WorldWideScience

Sample records for estuarine sediment standard

  1. Sediment measurement in estuarine and coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of uses of estuarine and coastal areas is given. Problems associated with these uses are discussed, and data needs for intelligent management of these valuable areas are outlined. Suspended sediment measurements are seen to be one of the greatest needs. To help understand the complexity of the problem, a brief discussion of sediment mechanics is given, including sediment sources, characteristics, and transport. The impact of sediment mechanics on its direct measurement (sampling and analysis) is indicated, along with recommendations for directly obtaining representative data. Indirect measurement of suspended sediment by remote sensors is discussed both theoretically and in the light of some recent experiences. The need for an integrated, multidisciplinary program to solve the problem of quantitatively measuring suspended sediment with remote sensors is stressed, and several important considerations of such a program and benefits to be derived therefrom are briefly addressed.

  2. Transport of Gas and Solutes in Permeable Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    dissolved organic matter (DOM) in filtering shelf sediments exceed those in the overlying water column. Although a large fraction of the terrigenous ...Transport of Gas and Solutes in Permeable Estuarine Sediments Markus Huettel Department of... sediment for the transport of solutes through the sand and sediment -water exchange of matter. Due to their compressibility, gas bubbles embedded in

  3. Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota in temperate estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, C; Jurgens, G; De Marco, P; Saano, A; Bordalo, A A

    2001-05-01

    Application of molecular techniques to ecological studies has unveiled a wide diversity of micro-organisms in natural communities, previously unknown to microbial ecologists. New lineages of Archaea were retrieved from several non-extreme environments, showing that these micro-organisms are present in a large variety of ecosystems. The aim was therefore to assess the presence and diversity of Archaea in the sediments of the river Douro estuary (Portugal), relating the results obtained to ecological data. Total DNA was extracted from sediment samples obtained from an estuary deprived of vegetation, amplified by PCR and the resulting DNA fragments cloned. The archaeal origin of the cloned inserts was checked by Southern blot, dot blot or colony blot hybridization. Recombinant plasmids were further analysed by restriction with AvaII and selected for sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses of 14 sequences revealed the presence of members of the domain Archaea. Most of the sequences could be assigned to the kingdom Crenarchaeota. Most of these sequences were closely related to those obtained from non-extreme Crenarchaeota members previously retrieved from diverse ecosystems, such as freshwater and marine environments. The presence of archaeal 16S rDNA sequences in temperate estuarine sediments emerges as a valuable contribution to the understanding of the complexity of the ecosystem.

  4. Pepsin-Digestibility of Contaminated Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A.; Henon, D. N.; Dale, J. L. L.

    2001-11-01

    A standard method for the in vitro digestion of animal protein feeds (2% pepsin in 0·075 N HCl) has been applied to contaminated sediments in order to evaluate a ' bioavailable ' or ' gut-soluble ' fraction of carbon, nitrogen and mineral and trace metals. For most sediment samples, considerably more nitrogen was digested than carbon because of enzymatic digestion of proteinaceous material, and the sequence of metal ' gut-solubility ' was: Cu, Zn>Mn>Fe≫Al. The principal mechanism of metal release appears to be hydrochloric acid digestion of inorganic hydrogenous host phases (e.g. amorphous Fe and Mn oxides), although release of Cu via surface complexation with pepsin molecules may also be significant, and the amount of metal digested enzymatically is restricted to a small and unquantifiable fraction associated with proteinaceous material. Dilute HCl alone does not, however, afford a suitable surrogate for assessing a gut-soluble fraction of metal because enzymatic and acid digestions exhibit synergistic effects, including possible re-adsorption of pepsin-metal complexes under acidic conditions, and exposure and acid attack of otherwise inaccessible hydrogenous material following enzymatic digestion of organic matter.

  5. Comparison of four chronic sediment toxicity tests using selected marine/estuarine tests species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, I.; Fleming, R. [WRc Medmenham, Marlow (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Several draft standard guidelines exist for acute marine/estuarine sediment bioassays which measure lethality over a 4 to 14 day exposure period. Although these are very useful tools for certain applications, such tests may not be useful for discriminating between sediments with the low levels of contaminants most likely to be found in UK estuaries. For this application, chronic sediment bioassays are required which allow the measurement of both lethal and sublethal effects (growth, development and reproduction). Some chronic bioassays are currently being developed for estuarine sediments by workers in Europe, America and Canada. The objectives of the study presented here were to compare four bioassays, currently in development, in terms of their sensitivity to sediment-bound lindane and to differences in particle size. The test species selected for the study were Corophium volutator, Arenicola marina, Macoma Balthica and Neanthes arenaceodentata. Three sediment types were used: high, medium and low percentage of fine material, These were achieved using mixtures of silica sand and a fine, natural, estuarine sediment, and spiked with lindane using a spiking protocol developed at WRc. The results of the study will be presented.

  6. Hydrodynamic Forcing Mobilizes Cu in Low-Permeability Estuarine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Minwei; Wang, Ning; Gaillard, Jean-François; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-05-03

    Overlying hydrodynamics play critical roles in controlling surface-porewater exchanges in permeable sediments, but these effects have rarely been characterized in low-permeability sediments. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments to evaluate the effects of varied hydrodynamic conditions on the efflux of metals from low-permeability estuarine sediments. Two Cu-contaminated sediments obtained from the Piscataqua River were subject to controlled levels of hydrodynamic shear in Gust mesocosms, including episodic sediment resuspension. Overlying water and porewater samples were collected over the course of experiments and analyzed for metal concentrations. The two sediments had similar permeability (∼10(-15) m(2)), but different particle size distributions. Hydrodynamic forcing enhanced the mobilization and efflux of Cu from the coarser-grained sediments, but not the finer-grained sediments. Sediment resuspension caused additional transitory perturbations in Cu concentrations in the water column. Particulate metal concentrations increased significantly during resuspension, but then rapidly decreased to preresuspension levels following cessation of sediment transport. Overall, these results show that the mobility and efflux of metals are likely to be influenced by overlying hydrodynamics even in low-permeability sediments, and these effects are mediated by sediment heterogeneity and resuspension.

  7. Changes in metal contamination levels in estuarine sediments around India – An assessment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Ramteke, D.; Chakraborty, S.; Nath, B.N.

    provides managers and decision-makers of environmental protection agency with a better scientific understanding for decision-making in controlling metal pollution in estuarine sediments around India....

  8. Interactions between waves, sediment, and turbulence on a shallow estuarine mudflat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacVean, Lissa J; Lacy, Jessica R

    2014-01-01

    Measurements were collected on a shallow estuarine mudflat in northern San Francisco Bay to examine the physical processes controlling waves, turbulence, sediment resuspension, and their interactions...

