulative state. It is a disease at high risk of amputation and cardiovascular death. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is efficacious in improving pain free walking distance in peripheral arterial disease with claudication; it also exerts favorable effects on the arterial wall and on endothelial function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of PLC on microcirculation, endothelial function and pain relief in patients affected by CLI not suitable for surgical intervention. We enrolled 48 patients with CLI. Patients were randomized into two groups: the first group was treated with PLC, the second was treated with saline solution. All of them underwent the following tests: laser Doppler flowmetry at the forefoot at rest and after ischemia, trans cutaneous oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure at the forefoot at rest and after ischemia, endothelium dependent dilation of the brachial artery. All tests were repeated after treatments. Pain was assessed by visual analog pain scale. Endothelium dependent dilation increased after PLC (9.5 ± 3.2 vs 4.9 ± 1.4 %; p production decreased after PLC. VAS showed a significant reduction in pain perception after active treatment. In CLI patients, PLC can improve microcirculation (post ischemic hyperemia, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 production). PLC also enhances endothelium dependent dilation and reduces analgesic consumption and pain perception.

  18. A review of dexketoprofen trometamol in acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Magdi; Moon, Jee Y

    2018-03-23

    Dexketoprofen trometamol is a modified non-selective COX inhibitor with a rapid onset of action that is available as both oral and parenteral formulations. The aim of this narrative review was to assess the efficacy and tolerability/safety of dexketoprofen trometamol in acute pain states using the best available published scientific evidence (randomized controlled clinical trials and systematic reviews/meta-analyses). Literature retrieval was performed via Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library (from inception up to March 2017) using combinations of the terms "randomized controlled trials", "dexketoprofen", "celecoxib", "etoricoxib", "parecoxib" and "acute pain". Single-dose dexketoprofen trometamol provides effective analgesia in the treatment of acute pain, such as postoperative pain (dental and non-dental surgery), renal colic, acute musculoskeletal disorders and dysmenorrhoea, and reduces opioid consumption in the postoperative setting. It has a rapid onset of action (within 30 minutes) and is well tolerated during short-term treatment. Direct comparisons with COX-2 inhibitors are lacking; however, the efficacy and tolerability of single-dose dexketoprofen trometamol appears to be consistent with that seen with celecoxib, etoricoxib and parecoxib in the acute pain setting. In conclusion, dexketoprofen trometamol appears to provide similar analgesic efficacy to COX-2 inhibitors when used to treat acute pain, has a rapid onset of action, is well tolerated, and has an opioid-sparing effect when used as part of a multimodal regimen in the acute pain setting.

  19. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  20. Elimination of pain improves specificity of clinical diagnostic criteria for adult chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Scott D; Reiter, Evan R; DiNardo, Laurence J; Wan, Wen; Schuman, Theodore A

    2017-05-01

    Determine whether the elimination of pain improves accuracy of clinical diagnostic criteria for adult chronic rhinosinusitis. Retrospective cohort study. History, symptoms, nasal endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT) results were analyzed for 1,186 adults referred to an academic otolaryngology clinic with presumptive diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis. Clinical diagnosis was rendered using the 1997 Rhinosinusitis Taskforce (RSTF) Guidelines and a modified version eliminating facial pain, ear pain, dental pain, and headache. Four hundred seventy-nine subjects (40%) met inclusion criteria. Among subjects positive by RSTF guidelines, 45% lacked objective evidence of sinonasal inflammation by CT, 48% by endoscopy, and 34% by either modality. Applying modified RSTF diagnostic criteria, 39% lacked sinonasal inflammation by CT, 38% by endoscopy, and 24% by either modality. Using either abnormal CT or endoscopy as the reference standard, modified diagnostic criteria yielded a statistically significant increase in specificity from 37.1% to 65.1%, with a nonsignificant decrease in sensitivity from 79.2% to 70.3%. Analysis of comorbidities revealed temporomandibular joint disorder, chronic cervical pain, depression/anxiety, and psychiatric medication use to be negatively associated with objective inflammation on CT or endoscopy. Clinical diagnostic criteria overestimate the prevalence of chronic rhinosinusitis. Removing facial pain, ear pain, dental pain, and headache increased specificity without a concordant loss in sensitivity. Given the high prevalence of sinusitis, improved clinical diagnostic criteria may assist primary care providers in more accurately predicting the presence of inflammation, thereby reducing inappropriate antibiotic use or delayed referral for evaluation of primary headache syndromes. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1011-1016, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Pain

    OpenAIRE

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-01-01

    The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  2. Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  3. Incobotulinum Toxin-A Improves Post-Surgical and Post-Radiation Pain in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Rostami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients who undergo surgery or radiation can develop persistent focal pain at the site of radiation or surgery. Twelve patients who had surgery or radiation for local cancer and failed at least two analgesic medications for pain control were prospectively enrolled in a research protocol. Patients were injected up to 100 units of incobotulinum toxin A (IncoA intramuscularly or subcutaneously depending on the type and location of pain (muscle cramp or neuropathic pain. Two patients passed away, one dropped out due to a skin reaction and another patient could not return for the follow up due to his poor general condition. All remaining 8 subjects (Age 31–70, 4 female demonstrated significant improvement of Visual Analog Scale (VAS (3 to 9 degrees, average 3.9 degrees and reported significant satisfaction in Patients’ Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC (7 out of 8 reported the pain as much improved. Three of the 8 patients reported significant improvement of quality of life.

  4. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  5. Implementation of a rapid chest pain protocol in the emergency department: A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Azalea Marie; Leasure, A Renee; Carithers, Cathrin; Burnette, Robert E; Berryman, Michael Scott

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project is to compare the effectiveness of a rapid 90-min chest pain screening and evaluation protocol to a 120-min screening and evaluation protocol in determining patient readiness for hospital admission or discharge home. The existing chest pain protocol utilized in the emergency department (ED) was revised based on a review of current research changing initial screening and reevaluation times from 120 to 90 min. A prospective comparative study of patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was performed comparing the existing chest pain protocol of 120 min (standard care) with a rapid screening evaluation protocol of 90 min. A total of 128 patients presenting to an ED in Texas with chest pain comprised the sample for this study. There was a significant difference in the number of minutes between the groups for readiness for disposition. The average time from chest pain evaluation to readiness for disposition home, observation, or admission decreased from an average of 191 min in the standard care group to an average of 118 min in the rapid screening group. Use of the rapid screening and evaluation protocol decreased the time to disposition by an average of 73 min, which enhanced ED flow without influencing disposition and patient safety. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Pregabalin Improves Pain Scores in Patients with Fibromyalgia Irrespective of Comorbid Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoff, Charles E; Emir, Birol; Whalen, Ed; Ortiz, Marie; Pauer, Lynne; Clair, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disorder with patients frequently suffering from comorbid conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). Data on how FM patients with comorbid OA respond to recommended therapies (such as pregabalin) could help their treatment. This was a pooled exploratory analysis of three randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of pregabalin in FM patients to assess the impact of comorbid OA on the response to pregabalin. Patients were divided into those with and without comorbid OA. Difference in change in least squares (LS) mean pain score at endpoint (assessed by 0-10 numeric rating scale, controlled for baseline pain score) with pregabalin (300 mg/day and 450 mg/day) vs placebo was assessed. Changes in Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) responders and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) total score were also assessed. There were 1665 patients in the analysis set (558, placebo; 552, pregabalin 300 mg/day; 555, pregabalin 450 mg/day), including 296 with comorbid OA. Pregabalin 450 mg/day significantly improved the LS mean (95% confidence interval) difference in pain score vs placebo in patients with (0.99 [0.44, 1.55], P pain intensity scores. These data could provide guidance to healthcare professionals treating these patients. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. State policy affecting pain management: recent improvements and the positive impact of regulatory health policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Aaron M; Maurer, Martha A; Joranson, David E

    2005-10-01

    Criteria-driven policy analysis resources from the University of Wisconsin Pain and Policy Studies Group (PPSG) evaluated drug control and professional practice policies that can influence use of controlled substances for pain management, and documented changes over a 3-year period. Additional research was needed to determine the extent of change, the types of messages contained in the policies, and what has contributed to changing policy content. Four research aims guided this study: (1) evaluate change between 2000 and 2003 of state policy that can affect pain relief, (2) describe content differences for statutes, regulations, guidelines, and policy statements, (3) evaluate differences between policies specific to pain management and policies governing general healthcare practice, and (4) compare content of policies specific to pain management created by healthcare regulatory boards to those created by state legislatures. Results showed that more current policies, especially policies regulating health professionals, tend to encourage pain management and avoid language that restricts professional decision-making and patient treatment. In addition, pain policies from healthcare regulatory boards were generally less restrictive than statutes or policies that govern general healthcare practice. These findings suggest that the positive policy change results primarily from state medical, pharmacy, and nursing boards adopting policies promoting pain management and the use of opioids, while containing few if any restrictions. Despite this improvement, further progress can be made when states continue to abrogate additional restrictions or clinically obsolete provisions from policies. PPSG policy evaluations provide guidance to lawmakers, healthcare regulators, and clinicians who are striving to achieve balanced policy, an attainable but redoubtable goal, to benefit patient care.

  8. Affect School for chronic benign pain patients showed improved alexithymia assessments with TAS-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulesius Hans O

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alexithymia is a disturbance associated with psychosomatic disorders, pain syndromes, and a variety of psychiatric disorders. The Affect School (AS based on Tomkins Affect Theory is a therapy focusing on innate affects and their physiological expressions, feelings, emotions and scripts. In this pilot study we tried the AS-intervention method in patients with chronic benign pain. Methods The AS-intervention, with 8 weekly group sessions and 10 individual sessions, was offered to 59 patients with chronic non-malignant pain at a pain rehabilitation clinic in Sweden 2004-2005. Pre and post intervention assessments were done with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20, the Visual Analogue Scale for pain assessment (VAS-pain, the European Quality of Life health barometer (EQoL and the Stress and Crisis Inventory-93 (SCI-93. After the group sessions we used Bergdahl's Questionnaire for assessing changes in interpersonal relations, general well-being and evaluation of AS. Results The AS intervention was completed by 54 out of 59 (92% patients. Significant reductions in total TAS-20 post-test scores (p = 0.0006 as well as TAS-20 DIF and DDF factors (Difficulties Identifying Feelings, and Difficulties Describing Feelings were seen (p = 0.0001, and p = 0.0008 while the EOT factor (Externally Oriented Thinking did not change. Improvements of HAD-depression scores (p = 0.04, EQoL (p = 0.02 and self-assessed changes in relations to others (p Conclusions This pilot study involving 59 patients with chronic benign pain indicates that the alexithymia DIF and DDF, as well as depression, social relations and quality of life may be improved by the Affect School therapeutic intervention.

  9. Exercise-mediated improvements in painful neuropathy associated with prediabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Anna L; Ryals, Janelle M; Guilford, Brianne L; Wilson, Natalie M; Christianson, Julie A; Wright, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients who will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Does the use of a brief cryotherapy intervention with analgesic administration improve pain management after total knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig-Wells, Deborah; Johnson, Ifeya; Samms-McPherson, Jacqueline; Thankachan, Soosan; Titus, Bobina; Jacob, Ani; Higgins, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have evaluated only the prolonged use of cryotherapy as a nonpharmacologic pain intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute application of cryotherapy at the time pain medication was given after a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provided better pain relief than analgesic drugs alone. A pretest, posttest, randomized controlled trial study design with crossover was used to evaluate the effects of cryotherapy on postoperative pain and satisfaction with pain management. A convenience sample of postoperative knee replacement patients constituted participants in the study. Two sequential episodes of pain requiring analgesic administration were studied in each patient, one with a 30-minute cryotherapy application and the other without cryotherapy. Dependent variables were changes in pain (posttest minus pretest) and level of satisfaction with pain management. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance, with p cryotherapy administration for the other pain episode. No significant difference between the two treatments was found for changes in pain scores after the treatments or patient satisfaction with pain management (p > .05). The order in which the treatments were provided was found to be significant (p = .02) for scores on patient satisfaction with pain management, with cryotherapy as the treatment for the second pain episode having higher scores than when delivered for the first pain episode. Sixty minutes after analgesic administration with or without cryotherapy, average pain scores remained greater than 7. In TKA patients, the short-term application of cryotherapy with analgesic medication administration did not significantly decrease pain or improve patient satisfaction with pain management compared with analgesic medication administration only. Further study is necessary to determine whether short-term cryotherapy shortly after TKA is of benefit to pain relief and patient satisfaction.

  11. Implementation of multidimensional knowledge translation strategies to improve procedural pain in hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Promislow, Sara; Stinson, Jennifer; Harrison, Denise; Victor, J Charles

    2014-11-25

    Despite extensive research, institutional policies, and practice guidelines, procedural pain remains undertreated in hospitalized children. Knowledge translation (KT) strategies have been employed to bridge the research to practice gap with varying success. The most effective single or combination of KT strategies has not been found. A multifaceted KT intervention, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ), that included tailored KT strategies was effective in improving pain practices and clinical outcomes at the unit level in a prospective comparative cohort study in 32 hospital units (16 EPIQ intervention and 16 Standard Care), in eight pediatric hospitals in Canada. In a study of the 16 EPIQ units (two at each hospital) only, the objectives were to: determine the effectiveness of evidence-based KT strategies implemented to achieve unit aims; describe the KT strategies implemented and their influence on pain assessment and management across unit types; and identify facilitators and barriers to their implementation. Data were collected from each EPIQ intervention unit on targeted pain practices and KT strategies implemented, through chart review and a process evaluation checklist, following four intervention cycles over a 15-month period. Following the completion of the four cycle intervention, 78% of 23 targeted pain practice aims across units were achieved within 80% of the stated aims. A statistically significant improvement was found in the proportion of children receiving pain assessment and management, regardless of pre-determined aims (p strategies implemented was 35 and included reminders, educational outreach and materials, and audit and feedback. Units successful in achieving their aims implemented more KT strategies than units that did not. No specific type of single or combination of KT strategies was more effective in improving pain assessment and management outcomes. Tailoring KT strategies to unit context, support from unit leadership

  12. Brief biopsychosocially informed education can improve insurance workers' back pain beliefs: Implications for improving claims management behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Darren; Mitchell, Tim; Pole, Naomi; Weir, James

    2016-11-22

    Biopsychosocially informed education is associated with improved back pain beliefs and positive changes in health care practitioners' practice behaviours. Assess the effect of this type of education for insurance workers who are important non-clinical stakeholders in the rehabilitation of injured workers. Insurance workers operating in the Western Australian workers' compensation system underwent two, 1.5 hour sessions of biopsychosocially informed education focusing on understanding and identifying barriers to recovery of injured workers with musculoskeletal conditions. Back pain beliefs were assessed pre-education, immediately post-education and at three-month follow-up (n = 32). Self-reported and Injury Management Advisor-reported assessment of change in claims management behaviours were collected at the three-month follow-up. There were positive changes in the Health Care Providers' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (p = 0.009) and Back Beliefs Questionnaire (p = 0.049) immediately following the education that were sustained at three-month follow-up. Positive changes in claims management behaviours were supported by self-reported and Injury Management Advisor-reported data. This study provides preliminary support that a brief biopsychosocially informed education program can positively influence insurance workers' beliefs regarding back pain, with concurrent positive changes in claims management behaviours. Further research is required to ascertain if these changes result in improved claims management outcomes.

  13. Low back pain and kidney mobility: local osteopathic fascial manipulation decreases pain perception and improves renal mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, P; Bongiorno, D; Vitturini, C

    2012-07-01

    difference (p-value Osteopathic manipulation is shown to be an effective manual approach towards improvement of kidney mobility and reduction of pain perception over the short-term, in individuals with non-specific LBP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http://www.icsi.org/low_back_pain/adult_low_back_pain__8.html. Accessed June ...

  15. Adults attending private physiotherapy practices seek diagnosis, pain relief, improved function, education and prevention: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Martin; Hancock, Mark J

    2017-10-01

    How important are different aspects of physiotherapy care to patients presenting to a primary care physiotherapist? Are patient factors (eg, age and gender) associated with how important different aspects of physiotherapy care are to individual patients? A cross-sectional survey with consecutive recruitment. A total of 500 adults aged≥18years who presented to a primary care physiotherapist. Participants were recruited from 10 private practices within the Sydney metropolitan area. Participants completed a survey assessing how important five aspects of physiotherapy care were in their initial decision to present to a primary care physiotherapist. These aspects were: diagnosis; information and education; treatment for pain relief; treatment to improve function; and prevention. The survey also collected characteristics of the patients and information about their presentation to the physiotherapist, to assess whether these factors were associated with the aspects of physiotherapy care that they considered most important. A total of 500 surveys were completed, with a response rate of 94%. All five aspects of physiotherapy care were considered either 'quite important' or 'extremely important' by most participants (diagnosis 65%; information and education 68%; pain relief 89%; improved function 93%; prevention 90%). Patient factors were associated with the participants' ratings of importance. Female participants and those with spinal pain more commonly rated pain relief as highly important. Participants with lower educational levels were more likely to rate diagnosis and information and education as important. This study demonstrated that most patients presenting to primary care physiotherapists value all aspects of physiotherapy care and do not simply want treatment for pain. Patient characteristics were associated with what individual patients considered the most important reason for presenting to a private primary care physiotherapist. [McRae M, Hancock MJ (2017

  16. Needs and requests--patients and physicians voices about improving the management of spinal cord injury neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbrink, Cecilia; Löfgren, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The present purpose was to explore patients' and involved physicians' needs and requests for improving their management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Sixteen patients with SCI and neuropathic pain, and nine physicians, were interviewed in focus-groups or individual interviews. An emergent design was used and the interviews and analyses were carried out in parallel, making it possible to use and deepen new emerging knowledge. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and processed according to content analysis. A final model with four themes described the results. Three themes covered the current situation: limitations in structure, lack of knowledge and competence, and frustrations. A fourth theme, needs and requests, described suggestions by patients and physicians for future improvements. Suggestions included increased participation, increased patient involvement in the pain rehabilitation process, support in the process of learning to live with pain, implementation of multi-modal pain rehabilitation, and the use of complementary treatments for neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain following SCI needs to be assessed and treated using a structured, inter-disciplinary, multi-modal rehabilitation approach involving patients in planning and decision-making. For improving SCI neuropathic pain management, there is a great need for individually-tailored management, planned in a dialogue on equal terms between health care and the patient. Patients desire continuity and regularity and the possibility of receiving complementary treatments for SCI neuropathic pain. Access to structured pain rehabilitation is needed. Support and tools need to be provided in the learning-to-live with pain process.

  17. Implementation of multidimensional knowledge translation strategies to improve procedural pain in hospitalized children

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Promislow, Sara; Stinson, Jennifer; Harrison, Denise; Victor, J Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite extensive research, institutional policies, and practice guidelines, procedural pain remains undertreated in hospitalized children. Knowledge translation (KT) strategies have been employed to bridge the research to practice gap with varying success. The most effective single or combination of KT strategies has not been found. A multifaceted KT intervention, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ), that included tailored KT strategies was effective in improving ...

  18. A case vignette study to assess the knowledge of pain physicians of neuropathic cancer pain: room for improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piano, V.M.M.; Lanteri-Minet, M.; Steegers, M.A.H.; Besse, K.; Donnet, A.; Verhagen, S.; Weel, C. van; Engels, Y.M.; Vissers, K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In more and more countries, a specific pain education curriculum is provided to instruct pain physicians. However, there is little literature on pain education and in particularly how to evaluate their knowledge. One of the modules interesting to assess is the use of clinical practice

  19. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...... also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree...

  20. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pu Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy.

  1. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  2. Baseline Examination Factors Associated With Clinical Improvement After Dry Needling in Individuals With Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Walker, Michael J; Smith, Ryan W; Booker, Jacquelynn M; Walkup, Isaac D; Su, Jonathan; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Flynn, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-experimental. To explore for associations between demographic, patient history, and physical examination variables and short-term improvement in self-reported disability following dry needling therapy performed on individuals with low back pain (LBP). Dry needling is an intervention used with increasing frequency in patients with LBP; however, the characteristics of patients who are most likely to respond are not known. Seventy-two volunteers with mechanical LBP participated in the study. Potential prognostic factors were collected from baseline questionnaires, patient history, and physical examination tests. Treatment consisted of dry needling to the lumbar multifidus muscles bilaterally, administered during a single treatment session. Improvement was based on percent change on the Oswestry Disability Index at 1 week. The univariate and multivariate associations between 33 potential prognostic factors and improved disability were assessed with correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regression. Increased LBP with the multifidus lift test (rpb = 0.31, P = .01) or during passive hip flexion performed with the patient supine (rpb = 0.23, P = .06), as well as positive beliefs about acupuncture/dry needling (rho = 0.22, P = .07), demonstrated univariate associations with Oswestry Disability Index improvement. Aggravation of LBP with standing (rpb = -0.27, P = .03), presence of leg pain (rpb = -0.29, P = .02), and any perception of hypermobility in the lumbar spine (rpb = -0.21, P = .09) were associated with less improvement. The multivariate model identified 2 predictors of improved disability with dry needling: pain with the multifidus lift test and no aggravation with standing (R(2) = 0.16, P = .01). Increased LBP with the multifidus lift test was the strongest predictor of improved disability after dry needling, suggesting that the finding of pain during muscle contraction should be studied in future dry needling studies. Prognosis, level 1b.

  3. Brief biopsychosocially informed education can improve insurance workers? back pain beliefs: Implications for improving claims management behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Beales, Darren; Mitchell, Tim; Pole, Naomi; Weir, James

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biopsychosocially informed education is associated with improved back pain beliefs and positive changes in health care practitioners? practice behaviours. OBJECTIVE: Assess the effect of this type of education for insurance workers who are important non-clinical stakeholders in the rehabilitation of injured workers. METHODS: Insurance workers operating in the Western Australian workers? compensation system underwent two, 1.5 hour sessions of biopsychosocially informed education fo...

  4. Improved Function and Reduced Pain after Swimming and Cycling Training in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatan, Mohammed; Baker, Jeffrey R; Machin, Daniel R; Park, Wonil; Akkari, Amanda S; Pasha, Evan P; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Arthritis and its associated joint pain act as significant barriers for adults attempting to perform land-based physical activity. Swimming can be an ideal form of exercise for patients with arthritis. Yet there is no information on the efficacy of regular swimming exercise involving patients with arthritis. The effect of a swimming exercise intervention on joint pain, stiffness, and physical function was evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Using a randomized study design, 48 sedentary middle-aged and older adults with OA underwent 3 months of either swimming or cycling exercise training. Supervised exercise training was performed for 45 min/day, 3 days/week at 60-70% heart rate reserve for 12 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index was used to measure joint pain, stiffness, and physical limitation. After the exercise interventions, there were significant reductions in joint pain, stiffness, and physical limitation accompanied by increases in quality of life in both groups (all p swimming and cycling training. Regular swimming exercise reduced joint pain and stiffness associated with OA and improved muscle strength and functional capacity in middle-aged and older adults with OA. Additionally, the benefits of swimming exercise were similar to the more frequently prescribed land-based cycling training. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01836380.

  5. Neck muscle vibration can improve sensorimotor function in patients with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinert, Konstantin; Keller, Martin; Taube, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    People with neck pain display a diminished joint position sense and disturbed postural control, which is thought to be a result of impaired somatosensory afferent activity and/or integration. Afferent processing can be artificially manipulated by vibration and was shown to reduce motor performance in healthy subjects. However, the effect of vibration on sensorimotor function in neck pain patients is scarcely investigated. To assess the effect of neck muscle vibration on joint position sense and postural control in neck pain subjects and healthy controls. Case control study. Thirteen neck pain patients and 10 healthy controls participated in the present study. Cervical joint position sense and dynamic and static postural stability. Short-term, targeted neck muscle vibration with 100 Hz was applied after baseline measurement. Vibration had opposite effects in patients and healthy subjects. Patients showed improved joint position sense (pneck pain. Thus, vibration may be used to counteract sensorimotor impairment of the cervical spine. Potential underlying mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Improved interoceptive awareness in chronic low back pain: a comparison of Back school versus Feldenkrais method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Teresa; Zangrando, Federico; Iosa, Marco; De Angelis, Simona; Marzoli, Caterina; Piccinini, Giulia; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria

    2017-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of the Feldenkrais method for relieving pain in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and the improvement of interoceptive awareness. This study was designed as a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Fifty-three patients with a diagnosis of CLBP for at least 3 months were randomly allocated to the Feldenkrais (mean age 61.21 ± 11.53 years) or Back School group (mean age 60.70 ± 11.72 years). Pain was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), disability was evaluated with the Waddel Disability Index, quality of life was measured with the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), and mind-body interactions were studied using the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness Questionnaire (MAIA). Data were collected at baseline, at the end of treatment, and at the 3-month follow-up. The two groups were matched at baseline for all the computed parameters. At the end of treatment (Tend), there were no significant differences between groups regarding chronic pain reduction (p = 0.290); VAS and MAIA-N sub scores correlated at Tend (R = 0.296, p = 0.037). By the Friedman analysis, both groups experienced significant changes in pain (p Feldenkrais method has comparable efficacy as Back School in CLBP. Implications for rehabilitation The Feldenkrais method is a mind-body therapy that is based on awareness through movement lessons, which are verbally guided explorations of movement that are conducted by a physiotherapist who is experienced and trained in this method. It aims to increase self-awareness, expand a person's repertoire of movements, and to promote increased functioning in contexts in which the entire body cooperates in the execution of movements. Interoceptive awareness, which improves with rehabilitation, has a complex function in the perception of chronic pain and should be investigated further in future research. The efficacy of the Feldenkrais method is

  7. Correlation between pain response and improvements in patient-reported outcomes and health-related quality of life in duloxetine-treated patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kei Ogawa,1 Shinji Fujikoshi,2 William Montgomery,3 Levent Alev1 1Medical Science, 2Statistical Science, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Japan; 3Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia Objective: We assessed whether quality of life (QoL improvement in duloxetine-treated patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP correlates with the extent of pain relief.Methods: Pooled data from three multicountry, double-blind, 12-week, placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine-treated (duloxetine 60 mg once daily; total number =335 patients with DPNP were analyzed. Based on improvement in 24-hour average pain scores, patients were stratified into four groups. Improvement in QoL, which was measured as the change from baseline in two patient-reported health outcome measures (Short Form [SF]-36 and five-dimension version of the EuroQol Questionnaire [EQ-5D], was evaluated and compared among the four groups. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between improvement in pain scores and improvement in QoL.Results: The group with more pain improvement generally showed greater mean change from baseline in all of the SF-36 scale scores and on the EQ-5D index. Pearson’s correlation coefficients ranged from 0.114 to 0.401 for the SF-36 scale scores (P<0.05, and it was 0.271 for the EQ-5D (P<0.001.Conclusion: Improvement in pain scores was positively correlated with improvement in QoL and patient-reported outcomes in duloxetine-treated patients. Keywords: diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, duloxetine, efficacy, function, quality of life

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF DRY NEEDLING, STRETCHING, AND STRENGTHENING TO REDUCE PAIN AND IMPROVE FUNCTION IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC LATERAL HIP AND THIGH PAIN: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavkovich, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Chronic lateral hip and thigh pain is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Many issues can cause pain in this region, and trigger points may contribute to pain. Dry Needling (DN) is an intervention used by physical therapists where a monofilament needle is inserted into soft tissue to reduce pain thereby facilitating return to prior level of function. The purpose of this case series is to report the outcomes of DN and conventional physical therapy as a treatment intervention for subjects with chronic lateral hip and thigh pain. Four subjects with chronic lateral hip and thigh pain attended between four and eight sixty-minute sessions of dry needling and stretching/ strengthening activities over a four to eight week intervention course. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term follow up averaging 12.25 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS). The LEFS and VAS indicated clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long term follow up for each subject. The LEFS(mean) for the four subjects improved from 50.75 at baseline to 66.75 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the LEFS(mean) was 65.50. Each subject met the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) and minimal detectable change (MDC) for the LEFS and the VAS. The VAS was broken down into best (VAS(B)), current (VAS(C)), and worst (VAS(W)) rated pain levels and averaged between the four subjects. The VAS(B) improved from 20 mm at the initial assessment to 0 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The VAS(C) improved from 25.75 mm to 11.75 mm, and the VAS(W) improved from 85 mm to 32.5 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 12.25 months), the VAS(B), VAS(C), and VAS(W) scores were 0 mm, 14.58 mm, and 43.75 mm respectively. Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were

  9. Heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide-biliverdin pathway may be involved in the antinociceptive activity of etoricoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeiro, Niedja M G; Aguiar, Jordana A; Chaves, Hellíada V; Silva, Antonio A R; Lima, Vilma; Benevides, Norma M B; Brito, Gerly A C; da Graça, José R V; Bezerra, Mirna M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the interaction between the heme oxygenase-1/ biliverdin/carbon monoxide (HO-1/BVD/CO) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathways in the writhing test. Mice were pretreated with 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg, ip etoricoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, or with one of the following HO-1/BVD/CO pathway modulators: 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg, sc ZnPP IX, a specific HO-1 inhibitor, 0.3, 1 or 3 mg/kg, sc hemin, a substrate of the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway; or 0.00025, 0.025 or 2.5 μmol/kg, sc DMDC, a CO donor. Mice pretreated with etoricoxib or one of the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway modulators received an injection of acetic acid (ip) after 30 and 60 min, respectively. Next, the number of writhes was quantified between 0 and 30 min after stimulus injection. In another series of experiments, ineffective doses of etoricoxib were co-administered with hemin or DMDC and an effective dose of etoricoxib with ZnPP IX, followed by an acetic acid injection. Four hours after the acetic acid injection, levels of bilirubin, which is a product of BVD conversion by the BVD reductase enzyme, in the peritoneal lavage were determined. Hemin or DMDC reduced (pZnPP IX potentiated (pZnPP IX. Pretreatment with ZnPP IX reduced bilirubin levels, but etoricoxib pretreatment significantly increased the bilirubin concentration in peritoneal exudates. The data obtained from these experiments showed that the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway was activated in the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing model. The analgesic effect of etoricoxib was at least partially dependent on the participation of the HO-1/BVD/CO pathway.

  10. Neurodynamic treatment did not improve pain and disability at two weeks in patients with chronic nerve-related leg pain: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ferreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people with nerve-related leg pain, does adding neurodynamic treatment to advice to remain active improve leg pain, disability, low back pain, function, global perceived effect and location of symptoms? Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Sixty participants with nerve-related leg pain recruited from the community. Interventions: The experimental group received four sessions of neurodynamic treatment. Both groups received advice to remain active. Outcome measures: Leg pain and low back pain (0, none, to 10, worst, Oswestry Disability Index (0, none, to 100, worst, Patient-Specific Functional Scale (0, unable to perform, to 30, able to perform, global perceived effect (–5 to 5 and location of symptoms were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after randomisation. Continuous outcomes were analysed by linear mixed models. Location of symptoms was assessed by relative risk (95% CI. Results: At 2 weeks, the experimental group did not have significantly greater improvement than the control group in leg pain (MD –1.1, 95% CI –2.3 to 0.1 or disability (MD –3.3, 95% CI –9.6 to 2.9. At 4 weeks, the experimental group experienced a significantly greater reduction in leg pain (MD –2.4, 95% CI –3.6 to –1.2 and low back pain (MD –1.5, 95% CI –2.8 to –0.2. The experimental group also improved significantly more in function at 2 weeks (MD 5.2, 95% CI 2.2 to 8.2 and 4 weeks (MD 4.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.8, as well as global perceived effect at 2 weeks (MD 2.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.5 and 4 weeks (MD 2.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.9. No significant between-group differences occurred in disability at 4 weeks and location of symptoms. Conclusion: Adding neurodynamic treatment to advice to remain active did not improve leg pain and disability at 2 weeks. Trial registration: NCT01954199. [Ferreira G, Stieven F, Araujo F, Wiebusch M, Rosa C, Plentz R, et al. (2016 Neurodynamic treatment did not improve

  11. Repeated Quantitative Urine Toxicology Analysis May Improve Chronic Pain Patient Compliance with Opioid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Khan, Omar M; Beiranvand, Afsaneh; Candido, Kenneth D

    2017-02-01

    Even though serious efforts have been undertaken by different medical societies to reduce opioid use for treating chronic benign pain, many Americans continue to seek pain relief through opioid consumption. Assuring compliance of these patients may be a difficult aspect of proper management even with regular behavioral monitoring. The purpose of this study was to accurately assess the compliance of chronic opioid-consuming patients in an outpatient setting and evaluate if utilizing repeated urine drug testing (UDT) could improve compliance. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Outpatient pain management clinic. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a retrospective analysis of data for 500 patients was conducted. We included patients who were aged 18 years and older who were treated with opioid analgesic medication for chronic pain. Patients were asked to provide supervised urine toxicology specimens during their regular clinic visits, and were asked to do so without prior notification. The specimens were sent to an external laboratory for quantitative testing using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Three hundred and eighty-six (77.2%) patients were compliant with prescribed medications and did not use any illicit drugs or undeclared medications. Forty-one (8.2%) patients tested positive for opioid medication(s) that were not prescribed in our clinic; 8 (1.6%) of the patients were positive for medication that was not prescribed by any physician and was not present in the Illinois Prescription Monitoring Program; 5 (1%) patients tested negative for prescribed opioids; and 60 (12%) patients were positive for illicit drugs (8.6% marijuana, 3.2% cocaine, 0.2% heroin). Repeated UDTs following education and disclosure, showed 49 of the 77 patients (63.6%) had improved compliance. This was a single-site study and we normalized concentrations of opioids in urine with creatinine levels while specific gravity normalization was not

  12. Exercise-Mediated Improvements in Painful Neuropathy Associated with Pre-Diabetes in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Anna L.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Guilford, Brianne L.; Wilson, Natalie M.; Christianson, Julie A.; Wright, Doug E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients which will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. PMID:23932909

  13. Improvements in kinematics, muscle activity and pain during functional tasks in females with patellofemoral pain following a single patterned electrical stimulation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaviano, Neal R; Huntsman, Stephanie; Dembeck, Ashley; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with patellofemoral pain present with altered hip muscle activation, faulty movement patterns, and pain during functional tasks. Examining new treatment options to address these impairments may better treat those with patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if patterned electrical stimulation to the lower extremity affects muscle activity, movement patterns, and pain following a single treatment. Fifteen females with patellofemoral pain were randomized to receive a single 15-minute treatment of either a patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation or a sham. Peak kinematics of the knee, hip, and trunk, electromyography and pain were examined pre and post-intervention during a single leg squat and lateral step-down task. Group means and pre/post reduced kinematic values were also plotted during the entire task with 90% confidence intervals to identify differences in movement strategies. No baseline differences were found in peak kinematics between groups. No pre to post-intervention differences in peak knee, hip and trunk kinematics were found, however differences were seen when the quality of movement across the entire tasks was assessed. The electrical stimulation group had improved knee flexion and hip abduction during the lateral step-down. A significant improvement in gluteus medius activation following patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation occurred during the step-down (P=0.039). Significant pain improvements were also seen in both the single leg squat (P=0.025) and lateral step-down (P=0.006). A single treatment of patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation improved muscle activation, lower extremity kinematics during functional tasks, and pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spinal Cord Stimulation Provides Pain Relief with Improved Psychosocial Function: Results from EMP3OWER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jason; Fabi, Alain; Candido, Kenneth; Knezevic, Nick; Creamer, Michael; Carayannopoulos, Alexios; Ghodsi, Abdi; Nelson, Christopher; Bennett, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The EMP 3 OWER™ study evaluated spinal cord stimulation (SCS) safety and efficacy and the associated changes in psychosocial and functional outcomes. Upon informed consent and IRB approval, 620 eligible subjects were enrolled prior to SCS trial evaluation and were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months post-implant. Patient-reported pain relief (PRP), numerical rating scale (NRS), satisfaction, quality of life (QOL), and pain disability index (PDI) were assessed at all follow-up visits while the pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), short form-36 (SF-36), short form-McGill pain questionnaire version 2 (SF-MPQ-2), and the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were assessed at the 6- and 12-month follow-up visits. Device and/or procedure-related adverse events were also recorded and reported. Subjects reporting a PRP ≥ 50% were considered responders. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA) examined the changes across time for all continuous measures. A total of 401 (71%) subjects received a permanent implant. Mean (±SD) patient-reported pain relief was 59.3% (±26.2), 59.2% (±28.9), and 58.2% (±32.0) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. A majority of enrolled subjects were responders at 3 (75.5%), 6 (74.7%), and 12 months (69.7%). RMANOVA revealed a statistically significant change for NRS, PCS, PDI, SF-36, SF-MPQ-2, and STAI scores. At 3 months, the majority of subjects (85.7%) were either very satisfied or satisfied with their device, with similar results at 6 and 12 months. At 3 months, the majority of subjects (73.3%) reported greatly improved or improved QOL with similar results at 6 and 12 months. Spinal cord stimulation provided pain relief and significant improvement of patient psychological and functional outcome measures. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Interventions to improve adherence to exercise for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Joanne L; Holden, Melanie A; Mason, Elizabeth Ej; Foster, Nadine E

    2010-01-20

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) is a major health problem, accounting for approximately one-quarter of general practice (GP) consultations in the United Kingdom (UK). Exercise and physical activity is beneficial for the most common types of CMP, such as back and knee pain. However, poor adherence to exercise and physical activity may limit long-term effectiveness. To assess the effects of interventions to improve adherence to exercise and physical activity for people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. We searched the trials registers of relevant Cochrane Review Groups. In addition, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index and reference lists of articles to October 2007. We consulted experts for unpublished trials. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating interventions that aimed to improve adherence to exercise and physical activity in adults with pain for three months and over in the axial skeleton or large peripheral joints. Two of the four authors independently assessed the quality of each included trial and extracted data. We contacted study authors for missing information. We included 42 trials with 8243 participants, mainly with osteoarthritis and spinal pain. Methods used for improving and measuring adherence in the included trials were inconsistent. Two of the 17 trials that compared different types of exercise showed positive effects, suggesting that the type of exercise is not an important factor in improving exercise adherence. Six trials studied different methods of delivering exercise, such as supervising exercise sessions, refresher sessions and audio or videotapes of the exercises to take home. Of these, five trials found interventions improved exercise adherence. Four trials evaluated specific interventions targeting exercise adherence; three of these showed a positive effect on exercise adherence. In eight trials

  16. Acute aquatic treadmill exercise improves gait and pain in people with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Jaimie A; Bressel, Eadric; Tillman, Mark D

    2013-03-01

    To examine the acute effects of aquatic and land treadmill exercise on gait kinematics as well as the level of disease-specific and movement-related pain for individuals with osteoarthritis. Quasi-experimental crossover design. Biomechanics laboratory. Participants (N=14; age, 43-64y) diagnosed with osteoarthritis at the knee (n=12), osteoarthritis at the knee and ankle (n=1), or osteoarthritis at the knee and hip (n=1). Participants performed 3 exercise sessions separated by at least 24 hours in 1 week for each mode of exercise (aquatic treadmill and land treadmill). Gait kinematics and pain were measured before and after each intervention. The angular velocity gain score during stance for left knee extension was improved by 38% after aquatic treadmill exercise (P=.004). Similarly, during swing, the gain scores for angular velocity were also greater for left knee internal rotation and extension by 65% and 20%, respectively (P=.004, P=.008, respectively). During stance, the joint angle gain score for left hip flexion was 7.23% greater after land exercise (P=.007). During swing, the angular velocity gain score for right hip extension was significantly greater for aquatic exercise by 28% (P=.01). Only the joint angle gain score for left ankle abduction during stance was significantly higher after land exercise (4.72%, P=.003). No other joint angle gain scores for either stance or swing were significantly different for either condition (P=.06-.96). Perceived pain was 100% greater after land than aquatic treadmill exercise (P=.02). Step rate and step length were not different between conditions (P=.31-.92). An acute training period on an aquatic treadmill positively influenced joint angular velocity and arthritis-related joint pain. Acute aquatic treadmill exercise may be useful as a conservative treatment to improve angular speed of the lower-extremity joints and pain related to osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published

  17. Effectiveness of a clinical intervention in improving pain control in outpatients with cancer treated by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallieres, Isabelle; Aubin, Michele; Blondeau, Lucie; Simard, Serge; Giguere, Anik

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of a multicomponent clinical intervention to reduce pain in outpatients with cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive either a clinical intervention including an information session, the use of a pain diary, and the possibility to contact a physician to adjust the pain medication, or the usual treatment of pain by the staff radiation oncologist. All patients reported their average and worst pain levels at baseline and 2 and 3 weeks after the start of the intervention. Results: The study groups were similar with respect to their baseline characteristics and pain levels at randomization. After 3 weeks, the average and worst pain experienced by patients randomized to the clinical intervention group was significantly inferior to the average pain experienced by patients in the control group (2.9/10 vs. 4.4/10 and 4.2/10 vs. 5.5/10, respectively). Results showed that the experimental group patients decreased their pain levels more than the control group patients did over time. Conclusion: An intervention including patient education, a pain diary, and defining a procedure for therapeutic adjustments can be effective to improve pain relief in outpatients with cancer

  18. Programmable intrathecal pumps for the management of chronic pain: recommendations for improved efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkes D

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Denise Wilkes Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA Abstract: The management of chronic pain can be very challenging. Often, physicians employ intrathecal (IT drug delivery systems as a last resort to relieve intractable pain. The system consists of an implantable pump that stores and delivers medication through a catheter to the IT space. Programmability is achieved by positioning an external devise over the implanted pump to change the mode of drug delivery. The innovations in programmable IT drug delivery systems are expanding more rapidly than ever before. Unfortunately, the rapid expansion is accompanied by a lack of prospective randomized trials examining these new options. In an effort to improve results and reduce side effects, publications by experts or expert consensus panels provide guidance for the community. The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of high interest topics in recent publications. Keywords: intrathecal morphine, chronic pain, programmable drug delivery, implantable drug delivery

  19. Shoulder tenotomies to improve passive motion and relieve pain in patients with spastic hemiplegia after upper motor neuron injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Surena; Alosh, Hassan; Baldwin, Keith; Mehta, Samir; Keenan, Mary Ann

    2011-07-01

    Shoulder adduction and internal rotation contractures commonly develop in patients with spastic hemiplegia after upper motor neuron (UMN) injury. Contractures are often painful, macerate skin, and impair axillary hygiene. We hypothesize that shoulder tenotomies are an effective means of pain relief and passive motion restoration in patients without active upper extremity motor function. A consecutive series of 36 adults (10 men, 26 women) with spastic hemiplegia from UMN injury, shoulder adduction, and internal rotation contractures, and no active movement, who underwent shoulder tenotomies of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, teres major, and subscapularis were evaluated. Patients were an average age of 52.2 years. Pain, passive motion, and satisfaction were considered preoperatively and postoperatively. Average follow-up was 14.3 months. Preoperatively, all patients had limited passive motion that interfered with passive functions. Nineteen patients had pain. After surgery, passive extension, flexion, abduction, and external rotation improved from 50%, 27%, 27%, and 1% to 85%, 70%, 66%, and 56%, respectively, compared with the normal contralateral side (P pain had improved pain relief at follow-up, with 18 (95%) being pain-free. Thirty-five (97%) were satisfied with the outcome of surgery, and all patients reported improved axillary hygiene and skin care. Age, gender, etiology, and chronicity of UMN injury were not associated with improvement in motion. We observed improvements in passive ROM and high patient satisfaction with surgery at early follow-up. Patients who had pain with passive motion preoperatively had significant improvements in pain after shoulder tenotomy. Shoulder tenotomy to relieve spastic contractures resulting from UMN injury can be an effective means of pain relief and improved passive range of motion in patients without active motor function. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby

  20. Back strength predicts walking improvement in obese, older adults with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Heather K; Vincent, Kevin R; Seay, Amanda N; Conrad, Bryan P; Hurley, Robert W; George, Steven Z

    2014-05-01

    To compare the effects of 4 months of isolated lumbar resistance exercise and total body resistance exercise on walking performance in obese, older adults with chronic low back pain. A secondary analysis examined whether responsiveness to training modulated walking improvement. Randomized, controlled trial. Research laboratory affiliated with tertiary care facility. Participants (N = 49; 60-85 years) were randomized into a 4-month resistance exercise intervention (TOTRX), lumbar extensor exercise intervention (LEXT), or a control group (CON). Walking performance, maximal low back strength and leg strength, and average resting and low back pain severity score (from an 11-point numerical pain rating scale; NRSpain) were collected at baseline and month 4. The TOTRX and LEXT improved lumbar extensor strength relative to CON, and the TOTRX (P vs 3.7 ± 2.6 points and 4.6 ± 2.4 points; P strength gains that achieved ≥20% greater than baseline values. Although the TOTRX demonstrated the greatest improvement in walking endurance among the intervention groups, this did not reach significance (10.1 ± 12.2% improvement in TOTRX vs 7.4 ± 30.0% LEXT and -1.7 ± 17.4% CON; P = .11). Gait speed increased most in the TOTRX (9.0 ± 13.5%) compared with the LEXT and CON groups (P strength explained 10.6% of the variance of the regression model for the change in walking endurance (P = .024). The use of LEXT and TOTRX produced similar modest improvements in patients' walking endurance. Lumbar extensor strength gain compared with leg strength gain is a moderate but important contributor to walking endurance in obese older adults with chronic low back pain. Responders to resistance exercise programs (event those with only lumbar extension exercise) who make at least a 20% improvement in strength can expect better improvement in walking endurance than those who do not achieve this strength improvement. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and

  1. Using education and support strategies to improve the way nurses assess regular and transient pain - A quality improvement study of three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Anna; Carlfjord, Siw; Schaller, Anne; Gerdle, Björn; Larsson, Britt

    2017-07-01

    Systematic and regular pain assessment has been shown to improve pain management. Well-functioning pain assessments require using strategies informed by well-established theory. This study evaluates documented pain assessments reported in medical records and by patients, including reassessment using a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) after patients receive rescue medication. Documentation surveys (DS) and patient surveys (PS) were performed at baseline (BL), after six months, and after 12 months in 44 in-patient wards at the three hospitals in Östergötland County, Sweden. Nurses and nurse assistants received training on pain assessment and support. The Knowledge to Action Framework guided the implementation of new routines. According to DS pain assessment using NRS, pain assessment increased significantly: from 7% at baseline to 36% at 12 months (pmedication and who had been reassessed increased from 73% to 86% (p=0.003). The use of NRS to document pain assessment after patients received rescue medication increased significantly (4% vs. 17%; ppain assessment increased, an encouraging finding considering the complex contexts of in-patient facilities. However, the achieved assessment levels and especially reassessments related to rescue medication were clinically unsatisfactory. Future studies should include nursing staff and physicians and increase interactivity such as providing online education support. A discrepancy between documented and reported reassessment in association with given rescue medication might indicate that nurses need better ways to provide pain relief. The fairly low level of patient-reported pain via NRS and documented use of NRS before and 12 months after the educational programme stresses the need for education on pain management in nursing education. Implementations differing from traditional educational attempts such as interactive implementations might complement educational programmes given at the work place. Standardized routines for pain

  2. Under Pressure: Applying Practice-Based Learning and Improvement to the Treatment of Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapolti, Mihaela; Wu, Cindy; Schuth, Olga A; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-10-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain after burn injury may have multiple causes, such as direct nerve injury, nerve compression, or neuroma formation, and can significantly impair quality of life and limit functional recovery. Management includes a team-based approach that involves close collaboration between occupational and physical therapists, plastic surgeons, and experts in chronic pain, from neurology, anesthesia, psychiatry, and physiatry. Carefully selected patients with an anatomic cause of chronic neuropathic pain unequivocally benefit from surgical intervention. Self-reflection and analysis yield improvement in both efficiency and effectiveness when managing patients with burns with chronic neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relief of depression and pain improves daily functioning and quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2013-12-02

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of depression relief and pain relief on the improvement in daily functioning and quality of life (QOL) for depressed patients receiving a 6-week treatment of fluoxetine. A total of 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were enrolled to receive 20mg of fluoxetine daily for 6 weeks. Depression severity, pain severity, daily functioning, and health-related QOL were assessed at baseline and again at week 6. Depression severity, pain severity, and daily functioning were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Body Pain Index, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Health-related QOL was assessed by three primary domains of the SF-36, including social functioning, vitality, and general health perceptions. Pearson's correlation and structural equation modeling were used to examine relationships among the study variables. Five models were proposed. In model 1, depression relief alone improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 2, pain relief alone improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 3, depression relief, mediated by pain relief, improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 4, pain relief, mediated by depression relief, improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 5, both depression relief and pain relief improved daily functioning and QOL. One hundred and six patients completed all the measures at baseline and at week 6. Model 5 was the most fitted structural equation model (χ(2) = 8.62, df = 8, p = 0.376, GFI = 0.975, AGFI = 0.935, TLI = 0.992, CFI = 0.996, RMSEA = 0.027). Interventions which relieve depression and pain improve daily functioning and QOL among patients with MDD. The proposed model can provide quantitative estimates of improvement in treating patients with MDD. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute pain management efficiency improves with point-of-care handheld electronic billing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Brenda G

    2009-02-01

    Technology advances continue to impact patient care and physician workflow. To enable more efficient performance of billing activities, a point-of-care (POC) handheld computer technology replaced a paper-based system on an acute pain management service. Using a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA) and software from MDeverywhere (MDe, MDeverywhere, Long Island, NY), we performed a 1-yr prospective observational study of an anesthesiology acute pain management service billings and collections. Seventeen anesthesiologists providing billable acute pain services were trained and entered their charges on a PDA. Twelve months of data, just before electronic implementation (pre-elec), were compared to a 12-m period after implementation (post-elec). The total charges were 4883 for 890 patients pre-elec and 5368 for 1128 patients post-elec. With adoption of handheld billing, the charge lag days decreased from 29.3 to 7.0 (P billing using PDAs to replace a paper-based billing system improved the collection rate and decreased the number of charge lag days with a positive return on investment. The handheld PDA billing system provided POC support for physicians during their daily clinical (e.g., patient locations, rounding lists) and billing activities, improving workflow.