  9. Copper effects on bacterial activity of estuarine silty sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela; Fernandes, Sandra; Sobral, Paula; Alcântara, Fernanda

    2007-07-01

    Bacteria of silty estuarine sediments were spiked with copper to 200 μg Cu g -1 dry weight sediment in order to assess the impact of copper on bacterial degradation of organic matter and on bacterial biomass production. Bacterial density was determined by direct counting under epifluorescence microscopy and bacterial production by the incorporation of 3H-Leucine. Leucine turnover rate was evaluated by 14C-leucine incorporation and ectoenzymatic activities were estimated as the hydrolysis rate of model substrates for β-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase. The presence of added copper in the microcosms elicited, after 21 days of incubation, generalised anoxia and a decrease in organic matter content. The non-eroded surface of the copper-spiked sediment showed, when compared to the control, a decrease in bacterial abundance and significant lower levels of bacterial production and of leucine turnover rate. Bacterial production and leucine turnover rate decreased to 1.4% and 13% of the control values, respectively. Ectoenzymatic activities were also negatively affected but by smaller factors. After erosion by the water current in laboratory flume conditions, the eroded surface of the control sediment showed a generalised decline in all bacterial activities. The erosion of the copper-spiked sediment showed, however, two types of responses with respect to bacterial activities at the exposed surface: positive responses of bacterial production and leucine turnover rate contrasting with slight negative responses of ectoenzymatic activities. The effects of experimental erosion in the suspended cells were also different in the control and in the copper-spiked sediment. Bacterial cells in the control microcosm exhibited, when compared to the non-eroded sediment cells, decreases in all activities after the 6-h suspension. The response of the average suspended copper-spiked sediment cell differed from the control by a less sharp decrease in ectoenzymatic activities and

  10. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakraborty, S.; Vudamala, K.; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B.N.

    Distribution of metals in different binding phases of estuarine sediments provides chemically significant description of metal–sediment interactions. This study describes the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE), Jahn–Teller effect...

  11. Biological test method: Acute test for sediment toxicity using marine or estuarine amphipods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McLeay, D. J; Sprague, John B

    1992-01-01

    Methods recommended by Environment Canada for performing 10-day tests for sediment toxicity, using one or more of the following species of marine or estuarine sediment-burrowing amphipods, are described in this report...

  12. Estuarine Sediment Dissolved Organic Matter Dynamics in an Enhanced Sediment Flux Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. Blake; Long, Wen; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2017-10-01

    Sediment derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) can comprise a substantial portion of the organic carbon budget in coastal bottom waters, yet it is often neglected in coastal carbon cycle models. In most modern sediment-water column flux models, biologically mediated reactions that remineralize particulate organic matter (POM) into inorganic compounds are simplified. In reality, organic matter remineralization is a complex suite of reactions that include DOM intermediate compounds. To better represent the sequential breakdown of POM and remineralization of DOM, a DOM state variable was built into a widely used sediment flux model. In the model, DOM is created in the sediment by hydrolysis of POM, and all organic matter passes through the DOM pool before remineralization. The model was run for 11 years and tuned to reproduce observed sediment flux data collected in Chesapeake Bay and then used to assess the role of DOM in sediment organic matter dynamics. Sediment-water column fluxes of DOM are highly variable both on seasonal and interannual scales, with substantial variability among stations in both magnitude and flux direction. Across all stations, semilabile and inert DOM is lost and labile DOM is taken up into the reactive first layer of the modeled sediment, with the net flux a balance of the two processes. The improved sediment flux model can be utilized to better understand the role of sediment biogeochemistry in the estuarine and coastal carbon cycle and shed light on difficult to measure processes involving DOM intermediate compounds.

  13. Relationship between benthic foraminifera and sediment in the estuarine complex of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.

    Two indices of community association were used to elucidate the relationship between changes in species composition of benthic foraminifera and changes in the grain size composition of the sediment in estuarine complex of Goa. The degree...

  14. Impact of boat-generated waves on intertidal estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanpain, O.; Deloffre, J.; Lafite, R.; Gomit, G.; Calluaud, D.; David, L.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrodynamics in the macrotidal Seine estuary (France) are controlled by the semi-diurnal tidal regime modulated seasonally by the fluvial discharge. Wind effect on sediment transport (through wind waves and swell) is observed at the mouth of the estuary. Over the last century, authorities have put emphasis on facilitating economic exchanges by means of embankment building and increased dredging activity. These developments led to allow and secure sea vessel traffic in the Seine estuary (from its mouth to the port of Rouen, 125 km upstream) but they also resulted in a change of estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport features. A riversides restoration policy has been recently started by port authorities. In this context, the objective of the field-based study presented is to connect vessel characteristics (i.e. speed, draft...), boat-generated waves and their sedimentary impacts. Such information will be used by stakeholders to manage riverside. The natural intertidal site of interest is located in the fluvial freshwater part of the Seine estuary characterized by a 4.5 m maximum tidal range. The foreshore slope is gently decreasing and surface sediments are composed of fine to coarse sand with occasional mud drapes. In order to decipher boat-generated events, the sampling strategy is based on continuous ADV measurements coupled with a turbidimeter and an altimeter to study sediment dynamics. These instruments are settled in the lower part of the foreshore (i) to obtain a significant dataset (i.e. oceanic instruments are not measuring in air) on a zone statically affected by boat waves and (ii) because most of boat traffic occurs during early flood or late ebb period. Spatial variations are assessed along a cross-section through grain-size analysis of surface sediments and topography measurements using pole technique. Results enhance hydrodynamic and sedimentary impacts of boat-generated waves compared respectively to tidal and wind effects. Long

  15. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated silvernanoparticles in the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cong, Yi; Banta, Gary Thomas; Selck, Henriette

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the toxicities of sediment-associated silver added to sediment as commercially available silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20 and 80 nm) and aqueous Ag (AgNO3) to the estuarine polychaete, Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor, were investigated for both individual and subcellular endpoints...

  16. MODELLING OF SEDIMENTS CONCENTRATION DISTRIBUTION IN DREDGED CANALS OF THE NIGER DELTA ESTUARINE REGION, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chizom Dike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous sediments concentration distributi on models used in the study of sediment characteristics of the dredged canals in the Niger-Delta estuarine region, Nigeria; did not take into consideration the lateral in flow due to tidal effects, which affects tremendously, the sediment intake into the estuarine waters. In the current research, existing models are modified by incorpora ting the missing lateral inflow parameters, which are peculiar to the Niger Delta environment, to obtain more accurate model results. Details are given herein, of the deve lopment and application of a 3-dimensional numerical model (EKU 2.8 Models to predict sediment concentration distribution (total suspended sediment & bed sediment load s in the Niger Delta estuarine canals, with Ekulama well 19 access canal as a case study. The approach in this paper involved coupling a sediment transport equation (w ith the inclusion of lateral inflow parameters, with an estuarine hydro-dy namics equation to generate a generic 3- dimensional sediment concentration distribu tion model, using deterministic approach. Predicted results using this model compar ed favorably with measured field results. Average sediment concentration of 29mg/l was obtained compared with 31mg/l measured in the field for bed sediment loads. Finally, the predicted sediment concentration distribution (TSS, when comp ared with field results, gave average correlation coefficient of 0.9.; hence, the present model will assist in generating adequate information /data on sediment ch aracteristics and transport mechanism, required for effective design of canals to redu ce rate of siltation. The application of the above knowledge/parameters generated from this model to effectively design canals to reduce siltation will be treated in subsequent articles.

  17. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Chao-Jen; Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Wei, Sean T.-S.; Lin, I-Ting; Ismail, Wael A.; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III)] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM) and individual electron acceptors (10 mM), including nitra...