  5. Improvement in sensory pain rating after palliative systemic radionuclide therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheofanis, Frank J; Smith, Cynthia; Najib, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether baseline and short-term patient-reported quality of life (QOL) differs in patients with symptomatic metastatic prostate cancer undergoing palliative management using opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), (89)strontium chloride ((89)Sr), and samarium-lexidronam ((153)Sm). Males were grouped according to primary palliative intervention: opioids (n = 40), NSAIDs (n = 40), (89)Sr chloride (n = 25), and (153)Sm (n = 25). The short form of the self-administered McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to measure QOL at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks after initiation of treatment. Clinical data were collected from patients' medical records. Statistical analyses were conducted using descriptive methods and the Student t test. A significant increase in the sensory pain rating was observed in the patients treated by NSAIDs ([upward arrow]21%) and (89)Sr ([upward arrow]46%), whereas those treated by opioids ([downward arrow]27%) and (153)Sm ([downward arrow]27%) demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in this subscore. There was a longitudinal decrease in QOL over time in patients treated by NSAIDs and (89)Sr as measured by the total pain rating score, whereas those treated with the other agents experienced improved QOL. This study demonstrates improvement in QOL achieved using (153)Sm, which is comparable to that achieved with the use of opioids during this observation interval.

  6. Scapular focused interventions to improve shoulder pain and function in adults with subacromial pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroki; Harrold, Meg E; Cavalheri, Vinicius; McKenna, Leanda

    2018-01-19

    The relationship between subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) and altered scapular movement has been previously reported. The purpose of this review was to determine the effect of interventions that focus on addressing scapular components to improve shoulder pain, function, shoulder range of motion (ROM), and muscle strength in adults with SAPS. Databases searched in September 2016 were: PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials [Central], EMBASE [via Ovid] and PEDro. All studies selected for this review were randomized controlled trials. In total, six studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analyses. In adults with SAPS, scapular focused interventions significantly improved pain with activities (MD [95% CI] = -0.88 [-1.19 to -0.58], I 2 43%) and shoulder function (-11.31 [-17.20 to -5.41] I 2 65%) in the short term. No between-group difference in shoulder pain and function were found at follow up (4 weeks). A between-group difference in shoulder abduction ROM in the short term only was found (12.71 [7.15 to 18.26]°, I 2 36%). No between-group difference in flexion ROM, supraspinatus muscle strength, pectoralis minor length or forward shoulder posture were found. In conclusion, in adults with SAPS, scapular focused interventions can improve short-term shoulder pain and function.

  7. High-intensity strength training improves function of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Skotte, Jørgen H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This study investigates consequences of chronic neck pain on muscle function and the rehabilitating effects of contrasting interventions. METHODS: Women with trapezius myalgia (MYA, n = 42) and healthy controls (CON, n = 20) participated in a case-control study. Subsequently MYA were...... randomized to 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n = 18), general fitness training (GFT, n = 16), or a reference group without physical training (REF, n = 8). Participants performed tests of 100 consecutive cycles of 2 s isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of shoulder elevation followed...... capacity during repetitive MVC of the trapezius muscle than healthy controls. High-intensity strength training effectively improves strength capacity during repetitive MVC of the painful trapezius muscle....

  8. Swimming Improves Pain and Functional Capacity of Patients With Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Giovana; Jennings, Fabio; Nery Cabral, Michele Vieira; Pirozzi Buosi, Ana Letícia; Natour, Jamil

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of swimming on pain, functional capacity, aerobic capacity, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Randomized controlled trial. Rheumatology outpatient clinics of a university hospital. Women with FM (N=75; age range, 18-60y) randomly assigned to a swimming group (SG) (n=39) or a walking group (WG) (n=36). The SG performed 50 minutes of swimming 3 times a week for 12 weeks, with a heart rate at 11 beats under the anaerobic threshold. The WG performed walking with a heart rate at the anaerobic threshold, with the same duration and frequency as the SG. Participants were evaluated before the exercise protocols (t0), at 6 weeks (t6), and at 12 weeks (t12) after the onset of the protocols. The primary outcome measure was the visual analog scale for pain. The secondary measurements were the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey for quality of life; a spiroergometric test for cardiorespiratory variables; and the timed Up & Go test for functional performance. Patients in both groups experienced improvement in pain after the 12-week program, with no difference between groups (P=.658). The same results were found regarding functional capacity and quality of life. Moreover, no statistical difference between groups was found regarding aerobic capacity over time. Swimming, like walking, is an effective method for reducing pain and improving both functional capacity and quality of life in patients with FM. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effect of botulinum toxin type B on residual limb sweating and pain. Is there a chance for indirect phantom pain reduction by improved prosthesis use?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K-U; Kohl, M; Seifert, U; Schlereth, T

    2012-04-01

    Hyperhidrosis of a residual limb after amputation is one of the most common reasons for impaired prosthesis use and quality of life and affects 30-50% of all amputees causing skin irritation in about 25%. Thus the probability of residual limb pain increases in addition to an increased likelihood of phantom pain due to shorter duration of prothesis use. Development of both types of pain was studied following treatment of hyperhidrosis in 9 amputees. A total of 9 lower limb amputees received injections of 1750 units of botulinum toxin type B (BTX-B) for the treatment of hyperhidrosis of a residual limb (20 intracutaneous injections each). Prior to injections and 4 weeks and 3 months afterwards, patients rated the impairments regarding residual limb pain, phantom pain and sweating of the residual limb. Furthermore the duration of use of the prosthetic device and quality of life were rated on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Stump pain (n=9) was highly significantly reduced after 3 months (baseline: NRS 5; 4 weeks: NRS 4, p=0.109; 3 months: NRS 3, p=0.008) and also a tendency for phantom pain after 3 months (baseline NRS 5; 3 months: NRS 3; p=0.109). Sweating of the residual limb prior to BTX-B application was rated as a median 7 on the NRS scale with significant improvements after 4 weeks (NRS 3, p=0.027) and 3 months (NRS 3, p=0.020). Impaired duration of prothesis use improved from NRS 8 to NRS 2 (4 weeks; p=0.023) and NRS 3 (3 months; p=0.023) as well as the quality of life (p=0.016, p=0.023, respectively). Residual limb pain improved 3 months after intracutaneous, low-dose BTX-B in a trial with 9 patients and also phantom pain by tendency. Sweating of the residual limb was significantly reduced, probably thereby improving the duration of prothesis use. Larger studies should confirm these findings and conclusions.

  10. Perioperative pregabalin improves pain and functional outcomes 3 months after lumbar discectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Siun M

    2010-04-01

    Patient outcome after lumbar discectomy for radicular low back pain is variable and the benefit is inconsistent. Many patients continue to experience pain 3 months after surgery. Pregabalin, a membrane stabilizer, may decrease perioperative central sensitization and subsequent persistent pain.

  11. Prognostic factors for short-term improvement in acute and persistent musculoskeletal pain consulters in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Jennifer E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the costs associated with the management of musculoskeletal pain in primary care, predicting the course of these conditions remains a research priority. Much of the research into prognostic indicators however considers musculoskeletal conditions in terms of single pain sites whereas in reality, many patients present with pain in more than one site. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors for early improvement in primary care consulters with acute and persistent musculoskeletal conditions across a range of pain sites. Methods Consecutive patients with a new episode of musculoskeletal pain completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, and then again at the 4/5th treatment visit, and if they were still consulting, at the 10th visit. The outcome was defined as patient self-report improvement sufficient to make a meaningful difference. Independent predictors of outcome were identified using multivariate regression analyses. Results Acute (th visit. Several variables at baseline were associated with improvement at the 4/5th visit, but the predictive models were weak and unable to discriminate between patients who were improved and those who were not. In contrast, it was possible to elicit a predictive model for improvement later on at the 10th visit, but only in patients with persistent pain. Being employed, reporting a decline in work fear-avoidance behaviour at the 4/5th visit, and being better by the 4/5th visit, were all independently associated with improvement. This model accounted for 34.3% (p Conclusions We were unable to identify baseline characteristics that predicted early outcome in musculoskeletal pain patients. However, early self-reported improvement and decline in work fear-avoidance behaviour as predictors of later improvement highlighted the importance of speedy recovery in persistent musculoskeletal pain consulters. Our findings reinforce the elusive nature of baseline predictors, and

  12. MULLIGANS MOBILISATION WITH MOVEMENT ( MWM RELIEVES PAIN AND IMPROVES FUNCTIONAL STATUS IN OSTEOARTHRITIS KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reepa Avichal Ughreja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several manual therapy techniques for limited and painful knee flexion, but there are very few evidence about the effectiveness of Mulligan’s Mobilisation With Movement (MWM in osteoarthritis of the knee. The objective of the study was to find the effect of MWM on pain and functional status in patients with osteoarthritis knee. Methods: 30 patients diagnosed with medial compartment tibiofemoral osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized into two groups ( experimental and control groups with 15 subjects in each group.The experimental group received medial glide MWM and medial rotation glide MWM in weight bearing and non-weight bearing positions after which the patients were asked to walk for a while. Conventional therapy in the form of shortwave diathermy (SWD, quadriceps strengthening and stretching of the calf and hamstrings was given to both the experimental and the control group. The intervention regimen lasted for seven days. Outcome measures were WOMAC score, VAS score and distance walked in 6-minute walk test. Result: The study showed significant improvement in VAS (p<0.05 in control group, p<0.001 in experimental group , WOMAC scale(p<0.05 in control group, p<0.001 in experimental group and distance walked in 6 minutes(p<0.05 in control group, p<0.001 in experimental group in both the groups, but all these improvements were highly significant in experimental group ( p< 0.001 than those in the control group. Conclusion: Mulligan’s MWM is significantly effective in relieving pain and improving functional status in osteoarthritis of the knee.

  13. INTEGRATION BETWEEN MRI AND PHYSICAL THERAPY TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed Elkhadir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal disorder treated by physical therapists. The cause for the shoulder pain is multifactorial. However, a specific diagnosis is crucial in the right management of shoulder dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of integrating the MRI for the accurate diagnosis and impact of this on rendering the effective physical therapy interventions in shoulder dysfunction patients. Methods: A retrospective study conducted on 14 patients who undergone an MRI with a 1.5 T unit MAGNETOM Symphony (Siemens, for their shoulder pain, where the diagnosis might be Muscle tears like, subscapularis, infraspinatus,supraspinatus and teres minor muscles; subacromial or subdeltoid bursitis and labral tears were included. All the subjects were then continued with usual physical therapy treatments for four weeks depending on their diagnosis which includes; advice, stretching, mobilization and strengthening exercises, manual therapy, massage, strapping, and electrotherapy . The outcome measures documented from the case sheet were; Visual Analogue Scale grade and passive range of motion of shoulder external / internal rotation and abduction. Results: Paired t test was used to compare the PROM between pre rehabilitation and post rehabilitation testing and the non parametric test, Mann Whitney U test was used for the comparison of VAS. All patients showed a significant improvement in VAS and PROM of abduction, internal and external rotation following physical therapy (P≤ 0.05. Conclusion: MRI is found to be a reliable method of diagnostic procedure for the shoulder pain and the integration of MRI and physical therapy to treat shoulder dysfunction leads to a better outcome.

  14. Is your client's back pain "rapidly reversible"? Improving low back care at its foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelson, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    To convey a valuable and greatly misunderstood paradigm for evaluating and treating low back pain (LBP) and its extensive scientific evidence. Low back pain is a highly prevalent and very expensive health dilemma. But by using a paradigm called Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (a.k.a. McKenzie methods), it is now possible to identify a very large LBP subgroup whose pain is rapidly reversible, meaning that it can often be eliminated quickly, with return to full function using a single, patient-specific direction of simple, yet precise, end-range low back exercises and some posture modifications. This interesting subgroup includes patients with both acute and chronic LBP as well as both LBP-only and sciatica with neural deficits. This special form of clinical assessment can detect which patients are in this large, rapidly reversible subgroup and which ones are not. Of the numerous studies targeting Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT), three have focused on patients whose persisting pain had led to recommendations of disc surgery where 50% were then found to still have a rapidly reversible disc problem with high rates of nonsurgical rapid recovery. If patients are never assessed in this way, this reversibility remains undiscovered and these patients commonly undergo potentially unnecessary surgery. Armed with knowledge of this subgroup, how to identify it, the considerable supportive scientific evidence and strongly beneficial implications of utilizing this MDT paradigm, case managers are positioned to have an immensely positive impact on the care of LBP. Tremendous cost savings and greatly improved clinical outcomes are available by utilizing this form of evidence-based MDT care.

  15. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolski F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. Keywords: tooth movement, pain control, drug therapy, laser therapy

  16. Can an integrated orthotic and rehabilitation program decrease pain and improve function after lower extremity trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedigrew, Katherine M; Patzkowski, Jeanne C; Wilken, Jason M; Owens, Johnny G; Blanck, Ryan V; Stinner, Daniel J; Kirk, Kevin L; Hsu, Joseph R

    2014-10-01

    Patients with severe lower extremity trauma have significant disability 2 years after injury that worsens by 7 years. Up to 15% seek late amputation. Recently, an energy-storing orthosis demonstrated improved function compared with standard orthoses; however, the effect when integrated with rehabilitation over time is unknown. (1) Does an 8-week integrated orthotic and rehabilitation initiative improve physical performance, pain, and outcomes in patients with lower extremity functional deficits or pain? (2) Is the magnitude of recovery different if enrolled more than 2 years after their injury versus earlier? (3) Does participation decrease the number considering late amputation? We prospectively evaluated 84 service members (53 less than and 31 > 2 years after injury) who enrolled in the initiative. Fifty-eight sustained fractures, 53 sustained nerve injuries with weakness, and six had arthritis (there was some overlap in the patients with fractures and nerve injuries, which resulted in a total of > 84). They completed 4 weeks of physical therapy without the orthosis followed by 4 weeks with it. Testing was conducted at Weeks 0, 4, and 8. Validated physical performance tests and patient-reported outcome surveys were used as well as questions pertaining to whether patients were considering an amputation. By 8 weeks, patients improved in all physical performance measures and all relevant patient-reported outcomes. Patients less than and greater than 2 years after injury improved similarly. Forty-one of 50 patients initially considering amputation favored limb salvage at the end of 8 weeks. We found this integrated orthotic and rehabilitation initiative improved physical performance, pain, and patient-reported outcomes in patients with severe, traumatic lower extremity deficits and that these improvements were sustained for > 2 years after injury. Efforts are underway to determine whether the Return to Run clinical pathway with the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal

  17. Controlling pain during orthodontic fixed appliance therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID): a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mudit; Kandula, Srinivas; Laxmikanth, Sarala M; Vyavahare, Shreyas S; Reddy, Satheesha B H; Ramachandra, Chanila S

    2014-11-01

    Despite all the technological advances in orthodontics, orthodontic treatment still seems to involve some degree of discomfort and/or pain. Pain control during orthodontic therapy is of great concern to both orthodontists and patients. However, there has been limited research into controlling such pain. The purpose of this work was to assess patient-perceived pain following fixed orthodontic treatment and to evaluate the comparative analgesic efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for controlling pain. A total of 45 patients about to undergo fixed appliance orthodontic treatment were enrolled in this double-blind prospective study. Patients were evenly and randomly distributed in a blinded manner to one of three groups as follows: paracetamol/acetaminophen 500 mg thrice daily; placebo in the form of empty capsules; and etoricoxib 60 mg once daily. Drug administration began 1 h before initiating the bonding procedure and archwire placement, and given until the day 3. The pain perceived was recorded by the patients on a linear and graded Visual Analogue Scale at time intervals of 2 h after insertion of the appliance; 6 h thereafter and again at nighttime of the same day of the appointment; 24 h later and on the 2nd day at nighttime; 48 h after the appointment and on day 3 at nighttime. Our results revealed that moderately intense pain is associated with routine orthodontic treatment, and that the amount of pain individuals perceive varies widely. We observed statistically significant differences in the pain control among the three groups, and that etoricoxib 60 mg proved most efficient. Etoricoxib 60 mg is highly efficacious for controlling pain during fixed orthodontic appliance therapy.

  18. Time to improvement of pain and sleep quality in clinical trials of pregabalin for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M; Emir, Birol; Pauer, Lynne; Resnick, Malca; Clair, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    To determine the time to immediate and sustained clinical improvement in pain and sleep quality with pregabalin in patients with fibromyalgia. A post hoc analysis of four 8- to 14-week phase 2-3, placebo-controlled trials of fixed-dose pregabalin (150-600 mg/day) for fibromyalgia, comprising 12 pregabalin and four placebo treatment arms. A total of 2,747 patients with fibromyalgia, aged 18-82 years. Pain and sleep quality scores, recorded daily on 11-point numeric rating scales (NRSs), were analyzed to determine time to immediate improvement with pregabalin, defined as the first of ≥2 consecutive days when the mean NRS score was significantly lower for pregabalin vs placebo in those treatment arms with a significant improvement at endpoint, and time to sustained clinical improvement with pregabalin, defined as a ≥1-point reduction of the baseline NRS score of patient responders who had a ≥30% improvement on the pain NRS, sleep NRS, or Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) from baseline to endpoint, or who reported "much improved" or "very much improved" on the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) at endpoint. Significant improvements in pain and sleep quality scores at endpoint vs placebo were seen in 8/12 and 11/12 pregabalin treatment arms, respectively (P pain or sleep occurred by day 1 or 2. Time to sustained clinical improvement occurred significantly earlier in pain, sleep, PGIC, and FIQ responders (P pain and sleep quality occurred faster with pregabalin vs placebo. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Can just-in-time, evidence-based "reminders" improve pain management among home health care nurses and their patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Margaret V; Pezzin, Liliana E; Feldman, Penny H; Murtaugh, Christopher M; Peng, Timothy R

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this randomized, controlled, home care intervention was to test the effectiveness of two nurse-targeted, e-mail-based interventions to increase home care nurses' adherence to pain assessment and management guidelines, and to improve patient outcomes. Nurses from a large urban non-profit home care organization were assigned to usual care or one of two interventions upon identification of an eligible cancer patient with pain. The basic intervention consisted of a patient-specific, one-time e-mail reminder highlighting six pain-specific clinical recommendations. The augmented intervention supplemented the initial e-mail reminder with provider prompts, patient education material, and clinical nurse specialist outreach. Over 300 nurses were randomized and outcomes of 673 of their patients were reviewed. Data collection involved clinical record abstraction of nurse care practices and patient interviews completed approximately 45 days after start of care. The intervention had limited effect on nurse-documented care practices but patient outcomes were positively influenced. Patients in the augmented group improved significantly over the control group in ratings of pain intensity at its worst, whereas patients in the basic group had better ratings of pain intensity on average. Other outcomes measures were also positively influenced but did not reach statistical significance. Our findings suggest that although reminders have some role in improving cancer pain management, a more intensive approach is needed for a generalized nursing workforce with limited recent exposure to state-of-the-art pain management practices.

  20. Postoperative pain management in orthopaedic patients: no differences in pain score, but improved stress control by epidural anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H A; Saatweber, P; Schmitz, C S; Hecker, H

    2002-09-01

    To investigate the interactions of postoperative pain and endocrine stress response, three groups of 21 patients each with total knee arthroplasty were compared in a randomized, prospective design. For postoperative pain management, a three-in-one block, an epidural catheter analgesia or an intravenous patient-controlled analgesia was used. After standardized balanced anaesthesia, the pain intensity was measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS). For detection of epinephrine, norepinephrine, antidiuretic hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in the plasma, blood samples were taken at six time points before and up to 180 min after the start of pain therapy. In addition, systolic arterial pressure, heart rate, partial arterial oxygen saturation, nausea, vomiting and satisfaction of the patients were recorded. Within 15 min after the start of pain therapy, VAS in all groups was similarly reduced from >40 mm to a range stress variables exceeded the normal range. Epidural anaesthesia led to a significant decrease of epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations, while an increase was observed in the group with patient-controlled analgesia, and the decrease in patients with the three-in-one block was less than in patients receiving epidural anaesthesia (P = 0.001). Differences in antidiuretic hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol were less pronounced. Systolic arterial pressure decreased significantly in all groups, particularly in patients with epidural anaesthesia. Partial arterial oxygen saturation and the incidence of nausea and vomiting were comparable. All patients were satisfied with the methods used. All methods of pain management led to sufficient analgesia, but they were not accompanied by an adequate reduction in endocrine stress response. Thus, postoperative pain is only a secondary stressor and sufficient analgesia with subjective well-being does not prove a stress-free state. With regard to the reduction of sympathoadrenergic stress

  1. Spa therapy together with supervised self-mobilisation improves pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a single-blind randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Jay, Nicolas; Kohler, François; Tamisier, Jean-Noë; Roques, Christian-François; Boulange, Michel; Gay, Gérard

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether spa therapy has a beneficial effect on pain and disability in patients with chronic shoulder pain, this single-blind randomised controlled clinical trial included patients with chronic shoulder pain due to miscellaneous conditions attending one of four spa centres as outpatients. Patients were randomised into two groups: spa therapy (18 days of standardised treatment combining thermal therapy together with supervised mobilisation in a thermal pool) and controls (spa therapy delayed for 6 months: `immediate versus delayed treatment' paradigm). All patients continued usual treatments during the 6-month follow-up period. The main endpoint was the mean change in the French-Quick DASH (F-QD) score at 6 months. The effect size of spa therapy was calculated, and the proportion of patients reaching minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) was compared. Secondary endpoints were the mean change in SF-36, treatment use and tolerance. One hundred eighty-six patients were included (94 patients as controls, 92 in the spa group) and analysed by intention to treat. At 6 months, the mean change in the F-QD score was statistically significantly greater among spa therapy patients than controls (- 32.6 versus - 8.15%; p pain, function and quality of life in patients with chronic shoulder pain after 6 months compared with usual care.

  2. Ankle Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it follows an injury. Even a relatively benign ankle injury can be quite painful, at least at first. ... improve after several weeks Self-care For many ankle injuries, self-care measures ease the pain. Examples include: ...

  3. Kinesio taping improves pain, range of motion, and proprioception in older patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwi-young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Junesun; Yoon, Young Wook

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the short-term effects of Kinesio taping (KT) on various types of pain, active range of motion (AROM), and proprioception in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Forty-six older participants (mean [SD], 57.9 [4.4] yrs) with osteoarthritis were randomly allocated to two groups: the KT group or the placebo-KT group. Taping with tension (KT application) or without tension (placebo-KT application) was applied to the quadriceps of the participants in both groups. Before and after intervention, pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale at rest and during walking, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed using an algometer in the quadriceps and the tibialis anterior. In addition, pain-free AROM and proprioception were measured. The KT group showed attenuation of pain during walking (effect size [ES], 1.97), PPT in the quadriceps (ES, 2.58), and PPT in the tibialis anterior (ES, 2.45). This group also showed significantly improved AROM (ES, 2.01) and proprioception (ES, 1.73-1.89; P proprioception. There were significant differences between the two groups in pain during walking and PPT. In addition, pain during walking showed a significant correlation with AROM and proprioception, and a significant correlation was found between PPT and AROM. These results demonstrated that KT application with proper tension to the quadriceps effectively attenuates various types of pain and improves AROM and proprioception in osteoarthritis patients. Thus, KT may be a suitable intervention to improve pain, AROM, and proprioception in patients with osteoarthritis in clinics.

  4. Test of a Process Evaluation Checklist to improve neonatal pain practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Janet; Stevens, Bonnie; Sidani, Souraya; Watt-Watson, Judy

    2015-05-01

    The Evidence-Based Practice Identification and Change (EPIC) strategy is a multifaceted knowledge translation intervention. Although the intervention promoted evidence-based practice, the process of delivering the intervention components is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity of the Process Evaluation Checklist developed for monitoring the fidelity of implementing the intervention to improve neonatal pain practices (i.e., documentation of ordering and administration of sucrose). A case study design was used. A research practice council in a single Neonatal Intensive Care Unit implemented the intervention. The Process Evaluation Checklist was used to record adherence in carrying out the intervention components. A significant improvement in the documentation of sucrose orders (p = .002) and administration (p = .004) provided evidence of the construct validity of this intervention fidelity measure. Using this measure in different contexts over longer periods of time will further validate the Process Evaluation Checklist. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cortico-steroid Injections for Pain Relief and Functional Improvement in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramappa, Arun; Walley, Kempland C; Herder, Lindsay M; Iyer, Sravisht; Zurakowski, David; Hall, Amber; DeAngelis, Joseph P

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Treatment options for SIS include conservative modalities such as use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and subacromial corticosteroid injections (CSIs). Although studies have found improvement in pain, function, and range of motion after CSI, the effect of injection route (anterior or posterior) on shoulder pain in patients with SIS has not been investigated. In the study reported here, patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: anterior CSI and posterior CSI. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS) and function with the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Patients were evaluated before injection (baseline) and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Of the 55 patients enrolled, 25 received anterior CSI and 30 received posterior CSI. The 2 groups showed no significant difference in VAS pain at baseline or 1, 3, or 6 months after injection. SANE scores were statistically different at 3 months. Each group had significantly less pain and better function 1, 3, and 6 months after injection than at baseline. Age, sex, and body mass index did not significantly affect the efficacy of anterior or posterior CSIs. In patients with SIS, subacromial CSI reduces pain and improves function for up to 6 months. These effects are no different for anterior and posterior injection routes. As a result, clinicians should rely on their clinical acumen when selecting injection routes, as anterior and posterior are both beneficial.

  6. Comparison of the Effect of Exercise Therapy with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Improvement of Pain and Function in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Akbari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: One of the most common disorders of the knee joint in adult is patellofemoral pain syndrome. Sometimes it becomes chronic and causes activity limitation. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of exercise therapy with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on improvement of pain intensity, knee function, muscle atrophy and range of knee flexion. Materials & Methods: This double-blind, randomized clinical trial was carried out in Zahedan Razmejo-Moghadam Physiotherapy Clinic, in 2007. Thirty-two patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome were recruited through simple non-probability sampling. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the equal groups, exercise therapy (including hip, knee, and leg muscles strengthening and stretching exercises or electrical stimulation group. Before and after intervention, we assessed pain through Visual Analog Scale (VAS (ordinal, function (ordinal with Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS, thigh circumference with tape measure (centimeter and range of knee flexion with goniometer (degree. A 10 session treatment program, three sessions per week and one hour per session was performed for both groups. Independent t-test or Mann-Whitney U and paired t-test or Wilcoxon were used for comparison between the pretreatment and post treatment results between groups and within groups, in SPSS software, respectively. Results: The mean total score of knee function increased from 100.53±19.25 to 130.87±18.25 in the electrical stimulation group and from 107.67±22.69 to 131.47±15.11 in the exercise therapy group (p=0.001. The mean score of knee function subscales including symptoms, pain, functional limitation, recreational activity, and life style improved in both groups (p<0.05. The pain score and range of knee flexion improved in both groups (p<0.05. After treatment, range of knee flexion significantly increased in the exercise group compared with the electrical

  7. An electronic intervention to improve safety for pain patients co-prescribed chronic opioids and benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Tauheed; Rife, Tessa L; Batki, Steven L; Pennington, David L

    2018-03-29

    Co-prescribing opioids and benzodiazepines increases overdose risk. A paucity of literature exists evaluating strategies to improve safety of co-prescribing. This study evaluated an electronic intervention to improve safety for patients co-prescribed chronic opioids for pain and benzodiazepines at 3 and 6 months. A prospective cohort study was conducted from December 2015 through May 2016 at San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System. A clinical dashboard identified 145 eligible patients prescribed chronic opioids and benzodiazepines. Individualized taper and safety recommendations were communicated to prescribers via electronic medical record progress note and encrypted e-mail at baseline. Primary outcome was number of patients co-prescribed chronic opioids and benzodiazepines. Secondary outcomes included daily dose of opioids and benzodiazepines and number prescribed ≥100 mg morphine equivalent daily dose. Safety outcomes included number with opioid overdose education and naloxone distribution, annual urine drug screening, annual prescription drug monitoring program review, and signed opioid informed consent. Linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations were used to examine within-group change in outcomes between baseline and 3 and 6 months. Among the 145 patients, mean (standard deviation) age was 62 (11) years and 91.7% (133/145) were male. Number co-prescribed significantly decreased from 145/145 (100%) at baseline to 93/139 (67%) at 6-month follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.34-0.81, P = .003). Mean opioid and benzodiazepine doses significantly decreased from 84.61 to 65.63 mg (95% CI: 8.32-27.86, P improve safety for patients co-prescribed chronic opioids for pain and benzodiazepines.

  8. Evaluation of past and present hair replacement techniques. Aesthetic improvement, effectiveness, postoperative pain, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S C; Rousso, D

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate and compare past and present hair replacement techniques of standard grafts, minigrafts, micrografts, scalp reduction, scalp flaps, strip harvesting, and punch harvesting procedures with regard to aesthetic improvement, effectiveness, postoperative pain, and complications. Three hundred surveys were mailed randomly to patients who had undergone hair replacement over the last 3 decades. The questionnaire asked patients to rate the level of postoperative results and complications in several comparison groups with regard to the following factors: itching, pain, swelling, scarring, bleeding, altered sensation, poor growth, color and texture, infection, hairline, and natural appearance. Each factor was rated by the patients on a scale of 0 to 3 (0, none [best]; 1, minimal; 2, moderate; and 3, worst [severe]). Private facial plastic surgery practice. A hypothesis about each set of survey questions was formed based on general trends in patient responses, also known as the null hypothesis; chi 2 tests were conducted for each of the survey questions to determine the statistical trend with a certain level of confidence. The weighted arithmetic mean of the expected response was used for the varying number of patients responding to each question. Using the chi 2 test, the formulated hypotheses can be accepted or rejected based on the observed and expected responses. Between 1981-1990 and 1991-1996, there was a reduction of 38 percentage points in the number of standard graft procedures performed, an increase of 31 percentage points in the number of minigraft procedures, and an increase of 48 percentage points in the number of micrograft procedures. The complication rate was 31% lower for minigraft procedures compared with standard graft procedures and 29% lower for micrograft procedures compared with minigraft procedures. The complication rate was 59% lower for strip harvesting procedures compared with punch harvesting procedures. Newer hair replacement techniques

  9. Alterations in thoracolumbosacral movement when pain causing lameness has been improved by diagnostic analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, L; Dyson, S; Pfau, T

    2017-06-01

    Lameness, thoracolumbosacral pain and reduced range of motion (ROM) often coexist; better understanding of their relationship is needed. The objectives were to determine if thoracolumbosacral movement of horses changes when pain causing lameness is improved by diagnostic analgesia. We hypothesised that reduction of lameness will increase ROM of the thoracolumbosacral region. Thirteen horses with different types of hind limb lameness were trotted in straight lines and lunged on a 10m diameter circle on left and right reins before and after lameness was subjectively substantially improved by diagnostic analgesia. Inertial sensor data were collected from the withers, thirteenth (T13) and eighteenth thoracic (T18) vertebrae, third lumbar (L3) vertebra, tubera sacrale (TS), left and right tubera coxae. ROM of flexion-extension, axial rotation, lateral bending, dorsoventral, lateral-lateral motion and vertical movement symmetry were quantified at each thoracolumbar site. Hiphike difference (HHD), maximum difference (MaxDiff) and minimum difference (MinDiff) for the pelvic sensors were measured. Percentage changes for before and after diagnostic analgesia were calculated; mean±standard deviation (SD) or median [interquartile range] were determined. Associations between the change in pelvic versus thoracolumbar movement symmetry after each local analgesic technique were tested. After resolution of lameness, HHD decreased by 7% [68%] (P=0.006). The MinDiff decreased significantly by 33% [61%] (P=0.01), 45±13% (P=0.005) and 52±23% (P=0.04), for TS, L3 and T18, respectively. There was significantly increased ROM in flexion-extension at T13, in axial rotation at T13, T18, L3 and in lateral-lateral ROM at L3. Thoracolumbosacral asymmetry and reduced ROM associated with lameness were both altered immediately by improvement in lameness using diagnostic analgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Hesperidin Improves with Diosmin in Experimental Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azucena I. Carballo-Villalobos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is caused by a primary lesion, dysfunction, or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the hesperidin antihyperalgesic effects alone or combined with diosmin in a model of neuropathic pain to corroborate a possible synergistic antinociceptive activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed in the aesthesiometer and plantar tests, respectively, after chronic constriction injury (CCI model in rats receiving hesperidin (HS, 5 doses from 10 to 1000 mg/kg alone or combined with diosmin (DS, 10 and 100 mg/kg in comparison to gabapentin (31.6 mg/kg. UHPLC-MS analysis of cerebral samples was used to recognize the central concentrations of these flavonoids. Participation of different receptors was also investigated in the presence of haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone antagonists. Acute hesperidin administration significantly decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Antihyperalgesic response of hesperidin, improved by a combination with diosmin (DS10/HS100 in both stimuli, was blockaded by haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone, but not WAY100635, antagonists. Both flavonoids were detected in brain samples. In conclusion, hesperidin alone and combined with diosmin produces antihyperalgesic response in the CCI model in rats. Antihyperalgesic effect of DS10/HS100 combination involves central activity partially modulated by D2, GABAA, and opioids, but not by 5-HT1A, receptors.

  11. Ketoprofen gel improves low back pain in addition to IV dexketoprofen: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Tunay, Kamil; Golcuk, Yalcin

    2016-08-01

    Oligoanalgesia is common in emergency departments (EDs), and pain management is of concern for ED physicians. The aim of this study was to reveal the effect of ketoprofen gel in patients presenting with mechanical low back pain to the ED. All the study patients received intravenous dexketoprofen additional to study drugs. After dexketoprofen, 2 g of 2.5% ketoprofen gel or placebo was administered to the site with pain and tenderness. Pain relief at 15 and 30 minutes was measured by visual analog scale scores. Rescue drug need and adverse effects were also recorded. A total of 140 patients were enrolled into the study. The mean age of the study patients was 35±12, and 56% (n=79) of them were male. The mean pain reduction at 30 minutes was 52±18 for ketoprofen gel and 37±17 for placebo, and ketoprofen gel was better than placebo at 30 minutes (mean difference, 16 mm; 95% confidence interval, 10-21). Ten patients (14%) in the placebo group and 2 patients (3%) in the ketoprofen gel group needed rescue drug (P=.35). Ketoprofen gel improves pain in patients presenting with mechanical low back pain to ED at 30 minutes in addition to intravenous dexketoprofen when compared to placebo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Further effort is needed to improve management of chronic pain in primary care. Results from the Arkys project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Piccinocchi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%. In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%. Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%. NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%, while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation.

  13. Improving communication in cancer pain management nursing: a randomized controlled study assessing the efficacy of a communication skills training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivet, Delphine; Delvaux, Nicole; Gibon, Anne-Sophie; Brancart, Cyrielle; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication is needed for optimal cancer pain management. This study assessed the efficacy of a general communication skills training program for oncology nurses on communication about pain management. A total of 115 nurses were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or control group (CG). The assessment included the recording of interviews with a simulated cancer patient at baseline for both groups and after training (TG) or 3 months after baseline (CG). Two psychologists rated the content of interview transcripts to assess cancer pain management communication. Group-by-time effects were measured using a generalized estimating equation. Trained nurses asked the simulated patient more questions about emotions associated with pain (relative rate [RR] = 4.28, p = 0.049) and cognitions associated with pain treatment (RR = 3.23, p management (RR = 0.40, p = 0.006) compared with untrained nurses. The general communication skills training program improved only a few of the communication strategies needed for optimal cancer pain management in nursing. General communication skills training programs should be consolidated using specific modules focusing on communication skills related to cancer pain management.

  14. Does e-pain plan improve management of sickle cell disease associated vaso-occlusive pain crisis? a mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Lin, Yi-Chin; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Padman, Rema; Seltman, Howard J

    2014-11-01

    There is limited application and evaluation of health information systems in the management of vaso-occlusive pain crises in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. This study evaluates the impact of digitization of paper-based individualized pain plans on process efficiency and care quality by examining both objective patient data and subjective clinician insights. Retrospective, before and after, mixed methods evaluation of digitization of paper documents in Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC. Subjective perceptions are analyzed using surveys completed by 115 clinicians in emergency department (ED) and inpatient units (IP). Objective effects are evaluated using mixed models with data on 1089 ED visits collected via electronic chart review 28 months before and 22 months after the digitization. Surveys indicate that all clinicians perceived the digitization to improve the efficiency and quality of pain management. Physicians overwhelmingly preferred using the digitized plans, but only 44% of the nurses had the same response. Analysis of patient records indicates that adjusted time from analgesic order to administration was significantly reduced from 35.50 to 26.77 min (pmanagement. This study highlights the important role of health information technology (HIT) on vaso-occlusive pain management for pediatric patients with sickle cell disease and the critical challenges in accommodating human factor considerations in implementing and evaluating HIT effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Does walking improve disability status, function, or quality of life in adults with chronic low back pain? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, Belinda J; Walters, Julie; Ferrar, Katia

    2016-06-01

    To establish the effectiveness of walking alone and walking compared to other non-pharmacological management methods to improve disability, quality of life, or function in adults with chronic low back pain. A systematic search of the following databases was undertaken: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Pedro, SportDiscus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The following keywords were used: 'back pain' or 'low back pain' or 'chronic low back pain' and 'walk*' or 'ambulation' or 'treadmill*' or 'pedometer*' or 'acceleromet*' or 'recreational' and 'disability' or 'quality of life' or 'function*'. Primary research studies with an intervention focus that investigated walking as the primary intervention compared to no intervention or any other non-pharmacological method in adults with chronic low back pain (duration >3 months). Seven randomised controlled trials involving 869 participants were included in the review. There was no evidence that walking was more effective than other management methods such as usual care, specific strength exercises, medical exercise therapy, or supervised exercise classes. One study found over-ground walking to be superior to treadmill walking, and another found internet-mediated walking to be more beneficial than non-internet-mediated walking in the short term. There is low quality evidence to suggest that walking is as effective as other non-pharmacological management methods at improving disability, function, and quality of life in adults with chronic low back pain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Adult emergency department patients with sickle cell pain crisis: results from a quality improvement learning collaborative model to improve analgesic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Paula; Hafner, John W; Martinovich, Zoran; Artz, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to 1) estimate differences in pain management process and patient-reported outcomes, pre- and postimplementation of analgesic protocols for adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), and 2) examine the effects of site and visit frequency on changes in pain scores and time to analgesic. A multicenter, prospective, longitudinal study enrolled patients from three academic medical centers between October 2007 and September 2009. All ED patients 18 years or older with a chief complaint of a sickle cell pain episode were enrolled. Sites formed a SCD quality improvement (QI) team and implemented standard nurse-initiated emergency department (ED) analgesic protocols; outcomes were compared between study periods defined as pre- and postimplementation of protocols. Medical record review was conducted to measure time to administration of initial analgesic, opioids used, route of opioid administration, the change in pain scores from arrival to discharge (negative numbers reflect a decrease in pain scores), and the number of ED visits per individual patient during the study period at each site. On day 7 after the ED visit, a follow-up phone interview was conducted. Patients were queried about their ED pain management using a scale from 1 to 10 (1 = outstanding, 10 = worst). Descriptive statistics are used to report the results. Ordinary least-squares regression models were constructed to measure the effect of time period, site, and number of visits per patient on change in pain score. During the study period, 342 unique patients (57% female, mean ± SD age = 32 ± 11 years) were enrolled and had a total of 2,934 visits. There was no difference in time to administration of the initial analgesic between study periods. Overall, there was a significant decrease in pain scores from arrival to discharge between the pre- and postintervention study periods: the average difference in arrival to discharge pain scores (cm) was greater during the postimplementation

  17. Additional Effects of a Physical Therapy Protocol on Headache Frequency, Pressure Pain Threshold, and Improvement Perception in Patients With Migraine and Associated Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Gonçalves, Maria Claudia; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Dach, Fabíola; Speciali, José Geraldo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Chaves, Thaís Cristina

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the additional effect provided by physical therapy in migraine treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Tertiary university-based hospital. Among the 300 patients approached, 50 women (age range, 18-55y) diagnosed with migraine were randomized into 2 groups: a control group (n=25) and a physiotherapy plus medication group (n=25) (N=50). Both groups received medication for migraine treatment. Additionally, physiotherapy plus medication patients received 8 sessions of physical therapy over 4 weeks, comprised mainly of manual therapy and stretching maneuvers lasting 50 minutes. A blinded examiner assessed the clinical outcomes of headache frequency, intensity, and self-perception of global change and physical outcomes of pressure pain threshold and cervical range of motion. Data were recorded at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. Twenty-three patients experienced side effects from the medication. Both groups reported a significantly reduced frequency of headaches; however, no differences were observed between groups (physiotherapy plus medication patients showed an additional 18% improvement at posttreatment and 12% improvement at follow-up compared with control patients, P>.05). The reduction observed in the physiotherapy plus medication patients was clinically relevant at posttreatment, whereas clinical relevance for control patients was demonstrated only at follow-up. For pain intensity, physiotherapy plus medication patients showed statistical evidence and clinical relevance with reduction posttreatment (P<.05). In addition, they showed better self-perception of global change than control patients (P<.05). The cervical muscle pressure pain threshold increased significantly in the physiotherapy plus medication patients and decreased in the control patients, but statistical differences between groups were observed only in the temporal area (P<.05). No differences were observed between groups regarding cervical range of motion. We cannot

  18. Improving School Nurse Pain Assessment Practices for Students With Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Brenna L; Smolinski, Megan

    2017-01-01

    School nurses are afforded minimal resources related to assessing pain in students with intellectual disability (ID) and have called for continuing education. The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of an education program regarding best practices for assessing pain in students with ID. Educational sessions were presented to 248 school nurses. Pre-, post-, and follow-up surveys measured (1) difficulty school nurses face when assessing pain, (2) knowledge and use of pain assessment methods, and (3) intent to change and actual changes to professional practices. Participants experienced less difficulty assessing pain following the educational program. Almost all participants intended to change pain assessment practices, but large caseloads limited new practice adoption. Policy makers must consider population size and acuity when determining school nurse staffing. Trainings and other resources should be made available to school nurses in order to make pain assessments for students with ID more thorough and efficient.

  19. [Improvement of lumbal motor control and trunkmuscle conditions with a novel low back pain prevention exercise program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácsné Bobály, Viktória; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Makai, Alexandra; Koller, Ákos; Járomi, Melinda

    2017-01-01

    Ballet dancers often suffer from low back pain. Low back pain can be reduced by strengthening the core muscles with the help of a special exercise program. In the study 62 ballet dancer women (average age: 14.89 ± 1.21 years) were included. Intervention group: n = 30 participant, average age: 14.86 ± 1.00 years, control group: n = 32 participant, average age: 14.91 ± 1.37 years. We examined the pain intensity that occurs during training with visual analog scale, the habitual posture with photogrammetry, the abdominal muscle strength with Kraus-Weber test, the static muscle strength of the trunk muscles with core test and the lumbar motor control with leg lowering test. The intervention group did a trunk prevented exercise program during 3 months, and then we examined them again. In the intervention group the intensity of pain significantly decreased (VAS1: p = 0.012; VAS2: p = 0.021), the abdominal muscle strength significantly improved (K-W. B: p=0.025; K-W. C: pCore-test: pexercise program, which improves the conditions of trunk muscles, the motor control of lumbar regions can be improved and the lower back pain and the incidence of injuries can be reduced. Orv., Hetil., 2017, 158(2), 58-66.