  18. Method for assessing the chronic toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment-associated contaminants using the amphipod Corophium volutator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, A; Rowland, S J; Canty, M; Smith, E L; Galloway, T S

    2007-06-01

    Acute sediment toxicity tests do not test key life stage events such as moulting and reproduction and therefore do not reveal the longer-term effects of contaminant exposure. A laboratory method is described for determining the chronic toxicity of contaminants associated with whole sediments. The test is conducted using neonates of the estuarine amphipod Corophium volutator at 15 degrees C, salinity 25 psu and a 12 h light:12 h dark photoperiod. The endpoints are survival and growth after 28 days and survival, growth and reproduction of amphipods upon termination of test i.e. reproduction within all control vessels (ca 75 days). The sediment chronic toxicity test was used to investigate the effects of sediments spiked with environmentally relevant preparations of slightly weathered Alaskan North Slope crude oil, including a water-accommodated-fraction (WAF) and a chemically-dispersed (Corexit 9527) WAF. Sediment oil concentrations were quantified using ultra-violet fluorescence. The amphipods exposed to chemically dispersed oil had higher mortality and lower growth rates than control-, Corexit 9527- and WAF-exposed organisms, resulting in reduced reproduction. The described method supplements the standard acute sediment test and would be particularly useful when long-term ecological effects are suspected but acute tests reveal no significant mortality. The sediment chronic test reported herein has shown that sediment that was not evidently toxic during 10-day acute tests could have population-level effects on sediment-dwelling amphipods.

  19. Aggregation, sedimentation, dissolution and bioavailability of quantum dots in estuarine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand their fate and transport in estuarine systems, the aggregation, sedimentation, and dissolution of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in seawater were investigated. Hydrodynamic size increased from 40 to 60 nm to >1 mm within 1 h in seawater, and the aggregates were highly p...

  20. Integrated sediment quality assessment in Paranaguá Estuarine System, Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueri, R B; Cesar, A; Torres, R J; Abessa, D M S; Morais, R D; Pereira, C D S; Nascimento, M R L; Mozeto, A A; Riba, I; DelValls, T A

    2009-10-01

    Sediment quality from Paranaguá Estuarine System (PES), a highly important port and ecological zone, was evaluated by assessing three lines of evidence: (1) sediment physical-chemical characteristics; (2) sediment toxicity (elutriates, sediment-water interface, and whole sediment); and (3) benthic community structure. Results revealed a gradient of increasing degradation of sediments (i.e. higher concentrations of trace metals, higher toxicity, and impoverishment of benthic community structure) towards inner PES. Data integration by principal component analysis (PCA) showed positive correlation between some contaminants (mainly As, Cr, Ni, and Pb) and toxicity in samples collected from stations located in upper estuary and one station placed away from contamination sources. Benthic community structure seems to be affected by both pollution and natural fine characteristics of the sediments, which reinforces the importance of a weight-of-evidence approach to evaluate sediments of PES.

  1. Seawater-induced mobilization of trace metals from mackinawite-rich estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa N L; Johnston, Scott G; Burton, Edward D; Bush, Richard T; Sullivan, Leigh A; Slavich, Peter G

    2013-02-01

    Benthic sediments in coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) drains can contain high concentrations (~1-5%) of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) as nano-particulate mackinawite. These sediments can sequester substantial quantities of trace metals. Because of their low elevation and the connectivity of drains to estuarine channels, these benthic sediments are vulnerable to rapid increases in ionic strength from seawater incursion by floodgate opening, floodgate failure, storm surge and seasonal migration of the estuarine salt wedge. This study examines the effect of increasing seawater concentration on trace metal mobilization from mackinawite-rich drain sediments (210-550 μmol g⁻¹ AVS) collected along an estuarine salinity gradient. Linear combination fitting of S K-edge XANES indicated mackinawite comprised 88-96% of sediment-bound S. Anoxic sediment suspensions were conducted with seawater concentrations ranging from 0% to 100%. We found that mobilization of some metals increased markedly with increasing ionic strength (Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni) whereas Al mobilization decreased. The largest proportion of metals mobilized from the labile metal pool, operationally defined as Σexchangeable + acid-extractable + organically-bound metals, occurred in sediments from relatively fresh upstream sites (up to 39% mobilized) compared to sediments sourced from brackish downstream sites (0-11% mobilized). The extent of relative trace metal desorption generally followed the sequence Mn > Ni ≈ Cu > Zn > Fe > Al. Trace metal mobilization from these mackinawite-rich sediments was attributed primarily to desorption of weakly-bound metals via competitive exchange with marine-derived cations and enhanced complexation with Cl⁻ and dissolved organic ligands. These results have important implications for trace metal mobilization from these sediments at near-neutral pH under current predicted sea-level rise and climate change scenarios. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Escherichia coli and fecal coliforms in freshwater and estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been known for some time that substantial populations of fecal coliforms and E. coli are harbored in freshwater bottom sediments, bank soils, and beach sands. However, the relative importance of sediments as bacterial habitats and as a source of water-borne fecal coliforms and E. coli has not...

  3. Holocene estuarine sediments as a source of arsenic in Pleistocene groundwater in suburbs of Hanoi, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Funabiki, Ayako; Do, An Thuan; Canh, Vu Duc; Nga, Tran Thi Viet; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater pollution by arsenic is a major health threat in suburban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam. The present study evaluates the effect of the sedimentary environments of the Pleistocene and Holocene deposits, and the recharge systems, on the groundwater arsenic pollution in Hanoi suburbs distant from the Red River. At two study sites (Linh Dam and Tai Mo communes), undisturbed soil cores identified a Pleistocene confined aquifer (PCA) and Holocene unconfined aquifer (HUA) as major aquifers, and Holocene estuarine and deltaic sediments as an aquitard layer between the two aquifers. The Holocene estuarine sediments (approximately 25-40 m depth, 9.6-4.8 cal ka BP) contained notably high concentrations of arsenic and organic matter, both likely to have been accumulated by mangroves during the Holocene sea-level highstand. The pore waters in these particular sediments exhibited elevated levels of arsenic and dissolved organic carbon. Arsenic in groundwater was higher in the PCA (25-94 μg/L) than in the HUA (5.2-42 μg/L), in both the monitoring wells and neighboring household tubewells. Elevated arsenic concentration in the PCA groundwater was likely due to vertical infiltration through the arsenic-rich and organic-matter-rich overlying Holocene estuarine sediments, caused by massive groundwater abstraction from the PCA. Countermeasures to prevent arsenic pollution of the PCA groundwater may include seeking alternative water resources, reducing water consumption, and/or appropriate choice of aquifers for groundwater supply.

  4. Mercury contamination history of an estuarine floodplain reconstructed from a 210Pb-dated sediment core (Berg River, South Africa)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kading, TJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury deposition histories have been scarcely documented in the southern hemisphere. A sediment core was collected from the ecologically important estuarine floodplain of the Berg River (South Africa). The authors establish the concentration of Hg...