  20. Resistance exercise improves muscle strength, health status and pain intensity in fibromyalgia--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Bjersing, Jan; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2015-06-18

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by persistent widespread pain, increased pain sensitivity and tenderness. Muscle strength in women with FM is reduced compared to healthy women. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program on muscle strength, health status, and current pain intensity in women with FM. A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years, symptom duration 0-35 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multi-center trial examining the effects of progressive resistance group exercise compared with an active control group. A person-centred model of exercise was used to support the participants' self-confidence for management of exercise because of known risks of activity-induced pain in FM. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks and was supervised by experienced physiotherapists. Primary outcome measure was isometric knee-extension force (Steve Strong®), secondary outcome measures were health status (FIQ total score), current pain intensity (VAS), 6MWT, isometric elbow-flexion force, hand-grip force, health related quality of life, pain disability, pain acceptance, fear avoidance beliefs, and patient global impression of change (PGIC). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention. Long-term follow up comprised the self-reported questionnaires only and was conducted after 13-18 months. Between-group and within-group differences were calculated using non-parametric statistics. Significant improvements were found for isometric knee-extension force (p = 0.010), health status (p = 0.038), current pain intensity (p = 0.033), 6MWT (p = 0.003), isometric elbow flexion force (p = 0.02), pain disability (p = 0.005), and pain acceptance (p = 0.043) in the resistance exercise group (n = 56) when compared to the control group (n = 49). PGIC differed significantly (p = 0.001) in favor of the resistance exercise group at post-treatment examinations

  1. Improvement in pain, fatigue, and subjective sleep quality through sleep hygiene tips in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Aline Cristina; Ventura, Camila; Gallinaro, Andrea Lopes; Costa, Renata Alqualo; Lage, Laís Verderame

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of sleep hygiene instructions for women with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia completed the study. The assessment comprised the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and a general questionnaire with personal data and lifestyle information. All patients received information about the disease and a sleep diary, but only the experimental group received the sleep hygiene instructions. Patients were asked to practice sleep hygiene, and, after three months, they were reevaluated by use of the same questionnaires. The mean age in the control group was 55.2 ±7.12 years, and, in the experimental group, 53.5 ±8.89 years (P = 0.392). The experimental group showed: a decrease in the pain Visual Analogue Scale values (P = 0.028), in fatigue (P = 0.021), and in the PSQI component 1 (P = 0.030); and a significant reduction in the difficulty falling asleep after waking up in the middle of the night (P = 0.031). The experimental group also showed an increase in the reporting percentage of "silent environment" (ranging from 42.9% to 68.6%), a decrease in the reporting percentage of "fairly quiet environment" (ranging from 40% to 22.9%), and a decrease in the reporting percentage of "noisy environment" (ranging from 17.1% to 8.6%). These changes facilitated falling asleep after waking up in the middle of the night. The sleep hygiene instructions allowed changing the patients' behavior, which resulted in pain and fatigue improvement, increased subjective quality of sleep, in addition to facilitating falling asleep after waking up in the middle of the night.

  2. Improved Acuity and Dexterity but Unchanged Touch and Pain Thresholds following Repetitive Sensory Stimulation of the Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kowalewski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity underlies the brain’s ability to alter perception and behavior through training, practice, or simply exposure to sensory stimulation. Improvement of tactile discrimination has been repeatedly demonstrated after repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS of the fingers; however, it remains unknown if such protocols also affect hand dexterity or pain thresholds. We therefore stimulated the thumb and index finger of young adults to investigate, besides testing tactile discrimination, the impact of rSS on dexterity, pain, and touch thresholds. We observed an improvement in the pegboard task where subjects used the thumb and index finger only. Accordingly, stimulating 2 fingers simultaneously potentiates the efficacy of rSS. In fact, we observed a higher gain of discrimination performance as compared to a single-finger rSS. In contrast, pain and touch thresholds remained unaffected. Our data suggest that selecting particular fingers modulates the efficacy of rSS, thereby affecting processes controlling sensorimotor integration.

  3. Does adding cognitive-behavioural physiotherapy to exercise improve outcome in patients with chronic neck pain? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D P; Oldham, J A; Woby, S R

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether adding a physiotherapist-led cognitive-behavioural intervention to an exercise programme improved outcome in patients with chronic neck pain (CNP). Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Four outpatient physiotherapy departments. Fifty-seven patients with CNP. Follow-up data were provided by 39 participants [57% of the progressive neck exercise programme (PNEP) group and 79% of the interactive behavioural modification therapy (IBMT) group]. Twenty-eight subjects were randomised to the PNEP group and 29 subjects were randomised to the IBMT group. IBMT is underpinned by cognitive-behavioural principles, and aims to modify cognitive risk factors through interactive educational sessions, graded exercise and progressive goal setting. The main outcome measure was disability, measured by the Northwick Park Questionnaire (NPQ). Secondary outcomes were the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), Pain Catastrophising Scale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (CPSS) and the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire. No significant between-group differences in disability were observed (mean NPQ change: PNEP=-7.2, IBMT=-10.2). However, larger increases in functional self-efficacy (mean CPSS change: PNEP=1.0, IBMT=3.2) and greater reductions in pain intensity (mean NPRS change: PNEP=-1.0, IBMT=-2.2; Pphysiotherapy in all patients with CNP. However, superior outcomes were observed for several secondary measures, and IBMT may offer additional benefit in some patients. ISRCTN27611394. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Innovation in hospital quality improvement activities--acute postoperative pain management (APOP) self-help toolkit audits as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Lisa K; Oliver, Kate; Tett, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    It is often difficult to maintain quality improvement change. Many behavioral strategies have been used to improve uptake of new practices and knowledge. One effective way of changing medication prescribing is audit and feedback with specific educational feedback. The challenge however is to maintain ongoing quality improvement activities. In Australia, unique downloadable "toolkits" are now available to assist hospitals to maintain prescribing quality improvement activities. The first designed to improve the management of acute postoperative pain (APOP toolkit) has been piloted. The toolkit includes data collection and educational tools, an automated feedback report on key indicators, with complete instructions for use. The APOP toolkit has been used in 73 hospitals, in two facilitated "snapshot" audits. There was continued improvement in performance, assessed by increases in the percentage of patients with measured pain and sedation scores and in those with documented pain management plans at discharge, compared with earlier APOP project audits. Using this example of the APOP toolkit and "snapshot" audits, we have now demonstrated that hospitals nationwide are able to undertake quality improvement activities voluntarily to maintain optimal performance. Encouragement, guidance, and availability of ready-made tools developed by a national team facilitate opportunities for ongoing quality improvements. © 2012 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  5. Intraoperative Techniques for the Plastic Surgeon to Improve Pain Control in Breast Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Farias-Eisner, Gina; Kao, Kenneth; Pan, Judy; Festekjian, Jaco; Gassman, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Summary:. In recent years, there has been a growing emphasis placed on reducing length of hospital stay and health costs associated with breast surgery. Adequate pain control is an essential component of enhanced recovery after surgery. Postoperative pain management strategies include use of narcotic analgesia, non-narcotic analgesia, and local anesthetics. However, these forms of pain control have relatively brief durations of action and multiple-associated side effects. Intraoperative regio...

  6. Are chronic low back pain outcomes improved with co-management of concurrent depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Henry

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To discuss the role of depression in chronic lower back pain and comment on appropriate methods of screening and co-management. Data Sources The current scientific literature was investigated using the online web databases CINAHL, Medline/PUBMED, Proquest, Meditext and from manual library searches. Data Extraction Databases were searched from 1980 to the present (2005. Articles were searched with the key words "depression" and "low back pain". Over three hundred articles were sourced and articles were then selected on their relevance to the chronic spinal pain states that present to manual therapy practitioners. Data synthesis Pain is a subjective awareness of peripheral nociceptive stimulation, projected from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex with each individual's pain experience being mediated by his or her psychological state. Thus a psychological component will often be associated with any painful experience. A number of studies suggest (among other things that the incidence of depression predicts chronicity in lower back pain syndromes but that chronic lower back pain does not have the reciprocal action to predict depression. Conclusion The aetiology of chronic pain is multifactorial. There is sufficient evidence in the literature to demonstrate a requirement to draw treatment options from many sources in order to achieve a favourable pain relief outcome. The treatment should be multimodal, including mental and emotional support, counseling and herbal advice. While a strong correlation between depression and chronic low back pain can be demonstrated, an apparent paucity of literature that specifically addresses the patient response to chiropractic treatment and concurrent psychotherapy identifies the need for prospective studies of this nature to be undertaken. It is likely that multimodal/multidisciplinary treatment approaches should be encouraged to deal with these chronic lower back pain syndromes.

  7. High-Frequency Repetitive Sensory Stimulation as Intervention to Improve Sensory Loss in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Marianne; Dinse, Hubert R; Mainka, Tina; Tegenthoff, Martin; Maier, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Achieving perceptual gains in healthy individuals or facilitating rehabilitation in patients is generally considered to require intense training to engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggested that beneficial outcome similar to training can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS). For example, high-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation (HF-rSS) enhances tactile performance and induces cortical reorganization in healthy subjects and patients after stroke. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show impaired tactile performance associated with shrinkage of cortical maps. We here investigated the feasibility and efficacy of HF-rSS, and low-frequency rSS (LF-rSS) to enhance tactile performance and reduce pain intensity in 20 patients with CRPS type I. Intermittent high- or low-frequency electrical stimuli were applied for 45 min/day to all fingertips of the affected hand for 5 days. Main outcome measures were spatial two-point-discrimination thresholds and mechanical detection thresholds measured on the tip of the index finger bilaterally. Secondary endpoint was current pain intensity. All measures were assessed before and on day 5 after the last stimulation session. HF-rSS applied in 16 patients improved tactile discrimination on the affected hand significantly without changes contralaterally. Current pain intensity remained unchanged on average, but decreased in four patients by ≥30%. This limited pain relief might be due to the short stimulation period of 5 days only. In contrast, after LF-rSS, tactile discrimination was impaired in all four patients, while detection thresholds and pain were not affected. Our data suggest that HF-rSS could be used as a novel approach in CRPS treatment to improve sensory loss. Longer treatment periods might be required to induce consistent pain relief.

  8. Improvement of pain-related self-management for cancer patients through a modular transitional nursing intervention: a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Patrick; Kuss, Oliver; Schmidt, Heike; Bauer, Alexander; Kitzmantel, Maria; Jordan, Karin; Krasemann, Susann; Landenberger, Margarete

    2014-04-01

    Patients' self-management skills are affected by their knowledge, activities, and attitudes toward pain management. This trial aimed to test the Self Care Improvement through Oncology Nursing (SCION)-PAIN program, a multimodular structured intervention to reduce patients' barriers to self-management of cancer pain. Two hundred sixty-three patients with diagnosed malignancy, pain>3 days, and average pain > or = 3/10 participated in a cluster-randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients on the intervention wards received, in addition to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic pain management, and discharge management. The intervention was conducted by specially trained cancer nurses and included components of patient education, skills training, and counseling. Starting with admission, patients received booster sessions every third day and one follow-up telephone counseling session within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group received standard care. Primary end point was the group difference in patient-related barriers to self-management of cancer pain (Barriers Questionnaire-BQ II) 7 days after discharge. The SCION-PAIN program resulted in a significant reduction of patient-related barriers to pain management 1 week after discharge from the hospital: mean difference on BQ II was -0.49 points (95% confidence interval -0.87 points to -0.12 points; P=0.02). Furthermore, patients showed improved adherence to pain medication; odds ratio 8.58 (95% confidence interval 1.66-44.40; P=0.02). A post hoc analysis indicated reduced average and worst pain intensity as well as improved quality of life. This trial reveals the positive impact of a nursing intervention to improve patients' self-management of cancer pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Minimally Invasive Posterior Stabilization Improved Ambulation and Pain Scores in Patients with Plasmacytomas and/or Metastases of the Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Schwab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of spine metastasis is expected to increase as the population ages, and so is the number of palliative spinal procedures. Minimally invasive procedures are attractive options in that they offer the theoretical advantage of less morbidity. Purpose. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation provided significant pain relief and improved function. Study Design. We compared pre- and postoperative pain scores as well as ambulatory status in a population of patients suffering from oncologic conditions in the spine. Patient Sample. A consecutive series of patients with spine tumors treated minimally invasively with stabilization were reviewed. Outcome Measures. Visual analog pain scale as well as pre- and postoperative ambulatory status were used as outcome measures. Methods. Twenty-four patients who underwent minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation for metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. Results. Seven (29% patients were unable to ambulate secondary to pain and instability prior to surgery. All patients were ambulating within 2 to 3 days after having surgery (=0.01. The mean visual analog scale value for the preoperative patients was 2.8, and the mean postoperative value was 1.0 (=0.001. Conclusion. Minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation significantly improved pain and ambulatory status in this series.

  10. Microdiscectomy improves pain-associated depression, somatic anxiety, and mental well-being in patients with herniated lumbar disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebow, Richard; Parker, Scott L; Adogwa, Owoicho; Reig, Adam; Cheng, Joseph; Bydon, Ali; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-02-01

    Emotional distress and depression are common psychological disturbances associated with low-back and leg pain. The effects of lumbar discectomy on pain, disability, and physical quality of life are well described. The effects of discectomy on emotional distress and mental well-being are less well understood. To assess the effect of microdiscectomy on depression, somatization, and mental well-being in patients with herniated lumbar discs. Patients undergoing surgical discectomy for single-level, herniated lumbar disc were prospectively evaluated preoperatively, and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Back and leg pain, depression, somatic perception, and mental well-being were assessed. One hundred patients were enrolled. All were available for 1-year follow-up. Preoperatively, the visual analog scale for low-back pain (BP-VAS), visual analog scale for leg pain (LP-VAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZUNG), Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire (MSPQ), and Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 mental component summary scale (SF-36-MCS) were 6.3 ± 2.5, 6.3 ± 2.5, 19 ± 11, 9 ± 7, and 4 ± 14. BP-VAS and LP-VAS significantly improved by 6 weeks. Significant improvement in SF-36-MCS was observed by 6 weeks postoperatively, improvement in MSPQ score was observed 3 months postoperatively, and improvement in the ZUNG depression score was observed 12 months postoperatively. No statistical difference occurred during the remainder of follow-up for any outcome measured once improvement reached statistical significance. Eighteen patients were somatized preoperatively, 67% of which were nonsomatized 1 year postoperatively. Ten patients were clinically depressed preoperatively, 70% of which were nondepressed 1 year postoperatively. Improvement in SF-36-MCS, ZUNG, and MSPQ correlated (P herniated lumbar disc.

  11. Can therapy dogs improve pain and satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Carl M; Dong, Yan; Thornhill, Thomas S; Wright, John; Ready, John; Brick, Gregory W; Dyer, George

    2015-01-01

    risk ratio, 1.1-1.6]; risk difference, 18% [95% CI of risk difference, 5%-39%]). The overall hospital rating also was greater in the treatment group (0-10 scale) (9.6; SD, 0.7 [95% CI, 9.3-9.8] versus 8.6, SD, 0.9 [95% CI, 8.3-8.9], ptherapy dogs has a positive effect on patients' pain level and satisfaction with hospital stay after total joint replacement. Surgeons are encouraged to inquire about the status of volunteer-based animal-assisted therapy programs in their hospital as this may provide a means to improve the immediate postoperative recovery for a select group of patients having total joint arthroplasty. Level II, randomized controlled study. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  12. Can A Complex Online Intervention Improve Cancer Nurses' Pain Screening and Assessment Practices? Results from a Multicenter, Pre-post Test Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jane L; Heneka, Nicole; Hickman, Louise; Lam, Lawrence; Shaw, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Unrelieved cancer pain has an adverse impact on quality of life. While routine screening and assessment forms the basis of effective cancer pain management, it is often poorly done, thus contributing to the burden of unrelieved cancer pain. The aim of this study was to test the impact of an online, complex, evidence-based educational intervention on cancer nurses' pain assessment capabilities and adherence to cancer pain screening and assessment guidelines. Specialist inpatient cancer nurses in five Australian acute care settings participated in an intervention combining an online spaced learning cancer pain assessment module with audit and feedback of pain assessment practices. Participants' self-perceived pain assessment competencies were measured at three time points. Prospective, consecutive chart audits were undertaken to appraise nurses' adherence with pain screening and assessment guidelines. The differences in documented pre-post pain assessment practices were benchmarked and fed back to all sites post intervention. Data were analyzed using inferential statistics. Participants who completed the intervention (n = 44) increased their pain assessment knowledge, assessment tool knowledge, and confidence undertaking a pain assessment (p nurses' pain assessment capabilities translated into a significant increasing linear trend in the proportion of documented pain assessments in patients' charts at the three time points (χ 2 trend = 18.28, df = 1, p pain assessment audit and feedback data, improves inpatient cancer nurses' self-perceived pain screening and assessment capabilities and strengthens cancer pain guideline adherence. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved dexterity after chronic electrical stimulation of the motor cortex for central pain: a special relevance for thalamic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Christophe; Vassal, François; Mertens, Patrick; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Magnin, Michel; Peyron, Roland

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate that motor cortex stimulation (MCS) could improve motor function in patients with neuropathic pain. In this prospective clinical study of 38 patients referred for MCS as treatment for their neuropathic pain, we collected any declaration of improvement in motor performance that could be attributed to MCS. Ten patients (26%) declared a benefit in their motor function. Eight presented objective evidence of recovered dexterity for rapid alternating movements. A minor proportion had improvement in dystonic posture (n = 2), but none had detectable increased motor strength or tonus changes. Overall, 73% of the patients with limb ataxia declared a benefit after MCS. In 6 out of 10 patients (60%), the anatomic lesion responsible for pain was restricted to the lateral aspect of the thalamus. All of them had either clinical or electrophysiological evidence of lemniscal dysfunction (proprioceptive ataxia). No correlation was found between the scores of pain relief and the modification of motor status. The correlation between thalamic lesions and benefits in motor performance was significant (Fisher's exact test, two-tailed, p = 0.0017). Up to 26% of patients estimated that MCS improved their motor outcome through recovered dexterity and in cases of lateral thalamic lesions. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Testing a path-analytic mediation model of how motivational enhancement physiotherapy improves physical functioning in pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheing, Gladys; Vong, Sinfia; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Brooks, Jessica; Chan, Chetwyn

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a complex phenomenon not easily discerned from psychological, social, and environmental characteristics and is an oft cited barrier to return to work for people experiencing low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate a path-analytic mediation model to examine how motivational enhancement physiotherapy, which incorporates tenets of motivational interviewing, improves physical functioning of patients with chronic LBP. Seventy-six patients with chronic LBP were recruited from the outpatient physiotherapy department of a government hospital in Hong Kong. The re-specified path-analytic model fit the data very well, χ (2)(3, N = 76) = 3.86, p = .57; comparative fit index = 1.00; and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.00. Specifically, results indicated that (a) using motivational interviewing techniques in physiotherapy was associated with increased working alliance with patients, (b) working alliance increased patients' outcome expectancy and (c) greater outcome expectancy resulted in a reduction of subjective pain intensity and improvement in physical functioning. Change in pain intensity also directly influenced improvement in physical functioning. The effect of motivational enhancement therapy on physical functioning can be explained by social-cognitive factors such as motivation, outcome expectancy, and working alliance. The use of motivational interviewing techniques to increase outcome expectancy of patients and improve working alliance could further strengthen the impact of physiotherapy on rehabilitation outcomes of patients with chronic LBP.

  15. Improving the management of post-operative acute pain: Priorities for change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, W. (Winfried); F. Coluzzi (Flaminia); Fletcher, D. (Dominique); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); B. Morlion (Bart); Neugebauer, E. (Edmund); Pérez, A.M. (Antonio Montes); J. Pergolizzi (Joseph)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPoor management of post-operative acute pain can contribute to medical complications including pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, infection and delayed healing, as well as the development of chronic pain. It is therefore important that all patients undergoing surgery should receive

  16. VIPER: Chronic Pain after Amputation: Inflammatory Mechanisms, Novel Analgesic Pathways, and Improved Patient Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    animal behavioral testing and cell culture experiments and his lab provides deep expertise in all experimental procedures Name: Alexander Chamessian...immune cells (macrophages) to chronic pain while also evaluating novel analgesics in relevant animal models. The current proposal also attempts to...immune cells (macrophages) to chronic pain while also evaluating novel analgesics in relevant animal models. The current proposal also attempts to

  17. Pregabalin and dexamethasone improves post-operative pain treatment after tonsillectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, O; Jørgensen, D G; Hilsted, K L

    2011-01-01

    Post-tonsillectomy pain can be severe. We investigated the analgesic effect from combinations of paracetamol, pregabalin and dexamethasone in adults undergoing tonsillectomy.......Post-tonsillectomy pain can be severe. We investigated the analgesic effect from combinations of paracetamol, pregabalin and dexamethasone in adults undergoing tonsillectomy....

  18. Improvement of pain related self management for oncologic patients through a trans institutional modular nursing intervention: protocol of a cluster randomized multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoke-Colberg Anette

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most frequent and distressing symptoms in cancer patients. For the majority of the patients, sufficient pain relief can be obtained if adequate treatment is provided. However, pain remains often undertreated due to institutional, health care professional and patient related barriers. Patients self management skills are affected by the patients' knowledge, activities and attitude to pain management. This trial protocol is aimed to test the SCION-PAIN program, a multi modular structured intervention to improve self management in cancer patients with pain. Methods 240 patients with diagnosed malignancy and pain > 3 days and average pain ≥ 3/10 will participate in a cluster randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients from the intervention wards will receive, additionally to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic pain management, nonpharmacologic pain management and discharge management. The intervention will be conducted by specially trained oncology nurses and includes components of patient education, skills training and counseling to improve self care regarding pain management beginning with admission followed by booster session every 3rd day and one follow up telephone counseling within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group will receive standard care. Primary endpoint is the group difference in patient related barriers to management of cancer pain (BQII, 7 days after discharge. Secondary endpoints are: pain intensity & interference, adherence, coping and HRQoL. Discussion The study will determine if the acquired self management skills of the patients continue to be used after discharge from hospital. It is hypothesized that patients who receive the multi modular structured intervention will have less patient related barriers and a better self management of cancer pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT

  19. Does an Exercise Intervention Improving Aerobic Capacity Among Construction Workers Also Improve Musculoskeletal Pain, Work Ability, Productivity, Perceived Physical Exertion, and Sick Leave?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Bültmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether an exercise intervention shown to increase aerobic capacity, would also lead to less musculoskeletal pain; improved work ability, productivity, and perceived physical exertion; and less sick leave. METHODS:: Sixty-seven construction workers were randomized...... into an exercise group training 3 × 20 minutes per week and a control group. Questionnaires and text messages were completed before and after the 12-week intervention. RESULTS:: No significant changes were found in musculoskeletal pain, work ability, productivity, perceived physical exertion, and sick leave...... multifaceted intervention, larger sample size, or longer follow-up. Text messages may be a convenient data-collection method in future studies....

  20. Comprehensive assessment of chronic pain management in primary care: a first phase of a quality improvement initiative at a multisite Community Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daren; Wang, Sissi; Zlateva, Ianita

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive formative assessment of chronic pain management in a large, multisite community health centre and use the results to design a quality improvement initiative based on an evidence-based practice model developed by the Veterans Health Administration. Improving quality and safety by incorporating evidence-based practices (EBP) is challenging, particularly in busy clinical practices such as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). FQHCs grapple with financial constraints, lack of resources and complex patient populations. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) Framework served as a basis for the comprehensive assessment. We used a range of measures and tools to examine pain care from a variety of perspectives. Patients with chronic pain were identified using self-reported pain scores and opioid prescription records. We employed multiple data collection strategies, including querying our electronic health records system, manual chart reviews and staff surveys. We found that patients with chronic pain had extremely high primary care utilisation rates while referral rates to pain-related specialties were low for these patients. Large gaps existed in primary care provider adherence to standards for pain care documentation and practice. There was wide provider variability in the prescription of opioids to treat pain. Staff surveys found substantial variation in both pain care knowledge and readiness to change, as well as low confidence in providers' ability to manage pain, and dissatisfaction with the resources available to support chronic pain care. Improving chronic pain management at this Community Health Center requires a multifaceted intervention aimed at addressing many of the problems identified during the assessment phase. During the intervention we will put a greater emphasis on increasing options for behavioural health and complementary medicine support, increasing

  1. Proximal fibular osteotomy: a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohu; Wei, Lei; Lv, Zhi; Zhao, Bin; Duan, Zhiqing; Wu, Wenjin; Zhang, Bin; Wei, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    Objective To explore the effects of proximal fibular osteotomy as a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of medial joint space and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods From January 2015 to May 2015, 47 patients who underwent proximal fibular osteotomy for medial compartment osteoarthritis were retrospectively followed up. Preoperative and postoperative weight-bearing and whole lower extremity radiographs were obtained to analyse the alignment of the lower extremity and ratio of the knee joint space (medial/lateral compartment). Knee pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale, and knee ambulation activities were evaluated using the American Knee Society score preoperatively and postoperatively. Results Medial pain relief was observed in almost all patients after proximal fibular osteotomy. Most patients exhibited improved walking postoperatively. Weight-bearing lower extremity radiographs showed an average increase in the postoperative medial knee joint space. Additionally, obvious correction of alignment was observed in the whole lower extremity radiographs in 8 of 47 patients. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that proximal fibular osteotomy effectively relieves pain and improves joint function in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis at a mean of 13.38 months postoperatively.

  2. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist attenuates the memory deficits associated with neuropathic pain and improves the efficacy of gabapentinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Goura, Venkatesh; Babu, Vuyyuru Arun; Yathavakilla, Sumanth; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh

    2015-10-01

    Memory deficit is a co-morbid disorder in patients suffering from neuropathic pain. Gabapentin and pregabalin (gabapentinoids) are among the widely prescribed medications for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Memory loss and sedation are the commonly reported side effects with gabapentinoids. Improving the cognitive functions and attenuating drug-induced side effects may play a crucial role in the management of pain. We evaluated the effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists on the memory deficits associated with neuropathy. We also studied the effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists on the side effects, and the analgesic effects of gabapentinoids. 5-HT6 receptor antagonists attenuated the cognitive deficits in neuropathic rats. Neuropathic rats co-treated with 5-HT6 receptor antagonist and gabapentinoids showed improvement in memory. 5-HT6 receptor antagonists enhanced the analgesic effects of gabapentinoids but had no effect on the motor side effects. The observed effects may not be due to pharmacokinetic interactions. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist attenuate the cognitive deficits associated with neuropathy, and this effect is also seen when co-treated with gabapentinoids. Since, 5-HT6 antagonists improved the effectiveness of gabapentinoids, reduction in the dosage and frequency of gabapentinoids treatment may reduce the side effects. Combining 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with gabapentinoids may offer a novel treatment strategy for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Virtual reality-augmented neurorehabilitation improves motor function and reduces neuropathic pain in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Michael; Bohli, Dominik; Kiper, Daniel; Pyk, Pawel; Spillmann, Jeremy; Meilick, Bruno; Curt, Armin; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Eng, Kynan

    2013-10-01

    Neurorehabilitation interventions to improve lower limb function and neuropathic pain have had limited success in people with chronic, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). We hypothesized that intense virtual reality (VR)-augmented training of observed and executed leg movements would improve limb function and neuropathic pain. Patients used a VR system with a first-person view of virtual lower limbs, controlled via movement sensors fitted to the patient's own shoes. Four tasks were used to deliver intensive training of individual muscles (tibialis anterior, quadriceps, leg ad-/abductors). The tasks engaged motivation through feedback of task success. Fourteen chronic iSCI patients were treated over 4 weeks in 16 to 20 sessions of 45 minutes. Outcome measures were 10 Meter Walking Test, Berg Balance Scale, Lower Extremity Motor Score, Spinal Cord Independence Measure, Locomotion and Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS), obtained at the start and at 4 to 6 weeks before intervention. In addition to positive changes reported by the patients (Patients' Global Impression of Change), measures of walking capacity, balance, and strength revealed improvements in lower limb function. Intensity and unpleasantness of neuropathic pain in half of the affected participants were reduced on the NPS test. Overall findings remained stable 12 to 16 weeks after termination of the training. In a pretest/posttest, uncontrolled design, VR-augmented training was associated with improvements in motor function and neuropathic pain in persons with chronic iSCI, several of which reached the level of a minimal clinically important change. A controlled trial is needed to compare this intervention to active training alone or in combination.

  4. Randomized clinical trial assessing whether additional massage treatments for chronic neck pain improve 12- and 26-week outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrea J; Wellman, Robert D; Cherkin, Daniel C; Kahn, Janet R; Sherman, Karen J

    2015-10-01

    This is the first study to systematically evaluate the value of a longer treatment period for massage. We provide a framework of how to conceptualize an optimal dose in this challenging setting of nonpharmacologic treatments. The aim was to determine the optimal dose of massage for neck pain. Two-phase randomized trial for persons with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Primary randomization to one of five groups receiving 4 weeks of massage (30 minutes 2x/or 3x/wk or 60 minutes 1x, 2x, or 3x/wk). Booster randomization of participants to receive an additional six massages, 60 minutes 1x/wk, or no additional massage. A total of 179 participants from Group Health and the general population of Seattle, WA, USA recruited between June 2010 and August 2011 were included. Primary outcomes self-reported neck-related dysfunction (Neck Disability Index) and pain (0-10 scale) were assessed at baseline, 12, and 26 weeks. Clinically meaningful improvement was defined as greater than or equal to 5-point decrease in dysfunction and greater than or equal to 30% decrease in pain from baseline. Clinically meaningful improvement for each primary outcome with both follow-up times was analyzed using adjusted modified Poisson generalized estimating equations (GEEs). Secondary analyses for the continuous outcomes used linear GEEs. There were no observed differences by primary treatment group at 12 or 26 weeks. Those receiving booster dose had improvements in both dysfunction and pain at 12 weeks (dysfunction: relative risk [RR]=1.56 [1.08-2.25], p=.018; pain: RR=1.25 [0.98-1.61], p=.077), but those were nonsignificant at 26 weeks (dysfunction: RR=1.22 [0.85-1.74]; pain: RR=1.09 [0.82-1.43]). Subgroup analysis by primary and booster treatments found the booster dose only effective among those initially randomized to one of the 60-minute massage groups. "Booster" doses for those initially receiving 60 minutes of massage should be incorporated into future trials of massage for chronic neck pain

  5. Periarticular dextrose prolotherapy instead of intra-articular injection for pain and functional improvement in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezasoltani Z

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zahra Rezasoltani,1 Mehrdad Taheri,2 Morteza Kazempour Mofrad,3 Seyed Amir Mohajerani2 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, AJA University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease that can lead to painful and dysfunctional joints. Prolotherapy involves using injections to produce functional restoration of the soft tissues of the joint. Intra-articular injections are controversial because of the introduction of needles into the articular capsule.Objectives: To compare the effect of periarticular versus intra-articular prolotherapy on pain and disability in patients with knee OA.Study design: Randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial.Setting: Single center, university hospital (Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran.Methods: A total of 104 patients with chronic knee OA were enrolled. In the intra-articular group, 8 mL of 10% dextrose and 2 mL of 2% lidocaine were injected. Injections were repeated at 1 and 2 weeks after the first injection. In the periarticular group, 5 mL of 20% dextrose and 5 mL of 1% lidocaine were injected subcutaneously at 4 points in the periarticular area. Pain and disability, as assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, were recorded at each follow-up visit at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 months post-injection.Results: The visual analog scale score was significantly lower in the periarticular compared with the intra-articular group at the 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-month visits but not at 1 month. Morning stiffness and difficulty in rising from sitting were improved in both groups and were not significantly different in the peri- and intra-articular groups. Pain, joint locking, and limitation scores were all improved in both

  6. Comparison Thoracic Epidural and Intercostal Block to Improve Ventilation Parameters and Reduce Pain in Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Aligholipour Maleki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest wall blunt trauma causes multiple rib fractures and will often be associated with significant pain and may compromise ventilator mechanics. Analgesia has great roll in rib fracture therapies, opioid are useful, but when used as sole agent may re-quire such high dose that they produce respiratory depression, especially in el-derly .the best analgesia for a severe chest wall injury is a continuous epidural infusion of local anesthetic. This provides complete analgesia allowing inspiration and coughing without of the risk of respiratory depression. Methods: sixty adult patients who with multiple rib fractures were enrolled in this study. They were divided into Group A or thoracic epidural with bupivacaine 0.125 % +1mg/5ml morphine and group B or inter-costal block with %0.25 bupivacaine. The patients were assessed through ICU and hos-pital stay length, ventilation function tests. Pain score among the patients was meas-ured with verbal rating scale, before and after administration of the analgesia. Results: We found a significant improvement in ventilatory function tests during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd days after epidural analgesia compared with the intercostal block (P < 0.004. Changes in the visual Analogue Scale were associated with marked improvement re-garding pain at rest and pain caused by coughing and deep breathing in group A com-pared group B... ICU and hospital stay markedly reduced in Group A. Conclusion: tho-racic epidural analgesia is superior to intercostals block regarding pain relief of rib frac-tures. Patients who received epidural analgesia had significantly lower pain scores at all studied times.

  7. Improving total knee arthroplasty perioperative pain management using a periarticular injection with bupivacaine liposomal suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Snyder, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA report low satisfaction with postoperative pain control. The purpose of this study is to examine if there is a difference in post-operative pain for TKA patients without femoral nerve block receiving an intra-operative pericapsular injection of bupivacaine liposome suspension (EXPAREL; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, California versus a concentrated multi drug cocktail. Seventy TKA patients were randomly assigned to either the bupivacaine liposome or the multi-drug cocktail. Post-operative pain scores, morphine sulfate equivalence consumption values, adverse events, and overall pain control satisfaction scores were collected. Patients reported significantly higher pain level for the cocktail group on post-op day 1 (p < .05 and post-op day 2 (p < .01 versus the bupivacaine liposome group. This same trend was found for morphine sulfate equivalence consumption in the PACU (p < .01 and post-op day 2 (p < .01. Higher satisfaction in pain control (p < .001 and overall experience (p < .01 was also found in the bupivacaine liposome group. Finally, significantly more adverse events were found in the multi-drug group versus the bupivacaine liposome group (p < .05. The study findings demonstrated a non-inferior difference, albeit not a clinically significant difference, in patient-perceived pain scores, morphine sulfate equivalence consumption, adverse events, and overall satisfaction.

  8. Evaluation of the performance improvement CME paradigm for pain management in the long-term care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Perry G; Bradshaw, David H; Cohen, Mitchell J; Connor, Stephen R; Donaldson, Gary; Gharibo, Christopher; Gidal, Barry E; Muir, James Cameron; Tselentis, Helen N

    2014-03-01

    A performance improvement continuing medical education (PI CME) activity was designed to assist clinicians with accurately identifying and appropriately managing persistent pain in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents. Volunteer LTCFs participated in a three-stage PI CME model consisting of: 1) baseline assessment, 2) implementation of practice improvement interventions, and 3) reassessment. Expert faculty chose performance measures and interventions for the activity. A champion was designated ateach LTCF to collect resident charts and enter data into an online database. Eight LTCFs located across the United States participated in the activity. Fifty resident charts were randomly selected by each LTCF champion (25 for stage 1 and 25 for stage 3); a total of 350 charts were reviewed. In addition to a toolkit containing numerous performance improvement resources, an in-service meeting led by an expert faculty member was conducted at each LTCF. Stage 3 data were collected 6 weeks after implementation of interventions and compared with stage 1 baseline data to measure change in performance. Aggregate data collected from seven LTCFs completing the PI CME activity through stage 3 revealed improvements from baseline in four of five performance measures. This CME activity allowed for collection of data demonstrating performance improvement in persistent pain management. The tools used as part of the intervention (available at http://www.achlpicme.org/LTC/toolkit) may help other clinicians enhance their management of LTCF residents with persistent pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Improving the Assessment of Pediatric Chronic Pain: Harnessing the Potential of Electronic Diaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Stinson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for evaluating chronic pain in children suffer from methodological problems. Real-time data capture approaches using electronic diaries have been proposed as a new standard for pain measurement. However, there is limited information available regarding the development, feasibility and validity of these approaches in children. The present paper reviews problems with current measures; rationale for developing real-time data capture approaches using electronic diaries; mechanics of developing electronic pain diaries; current evidence regarding their usability, feasibility and validity; and discusses future directions for research in this area.

  10. Role of WhatsApp-based discussions in improving residents' knowledge of post-operative pain management: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Sumitra G; Bhawalkar, Pranay

    2017-10-01

    To provide a platform for the dissemination of basic knowledge of pain management, a WhatsApp group was created by residents and consultants. Common clinical scenarios, resident queries, and important instructions to be followed by residents with respect to running the Acute Pain Service were discussed in the group. This study evaluates the benefits of this interaction. This study was approved by the hospital ethics board and was registered with the Clinical Trial Registry of India. Second- and third-year anesthesia residents were included in a WhatsApp group, along with consultants (board certified anesthesiologists with a special interest in pain). Pain knowledge assessment was performed pre- and post-discussion using a standard 22-point questionnaire. A feedback form, which included self-rated confidence scores (1-10, 10-most confident) and opinions about the 3-month WhatsApp discussion, was collected. Improvements in the documentation in clinical sheets post-discussion were also analyzed. A total of 38 residents were included in the WhatsApp group. An improvement in the percentage of correct answers from 69.1% (pre-discussion) to 73.6% (post-discussion) was observed (P = 0.031). Improvements in the self-rated residents' confidence levels were also noted (P WhatsApp-based discussion was useful. Documentation of the details of epidural blockade in clinical sheets improved from 30% to 100%. The WhatsApp discussion improved residents' knowledge and confidence levels, and also resulted in improved documentation of essential details in the clinical notes. This form of education is promising and should be explored in future studies.

  11. Intraoperative Techniques for the Plastic Surgeon to Improve Pain Control in Breast Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias-Eisner, Gina; Kao, Kenneth; Pan, Judy; Festekjian, Jaco; Gassman, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing emphasis placed on reducing length of hospital stay and health costs associated with breast surgery. Adequate pain control is an essential component of enhanced recovery after surgery. Postoperative pain management strategies include use of narcotic analgesia, non-narcotic analgesia, and local anesthetics. However, these forms of pain control have relatively brief durations of action and multiple-associated side effects. Intraoperative regional blocks have been effectively utilized in other areas of surgery but have been understudied in breast surgery. The aim of this article was to review various intraoperative techniques for regional anesthesia and local pain control in breast surgery and to highlight areas of future technique development.

  12. Intraoperative Techniques for the Plastic Surgeon to Improve Pain Control in Breast Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Farias-Eisner, MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. In recent years, there has been a growing emphasis placed on reducing length of hospital stay and health costs associated with breast surgery. Adequate pain control is an essential component of enhanced recovery after surgery. Postoperative pain management strategies include use of narcotic analgesia, non-narcotic analgesia, and local anesthetics. However, these forms of pain control have relatively brief durations of action and multiple-associated side effects. Intraoperative regional blocks have been effectively utilized in other areas of surgery but have been understudied in breast surgery. The aim of this article was to review various intraoperative techniques for regional anesthesia and local pain control in breast surgery and to highlight areas of future technique development.

  13. Minimizing pain during childhood vaccination injections: improving adherence to vaccination schedules

    OpenAIRE

    Eden LM; Macintosh JLB; Luthy KE; Beckstr; RL

    2014-01-01

    Lacey M Eden, Janelle LB Macintosh, Karlen E Luthy, Renea L Beckstrand College of Nursing, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA Abstract: Pain experienced in childhood can lead to long-term and psychologically detrimental effects. Unfortunately, the most common pain experienced in childhood is caused by vaccinations and may lead to non-adherence to the recommended vaccination schedule. As a result, it is the health care provider's responsibility to take measures to reduce vaccination...

  14. Minimizing pain during childhood vaccination injections: improving adherence to vaccination schedules

    OpenAIRE

    Luthy,; Eden,Lacey; Macintosh,Janelle; Beckstrand,Renea

    2014-01-01

    Lacey M Eden, Janelle LB Macintosh, Karlen E Luthy, Renea L Beckstrand College of Nursing, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA Abstract: Pain experienced in childhood can lead to long-term and psychologically detrimental effects. Unfortunately, the most common pain experienced in childhood is caused by vaccinations and may lead to non-adherence to the recommended vaccination schedule. As a result, it is the health care provider's responsibility to take measures to reduce vaccina...

  15. INTEGRATION BETWEEN MRI AND PHYSICAL THERAPY TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Awad Mohamed Elkhadir; Saddig D. Jastaniah; Amer Al Saif; Khalid Khashoggi; Mohamed Faisal Chevidikunnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal disorder treated by physical therapists. The cause for the shoulder pain is multifactorial. However, a specific diagnosis is crucial in the right management of shoulder dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of integrating the MRI for the accurate diagnosis and impact of this on rendering the effective physical therapy interventions in shoulder dysfunction patients. Methods: A retrospect...

  16. Morning Versus Evening Bright Light Treatment at Home to Improve Function and Pain Sensitivity for Women with Fibromyalgia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Ong, Jason C; Shakoor, Najia; Williams, David A; Burns, John

    2017-01-01

    To test the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of a home-based morning versus evening bright light treatment on function and pain sensitivity in women with fibromyalgia. A single blind randomized study with two treatment arms: 6 days of a 1 hour morning light treatment or 6 days of a 1 hour evening light treatment. Function, pain sensitivity, and circadian timing were assessed before and after treatment. Participants slept at home, except for two nights in Sleep Center. Ten women meeting the American College of Rheumatology's diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia, including normal blood test results. Self-reported function was assessed with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Pain sensitivity was assessed using a heat stimulus that gave measures of threshold and tolerance. Circadian timing was assessed with the dim light melatonin onset. Both morning and evening light treatments led to improvements in function and pain sensitivity. However, only the morning light treatment led to a clinically meaningful improvement in function (>14% reduction from baseline FIQ) and morning light significantly increased pain threshold more than evening light ( P  pain tolerance (r = 0.67, P  fibromyalgia. Those who undergo morning light treatment may show improvements in function and pain sensitivity. Advances in circadian timing may be one mechanism by which morning light improves pain sensitivity. Findings can inform the design of a randomized controlled trial. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Evaluation of a novel biodegradable thermosensitive keto-hydrogel for improving postoperative pain in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Huang Wu

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the sustained analgesic effect of ketorolac-eluting thermosensitive biodegradable hydrogel in the plantar incisional pain model of the rat hind-paw. A ketorolac-embedded 2, 2'-Bis (2-oxazolin (BOX linking methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol and poly(lactide-co-glycolide (mPEG-PLGA diblock copolymer (BOX copolymer was synthesized as keto-hydrogel based on optimal sol-gel phase transition and in vitro drug release profile. The effect of keto-hydrogel on postoperative pain (POP was assessed using the established plantar incisional pain model in hind-paw of rats and compared to that of ketorolac solution. Pain and sensory threshold, as well as pain scoring, were evaluated with behavioral tests by means of anesthesiometer and incapacitance apparatus, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, VEGF, and IL-1β around incisional wounds were measured by ELISA. Tissue histology was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. Ten mg/mL (25 wt% keto-hydrogel showed a sol-gel transition at 26.4°C with a 10-day sustained drug release profile in vitro. Compared to ketorolac solution group, the concentration of ketorolac in tissue fluid was higher in the keto-hydrogel group during the first 18 h of application. Keto-hydrogel elevated pain and sensory threshold, increased weight-bearing capacity, and significantly reduced the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β while enhanced VEGF in tissue fluid. Histologic analysis reveals greater epithelialization and collagen deposition around wound treated with keto-hydrogel. In conclusion, our study suggests that keto-hydrogel is an ideal compound to treat POP with a secondary gain of improved incisional wound healing.

  18. N-acetyl glucosamine and proteoglycan containing supplement improves the locomotor functions of subjects with knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraoka, Yuna; Harada, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Mikiyuki; Yamamura, Haruo; Shirasawa, Takuji

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of N-acetyl glucosamine and proteoglycan-containing supplement (NGPS) on knee pain and locomotor functions in middle-aged and elderly persons with knee pain. An open trial was conducted on 19 subjects suffering from knee pain. The subjects, aged (55.6 ± 6.9) years, were given the NGPS tablets, which they must take 3 times per day, that contain 526.5 mg of N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) and 33.6 mg of proteoglycan for 12 weeks. Subjective pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), while the function of the knee with regard to daily operation was evaluated using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Score (JKOM). Walking, stair-climbing and swelling were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association Score (JOA). These items were evaluated at a baseline, and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of NGPS treatment. The VAS scores at 8 (p = 0.004) and 12 (p < 0.001) weeks were significantly lower than that at the baseline. The JKOM total score was significantly lower at 8 and 12 weeks (p = 0.001) than that at the baseline. The JOA score in the more painful side of the leg was significantly higher at 12 weeks (p = 0.002) than that at the baseline. The present study reveals that intake of NGPS is effective for relieving knee pain and improving knee function when walking or climbing stairs, swelling and bending or stretching.

  19. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  20. Paravertebral Block: An Improved Method of Pain Control in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, William C.; McCowan, Timothy C.; DeValdenebro, Miguel; Wright, Lonnie B.; Workman, James L.; Culp, William C.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage remains a painful procedure in many cases despite the routine use of large amounts of intravenous sedation. We present a feasibility study of thoracic paravertebral blocks in an effort to reduce pain during and following the procedure and reduce requirements for intravenous sedation. Methods. Ten consecutive patients undergoing biliary drainage procedures received fluoroscopically guided paravertebral blocks and then had supplemental intravenous sedation as required to maintain patient comfort. Levels T8-T9 and T9-T10 on the right were targeted with 10-20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sedation requirements and pain levels were recorded. Results. Ten biliary drainage procedures in 8 patients were performed for malignancy in 8 cases and for stones in 2. The mean midazolam use was 1.13 mg IV, and the mean fentanyl requirement was 60.0 μg IV in the block patients. Two episodes of hypotension, which responded promptly to volume replacement, may have been related to the block. No serious complications were encountered. The mean pain score when traversing the chest wall, liver capsule, and upon entering the bile ducts was 0.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 1 patient reporting a pain level of 1 and 9 reporting 0. The mean peak pain score, encountered when manipulating at the common bile duct level or when addressing stones there, was 5.4 and ranged from 0 to 10. Conclusions. Thoracic paravertebral block with intravenous sedation supplementation appears to be a feasible method of pain control during biliary interventions

  1. Finding Ways to Lift Barriers to Care for Chronic Pain Patients: Outcomes of Using Internet-Based Self-Management Activities to Reduce Pain and Improve Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Rod

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic pain is prevalent, disabling, costly, and undertreated. There is clearly a need to improve patient understanding of ways to manage their pain. Internet-based programs are continually being developed to facilitate mental health improvement, providing tailored content for patients to manage their pain, anxiety, and depression. Objective. To evaluate the impact of Internet-based patient self-management education and activities on patients’ pain, anxiety, and quality of life in patients who could not access multidisciplinary pain management. Design. Observational study. Subjects. Two hundred (200 patients (61% females, 39% males, between 18 and 75 years old from one community pain clinic in Toronto, Canada (Toronto Poly Clinic, participated. Patients had moderate to severe pain, depression, and anxiety. These patients committed to study from a group of 515 patients with chronic noncancer pain of different origins who were stable on their levels of pain, anxiety, and depression for 12 consecutive months before start of study and could not afford noninsured treatment modalities like physiotherapy, psychology, nutrition, or exercise therapy consultation. Methods. Patients were encouraged to visit two Internet sites (a blog and Twitter postings for educational postings written by the author about exercise, nutrition, mindfulness meditation, disease management methods, evidence-based supplements, daily relaxation exercises, and overall self-management methods 15 minutes per day for six months. Patients were also encouraged to share their ideas and comments on a blog. Activity logs were kept by patients and reviewed by physician at follow-up visits. Compliance was encouraged via weekly email reminders and phone calls during the observation period. Results. Modest improvements were noted in pain, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Of the patients with moderate or severe pain before treatment, 45% reported mild levels of pain

  2. [Isokinetic trunk strength testing in chronic low back pain. The role of habituation and training to improve measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzica, I; Tiffreau, V; Popielarz, S; Duquesnoy, B; Thevenon, A

    2007-06-01

    Isokinetic dynamometers put subjects in very different conditions from natural movement. Familiarization with the isokinetic device may therefore explain better performance without showing any improvement in strength. To determine the part of habituation and training in improved trunk isokinetic performance on isometric assessment after a back rehabilitation program for chronic low back pain. A total of 26 patients with chronic low back pain consecutively admitted to the same rehabilitation department for a 4-week rehabilitation program underwent isometric assessment of the trunk flexors and extensors on the day of admission and 2 days and 21 days after admission. The maximal torque and total work were registered at 30 degrees , 90 degrees and 120 degrees/s. Values for all parameters, except flexor values at 30 degrees/s, were significantly improved between day 0 and day 2 after admission. Between day 2 and day 21 after admission, values for all parameters were improved significantly. Except for flexor values at 30 degrees/s, the parameter values at day 2 showed improvement ranging from 33% to 58% of the improvement seen at day 21. The improvement in parameter values found on isokinetic assessment two days after a one-day rehabilitation program for low back pain is probably explained by a habituation effect. We can expect that increase in the maximal torque and total work after 3 weeks of rehabilitation is, at least in part, the consequence of the strengthening program. We should interpret with caution the results of studies involving an isokinetic dynamometer to measure the strength of trunk muscles without a learning training.

  3. Can training in empathetic validation improve medical students' communication with patients suffering pain? A test of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Steven J; Flink, Ida K; Nilsson, Emma; Edlund, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Patient-centered, empathetic communication has been recommended as a means for improving the health care of patients suffering pain. However, a problem has been training health care providers since programs may be time-consuming and difficult to learn. Validation, a form of empathetic response that communicates that what a patient experiences is accepted as true, has been suggested as an appropriate method for improving communication with patients suffering pain. We study the immediate effects of providing medical students with a 2-session (45-minute duration each) program in validation skills on communication. A one group, pretest vs posttest design was employed with 22 volunteer medical students. To control patient variables, actors simulated 1 of 2 patient scenarios (randomly provided at pretest and posttest). Video recordings were blindly evaluated. Self-ratings of validation and satisfaction were also employed. Observed validation responses increased significantly after training and corresponded to significant reductions in invalidating responses. Both the patient simulators and the medical students were significantly more satisfied after the training. We demonstrated that training empathetic validation results in improved communication thus extending previous findings to a medical setting with patients suffering pain. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to provide validation training for health care providers and this warrants further investigation in controlled studies.

  4. Pilot study: whole body manual subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) therapy improved pain and SAT structure in women with lipedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Karen L; Ussery, Christopher; Eekema, Alyna

    2017-09-20

    Background Lipedema is a common painful subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) disorder in women affecting the limbs. SAT therapy is a manual therapy to improve soft tissue quality. Objective Determine if SAT therapy improves pain and structure of lipedema SAT. Design Single arm prospective pilot study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients Seven women, 46 ± 5 years, weight 90 ± 19 kg, with lipedema. Intervention Twelve 90-min SAT therapy sessions over 4 weeks. Outcomes Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, SAT ultrasound (Vevo 2100), leg volumetrics, skin caliper assessment, tissue exam, weight, resting metabolic rate, pain assessment, lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and body shape questionnaire (BSQ) at baseline and end of study. Results Weight, resting metabolic rate and BSQ did not change significantly. Limb fat over total body fat mass (p = 0.08) and trunk fat over total body mass trended down from baseline (p = 0.08) by DXA. Leg volume and caliper assessments in eight of nine areas (p lipedema. Limitations Small number of subjects. Conclusion SAT therapy in 4 weeks improved tissue structure, perceived leg function, and volume although shape was not affected. While side effects of SAT therapy were common, all women felt the therapy was beneficial.

  5. Intelligent Physical Exercise Training in a Workplace Setting Improves Muscle Strength and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Dalager

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess effects of 1-year Intelligent Physical Exercise Training (IPET on musculoskeletal health. Methods. Office workers were randomized 1 : 1 to a training group, TG (N=193, or a control group, CG (N=194. TG received 1 h supervised high intensity IPET every week within working hours for 1 year and was recommended to perform 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity for 6 days a week during leisure. The IPET program was based on baseline health measures. Results. No baseline differences were present. An intention-to-treat analysis showed significant between-group effect for muscle strength but not for musculoskeletal pain. However, a per-protocol analysis of those with an adherence of ≥70% demonstrated a significant between-group effect for neck pain during the past three months. Several significant within-group changes were present, where TG and TG ≥ 70% demonstrated clinically relevant pain reductions whereas minimal reductions were seen for CG. Conclusion. IPET and recommendations of moderate intensity physical activity demonstrated significant between-group effect on muscle strength. Interestingly, significant within-group reductions in musculoskeletal pain were seen not only in TG but also in CG. This may underlie the lack of such between-group effect and shows that a possible positive side effect of merely drawing attention can improve musculoskeletal health.

  6. Patient perspectives of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and methods for improving pain control and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patak, Lance S; Tait, Alan R; Mirafzali, Leela; Morris, Michelle; Dasgupta, Sunavo; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) attributes that negatively impact patient satisfaction and ability to control pain while using PCA and (2) obtain data on patient perceptions of new PCA design features. We conducted a prospective survey study of postoperative pain control among patients using a PCA device. The survey was designed to evaluate patient satisfaction with pain control, understanding of PCA, difficulties using PCA, lockout-period management, and evaluation of new PCA design features. A total of 350 eligible patients completed the survey (91%). Patients who had difficulties using PCA were less satisfied (P PCA. Forty-nine percent of patients reported not knowing if they would receive medicine when they pushed the PCA button, and of these, 22% believed that this uncertainty made their pain worse. The majority of patients preferred the proposed PCA design features for easier use, including a light on the button, making it easier to find (57%), and a PCA button that vibrates (55%) or lights up (70%), alerting the patient that the PCA pump is able to deliver more medicine. A majority of patients, irrespective of their satisfaction with PCA, preferred a new PCA design. Certain attributes of current PCA technology may negatively impact patient experience, and modifications could potentially address these concerns and improve patient outcomes.

  7. Strength training improves fatigue resistance and self-rated health in workers with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    care ergonomic training (control). At baseline and follow-up, participants performed a handgrip muscular fatigue test (time above 50% of maximal voluntary contraction force) with simultaneous recording of electromyography. Additionally, participants replied to a questionnaire regarding self......Chronic musculoskeletal pain is widespread in the working population and leads to muscular fatigue, reduced work capacity, and fear of movement. While ergonomic intervention is the traditional approach to the problem, physical exercise may be an alternative strategy. This secondary analysis...... of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual...

  8. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    with the use of abdominal binders. Reduction of pulmonary function during use of abdominal binders has not been revealed. CONCLUSION: Abdominal binders reduce post-operative psychological distress, but their effect on post-operative pain after laparotomy and seroma formation after ventral hernia repair remains......INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...

  9. Postoperative pain management in children has been improved, but can be further optimized

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kart, T; van der Laan, K; Crombach, J

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the analgesic treatment currently used in children, and to identify if problems can be related to any particular routine or group of children. Analgesics administered pre-, per- and postoperatively were recorded, and intensity of pain during rest...... and movement and incidence and severity of side effects were measured four times postoperatively. Fifty-nine children aged 3 to 15 years undergoing miscellaneous operations participated. All children received analgesic treatment. During the study period 26 children reported at least one episode of unacceptable...... pain, while unacceptable pruritus, nausea or vomiting were observed in 18 children. It was not possible to relate the incidence of pain and side effects to any particular analgesic treatment or type of surgery, but groups of children that might need additional attention were identified. Even though...

  10. Does a combination of physical training, specific exercises and pain education improve health-related quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris, I; Søgaard, Karen; Gram, B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of combining pain education, specific exercises and graded physical activity training (exercise) compared with pain education alone (control) on physical health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in chronic neck pain patients. METHODS: A multicentre randomised...

  11. Patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI): interpreting meaningful change in pain from the patient's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Klooster, Peter M.; Drossaers-Bakker, K.W.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of clinically meaningful changes in patient-reported pain has become increasingly important when interpreting results of clinical studies. However, proposed response criteria, such as the minimal clinically important difference, do not correspond with the growing need for information

  12. Implementation of a chest pain management service improves patient care and reduces length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adam C; O'Dwyer, Kristina M; Cullen, Louise; Brown, Anthony; Denaro, Charles; Parsonage, William

    2014-03-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common complaints in patients presenting to an emergency department. Delays in management due to a lack of readily available objective tests to risk stratify patients with possible acute coronary syndromes can lead to an unnecessarily lengthy admission placing pressure on hospital beds or inappropriate discharge. The need for a co-ordinated system of clinical management based on enhanced communication between departments, timely and appropriate triage, clinical investigation, diagnosis, and treatment was identified. An evidence-based Chest Pain Management Service and clinical pathway were developed and implemented, including the introduction of after-hours exercise stress testing. Between November 2005 and March 2013, 5662 patients were managed according to a Chest Pain Management pathway resulting in a reduction of 5181 admission nights by more timely identification of patients at low risk who could then be discharged. In addition, 1360 days were avoided in high-risk patients who received earlier diagnosis and treatment. The creation of a Chest Pain Management pathway and the extended exercise stress testing service resulted in earlier discharge for low-risk patients; and timely treatment for patients with positive and equivocal exercise stress test results. This service demonstrated a significant saving in overnight admissions.

  13. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  14. The cognitive behavioral therapy causes an improvement in quality of life in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. C. Castro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain causes functional incapacity and compromises an individual's affective, social, and economic life. OBJECTIVE: To study the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT effectiveness in a group of patients with chronic pain. METHODS: A randomized clinical trial with two parallel groups comprising 93 patients with chronic pain was carried out. Forty-eight patients were submitted to CBT and 45 continued the standard treatment. The visual analogue, hospital anxiety and depression, and quality of life SF-36 scales were applied. Patients were evaluated before and after ten weeks of treatment. RESULTS: When the Control Group and CBT were compared, the latter presented reduction of depressive symptoms (p=0.031 and improvement in the domains 'physical limitations' (p=0.012, 'general state of health' (p=0.045, and 'limitations by emotional aspects' (p=0.025. CONCLUSIONS: The CBT was effective and it has caused an improvement in more domains of quality of life when compared to the Control Group, after ten weeks of treatment.

  15. A brief bedside visual art intervention decreases anxiety and improves pain and mood in patients with haematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, J J; Curry, E A; Ehlers, S L; Scanlon, P D; Bauer, B A; Rian, J; Larson, D R; Wolanskyj, A P

    2018-04-17

    Treatment of cancer-related symptoms represents a major challenge for physicians. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether a brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improves mood, reduces pain and anxiety in patients with haematological malignancies. Thirty-one patients (21 women and 10 men) were invited to participate in a BVAI where the goal of the session was to teach art technique for ~30 min. Primary outcome measures included the change in visual analog scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule scale, from baseline prior to and immediately post-BVAI. Total of 21 patients (19 women and two men) participated. A significant improvement in positive mood and pain scores (p = .003 and p = .017 respectively) as well as a decrease in negative mood and anxiety (p = .016 and p = .001 respectively) was observed. Patients perceived BVAI as overall positive (95%) and wished to participate in future art-based interventions (85%). This accessible experience, provided by artists within the community, may be considered as an adjunct to conventional treatments in patients with cancer-related mood symptoms and pain, and future studies with balanced gender participation may support the generalisability of these findings. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  17. Exercise during school hours when added to patient education improves outcome for 2 years in adolescent patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, M S; Roos, Ewa M.; Olesen, J L

    2015-01-01

    and 6 months (OR 1.88 and 1.43) while the effect was further increased at 24 months (OR of 2.52, NNT of 5). A higher total number of weekly exercise sessions increased the odds of recovery. CONCLUSIONS: In adolescent PFP, the addition of exercise therapy for 3 months was more effective than patient...... education alone. The effect was apparent at 3 months and increased up to 2 years. Adherence to exercises was important and improved the odds of recovery. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: clinicaltrials.gov reference: NCT01438762.......BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is common among adolescents and associated with long-lasting pain and disability. Patient education and exercise therapy are commonly used treatments in primary and secondary care but the effect of these treatments in adolescents is unknown. We aimed...

  18. A randomized, clinical trial of education or motivational-interviewing-based coaching compared to usual care to improve cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mary Laudon; Elliott, Janette E; Rao, Stephen M; Fahey, Kathleen F; Paul, Steven M; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of two interventions compared to usual care in decreasing attitudinal barriers to cancer pain management, decreasing pain intensity, and improving functional status and quality of life (QOL). Randomized clinical trial. Six outpatient oncology clinics (three Veterans Affairs [VA] facilities, one county hospital, and one community-based practice in California, and one VA clinic in New Jersey)Sample: 318 adults with various types of cancer-related pain. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, standardized education, or coaching. Patients in the education and coaching groups viewed a video and received a pamphlet on managing cancer pain. In addition, patients in the coaching group participated in four telephone sessions with an advanced practice nurse interventionist using motivational interviewing techniques to decrease attitudinal barriers to cancer pain management. Questionnaires were completed at baseline and six weeks after the final telephone calls. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate for differences in study outcomes among the three groups. Pain intensity, pain relief, pain interference, attitudinal barriers, functional status, and QOL. Attitudinal barrier scores did not change over time among groups. Patients randomized to the coaching group reported significant improvement in their ratings of pain-related interference with function, as well as general health, vitality, and mental health. Although additional evaluation is needed, coaching may be a useful strategy to help patients decrease attitudinal barriers toward cancer pain management and to better manage their cancer pain. By using motivational interviewing techniques, advanced practice oncology nurses can help patients develop an appropriate plan of care to decrease pain and other symptoms.

  19. [Comparison between aquatic-biodanza and stretching for improving quality of life and pain in patients with fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, María del Mar; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Rodríguez-Ferrer, María Encarnación

    2012-11-01

    To determine the level of improvement, as regards pain, impact on fibromyalgia and depression, achieved by patients with fibromyalgia by comparing aquatic biodanza and stretching exercises. Randomised controlled trial with two intervention groups. Five health centres (Almeria). A total of 82 fibromyalgia patients between 18 and 65 years old, diagnosed by American College of Rheumatology criteria, were included, with 12 patients declining to take part in the study. The 70 remaining patients were randomly assigned to two groups of 35 patients each: aquatic biodanza and stretching exercises. Those who did not attend in at least 14 sessions or changed their treatment during the studio were excluded. The final sample consisted of 19 patients in aquatic biodanza group and 20 in stretching group. The limitations of the study included, the open evaluation design and a sample size reduced by defaults. The outcome measures were sociodemographic data, quality of life (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), pain (McGill-Melzack questionnaire; and Visual Analogue Scale), pressure algometry (Wagner FPI10 algometer) and depression (Beck Inventory). These were carried out before and after a 12-week therapy. The mean age of the sample was 55.41 years. The mean period from diagnosis was 13.44 years. The sample consisted mainly of housewives. There were significant differences (P<.05) between groups, in pain (P<.01), fibromyalgia impact (P<.01), and depression (P<.04) after the treatment. The biodanza aquatic exercises improve pain and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Increasing the Number of Outpatients Receiving Spiritual Assessment: A Pain and Palliative Care Service Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Castillo, Blanca J; Hirsch, Rosemarie; Groninger, Hunter; Baker, Karen; Cheng, M Jennifer; Phillips, Jayne; Pollack, John; Berger, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is a patient need that requires special attention from the Pain and Palliative Care Service team. This quality improvement project aimed to provide spiritual assessment for all new outpatients with serious life-altering illnesses. Percentage of new outpatients receiving spiritual assessment (Faith, Importance/Influence, Community, Address/Action in care, psychosocial evaluation, chaplain consults) at baseline and postinterventions. Interventions included encouraging clinicians to incorporate adequate spiritual assessment into patient care and implementing chaplain covisits for all initial outpatient visits. The quality improvement interventions increased spiritual assessment (baseline vs. postinterventions): chaplain covisits (25.5% vs. 50%), Faith, Importance/Influence, Community, Address/Action in care completion (49% vs. 72%), and psychosocial evaluation (89% vs. 94%). Improved spiritual assessment in an outpatient palliative care clinic setting can occur with a multidisciplinary approach. This project also identifies data collection and documentation processes that can be targeted for improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Progesterone analogues reduce plasma Epstein–Barr virus DNA load and improve pain control in recurrent/metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients under supportive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yen Hung

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Progesterone analogues improve quality of life in terms of performance status, pain control, and plasma EBV DNA load in patients with locally recurrent/metastatic NPC under palliative care.

  2. Light touch contact improves pain-evoked postural instability during quiet standing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirata, Rogerio P.; Christensen, Steffan W.; Agger, Simone

    2018-01-01

    for 40 seconds with their eyes closed. Their postural stability was quantified by the area and velocity of center of pressure (CoP) displacement. The CoP was recorded with and without pain during two different conditions: 1) no touch and 2) the subjects were asked to lightly touch a curtain...... with their right index finger and focus their attention on keeping it as still as possible. Results: Hypertonic injections induced higher NRS scores compared with control injections (P touch...... compared with the light touch condition (P touch between the hypertonic and isotonic injection conditions. Although experimental knee-related pain impaired postural stability, lightly touching a curtain with the fingertip decreased postural sway during...

  3. A 13-Weeks Mindfulness Based Pain Management Program Improves Psychological Distress in Patients with Chronic Pain Compared with Waiting List Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    and psychological distress were performed in both groups at baseline and after 13 weeks. RESULTS: The CBTm program reduced depression, anxiety and pain-catastrophizing compared with the control group. Increased level of mindfulness and acceptance were associated with change in psychological distress......) in patients with chronic non-malignant pain with a control condition. It was hypothesised that the CBTm program would reduce pain intensity and psychological distress compared to the control condition and that level of mindfulness and acceptance both would be associated with the reduction in pain intensity...... and psychological distress. METHODS: A case-control design was used and data were collected from a convenience sample of 70 patients with chronic non-malignant pain. Fifty patients were consecutively recruited to the CBTm intervention and 20 patients matched waiting list controls. Assessments of clinical pain...

  4. Intraoperative Sensorcaine significantly improves postoperative pain management in outpatient reduction mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliford, Alfred T; Spector, Jason A; Flores, Roberto L; Louie, Otway; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2007-09-15

    Breast reduction is one of the most frequently performed plastic surgical procedures in the United States; more than 160,500 patients underwent the procedure in 2005. Many outpatient reduction mammaplasty patients report the greatest postoperative discomfort in the first 48 hours. The authors' investigated the effect of intraoperative topical application of the long-acting local anesthetic agent bupivacaine (Sensorcaine or Marcaine) on postoperative pain, time to postanesthesia care unit discharge, and postoperative use of narcotic medication. In a prospective, randomized, single-blind trial, intraoperative use of Sensorcaine versus placebo (normal saline) was compared. Postoperative pain was quantified using the visual analogue scale, and time to discharge from the postanesthesia care unit was recorded. Patients documented their outpatient pain medication usage. Of the 37 patients enrolled in the study, 20 were treated with intraoperative topical Sensorcaine and 17 received placebo. Patients treated with Sensorcaine were discharged home significantly faster (2.9 hours versus 3.8 hours, p = 0.002). The control arm consistently had higher pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit (although not statistically significant) than the Sensorcaine group using the visual analogue scale system. Furthermore, patients receiving Sensorcaine required significantly less narcotic medication while recovering at home (mean, 3.5 tablets of Vicodin) than the control group (mean, 6.4 tablets; p = 0.001). There were no complications resulting from Sensorcaine usage. This prospective, randomized, single-blind study demonstrates that a single dose of intraoperative Sensorcaine provides a safe, inexpensive, and efficacious way to significantly shorten the length of postanesthesia care unit stay and significantly decrease postoperative opioid analgesic use in patients undergoing ambulatory reduction mammaplasty.

  5. Pilates training improves pain and quality of life of women with fibromyalgia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Mariana; Avila, Mariana Arias; Colombo, Mariana Matos; Gramani-Say, Karina; Driusso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There is still lack of evidence that supports Pilates training in women with fibromyalgia syndrome. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the effects of Pilates on pain, quality of life, depression and anxiety in women with fibromyalgia syndrome. METHODS: Twenty female volunteers diagnosed with fibromyalgia took part on this study. Thirteen women were assigned for the treatment group and seven, for the control group. All 20 patients were evalu...

  6. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L 4-5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L 4-5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  7. Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy for chronic low back pain to reduce pain, and improve functionality and general well-being compared with physiotherapy: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Christoph; Messerschmidt, Steffen; Minford, Eunice J; Greenaway-Twist, Kate; Szramka, Maxine; Masiorski, Marianna; Sheldrake, Michelle; Jones, Mark

    2017-07-17

    Low back pain causes more global disability than any other condition. Once the acute pain becomes chronic, about two-thirds of sufferers will not fully recover after 1-2 years. There is a paucity of effective treatments for non-specific, chronic low back pain. It has been noted that low back pain is associated with changes in the connective tissue in the affected area, and a very low-impact treatment, Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy (ECTT), has been developed to restore flexibility in connective tissue. ECTT uses patterns of very small, circular movements, to the legs, arms, spine, sacrum and head, which anecdotally are effective in pain relief. In an unpublished single-arm phase I/II trial with chronic pain patients, ECTT showed a 56% reduction in pain after five treatments and 45% and 54% improvements at 6 months and 7-9 years of follow-up respectively. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to compare ECTT with physiotherapy for reducing pain and improving physical function and physical and mental well-being in patients with chronic low back pain. The trial will be held at two hospitals in Vietnam. One hundred participants with chronic low back pain greater than or equal to 40/100 on the visual analogue scale will be recruited and randomised to either ECTT or physiotherapy. Four weekly treatments will be provided by two experienced ECTT practitioners (Treatment Group, 40 minutes each) and hospital-employed physiotherapy nurses (Control Group, 50 minutes). The primary outcomes will be changes in pain, physical function per the Quebec Pain Functionality Questionnaire and physical and mental well-being recorded by the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), with mixed modelling used as the primary statistical tool because the data are longitudinal. Initial follow-up will be at either 4 or 8 months, with a second follow-up after 12 months. The trial design has important strengths, because it is to be conducted in hospitals under medical supervision

  8. Validated RP-HPLC Method for the Assay of Etoricoxib (A Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Topalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, accurate, sensitive and reproducible reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the quantitative determination of Etoricoxib in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The assay was performed on Hypersil ODS C-18 (250 x 4.6 mm., 5µm particle size column using acetonitrile and potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 4.2 (46:54 % v/v as mobile phase with UV detection at 280 nm (flow rate 1.2 ml/min. Bromhexine was used as an internal standard. Quantization was achieved by measurement of the peak area ratio of the drug to the internal standard. The limit of detection (LOD and the limit of quantification (LOQ were 0.0704 µg ml-1 and 0.2134 µg ml-1 respectively. Each analysis required no longer than 10 minutes. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range from 0.5-85.0 µg ml-1. The retention times of Etoricoxib and Bromhexine were found to be 3.083 and 7.631 minutes respectively. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guidelines and can be used successfully to analyse marketed formulations.

  9. Etoricoxib selective sensor based on uracil-5,6-diamino-2-thio hydrochloride as neutral carrier for potentiometric analysis in pharmaceutical preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Fares Rassi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A construction and electrochemical behavior of novel potentiometric membrane sensor responsive to the etoricoxib was described. The sensor was based on the ion-pair complex of etoricoxib (ET with Uracil-5,6-diamino-2-thio hydrochloride UDTH (ET-UDTH as exchange sites in a PVC matrix with different plasticizers dibutylphthalate (DBP (electrode B tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP (electrode C, and dioctylphthalate (DOP (electrode A. The electrodes exhibited near-Nernstian response for ET-UDTH over the concentration range 0.051-40.042 mM. The electrode offered significant advantages including long lifetime (about 2 months, excellent stability and reproducibility, good response time (10-25 s, and wide pH working range (pH 5-12. Selectivity coefficients of ET related to a number of interfering cation and some organic compounds were investigated, and there were negligible interference caused by most of the investigated species. The direct determination of 0.5-10 mM of ET showed an average recovery of 99.03-101.75% and a mean relative standard deviation 0.40-1.88. The results were obtained by determination of ET in tablets using the proposed electrodes which were comparable favorably with those obtained by spectrophotometric method

  10. Muscle releases to improve passive motion and relieve pain in patients with spastic hemiplegia and elbow flexion contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Surena; Horneff, J Gabe; Baldwin, Keith; Keenan, Mary Ann

    2012-10-01

    Patients with spastic hemiplegia after upper motor neuron (UMN) injury can develop elbow contractures. This study evaluated outcomes of elbow releases in treating spastic elbow flexion contractures in hemiplegic patients. Adults with spastic hemiplegia due to UMN injury who underwent elbow releases (brachialis, brachioradialis, and biceps muscles) were included. Nonoperative treatment was unsuccessful in all patients. Patients complained of difficulty with passive functions. Passive range of motion (ROM), pain relief, Modified Ashworth spasticity score, and complications were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. There were 8 men and 21 women with an average age of 52.4 years (range, 24.1-81.4 years). Seventeen patients had pain preoperatively. Postoperative follow-up was a mean of 1.7 years (range, 1-4.5 years). Preoperatively, patients lacked a mean of 78° of passive elbow extension compared with 17° postoperatively (P .05). Releases of the brachialis, brachioradialis, and biceps muscles can be an effective means of pain relief, improved passive ROM, and decreased spasticity in patients with elbow flexion deformity after UMN injury. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as "low back pain", "older people", and "strengthening exercise". Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances.

  13. The Maastricht Ultrasound Shoulder pain trial (MUST: Ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of patients with non-chronic shoulder pain in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cals Jochen WL

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial disorders are considered to be one of the most common pathologies affecting the shoulder. Optimal therapy for shoulder pain (SP in primary care is yet unknown, since clinical history and physical examination do not provide decisive evidence as to the patho-anatomical origin of the symptoms. Optimal decision strategies can be furthered by applying ultrasound imaging (US, an accurate method in diagnosing SP, demonstrating a clear relationship between diagnosis and available therapies. Yet, the clinical cost-effectiveness of applying US in the management of SP in primary care has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and methods of a trial assessing the cost-effectiveness of ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of primary care patients with non-chronic shoulder pain. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial (RCT will involve 226 adult patients with suspected subacromial disorders recruited by general practitioners. During a Qualification period of two weeks, patients receive care as usual as advised by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, and patients are referred for US. Patients with insufficient improvement qualify for the RCT. These patients are then randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. The therapies used in both groups are the same (corticosteroid injections, referral to a physiotherapist or orthopedic surgeon except that therapies used in the intervention group will be tailored based on the US results. Ultrasound diagnosed disorders include tendinopathy, calcific tendinitis, partial and full thickness tears, and subacromial bursitis. The primary outcome is patient-perceived recovery at 52 weeks, using the Global Perceived Effect questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are disease specific and generic quality of life, cost-effectiveness, and the adherence to the initial applied treatment. Outcome measures will be assessed

  14. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with chronic widespread pain: primary endpoint of the randomized, nonblinded, parallel-group IMPROvE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amris, Kirstine; Wæhrens, Eva E; Christensen, Robin; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the functional and psychological outcomes of a 2-week, group-based multicomponent treatment course that targeted patients with chronic widespread pain. Patients (192 included in the intention-to-treat population), all fulfilling the 1990 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for fibromyalgia, were consecutively recruited from a tertiary care setting and randomized (1:1) to either the treatment course or a waiting list control group. Co-primary outcomes were the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) and SF-36 Mental Composite Score (MCS) evaluated at 6-month follow-up. Primary endpoints were partly achieved with a statistically significant improvement in AMPS activities of daily living motor (group mean difference: 0.20 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09 to 0.31] logits; P=.0003) and AMPS activities of daily living process (0.20 [95% CI: 0.12 to 0.27] logits, Pfibromyalgia patients presenting with a substantial disability established over many years, the 2-week multicomponent treatment course resulted in observable improvement of functional ability in a subgroup of patients at 6-month follow-up. This improvement, however, was not reflected in secondary patient reported outcomes, including scores of self-reported functional ability on standardized questionnaires. We suggest including observation-based assessments in future clinical trials focusing on functional outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. IMPROVE trial: a randomized controlled trial of patient-controlled analgesia for sickle cell painful episodes: rationale, design challenges, initial experience, and recommendations for future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton D; Smith, Wally R; Wager, Carrie G; Kim, Hae-Young; Bell, Margaret C; Miller, Scott T; Weiner, Debra L; Minniti, Caterina P; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Ataga, Kenneth I; Eckman, James R; Hsu, Lewis L; McClish, Donna; McKinlay, Sonja M; Molokie, Robert; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Telen, Marilyn J

    2013-04-01

    The hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD) is pain from a vaso-occlusive crisis. Although ambulatory pain accounts for most days in pain, pain is also the most common cause of hospitalization and is typically treated with parenteral opioids. The evidence base is lacking for most analgesic practice in SCD, particularly for the optimal opioid dosing for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), in part because of the challenges of the trial design and conduct for this rare disease. The purpose of this report is to describe our Network's experiences with protocol development, implementation, and analysis, including overall study design, the value of pain assessments rather than 'crisis' resolution as trial endpoints, and alternative statistical analysis strategies. The Improving Pain Management and Outcomes with Various Strategies (IMPROVE) PCA trial was a multisite inpatient randomized controlled trial comparing two PCA-dosing strategies in adults and children with SCD and acute pain conducted by the SCD Clinical Research Network. The specified primary endpoint was a 25-mm change in a daily average pain intensity using a Visual Analogue Scale, and a number of related pain intensity and pain interference measures were selected as secondary efficacy outcomes. A time-to-event analysis strategy was planned for the primary endpoint. Of 1116 individuals admitted for pain at 31 participating sites over a 6-month period, 38 were randomized and 4 withdrawn. The trial was closed early due to poor accrual, reflecting a substantial number of challenges encountered during trial implementation. While some of the design issues were unique to SCD or analgesic studies, many of the trial implementation challenges reflected the increasing complexity of conducting clinical trials in the inpatient setting with multiple care providers and evolving electronic medical record systems, particularly in the context of large urban academic medical centers. Complicated clinical organization of many

  16. Cancer pain management and the opioid crisis in America: How to preserve hard-earned gains in improving the quality of cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paice, Judith A

    2018-03-02

    Cancer pain remains a feared consequence of the disease and its treatment. Although prevalent, cancer pain can usually be managed through the skillful application of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Unfortunately, access to these therapies has been hampered by interventions designed to contain another serious public health problem: the opioid misuse epidemic. This epidemic and the unintended consequences of efforts to control this outbreak are leading to significant barriers to the provision of cancer pain relief. Oncologists and other professionals treating those with cancer pain will require new knowledge and tools to provide safe and effective pain control while preventing additional cases of substance use disorders (SUDs), helping patients in recovery to maintain sobriety, and guiding those not yet in recovery to seek treatment. How do these 2 serious epidemics intersect and affect oncology practice? First, oncology professionals will need to adopt practices to prevent SUDs by assessing risk and providing safe pain care. Second, oncology practices are likely to see an increased number of patients with a current or past SUD, including opioid misuse. Few guidelines exist for the direct management of pain when opioids may be indicated in these individuals. Third, modified prescribing practices along with the education of patients and families are warranted to prevent the exposure of these medications to unintended persons. Finally, advocacy on behalf of those with cancer pain is imperative to avoid losing access to essential therapies, including opioids, for those who might benefit. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  17. Virtual reality improves embodiment and neuropathic pain caused by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozeg, Polona; Palluel, Estelle; Ronchi, Roberta; Solcà, Marco; Al-Khodairy, Abdul-Wahab; Jordan, Xavier; Kassouha, Ammar; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-10-31

    To investigate changes in body ownership and chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) using multisensory own body illusions and virtual reality (VR). Twenty patients with SCI with paraplegia and 20 healthy control participants (HC) participated in 2 factorial, randomized, repeated-measures design studies. In the virtual leg illusion (VLI), we applied asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back (either immediately above the lesion level or at the shoulder) and to the virtual legs as seen on a VR head-mounted display. We tested the effect of the VLI on the sense of leg ownership (questionnaires) and on perceived neuropathic pain (visual analogue scale pain ratings). We compared illusory leg ownership with illusory global body ownership (induced in the full body illusion [FBI]), by applying asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back and the back of a virtual body as seen on a head-mounted display. Our data show that patients with SCI are less sensitive to multisensory stimulations inducing illusory leg ownership (as compared to HC) and that leg ownership decreased with time since SCI. In contrast, we found no differences between groups in global body ownership as tested in the FBI. VLI and FBI were both associated with mild analgesia that was only during the VLI specific for synchronous visuotactile stimulation and the lower back position. The present findings show that VR exposure using multisensory stimulation differently affected leg vs body ownership, and is associated with mild analgesia with potential for SCI neurorehabilitation protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Hydrotherapy improves pain and function in older women with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João Marcos; Cisneros, Lígia; Dias, Rosângela; Fritsch, Carolina; Gomes, Wellington; Pereira, Leani; Santos, Mary Luci; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique

    Currently, there is poor evidence of the effect of hydrotherapy alone on patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. The study aimed to assess the impact of hydrotherapy on pain, function, and muscle function in older women with knee osteoarthritis. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of hydrotherapy in women with knee osteoarthritis. Seventy-three women aged 65 and older were randomized to hydrotherapy (n=36) or a control group (n=37). The hydrotherapy group received the intervention program in a heated pool (twice per week for six weeks) and an educational protocol while the control group received an educational protocol only. Primary outcomes (before and post-treatment) were pain intensity (0-100) and function (0-100), assessed with the WOMAC questionnaire. Secondary outcomes (before and post-treatment) were knee extensor and knee flexor muscle performance (strength, power, and endurance), assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer. The magnitude of change between the groups for the outcomes was calculated using linear regression models adjusted by baseline outcome values. The hydrotherapy group had better outcomes for pain (adjusted mean difference=11 points, 95% CI: 3-18) and function (adjusted mean difference=12 points, 95% CI: 5-18). Patients receiving hydrotherapy had better performance for knee flexor and extensor strength, knee flexor power, and knee extensor endurance. Older women with knee osteoarthritis are likely to have benefits from a course of hydrotherapy exercises. Registry of clinical trials (Trial number RBR-8F57KR) - http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-8f57kr/. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. The Web-Based Osteoarthritis Management Resource My Joint Pain Improves Quality of Care: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umapathy, Hema; Bennell, Kim; Dickson, Chris; Dobson, Fiona; Fransen, Marlene; Jones, Graeme; Hunter, David J

    2015-07-07

    Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for conservative treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), management is often confined to the use of analgesics and waiting for eventual total joint replacement. This suggests a gap in knowledge for persons with OA regarding the many different treatments available to them. Our objective was to evaluate outcomes after usage of a Web-based resource called My Joint Pain that contains tailored, evidence-based information and tools aimed to improve self-management of OA on self-management and change in knowledge. A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the My Joint Pain website intervention over a 12-month period. The intervention provided participants with general and user-specific information, monthly assessments with validated instruments, and progress-tracking tools. A nationwide convenience sample of 195 participants with self-assessed hip and/or knee OA completed both baseline and 12-month questionnaires (users: n=104; nonusers: n=91). The primary outcome measure was the Health Evaluation Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) to evaluate 8 different domains (health-directed activity, positive and active engagement in life, emotional distress, self-monitoring and insight, constructive attitudes and approaches, skill and technique acquisition, social integration and support, health service navigation) and the secondary outcome measure was the 17-item Osteoarthritis Quality Indicator (OAQI) questionnaire to evaluate the change in appropriateness of care received by participants. Independent t tests were used to compare changes between groups for the heiQ and chi-square tests to identify changes within and between groups from baseline to 12 months for each OAQI item. Baseline demographics between groups were similar for gender (152/195, 77.9% female), age (mean 60, SD 9 years) and body mass index (mean 31.1, SD 6.8 kg/m(2)). With the exception of health service navigation, mean effect sizes from all other heiQ domains

  20. Adult emergency department patients with sickle cell pain crisis: a learning collaborative model to improve analgesic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Paula; Artz, Nicole; Mark Courtney, D; Martinovich, Zoran; Weiss, Kevin B; Zvirbulis, Elena; Hafner, John W

    2010-04-01

    The objectives were to report the baseline (prior to quality improvement interventions) patient and visit characteristics and analgesic management practices for each site participating in an emergency department (ED) sickle cell learning collaborative. A prospective, multisite longitudinal cohort study in the context of a learning-collaborative model was performed in three midwestern EDs. Each site formed a multidisciplinary team charged with improving analgesic management for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Each team developed a nurse-initiated analgesic protocol for SCD patients (implemented after a baseline data collection period of 3.5 months at one site and 10 months at the other two sites). All sites prospectively enrolled adults with an acute pain crisis and SCD. All medical records for patients meeting study criteria were reviewed. Demographic, health services, and analgesic management data were abstracted, including ED visit frequency data, ED disposition, arrival and discharge pain score, and name and route of initial analgesic administered. Ten interviews per quarter per site were conducted with patients within 14 days of their ED discharge, and subjects were queried about the highest level of pain acceptable at discharge. The primary outcome variable was the time to initial analgesic administration. Variable data were described as means and standard deviations (SDs) or medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) for nonnormal data. A total of 155 patients met study criteria (median age = 32 years, IQR = 24-40 years) with a total of 701 ED visits. Eighty-six interviews were conducted. Most patients (71.6%) had between one and three visits to the ED during the study period. However, after removing Site 3 from the analysis because of the short data enrollment period (3.5 months), which influenced the mean number of visits for the entire cohort, 52% of patients had between one and three ED visits over 10 months, 21% had four to nine visits, and 27% had

  1. Ankle Nerve Block Adjuvant to General Anesthesia Reduces Post-surgical Pain and Improves Functional Outcomes in Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kir, Mustafa; Kir, Gulay

    2018-03-12

    Postoperative pain is a frequently problem after orthopedic procedures like hallux valgus surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ankle block improves early and mid-term functional outcomes and postoperative pain management after hallux valgus surgery in patients receiving general anesthesia. This randomized controlled trial investigated 60 patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were prospectively randomized into two groups; general anesthesia only (Group A) and ankle block added to general anesthesia (Group B). Age, body-mass index (BMI), tourniquet time (TT), duration of surgery (DOS), first analgesic need time (FANT), perioperative analgesic regimen and visual analog scale (VAS), The Ankle Score American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) and length of hospital stay were recorded. Independent variables were analyzed by t-test. Non-parametric data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney-U test. Patient's age, demographics and body mass indices were similar between the two groups. Average length of hospital stay was significantly longer in Group A (p < 0,01). Group B had longer time to first analgesic need than Group A (p < 0,01) Patients in Group B required less analgesic in postoperative period. Preoperative VAS and AOFAS scores were not statistically different between the two groups. Postoperative day 1 VAS score was significantly lower in Group B than in Group A. Follow-up visits at 3, 6 and 12 months showed significantly lower VAS and higher AOFAS scores in Group B than Group A. Ankle block added to general anaesthesia may improve early and mid-term postoperative functional outcomes and postoperative pain management in patients who undergo hallux valgus surgery. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [Clinical practice data regarding tapentadol prolonged release treatment for severe chronic pain - improvement of analgesia, functional competence and quality of life in particular under tapentadol monotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Thomas; Krings, Doris; Waldmann-Rex, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    To assess effectiveness and tolerability of tapentadol prolonged release (PR, Palexia® retard) for the treatment of severe chronic pain under routine clinical practice conditions in Germany. In this prospective non-interventional study, data regarding previous and concomitant analgesic treatment, tapentadol dosage, pain intensity, functionality, quality of life, and tolerability of tapentadol PR were collected over a 3-month observation period. A total of 5,002 patients were included in the effectiveness analysis; a subgroup analysis assessed effectiveness for all patients receiving tapentadol monotherapy (n = 1476). Nearly all patients of the total study population (95.9%) had already received analgesic long-term treatment (31.7% strong opioids) prior to the start of the study. Treatment with tapentadol PR (mean daily dose 216 ± 103 mg at end of observation) resulted in a reduction in pain intensity of 3.9 points from 7.2 ± 1.4 at baseline (95%CI -3.93; -3.83; p ≤ 0.001; NRS-11); clinically relevant pain relief ≥ 50% was documented for 65.1% of the patients. All 4 evaluated aspects regarding pain-related functionality, and quality of life of the patients also improved significantly. Compared to the total patient population, pain relief was greater in the subgroup receiving tapentadol monotherapy; baseline pain intensity was comparable between the groups. Pain-related functional impairment also declined to a slightly greater extent, and quality of life was rated more positively at end of observation. Analgesic treatment with tapentadol PR in routine clinical practice resulted in a marked reduction of severe chronic pain with significant improvements of functionality and quality of life. On the basis of these results and the favourable safety profile, tapentadol PR can thus be considered an alternative to classical opioids in the treatment of severe chronic pain.

  3. High-Intensity Strength Training Improves Function of Chronically Painful Muscles: Case-Control and RCT Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars L. Andersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study investigates consequences of chronic neck pain on muscle function and the rehabilitating effects of contrasting interventions. Methods. Women with trapezius myalgia (MYA, n=42 and healthy controls (CON, n=20 participated in a case-control study. Subsequently MYA were randomized to 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n=18, general fitness training (GFT, n=16, or a reference group without physical training (REF, n=8. Participants performed tests of 100 consecutive cycles of 2 s isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC of shoulder elevation followed by 2 s relaxation at baseline and 10-week follow-up. Results. In the case-control study, peak force, rate of force development, and rate of force relaxation as well as EMG amplitude were lower in MYA than CON throughout all 100 MVC. Muscle fiber capillarization was not significantly different between MYA and CON. In the intervention study, SST improved all force parameters significantly more than the two other groups, to levels comparable to that of CON. This was seen along with muscle fiber hypertrophy and increased capillarization. Conclusion. Women with trapezius myalgia have lower strength capacity during repetitive MVC of the trapezius muscle than healthy controls. High-intensity strength training effectively improves strength capacity during repetitive MVC of the painful trapezius muscle.

  4. Physiotherapists' knowledge of pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    overall pain knowledge. Conclusion. There is an inadequate level of pain knowledge among members of the sports and orthopaedic manipulative physiotherapy ... Improving an individual's coping skills is more important than determining the extent to which there may be a psychological cause of the pain. 0.62. Pain due to ...

  5. The effect of anxiety and depression on improvements in pain in a randomized, controlled trial of pregabalin for treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M; Crofford, Leslie J; Martin, Susan A; Young, James P; Sharma, Uma

    2007-01-01

    To assess symptoms of anxiety and depression in a large cohort of fibromyalgia patients and to determine the impact of these symptoms on response of pain to pregabalin treatment. Patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the baseline visit in a randomized, controlled trial of pregabalin for treatment of fibromyalgia. Mean anxiety and depression subscale scores were calculated, and proportions of patients by symptom severity were determined. The difference between the proportion of patients reporting anxiety and depression at baseline was tested using McNemar's test. Baseline anxiety and depression were evaluated as covariates by including them-as interaction terms with treatment-in an ancova model. A path analysis evaluated the association between improvements in anxiety and depression and pain relief. In total, 529 patients were enrolled. Significantly more patients reported anxiety symptoms (71%) than depressive symptoms (56%) (P anxiety or depression scores. By path analysis, 75% of the pain reduction was not explained by improvements in anxiety and depressive symptoms. Anxiety symptoms were more common than depressive symptoms in this cohort. Our results suggest patients with fibromyalgia should be routinely assessed for the presence of both anxiety and depression. The pain treatment effect of pregabalin did not depend on baseline anxiety or depressive symptoms, suggesting pregabalin improves pain in patients with or without these symptoms. Much of the pain reduction appears to be independent of improvements in anxiety or mood symptoms.

  6. The Effect of Initiatives to Overcome Language Barriers and Improve Attendance: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Adherence in an Inner City Chronic Pain Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Michael H; White, Robert S; Chen, Kelly Yan; Nair, Singh; Hall, Charles; Shaparin, Naum

    2017-02-01

    Language barriers can prevent pain physicians and patients from forming meaningful rapport and drive health care disparities. Non-adherence with scheduled pain clinic appointments deprives patients with chronic pain of needed specialist care. We evaluated the benefit of comprehensive initiatives to overcome language barriers to improve patient adherence with initial scheduled chronic pain clinic appointments. After implementation of our initiative, we performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis and fit logistic regression models to investigate the association between demographic factors and adherence. We collected retrospective data from an observational cohort with a scheduled appointment at the adult inner-city underserved outpatient Pain Center at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Between March 2012 and March 2014, 14,459 appointments were scheduled; 3,035 of these appointments represented initial first visits; patients had a mean age of 53 years; 15% were predominantly Spanish-speaking, 65% were female. Our initiative to overcome language barriers in our pain clinic included appointment reminders in the patient’s preferred language, Spanish-speaking staff, and unified locations with equitable access. Our dependent variable was adherence with a first scheduled pain clinic appointment. We found that after implementation of our initiative, speaking Spanish was now statistically significantly associated with higher rates of adherence with appointments (Odds Ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval [1.06–1.64]). We infer from our results that coordinated initiatives to overcome language barriers can be beneficial in improving appointment adherence and access to care by enhancing rapport and communication between pain physicians and their patients. The results of this retrospective cross-sectional analysis of patients’ adherence with scheduled appointments in an inner-city chronic pain clinic suggests that targeted initiatives including a pre

  7. Usability Testing of the iPhone App to Improve Pain Assessment for Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment (Prehospital Setting): A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Rachael E; Lane, Matthew; Schofield, Pat A

    2017-03-15

    Pain assessment in older adults with cognitive impairment is often challenging, and paramedics are not given sufficient tools/training to assess pain. The development of a mobile app may improve pain assessment and management in this vulnerable population. We conducted usability testing of a newly developed iPhone pain assessment application with potential users, in this case as a tool for clinical paramedic practice to improve pain assessment of older adults with cognitive impairment. We conducted usability testing with paramedic students and a Delphi panel of qualified paramedics. Participants studied the app and paper-based algorithm from which the app was developed. The potential use for the app was discussed. Usability testing focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a thematic approach. Proposed recommendations were disseminated to the Delphi panel that reviewed and confirmed them. Twenty-four paramedic students from two UK ambulance services participated in the focus groups. Usability of the app and its potential were viewed positively. Four major themes were identified: 1) overall opinion of the app for use in paramedic services; 2) incorporating technological applications into the health care setting; 3) improving knowledge and governance; and 4) alternative uses for the app. Subthemes were identified and are presented. Our results indicate that the pain assessment app constitutes a potentially useful tool in the prehospital setting. By providing access to a tool specifically developed to help identify/assess pain in a user-friendly format, paramedics are likely to have increased knowledge and confidence in assessing pain in patients with dementia. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Development of a Web-Based Quality Dashboard Including a Toolbox to Improve Pain Management in Dutch Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos-Blom, Marie-José; Gude, Wouter T; de Jonge, Evert; Spijkstra, Jan Jaap; van der Veer, Sabine N; Dongelmans, Dave A; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2017-01-01

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a common strategy to improve quality of care. Meta-analyses have indicated that A&F may be more effective in realizing desired change when baseline performance is low, it is delivered by a supervisor or colleague, it is provided frequently and in a timely manner, it is delivered in both verbal and written formats, and it includes specific targets and an action plan. However, there is little information to guide operationalization of these factors. Researchers have consequently called for A&F interventions featuring well-described and carefully justified components, with their theoretical rationale made explicit. This paper describes the rationale and development of a quality dashboard including an improvement toolbox for four previous developed pain indicators, guided by Control Theory.