  5. Restoration of estuarine tidal mudflat sediments after hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Colen, Carl; Montserrat, F; Middelburg, JJ

    Ecosystem function recovery and benthic community recovery was investigated after experimentally induced depleted oxygen bottom water concentrations in a tidal mudflat (Paulinapolder, Westerschelde estuary). Macrofauna recovery developed through different succession stages and was structured...... by surface deposit feeding macrofauna during the first stage, stabilized the sediment and thereby enhanced macrobenthic and nematode recruitment success. Bioturbation impact of later succession species increased oxygen input in the sediment, resulting in an enhanced nitrification, denitrification and energy...

  6. Transport of Gas and Solutes in Permeable Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    sediments using benthic chambers and bubble traps. While the chambers allowed changing the advective transport component and thereby also Report...may be a factor during periods of O2-consuming decaying phytoplankton blooms in the water column. Similar to the O2 bubbles, the CH4 bubbles that...investigate the effect of the input of old (i.e. crude oil) and new (i.e. phytoplankton detritus) organic matter on sediment properties and 9

  7. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Jen Shih

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM and individual electron acceptors (10 mM, including nitrate, Fe3+, and sulfate. The analysis of androgen metabolites indicated that testosterone biodegradation under denitrifying conditions proceeds through the 2,3-seco pathway, whereas testosterone biodegradation under iron-reducing conditions may proceed through an unidentified alternative pathway. Metagenomic analysis and PCR-based functional assays suggested that Thauera spp. were the major testosterone degraders in estuarine sediment samples incubated with testosterone and nitrate. Thauera sp. strain GDN1, a testosterone-degrading betaproteobacterium, was isolated from the denitrifying sediment sample. This strain tolerates a broad range of salinity (0–30 ppt. Although testosterone biodegradation did not occur under sulfate-reducing conditions, we observed the anaerobic biotransformation of testosterone to estrogens in some testosterone-spiked sediment samples. This is unprecedented since biotransformation of androgens to estrogens is known to occur only under oxic conditions. Our metagenomic analysis suggested that Clostridium spp. might play a role in this anaerobic biotransformation. These results expand our understanding of microbial metabolism of steroids under strictly anoxic conditions.

  8. A manipulative field experiment to evaluate an integrative methodology for assessing sediment pollution in estuarine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Marín, Arnaldo

    2009-05-15

    The assessment of sediment contamination is of crucial importance for the management of estuarine ecosystems. Environmental risk assessment of oil pollution must be specific to these ecosystems because of their unique toxicant bioavailability dynamics, which is not comparable with that of other ecosystems where the environmental parameters are less variable. The goal of this work was to test in two European estuarine areas (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal; La Manga, Spain) whether the common methodology used to evaluate sediment pollution in marine sediment (amphipod toxicity tests and community structure analysis) is suited to these physico-chemically unique systems. Manipulative field experiments were conducted at three oil concentration levels, to compare resulting changes in community structure with laboratory and in situ amphipod toxicity tests carried out with native amphipod species Corophium multisetosum (Atlantic area) and Microdeutopus gryllotalpa (Mediterranean area). The impact of the toxicant was reflected in the community structure and toxicity tests, both of which were correlated with oil concentration. These results point to this methodology being a reliable tool for assessing and monitoring pollution in estuarine areas.

  9. Spatial and temporal variability of suspended-sediment concentrations in a shallow estuarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ruhl

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Shallow subembayments respond differently than deep channels to physical forces acting in estuaries. The U.S. Geological Survey measured suspended-sediment concentrations at five locations in Honker Bay, a shallow subembayment of San Francisco Bay, and the adjacent channel to investigate the spatial and temporal differences between deep and shallow estuarine environments. During the first freshwater pulse of the wet season, the channel tended to transport suspended sediments through the system, whereas the shallow area acted as off-channel storage where deposition would likely occur. Following the freshwater pulse, suspended-sediment concentrations were greater in Honker Bay than in the adjacent deep channel, due to the larger supply of erodible sediment on the bed. However, the tidal variability of suspended-sediment concentrations in both Honker Bay and in the adjacent channel was greater after the freshwater pulse than before. During wind events, suspended-sediment concentrations in the channel were not affected; however, wind played a crucial role in the resuspension of sediments in the shallows. Despite wind-wave sediment resuspension in Honker Bay, tidally averaged suspended-sediment flux was controlled by the flood-dominated currents.

  10. Assessment of factors influencing direct enumeration of viruses within estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, Rebekah R; Liu, Ling; Wommack, K Eric

    2006-07-01

    Accurate enumeration of viruses within environmental samples is critical for investigations of the ecological role of viruses and viral infection within microbial communities. This report evaluates differences in viral and bacterial direct counts between estuarine sediment samples which were either immediately processed onboard ship or frozen at -20 degrees C and later processed. Viral and bacterial abundances were recorded at three stations spanning the length of the Chesapeake Bay in April and June 2003 within three sediment fractions: pore water (PW), whole sediment (WS), and sediment after pore water removal (AP). No significant difference in viral abundance was apparent between extracts from fresh or frozen sediments. In contrast, bacterial abundance was significantly lower in the samples subjected to freezing. Both bacterial and viral abundance showed significant differences between sediment fractions (PW, WS, or AP) regardless of the fresh or frozen status. Although pore water viral abundance has been used in the past as a measurement of viral abundance in sediments, this fraction accounted for only ca. 5% of the total sediment viral abundance across all samples. The effect of refrigerated storage of sediment viral extracts was also examined and showed that, within the first 2 h, viral abundance decreased ca. 30% in formalin-fixed extracts and 66% in unfixed extracts. Finally, the reliability of direct viral enumeration via epifluorescence microscopy was tested by using DNase treatment of WS extractions. These tests indicated that a large fraction (>86%) of the small SYBR gold fluorescing particles are likely viruses.

  11. Lead distribution in coastal and estuarine sediments around India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, S.; Chakraborty, P.; Nath, B.N.

    non-monsoon months(Jena, 2008). The Pearson correlation and statistical regression analysis (based on the available literature data from this region) show a significant positive correlation between Pb and Fe/Mn in the sediments from this region... minor enrichment of Pb with EF values from 1 to 3. The Pearson correlation and regression analysis on the available literature data indicate a strong positive correlation between Pb and Al (Figure 4, Table 4). This finding suggests that most of the Pb...

  12. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Torres-Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June and rainy seasons (July, October, and November. Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g, with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA.