  9. Trunk Dynamics Are Impaired in Ballet Dancers with Back Pain but Improve with Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Jan E; VAN DEN Hoorn, Wolbert; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Trunk control is essential in ballet and may be compromised in dancers with a history of low back pain (LBP) by associated changes in motor control. This study aimed to compare trunk mechanical properties between professional ballet dancers with and without a history of LBP. As a secondary aim, we assessed whether asking dancers to use motor imagery to respond in a "fluid" manner could change the mechanical properties of the trunk and whether this was possible for both groups. Trunk mechanical properties of stiffness and damping were estimated with a linear second-order system, from trunk movement in response to perturbations, in professional ballet dancers with (n = 22) and without (n = 8) a history of LBP. The second-order model adequately described trunk movement in response to the perturbations. Trials were performed with and without motor imagery to respond in a fluid manner to the perturbation. Dancers with a history of LBP had lower damping than dancers without LBP during the standard condition (P = 0.002) but had greater damping during the "fluid" condition (P 0.99). Stiffness was not different between the dancers with and those without a history of LBP (P = 0.252) but was less during the fluid condition than the standard condition (P < 0.001). Although dancers with a history of LBP have less trunk damping than those without LBP, they have the capacity to modulate the trunk's mechanical properties to match that of pain-free dancers by increasing damping with motor imagery. These observations have potential relevance for LBP recurrence and rehabilitation.

  10. Neonatal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  11. [Conversion to tapentadol PR improves analgesia and quality of life in patients with severe and chronic pain despite using tramadol > 300 mg/d].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Uwe; Waldmann-Rex, Susanne; Lehmann, Ute

    2015-06-01

    This subgroup analysis of a non-interventional study involving general practitioners and internists investigated the administration of tapentadol PR (prolonged release) in patients with widely-utilized tramadol pretreatment in routine clinical practice in Germany. Data of all patients in the study cohort who had tramadol as the only opioid in their previous therapy were included in the analysis (n = 685); among them especially the 99 patients with tramadol dosages exceeding 300 mg/d were focused. Data collection during the 3-month observation period included previous and concomitant analgesic treatment, tapentadol PR dosage, pain intensity, sleep and quality of life parameters, and tolerability of tapentadol PR. Back pain was the most common cause of pain (n = 86/99), other pain diagnoses were (partly additionally) recorded in 68 cases. A mixed type of pain dominated. The previous tramadol therapy was usually combined with non-opioids (n = 74), co-analgesics (n = 44) and analgesic rescue medication (n = 35). Tapentadol PR therapy reduced the mean initial pain intensity of 7.3 ± 1.5 to 3.1 ± 1.8 points (NRS-11, 11-point pain scale, n = 96) at the end of observation, using an average dosage of 218.7 mg/d. Tapentadol PR was finally applied as the sole analgesic in 32/95 patients. 69/96 patients achieved a clinically meaningful pain relief of at least 50 %, while 63 patients gained a pain reduction of ≥ 4 NRS-points. 89/95 patients reached or exceeded their additional individual treatment goal. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in pain-related impairments of daily activities and an improvement in quality of life with an overall good tolerability of tapentadol PR. Treatment with tapentadol PR was assessed positively by physicians and patients. Data analysis shows a clinically relevant benefit in patients unsuccessfully pretreated with tramadol by consecutive conversion to the potent analgesic tapentadol PR.

  12. Improvement of a Clinical Score for Necrotizing Fasciitis: 'Pain Out of Proportion' and High CRP Levels Aid the Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschitz, Thomas; Schlicht, Svenja; Siegel, Ekkehard; Hanke, Eric; von Stebut, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare mono-/polymicrobial skin infection that spreads to underlying tissues. NF is quickly progressing and leads to life threatening situations. Immediate surgical debridement together with i.v. antibiotic administration is required to avoid fatal outcome. Early diagnosis is often delayed due to underestimation or confusion with cellulitis. We now compared the initial clinical and laboratory presentation of NF and cellulitis in detail to assess if a typical pattern can be identified that aids timely diagnosis of NF and avoidance of fatal outcome. 138 different clinical and laboratory features of 29 NF patients were compared to those of 59 age- and gender matched patients with severe erysipelas requiring a subsequent hospitalization time of ≥10 days. Differences in clinical presentation were not obvious; however, NF patients suffered significantly more often from strong pain. NF patients exhibited dramatically elevated CRP levels (5-fold, p>0.001). The overall laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC) score was significantly higher in NF patients as compared to cellulitis. However, a modification of the score (alteration of laboratory parameters, addition of clinical parameters) led to a clear improvement of the score with a higher positive predictive value without losing specificity. In summary, clinical differentiation of NF from cellulitis appears to be hard. 'Pain out of proportion' may be an early sign for NF. An improvement of the LRINEC score emphasizing only relevant laboratory and clinical findings as suggested may aid the early diagnosis of NF in the future leading to improvement of disease outcome by enabling rapid adequate therapy.

  13. A randomized control trial on the effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment in reducing pain and improving the quality of life in elderly patients affected by osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Liria; Mandara, Alfonso; Bottali, Michele; Gulisano, Vincenzo; Orfei, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    In the elderly population, a decrease in bone mineral density (osteoporosis) is often associated with a decrease in quality of life and an increase in self reported body pain. This pain originates from the musculoskeletal system and can potentially affect different areas of the body. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on self reported pain and quality of life in an elderly population. Randomized placebo controlled trial. Patients were recruited from the Geriatric Department, Bassini Hospital (Milan, Italy). Patients were randomly assigned to either 6 sessions of OMT (n = 37 patients) or an equivalent number of sham manipulative treatment (SMT) (n = 35 patients). The main outcome variables were QOL measured by QUALEFFO -41 and overall bodily pain measured using a visual analog scale (VAS). Data were analyzed using a two factor ANOVA (treatment × time) for repeated measurements with an α level set at p ≤ 0.05. Main result of this study was that OMT compared to SMT showed a significant decreased of disability. This effect was demonstrated by a significant interaction in the overall disability score (p =0.001) and the Mental wellbeing (p =0.058), Health perception (p =0.005) and Pain (p =0.003) QUALEFFO -41 subscales, while no significant difference (no interaction) for pain as measured by VAS and for the Daily activities, Walking, Household cleaning and Leisure time activities QUALEFFO -41 subscales (p > 0.05) was found. No adverse effects were recorded during the study. This study demonstrated that, in a group of elderly subjects affected by osteoporosis OMT was able to increase self reported QOL while the effect on body pain perception is unclear. This overall improvement in QOL appears to be caused by an improvement in psychological factors (i.e Mental wellbeing and Health perception) rather than physical factors. In fact, all QUALEFFO -41 subscales related to physical function demonstrated no

  14. Use of non-opioid analgesics as adjuvants to opioid analgesia for cancer pain management in an inpatient palliative unit: does this improve pain control and reduce opioid requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Shivani; Gordon, Pamela; Sharma, Prashant; Gross, James; Davis, Mellar P

    2015-03-01

    Cancer pain is complex, and despite the introduction of the WHO cancer pain ladder, few studies have looked at the prevalence of adjuvant medication use in an inpatient palliative medicine unit. In this study, we evaluate the use of adjuvant pain medications in patients admitted to an inpatient palliative care unit and whether their use affects pain scores or opiate dosing. In this retrospective observational study, patients admitted to the inpatient palliative care unit over a 3-month period with a diagnosis of cancer on opioid therapy were selected. Data pertaining to demographics, diagnosis, oral morphine dose equivalent of the opioid at the time of discharge, adjuvant analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and pain scores as reported by nurses and physicians were collected. Seventy-seven patients were eligible over a 3-month period, out of which 65 (84 %) were taking an adjuvant medication. The most commonly prescribed adjuvant was gabapentin (70 %). Fifty-seven percent were taking more than one adjuvant. There were more women in the group receiving adjuvants (57 vs. 17%, p = 0.010). Those without adjuvants compared with those on adjuvants did not have worse pain scores on discharge as reported by physicians (0.8 ± 0.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7, p = 0.58) or nurses (2.0 ± 2.7 vs. 2.1 ± 2.6, p = 0.86). There was no difference in morphine equivalent doses of the opioid in both groups (median (min, max); 112 (58, 504) vs. 200 (30, 5,040)) at the time of discharge; 75-80 % of patients had improvement in pain scores as measured by a two-point reduction in numerical rating scale (NRS). This study shows that adjuvant medications are commonly used for treating pain in patients with cancer. More than half of study population were on two adjuvants or an adjuvant plus NSAID along with an opioid. We did not demonstrate any benefit in terms of improved pain scores or opioid doses with adjuvants, but this could reflect confounding variables and physician choice

  15. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Azizah Ishak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP. Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as “low back pain”, “older people”, and “strengthening exercise”. Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p<0.05. Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances.

  16. Group-based multimodal exercises integrated with cognitive-behavioural therapy improve disability, pain and quality of life of subjects with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial with one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ambrosini, Emilia; Rocca, Barbara; Cazzaniga, Daniele; Liquori, Valentina; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Vernon, Howard

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a group-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme on disability, pain and quality of life in subjects with chronic neck pain. Randomized controlled trial. Specialized rehabilitation centre. A total of 170 patients (mean age of 53 years (13); 121 females). The multidisciplinary group underwent a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme combining multimodal exercises with psychologist-lead cognitive-behavioural therapy sessions. The general exercise group underwent general physiotherapy. Both groups followed group-based programmes once a week for ten weeks. Additionally, the multidisciplinary group met with the psychologist once a week for a 60-minute session. The Neck Disability Index (primary outcome), the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, a pain numerical rating scale and the Short-Form Health Survey. The participants were evaluated before, after training and after 12 months. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was used for each outcome measure. Significant effects ( p-value <0.001) were found over time and between groups for all outcome measures. After training, significant improvements were found for both groups for all outcome measures except kinesiophobia and catastrophizing, which did not change in the control group; however, the improvements were significantly greater for the multidisciplinary group. At 12-month follow-up a clinically meaningful between-group difference of 12.4 Neck Disability Index points was found for disability. A group-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme including cognitive-behavioural therapy was superior to group-based general physiotherapy in improving disability, pain and quality of life of subjects with chronic neck pain. The effects lasted for at least one year.

  17. Improved Pain Relief With Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Two Weeks in Patients Using Tonic Stimulation: Results From a Small Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Peter; Espinet, Anthony; Mitchell, Bruce; Russo, Marc; Muir, Andrew; Verrills, Paul; Davis, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a tonic waveform with consistent stream of pulses; burst delivers groups of pulses separated by short pulse-free periods. The current study compared the short-term safety and efficacy of burst with tonic stimulation in subjects already receiving SCS. At 4 IRB-approved sites, 22 subjects previously implanted with an SCS device for intractable, chronic pain gave informed consent and received burst stimulation for 14 days. Subjects reported average daily Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for overall, trunk, and limb pain using tonic stimulation and after 7 and 14 days of burst stimulation. Thoughts about pain were assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Areas of paresthesia were assessed during tonic and burst stimulation using body maps. Assessment of patient satisfaction and preferred stimulation occurred after 14 days of burst. Average daily overall VAS reduced 46% from a mean of 53.5 (±20.2) mm during tonic SCS to 28.5 (±18.1) mm during burst (p pain relief was the most common reason cited for preference. A majority of subjects reported improved pain relief using burst compared with tonic stimulation. Most subjects experienced less paresthesia during burst and preferred burst citing better pain relief. © 2015 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. How Repeated Time To Event (RTTE) modelling of opioid requests after surgery may improve future post-operative pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Kreilgaard, Mads

    at Orthopaedic Department, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark during the period May-Dec 2012. Morphine administration times (estimated precision: ±5mins), formulations and doses were extracted from medical journals in the hospitalization period or until 96 hours after surgery. RTTE modelling was performed......: (1) Dept. of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark (2) Orthopaedic Surgery Research Unit, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark (3) Dept. of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University, Sweden Type: Poster: Drug/Disease modelling – CNS Objectives: Amount of opioid (eg......Title: How Repeated Time To Event (RTTE) modelling of opioid requests after surgery may improve future post-operative pain management Author: Rasmus Vestergaard Juul (1) Sten Rasmussen (2) Mads Kreilgaard (1) Ulrika S. H. Simonsson (3) Lona Louring Christrup (1) Trine Meldgaard Lund (1) Institution...

  19. Pain and Nociception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain, especially pain caused by metastasis to bone, is a severe type of pain, and unless the cause and consequences can be resolved, the pain will become chronic. As detection and survival among patients with cancer have improved, pain has become an increasing challenge, because traditiona...... spinal cord mechanisms of sensitization, and finally address central processing. Our aim is to provide a mechanistic background for the sensory characteristics of cancer-induced bone pain as a basis for better understanding and treating this condition.......Cancer pain, especially pain caused by metastasis to bone, is a severe type of pain, and unless the cause and consequences can be resolved, the pain will become chronic. As detection and survival among patients with cancer have improved, pain has become an increasing challenge, because traditional...... therapies are often only partially effective. Until recently, knowledge of cancer pain mechanisms was poor compared with understanding of neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. We now view cancer-induced bone pain as a complex pain state involving components of both inflammatory and neuropathic pain...

  20. Using Quality Improvement Methods to Implement an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) Supported Individualized Home Pain Management Plan for Children with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lori E; Simmons, Kenya; Kaiser, Peggy; Davis, Blair; Boyd, Patricia; Eichhorn, Tiffany; Mahaney, Tracy; Joffe, Naomi; Morgan, Darice; Schibler, Kathy; Anderson, Viia; Quinn, Charles T; Kalinyak, Karen A

    2014-05-01

    Using quality improvement methodology, our goal was to develop and implement individualized home pain management plans (HPMP) that included pharmacologic as well as non-pharmacologic strategies for children with sickle cell disease (SCD). We hypothesized that successfully implemented HPMPs would have an impact on Emergency Department (ED) use, decreasing ED visits for uncomplicated SCD pain episodes. A multidisciplinary quality improvement team developed a questionnaire to assess the frequency, location and severity of a patient's pain during a routine, comprehensive visit in order to help the patient and family develop an effective pain management strategy using both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic actions. Using plan do study act cycles (PDSAs), this team was able to build this process into the daily workflow for all SCD patients age 5 years to 21 years of age. Patients with comprehensive visits scheduled from January 2012 to May 2013 were included (N=188) in the intervention. By May of 2013, 88% of eligible patients had an individualized HPMP in place. There was a concomitant reduction in the percentage of SCD patients seen in the ED for uncomplicated SCD pain (6.9% vs. 1.1%). Using quality improvement methods, an individualized HPMP intervention was incorporated successfully into the daily workflow of a busy outpatient SCD clinic. This intervention has the potential to improve patient outcomes by decreasing avoidable ED visits as well as reducing overall healthcare costs.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of participatory ergonomic low back pain training on workplace improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Kenshi; Kusumoto, Akira; Nagata, Tomohisa; Mori, Koji

    2017-05-25

    This study aimed to determine the effects of participatory workplace improvement (PWI) -based provision of ergonomic training and ergonomic action checklists (ACLs) to on-site managers on workplace improvement activities for low back pain (LBP). A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted at a manufacturing company in Japan. Teams entered in the study were randomly assigned to a control and an intervention group. A total of three interventional training sessions on methods of ergonomics were provided to on-site managers in the intervention group, with 1-month intervals between sessions. Ergonomic ACLs were provided at the same time. After completion of the training sessions, each team then provided a report of improvements each month for the next 10 months. Two people in charge of safety and health chose two major objectives of the implemented activities from the five categories. The reported number of improvements was analyzed using a Poisson regression model. In the intervention group, although the incident rate ratio (IRR) of PWIs in countermeasures for the LBP category was significantly elevated after the training sessions, the IRR of improvements decreased over time during the 10-month follow-up period. No significant difference was observed in the IRR of total PWIs in either the control or intervention group. PWI-based provision of ergonomic training sessions and ergonomics ACLs to on-site managers was shown to be effective for workplace improvement activities targeted at LBP. However, because the effects decrease over time, efforts should be made to maintain the effects through regular interventions.

  2. Treatment with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone improves pain relief and opioid-induced constipation compared with prolonged-release oxycodone in patients with chronic severe pain and laxative-refractory constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelaert, Jan; Koopmans-Klein, Gineke; Dioh, Alioune; Louis, Frédéric; Gorissen, Mayken; Logé, David; Van Op den Bosch, Joeri; van Megen, Yvonne J B

    2015-04-01

    Laxative-refractory opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is defined as OIC despite using 2 laxatives with a different mechanism of action (based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System level 4 term [contact laxatives, osmotically acting laxatives, softeners/emollients, enemas, and others]). OIC has a significant impact on the treatment and quality of life of patients with severe chronic pain. This noninterventional, observational, real-life study in Belgium investigated the efficacy of prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone combination (PR OXN) treatment regarding pain relief and OIC compared with previous prolonged-release oxycodone (PR OXY) treatment for laxative-refractory OIC in daily clinical practice. Laxative-refractory OIC patients with severe chronic pain were treated with PR OXN for 12 weeks (3 visits). Pain relief (assessed on a numerical rating scale) and OIC (assessed by using the Bowel Function Index [BFI]) were evaluated at each visit. A responder was defined as a patient who had: (1) no worsening of pain at the last visit compared with visit 1 or a numerical rating scale ≤4 at visit 3/last visit; and (2) a reduction in BFI ≥12 units at visit 3/last visit compared with visit 1; or (3) a BFI ≤28.8 at visit 3/last visit. Sixty-eight laxative-refractory OIC patients with severe chronic pain (mean (sd) age 59.8 (13.3) years, 67.6% female and 91.2% non-malignant pain) were treated for 91 days with PR OXN (median daily dose, 20 mg). Treatment with PR OXN resulted in a significant and clinically relevant decrease of pain of 2.1 units (P opioid related, and PR OXN treatment was well tolerated. Treatment with PR OXN resulted in a significant and clinically relevant reduction in OIC compared with previous PR OXY treatment for these patients with severe chronic pain and laxative-refractory OIC. Treatment with PR OXN also resulted in a significant improvement in pain relief and quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01710917

  3. Sources of pain in laparoendoscopic gynecological surgeons: An analysis of ergonomic factors and proposal of an aid to improve comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sa Ra; Shim, Sunah; Yu, Taeri; Jeong, Kyungah; Chung, Hye Won

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) offers cosmetic benefits to patients; however, surgeons often experience pain during MIS. We administered an ergonomic questionnaire to 176 Korean laparoscopic gynecological surgeons to determine potential sources of pain during surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that had a significant impact on gynecological surgeons' pain. Operating table height at the beginning of surgery and during the operation were significantly associated with neck and shoulder discomfort (P ergonomic solutions to reduce gynecological laparoscopic surgeons' pain. Based on our results, we propose the use of an ergonomic surgical step stool to reduce physical pain related to performing laparoscopic operations.

  4. Comprehensive study of back and leg pain improvements after adult spinal deformity surgery: analysis of 421 patients with 2-year follow-up and of the impact of the surgery on treatment satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Clark, Aaron J; Lafage, Virginie; Kim, Han Jo; Rolston, John D; Eastlack, Robert; Hart, Robert A; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Kelly, Michael P; Kebaish, Khaled; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric; Hostin, Richard; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Back and leg pain are the primary outcomes of adult spinal deformity (ASD) and predict patients' seeking of surgical management. The authors sought to characterize changes in back and leg pain after operative or nonoperative management of ASD. Outcomes were assessed according to pain severity, type of surgical procedure, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab spine deformity class, and patient satisfaction. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed data in a prospective multicenter database of ASD patients. Inclusion criteria were the following: age > 18 years and presence of spinal deformity as defined by a scoliosis Cobb angle ≥ 20°, sagittal vertical axis length ≥ 5 cm, pelvic tilt angle ≥ 25°, or thoracic kyphosis angle ≥ 60°. Patients were grouped into nonoperated and operated subcohorts and by the type of surgical procedure, spine SRS-Schwab deformity class, preoperative pain severity, and patient satisfaction. Numerical rating scale (NRS) scores of back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, physical component summary (PCS) scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs), and substantial clinical benefits (SCBs) were assessed. RESULTS Patients in whom ASD had been operatively managed were 6 times more likely to have an improvement in back pain and 3 times more likely to have an improvement in leg pain than patients in whom ASD had been nonoperatively managed. Patients whose ASD had been managed nonoperatively were more likely to have their back or leg pain remain the same or worsen. The incidence of postoperative leg pain was 37.0% at 6 weeks postoperatively and 33.3% at the 2-year follow-up (FU). At the 2-year FU, among patients with any preoperative back or leg pain, 24.3% and 37.8% were free of back and leg pain, respectively, and among patients with severe (NRS scores of 7-10) preoperative back or leg pain, 21.0% and 32.8% were free of back and leg pain, respectively

  5. Long-Term Pain Treatment Did Not Improve Sleep in Nursing Home Patients with Comorbid Dementia and Depression: A 13-Week Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti M. Blytt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previous research indicates that pain treatment may improve sleep among nursing home patients. We aimed to investigate the long-term effect of pain treatment on 24-h sleep patterns in patients with comorbid depression and dementia.Design: A 13-week, multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between August 2014 and September 2016.Setting: Long-term patients from 47 nursing homes in Norway.Participants: We included 106 patients with comorbid dementia and depression according to the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD.Intervention: Patients who were not using analgesics were randomized to receive either paracetamol (3 g/day or placebo tablets. Those who already received pain treatment were randomized to buprenorphine transdermal system (maximum 10 μg/h/7 days or placebo transdermal patches.Measurements: Sleep was assessed continuously for 7 days by actigraphy, at baseline and in week 13. Total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep onset latency (SOL, wake after sleep onset (WASO, early morning awakening (EMA, and number of wake bouts (NoW were evaluated. In addition, daytime total sleep time (DTS was estimated. Pain was assessed with Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale (MOBID-2.Results: The linear mixed model analyses for TST, SE, SOL, WASO, EMA, NoW and DTS showed no statistically significant differences between patients who received active pain treatment and those who received placebo. Post hoc subgroup analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences between active treatment and placebo from baseline to week 13 in patients who were in pain (MOBID-2 ≥ 3 at baseline, or in patients who had poor sleep (defined as SE < 85% at baseline. Patients who received active buprenorphine showed an increase in TST and SE compared to those who received active paracetamol

  6. A randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of a self-care intervention to improve cancer pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustøen, Tone; Valeberg, Berit T; Kolstad, Eva; Wist, Erik; Paul, Steven; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The undertreatment of cancer pain remains a significant clinical problem. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of the PRO-SELF Pain Control Program that was modified for Norwegian cancer patients in decreasing pain and increasing opioid intake compared with control care. Oncology outpatients with pain from bone metastasis were randomized into the PRO-SELF (n = 87) or control (n = 92) groups. A nurse visited patients in the PRO-SELF group in their home at weeks 1, 3, and 6 and conducted telephone interviews at weeks 2, 4, and 5. Patients in both groups completed a daily diary of pain intensity ratings and analgesic intake. For both groups, significant decreases in pain intensity scores and in hours per day in pain (both, P pain measures. In both groups, total dose of opioid taken increased over time. However, no significant group × time interactions were found for changes over time in the total dose, around-the-clock dose, or as-needed dose of opioid analgesics taken. Possible reasons for the lack of efficacy include an inadequate dose of the psychoeducational intervention, inadequate changes in analgesic prescriptions, and/or the impact of attention provided to the control group. Coaching, nursing support, and the use of a pain diary may be important interventions to reduce pain intensity.

  7. Topical lidocaine to improve oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth ulcers: a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Sandy M; McCarthy, Michelle; Tancharoen, Chasari; Lee, Katherine J; Davidson, Andrew; Babl, Franz E

    2014-03-01

    We establish the efficacy of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions compared with placebo. This was a randomized placebo-controlled trial of viscous lidocaine versus placebo at a single pediatric emergency department. Study staff, clinicians, nurses, caregivers, and participants were blinded to the group assignment. Children with acute infectious ulcerative mouth conditions (gingivostomatitis, ulcerative pharyngitis, or hand, foot, and mouth disease) and poor oral fluid intake were randomized to receive 0.15 mL/kg of either 2% viscous lidocaine or placebo with identical appearance and flavor. The primary outcome was the amount of fluid ingested in the 60 minutes after administration of the intervention, with a difference in intake of 4 mL/kg considered clinically important. Secondary outcomes were specific milliliter per kilogram fluid targets and incidence of adverse events. One hundred participants were recruited (50 per treatment group), all of whom completed the 60-minute fluid trial period. Oral intake 1 hour after drug administration was similar in both groups: lidocaine median 8.49 mL/kg (interquartile range 4.07, 13.84 mL/kg) versus placebo 9.31 mL/kg (interquartile range 3.06, 15.18 mL/kg); difference in medians 0.82 mL/kg (95% confidence interval -2.52 to 3.26); Mann-Whitney P=.90. Likewise, short-term secondary outcomes were similar between the groups and there were no adverse events in either group. Viscous lidocaine is not superior to a flavored gel placebo in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth ulcers. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Clinical Studies about improvement rate in managering patients who had lumbago and pain in loin & feet with herbal-acupunture therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tung-Shuen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this study is to compare the improvement rate in managering patients who had lumbago and pain in loin & feet by herbal-acupunture therapy with conservative treatment. Methods : 40patients who invited from March. 2003 to May. 2004 with lumbago and pain in loin & feet inve, were divided into two classes. A class was managed with conservative treatment(acupuncture, herb med, negative therapy, bed rest and physical therapy and herbal-acupuncture therapy, the other class was managed with conservative treatment only. Two classes were distributed by sex and age, therapeutic periods, radiolographic results and therapeutic results that checked with VAS(visual analog scale and ODI(Oswestry disability index. Results : According to VAS and ODI results, A class was managed with conservative treatment and herbal-acupuncture therapy shows the improvement in controling the pain of lumbago etc. comparing with the other class.

  9. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  10. Deep heating therapy via microwave diathermy relieves pain and improves physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabini, A; Piazzini, D B; Tancredi, G; Foti, C; Milano, G; Ronconi, G; Specchia, A; Ferrara, P E; Maggi, L; Amabile, E; Galli, M; Bernabei, R; Bertolini, C; Marzetti, E

    2012-12-01

    Deep heating therapy (DHT) has shown to improve pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the short term. Benefits of superficial heating therapy (SHT) are controversial. Long-term effects of both heating modalities have not yet been investigated. To compare the effects of DHT and SHT in patients with symptomatic knee OA, and to determine the long-term effects of heat therapy. Double-blind randomized clinical trial. Outpatient clinic of Geriatrics and Physiatrics, University Hospital. Fifty-four patients with radiologically established diagnosis of moderate knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade II or III) and pain lasting for at least three weeks. DHT: local microwave diathermy (three 30-min sessions a week for four weeks); SHT: application of hot packs (three 30-min sessions a week for four weeks). Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index for the assessment of joint pain, stiffness and physical function limitations. British Medical Research Council (BMRC) rating scale for the evaluation of muscle strength, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain assessment. Follow up: 24 weeks for all outcome measures; 12 months for the primary outcome. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a treatment effect in favor of DHT for all outcome measures. No clinically relevant changes were observed in the SHT group. Benefits of DHT were maintained over 12 months of follow-up. DHT via localized microwave diathermy improves pain, muscle strength and physical function in patients affected by knee OA, with benefits maintained over the long term. No clinically relevant improvements were observed in patients who underwent SHT. DHT via microwave diathermy delivered three times a week for four weeks significantly improves pain and function in patients affected by moderate knee OA, with benefits retained for at least 12 months. No clinically relevant changes are observed in knee OA patients treated with SHT.

  11. Use of a clinical pathway to improve the acute management of vaso-occlusive crisis pain in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Katherine L; Krajewski, Jennifer A; Babineau, John; Tresgallo, Mary; Schechter, William; Saroyan, John M; Kharbanda, Anupam

    2014-04-01

    The most common, debilitating morbidity of sickle cell disease (SCD) is vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) pain. Although guidelines exist for its management, they are generally not well-followed, and research in other pediatric diseases has shown that clinical pathways improve care. The purpose of our study was to determine whether a clinical pathway improves the acute management of sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) pain in the pediatric emergency department (PED). Pain management practices were prospectively investigated before and after the initiation of a clinical pathway in the PED of an urban, tertiary care center with 50,000 ED visits per year and approximately 200 active sickle cell patients. The pathway included instructions for triage, monitoring, medication administration, and timing of assessments and interventions. Data were eligible from 35 pre-pathway and 33 post-pathway visits. Primary outcome was time interval to administration of first analgesic medication. Statistical analysis was by Student's t-test, using natural-log-transformed data for outcomes with skewed distribution curves. Time interval to first analgesic improved from 74 to 42 minutes (P = 0.012) and to first opioid from 94 to 46 minutes (P = 0.013). The percentage of patients who received ketorolac increased from 57% to 82% (P = 0.03). Decrease in time interval to subsequent pain score assessment was not statistically significant (110 to 72 minutes (P = 0.07)), and change in pain score was not different (P = 0.25). The use of a clinical pathway for sickle cell VOC in the PED can improve important aspects of pain management and merits further investigation and implementation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sources of pain in laparoendoscopic gynecological surgeons: An analysis of ergonomic factors and proposal of an aid to improve comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sa Ra; Shim, Sunah; Yu, Taeri; Jeong, Kyungah; Chung, Hye Won

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) offers cosmetic benefits to patients; however, surgeons often experience pain during MIS. We administered an ergonomic questionnaire to 176 Korean laparoscopic gynecological surgeons to determine potential sources of pain during surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that had a significant impact on gynecological surgeons' pain. Operating table height at the beginning of surgery and during the operation were significantly associated...

  13. The Maastricht Ultrasound Shoulder pain trial (MUST): Ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of patients with non-chronic shoulder pain in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Ottenheijm, Ramon PG; Joore, Manuela A; Walenkamp, Geert HIM; Weijers, René E; Winkens, Bjorn; Cals, Jochen WL; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Subacromial disorders are considered to be one of the most common pathologies affecting the shoulder. Optimal therapy for shoulder pain (SP) in primary care is yet unknown, since clinical history and physical examination do not provide decisive evidence as to the patho-anatomical origin of the symptoms. Optimal decision strategies can be furthered by applying ultrasound imaging (US), an accurate method in diagnosing SP, demonstrating a clear relationship between diagnosis ...

  14. Can we improve pain and sleep in elderly individuals with transcranial direct current stimulation? – Results from a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey MP

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Philippe Harvey,1,2 Dominique Lorrain,1,3 Marylie Martel,1,2 Kayla Bergeron-Vezina,1 Francis Houde,1,2 Mario Séguin,2,4 Guillaume Léonard1,2,5 1Research Centre on Aging, CIUSSS de l’Estrie-CHUS, 2Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 3Department of Psychology, Université de Sherbrooke 4Department of Neurosurgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, 5School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada Background: The prevalence of chronic pain and sleep disturbances substantially increases with age. Pharmacotherapy remains the primary treatment option for these health issues. However, side effects and drug interactions are difficult to control in elderly individuals.Aims: The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomized sham-controlled trial and to collect preliminary data on the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to reduce pain and improve sleep in older adults suffering from chronic pain.Methods: Fourteen elderly individuals (mean age 71±7 years suffering from chronic pain and sleep complaints were randomized to receive either anodal tDCS, applied over the primary motor cortex (2 mA, 20 minutes, or sham tDCS, for 5 consecutive days. Pain was measured with visual analog scales, pain logbooks and questionnaires, while sleep was assessed with actigraphy, sleep diaries and questionnaires.Results: There were no missing data for pain and sleep measures, except for actigraphy, that generated several missing data. Blinding was maintained throughout the study, for both the evaluator and participants. Active but not sham tDCS significantly reduced pain (P<0.05. No change was observed in sleep parameters, in both the active and sham tDCS groups (all P≥0.18.Conclusion: The present study provides guidelines for the implementation of future tDCS studies in larger populations of elderly individuals. M1 anodal tDCS in this

  15. Gabapentin Does Not Appear to Improve Postoperative Pain and Sleep Patterns in Patients Who Concomitantly Receive Regional Anesthesia for Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Control Trial

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    Jean Daniel Eloy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, gabapentin has gained popularity as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of postoperative pain. Numerous studies have shown a decrease in pain score, even with immediate postoperative activity, which is significant for early post-op ambulation and regaining functionality sooner. However, studies have been in conclusive in patients undergoing lower extremity orthopedic surgery. For this reason, we hoped to study the effect of gabapentin on postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, or a hip fracture repair. This was done in the setting of ensuring adequate postoperative analgesia with regional blocks and opioid PCA, as is protocol at our institution. Given the sedative effects of gabapentin and the potential for improving postoperative sleep patterns, we also studied the drug’s effect on this aspect of our patient’s postoperative course. We utilized the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and Visual Analog Scale for pain to obtain a more objective standardized score amongst our study population. Our results indicate that gabapentin does not offer any additional relief in pain or improve sleep habits in patients who have received either a femoral or lumbar plexus block for lower extremity orthopedic surgery. This trial is registered with NCT01546857.

  16. EFFECT OF KINESIO TAPING IN ADJUNCT TO CONVENTIONAL THERAPY IN REDUCING PAIN AND IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL ABILITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PLANTAR FASCIITIS A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

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    S.Tulasi Ratna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of foot. The pain and discomfort associated with this condition has a dramatic impact on physical mobility and function. Treatment of this condition is usually conservative; however, review of literature revealed no clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy of any targeted treatment for this condition. Methods: This was a prospective study which included 60 subjects with plantar fasciitis, who were randomly divided into two groups. Subjects in group I received ultrasound and exercise therapy while subjects in group II received kinesio tape in addition to ultrasound and exercise therapy. Patients were evaluated at the beginning of the study and at the end of three weeks using VAS (visual analogue scale for pain intensity, PFPS (plantar fasciitis pain / disability scale for functional ability and ultra sonography for any change in the caliber of plantar fascia. Results: A statistically significant difference in improvement was noted within the groups and between the groups in terms of visual analogue scale and plantar fasciitis pain /disability scale score (p0.05. Conclusion: Kinesio taping can be used as an adjunct to conventional therapy in clinical application for greater improvement in pain levels and functional ability in patients with plantar fasciitis.

  17. Sequential application of non-pharmacological interventions reduces the severity of labour pain, delays use of pharmacological analgesia, and improves some obstetric outcomes: a randomised trial

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    Rubneide Barreto Silva Gallo

    2018-01-01

    Trial registration: NCT01389128. [Gallo RBS, Santana LS, Marcolin AC, Duarte G, Quintana SM (2018 Sequential application of non-pharmacological interventions reduces the severity of labour pain, delays use of pharmacological analgesia, and improves some obstetric outcomes: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy 64: 33–40

  18. An innovative nonpharmacological intervention combined with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia increased patient global improvement in pain and satisfaction after major surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang CC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chia-Chun Chuang,1 Chien-Ching Lee,1,2 Li-Kai Wang,1 Bor-Shyh Lin,2 Wen-Ju Wu,1 Chung-Han Ho,3 Jen-Yin Chen1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, 2Department of Imaging and Biomedical Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 3Department of Medical Research, Chi Mei Medical Center, 4Department of the Senior Citizen Service Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate whether a nonpharmacological approach through implementation of a communication improvement program (named CICARE for Connect, Introduce, Communicate, Ask, Respond and Exit into standard operating procedure (SOP in acute pain service (APS improved satisfaction in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA.Patients and methods: This was a nonrandomized before–after study. Adult patients (aged between 20 and 80 years who received IV-PCA after major surgery were included. Implementing CICARE into SOP was conducted in APS. Anonymous questionnaires were used to measure outcomes in this prospective two-part survey. The first part completed by APS nurses contained patients’ characteristics, morphine dosage, delivery/demand ratios, IV-PCA side effects and pain at rest measured with an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10. A score of NRS ≥4 was defined as inadequately treated pain. The ten-question second part was completed by patients voluntarily after IV-PCA was discontinued. Each question was assessed with a 5-point Likert scale (1: extremely poor; 5: excellent. Patients were separated into “before” and “after” CICARE groups. Primary outcomes were patient global impression of improvement in pain (PGI-Improvement and patient satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included quality of communication skills, instrument proficiency and accessibility/availability of IV-PCA.Results: The response rate was 55.3%, with 187 usable questionnaires. CICARE

  19. Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduce pain and improve quality of life in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia? A randomized controlled trial

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    Tantawy SA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sayed A Tantawy,1,2 Dalia M Kamel,3 Walid Kamal Abdelbasset4,5 1Department of Physiotherapy, Centre of Radiation, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Ahlia University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain; 3Department of Physical Therapy for Obstetrics & Gynecology, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 4Department of Physical Therapy and Health Rehabilitation, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul Aziz University, Alkharj, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Physical Therapy, Kasr Al-Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt Background: Chronic orchialgia is defined as testicular pain, which may be either unilateral or bilateral, lasting for more than 3 months. It disturbs a patient’s daily activities and quality of life (QoL, inciting the patient to search for treatments to alleviate the pain. It is estimated that 25% of chronic orchialgia cases are idiopathic.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate how effective transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS is in pain reduction and how it consequently affects the QoL in patients with idiopathic chronic orchialgia (ICO.Patients and methods: Seventy-one patients were randomly assigned to group A (study group, which included 36 patients who received TENS and analgesia, and group B (control group, which included 35 patients who received analgesia only. The outcome measures were the participants’ demographic data and results of the visual analog scale (VAS and QoL questionnaire. These outcomes were measured before and after 4 weeks of treatment and at 2-month follow-up.Results: The results showed that compared to pretreatment, there was a significant reduction in pain postintervention and at 2-month follow-up in group A (P<0.0001 and <0.001, respectively; F=7.1 as well as a significant improvement in QoL at these time points (P<0.0001 and <0

  20. Management of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, P; Gaynor, J S

    2000-07-01

    Pain secondary to cancer in animals should be promptly addressed to alleviate suffering, stress, and anxiety and to improve quality of life. Uncontrolled cancer pain can have a negative effect on the owners and caregivers of affected animals. The pathophysiology of cancer pain is discussed in this article, along with pain evaluation and monitoring. Treatment of cancer pain should be individualized, and a step-wise approach to the management of cancer pain is presented. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and adjuvant medications are also reviewed.

  1. Pediatric pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated.

  2. Intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow stromal cells improves neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J; Zurita, M; Rico, M A; Aguayo, C; Fernández, C; Gutiérrez, R; Rodríguez-Boto, G; Saab, A; Hassan, R; Ortega, C

    2018-03-23

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is highly disabling, responds poorly to pharmacological treatment, and represents a significant cause of decreased quality of life in patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). In recent years, cell therapy with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been considered as a potential therapeutic weapon in this entity. Ten patients suffering chronic SCI received 100 million MSCs into subarachnoid space by lumbar puncture (month 1 of the study) and this procedure was repeated at months 4 and 7 until reaching a total doses of 300 million MSCs. Intensity of NP was measured by standard numerical rating scale (VAS) from 0 to 10, recording scores previous to the first MSCs administration and monthly, until month 10 of follow-up. Months 1, 4, 7 and 10 of the study were selected as time points in order to a statistical analysis by the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank test. Our results showed significant and progressive improvement in NP intensity after the first administration of MSCs (p: 0.003). This study supports the benefit of intrathecal administration of autologous MSCs for the treatment of NP in patients with SCI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP versus Autologous Whole Blood on Pain and Function Improvement in Tennis Elbow: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Seyed Ahmad Raeissadat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS, modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P>0.05. At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P<0.05. Conclusion. PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion.

  4. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) versus Autologous Whole Blood on Pain and Function Improvement in Tennis Elbow: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Sedighipour, Leyla; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Bayat, Masume; Rahimi, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Autologous whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have been both suggested to treat chronic tennis elbow. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of PRP versus autologous whole blood local injection in chronic tennis elbow. Methods. Forty patients with tennis elbow were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group 1 was treated with a single injection of 2 mL of autologous PRP and group 2 with 2 mL of autologous blood. Tennis elbow strap, stretching, and strengthening exercises were administered for both groups during a 2-month followup. Pain and functional improvements were assessed using visual analog scale (VAS), modified Mayo Clinic performance index for the elbow, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) at 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Results. All pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. No statistically significant difference was noted between groups regarding pain scores in 4-week follow-up examination (P > 0.05). At 8-week reevaluations, VAS and Mayo scores improved only in PRP group (P PRP and autologous whole blood injections are both effective to treat chronic lateral epicondylitis. PRP might be slightly superior in 8-week followup. However, further studies are suggested to get definite conclusion.

  5. Doubling Your Payoff: Winning Pain Relief Engages Endogenous Pain Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Susanne; Gandhi, Wiebke; Kwan, Saskia; Ahmed, Alysha-Karima; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    When in pain, pain relief is much sought after, particularly for individuals with chronic pain. In analogy to augmentation of the hedonic experience ("liking") of a reward by the motivation to obtain a reward ("wanting"), the seeking of pain relief in a motivated state might increase the experience of pain relief when obtained. We tested this hypothesis in a psychophysical experiment in healthy human subjects, by assessing potential pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief "won" in a wheel of fortune game compared with pain relief without winning, exploiting the fact that the mere chance of winning induces a motivated state. The results show pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief obtained by winning in behaviorally assessed pain perception and ratings of pain intensity. Further, the higher participants scored on the personality trait novelty seeking, the more pain inhibition was induced. These results provide evidence that pain relief, when obtained in a motivated state, engages endogenous pain-inhibitory systems beyond the pain reduction that underlies the relief in the first place. Consequently, such pain relief might be used to improve behavioral pain therapy, inducing a positive, perhaps self-amplifying feedback loop of reduced pain and improved functionality.

  6. Local anesthetic delivery via surgical drain provides improved pain control versus direct skin infiltration following axillary node dissection for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khpal, Muska; Miller, James R C; Petrovic, Zika; Hassanally, Delilah

    2018-03-01

    Axillary node dissection has a central role in the surgical management of breast cancer; however, it is associated with a significant risk of lymphoedema and chronic pain. Peri-operative administration of local anesthesia reduces acute and persistent post-surgical pain, but there is currently no consensus on the optimal method of local anesthetic delivery. Patients undergoing axillary dissection for breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive a one-off dose of levobupivacaine 0.5% (up to 2 mg/kg) following surgery, either via the surgical drain or by direct skin infiltration. Post-operative pain control at rest and on shoulder abduction was assessed using a numerical rating scale. Total analgesia consumption 48 h after surgery was also recorded. Pain scores were significantly lower when local anesthesia was administered via surgical drain at both 3 and 12 h after surgery; this trend extended to 24 h post-operatively. However, pain scores on shoulder abduction did not differ at the 12 or 24 h time points. No differences were found in the total analgesia consumption or length of hospital stay between treatment groups. This study demonstrates that local anesthetic delivery via a surgical drain provides improved pain control compared to direct skin infiltration following axillary node dissection. This is likely to be important for the management of acute pain in the immediate post-operative period; however, further studies may be required to validate this in specific patient subgroups, e.g., breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

  7. Improved Pain Relief With Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Two Weeks in Patients Using Tonic Stimulation: Results From a Small Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Peter; Espinet, Anthony; Mitchell, Bruce; Russo, Marc; Muir, Andrew; Verrills, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a tonic waveform with consistent stream of pulses; burst delivers groups of pulses separated by short pulse‐free periods. The current study compared the short‐term safety and efficacy of burst with tonic stimulation in subjects already receiving SCS. Materials and Methods At 4 IRB‐approved sites, 22 subjects previously implanted with an SCS device for intractable, chronic pain gave informed consent and received burst stimulation for 14 days. Subjects reported average daily Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for overall, trunk, and limb pain using tonic stimulation and after 7 and 14 days of burst stimulation. Thoughts about pain were assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Areas of paresthesia were assessed during tonic and burst stimulation using body maps. Assessment of patient satisfaction and preferred stimulation occurred after 14 days of burst. Results Average daily overall VAS reduced 46% from a mean of 53.5 (±20.2) mm during tonic SCS to 28.5 (±18.1) mm during burst (p VAS scores were also reduced by 33% and 51%, respectively. During burst, 16 subjects (73%) reported no paresthesia, 5 (23%) reported a reduction, and 1 (4%) reported increased paresthesia. After 14 days, 21 subjects (95%) reported being very satisfied or satisfied with burst. Burst was preferred by 20 subjects (91%), tonic by 1 (5%), and 1 (5%) reported no preference. Better pain relief was the most common reason cited for preference. Conclusions A majority of subjects reported improved pain relief using burst compared with tonic stimulation. Most subjects experienced less paresthesia during burst and preferred burst citing better pain relief. PMID:25879884

  8. The use of stabilization exercises and movement reeducation to manage pain and improve function in a dancer with focal degenerative joint disease of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagins, Marshall

    2011-09-01

    Little has been written about rehabilitation of low back pain (LBP) specific to the professional dancer. However, there is a rapidly increasing amount of rehabilitation research related to the care of LBP in the general population that may be applied to the dancer population. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy management of a 37-year-old female professional dancer with a 5-year history of spinal pain and loss of function in the presence of degenerative joint disease at a single segment (T12-L1). Patient interventions focused on stabilization exercises and movement reeducation. The dancer returned to limited dance performance at 6 weeks. At 5 months she had returned to complete dance function, with pain and functional (Oswestry) levels improved from initial values of 7/10 and 48%, respectively, to 1/10 and 26%.

  9. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjøsund Hanne L

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. Conclusions The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the

  10. Does core stability exercise improve lumbopelvic stability (through endurance tests) more than general exercise in chronic low back pain? A quasi-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Mohammad Bagher; Rezaei, Mandana; Zamanlou, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare core stability and general exercises (GEs) in chronic low back pain (LBP) patients based on lumbopelvic stability (LPS) assessment through three endurance core stability tests. There is a controversy about preference of core stability exercise (CSE) over other types of exercise for chronic LBP. Studies which have compared these exercises used other outcomes than those related to LPS. As it is claimed that CSE enhances back stability, endurance tests for LPS were used. A 16-session CSE program and a GE program with the same duration were conducted for two groups of participants. Frequency of interventions for both groups was three times a week. Forty-three people (aged 18-60 years) with chronic non-specific LBP were alternately allocated to core stability (n = 22) or GE group (n = 21) when admitted. The primary outcomes were three endurance core stability tests including: (1) trunk flexor; (2) trunk extensor; and (3) side bridge tests. Secondary outcomes were disability and pain. Measurements were taken at baseline and the end of the intervention. After the intervention, test times increased and disability and pain decreased within groups. There was no significant difference between two groups in increasing test times (p = 0.23 to p = 0.36) or decreasing disability (p = 0.16) and pain (p = 0.73). CSE is not more effective than GE for improving endurance core stability tests and reducing disability and pain in chronic non-specific LBP patients.

  11. Pain and Policy Studies Group: Two Decades of Working to Address Regulatory Barriers to Improve Opioid Availability and Accessibility Around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, James F; Maurer, Martha A

    2018-02-01

    For two decades, the Pain & Policy Studies Group (PPSG), a global research program at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, has worked passionately to fulfill its mission of improving pain relief by achieving balanced access to opioids worldwide. PPSG's early work highlighted the conceptual framework of balance leading to the development of the seminal guidelines and criteria for evaluating opioid policy. It has collaborated at the global level with United Nations agencies to promote access to opioids and has developed a unique model of technical assistance to help national governments assess regulatory barriers to essential medicines for pain relief and amend existing or develop new legislation that facilitates appropriate and adequate opioid prescribing according to international standards. This model was initially applied in regional workshops and individual country projects and then adapted for PPSG's International Pain Policy Fellowship, which provides long-term mentoring and support for several countries simultaneously. The PPSG disseminates its work online in several ways, including an extensive Web site, news alerts, and through several social media outlets. PPSG has become the focal point for expertise on policy governing drug control and medicine and pharmacy practice related to opioid availability and pain relief. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sources of pain in laparoendoscopic gynecological surgeons: An analysis of ergonomic factors and proposal of an aid to improve comfort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa Ra Lee

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive surgery (MIS offers cosmetic benefits to patients; however, surgeons often experience pain during MIS. We administered an ergonomic questionnaire to 176 Korean laparoscopic gynecological surgeons to determine potential sources of pain during surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that had a significant impact on gynecological surgeons' pain. Operating table height at the beginning of surgery and during the operation were significantly associated with neck and shoulder discomfort (P <0.001. The ability to control the operating table height was the single factor most significantly associated with neck (P <0.001 and shoulder discomfort (P <0.001. Discomfort of the hand/digits was significantly associated with the trocar site (P = 0.035. The type of electrocautery activation switch and foot pedal were significantly related to surgeons' foot and leg discomfort (P <0.001. In evaluating the co-occurrence of pain in 4 different sites (neck, shoulder, back, hand/digits, the neck and shoulder were determined to have the highest co-occurrence of pain (Spearman's ρ = 0.64, P <0.001. These results provide guidance for identifying ergonomic solutions to reduce gynecological laparoscopic surgeons' pain. Based on our results, we propose the use of an ergonomic surgical step stool to reduce physical pain related to performing laparoscopic operations.

  13. Trunk Muscle Training Augmented with Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Appears to Improve Function in Older Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Preliminary Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Gregory E; Sions, J. Megan; Velasco, Teonette O.; Manal, Tara J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of a trial to evaluate a trunk muscle training program augmented with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (TMT+NMES) for the rehabilitation of older adults with chronic LBP and to preliminarily investigate whether TMT+NMES could improve physical function and pain compared with a passive control intervention. Methods We conducted a single-blind, randomized feasibility trial. Patients aged 60-85 years were allocated to TMT+NMES (n=31) or a passive control intervention (n=33), consisting of passive treatments, i.e. heat, ultrasound and massage. Outcomes assessed 3-months and 6-months post-randomization included Timed Up and Go Test, gait speed, pain and LBP-related functional limitation. Results Feasibility was established by acceptable adherence (>/= 80%) and attrition (pain of greater than 2 points on a numeric pain rating scale during the course of the trial. But, only the TMT+NMES group had clinically important improvements in both performance-based and self-reported measures of function. In terms of the participants' global rating of functional improvement at 6-months, the TMT+NMES group improved by 73.9% and the passive control group improved by 56.7% compared to baseline. The between-group difference was 17.2% (95%CI: 5.87-28.60) in favor of TMT+NMES. Discussion It appears that a larger randomized trial investigating the efficacy of trunk muscle training augmented with NMES for the purpose of improving physical function in older adults with chronic LBP is warranted. PMID:26736024

  14. Implementation of a Quality Improvement Process Aimed to Deliver Higher-Value Physical Therapy for Patients With Low Back Pain: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Emily; McCathie, Becky

    2015-12-01

    The current state of health care demands higher-value care. Due to many barriers, clinicians routinely do not implement evidence-based care even though it is known to improve quality and reduce cost of care. The purpose of this case report is to describe a theory-based, multitactic implementation of a quality improvement process aimed to deliver higher-value physical therapy for patients with low back pain. Patients were treated from January 2010 through December 2014 in 1 of 32 outpatient physical therapy clinics within an academic health care system. Data were examined from 47,755 patients (mean age=50.3 years) entering outpatient physical therapy for management of nonspecific low back pain, with or without radicular pain. Development and implementation tactics were constructed from adult learning and change management theory to enhance adherence to best practice care among 130 physical therapists. A quality improvement team implemented 4 tactics: establish care delivery expectations, facilitate peer-led clinical and operational teams, foster a learning environment focused on meeting a population's needs, and continuously collect and analyze outcomes data. Physical therapy utilization and change in functional disability were measured to assess relative cost and quality of care. Secondarily, charge data assessed change in physical therapists' application of evidence-based care. Implementation of a quality improvement process was measured by year-over-year improved clinical outcomes, decreased utilization, and increased adherence to evidence-based physical therapy, which was associated with higher-value care. When adult learning and change management theory are combined in quality improvement efforts, common barriers to implementing evidence-based care can be overcome, creating an environment supportive of delivering higher-value physical therapy for patients with low back pain. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  15. Self-reported Recovery is Associated with Improvement in Localised Hyperalgesia Among Adolescent Females with Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Roos, Ewa M.; Olesen, Jens Lykkegaard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Adolescent females with PFP have localised (around the knee) and distal (tibialis anterior muscle) hyperalgesia assessed by decreased Pressure Pain Thresholds (PPT). This may have implications for treating PFP as both localised and central pain mechanisms may contribute...... to the manifestations of pain. The objective of this study was to compare the change in localised and distal hyperalgesia among female adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain (PFP) deeming themselves recovered compared to those not recovered 3 months after patient education with or without exercise therapy. METHODS...... adolescents. Changes in localised and distal hyperalgesia from baseline to follow-up were compared to self-reported recovery. Adolescents were categorized as recovered if they rated themselves as "completely recovered" or "strongly recovered" (category 1 or 2) on a 7-point Likert scale. RESULTS: 39...

  16. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  17. Heel pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  18. Flank pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  19. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing as a Rescue Procedure for Persistent Anterior Knee Pain After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: Do Our Patients Really Improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ibarguen, Ainhoa Nekane; Navarro-Arribas, Rafael; Pretell-Mazzini, Juan; Prada-Cañizares, Alfonso Carlos; Jara-Sánchez, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Secondary patellar resurfacing (SPR) is a procedure that can be used in patients with persistent anterior knee pain (AKP) after a primary total knee arthroplasty. The aim of our study was to analyze the clinical and functional outcomes as well as the complications of this procedure and identify predictive factors for a favorable outcome. Forty-six patients who underwent SPR for persistent AKP after primary total knee arthroplasty were retrospectively studied. The patient's mean age was 68 years (range, 36-86 years). The average follow-up time after SPR was 74 months (range, 24-197 months). Demographic data, Knee Society Score scale, range of motion, pain improvement (Visual Analogue Scale), overall satisfaction, and complications were recorded. The statistical analysis was performed using STATA tm/SE v10. There was an improvement of the Knee Society scale (from 54 ± 11 to 64 ± 16 points; P pain improvement, and 65% of patients were not satisfied. Four patients showed complications, and in 2 cases, reoperation was necessary. We did not find any preoperative predictive factor for a favorable outcome after SPR. Despite improvement of the Knee Society scale, many patients continue with AKP and are dissatisfied with this procedure; therefore, we do not recommend it in this clinical scenario. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early reduction in painful physical symptoms is associated with improvements in long-term depression outcomes in patients treated with duloxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quail Deborah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the association of the change of painful physical symptoms (PPS after 4 weeks, with the 6-month treatment outcomes of depressive symptoms in patients treated with duloxetine in clinical practice. Methods Multicenter, prospective, 6-month, non-interventional study in adult outpatients with a depressive episode and starting treatment with duloxetine. Depression severity was assessed by the clinician (Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology [IDS-C] and patient (Kurz-Skala Stimmung/Aktivierung [KUSTA]. Somatic symptoms and PPS were assessed using the patient-rated Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI and visual analog scales (VAS for pain items. Association of change in PPS with outcomes of depressive symptoms was analyzed based on mean KUSTA scores (mean of items mood, activity, tension/relaxation, sleep and achievement of a 50% reduction in the total IDS-C score after 6 months using linear and logistic regression models, respectively. Results Of the 4,517 patients enrolled (mean age: 52.2 years, 71.8% female, 3,320 patients (73.5% completed the study. 80% of the patients had moderate to severe overall pain (VAS > 30 mm at baseline. A 50% VAS overall pain reduction after 4 weeks was associated with a 13.32 points higher mean KUSTA score after 6 months, and a 50% pain reduction after 2 weeks with a 6.33 points improvement. No unexpected safety signals were detected in this naturalistic study. Conclusion Pain reduction after 2 and 4 weeks can be used to estimate outcomes of long-term treatment with duloxetine. PPS associated with depression have a potential role in predicting remission of depressive symptoms in clinical practice.

  1. [Nocioceptive pain, neuropathic pain and pain memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Homs, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Pain is a cognitive evaluation. Its appearance in the new functional image systems is promising. Nocioceptive pain, usually acute or persistent, is useful to prevent animals from getting injured. Chronic pain is disease per se: It is due to a sensitisation phenomena and pain memory with an important relationship with emotions. Neuropathic pain is a neurological symptom due to a somatosensorial system dysfunction. In this case, axonal ectopic generation of impulses and synaptic hyperexcitability occurs. In persistent cases, sensitisation phenomenon and memory of pain appear together with neuropathic pain. Pain treatment should be physiopathologicaly orientated. Pain units, specialized in analgesic treatment and some invasive techniques, are usually competent in the treatment of nocioceptive pain. Neuropathic pain should have a neurologic diagnosis and treatment. But neurologist need to be more and more interested in the chronic pain related with memory and sensitisation: better knowledge of the cerebral mechanisms in this phenomenon can add to this pathology in our field.

  2. Exercise in waist-high warm water decreases pain and improves health-related quality of life and strength in the lower extremities in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusi, N; Tomas-Carus, P; Häkkinen, A; Häkkinen, K; Ortega-Alonso, A

    2006-02-15

    To evaluate the short- and long-term efficacy of exercise therapy in a warm, waist-high pool in women with fibromyalgia. Thirty-four women (mean +/- SD tender points 17 +/- 1) were randomly assigned to either an exercise group (n = 17) to perform 3 weekly sessions of training including aerobic, proprioceptive, and strengthening exercises during 12 weeks, or to a control group (n = 17). Maximal unilateral isokinetic strength was measured in the knee extensors and flexors in concentric and eccentric actions at 60 degrees /second and 210 degrees /second, and in the shoulder abductors and adductors in concentric contractions. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed using the EQ-5D questionnaire; pain was assessed on a visual analog scale. All were measured at baseline, posttreatment, and after 6 months. The strength of the knee extensors in concentric actions increased by 20% in both limbs after the training period, and these improvements were maintained after the de-training period in the exercise group. The strength of other muscle actions measured did not change. HRQOL improved by 93% (P = 0.007) and pain was reduced by 29% (P = 0.012) in the exercise group during the training, but pain returned close to the pretraining level during the subsequent de-training. However, there were no changes in the control group during the entire period. The therapy relieved pain and improved HRQOL and muscle strength in the lower limbs at low velocity in patients with initial low muscle strength and high number of tender points. Most of these improvements were maintained long term.

  3. STUDY REGARDING THE EFFICIENCY OF A PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAM IN PAIN REDUCTION, PHYSICAL FUNCTION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IMPROVEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH HIP OSTHEOARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Doriana Ioana CIOBANU; Carmen Ileana ȘERBESCU

    2016-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis is mainly characterized by articular cartilage lesisons (distrophy, erosions), lack of articular surfaces shape and contour due to femoral head distruction.Aim. This paperwork aims to emphasize the efficiency of a comprehensive rehabilitation program in functional and quality of life improvement and pain reduction, in patients with hip osteoarthritis.Subjects. This study was conducted in Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital from Baile Felix, on a group of 10 patiants with...

  4. Instillation of Hyaluronic Acid via Electromotive Drug Administration Can Improve the Efficacy of Treatment in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome: A Randomized Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gülpınar, Ömer; Haliloğlu, Ahmet Hakan; Gökce, Mehmet İlker; Arıkan, Nihat

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In the treatment of interstitial cystitis, intravesical hyaluronic acid application may be suggested as a treatment option. In this randomized prospective study, the authors aimed to identify whether instilling the hyaluronic acid with electromotive drug administration (EMDA) would increase the tissue uptake and improve the efficacy. Materials and Methods The data of 31 patients who had been diagnosed with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) between 2004 and 2005 were...

  5. [The management of post-surgical pain in the patient treated for hallux valgus with percutaneous and minimally invasive technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio, L; Sodano, L; Touloupakis, G; Chiominto, M G; Rocco, A

    2014-01-01

    In today's literature there are no defined guidelines for the treatment of postoperative pain in corrective surgery of hallux valgus. In this study we evaluated the use of a new treatment protocol designed to minimize the postoperative pain related to the surgical treatment of hallux valgus. The study involved 20 female patients (20 feet) treated for moderate to severe hallux valgus between September 2011 and December of 2012 with a percutaneous technique (10 feet) and minimally invasive surgery (Endolog System) (10 feet). All patients received postoperative as analgesic therapy 1 cp etoricoxib 120 mg/ day for 5 days + oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone 5mg 1cp × 2/day for 15 days. The evaluation forms of pain VAS/VRS have been used for the evaluation of pre and postoperative pain at 15 and 30 days. In both groups we found a significant reduction of pain in the days following surgery. At 30 days the VAS score was similar in between the two groups. Few and mild side effects were reported (1 case). The co-administration of an anti-cox2 and an opioid in the first postoperative hours is useful to reduce soft tissue swelling and to control pain without causing significant side effects. The therapeutic protocol adopted, along with an adequate anesthesiological approach, has proved to be very effective for pain management in peri-and post-operative treatment of hallux valgus.

  6. Do medical student attitudes towards patients with chronic low back pain improve during training? a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Hayley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care professionals with positive attitudes towards the functional abilities of patients with low back pain are more likely to encourage activity and avoidance of rest as per recommended guidelines. This study investigated whether medical student training fosters positive attitudes towards patients with back pain and their ability to function. Methods First (n = 202 and final (n = 146 year medical students at the University of Glasgow completed the Health Care Professionals' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (HC-PAIRS questionnaire. This measures attitudes of clinicians towards the functional ability of patients with back pain. A group of first (n = 62 and final year (n = 61 business students acted as non-health care controls. Attitudes were compared using two-way ANOVA with year of study and discipline of degree as independent variables. Results Both year of study [F(1,465 = 39.5, p Conclusions Undergraduate medical training promotes positive attitudes towards the functional ability of patients with back pain, suggesting that students may be more likely to develop an evidence-based approach to this patient group after qualification. Some adjustments to training may be warranted to encourage a more positive shift in attitudes.

  7. Do medical student attitudes towards patients with chronic low back pain improve during training? a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Hayley; Ryan, Cormac; Lauchlan, Douglas; Field, Max

    2012-03-19

    Health care professionals with positive attitudes towards the functional abilities of patients with low back pain are more likely to encourage activity and avoidance of rest as per recommended guidelines. This study investigated whether medical student training fosters positive attitudes towards patients with back pain and their ability to function. First (n = 202) and final (n = 146) year medical students at the University of Glasgow completed the Health Care Professionals' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (HC-PAIRS) questionnaire. This measures attitudes of clinicians towards the functional ability of patients with back pain. A group of first (n = 62) and final year (n = 61) business students acted as non-health care controls. Attitudes were compared using two-way ANOVA with year of study and discipline of degree as independent variables. Both year of study [F(1,465) = 39.5, p students commenced their course with more positive attitudes than non-health care students (65.7 vs. 69.2 respectively; p student groups had widened (56.4 vs. 65.3; p patients with back pain, suggesting that students may be more likely to develop an evidence-based approach to this patient group after qualification. Some adjustments to training may be warranted to encourage a more positive shift in attitudes.

  8. Auricular Acupressure to Improve Menstrual Pain and Menstrual Distress and Heart Rate Variability for Primary Dysmenorrhea in Youth with Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dysmenorrhea and accompanying symptoms can have a negative impact on academic achievement, physical activity and functioning, and quality of life. Unfortunately, stress increases the sensitivity and severity of pain, activating sympathetic responses while inhibiting parasympathetic responses. Objective. This study used objective, physiological measurements to evaluate the effects of auricular acupressure on menstrual pain and menstrual distress in young college students with primary dysmenorrhea across two menstrual cycles. The aim was to determine if significant differences could be detected between the intervention and follow-up phases after controlling life stress. Design. A one-group experimental research design was used, and repeated measurements and followups were done. Thirty-two women completed questionnaires and physiological parameters were measured. Results. Significant differences between the intervention and follow-up phases were found for high frequency (HF and blood pressure on day 1 and no significant differences in menstrual pain and menstrual distress, heart rate variability, low frequency (LF, LF/HF ratio, or heart rate. Conclusion. Auricular acupressure effectively increases parasympathetic activity to maintain autonomic function homeostasis in young women with primary dysmenorrhea and may have a value in alleviating menstrual pain and menstrual distress in a high-stress life. Future studies should consider stress, stimulus dose of auricular acupressure, severity of menstrual pain, and a longitudinal research design.

  9. The effect of a nurse-directed intervention to reduce pain and improve behavioral and physical outcomes in patients with critically colonized/infected chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Mueller, Martina; Spencer, Cam; Rinard, Bobbie; Loftis, Greg

    2014-01-01

    ankle range of motion (P = .498). Functional and physical activity scores revealed no statistically significant differences in 3 measures, including Timed Up and Go test (P = .624), Timed Chair Standing Test (P = .686), or the Community Health Activities Model for Seniors (P = .803). While somewhat feasible to implement in the wound care setting, no improvement in outcomes was observed with the addition of the WOC nurse-directed intervention. However, pain in the lower legs of patients with critically colonized/infected wounds in both groups improved after a 6-week behavioral/physical activity intervention. A larger trial is needed to further elucidate these findings.

  10. Lumbar scoliosis: Reducing lower back pain and improving function in adulthood. A case report with a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polastri, Massimiliano; Romano, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) can persist into adulthood as a sequelae of adolescent lumbar scoliosis, particularly under certain conditions influenced by aspects of bodily biomechanics and/or other factors. Here we describe the use of tailored bracing used in an adult with pre-existing lumbar scoliosis suffering from LBP. A 40-year-old female presented with acute LBP. The subject complained of acute lumbar pain exacerbated when she was upright, and when she was engaged in the normal activities of daily life. At the time of the first observation, the patient was wearing a brace that was readily available commercially. We modified the non-individualized elastic brace that the patient had already purchased. Major improvements were observed in either or both of the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale and Numerical Pain Rating Scale scores. We speculate that the tailored bracing described in the present case may be a viable option in carefully selected cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The efficacy of patellar decompression for improving anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Woo; Lee, Sun-Mi; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Anterior knee pain remains common following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of patellar decompression via drilling for the treatment of anterior knee pain following TKA without patellar resurfacing. A prospective cohort study was performed in 271 consecutive patients who underwent primary total knee replacement with patellar decompression (study group, n = 131) or without decompression (control group, n = 140). The patients were assessed according to the Knee Society rating, clinical anterior knee pain score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient-satisfaction score in each group. Each assessment was performed without the examiner knowing whether the patella had been decompressed. Radiographic evaluations were also performed according to the Knee Society scoring system for functional activity and our own severity grade system for patellofemoral articular change. There were no adverse events following patellar decompression. The overall prevalence of anterior knee pain was not significantly different between groups (p = 0.71). However, patients presenting pain over grade II after the operation in the study group were statistically low (p = 0.01). The overall postoperative knee scores were higher in the study group, but there were no significant differences between groups (p = 0.0731). Analyses of the radiographs revealed similar postoperative outcomes in both groups of knees. As we observed significantly lower rates of anterior knee pain and no patellar complications following patellar decompression via drilling in TKA without patellar resurfacing, we recommend performing patellar decompression in cases of total knee replacement without patellar resurfacing.

  12. The peripheral and central mechanisms of transition of acute to chronic pain and the possible role of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition in the prevention of pain syndrome chronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Davydov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain syndromes as a cause of suffering, short-term or persistent disability, and social losses greatly worsen quality of life. The mechanisms leading to the occurrence and maintenance of chronic pain are traditionally of interest for in-depth study since each of them is potentially a target for pharmacotherapy. Peripheral and central sensitizations, as well as disinhibition make different contributions to the development of chronic pain. The fact that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors may affect at both the peripheral and central, spinal levels, by modulating such a phenomenon as central sensitization, has been recently discussed. There are theoretical prerequisites for a discussion of this action of COX-2 inhibitors; however, clinical findings supporting this hypothesis have been scarce so far. In this connection, of interest is the clinical trial published in 2016, which may suggest to a high degree of accuracy that some analgesic effect of the selective COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib is realized through the central mechanisms of pain modulation. 

  13. Neurocognitive therapeutic exercise improves pain and function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, E; Rabini, A; Piccinini, G; Piazzini, D B; Vulpiani, M C; Vetrano, M; Specchia, A; Ferriero, G; Bertolini, C; Saraceni, V M

    2014-06-01

    Traditional rehabilitation improves pain and function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Neurocognitive rehabilitation has shown to be highly effective after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. However, its effects in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome have not yet been established. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of neurocognitive therapeutic exercise, based on proprioception and neuromuscular control, on pain and function in comparison to traditional therapeutic exercise in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Single-blind randomized, non-inferiority clinical trial. Outpatient clinic of Geriatrics and Physiatrics, University Hospital. Forty-eight patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (Neer stage I) and pain lasting for at least three months. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to either neurocognitive therapeutic exercise or traditional therapeutic exercise. Both treatments were provided one-hour session, three times a week for five weeks. The primary outcome measure was the short form of the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (Quick-DASH questionnaire) for the assessment of physical ability and symptoms of the upper extremity. Constant-Murley shoulder outcome score for the determination of range of motion, pain and strength; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Society standardized shoulder assessment form for the evaluation of physical ability in daily-living tasks; a visual analogue scale for pain assessment at rest and during movements; Likert score for the estimation of participant satisfaction. before treatment, end of treatment, 12 and 24 weeks after the completion of each intervention for all outcome measures, except for the Likert score that was evaluated only at the end of treatment. 24 weeks. At the end of treatment and at follow-up, both treatment groups experienced improvements in all outcomes measures relative to baseline values, except for the

  14. A multimedia campaign to improve back beliefs in patients with non-specific low back pain: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Arnela; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Bamarni, Jiman; van Tulder, Maurits W; Anema, Johannes R

    2017-05-18

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent and costly disorders worldwide. To reduce its burden in the Netherlands, implementation of a multidisciplinary guideline for LBP was supported by a multifaceted eHealth campaign for patients with LBP. The current study aims 1) to evaluate whether the implementation strategy was performed as planned; 2) to assess the feasibility, barriers and facilitators of the patient based eHealth campaign; 3) to gain insight into the satisfaction and experiences of patients with various ethnic backgrounds with the implementation strategy and to make a comparison between them; and 4) to explore the association between exposure to and satisfaction with the implementation strategy. This process evaluation was performed using the Linnan and Steckler framework, and used a mixed methods approach for data collection and analysis. The relationship between satisfaction of patients and exposure to the strategy was statistically examined. Semi-structured interviews were analysed using qualitative data analysis methods. Two hundred and fourteen patients participated in the quantitative, and 44 in the qualitative analysis. Most were female and had a high level of education. Many patients did not use the campaign at all or only once, and those that did rated it as reasonable. Patient satisfaction with the campaign increased significantly with an increase in its use. Qualitative analysis showed that four main themes played a role in campaign rating and use: satisfaction with intervention components, perceived benefits of the intervention, usage of the intervention, and satisfaction with the medium used. This process evaluation showed that the eHealth campaign was used only by a small proportion of patients with non-specific LBP. It seemed that the campaign was offered to the patients too late, that the lay-out of the campaign did not meet patient needs, and that healthcare providers rarely discussed the campaign with their patients, while

  15. Education and Visual Information Improves Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Local Injections on Shoulder Pain and Associated Anxiety Level: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkucak, Murat; Cilesizoglu, Nurce; Capkin, Erhan; Can, Ipek; Batmaz, Ibrahim; Kerimoglu, Servet; Onder, Mustafa Avni; Karaca, Adem; Ayar, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Local injections are widely used in patients with a painful shoulder. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible impact of patients' visual information on the effectiveness of ultrasound (US)-guided local injections on anxiety levels and shoulder pain. A total of 151 patients, scheduled for local injection owing to shoulder pain, were randomly assigned into two groups in a consecutive order. Patients in group I (n = 72) were provided information related to US findings and allowed to watch the procedures from the monitor, whereas patients in group II (n = 79) received the injection only without any collaboration. Data were collected from both groups immediately before and after injections through visual analog scale and questionnaire (the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] forms 1 and 2). US-guided local injections provided significant improvement of anxiety and pain in both groups, irrespective of providing visual information. Group I and group II comparisons with respect to the visual analog scale, STAI 1, and STAI 2 yielded significant difference only for postinjection STAI 2 in group I (P = 0.006). Intragroup comparisons revealed significant differences between preinjection and postinjection values (group I: visual analog scale, P = 0.001; STAI form 1, P = 0.001; STAI form 2, P = 0.002; group II: visual analog scale, P = 0.001; STAI form 1, P = 0.002; STAI form 2, P = 0.042). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of postinjection satisfaction levels from the procedures (P = 0.824). Performing US-guided shoulder injections with patient visual information provides positive contributions to coping with pain and anxiety. In particular, the patient collaboration-based US-guided injections have positive consequences on patients' long-standing "trait-anxiety" levels.

  16. Buprenorphine Transdermal System Improves Sleep Quality and Reduces Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Low Back Pain: Results from Two Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarlas, Aaron; Miller, Kate; Wen, Warren; Lynch, Shau Yu; Ripa, Steven R; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of buprenorphine (Butrans®) transdermal System (BTDS) treatment on sleep outcomes for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain (CLBP). Two enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal, double-blind, controlled trials examined BTDS treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe CLBP. Trial I evaluated BTDS 10 and 20 mcg/hour against a placebo control among opioid-naïve patients. Trial II compared BTDS 20 mcg/hour against a lower-dose control (BTDS 5 mcg/hour) among opioid-experienced patients. The patient-reported Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS) assessed overall sleep quality (Sleep Problems Index [SPI]), Disturbance, and other sleep outcomes. In each trial, MOS-SS scores were compared between target treatment and control arms during the 12-week double-blind phase. Correspondence of changes in sleep outcomes and pain severity and the degree to which pain reduction mediates treatment impact on sleep outcomes were examined. Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale scores were collected from 541 (Trial I) and 441 (Trial II) patients prior to randomization and from 369 (Trial I) and 274 (Trial II) patients at week 12. Patients receiving target treatment showed statistically significantly more improvement in SPI and Disturbance scores at 12 weeks than their respective controls (Ps opioid-naïve and opioid-experienced patients with moderate-to-severe CLBP. Benefits of BTDS for these sleep outcomes emerged within 4 weeks and were maintained over the entire 12-week treatment period. © 2015 Optum. Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  17. Kinesio Taping Improves Perceptions of Pain and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis. A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlf, Anna Lina; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Zech, Astrid

    2018-02-21

    Although increasingly used for therapeutic treatment only limited evidence exists regarding the effects of kinesio taping on patients with knee osteoarthritis. To determine the effects of kinesio taping on pain, function, gait and neuromuscular control concerning patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Randomized sham-controlled trial. University laboratory. 141 Patients (65.1±7.0 years) with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Kinesio tape, sham tape or no tape for 3 consecutive days. Self-reported pain, stiffness and function were measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Further tests included the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS-Test), 10-m Walk Test (10MWT), the maximum voluntary isometric contraction force (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris and knee active range of motion (active ROM). At baseline, there were no differences in all outcomes between groups except for knee flexion. Significant effects were found for WOMAC pain (tape vs. sham p=0.053; tape vs. control p=0.047), stiffness (tape vs. sham p=0.012; tape vs. control p≤0.001) and physical function (tape vs. sham p=0.034; tape vs. control p=0.004). No interactions were found for balance, muscle strength, walking speed or active ROM. Wearing kinesio tape for three consecutive days had beneficial effects regarding self-reported clinical outcomes of pain, joint stiffness and function. This emphasizes that kinesio taping might be an adequate conservative treatment for the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

  18. [Neurolitic block of the lumbar sympathetic chain improves chronic pain in a patient with critical lower limb ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto Junior, Elton Pereira de Sá; Nascimento, Jedson Dos Santos; de Castro, Anita Perpetua Carvalho Rocha

    Sympathectomy is one of the therapies used in the treatment of chronic obstructive arterial disease (COAD). Although not considered as first-line strategy, it should be considered in the management of pain difficult to control. This clinical case describes the evolution of a patient with inoperable COAD who responded properly to the lumbar sympathetic block. A female patient, afro-descendant, 69 years old, ASA II, admitted to the algology service due to refractory ischemic pain in the lower limbs. The patient had undergone several surgical procedures and conservative treatments without success. Vascular surgery considered the case as out of therapeutic possibility, unless limb amputation. At that time, sympathectomy was indicated. After admission to the operating room, the patient was monitored, positioned and sedated. The blockade was performed with the aid of radioscopy, bilaterally, at L2-L3-L4 right and L3 left levels. On the right side, at each level cited, 3mL of absolute alcohol with 0.25% bupivacaine were injected without vasoconstrictor, and on the left side only local anesthetic. The procedure was performed uneventfully. The patient was discharged with complete remission of the pain. Neurolitic block of the lumbar sympathetic chain is an effective and safe treatment option for pain control in patients with critical limb ischemia patients in whom the only possible intervention would be limb amputation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Does Subcutaneous Infiltration of Liposomal Bupivacaine Following Single-Level Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery Improve Immediate Postoperative Pain Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Tou, Kevin; Winkel, Rose; Puffer, Ross; Bydon, Mohamad; Nassr, Ahmad; Huddleston, Paul; Yaszemski, Michael; Currier, Bradford; Freedman, Brett

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective case-control study using prospectively collected data. Evaluate the impact of liposomal bupivacaine (LB) on postoperative pain management and narcotic use following standardized single-level low lumbar transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Poor pain control after surgery has been linked with decreased pain satisfaction and increased economic burden. Unfortunately, opioids have many limitations and side effects despite being the primary treatment of postoperative pain. LB may be a form of pre-emptive analgesia used to reduce the use of postoperative narcotics as evidence in other studies evaluating its use in single-level microdiskectomies. The infiltration of LB subcutaneously during wound closure was performed by a single surgeon beginning in July 2014 for all single-level lumbar TLIF spinal surgeries at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. This cohort was compared against a control cohort of patients who underwent the same surgery by the same surgeon in the preceding 6 months. Statistical analysis was performed on relevant variables including: morphine equivalents of narcotic medication used (primary outcome), length of hospitalization, Visual Analog Scale pain scores, and total time spent on a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump. A total of 30 patients were included in this study; 16 were in the intervention cohort and 14 were in the control cohort. The morphine equivalents of intravenous narcotic use postoperatively were significantly less in the LB cohort from day of surgery to postoperative day 3. Although the differences lost their statistical significance, the trend remained for total (oral and intravenous) narcotic consumption to be lower in the LB group. The patients who received the study intervention required an acute pain service consult less frequently (62.5% in LB cohort vs. 78.6% in control cohort). The amount of time spent on a PCA pump in the LB group was 31 hours versus 47 hours in the control group ( p =0.1506). Local

  20. Reflexology versus Swedish Massage to Reduce Physiologic Stress and Pain and Improve Mood in Nursing Home Residents with Cancer: A Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Hodgson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate and compare the effects of reflexology and Swedish massage therapy on physiologic stress, pain, and mood in older cancer survivors residing in nursing homes. Methods. An experimental, repeated-measures, crossover design study of 18 nursing home residents aged 75 or over and diagnosed with solid tumor in the past 5 years and following completion of cancer treatments. The intervention tested was 20 minutes of Swedish Massage Therapy to the lower extremities, versus 20 minute Reflexology, using highly specified protocols. Pre- and post-intervention levels of salivary cortisol, observed affect, and pain were compared in the Swedish Massage Therapy and Reflexology conditions. Results. Both Reflexology and Swedish Massage resulted in significant declines in salivary cortisol and pain and improvements in mood. Conclusions. Preliminary data suggest that studies of Swedish Massage Therapy and Reflexology are feasible in this population of cancer survivors typically excluded from trials. Both interventions were well tolerated and produced measurable improvements in outcomes. Further research is needed to explore the mechanisms underlying the potential benefits of these CAM modalities in this patient population.

  1. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Mindfulness-Based (Baduanjin Exercise for Alleviating Musculoskeletal Pain and Improving Sleep Quality in People with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liye Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: we performed the first systematic review with meta-analyses of the existing studies that examined mindfulness-based Baduanjin exercise for its therapeutic effects for individuals with musculoskeletal pain or insomnia. Methods: Both English- (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier, and Google Scholar and Chinese-language (CNKI and Wangfang electronic databases were used to search relevant articles. We used a modified PEDro scale to evaluate risk of bias across studies selected. All eligible RCTS were considered for meta-analysis. The standardized mean difference was calculated for the pooled effects to determine the magnitude of the Baduanjin intervention effect. For the moderator analysis, we performed subgroup meta-analysis for categorical variables and meta-regression for continuous variables. Results: The aggregated result has shown a significant benefit in favour of Baduanjin at alleviating musculoskeletal pain (SMD = −0.88, 95% CI −1.02 to −0.74, p < 0.001, I2 = 10.29% and improving overall sleep quality (SMD = −0.48, 95% CI −0.95 to −0.01, p = 004, I2 = 84.42%. Conclusions: Mindfulness-based Baduanjin exercise may be effective for alleviating musculoskeletal pain and improving overall sleep quality in people with chronic illness. Large, well-designed RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. STRENGTH EXERCISES COMBINED WITH DRY NEEDLING WITH ELECTRICAL STIMULATION IMPROVE PAIN AND FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RTCT) is regularly treated by the physical therapist. Multiple etiologies for RTCT exist, leading an individual to seek treatment from their provider of choice. Strengthening exercises (SE) have been reported to be effective in the treatment of RTCT, but there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of dry needing (DN) for this condition. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to investigate DN to various non-trigger point-based anatomical locations coupled with strengthening exercises (SE) as a treatment strategy to decrease pain and increase function in healthy patients with chronic RTC pathology. Case Descriptions Eight patients with RTCT were treated 1-2 times per week for up to eight weeks, and no more than sixteen total treatment sessions of SE and DN. Outcomes were tested at baseline and upon completion of therapy. A long-term outcome measure follow up averaging 8.75 months (range 3 to 20 months) was also performed. The outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Quick Dash (QD). Outcomes Clinically meaningful improvements in disability and pain in the short term and upon long-term follow up were demonstrated for each patient. The mean VAS was broken down into best (VASB), current (VASC), and worst (VASW) rated pain levels and the mean was calculated for the eight patients. The mean VASB improved from 22.5 mm at the initial assessment to 2.36 mm upon completion of the intervention duration. The mean VASC improved from 28.36 mm to 5.0 mm, and the mean VASW improved from 68.88 mm to 13.25 mm. At the long-term follow up (average 8.75 months), The mean VASB, VASC, and VASW scores were 0.36 mm, 4.88 mm, and 17.88 mm respectively. The QDmean for the eight patients improved from 43.09 at baseline to 16.04 at the completion of treatment. At long-term follow-up, the QDmean was 6.59. Conclusion Clinically meaningful improvements in pain and disability were

  3. Electronic audit and feedback intervention with action implementation toolbox to improve pain management in intensive care: protocol for a laboratory experiment and cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Wouter T; Roos-Blom, Marie-José; van der Veer, Sabine N; de Jonge, Evert; Peek, Niels; Dongelmans, Dave A; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2017-05-25

    Audit and feedback is often used as a strategy to improve quality of care, however, its effects are variable and often marginal. In order to learn how to design and deliver effective feedback, we need to understand their mechanisms of action. This theory-informed study will investigate how electronic audit and feedback affects improvement intentions (i.e. information-intention gap), and whether an action implementation toolbox with suggested actions and materials helps translating those intentions into action (i.e. intention-behaviour gap). The study will be executed in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs) and will be focused on pain management. We will conduct a laboratory experiment with individual ICU professionals to assess the impact of feedback on their intentions to improve practice. Next, we will conduct a cluster randomised controlled trial with ICUs allocated to feedback without or feedback with action implementation toolbox group. Participants will not be told explicitly what aspect of the intervention is randomised; they will only be aware that there are two variations of providing feedback. ICUs are eligible for participation if they submit indicator data to the Dutch National Intensive Care Evaluation (NICE) quality registry and agree to allocate a quality improvement team that spends 4 h per month on the intervention. All participating ICUs will receive access to an online quality dashboard that provides two functionalities: gaining insight into clinical performance on pain management indicators and developing action plans. ICUs with access to the toolbox can develop their action plans guided by a list of potential barriers in the care process, associated suggested actions, and supporting materials to facilitate implementation of the actions. The primary outcome measure for the laboratory experiment is the proportion of improvement intentions set by participants that are consistent with recommendations based on peer comparisons; for the randomised

  4. Cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment

  5. Yoga improves quality of life and fall risk-factors in a sample of people with chronic pain and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Arlene A; Atler, Karen E; Malcolm, Matthew P; Grimm, Laura A; Klinedinst, Tara C; Marchant, David R; Marchant, Tasha P; Portz, Jennifer Dickman

    2018-05-01

    Assess pre to-post outcomes for people with chronic pain and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) randomized to an 8-week yoga intervention or usual care. Participants were included if they self-reported: chronic pain; T2DM; >18 years old; no exercise restrictions or consistent yoga; and consented to the study. After yoga, there were significant improvements in: Brief Pain Inventory pain interference (49 ± 15.00 vs. 41.25 ± 19.46, p = .034); Fullerton Advanced Balance scale (14.2 ± 14.1 vs. 20.4 ± 13.5, p = .03); upper extremity strength (7.7 ± 6.3 vs.10.8 ± 6.5, p = .02); lower extremity strength (4.1 ± 3.8 vs. 6.7 ± 4.8, p = .02); and RAND 36-item Health Survey quality of life scores (81.1 ± 7.7 vs. 91.9 ± 8.9, p = .04). Balance scores became significantly worse during the 8 weeks for people randomized to the control (27.1 ± 9.9 vs. 21.7 ± 13.4, = p.01). Data from this small RCT indicates yoga may be therapeutic and may improve multiple outcomes in this seemingly at-risk population. NCT03010878. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study protocol: Improving patient choice in treating low back pain (IMPACT - LBP: A randomised controlled trial of a decision support package for use in physical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tysall Colin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain is a common and costly condition. There are several treatment options for people suffering from back pain, but there are few data on how to improve patients' treatment choices. This study will test the effects of a decision support package (DSP, designed to help patients seeking care for back pain to make better, more informed choices about their treatment within a physiotherapy department. The package will be designed to assist both therapist and patient. Methods/Design Firstly, in collaboration with physiotherapists, patients and experts in the field of decision support and decision aids, we will develop the DSP. The work will include: a literature and evidence review; secondary analysis of existing qualitative data; exploration of patients' perspectives through focus groups and exploration of experts' perspectives using a nominal group technique and a Delphi study. Secondly, we will carry out a pilot single centre randomised controlled trial within NHS Coventry Community Physiotherapy. We will randomise physiotherapists to receive either training for the DSP or not. We will randomly allocate patients seeking treatment for non specific low back pain to either a physiotherapist trained in decision support or to receive usual care. Our primary outcome measure will be patient satisfaction with treatment at three month follow-up. We will also estimate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention, and assess the value of conducting further research. Discussion Informed shared decision-making should be an important part of any clinical consultation, particularly when there are several treatments, which potentially have moderate effects. The results of this pilot will help us determine the benefits of improving the decision-making process in clinical practice on patient satisfaction. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46035546

  7. Self-reported Recovery is Associated With Improvement in Localized Hyperalgesia Among Adolescent Females With Patellofemoral Pain: Results From a Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Roos, Ewa M; Olesen, Jens L; Rasmussen, Sten; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) have localized (around the knee) and distal (tibialis anterior muscle) hyperalgesia assessed by decreased pressure pain thresholds (PPT). This may have implications for treating PFP as both localized and central pain mechanisms may contribute to the manifestations of pain. The objective of this study was to compare the change in localized and distal hyperalgesia among female adolescents with PFP deeming themselves recovered compared with those not recovered 3 months after patient education with or without exercise therapy. This is an ancillary analysis of a cluster randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of patient education with or without exercise therapy on self-reported recovery in 121 adolescents with PFP. PPTs were measured at 4 sites around the knee and on tibialis anterior in a random subsample of 57 female adolescents. Changes in localized and distal hyperalgesia from baseline to follow-up were compared with self-reported recovery. Adolescents were categorized as recovered if they rated themselves as "completely recovered" or "strongly recovered" on a 7-point Likert scale. Thirty-nine adolescents (68%) were available for follow-up at 3 months and 10 adolescents reported being recovered. Recovered adolescents had a 68 kPa (95% CI, 1, 136; P=0.047) larger improvement in PPT around the knee and a 76 kPa (95% CI, -29, 181; P=0.16) nonsignificant improvement in PPT on the tibialis anterior compared with adolescents not recovered. Female adolescents with PFP who rated themselves as recovered had a larger reduction in localized hyperalgesia compared with those not recovered.

  8. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to ease your pain. For instance, eat smaller meals if your pain is accompanied by indigestion. Avoid ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/abdominal-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050728 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  9. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  10. Breast pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, changes in the level of of hormones during menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast pain. Some swelling and tenderness just before ...

  11. Foot pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  12. Eye pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  13. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  14. Ankle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  15. Efficacy of dienogest in improving pain in women with endometriosis: a 12-month single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorana, A; Incandela, Domenico; Parazzini, F; Alio, W; Mercurio, A; Giambanco, L; Alio, L

    2017-06-29

    Dienogest has recently been marketed as a medical treatment for endometriosis. Given the recent introduction on the market of Dienogest, little data are available regarding its effectiveness in routine clinical practice. The study is an observational, single-center, cohort study. Eligible was women with a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis dating back Dienogest 2 mg once daily treatment at the time of study entry for no more than 30 days, consecutively observed between September 2013 to September 2014. In accordance with routine practice, women came back for clinical assessment and evaluation of pain after 1 (V1), 3 (V2), and 12 (V3) months. A total of 132 women were enrolled in the study. A total of 21 of the enrolled patients were released from the study during follow-up due to adverse effects. The mean pelvic pain VAS score at baseline was 8.9 (SD 1.3). The corresponding values were 6.7 (SD 3.2) and 5.7 (SD 3.7) for dyspareunia and dyschezia. The mean VAS scores progressively and significantly decreased to 0.9 (SD 1.6) for pelvic pain, 1.4 (SD 2.1) for dyspareunia and 0.2 (SD 0.9) for dyschezia, respectively, 12 months after start of treatment. This study confirms that in routine clinical practice, Dienogest 2 mg is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for endometriosis-related pain in women with endometriosis.