  13. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g) compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA. PMID:23401664

  14. Abundance and Distribution of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Coastal and Estuarine Sediments-a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassard, Francis; Gwyther, Ceri L; Farkas, Kata; Andrews, Anthony; Jones, Vera; Cox, Brian; Brett, Howard; Jones, Davey L; McDonald, James E; Malham, Shelagh K

    2016-01-01

    The long term survival of fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) and human pathogenic microorganisms in sediments is important from a water quality, human health and ecological perspective. Typically, both bacteria and viruses strongly associate with particulate matter present in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. This association tends to be stronger in finer textured sediments and is strongly influenced by the type and quantity of clay minerals and organic matter present. Binding to particle surfaces promotes the persistence of bacteria in the environment by offering physical and chemical protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. How bacterial and viral viability and pathogenicity is influenced by surface attachment requires further study. Typically, long-term association with surfaces including sediments induces bacteria to enter a viable-but-non-culturable (VBNC) state. Inherent methodological challenges of quantifying VBNC bacteria may lead to the frequent under-reporting of their abundance in sediments. The implications of this in a quantitative risk assessment context remain unclear. Similarly, sediments can harbor significant amounts of enteric viruses, however, the factors regulating their persistence remains poorly understood. Quantification of viruses in sediment remains problematic due to our poor ability to recover intact viral particles from sediment surfaces (typically true viral titre in sediments may be being vastly underestimated. In turn, this is limiting our ability to understand the fate and transport of viruses in sediments. Model systems (e.g., human cell culture) are also lacking for some key viruses, preventing our ability to evaluate the infectivity of viruses recovered from sediments (e.g., norovirus). The release of particle-bound bacteria and viruses into the water column during sediment resuspension also represents a risk to water quality. In conclusion, our poor process level understanding of viral/bacterial-sediment

  15. Interactions between waves, sediment, and turbulence on a shallow estuarine mudflat

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVean, Lissa J.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements were collected on a shallow estuarine mudflat in northern San Francisco Bay to examine the physical processes controlling waves, turbulence, sediment resuspension, and their interactions. Tides alone forced weak to moderate currents of 10–30 cm s-1 in depths of 0–3 m, and maintained a background suspension of 30–50 mg L21 of fine sediment. In the presence of wind waves, bottom orbital velocities spanned 20–30 cm s-1, suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC) at 15 and 30 cm above the bed (cmab) increased by 1–2 orders of magnitude, and vertical gradients in SSC were strong enough to produce turbulence-limiting stratification, with gradient Richardson numbers exceeding 0.25. Simultaneously, turbulent

  16. Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation in Salem Sound, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, E. R.; Hubeny, J. B.; Zhu, J.; Olsen, C. R.; Warren, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Salem Sound watershed (MA) historically has been a region of significant industrial activity. Two specific point sources for pollution in the region are the South Essex Sewerage District (SESD) wastewater treatment facility, and the Salem Harbor Power Station, a coal-burning power plant. This study tests the hypothesis that human impact on Salem Sound is preserved in the sediment record. A sediment core was taken near the location of the SESD outfall. This core was analyzed for content of organic matter via loss on ignition (LOI), as well as magnetic susceptibility. An age model was constructed using 137Cs and 210Pb. Below 31 cm (mid-nineteenth century), the core contains mean background values of 2.7% LOI and values increase above this depth. At 21cm, a rapid increase in organic matter concentration from 6.6% to 11.8% is observed. This depth corresponds to ~1905 which is contemporaneous with construction of the outfall pipe discharging raw wastewater. At a depth of 7 cm (mid 1970s), LOI values decrease from 11.7% to 9.3%. This shift is likely attributed to SESD beginning primary treatment in 1977. LOI values continue to drop at 2cm (late 1990s), from 7.8% to 6.3%, and remain at 6.1% to the modern surface, likely a result of SESD upgrading to secondary treatment in 1998. Magnetic susceptibility also shows variability down core that is likely attributed to human impact. At a depth of approximately 20cm susceptibility values start increasing from 4.2 SI units until they reach a peak at 15cm (8.8 SI units). This increase can be attributed to the industrial revolution and increased industrial activity in the area. A decrease in susceptibility is observed at 15cm to 11cm (5.6 SI units) that may be attributed to the Great Depression and less fossil fuels being burned due to the economic situation. At approximately 10cm and 8.0 SI units, an increasing trend is first observed. This trend continues up to the modern surface where it eventually reaches 19.9 SI units. This

  17. Sediment composition influences spatial variation in the abundance of human pathogen indicator bacteria within an estuarine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L Perkins

    Full Text Available Faecal contamination of estuarine and coastal waters can pose a risk to human health, particularly in areas used for shellfish production or recreation. Routine microbiological water quality testing highlights areas of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB contamination within the water column, but fails to consider the abundance of FIB in sediments, which under certain hydrodynamic conditions can become resuspended. Sediments can enhance the survival of FIB in estuarine environments, but the influence of sediment composition on the ecology and abundance of FIB is poorly understood. To determine the relationship between sediment composition (grain size and organic matter and the abundance of pathogen indicator bacteria (PIB, sediments were collected from four transverse transects of the Conwy estuary, UK. The abundance of culturable Escherichia coli, total coliforms, enterococci, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Vibrio spp. in sediments was determined in relation to sediment grain size, organic matter content, salinity, depth and temperature. Sediments that contained higher proportions of silt and/or clay and associated organic matter content showed significant positive correlations with the abundance of PIB. Furthermore, the abundance of each bacterial group was positively correlated with the presence of all other groups enumerated. Campylobacter spp. were not isolated from estuarine sediments. Comparisons of the number of culturable E. coli, total coliforms and Vibrio spp. in sediments and the water column revealed that their abundance was 281, 433 and 58-fold greater in sediments (colony forming units (CFU/100g when compared with the water column (CFU/100ml, respectively. These data provide important insights into sediment compositions that promote the abundance of PIB in estuarine environments, with important implications for the modelling and prediction of public health risk based on sediment resuspension and transport.

  18. Sediment composition influences spatial variation in the abundance of human pathogen indicator bacteria within an estuarine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tracy L; Clements, Katie; Baas, Jaco H; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; Malham, Shelagh K; McDonald, James E

    2014-01-01

    Faecal contamination of estuarine and coastal waters can pose a risk to human health, particularly in areas used for shellfish production or recreation. Routine microbiological water quality testing highlights areas of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) contamination within the water column, but fails to consider the abundance of FIB in sediments, which under certain hydrodynamic conditions can become resuspended. Sediments can enhance the survival of FIB in estuarine environments, but the influence of sediment composition on the ecology and abundance of FIB is poorly understood. To determine the relationship between sediment composition (grain size and organic matter) and the abundance of pathogen indicator bacteria (PIB), sediments were collected from four transverse transects of the Conwy estuary, UK. The abundance of culturable Escherichia coli, total coliforms, enterococci, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Vibrio spp. in sediments was determined in relation to sediment grain size, organic matter content, salinity, depth and temperature. Sediments that contained higher proportions of silt and/or clay and associated organic matter content showed significant positive correlations with the abundance of PIB. Furthermore, the abundance of each bacterial group was positively correlated with the presence of all other groups enumerated. Campylobacter spp. were not isolated from estuarine sediments. Comparisons of the number of culturable E. coli, total coliforms and Vibrio spp. in sediments and the water column revealed that their abundance was 281, 433 and 58-fold greater in sediments (colony forming units (CFU)/100g) when compared with the water column (CFU/100ml), respectively. These data provide important insights into sediment compositions that promote the abundance of PIB in estuarine environments, with important implications for the modelling and prediction of public health risk based on sediment resuspension and transport.