  16. Lumbar multifidus muscle thickness does not predict patients with low back pain who improve with trunk stabilization exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Kristen A; Henry, Sharon M; Ouellette-Morton, Rebecca H; DeSarno, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    To understand lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle activation as a clinical feature to predict patients with low back pain (LBP) who are likely to benefit from stabilization (STB) exercises. Prospective, cohort study. Outpatient physical therapy clinics. Persons with LBP were recruited for this study. Subjects (N=25) were classified as either eligible to receive STB exercises or ineligible on the basis of current clinical prediction rules. Six weeks of STB treatment. Before and after treatment, subjects underwent rehabilitative ultrasound imaging to quantify LM-muscle activation and completed disability and pain questionnaires. Analyses were performed to examine the (1) relation between LM-muscle activation and current clinical features used to predict patients with LBP likely to benefit from STB exercises, (2) LM-muscle activation between the STB-eligible and STB-ineligible groups before and after STB treatment, and (3) relation between LM-muscle activation before STB treatment and (a) disability and (b) pain outcomes after treatment for both groups. No relation was found between LM-muscle activation and the number of clinical features. Before STB treatment, LM-muscle activation between the STB-eligible and STB-ineligible groups did not differ. After STB treatment, LM-muscle activation differed between the groups; however, this interaction was because the LM-muscle activation for the STB-eligible group decreased after treatment while that for the STB-ineligible group increased after treatment. Finally, only the STB-eligible group had a significant reduction in disability following treatment; however, no relation was found between LM-muscle activation before treatment and (a) disability or (b) pain outcomes after treatment in the STB-eligible group. LM-muscle activation does not appear to be a clinical feature that predicts patients with LBP likely to benefit from STB exercises. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Does Kinesio Taping of the Knee Improve Pain and Functionality in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis?: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya Mutlu, Ebru; Mustafaoglu, Rustem; Birinci, Tansu; Razak Ozdincler, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Kinesio taping on the functionality, pain, range of motion (ROM), and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis compared with a placebo Kinesio tape (KT) application. Forty-two consecutive patients were randomized to a KT group and a placebo taping group. The assessments were performed at baseline, after the initial KT application, the third KT application, and 1 month later. The functional status of patients was evaluated using the Aggregated Locomotor Function score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis scale. Pain level, muscle strength, and active ROM were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), a handheld dynamometer, and digital goniometer, respectively. Patients receiving the KT application demonstrated large decrease in VAS activity and walking task scores compared with the placebo taping group from the initial taping application to after the third taping application (P = 0.009 and P Kinesio taping resulted in superior short-term effects on walking task, pain, and knee-flexion ROM compared with placebo taping in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Short-term transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and improves the masticatory muscle activity in temporomandibular disorder patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Lima FERREIRA

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies to assess the effects of therapies on pain and masticatory muscle function are scarce. Objective To investigate the short-term effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS by examining pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT and electromyography (EMG activity in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD. Material and Methods Forty patients with myofascial TMD were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial and were divided into two groups: active (n=20 and placebo (n=20 TENS. Outcome variables assessed at baseline (T0, immediately after (T2 and 48 hours after treatment (T1 were: pain intensity with the aid of a visual analogue scale (VAS; PPT of masticatory and cervical structures; EMG activity during mandibular rest position (MR, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and habitual chewing (HC. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was applied to the data and the significance level was set at 5%. Results There was a decrease in the VAS values at T1 and T2 when compared with T0 values in the active TENS group (p<0.050. The PPT between-group differences were significant at T1 assessment of the anterior temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM and T2 for the masseter and the SCM (p<0.050. A significant EMG activity reduction of the masseter and anterior temporalis was presented in the active TENS during MR at T1 assessment when compared with T0 (p<0.050. The EMG activity of the anterior temporalis was significantly higher in the active TENS during MVC at T1 and T2 when compared with placebo (p<0.050. The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscle was significantly higher in the active TENS during HC at T1 when compared with placebo (p<0.050. Conclusions The short-term therapeutic effects of TENS are superior to those of the placebo, because of reported facial pain, deep pain sensitivity and masticatory muscle EMG activity improvement.

  19. Period Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain relievers such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs include ibuprofen and naproxen. Besides relieving pain, NSAIDs reduce the amount of prostaglandins that your uterus ...

  20. EFFICACY OF KALTENBORN GRADE III MOBILIZATIONS, MUSCLE ENERGY TECHNIQUES AND THEIR COMBINATION TO IMPROVE RANGE AND FUNCTIONAL ABILITY IN ADULTS WITH MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Anwar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiotherapy is an essentialtreatment in the management of Mechanical Neck ache, still there was lack of literature seen supporting the effectiveness of Physiotherapy interventions with their doses targeting specific group of population. The focus of study was to see the effectiveness of Kaltenborn Grade III mobilization, Muscle Energy Techniques and their combination to improve range and functional ability in patients with Mechanical Neck ache. Methods: 72 patients with Mechanical Neck achewere randomly categorized in 3 groups (Mobilization, METs and Combination group. NDI scale and goniometry was used as an assessment tool to measure the outcome before and after treatment (follow up 1 week. Results: According to the results there was significant improvement seen in Combination group (Mobilization and METs in terms of pain, which decreased from 7.70±0.69 to 1.25±1.93 (p=0.00, gain in ROM e.g. Cervical Flexion (27.29±2.38 to 37.54±3.14. Whereas, marked significance (p=0.00 was seen in the NDI score and percentage of Combination group. ANOVA tells us that difference was significant in all three groups in categories of pain (VAS, gain in cervical ranges and NDI score and percentage as p=0.00. Combination group had significant difference within the groups then METs and Mobilization group in all categories of VAS, Cervical ranges, NDI score and percentage. Conclusion: Combination of (Grade III Kaltenborn and METs was seen more effective in terms of improving Mechanical Neck Pain, in smaller treatment session (7 days only.

  1. STUDY REGARDING THE EFFICIENCY OF A PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAM IN PAIN REDUCTION, PHYSICAL FUNCTION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IMPROVEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH HIP OSTHEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doriana Ioana CIOBANU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hip osteoarthritis is mainly characterized by articular cartilage lesisons (distrophy, erosions, lack of articular surfaces shape and contour due to femoral head distruction.Aim. This paperwork aims to emphasize the efficiency of a comprehensive rehabilitation program in functional and quality of life improvement and pain reduction, in patients with hip osteoarthritis.Subjects. This study was conducted in Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital from Baile Felix, on a group of 10 patiants with hip arthrosis, aged between 50 and 80 years old, 50% man, 50% woman, average weight &2 kg, IMC 25.6, duration of affection average 17 years, 50% retired from activity, 50% workers.Metods. As assessment tools were used: goniometry, 0-5 scale for muscular force and Womac index for pain and quality of life assessment. The exercise program aimed to increase hip muscle tonus and the increasing of hip jount mobility and stability due to a better crossing of femorla head in the acetabular cavity.Results. After following rehabilitation program, we found the reduction of pain (11±8.18 baseline versus 9±8.18 final, the improvement of hip joint moiblity (4.60±3.28 pretest versus 3.7±3.27 posttest, of physical functioning (43.20±26.75 pretest versus 40.30±26.42 posttest and of quality of life (59.8±38.12 pretest versus 53±37.70 posttest. Conclusions: A rehabilitation program followed 5 times/ week, for two weeks, can lead to the improvement of hip joint mobility, to an increased muscular force of pelvic girdle and to the impovement of quality of life in patients with hip osteoarthritis

  2. Early Intra-articular Corticosteroid Injection Improves Pain and Function in Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder: 1-Year Retrospective Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Kang, Hyuncheol; Lee, Michael Y; Kang, Dae Ryong; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Intra-articular corticosteroid injection is a commonly used therapy for adhesive capsulitis, but not enough studies exist on the optimal timing of the injection. To determine whether intra-articular corticosteroid injection has better outcomes in patients with earlier stage than later stage of adhesive capsulitis. Retrospective longitudinal study SETTING: University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Primary adhesive capsulitis patients (n=339) who were unresponsive to at least 1 month of conservative treatment and who had ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection. Not applicable. Visual analogue scale, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and passive range of motion (flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation and extension) were evaluated at pretreatment, month 1 and 12 after the first injection. The result of the multiple regressions, which considered the main and the interaction effect of confounding variables, showed that the differences of all outcomes in both short-term effect at month 1 and long-term effect at month 12 are greater when the duration of pain prior to injection is shorter. Among the confounders, the injection number in the difference of internal rotation and extension between month 0 and 12 (IRE Δ(0-12)) was statistically significant. IRE Δ(0-12) was also greater when the pain duration was shorter, though the decrease in IRE Δ(0-12) differed depending on the number of injections. Early injection improves outcomes of adhesive capsulitis at both short- and long-term follow-ups. If pain persists despite non-invasive and conservative treatments, early injection may be considered to shorten its natural history. III. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic female pelvic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab Maitra

    2013-01-01

    diagnosis of the pain generators leads to a diagnosis specific management of the pain condition. Using a multidisciplinary approach can improve outcomes for patients suffering from the condition and minimize the associated disability.

  4. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests repeated intravesical application of botulinum toxin A injections may improve treatment efficacy of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Jia-Heng; Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Wang, Yu-Syuan; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2013-04-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: A single set of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections relieves clinical symptoms of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), but lacks long-term effect. An inadequate anti-inflammatory effect is likely to cause treatment failure. The study shows that chronic inflammation and apoptotic signalling molecules are significantly reduced after repeated intravesical BoNT-A injection in patients with IC/BPS. It also shows that repeated BoNT-A injections are necessary to achieve greater success in the treatment of IC/BPS. To investigate the mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). A total of 23 women with IC/BPS who received single intravesical BoNT-A injection were studied. Among them, 11 received three repeated injections every 6 months to improve their symptoms. Bladder biopsy was obtained before each BoNT-A injection and the clinical symptoms and urodynamic variables were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for TUNEL and mast cell activity, and western blotting analysis of tryptase, cytokines, Bax and phospho-p38 (p-p38) were carried out. We compared the clinical results and IHC data among baseline, single or repeated BoNT-A treatments. Single BoNT-A injection improved clinical symptoms, pain score and daytime urinary frequency. Mast cell activity and apoptotic cell count did not decrease significantly, while Bax and p-p38, but not tryptase, decreased significantly after a single BoNT-A injection. The 11 patients who received three repeated BoNT-A injections had significantly lower pain scores than the remaining patients (mean [SD]: 5.80 [2.27] vs. 3.03 [2.30], P = 0), glomerulation degree (mean [SD]: 1.80 [1.06] vs. 1.20 [1.06], P = 0.026) and global response scores (mean [SD]: 0.30 [0.92] vs. 1.20 [1.06], P = 0) after treatment. Tryptase, Bax, p-p38 and apoptotic cell counts all decreased significantly. 25-k

  5. A comparison of two short education programs for improving low back pain-related disability in the elderly: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Francisco; Abraira, Víctor; Santos, Severo; Díaz, Elena; Gestoso, Mario; Muriel, Alfonso; Gil del Real, María Teresa; Mufraggi, Nicole; Noguera, Juan; Zamora, Javier

    2007-05-01

    Cluster randomized clinical trial. To assess the effectiveness of 2 minimal education programs for improving low back pain (LBP)-related disability in the elderly. No education program has shown effectiveness on low back pain (LBP)-related disability in the elderly. A total of 129 nursing homes (6389 residents) in northern Spain were invited to participate in the study. The actual participants were 12 nursing homes randomly assigned to 3 groups and 661 subjects. An independent physician gave a 20-minute talk with slide projections summarizing the content of the Back Book (active management group), the Back Guide (postural hygiene group), and a pamphlet on cardiovascular health (controls). Disability was measured with the Roland-Morris questionnaire (RMQ). Blind assessments were performed before the intervention, and 30 and 180 days later. The effect of the intervention on disability was estimated by generalized mixed linear random effects models. Mean age of participants ranged between 79.9 and 81.2 years. Disability improved in all groups, but at the 30-day assessment the postural education group showed an additional improvement of 1.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.2-1.9), RMQ points and at the 180-day assessment the active education group an additional improvement of 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.6-3.4). In the subset of subjects with LBP when entering the study, postural education had no advantages over controls, while an additional improvement of 3.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.5- 4.5) RMQ points at the 180-day assessment was observed in the active education group. In institutionalized elderly, the handing out of the Back Book supported by a 20-minute group talk improves disability 6 months later, and is even more effective in those subjects with LBP.

  6. Back Pain with Leg Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfsons, Simon; Bar, Negev; Eisenberg, Elon

    2017-07-01

    The clinical diagnostic dilemma of low back pain that is associated with lower limb pain is very common. In relation to back pain that radiates to the leg, the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) states: "Pain in the lower limb should be described specifically as either referred pain or radicular pain. In cases of doubt no implication should be made and the pain should be described as pain in the lower limb." Bogduks' editorial in the journal PAIN (2009) helps us to differentiate and define the terms somatic referred pain, radicular pain, and radiculopathy. In addition, there are other pathologies distal to the nerve root that could be relevant to patients with back pain and leg pain such as plexus and peripheral nerve involvement. Hence, the diagnosis of back pain with leg pain can still be challenging. In this article, we present a patient with back and leg pain. The patient appears to have a radicular pain syndrome, but has no neurological impairment and shows signs of myofascial involvement. Is there a single diagnosis or indeed two overlapping syndromes? The scope of our article encompasses the common diagnostic possibilities for this type of patient. A discussion of treatment is beyond the scope of this article and depends on the final diagnosis/diagnoses made.

  7. Cancer pain management: Basic information for the young pain physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SPS Rana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is multifactorial and complex. The impact of cancer pain is devastating, with increased morbidity and poor quality of life, if not treated adequately. Cancer pain management is a challenging task both due to disease process as well as a consequence of treatment-related side-effects. Optimization of analgesia with oral opioids, adjuvant analgesics, and advanced pain management techniques is the key to success for cancer pain. Early access of oral opioid and interventional pain management techniques can overcome the barriers of cancer pain, with improved quality of life. With timely and proper anticancer therapy, opioids, nerve blocks, and other non-invasive techniques like psychosocial care, satisfactory pain relief can be achieved in most of the patients. Although the WHO Analgesic Ladder is effective for more than 80% cancer pain, addition of appropriate adjuvant drugs along with early intervention is needed for improved Quality of Life. Effective cancer pain treatment requires a holistic approach with timely assessment, measurement of pain, pathophysiology involved in causing particular type of pain, and understanding of drugs to relieve pain with timely inclusion of intervention. Careful evaluation of psychosocial and mental components with good communication is necessary. Barriers to cancer pain management should be overcome with an interdisciplinary approach aiming to provide adequate analgesia with minimal side-effects. Management of cancer pain should comprise not only a physical component but also psychosocial and mental components and social need of the patient. With risk-benefit analysis, interventional techniques should be included in an early stage of pain treatment. This article summarizes the need for early and effective pain management strategies, awareness regarding pain control, and barriers of cancer pain.

  8. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Mjøsund, Hanne L; Petersen, Ditte H D

    2010-01-01

    A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted) treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outco...... outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP....

  9. Postamputation pain: studies on mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolajsen, Lone

    2012-10-01

    catastrophizing was associated with phantom pain (X). In conclusion, the present doctoral thesis confirmed and expanded the findings by others that several mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of phantom pain. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms will hopefully lead to improved treatment of pain after amputation in the future.

  10. Neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions.

  11. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Summary Points. • Muscle pain, known as myalgia, can be in one targeted area or across many muscles, occurring with overexertion or overuse of these muscles. • Pain can be classified as acute or chronic pain and further categorized as nociceptive or neuropathic. • Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical ...

  12. Use of patient flow analysis to improve patient visit efficiency by decreasing wait time in a primary care-based disease management programs for anticoagulation and chronic pain: a quality improvement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potisek, Nicholas M; Malone, Robb M; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Ives, Timothy J; Chelminski, Paul R; DeWalt, Darren A; Pignone, Michael P

    2007-01-15

    Patients with chronic conditions require frequent care visits. Problems can arise during several parts of the patient visit that decrease efficiency, making it difficult to effectively care for high volumes of patients. The purpose of the study is to test a method to improve patient visit efficiency. We used Patient Flow Analysis to identify inefficiencies in the patient visit, suggest areas for improvement, and test the effectiveness of clinic interventions. At baseline, the mean visit time for 93 anticoagulation clinic patient visits was 84 minutes (+/- 50 minutes) and the mean visit time for 25 chronic pain clinic patient visits was 65 minutes (+/- 21 minutes). Based on these data, we identified specific areas of inefficiency and developed interventions to decrease the mean time of the patient visit. After interventions, follow-up data found the mean visit time was reduced to 59 minutes (+/-25 minutes) for the anticoagulation clinic, a time decrease of 25 minutes (t-test 39%; p time for the chronic pain clinic was reduced to 43 minutes (+/- 14 minutes) a time decrease of 22 minutes (t-test 34 %; p < 0.001). Patient Flow Analysis is an effective technique to identify inefficiencies in the patient visit and efficiently collect patient flow data. Once inefficiencies are identified they can be improved through brief interventions.

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic herb-drug interaction of Andrographis paniculata (Nees) extract and andrographolide with etoricoxib after oral administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balap, Aishwarya; Atre, Bhagyashri; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Sinnathambi, Arulmozhi; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2016-05-13

    Andrographis paniculata Nees (Acanthacae) is commonly used medicinal plant in the traditional. Unani and Ayurvedic medicinal systems. It has broad range of pharmacological effects such as hepatoprotective, antioxidant, antivenom, antifertility, inhibition of replication of the HIV virus, antimalarial, antifungal, antibacterial, antidiabetic, suppression of various cancer cells and anti-inflammatory properties. Andrographolide (AN) is one of the active constituent of the A. paniculata Nees extract (APE). They have been found in many traditional herbal formulations in India and proven to be effective as anti-inflammatory drug To evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (anti-arthritic) herb-drug interactions of A. paniculata Nees extract (APE) and pure andrographolide (AN) with etoricoxib (ETO) after oral co-administration in wistar rats. After oral co-administration of APE (200mg/Kg) and AN (60mg/kg) with ETO (10mg/kg) in rats, drug concentrations in plasma were determined using HPLC method. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of Cmax, tmax, t1/2, MRT, Vd, CL, and AUC were calculated by non-compartment model. Change in paw volume, mechanical nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia, histopathology and hematological parameters were evaluated to study antiarthritic activity. Co-administration of ETO with APE and pure AN decreased systemic exposure level of each compound in vivo. The Cmax, AUC, t1/2 of ETO was decreased whereas Vd and CL of ETO was increased significantly after co-administration of ETO with pure AN and APE. In pharmacodynamic study, ETO alone and ETO+APE (10+200mg/kg) groups exhibited significant synergistic anti-arthritic activity as compared to groups ETO+AN, APE and AN alone. The results obtained from this study suggested that ETO, APE and pure AN existed pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in rat which is correlated with anti-arthritic study. Physicians and patients using A. paniculata should have the knowledge about its possible

  14. Menopause affects pain depending on pain type and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggiola, Maria Cristina; Nanni, Michela; Bachiocco, Valeria; Vodo, Stellina; Aloisi, Anna M

    2012-05-01

    Women are more affected than men by many chronic pain conditions, suggesting the effect of sex-related mechanisms in their occurrence. The role of gonadal hormones has been studied but with contrasting results depending on the pain syndrome, reproductive status, and hormone considered. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pain changes related to the menopausal transition period. In this observational study, postmenopausal women were asked to evaluate the presence of pain in their life during the premenopausal and postmenopausal periods and its modification with menopause. One hundred one women were enrolled and completed questionnaires on their sociodemographic status, pain characteristics, and evolution. The most common pain syndromes were headache (38%), osteoarticular pain (31%), and cervical/lumbar pain (21%). Pain was present before menopause in 66 women, ceased with menopause in 17, and started after menopause in 18. Data were used for cluster analysis, which allowed the division of participants into four groups. In the first, all women experienced headaches that disappeared or improved with menopause. The second group included osteoarticular pain; the pain improved in half of these women and remained stable in the other half. The third group had cervical/lumbar pain, which disappeared or improved with menopause in all. The fourth group presented different kinds of moderate pain, which worsened in all. The present study provides preliminary data suggesting that menopause can affect pain depending on the painful condition experienced by the woman. This underlines the different interactions of menopause-related events with body structures involved in pain.

  15. Improvements in tissue blood flow and lumbopelvic stability after lumbopelvic core stabilization training in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paungmali, Aatit; Henry, Leonard Joseph; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of lumbopelvic stabilization training on tissue blood flow changes in the lumbopelvic region and lumbopelvic stability compared to placebo treatment and controlled intervention among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 25 participants (7 males, 18 females; mean age, 33.3 ± 14.4 years) participated in this within-subject, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison trial. The participants randomly underwent three types of interventions that included lumbopelvic stabilization training, placebo treatment, and controlled intervention with 48 hours between sessions. Lumbopelvic stability and tissue blood flow were measured using a pressure biofeedback device and a laser Doppler flow meter before and after the interventions. [Results] The repeated-measures analysis of variance results demonstrated a significant increase in tissue blood flow over the lumbopelvic region tissues for post- versus pre-lumbopelvic stabilization training and compared to placebo and control interventions. A significant increase in lumbopelvic stability before and after lumbopelvic stabilization training was noted, as well as upon comparison to placebo and control interventions. [Conclusion] The current study supports an increase in tissue blood flow in the lumbopelvic region and improved lumbopelvic stability after core training among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

  16. Persistence of improvements in postural strategies following motor control training in people with recurrent low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Henry; Hodges, Paul W

    2008-08-01

    This study investigated long-term effects of training on postural control using the model of deficits in activation of transversus abdominis (TrA) in people with recurrent low back pain (LBP). Nine volunteers with LBP attended four sessions for assessment and/or training (initial, two weeks, four weeks and six months). Training of repeated isolated voluntary TrA contractions were performed at the initial and two-week session with feedback from real-time ultrasound imaging. Home program involved training twice daily for four weeks. Electromyographic activity (EMG) of trunk and deltoid muscles was recorded with surface and fine-wire electrodes. Rapid arm movement and walking were performed at each session, and immediately after training on the first two sessions. Onset of trunk muscle activation relative to prime mover deltoid during arm movements, and the coefficient of variation (CV) of EMG during averaged gait cycle were calculated. Over four weeks of training, onset of TrA EMG was earlier during arm movements and CV of TrA EMG was reduced (consistent with more sustained EMG activity). Changes were retained at six months follow-up (p<0.05). These results show persistence of motor control changes following training and demonstrate that this training approach leads to motor learning of automatic postural control strategies.

  17. Modifying tetramethyl–nitrophenyl–imidazoline with amino acids: design, synthesis, and 3D-QSAR for improving inflammatory pain therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang X

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Xueyun Jiang,1 Yuji Wang,1 Haimei Zhu,1 Yaonan Wang,1 Ming Zhao,1,2 Shurui Zhao,1 Jianhui Wu,1 Shan Li,1 Shiqi Peng11Beijing Area Major Laboratory of Peptide and Small Molecular Drugs, Engineering Research Center of Endogenous Prophylactic of Ministry of Education of China, Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Faculty of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, TaiwanAbstract: With the help of pharmacophore analysis and docking investigation, 15 novel 1-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-(3-nitrophenyl-4,5-dihydroimidazol-1-yl-oxyacetyl-L-amino acids (6a–o were designed, synthesized, and assayed. On tail-flick and xylene-induced ear edema models, 10 µmol/kg 6a–o exhibited excellent oral anti-inflammation and analgesic activity. The dose-dependent assay of their representative 6f indicates that the effective dose should be 3.3 µmol/kg. The correlation of the three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship with the docking analysis provides a basis for the rational design of drugs to treat inflammatory pain.Keywords: tetramethylimidazoline, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, 3D-QSAR

  18. Recurrent gastroesophageal symptoms and precordial pain in a gastrectomized man improved by amitriptyline. Physiologic, metabolic, endocrine, neurochemical and psychiatric findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Rada, I; Jara, H; Lechin, M; Cabrera, A; Lechin, A; Gomez, F; Jimenez, V; Arocha, L

    1989-01-01

    A 57-year-old white man presenting frequent recurrent chest and precordial pain, heartburn (pyrosis) and post-prandial vomiting for the previous 33 years (one to two years after Bilroth II gastrectomy) was submitted to cardiovascular, endoscopic, radiologic and biochemical studies with negative results. Doctors recommended surgical operation because of an excessively long afferent loop, Several biologic markers were performed at our hospital (intestinal pharmacomanometry, i.m. clonidine test, plasma neurotransmitters plus hormones, oral glucose tolerance test, plasma insulin, etc.), revealing an autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance characterized by hyperactivity of the cholinergic plus hypoactivity of the noradrenergic central system. Psychiatric evaluation demonstrated Dysthymic Depression. Treatment with a small daily dose of amitriptyline (a drug which enhances central noradrenergic activity and exerts powerful anticholinergic effects) suppressed symptoms, normalized physiological plus hormonal plus neurochemical parameters and made depressive manifestations disappear. The results suggest that the ANS imbalance was related to depressive syndrome and potentiated by neurohumoral disorders depending on duodenal and jejunal exclusion, and on intestinal post-prandial hyper-osmolarity.

  19. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have chronic pain may also have low self-esteem, depression, and anger. Symptoms of chronic pain Chronic ... itself often leads to other symptoms. These include low self-esteem, anger, depression, anxiety, or frustration. What causes chronic ...

  20. Elbow Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain is often caused by overuse. Many sports, hobbies and jobs require repetitive hand, wrist or arm ... Accessed Jan. 16, 2016. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/elbow-pain/basics/ ...

  1. Finger pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  2. Habituating pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Jeppe Zielinski Nguyen; Lund, Henrik Lambrecht; Møller, Jeppe Lykke

    2013-01-01

    the industry reproduce physical strain and the habituation of pain as unquestioned conditions in construction work. The understanding of this mutual reinforcement of the necessity of physically straining, painful, high-paced construction work provides fruitful perspectives on the overrepresentation...

  3. Reward and motivation in pain and pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Pain is fundamentally unpleasant, a feature that protects the organism by promoting motivation and learning. Relief of aversive states, including pain, is rewarding. The aversiveness of pain, as well as the reward from relief of pain, is encoded by brain reward/motivational mesocorticolimbic circuitry. In this Review, we describe current knowledge of the impact of acute and chronic pain on reward/motivation circuits gained from preclinical models and from human neuroimaging. We highlight emerging clinical evidence suggesting that anatomical and functional changes in these circuits contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. We propose that assessing activity in these conserved circuits can offer new outcome measures for preclinical evaluation of analgesic efficacy to improve translation and speed drug discovery. We further suggest that targeting reward/motivation circuits may provide a path for normalizing the consequences of chronic pain to the brain, surpassing symptomatic management to promote recovery from chronic pain. PMID:25254980

  4. Brief cognitive interventions for burn pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haythronthwaite, J A; Lawrence, J W; Fauerbach, J A

    2001-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of 2 brief cognitive interventions in supplementing regular medical treatment for pain during burn dressing change. Forty-two burn inpatients were randomly assigned to 3 groups: sensory focusing, music distraction, and usual care. Patients reported pain, pain relief satisfaction with pain control, and pain coping strategies. The sensory focusing group reported greater pain relief compared to the music distraction group and a reduction in remembered pain compared to the usual care group, although group differences were not observed on serial pain ratings. In addition, after controlling for burn size and relevant covariates, regression analyses indicated that catastrophizing predicted pain, memory for pain, and satisfaction with pain control. Refinement of the sensory focusing intervention is warranted to reduce catastrophic thinking and improve pain relief

  5. Chronicity of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerschman, J A

    2000-10-01

    Acute and chronic orofacial pain continues to be poorly understood and managed. The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) 1999 report on acute pain management promotes the development of evidence based clinical practice guidelines aimed at improving both the quality of health care and health outcomes in medical and dental practice in Australia. Nerve signals arising from sites of tissue or nerve injury lead to long term changes in the central nervous system and the amplification and persistence of pain. These nociceptor activity-induced neuronal changes known as central sensitization, have important clinical implications in the development of new approaches to the management of persistent pain. These findings and implications are discussed in relationship to poorly managed and understood conditions such as oral dysaesthesia, burning mouth syndrome, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia, peripheral nerve injury, deafferentation and phantom tooth syndrome.

  6. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  7. Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tightness in your chest Crushing or searing pain that radiates to your back, neck, jaw, shoulders, and one or both arms Pain that lasts ... com. Accessed Sept. 6, 2017. Yelland MJ. Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. ...

  8. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arms or hands or if you have shooting pain into your shoulder or down your arm. Symptoms Signs and symptoms ... org/search/Pages/results.aspx?k=Chronic neck pain. Accessed June 11, 2015. Isaac Z. Evaluation of the patient with neck pain and cervical ...

  9. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  10. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  11. Documentation of pain care processes does not accurately reflect pain management delivered in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Erin E; Bair, Matthew J; Carey, Timothy S; Weinberger, Morris

    2010-03-01

    Researchers and quality improvement advocates sometimes use review of chart-documented pain care processes to assess the quality of pain management. Studies have found that primary care providers frequently fail to document pain assessment and management. To assess documentation of pain care processes in an academic primary care clinic and evaluate the validity of this documentation as a measure of pain care delivered. Prospective observational study. 237 adult patients at a university-affiliated internal medicine clinic who reported any pain in the last week. Immediately after a visit, we asked patients to report the pain treatment they received. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) to assess pain severity at baseline and 1 month later. We extracted documentation of pain care processes from the medical record and used kappa statistics to assess agreement between documentation and patient report of pain treatment. Using multivariable linear regression, we modeled whether documented or patient-reported pain care predicted change in pain at 1 month. Participants' mean age was 53.7 years, 66% were female, and 74% had chronic pain. Physicians documented pain assessment for 83% of visits. Patients reported receiving pain treatment more often (67%) than was documented by physicians (54%). Agreement between documentation and patient report was moderate for receiving a new pain medication (k = 0.50) and slight for receiving pain management advice (k = 0.13). In multivariable models, documentation of new pain treatment was not associated with change in pain (p = 0.134). In contrast, patient-reported receipt of new pain treatment predicted pain improvement (p = 0.005). Chart documentation underestimated pain care delivered, compared with patient report. Documented pain care processes had no relationship with pain outcomes at 1 month, but patient report of receiving care predicted clinically significant improvement. Chart review measures may not accurately

  12. Diagnostic Uncertainties in Post-stroke Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, M.; Renzenbrink, G.J.; Van Dongen, R.T.M.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Geurts, A.C.H.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2008-01-01

    Aim of Investigation Pain is a common complication after stroke. The etiology of post-stroke pain is largely unknown and classification of post-stroke pain subtypes is primarily based on neurological examination and pain assessment. Classification could probably be improved by a better understanding

  13. Low dose of donepezil improves gabapentin analgesia in the rat spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anna; Honoré, Per Hartvig; Andersen, Lene Munkholm

    2010-01-01

    alone. Following multiple, oral dosing, gabapentin (25 mg/kg p.o.) was administered once daily over 20 days. Addition of donepezil (1.5 mg/kg p.o.) from day 11 to day 20 resulted in improved analgesia during the period of combination therapy, in comparison with the gabapentin monotherapy period....... Furthermore, the treatment effects were stable in both the mono- and the combination therapy period, indicating that tolerance development does not occur within the studied time frame. In conclusion, the results from this preclinical study support the use of donepezil as adjunctive to gabapentin to improve...

  14. Painful and painless channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David L H; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of genetic variants that substantially alter an individual's perception of pain has led to a step-change in our understanding of molecular events underlying the detection and transmission of noxious stimuli by the peripheral nervous system. For example, the voltage-gated sodium ion channel Nav1.7 is expressed selectively in sensory and autonomic neurons; inactivating mutations in SCN9A, which encodes Nav1.7, result in congenital insensitivity to pain, whereas gain-of-function mutations in this gene produce distinct pain syndromes such as inherited erythromelalgia, paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and small-fibre neuropathy. Heterozygous mutations in TRPA1, which encodes the transient receptor potential cation channel, can cause familial episodic pain syndromes, and variants of genes coding for the voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.8 (SCN10A) and Nav1.9 (SCN11A) lead to small-fibre neuropathy and congenital insensitivity to pain, respectively. Furthermore, other genetic polymorphisms have been identified that contribute to risk or severity of more complex pain phenotypes. Novel models of sensory disorders are in development-eg, using human sensory neurons differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Understanding rare heritable pain disorders not only improves diagnosis and treatment of patients but may also reveal new targets for analgesic drug development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a Web-Based Quality Dashboard Including a Toolbox to Improve Pain Management in Dutch Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Blom, Marie-José; Gude, Wouter T.; de Jonge, Evert; Spijkstra, Jan Jaap; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Dongelmans, Dave A.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2017-01-01

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a common strategy to improve quality of care. Meta-analyses have indicated that A&F may be more effective in realizing desired change when baseline performance is low, it is delivered by a supervisor or colleague, it is provided frequently and in a timely manner, it is

  16. [Clinical observation on improvement of motion range of cervical spine of patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy treated with rotation-traction manipulation and neck pain particles and cervical neck pain rehabilitation exercises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Peng-Chao; Zhu, Li-Guo; Gao, Jing-Hua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Min-Shan; Wei, Xu; Wang, Shang-Quan

    2010-10-01

    To observe the effects of two different therapies on patients whose cervical function were restricted due to cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Form April 2008 to October 2009, 71 cases with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were divided into group A (36 cases) and group B (35 cases). Among them, 22 cases were male and 49 cases were female, ranging in age form 45 to 65 years with an average of 52.27 years, course of disease was from 3 days to 5 years. The patients in group A were treated with rotation-traction manipulation, neck pain particles and cervical rehabilitation exercises; and the patients in group B were treated with cervical traction, Diclofenac sodium sustained release tablets and wearing neck collar. Theapeutic time was two weeks. The cervical anteflexion, extension, left and right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity were measured by helmet-style activities instrument before and after treatment (at the 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days and 1 month after treatment respectively). There were no difference between two groups in cervical activity in all directions before treatment (P > 0.05). Compared with the beginning, cervical anteflexion and extension showed significant difference at the 5th day after treatment in group A (P cervical anteflexion showed significant difference at the 13th day after treatment (P 0.05); cervical extension showed significant difference at the 7th day after treatment compared with the beginning (P cervical anteflexion, left and right lateral bending, left and right rotative activity showed significant difference at the 1 month after treatment (P cervical rehabilitation exercises in treating cervicalspondylotic radiculopathy have quick effect to improve the activities of cervical anteflexion, extension, left lateral bending, and have durable effect to improve the activities of cervical spine in all directions.

  17. Spontaneous pain attacks: neuralgic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, L.G.

    2006-01-01

    Paroxysmal orofacial pains can cause diagnostic problems, especially when different clinical pictures occur simultaneously. Pain due to pulpitis, for example, may show the same characteristics as pain due to trigeminal neuralgia would. Moreover, the trigger point of trigeminal neuralgia can either

  18. Ejaculatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Møhl, Bo; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    and treatment strategies. METHODS: Ten patients with severe pain-related sexual dysfunction and ejaculatory pain were assessed in detail by quantitative sensory testing and interviewed by a psychologist specialized in evaluating sexual functional disorders and were compared with a control group of 20 patients....... CONCLUSIONS: Postherniotomy ejaculatory pain and pain-related sexual dysfunction is a specific chronic pain state that may be caused by pathology involving the vas deferens and/or nerve damage. Therapeutic strategies should therefore include neuropathic pain treatment and/or surgical exploration.......BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction due to ejaculatory and genital pain after groin hernia surgery may occur in approximately 2.5% of patients. However, the specific psychosexological and neurophysiologic characteristics have not been described, thereby precluding assessment of pathogenic mechanisms...

  19. The burden of chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per; Juel, Knud

    2012-01-01

    sample consisted of 25,000 individuals (≥16 years old) living in Denmark. In all, 60.7% completed a mailed or online questionnaire. Associations were examined with multiple logistic regression analysis. The study population consisted of 14,925 individuals in whom a high prevalence of chronic pain (26......Chronic pain is currently considered a public health problem with high costs to the individual and society. To improve prevention and treatment of chronic pain, epidemiologic studies are mandatory for assessing chronic pain. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of chronic pain...

  20. Integrative medicine for chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Felix J.; Brüning, Alexander; Barcelona, Cyrus; Büssing, Arndt; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav; Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Integrative medicine inpatient treatment has been shown to improve physical and mental health in patients with internal medicine conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a 2-week integrative medicine inpatient treatment in patients with chronic pain syndromes and the association of treatment success with patient-related process variables. Methods: Inpatients with chronic pain syndromes participating in a 2-week integrative medicine inpatient program were included. Patients’ pain intensity, pain disability, pain perception, quality of life, depression, and perceived stress were measured on admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge. Likewise process variables including ability and will to change, emotional/rational disease acceptance, mindfulness, life and health satisfaction, and easiness of life were assessed. Results: A total of 310 inpatients (91% female, mean age 50.7 ± 12.4 year, 26.5% low back pain, and 22.9% fibromyalgia) were included. Using mixed linear models, significant improvements in pain intensity, pain disability, pain perception, quality of life, depression, and perceived stress were found (all P medicine inpatient treatment can benefit patients with chronic pain conditions. Functional improvements are associated with improved ability to change and implementation, disease acceptance, and satisfaction. PMID:27399133

  1. Pain Scores Are Not Predictive of Pain Medication Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Galloway

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare Visual Analogue Scale (VAS scores with overall postoperative pain medication requirements including cumulative dose and patterns of medication utilization and to determine whether VAS scores predict pain medication utilization. Methods. VAS scores and pain medication data were collected from participants in a randomized trial of the utility of phenazopyridine for improved pain control following gynecologic surgery. Results. The mean age of the 219 participants was 54 (range19 to 94. We did not detect any association between VAS and pain medication utilization for patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA or RN administered (intravenous or oral medications. We also did not detect any association between the number of VAS scores recorded and mean pain scores. Conclusion. Postoperative VAS scores do not predict pain medication use in catheterized women inpatients following gynecologic surgery. Increased pain severity, as reflected by higher VAS scores, is not associated with an increase in pain assessment. Our findings suggest that VAS scores are of limited utility for optimal pain control. Alternative or complimentary methods may improve pain management.

  2. Deficient Pain Modulation in Patients with Chronic Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashi, Yafit; Ratmansky, Motti; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-11-14

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) following stroke significantly affects the individual's function and quality of life. The mechanism of HSP is not clearly understood; hence, it is unclear why HSP resolves spontaneously or following routine care in some patients, while in others it becomes persistent. The aim was therefore to study whether HSP is associated with deficient pain modulation. Thirty post-stroke patients-16 with HSP and 14 without HSP-and 20 matched controls participated. Pain adaptation and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were measured as indicators of pain modulation, in the affected (hemiplegic) and contralateral shoulder as well as in the affected shin among post-stroke patients, and in comparable body regions among controls. Post-stroke patients also underwent functional and physical evaluation of the shoulder. Pain adaptation was absent among HSP patients, in both the painful shoulder and the affected shin, but existed in the 2 control groups. In addition, the affected shoulder and shin among the HSP group had reduced thermal sensibility compared to the contralateral regions. CPM was similar across groups. Shoulder functional status and physical status were similar for the 2 post-stroke groups. The results suggest that HSP is associated with a lack of pain adaptation, characteristic not only of the painful shoulder but also of the affected side. Although we cannot determine whether lack of pain adaptation precedes the HSP or results from it, interventions that enhance descending pain inhibition may improve management and prevent HSP chronification. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalonde L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lyne Lalonde,1–4 Manon Choinière,3,5 Elisabeth Martin,3 Lise Lévesque,3 Éveline Hudon,2,3,6 Danielle Bélanger,2 Sylvie Perreault,1,7 Anaïs Lacasse,8 Marie-Claude Laliberté1,9 1Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Équipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, Laval, QC, Canada; 3Centre de recherche, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CRCHUM, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal and Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, QC, Canada; 5Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 6Department of Family Medicine and Emergency, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Drug Utilization, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 8Département des sciences de la santé, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Canada; 9AbbVie Corporation, St-Laurent, QC, Canada Purpose: There is evidence that the management of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP in primary care is far from being optimal. A 1-day workshop was held to explore the perceptions of key actors regarding the challenges and priority interventions to improve CNCP management in primary care. Methods: Using the Chronic Care Model as a conceptual framework, physicians (n=6, pharmacists (n=6, nurses (n=6, physiotherapists (n=6, psychologists (n=6, pain specialists (n=6, patients (n=3, family members (n=3, decision makers and managers (n=4, and pain researchers (n=7 took part in seven focus groups and five nominal groups. Results: Challenges identified in focus group discussions were related to five dimensions: knowledge gap, “work in silos”, lack of awareness that CNCP represents an important clinical problem

  4. Pain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Foulkes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which afflicts up to 20% of the population at any time, provides both a massive therapeutic challenge and a route to understanding mechanisms in the nervous system. Specialised sensory neurons (nociceptors signal the existence of tissue damage to the central nervous system (CNS, where pain is represented in a complex matrix involving many CNS structures. Genetic approaches to investigating pain pathways using model organisms have identified the molecular nature of the transducers, regulatory mechanisms involved in changing neuronal activity, as well as the critical role of immune system cells in driving pain pathways. In man, mapping of human pain mutants as well as twin studies and association studies of altered pain behaviour have identified important regulators of the pain system. In turn, new drug targets for chronic pain treatment have been validated in transgenic mouse studies. Thus, genetic studies of pain pathways have complemented the traditional neuroscience approaches of electrophysiology and pharmacology to give us fresh insights into the molecular basis of pain perception.

  5. Addition of buprenorphine to local anesthetic in adductor canal blocks after total knee arthroplasty improves postoperative pain relief: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sandeep H; Gilbert, Lisa A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Applefield, Daniel J; Kassab, Safa S; Ellis, Terry A

    2016-09-01

    For the hundreds of thousands of patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the United States each year, early mobilization has been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and reduce complications. Management of postoperative pain is a critical factor in achieving early mobilization. Recent studies have shown that the use of an adductor canal block (ACB) after TKA results in increased preservation of quadriceps muscle strength, without significant difference in postoperative pain when compared to femoral nerve block. This increased preservation of quadriceps muscle strength leads to earlier mobilization. Studies have also demonstrated a prolongation of analgesia with the addition of buprenorphine to local anesthetic for regional block placement. This study examined the effect on postoperative opioid consumption when adding buprenorphine to an ACB vs an ACB with local anesthetic alone, for postoperative analgesia after unilateral TKA. A total of 100 patients scheduled for TKA were randomized to receive postoperative ACB with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic and buprenorphine. The primary outcome examined was total opioid analgesic (milligrams of hydrocodone equivalent) consumption in the first 24 hours postsurgery. The secondary outcomes examined were the reported incidence of the opioid side effects nausea, vomiting, and pruritis. Postoperative opioid consumption decreased significantly in the group that received an ACB with local anesthetic and buprenorphine compared to an ACB with local anesthetic only (25.34±2.62 vs 35.84±2.86; P=.0076). Secondary outcomes showed no statistical difference between the 2 groups in terms of the incidence of nausea, vomiting, or pruritus. The addition of buprenorphine to an adductor canal block decreases postoperative opioid consumption when compared to an ACB with local anesthetic alone. This reduction in opioid consumption, without significant increase in side effects, makes this an attractive

  6. Safety and efficacy of botox injection in alleviating post-operative pain and improving quality of life in lower extremity limb lengthening and deformity correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finley Allen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distraction osteogenesis is the standard treatment for the management of lower limb length discrepancy of more than 3 cm and bone loss secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma or infection. This technique consists of an osteotomy of the bone to be lengthened, application of an external fixator, followed by gradual and controlled distraction of the bone ends. Although limb lengthening using the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis principle yields excellent results in most cases, the technique has numerous problems and is not well tolerated by many children. The objective of the current study is to determine if Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A, which is known to possess both analgesic and paralytic actions, can be used to alleviate post-operative pain and improve the functional outcome of children undergoing distraction osteogenesis. Methods/Design The study design consists of a multi centre, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients between ages 5–21 years requiring limb lengthening or deformity correction using distraction will be recruited from 6 different sites (Shriners Hospital for Children in Montreal, Honolulu, Philadelphia and Portland as well as DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware and Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont. Approximately 150 subjects will be recruited over 2 years and will be randomized to either receive 10 units per Kg of BTX-A or normal saline (control group intraoperatively following the surgery. Functional outcome effects will be assessed using pain scores, medication dosages, range of motion, flexibility, strength, mobility function and quality of life of the patient. IRB approval was obtained from all sites and adverse reactions will be monitored vigorously and reported to IRB, FDA and Health Canada. Discussion BTX-A injection has been widely used world wide with no major side effects reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time BTX

  7. Can facet joint fluid on MRI and dynamic instability be a predictor of improvement in back pain following lumbar fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoddy, Mark C; Sielatycki, John A; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Engstrom, Stephen M; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between lumbar facet fluid and dynamic instability in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), as well as the relationship between facet fluid and patient-reported outcomes following a posterior lumbar fusion. We analyzed consecutive patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis undergoing single level posterior lumbar fusion from December 2010 to January 2013 at a single academic institution. We investigated the relationship between fluid in the facet joint as measured on axial MRI and the presence of dynamic instability. We investigated the impact of facet fluid, Modic changes, and dynamic instability on patient-reported outcomes. There was a significant association between the amount of facet joint fluid and the presence of dynamic instability (p = 0.03); as facet fluid increases, the probability of dynamic instability also increases. For every 1 mm of facet fluid, there was a 41.6 % increase (95 % CI 1.8-97) in the odds of dynamic instability. A facet fluid amount less than 0.5 mm gave a 90 % probability that there was no dynamic instability. The presence of facet fluid and dynamic instability were associated with achieving minimal clinical important difference (MCID) in low back pain following lumbar fusion (p = 0.04 and 0.05, respectively). Facet joint fluid is associated with the presence of dynamic instability in DS. The presence of facet fluid and dynamic instability may predict increased likelihood of achieving MCID for improvement in back pain following posterior lumbar fusion.

  8. Doubling Your Payoff: Winning Pain Relief Engages Endogenous Pain Inhibition1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Saskia; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When in pain, pain relief is much sought after, particularly for individuals with chronic pain. In analogy to augmentation of the hedonic experience (“liking”) of a reward by the motivation to obtain a reward (“wanting”), the seeking of pain relief in a motivated state might increase the experience of pain relief when obtained. We tested this hypothesis in a psychophysical experiment in healthy human subjects, by assessing potential pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief “won” in a wheel of fortune game compared with pain relief without winning, exploiting the fact that the mere chance of winning induces a motivated state. The results show pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief obtained by winning in behaviorally assessed pain perception and ratings of pain intensity. Further, the higher participants scored on the personality trait novelty seeking, the more pain inhibition was induced. These results provide evidence that pain relief, when obtained in a motivated state, engages endogenous pain-inhibitory systems beyond the pain reduction that underlies the relief in the first place. Consequently, such pain relief might be used to improve behavioral pain therapy, inducing a positive, perhaps self-amplifying feedback loop of reduced pain and improved functionality. PMID:26464995

  9. The effect of pilates exercise on improvement of functional tests in young male with patello-femoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Gökhan YAZICI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study of the effect of Pilates exercise on improvement of functional Performance tests in young male with PFPS was the main purpose the present study. Material and Methods: The 11-young male (age: 26.41±1.04yr, height: 177.37±3.21cm, and weight: 177.37±3.21kg with PFPS, as exercise groups, performed the Pilates exercises for ten weeks, three sessions per week and one hour per session. Functional performance tests (Step-down, left and right and Single-leg press was assessed. All data were analysed using SPSS and the statistical significance level was set at p<0.05 and p<0.001. Results: The result of analysis indicated that significant difference found between pre- and post-test in exercise group in Step-down test (t=9.79, p<0.001 and Single-Leg Press (t=8.86, p<0.001 test. Conclusion: According to the results of the present research, it could be concluded that for improvement of daily activities and functional performance in young male with PFPS, Pilates exercise method is recommended.