  19. Impact of silver nanoparticle contamination on the genetic diversity of natural bacterial assemblages in estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Adam; Handy, Richard D; Readman, James W; Atfield, Andrew; Mühling, Martin

    2009-06-15

    Recent advancements in the nanotechnology industry have seen a growing interest in integrating silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) into consumer and medical products. To date, there has been little research into the toxicological impact that Ag-NPs will have when they enter the marine realm. Of particular concern are the possible effects of Ag-NPs on natural bacterial assemblages, given the antimicrobial activity of silver. In this study, estuarine sediment samples were dosed in triplicate for 20 days from a stock solution of Ag-NPs, with a final cumulative treatment of either 0 microg L(-1) (control), 25 microg L(-1) or 1000 microg L(-1). The experimental tanks were left for a further 10 days to allow for any recovery. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometery (ICP-OES) of water and sediment samples confirmed that the Ag-NPs concentration in the aqueous phase decreased after each dosing and were transported to accumulate in the surface layer of the sediment (approximately top 3 mm). The overall concentration of Ag-NPs in the water column, however, increased steadily during the 20 days of dosing but decreased rapidly during the following 10 days without dosing. Nevertheless, the Ag-NPs did not have any impact on the prokaryotic abundance in the water column over the incubation period (ANOVA, P Environmental DNA was extracted from sediment samples and a two-step nested PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) approach, using PCR primers specific to the phylum Bacteria, was adopted to assess their diversity. Multivariate statistical analyses of presence/ absence matrices produced from DGGE profiles revealed negligible differences in bacterial diversity between treatments, suggesting that, under the selected experimental regime, Ag-NPs present little or no impact on estuarine sediment bacterial diversity. Possible reasons for this could include environmental factors, in particular the chloride ions in estuary water affecting the chemistry and

  20. Contamination of estuarine water, biota, and sediment by halogenated organic compounds: A field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Chiou, C.T.; Brinton, T.I.; Barber, L.B.; Demcheck, D.K.; Demas, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted in the vicinity of an industrial outfall in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, have shown that water, bottom and suspended sediment, and four different species of biota are contaminated with halogenated organic compounds (HOC) including haloarenes. A "salting-out" effect in the estuary moderately enhanced the partitioning tendency of the contaminants into biota and sediments. Contaminant concentrations in water, suspended sediments, and biota were found to be far below the values predicted on the basis of the assumption of phase equilibria with respect to concentrations in bottom sediment. Relative concentration factors of HOC between biota (catfish) and bottom sediment increased with increasing octanol/estuarine water partition coefficients (Kow*), maximizing at log Kow* of about 5, although these ratios were considerably less than equilibrium values. In contrast, contaminant concentrations in water, biota, and suspended sediments were much closer to equilibrium values. Bioconcentration factors of HOC determined on the basis of lipid content for four different biotic species correlated reasonably well with equilibrium triolein/water partition coefficients (Ktw).

  1. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Vudamala, Krushna; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-02-01

    Distribution of metals in different binding phases of estuarine sediments provides chemically significant description of metal-sediment interactions. This study describes the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE), Jahn-Teller effect, and water exchange rate (k-w) on metal distribution in different binding phases of estuarine sediments. It was found that Cu had highest affinity for organic binding phases in the studied sediments followed by Ni and Pb. However, Pb showed strong association with Fe/Mn oxide phases followed by Ni and Cu. Faster k-w of Cu (II) (1 × 10(9) s(-1)) increased the rate of complex formation of Cu(2+) ion with ligand in the organic phases. The Cu-ligand (from organic phase) complexes gained extra stability by the Jahn-Teller effect. The combined effects of these two phenomena and high ionic potential increased the association of Cu with the organic phases of the sediments than Ni and Pb. The smaller ionic radii of Ni(2+) (0.72 Å) than Pb(2+) (1.20 Å) increase the stability of Ni-ligand complexes in the organic phase of the sediments. High LFSE of Ni(II) (compared with Pb(2+) ions) also make Ni-organic complexes increasingly stable than Pb. High k-w (7 × 10(9) s(-1)) of Pb did not help it to associate with organic phases in the sediments. The high concentration of Pb in the Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phase was probably due to co-precipitation of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+). High surface area or site availability for Pb(2+) ion on Fe oxyhydroxide phase was probably responsible for the high concentration of Pb in Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase. Increasing concentrations of Cu in organic phases with the increasing Cu loading suggest that enough binding sites were available for Cu in the organic binding phases of the sediments. This study also describes the influence of nature of sedimentary organic carbon (terrestrial and marine derived OC) in controlling these metal distribution and speciation in marine sediment.

  2. Natural and Anthropocene fluxes of trace elements in estuarine sediments of Galician Rias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Vázquez, Miguel Ángel; Caetano, Miguel; Álvarez-Iglesias, Paula; Pedrosa-García, María del Canto; Calvo, Susana; De Uña-Álvarez, Elena; Quintana, Begoña; Vale, Carlos; Prego, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    The Anthropocene has been proposed as a new geo-stratigraphic epoch where humans have become a global factor affecting the ecosystems. Estuarine sediments constitute a biogeochemical reservoir where trace elements (TEs) from natural sources mix with a fraction generated by human activities. This study assessed the natural lithogenic imprint of TEs from uncontaminated sedimentary records to study anthropogenic changes. Sediment cores were sampled in the estuarine part of the low populated and low industrialized rias of Ares (A), Betanzos (B) and Cedeira (C), which are located in the NW of the Iberian Peninsula. Cores were dated by the 210Pb method, covering up to the last century period. Sedimentation rates (in mm yr-1) were 3.4 ± 0.6 (older than 1961) and 8.2 ± 3.2 (younger than 1961) for core A, 0.9 ± 0.2 (mining (the largest mine open-pit in the Iberian Peninsula) in core A, by bridge/road constructions, vehicles emissions and river mouth urbanization in core B, and changes in land use in core C. Sediment accumulation rates increased 2.4 (core A) and 4.7 times (core B) while TEs fluxes increased 2.4 times in core A and between 3.6 and 5.1 times in core B. Pre-industrial sedimentary records showed the lithogenic differences of the drainage basins, mainly granitic watersheds for cores A and B and the prevalence of basic rocks of the Ortegal Geological Complex for core C. This explains the high concentrations and fluxes of Cr, Ni and V of core C. The different lithogenic imprints highlight the value of using local background references in contamination studies, such as those on the Anthropocene influence in estuaries, which occurred after the Spanish Civil War in the studied rias.

  3. Abundance and distribution of enteric bacteria and viruses in coastal and estuarine sediments – a review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Hassard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The long term survival of faecal indicator organisms (FIOs and human pathogenic microorganisms in sediments is important from a water quality, human health and ecological perspective. Typically, both bacteria and viruses strongly associate with particulate matter present in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. This association tends to be stronger in finer textured sediments and is strongly influenced by the type and quantity of clay minerals and organic matter present. Binding to particle surfaces promotes the persistence of bacteria in the environment by offering physical and chemical protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. How bacterial and viral viability and pathogenicity is influenced by surface attachment requires further study. Typically, long-term association with surfaces including sediments induces bacteria to enter a viable-but-non-culturable (VBNC state. Inherent methodological challenges of quantifying VBNC bacteria may lead to the frequent under-reporting of their abundance in sediments. The implications of this in a quantitative risk assessment context remain unclear. Similarly, sediments can harbour significant amounts of enteric viruses, however, the factors regulating their persistence remains poorly understood. Quantification of viruses in sediment remains problematic due to our poor ability to recover intact viral particles from sediment surfaces (typically <10%, our inability to distinguish between infective and damaged (non-infective viral particles, aggregation of viral particles, and inhibition during qPCR. This suggests that the true viral titre in sediments may be being vastly underestimated. In turn, this is limiting our ability to understand the fate and transport of viruses in sediments. Model systems (e.g. human cell culture are also lacking for some key viruses, preventing our ability to evaluate the infectivity of viruses recovered from sediments (e.g. norovirus. The release of particle

  4. Implications of tidally-varying bed stress and intermittent estuarine stratification on fine-sediment dynamics through the Mekong's tidal river to estuarine reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, R. L.; Ogston, A. S.; Allison, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    River gauging stations are often located upriver of tidal propagation where sediment transport processes and storage are impacted by widely varying ratios of marine to freshwater influence. These impacts are not yet thoroughly understood. Therefore, sediment fluxes measured at these stations may not be suitable for predicting changes to coastal morphology. To characterize sediment transport dynamics in this understudied zone, flow velocity, salinity, and suspended-sediment properties (concentration, size, and settling velocity) were measured within the tidal Sông Hậu distributary of the lower Mekong River, Vietnam. Fine-sediment aggregation, settling, and trapping rates were promoted by seasonal and tidal fluctuations in near-bed shear stress as well as the intermittent presence of a salt wedge and estuary turbidity maximum. Beginning in the tidal river, fine-grained particles were aggregated in freshwater. Then, in the interface zone between the tidal river and estuary, impeded near-bed shear stress and particle flux convergence promoted settling and trapping. Finally, in the estuary, sediment retention was further encouraged by stratification and estuarine circulation which protected the bed against particle resuspension and enhanced particle aggregation. These patterns promote mud export ( 1.7 t s-1) from the entire study area in the high-discharge season when fluvial processes dominate and mud import ( 0.25 t s-1) into the estuary and interface zone in the low-discharge season when estuarine processes dominate. Within the lower region of the distributaries, morphological change in the form of channel abandonment was found to be promoted within minor distributaries by feedbacks between channel depth, vertical mixing, and aggregate trapping. In effect, this field study sheds light on the sediment trapping capabilities of the tidal river - estuary interface zone, a relatively understudied region upstream of where traditional concepts place sites of deposition

  5. Estuarine sediment acute toxicity testing with the European amphipod Corophium multisetosum Stock, 1952.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ré, Ana; Freitas, Rosa; Sampaio, Leandro; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor

    2009-09-01

    This study assessed the use of the European amphipod Corophium multisetosum Stock [Stock, J.H., 1952. Some notes on the taxonomy, the distribution and the ecology of four species of the genus Corophium (Crustacea, Malacostraca). Beaufortia 21, 1-10] in estuarine sediment acute toxicity testing. The sensitivity of adults to the reference toxicant CdCl(2) was determined in water-only 96 h exposures in salinity 2. LC(50) values ranged from 0.33mgCd(2+)L(-1) at 22 degrees C to 0.57mgCd(2+)L(-1) at 15 degrees C. Adult survival was studied in control sediment with water salinity from 0 to 36 and with fine particles content (sediment, dry weight. Experiments were conducted at 15, 18 and 22 degrees C and the results indicate that the species can be used under the full salinity range although higher mortality was observed at the lower salinity in the higher water temperature, and at the higher salinity in the lower water temperature. The species also tolerated the studied range of sediment fines content and showed the highest sensitivity at intermediate values of fines, especially at the higher temperature, thus advising that tests which have to accommodate sediments with a wide range in fines content should preferably be conducted at 15 degrees C rather than at 22 degrees C. The response in natural sediments was studied in samples collected yearly from 1997 to 2006, at a site located off the Tagus Estuary, western Portugal. A major flood event in winter 2000-2001 induced detectable alterations in sediment baseline descriptors (grain-size, redox potential and total volatile solids), organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, DDT metabolites and gamma-HCH) and the macrofauna benthic community. Mortality of the amphipod diminished significantly from the before to the after flood period, in close agreement with diminishing sediment contamination and increasing benthic fauna diversity, in the same time period. C. multisetosum is suitable to conduct acute sediment toxicity tests and

  6. Simultaneous removal of organic carbon and nitrogen pollutants in the Yangtze estuarine sediment: The role of heterotrophic nitrifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiang; Lu, Jian; Wu, Jun; Luo, Yongming

    2017-05-01

    The Yangtze Estuary is one of the most eutrophic coastal areas in the world. The engagement of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria in the simultaneous removal of organic carbon and ammonium in the Yangtze estuarine sediment was investigated. The specific nitrification rate in the selective autotrophic nitrification inhibition treatment was about 25% of that in the control without autotrophic nitrification inhibition, suggesting that heterotrophic nitrification, in addition to autotrophic nitrification, was an important nitrification process in the sediment. The increase of heterotrophic nitrification can offset the decrease in autotrophic nitrification, which subsequently leads to the high tolerance of nitrification to the organic carbon. The number of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria was 7.1 × 107 MPN g-1 in sediment collected from Site 1 while that of autotrophic nitrification bacteria was 4.2 × 108 MPN g-1. The isolation of heterotrophic nitrification bacteria provides direct evidence of the engagement of heterotrophs in the nitrification of the Yangtze estuarine sediment. The results show that nitrification is catalyzed by both the autotrophs and the heterotrophs, indicating functional redundancy of nitrification in sediment. Since organic carbon usually coexists with ammonium, these findings indicate an alternative bioprocess for the simultaneous removal of organic carbon and ammonium in Yangtze estuarine sediment.

  7. Isolation and characterization of Cr(VI)-reducing actinomycetes from estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahara, Takeshi; Xu, Xudan; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Imada, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation technologies have strong potential use in the less costly and more environmentally friendly removal of highly toxic hexavalent-chromium (Cr(VI)) compared with physicochemical technologies. Several Cr(VI)-reducing bacteria have been isolated; however, there are few studies on Cr(VI)-resistant and Cr(VI)-reducing actinomycetes. In this study, Cr(VI)-reducing actinomycetes were screened from estuarine, marine, and terrestrial samples on the basis of Cr(VI)-resistant and Cr(VI)-reducing ability. Of the 80 Streptomyces-like strains isolated, 20 strains were found to be resistant to 50 mg/l of Cr(VI). In addition, two strains isolated from the estuarine sediment of Tokyo Bay were found to be resistant to a concentration of 150 mg/l of Cr(VI). Furthermore, one Cr(VI)-reducing strain was found to remove 60 mg/l of Cr(VI) within 1 week and was identified as Streptomyces thermocarboxydus based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The comparative evaluation with the type strain S. thermocarboxydus NBRC 16323 showed that our isolated strain had higher ability to grow at 27 °C and reduce Cr(VI) at a NaCl concentration of 6.0 % at 27 °C compared with the type strain NBRC 16323. These results indicate that our isolated strain have a potential ability to remove Cr(VI) from contaminated, highly saline sources without heating.