  10. Instillation of Hyaluronic Acid via Electromotive Drug Administration Can Improve the Efficacy of Treatment in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome: A Randomized Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülpınar, Omer; Haliloğlu, Ahmet Hakan; Gökce, Mehmet İlker; Arıkan, Nihat

    2014-05-01

    In the treatment of interstitial cystitis, intravesical hyaluronic acid application may be suggested as a treatment option. In this randomized prospective study, the authors aimed to identify whether instilling the hyaluronic acid with electromotive drug administration (EMDA) would increase the tissue uptake and improve the efficacy. The data of 31 patients who had been diagnosed with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) between 2004 and 2005 were examined. The patients were randomized to two groups: patients in group A received hyaluronic acid directly with a catheter and patients in group B received hyaluronic acid with EMDA. The patients were followed for 24 months and the two groups were compared at certain time intervals. The primary end points of the study were visual analogue scale (VAS) score, global response assessment, and micturition frequency in 24 hours. There were 6 males and 25 females. The two groups were similar in baseline parameters. The decrease in VAS score and the micturition frequency in 24 hours were significantly lower with EMDA at months 6 and 12. The difference between the two groups was not significant at months 1 and 24. Also, treatment with EMDA, positive KCl test, and pretreatment voiding frequency >17 were associated with higher response rates. Hyaluronic acid installation is an effective glycosaminoglycan substitution therapy in patients with BPS/IC. Instillation of hyaluronic acid via EMDA can improve the efficacy of the treatment; however, lack of long-term efficacy is the major problem with this glycosaminoglycan substitution therapy.

  11. Trajectories of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axén, Iben; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain is not a self-limiting problem, but rather a recurrent and sometimes persistent disorder. To understand the course over time, detailed investigation, preferably using repeated measurements over extended periods of time, is needed. New knowledge concerning short-term trajectories...... indicates that the low back pain 'episode' is short lived, at least in the primary care setting, with most patients improving. Nevertheless, in the long term, low back pain often runs a persistent course with around two-thirds of patients estimated to be in pain after 12 months. Some individuals never have...... low back pain, but most have it on and off or persistently. Thus, the low back pain 'condition' is usually a lifelong experience. However, subgroups of patients with different back pain trajectories have been identified and linked to clinical parameters. Further investigation is warranted...

  12. Transversus abdominis plane (tap) block in laparoscopic colorectal surgery improves postoperative pain management: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Elisabeth; Maggiori, Léon; Prost À la Denise, Justine; Panis, Yves

    2018-01-30

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a locoregional anesthesia technique of growing interest in abdominal surgery. However, its efficacy following laparoscopic colorectal surgery is still debated. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the efficacy of TAP-block after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. All comparative studies focusing on TAP-block after laparoscopic colorectal surgery have been systematically identified through the MEDLINE database, reviewed and included. Meta-analysis was performed according to the Mantel-Haenszel method for random effects. Endpoints included postoperative opioid consumption, morbidity, time to first bowel movement and length of hospital stay. A total of 13 studies, including 7 randomized controlled trials, were included, comprising a total of 600 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery with TAP-block, compared to 762 patients without TAP-Block. Meta-analysis of these studies showed that TAP-block was associated with a significantly reduced postoperative opioid consumption the first day after surgery (Weighted Mean Difference (WMD): -14.54 [-25.14; -3.94]; p=0.007) and a significantly shorter time to first bowel movement (WMD: -0.53 [-0.61; -0.44]; pTAP-block was not associated with a significant increase of postoperative overall complication rate (OR=0.84 [0.62 - 1.14]; p=0.27). TAP-block in laparoscopic colorectal surgery improves postoperative opioid consumption and postoperative digestive function recovery without any significant drawback. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    emotional symptoms due to the polytraumatic nature of these injuries (2). Furthermore, central neuropathic pain in general is often intractable to...as well as emotional symptoms due to the polytraumatic nature of these injuries (Clark et al., 2009b). Furthermore, central neuropathic pain in

  14. An abbreviated therapeutic neuroscience education session improves pain knowledge in first-year physical therapy students but does not change attitudes or beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Terry; Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2017-02-01

    To determine if a 3-hour therapeutic neuroscience education session alters physical therapy student's knowledge of pain and effects their attitudes and beliefs regarding treating chronic pain. Seventy-seven entry-level doctoral physical therapy students participated in the study. Following consent, demographic data were obtained and then the subjects completed the Neuroscience of Pain Questionnaire, the Health Care Provider's Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale and an additional questionnaire designed by the researchers. The subjects then received a 3-hour educational session developed by the researchers, focusing on the neurobiology and physiology of pain. The questionnaires were re-administered immediately after the educational session and at 6 months post-education. Seventy-seven subjects (mean age = 24.7 years, 57.1% female and 81.8% white) completed the questionnaires pre- and post-educational session with 75 completing the questionnaires at 6 months. To assess the effect of the education on the scores of the questionnaires, a repeated measures ANOVA was conducted. Students demonstrated significantly higher scores on the neuroscience of pain questionnaire ( p  educational session on the neuroscience of pain is beneficial for educating entry-level doctoral physical therapy students immediately post-education and at 6 months. This educational session had no effect on the student's attitudes and beliefs regarding treating the chronic pain population. There were additional significant findings regarding individual questions posed to the subjects.

  15. Pain channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  16. Gastric pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intermittent pain and. Not generalised or localised to other abdominal or chest regions and. Not relieved by defecation or passage of flatus and. Not fulfilling the ... retrosternal component. • The pain is commonly induced or relieved by the ingestion of a meal, but may occur during fasting. • Postprandial distress syndrome.

  17. Neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Re

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is the expression of a dysfunction or primary lesion of a nerve in the peripheral or central nervous system, or both, rather than the biological signal transmitted by the nerve following peripheral nociceptor activation. It represents about 20% of all painful syndromes, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5%, however is actual incidence is hard to pinpoint due to the difficulties encountered in distinguishing it from chronic pain, of which it represents a significant percentage, on account of the not infrequent concurrence of conditions. It is crucial to recognise the variety of symptoms with which it can present: these can be negative and positive and, in turn, motor, sensitive and autonomic. In public health terms, it is important to emphasise that the diagnosis of neuropathic pain does not in most cases require sophisticated procedures and does not therefore weigh on health expenditure. In clinical practice, a validated scale (the LANSS is mentioned is useful for identifying patients presenting neuropathic pain symptoms. Therapy is based on three categories of medication: tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptics and opioids at high doses: neuropathic pain has a bad reputation for often resisting common therapeutic approaches and responding less well that nociceptor pain to monotherapy. Therapeutic strategies are all the more adequate the more they are based on symptoms and therefore on the pain generation mechanisms, although the recommendations are dictated more by expert opinions that double-blind randomised trials.

  18. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vehicle accidents is a common cause of neck pain. The diagnosis of neck pain is determined by a medical history and physical ... qualified health care provider for professional medical advice, diagnosis and treatment of a medical or health condition. ... Links Glossary of Rheumatology Terms ...

  19. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  20. Orofacial Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aligned teeth can have trouble because the muscles work harder to bring the teeth together, causing strain. Pain also can be caused by clenching or grinding teeth, trauma to the head and neck or poor ergonomics. ; Some people may experience pain in the ears, ...

  1. Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH About Mission The NIH Director Organization Budget History NIH Almanac Public Involvement Outreach & Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Pain Management Small Text Medium Text Large Text Pain Management YESTERDAY Early Greeks and Romans advanced the idea that the brain ...

  2. Chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. The pain may spread to the arm, shoulder, jaw, or back. A tear in the wall of the aorta, the large blood vessel that takes blood from the heart to the rest of the body ( aortic dissection ) causes sudden, severe ...

  3. Control of the lumbar neutral zone decreases low back pain and improves self-evaluated work ability: a 12-month randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suni, Jaana; Rinne, Marjo; Natri, Antero; Statistisian, Matti Pasanen; Parkkari, Jari; Alaranta, Hannu

    2006-08-15

    A randomized controlled study with 12 months intervention. To study the effectiveness of a training intervention with emphases on the control of lumbar neutral zone (NZ) and behavior modeling as secondary prevention of low back pain (LBP) and disability. Improving the control of lumbar NZ and enhancing muscle activation patterns ensuring spinal stability have been proposed as means for secondary prevention of LBP and disability. In addition, cognitive behavior interventions have been shown to lower the risk of recurrence of LBP and long-term disability. Middle-aged working men with recent LBP but without severe disability were randomly allocated to either a training (TG, n = 52) or control group (CG, n = 54). The aim was to exercise twice a week for 12 months, once guided and once independently. The outcome measures were the changes in intensity of LBP, disability, self-evaluated future work ability, and neuromuscular fitness. The intensity of LBP decreased significantly more (39%) in the TG than in CG at 12 months. The proportion of subjects with negative expectations about their future work ability decreased in both groups at 6 and 12 months; however, the proportion was significantly bigger in TG compared with CG (P = 0.028). There effects on disability indexes and fitness were not statistically significant. Controlling lumbar NZ is a specific form of exercise and daily self-care with potential for prevention of recurrent nonspecific LBP and disability among middle aged working men.

  4. Pain Coping Strategies for Children with Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim J. Rosenzweig

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To present information on pain management strategies for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Methods. The second author developed a manual to present pain management strategies to children. The use of the manual was pilot-tested with a group of children with JIA. Telephone interviews were used to gather information on implementation of pain management strategies. Results. Children were able to implement the pain management strategies. Children reported a reduction in daily pain experiences related to JIA when using the pain management strategies. Conclusions. The pain management strategies were successful as an adjunctive intervention for short-term pain management. Pain symptoms related to JIA can severely limit children's participation in daily activities. Further study on how children use pain management strategies to improve their involvement in daily activities will provide useful clinical information.

  5. Headache attributed to masticatory myofascial pain: impact on facial pain and pressure pain threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Y M; Porporatti, A L; Stuginski-Barbosa, J; Bonjardim, L R; Speciali, J G; Conti, P C R

    2016-03-01

    There is no clear evidence on how a headache attributed to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) can hinder the improvement of facial pain and masticatory muscle pain. The aim of this study was to measure the impact of a TMD-attributed headache on masticatory myofascial (MMF) pain management. The sample was comprised of adults with MMF pain measured according to the revised research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) and additionally diagnosed with (Group 1, n = 17) or without (Group 2, n = 20) a TMD-attributed headache. Both groups received instructions on how to implement behavioural changes and use a stabilisation appliance for 5 months. The reported facial pain intensity (visual analogue scale--VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT--kgf cm(-2)) of the anterior temporalis, masseter and right forearm were measured at three assessment time points. Two-way anova was applied to the data, considering a 5% significance level. All groups had a reduction in their reported facial pain intensity (P 0·100). A TMD-attributed headache in patients with MMF pain does not negatively impact pain management, but does change the pattern for muscle pain improvement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    of the pain experience: location, duration, intensity, quality, onset and impact on activities of daily living. Holistic management must be based on a safe and effective mix of psychosocial approaches together with local and systemic pain management. It is no longer acceptable to ignore or inadequately...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  7. [Hindfoot pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Joël; Bouysset, Maurice

    2010-03-20

    The hindfoot is the part of the foot which is proximal to the midtarsal joint. The obvious causes of pain are not considered (post-traumatic etiologies, sprains and fractures but also cutaneous lesions). The main etiologies on the subject are successively exposed by following the localization of the pain. Diffuse pains (ankle arthritis tarsal osteoarthritis, algodystrophy, calcaneo-navicular synostosis but also bone diseases like stress fractures, Paget disease or tumors). Plantar talalgia (Sever's disease, plantar fasciitis and entrapment neuropathies such as (esions of the medial calcaneal nerve, of the first branch of the plantar lateral nerve, medial plantar nerve and lateral plantar nerve). Posterior pains: calcaneal tendinopathy including peritendinitis, tendinosis, retro-calcaneal bursitis and pathology of the postero-lateral talar tuberosity. Medial pains: tendinopathies of the posterior tibial tendon and tendinopathy of the flexor hallucis longus tendon and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Lateral pains: fibularis tendinopathies including split lesions of the fibularis brevis tendon, displacement of the fibularis iongus tendon, sinus tarsi syndrome and finally thickenings of capsules and ligaments and ossifications localized under the tibial malleoli. Anterior pains: antero-inferior tibio-fibular ligament, anterior tibial tendinopathy and anterior impingment syndrome.

  8. Experimental design and reporting standards for improving the internal validity of pre-clinical studies in the field of pain: Consensus of the IMI-Europain consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knopp, K.L.; Stenfors, C.; Baastrup, Cathrine Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    and conduct, and data analysis and interpretation. Key principles such as sample size calculation, a priori definition of a primary efficacy measure, randomization, allocation concealments, and blinding are discussed. In addition, considerations of how stress and normal rodent physiology impact outcome......Background and aims Pain is a subjective experience, and as such, pre-clinical models of human pain are highly simplified representations of clinical features. These models are nevertheless critical for the delivery of novel analgesics for human pain, providing pharmacodynamic measurements...

  9. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources FAQs Glossary Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain Awareness Toolkits September ...

  10. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain ... The physician and the patient are accustomed to deal with acute pain and both naturally expect that ...

  11. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at greater risk of having anxiety as young adults [2] . Abdominal pain or bellyaches in children What ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ...

  12. Elbow pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are gardening, playing baseball, using a screwdriver, or overusing your wrist and arm. Young children commonly develop " ... Treatment depends on the cause, but may involve: Antibiotics Corticosteroid shots Manipulation Pain medicine Physical therapy Surgery ( ...

  13. Hip Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosis and decision making. In: DeLee & Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/hip-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050684 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  14. Pain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of feelings often makes people look for the meaning that cancer and pain have in their life. ... tips: ■■ Ask your doctor if there are generic brands of your medicine available. These usually cost less ...

  15. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 16, 2014. Phantom pain Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Urination Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small masses of minerals) in the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common cause of painful urination. Signs and Symptoms burning or stinging with urination the urge to ...

  17. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  18. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This condition is called rotator cuff tendinitis or bursitis. Shoulder pain may also be caused by: Arthritis ... shoulder joint Bone spurs in the shoulder area Bursitis , which is inflammation of a fluid-filled sac ( ...

  19. Heel Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the big toe joint; an inflamed bursa (bursitis), a small, irritated sac of fluid; a neuroma ( ... sometimes painful deformity generally is the result of bursitis caused by pressure against the shoe and can ...

  20. Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Plan for an Opioid Emergency Access and Attitudes Globally Arthritis Survey Understanding Clinical Trials Resource Guide ... Guide Tension increases pain. This five-minute relaxation exercise can help you let go of physical stress ...

  1. Pain (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the PDQ summary on Acupuncture for more information. Hypnosis Hypnosis may help you relax and may be combined with other thinking and behavior methods. Hypnosis to relieve pain works best in people who ...

  2. Penis pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  3. Anal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and whole grains, exercising daily, and taking stool softeners, if needed, to facilitate bowel movements, reduce straining and ease pain Sitting in a tub of hot water up to your hips — known as a sitz ...

  4. Abdominal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... citrus, high-fat foods, fried or greasy foods, tomato products, caffeine, alcohol, and carbonated beverages. Avoid aspirin, ... especially if bright red, maroon or dark, tarry black) Have chest, neck, or shoulder pain Have sudden, ...

  5. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addition, there doesn't appear to be one type of mattress that's best for people with back pain. It's probably a ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  6. Leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a muscle cramp (also called a charley horse ). Common causes of cramps include: Dehydration or low ... muscle ( strain ) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon ( tendinitis ) Shin splints (pain in the ...

  7. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  8. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  9. Gynecologic management of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Frank F; Hellman, Kevin M; Backonja, Miroslav M

    2011-11-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists often are the initial management clinicians for pelvic neuropathic pain. Although treatment may require comprehensive team management and consultation with other specialists, there are a few critical and basic steps that can be performed during an office visit that offer the opportunity to improve quality of life significantly in this patient population. A key first step is a thorough clinical examination to map the pain site physically and to identify potentially involved nerves. Only limited evidence exists about how best to manage neuropathic pain; generally, a combination of surgical, manipulative, or pharmacologic methods should be considered. Experimental methods to characterize more precisely the nature of the nerve dysfunction exist to diagnose and treat neuropathic pain; however, additional scientific evidence is needed to recommend these options unanimously. In the meantime, an approach that was adopted from guidelines of the International Association for the Study of Pain has been tailored for gynecologic pain. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Walking training at the heart rate of pain threshold improves cardiovascular function and autonomic regulation in intermittent claudication: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehuen, Marcel; Cucato, Gabriel G; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo F; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M; Wolosker, Nelson; Leicht, Anthony S; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia M

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of walking training (WT) on cardiovascular function and autonomic regulation in patents with intermittent claudication (IC). Randomized controlled trial. Forty-two male patients with IC (≥50years) were randomly allocated into two groups: control (CG, n=20, 30min of stretching exercises) and WT (WTG, n=22, 15 bouts of 2min of walking interpolated by 2min of upright rest-walking intensity was set at the heart rate of pain threshold). Both interventions were performed twice/week for 12 weeks. Walking capacity (maximal treadmill test), blood pressure (auscultatory), cardiac output (CO 2 rebreathing), heart rate (ECG), stroke volume, systemic vascular resistance, forearm and calf vascular resistance (plethysmography), and low (LF) and high frequency (HF) components of heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of the study. WT increased total walking distance (+302±85m, p=0.001) and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (+2.13±1.07ms/mmHg, p=0.02). Additionally, at rest, WT decreased systolic and mean blood pressures (-10±3 and -5±2mmHg, p=0.001 and p=0.01, respectively), cardiac output (-0.37±0.24l/min, p=0.03), heart rate (-4±2bpm, p=0.001), forearm vascular resistance (-8.5±2.8U, p=0.02) and LF/HF (-1.24±0.99, p=0.001). No change was observed in the CG. In addition to increasing walking capacity, WT improved cardiovascular function and autonomic regulation in patients with IC. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. First Dutch Consensus of Pain Quality Indicators for Pain Treatment Facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, N. de; Grotel, M. van; Patijn, J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Kleef, M. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a general consensus about the need to define and improve the quality of pain treatment facilities. Although guidelines and recommendations to improve the quality of pain practice management have been launched, provision of appropriate pain treatment is inconsistent and the

  12. Knowledge of pain management in patients with painful bone metastases : A multicentre randomized trial on pain education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerling, J. I.; Reyners, A.; van der Linden, Y.; Mul, V.; Westhoff, P.; de Graeff, A.; Rodenhuis, C.; de Nijs, E.; Muilenburg, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Education of patients regarding pain management may improve patient empowerment and, consequently, reduce pain intensity. To investigate the effect of education on pain intensity, a multicentre phase 3 study was conducted between 1-3-2011 and 1-4-2016. A total of 354 patients who

  13. The effectiveness of the Pilates method: reducing the degree of non-structural scoliosis, and improving flexibility and pain in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Araújo, Maria Erivânia; Bezerra da Silva, Elirez; Bragade Mello, Danielli; Cader, Samária Ali; Shiguemi Inoue Salgado, Afonso; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates with regard to the degree of scoliosis, flexibility and pain. The study included 31 female students divided into two groups: a control group (CG = 11), which had no therapeutic intervention, and an experimental group (EG = 20), which underwent Pilates-based therapy. We used radiological goniometry measurements to assess the degree of scoliosis, standard goniometry measurements to determine the degree of flexibility and the scale of perceived pain using the Borg CR 10 to quantify the level of pain. The independent t test of the Cobb angle (t = - 2.317, p = 0.028), range of motion of trunk flexion (t = 3.088, p = 0.004) and pain (t = -2.478, p = 0.019) showed significant differences between the groups, with best values in the Pilates group. The dependent t test detected a significant decrease in the Cobb angle (Δ% = 38%, t = 6.115, p = 0.0001), a significant increase in trunk flexion (Δ% = 80%, t = -7.977, p = 0.0001) and a significant reduction in pain (Δ% = 60%, t = 7.102, p = 0.0001) in the EG. No significant difference in Cobb angle (t = 0.430, p = 0.676), trunk flexion, (t = 0.938p = 0.371) or pain (t = 0.896, p = 0.391) was found for the CG. The Pilates group was better than control group. The Pilates method showed a reduction in the degree of non-structural scoliosis, increased flexibility and decreased pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pain and functional improvement effects of methylene blue injection on the soft tissue around fusion site after traumatic thoracolumbar fixation: A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Yazdanpanah, Hamed; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Farrokhi, Farnaz; Mesbahi, Amir Reza

    2016-11-01

    Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can cause pain, long-term reductions in quality of life (QOL), and neural deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methylene blue (MB) on preventing postoperative pain and improving QOL in patients with throracolumbar fractures undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation. Fifty patients underwent standard posterior pedicular screw fixation for stabilization of the thoracolumbar fractures: 25 received 1ml of MB solution at a concentration of 0.5% and 25 received normal saline on the soft tissue around fusion site. Primary outcomes were the control of pain, evaluated at 48h, 2 and 6 months after surgery with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS), and the improvement of QOL, assessed 2 and 6 months postoperatively by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire. The mean VAS scores for pain were significantly lower in the MB group compared with the control group at 2 months (1.30±0.45 vs. 2.60±1.19, P<0.001) and 6 months (1.17±0.37 vs. 1.60±0.87; P=0.028) after treatment. At 2 months after the surgery, the mean ODI score was significantly lower in the MB-treated patients than the control group (20.4±10.92 vs. 34.8±15.11; P=0.001). The ODI score in the MB-treated patients was better than the control group at 6 months after the surgery (12.2±11.66 vs. 20.8±11.14; P=0.016). A single dose of MB on the soft tissue around fusion site shows promising results in terms of safety, reduction of postoperative pain, and functional results when compared with placebo 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cannabis and Cannabinoids for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso; Kolano, Ashley L; Alvarado-Vázquez, P Abigail

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to provide the most up-to-date scientific evidence of the potential analgesic effects, or lack thereof, of the marijuana plant (cannabis) or cannabinoids, and of safety or tolerability of their long-term use. We found that inhaled (smoked or vaporized) cannabis is consistently effective in reducing chronic non-cancer pain. Oral cannabinoids seem to improve some aspects of chronic pain (sleep and general quality of life), or cancer chronic pain, but they do not seem effective in acute postoperative pain, abdominal chronic pain, or rheumatoid pain. The available literature shows that inhaled cannabis seems to be more tolerable and predictable than oral cannabinoids. Cannabis or cannabinoids are not universally effective for pain. Continued research on cannabis constituents and improving bioavailability for oral cannabinoids is needed. Other aspects of pain management in patients using cannabis require further open discussion: concomitant opioid use, medical vs. recreational cannabis, abuse potential, etc.

  16. Faster Improvement in Migraine Pain Intensity and Migraine-Related Disability at Early Time Points with AVP-825 (Sumatriptan Nasal Powder Delivery System) versus Oral Sumatriptan: A Comparative Randomized Clinical Trial Across Multiple Attacks from the COMPASS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; McGinley, James S; Shulman, Kenneth J; Wirth, R J; Buse, Dawn C

    2017-11-01

    Fast relief of migraine pain, associated symptoms, and migraine-related disability are priorities in the acute treatment of migraine. Efforts to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of acute migraine treatments with the aim of providing faster relief include the development of non-oral routes of administration. AVP-825 (ONZETRA ® Xsail ® ) is a delivery system containing 22 mg sumatriptan powder that uses a patient's own breath to deliver medication intranasally, targeting the upper posterior nasal cavity beyond the narrow nasal valve, an area lined with vascular mucosa conducive to rapid drug absorption into the systemic circulation. While most studies comparing treatments measure differences in proportions of patients achieving a dichotomous endpoint at fixed time intervals, in this study we compare trajectories of migraine pain and disability over time for AVP-825 versus 100 mg oral sumatriptan tablets. We used data from the COMPASS study (NCT01667679, clinicaltrials.gov), a double-blind, double-dummy, active-comparator, cross-over study of people with a diagnosis of migraine. Participants treated up to five qualifying migraine attacks within 1 hour of onset with either AVP-825 plus placebo tablets or 100 mg oral sumatriptan tablets plus placebo delivery system during the first of two 12-week treatment periods, and then switched treatment sequences to treat up to five more attacks in the second treatment period. Patients recorded ordinal migraine pain intensity and migraine-related disability before dosing (predose), and at 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes. Three-level ordinal multilevel models accounted for unique data structure (repeated measures nested within attacks for each patient) and tested for treatment differences in migraine pain and migraine-related disability through the first 2 hours of attacks post dose. Among 259 study participants (mean age 40.0 years, 84.6% female, 78.4% white), there was significant between and within person

  17. Neural manual vs. robotic assisted mobilization to improve motion and reduce pain hypersensitivity in hand osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Valdes, Kristin; Imperio, Grace; Borboni, Alberto; Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Galeri, Silvia; Negrini, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study is to detail the protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of neural manual vs. robotic assisted on pain in sensitivity as well as analyse the quantitative and qualitative movement of hand in subjects with hand osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-two patients, aged 50 to 90 years old of both genders, with a diagnosis of hand Osteoarthritis (OA), will be recruited. Two groups of 36 participants will receive an experimental intervention (neurodynamic mobilization intervention plus exercise) or a control intervention (robotic assisted passive mobilization plus exercise) for 12 sessions over 4 weeks. Assessment points will be at baseline, end of therapy, and 1 and 3 months after end of therapy. The outcomes of this intervention will be pain and determine the central pain processing mechanisms. [Result] Not applicable. [Conclusion] If there is a reduction in pain hypersensitivity in hand OA patients it can suggest that supraspinal pain-inhibitory areas, including the periaqueductal gray matter, can be stimulated by joint mobilization.

  18. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF SCAPULAR MOBILIZATION VERSUS MOBILIZATION WITH MOVEMENT TO REDUCE PAIN AND IMPROVE GLENO-HUMERAL RANGE OF MOTION IN ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS OF SHOULDER: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipika Boruah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joint mobilization is an effective intervention for adhesive capsulitis. Scapular mobilization in shoulder adhesive capsulitis is used to decrease intra articular pressure by increasing mobility of the joint capsule and its surrounding soft tissue that results in a reduction of pain and increase range of motion and shoulder function. At the same time the use of mobilization with movement (MWM for peripheral joints was also used clinically. This technique combines a sustained application of a manual technique ‘gliding’ force to a joint with concurrent physiologic motion of joint, either actively performed by the subject or passively performed by the therapist. So far there is no study which is done on comparison between both of these techniques. The aim of the study is to find out whether the scapular mobilization or mobilization with movement technique improve gleno-humeral range of motion and reduce pain in patients with shoulder adhesive capsulitis. Methods: 50 subjects with adhesive capsulitis were randomly divided in to two groups and one group was treated with mobilization with movement and another group treated with scapular mobilization technique. Each group consist 25 patients. Both groups were given hot packs and pendular exercises as conventional therapy procedures. Treatment was given 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Restricted joint range of motion and severity of pain were measured before and after treatment completion by using goniometer and SPADI pain score respectively. Result: Results of the present study revealed that there was a significant difference in SPADI pain score(%, AROM-GH-Flexion and AROM-GH-External rotation who were treated in group A(MWM with mean being 44.00, 102.24 and 46.08 respectively compared to group B (SM with mean being 54.00, 81.00 and 35.84 in 3 weeks. Comparisons between these three parameters used in two treatment techniques were extremely significant (p= 0.000 for all. Conclusion: On the

  19. Right upper quadrant pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralls, P.W.; Colletti, P.M.; Boswell, W.D. Jr.; Halls, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Historically, assessment of acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain has been a considerable clinical challenge. While clinical findings and laboratory data frequently narrow the differential diagnosis, symptom overlap generally precludes definitive diagnosis among the various diseases causing acute right upper quadrant pain. Fortunately, the advent of newer diagnostic imaging modalities has greatly improved the rapidity and reliability of diagnosis in these patients. An additional challenge to the physician, with increased awareness of the importance of cost effectiveness in medicine, is to select appropriate diagnostic schema that rapidly establish accurate diagnoses in the most economical fashion possible. The dual goals of this discussion are to assess not only the accuracy of techniques used to evaluate patients with acute right upper quadrant pain, but also to seek out cost-effective, coordinated imaging techniques to achieve this goal

  20. Self-reported pain and disability outcomes from an endogenous model of muscular back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steven Z

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to develop an induced musculoskeletal pain model of acute low back pain and examine the relationship among pain, disability and fear in this model. Methods Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in 52 healthy volunteers (23 women, 17 men; average age 22.4 years; average BMI 24.3 using fatiguing trunk extension exercise. Measures of pain intensity, unpleasantness, and location, and disability, were tracked for one week after exercise. Results Pain intensity ranged from 0 to 68 with 57.5% of participants reporting peak pain at 24 hours and 32.5% reporting this at 48 hours. The majority of participants reported pain in the low back with 33% also reporting pain in the legs. The ratio of unpleasantness to intensity indicated that the sensation was considered more unpleasant than intense. Statistical differences were noted in levels of reported disability between participants with and without leg pain. Pain intensity at 24 hours was correlated with pain unpleasantness, pain area and disability. Also, fear of pain was associated with pain intensity and unpleasantness. Disability was predicted by sex, presence of leg pain, and pain intensity; however, the largest amount of variance was explained by pain intensity (27% of a total 40%. The second model, predicting pain intensity only included fear of pain and explained less than 10% of the variance in pain intensity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a significant association between pain and disability in this model in young adults. However, the model is most applicable to patients with lower levels of pain and disability. Future work should include older adults to improve the external validity of this model.

  1. Minimally Invasive Placement of Spinal Cord Stimulator Paddle Electrodes Is Associated With Improved Perioperative and Long-Term Experience Among Neuropathic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Paul, Darcia; Mednikov, Alina

    2018-03-01

    Prospective, observational cohort study. This study compared in-hospital and long-term outcomes among spinal cord stimulation (SCS) patients undergoing paddle insertion by open or minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches. Patients with treatment-refractory extremity neuropathic pain may benefit from SCS. Conventional placement of surgical paddles for an external neurostimulation trial is through open laminectomy, but MIS techniques may offer advantages. Twenty SCS patients were prospectively assessed. Open patients underwent caudal thoracic laminectomy for multicolumnar electrode paddle placement. MIS patients underwent paddle placement through interlaminar flavectomy using tubular retractors. Demographic data included age, sex, underlying diagnosis, and preoperative visual analog scale (VAS) extremity scores. Intraoperative data included operative duration, blood loss, and number of device passages to achieve final position. Perioperative data included VAS back pain scores; trial data included time-to-trial and time-to-decision. Postoperative data included 1 month VAS back pain scores and 1 year follow-up device complications. No demographic differences were observed among surgical cohorts. MIS procedures had shorter operative duration (P = 0.03), less blood loss (P patients reported less perioperative surgical back pain (P patients who also made sooner decision whether to implant the SCS device (2.8 ± 1.4 vs 4.3 ± 1.0 days, P = 0.013). Similar 1 month back pain scores were reported between surgical cohorts (P = 0.08). MIS techniques for SCS surgical paddle implantation is associated with less perioperative morbidity and surgical site back pain, shorter external neurostimulator trial duration, and long-term device stability benefits. 2.

  2. Painful menstrual periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menstruation - painful; Dysmenorrhea; Periods - painful; Cramps - menstrual; Menstrual cramps ... related activities for a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of ...

  3. Dysmenorrhea: Painful Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Dysmenorrhea: Painful Periods Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Dysmenorrhea: Painful Periods Patient Education FAQs Dysmenorrhea: Painful Periods Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish ...

  4. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Back Pain During Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Back Pain During Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Back Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January ...

  5. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acupuncture - pain relief; Hypnosis - pain relief; Guided imagery - pain relief ... neck, shoulder, knee, or elbow) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Hypnosis is a focused state of concentration. With self- ...

  6. New Cancer Pain Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Kenneth D; Kusper, Teresa M; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2017-02-01

    Cancer pain is often incapacitating and discouraging to patients; is demoralizing to family members and care takers; and is taxing and difficult to subdue for the pain specialists. The consequences of implementing suboptimal treatment are far-reaching; therefore, effective treatment methods are in a great demand. The face of cancer pain management has changed in considerable ways, and interventional procedures have become an integral part of providing multimodal analgesia in cancer pain treatment. The goals of this review are to draw attention to the critical role that regional anesthetic nerve blocks and interventional pain management techniques play in treating malignancy-related pain and emphasize the benefits provided by the aforementioned treatment strategies. A large proportion of cancer patients continues to struggle with an inadequately treated pain despite a strict adherence to the WHO analgesic step ladder. The previous pain treatment algorithm has been modified to include peripheral neural blockade, neuro-destructive techniques, neuromodulatory device use, and intrathecal drug delivery systems. The accumulated evidence highlights the opioid-sparing qualities and other benefits afforded by these modalities: decreasing medication-induced side effects, reducing economic burden of poor analgesia, and overall improvement in quality of life of the patients afflicted with a painful neoplastic disease. The rising prevalence of cancer-related pain syndromes is paralleled by an unmatched growth of innovative treatment strategies. Modified WHO analgesic ladder represents one of the greatest paradigm shifts within the domain of oncologic pain treatment. The cancer patient population requires a prompt and liberal, albeit judicious, delivery of unorthodox pain treatment options freed from the rigid bonds of conventional guidelines and standard practices.

  7. Shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a frequent complaint encountered in the emergency setting. A brief review of shoulder anatomy and physical examination sets the foundation for evaluation of shoulder pain. Considerations of patient's age are helpful to predict injuries. Fractured clavicles are often seen in traumatic injuries in children and young adults, whereas fractures of the humeral head are more often seen in the elderly from traumatic injuries. Shoulder dislocations are more common in teens to fourth decade. This article reviews specific acute injuries, chronic conditions, and radiologic considerations of patients with shoulder complaints encountered in emergency settings.

  8. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  9. Oncology Nursing Certification: Relation to Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes About Pain, Patient-Reported Pain Care Quality, and Pain Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L; Brant, Jeannine M; Donohue, Rebecca; Smith, Ellen M Lavoie; Towsley, Gail; Berry, Patricia H; Guo, Jia-Wen; Al-Qaaydeh, Sharifa; Pett, Marjorie A; Donaldson, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To (a) compare pain knowledge and attitudes between nurses with oncology certified nurse (OCN®) status, non-OCN®-certified nurses, and nurses ineligible for certification and (b) examine the relationships among OCN® status, nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain, patient-reported quality of nursing pain care, and pain outcomes. 
. Prospective, correlational survey design. Patients were nested within nurses. 
. Six inpatient oncology units in three hospitals. 91 nurses in three states (28 OCN®-certified nurses, 37 noncertified nurses, and 26 not eligible for certification). Certification status was validated for 105 nurses who were matched with a sample of 320 patients. 
. Nurses completed a survey, and matched adult patients who were experiencing pain rated their pain care quality and pain experience during the past shift. 
. Demographic characteristics, certification status, and responses to the Nurse Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (NKASRP), Pain Care Quality Survey-Nursing, and modified Brief Pain Inventory (Short Form). 
. OCN®-certified nurses scored significantly higher on the NKASRP (82% correct) compared to non-OCN® eligible nurses (76%) and non-OCN® ineligible nurses (74%) (p pain care quality or pain outcomes or (b) NKASRP and care quality or outcomes (p > 0.05).
. OCN®-certified nurses' knowledge and attitudes related to pain management were superior to noncertified nurses. Neither knowledge and attitudes nor OCN® status were associated with pain care quality or pain outcomes. 
. Knowledge is necessary but insufficient to improve patient outcomes; providing optimal pain care requires action. Sustained efforts to improve cancer pain management are indicated.

  10. Clinical and psychological parameters associated with pain pattern phenotypes in women with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, J Curtis; Tripp, Dean A

    2015-01-01

    It was recently suggested that 2 distinct clinical phenotypes can be described in patients with urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome, including pelvic pain only and pelvic pain beyond. We examined data on patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, including body pain location mapping, and associated medical and psychosocial phenotyping to validate these body pain maps in a cohort of female patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome undergoing tertiary care. Validated questionnaires from 173 diagnosed outpatient female patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome included a body pain area diagram, demographics/history, pain assessment, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome symptoms, depression, anxiety, stress, fatigue, sexual functioning, catastrophizing, quality of life and data on other chronic pain conditions. Two pain phenotypes based on counts of body locations, pelvic pain only and pelvic pain beyond, were comprehensively examined. The 157 patients (81%) identified with pelvic pain beyond reported more sensory type pain, poorer physical quality of life, and greater somatic depression and sleep disturbance than the 36 (19%) categorized with pelvic pain only. The sexual pain score was higher in the pelvic pain only group. Furthermore, patients with the pelvic pain beyond phenotype reported a higher prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia as well as more general fatigue symptoms and psychiatric conditions. Two distinct pain location phenotypes, including pelvic pain only and pelvic pain beyond, were identified by our independent analysis of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Assessing clinical phenotypes based on pain patterns has significant ramifications in our improved understanding of the etiology and treatment of female patients diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  11. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or glucosamine reduced pain and improved muscle strength with resistance training in a randomized controlled trial of knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Susanne G; Beyer, Nina; Hansen, Mette Rud

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of 12 weeks of strength training in combination with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), glucosamine, or placebo on muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), strength (primary outcome parameters), and function, power, pain, and satellite cell number (secondary outcom...

  12. Improvement in chronic low back pain in an aviation crash survivor with adjacent segment disease following flexion distraction therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Dean M

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the chiropractic management of chronic low back pain in a patient with adjacent segment disease. The patient was a 30-year-old man with a 3-year history of chronic nonspecific low back pain following a lumbar disk herniation. Two years before this incident, he had severe lumbar fractures and cauda equina injury due to an aviation accident that required multilevel lumbar fusion surgery, vertebrectomy, and cage reconstruction. The patient received chiropractic management using Cox Flexion Distraction over a 4-week period. A complete reduction of symptoms to 0/10 on a verbal numerical rating scale was achieved within 4 weeks. At 3 months, the patient was able to work 8 to 9 hours per day in his dental practice with no pain. At 9 months, the patient continued to report a complete reduction of symptoms. This report describes the successful management of a patient with chronic low back pain associated with adjacent segment disease using Cox Flexion Distraction protocols.

  13. Achilles Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  14. Foot pain

    OpenAIRE

    Formosa, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    Foot complaints are very common in general practice and their incidence increases with age. Three out of four people complain of foot pain during the course of a lifetime, while approximately 20% of people aged 65 years or older complain of non-traumatic foot problems.

  15. Arm Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2013. http://accessmedicine. com. Accessed Jan. 16, 2016. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/arm-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050870 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  16. Unravelling the Relationship Between Parent and Child PTSD and Pediatric Chronic Pain: the Mediating Role of Pain Catastrophizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Alexandra; Soltani, Sabine; Pavlova, Maria; Noel, Melanie

    2018-02-01

    Clinically elevated rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are found among many youth with chronic pain and their parents and are linked to worse child pain outcomes. Conceptual models of mutual maintenance in pediatric PTSD and chronic pain posit that child and parent pain catastrophizing are key mechanisms underlying this co-occurrence. To our knowledge, the current study is the first to examine child and parent pain catastrophizing as potential mediators in the child PTSD-child pain and parent PTSD-child pain relationships among a cohort of youth with chronic pain. One hundred two children (72.5% female, mean age=13.5 years), recruited from a tertiary level chronic pain program, and 1 of their parents participated. At intake, parents completed psychometrically sound self-report measures of PTSD symptoms and catastrophizing about child pain. Children completed self-report measures of PTSD symptoms, pain catastrophizing, pain interference, and pain intensity. Findings revealed that relationships between child PTSD and child pain as well as parent PTSD and child pain were mediated by child (but not parent) pain catastrophizing. This suggests that children's catastrophic thinking about pain may explain how child and parent PTSD symptoms influence children's experience of chronic pain and is a potential target in family-based interventions to improve pain and mental health outcomes. Consistent with conceptual models of co-occurring PTSD and chronic pain, children's catastrophic thinking about child pain mediated relationships between parent and child PTSD symptoms and child chronic pain outcomes. Child pain catastrophizing may be a fruitful target in interventions to improve children's chronic pain and mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. When Sex Is Painful

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  18. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain ... web site was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Medtronic Foundation and Purdue Pharma. Medtronic ...

  19. Breakthrough cancer pain – still a challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarit, Cesar; Juliá, Joaquim; López, Rafael; Anton, Antonio; Escobar, Yolanda; Casas, Ana; Cruz, Juan Jesús; Galvez, Rafael; Mañas, Ana; Zaragozá, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain is defined as transient pain exacerbation in patients with stable and controlled basal pain. Although variable, the prevalence of breakthrough cancer pain is high (33%–95%). According to the American Pain Foundation, breakthrough pain is observed in 50%–90% of all hospitalized cancer patients, in 89% of all patients admitted to homes for the elderly and terminal-patient care centers, and in 35% of all ambulatory care cancer patients. The management of breakthrough cancer pain should involve an interdisciplinary and multimodal approach. The introduction of new fentanyl formulations has represented a great advance and has notably improved treatment. Among these, the pectin-based intranasal formulation adjusts very well to the profile of breakthrough pain attacks, is effective, has a good toxicity profile, and allows for convenient dosing – affording rapid and effective analgesia with the added advantage of being easily administered by caregivers when patients are unable to collaborate. PMID:23204865

  20. Low back pain (non-specific)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krismer, M.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    chronic. Simple analgesics, NSAIDs and muscle relaxants can reduce pain and can improve and maintain function. Maintaining physical activity, avoiding rest and manual therapy can reduce pain and maintain and restore function in acute LBP. Behavioural treatment can prevent LBP becoming chronic. Aerobic...... days lost (indirect costs) and less so by direct treatment costs. A substantial proportion of individuals with chronic LBP has been found to have chronic widespread pain. LBP is often associated with other pain manifestations such as headache, abdominal pain and pain in different locations...... of the extremities. Widespread pain is associated with a worse prognosis compared to localised LBP. Treatment targets are reduction of pain and better activity/participation, including prevention of disability as well as maintainance of work capacity. The evidence from selected and appraised guidelines, systematic...

  1. Nursing pain management--a qualitative interview study of patients with pain, hospitalized for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustøen, Tone; Gaardsrud, Torill; Leegaard, Marit; Wahl, Astrid K

    2009-03-01

    Pain is a significant symptom in cancer patients. Understanding of patients' experiences in relation to pain management is important in evidence-based nursing in the field of pain. The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' experiences of nursing pain management during hospitalization for cancer treatment. Eighteen cancer patients participated in the study, all with advanced cancer, including skeleton metastases. The female participants all had breast cancer, and the male participants all had prostate cancer. Data were collected by in-depth interviews, and qualitative description was used to entail low-inference interpretation to reach an understanding of the essence of pain and nursing pain management. Patients found it somewhat difficult to express their expectations of nursing pain management and competencies. However, 1) being present and supportive; 2) giving information and sharing knowledge; 3) taking care of medication; and 4) recognizing the pain emerged as themes in nursing pain management. Although patients believed that nurses were caring persons, they perceived differences between nurses in the ways they handled pain management. Furthermore, some patients experienced a lack of information from nurses in relation to pain management. Although cancer patients' experiences showed the importance of nurses in pain management, it seems that nurses should have a clearer role in cancer pain management in relation to counseling and patient education. The results from this study can increase nurses' awareness of their role in pain management as a first step in improving pain management for patients.

  2. The Postoperative Pain Assessment Skills Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael McGillion

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Pain-related misbeliefs among health care professionals (HCPs are common and contribute to ineffective postoperative pain assessment. While standardized patients (SPs have been effectively used to improve HCPs’ assessment skills, not all centres have SP programs. The present equivalence randomized controlled pilot trial examined the efficacy of an alternative simulation method – deteriorating patient-based simulation (DPS – versus SPs for improving HCPs’ pain knowledge and assessment skills.

  3. Minimum detectable and minimal clinically important changes for pain in patients with nonspecific neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamora Javier

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The minimal detectable change (MDC and the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC have been explored for nonspecific low back pain patients and are similar across different cultural settings. No data on MDC and MCIC for pain severity are available for neck pain patients. The objectives of this study were to estimate MDC and MCIC for pain severity in subacute and chronic neck pain (NP patients, to assess if MDC and MCIC values are influenced by baseline values and to explore if they are different in the subset of patients reporting referred pain, and in subacute versus chronic patients. Methods Subacute and chronic patients treated in routine clinical practice of the Spanish National Health Service for neck pain, with or without pain referred to the arm, and a pain severity ≥ 3 points on a pain intensity number rating scale (PI-NRS, were included in this study. Patients' own "global perceived effect" over a 3 month period was used as the external criterion. The minimal detectable change (MDC was estimated by means of the standard error of measurement in patients who self-assess as unchanged. MCIC were estimated by the mean value of change score in patients who self-assess as improved (mean change score, MCS, and by the optimal cutoff point in receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC. The effect on MDC and MCIC of initial scores, duration of pain, and existence of referred pain were assessed. Results 658 patients were included, 487 of them with referred pain. MDC was 4.0 PI-NRS points for neck pain in the entire sample, 4.2 for neck pain in patients who also had referred pain, and 6.2 for referred pain. MCS was 4.1 and ROC was 1.5 for referred and for neck pain, both in the entire sample and in patients who also complained of referred pain. ROC was lower (0.5 PI-NRS points for subacute than for chronic patients (1.5 points. MCS was higher for patients with more intense baseline pain, ranging from 2.4 to 4.9 PI

  4. Externalizing the private experience of pain: a role for co-speech gestures in pain communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbotham, Samantha; Lloyd, Donna M; Holler, Judith; Wearden, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of effective pain communication, talking about pain represents a major challenge for patients and clinicians because pain is a private and subjective experience. Focusing primarily on acute pain, this article considers the limitations of current methods of obtaining information about the sensory characteristics of pain and suggests that spontaneously produced "co-speech hand gestures" may constitute an important source of information here. Although this is a relatively new area of research, we present recent empirical evidence that reveals that co-speech gestures contain important information about pain that can both add to and clarify speech. Following this, we discuss how these findings might eventually lead to a greater understanding of the sensory characteristics of pain, and to improvements in treatment and support for pain sufferers. We hope that this article will stimulate further research and discussion of this previously overlooked dimension of pain communication.

  5. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muirhead-Allwood Sarah K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31. All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p

  6. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    preliminary study in female Sprague-Dawley rats, since male rats are more prone to bladder care issues (e.g., infection or bladder emptying issues). Based...as a whole. SCI also causes bowel dysfunction (“ neurogenic bowel dysfunction”), which is characterized by constipation and/or fecal incontinence5...contusion SCI device and began SCI experiments. • Completed SCI experiments to develop SCI models of pain and neurogenic bowel disorder

  7. Reiki efficacy of therpy in improving pain, fatigue, quiality of life and its impact on activities´s of women daily living suffering from fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Casillas Santamaría

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The evaluation the Reiki therapy effectiveness to relieve pain, fatigue and its impact on activities´s of women daily living suffering from fibromyalgia.Methods: A controlled clinical trial, randomized to three groups (Reiki therapy, placebo and control and hiding of random distribution. Subjects: 150 women, over 18 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia, according to the American College of Rhe