  8. The effect of accidental sulphuric acid leaking on metal distributions in estuarine sediment of Patos Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlean, N; Baraj, B; Niencheski, L F; Baisch, P; Robinson, D

    2001-11-01

    In August of 1998 the tanker BAHAMAS belonging to the Chem Oil Company containing 12,000 t of concentrated sulphuric acid, had an accident on board, after which estuarine water entered one of the compartments of the tanker, resulting in a vigorous exothermic reaction. The reaction of acid with the metallic interior hull of the ship and the accompanying heat and H2 production resulted in an imminent risk of explosion. To avoid an explosion, given the fact that neutralization was not possible, some of the cargo was discharged into the surrounding water. Neutralization was done in January 1999, after the acid concentration in the tanker had decreased and the concentrations of Fe, Cr and Ni remained elevated. Metal concentrations in bottom sediments showed significant modifications. Leached mercury migrated and redeposited downstream, reaching approximately 76 times the background values. Such an anomaly has a well expressed barrier character. The mechanism for redeposition of Hg and other metals probably followed the pattern: Downstream as a result of dilution and mixing with seawater the pH of acid-water increases, favouring adsorption and/or precipitation of metals. The leading edge of a geochemical barrier, at positions 7-9 of sampling sites (Fig. 1), is confirmed by pH variations in the water. The reestablishment of normal pH occurred after a short time due to the high buffering capacity of seawater and large natural dilution process. The concentration of metals in estuarine water during and after the accident showed insignificant anomalies.

  9. Preparation of an estuarine sediment quality control material for the determination of trace metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatje Vanessa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality Control Materials (QCM have being used routinely in daily laboratory work as a tool to fill the gap between need and availability of Certified Reference Materials (CRM. The QCM are a low-cost alternative to CRMs, and they are in high demand, especially, for the implementation of quality control systems in laboratories of several areas. This paper describes the preparation of a QCM for the determination of trace metals in estuarine sediments and the results of an interlaboratory exercise. Homogeneity and stability studies were performed and analysis of variance was carried out with the results. No statistical significant differences were observed in the concentrations of Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn between- or within bottle results. Neither the storage nor temperature affected the results. Therefore, the QCM produced is considered homogeneous and stable and can be used for statistical control charts, evaluation of reproducibility and interlaboratory exercises.

  10. An Evaluation of Partial Digestion Protocols for the Extraction and Measurement of Trace Metals of Environmental Concern in Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, S. J.; Krahforst, C.; Sherman, L.; Kehm, K.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a broad study of the fate and transport of trace metals in estuarine sediments (Krahforst et al., 2013), the efficacy of commonly-used partial digestion protocols, including ISO 11466 (treatment with aqua regia), EPA 3050B (nitric acid followed by H2O2) and a modified rock digestion method ('RD' method- H2O2 followed by nitric), were evaluated for two NIST SRM materials, marine sediment 2702 and estuarine sediment 1646a. Unlike so-called total sediment digestions, the methods studied in this work do not employ hydrofluoric acid and are thought to leave silicates substantially or wholly intact. These methods can in principle compliment studies based on total digestions by providing information about trace metals in phases that are potentially more labile in the marine environment. Samples were digested in ~150 mg aliquots. Application of ISO 11466 and EPA 3050B followed published protocols except that digestions were carried out in trace-metal clean 15 mL capped Teflon vessels in an Al block digester and, at the end of the procedure, the supernatant was decanted from undigested material following repeated centrifugation in 2% nitric acid. Digested solutions were analyzed for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, Sn and Pb content by ICPMS. All elements were analyzed in collision reaction cell mode to minimize isobaric interferences, except Cd and Ag, which were analyzed in standard mode. Instrument performance was monitored in-run by analyzing the SRM 1643e and several quality-check standards. Two repeated digestions of SRM 2702 and SRM 1646a using EPA 3050B produced identical yields, within the standard deviation of repeated analyses (0 - 5%), for all analyzed elements except Cu, which varied by 30% for SRM 2702. The same was true for ISO 11466, although the standard deviation of repeated analyses for this digestion series tended to be larger (digestions typically range from 5 - 15% higher than EPA 3050B for all studied elements. Comparisons between

  11. Integrated quality assessment of sediments from harbour areas in Santos-São Vicente Estuarine System, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruaem, Lucas Moreira; de Castro, Ítalo Braga; Hortellani, Marcos Antonio; Taniguchi, Satie; Fillmann, Gilberto; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Varella Petti, Mônica Angélica; Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo de Souza; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Maranho, Luciane Alves; Davanso, Marcela Bergo; Nonato, Edmundo Ferraz; Cesar, Augusto; Costa-Lotufo, Leticia Veras; Abessa, Denis Moledo de Souza

    2013-09-01

    Santos-São Vicente Estuarine System is a highly populated coastal zone in Brazil and where it is located the major port of Latin America. Historically, port activities, industrial and domestic effluents discharges have constituted the main sources of contaminants to estuarine system. This study aimed to assess the recent status of sediment quality from 5 zones of Port of Santos by applying a lines-of-evidence approach through integrating results of: (1) acute toxicity of whole sediment and chronic toxicity of liquid phases; (2) grain size, organic matter, organic carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, linear alkylbenzenes and butyltins; (3) benthic community descriptors. Results revealed a gradient of increasing contamination for metals and organic compounds, alongside with their geochemical carriers. Sediment liquid phases were more toxic compared to whole sediment. Low number of species and individuals indicated the impoverishment of benthic community. The use of site-specific sediment quality guidelines was more appropriate to predict sediment toxicity. The integration of results through Sediment Quality Triad approach and principal component analysis allowed observing the effects of natural stressors and dredging on sediment quality and benthic distribution. Even with recent governmental efforts to control, pollution is still relevant in Port of Santos and a threat to local ecosystems.

  12. Shoreface to estuarine sedimentation in the late Paleocene Matanomadh Formation, Kachchh, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, V. K.; Singh, B. P.

    2017-04-01

    Late Paleocene sedimentation in the pericratonic Kachchh Basin marks the initial marine transgression during the Cenozoic era. A 17 m thick sandstone-dominated succession, known as the clastic member (CM) of the Matanomadh Formation (MF), is exposed sporadically in the basin. Three facies associations are reconstructed in the succession in three different sections. Facies association-1 contains matrix-supported pebbly conglomerate facies, horizontally-laminated sandstone-mudstone alternation facies, hummocky- and swaley cross-bedded sandstone facies, wave-rippled sandstone facies and climbing ripple cross-laminated sandstone facies. This facies association developed between shoreface and foreshore zone under the influence of storms on a barrier ridge. Facies association-2 contains sigmoidal cross-bedded sandstone facies, sandstone-mudstone alternation facies, flaser-bedded sandstone facies, herringbone cross-bedded sandstone facies and tangential cross-bedded sandstone facies. This facies association possessing tidal bundles and herringbone cross-beds developed on a tidal flat with strong tidal influence. Facies association-3 comprises pebbly sandstone facies, horizontally-bedded sandstone facies, tangential cross-bedded sandstone facies exhibiting reactivation surfaces and tabular cross-bedded sandstone facies. This facies association represents sedimentation in a river-dominated estuary and reactivation surfaces and herringbone cross-beds indicating tidal influence. The bipolar paleocurrent pattern changes to unipolar up-section because of the change in the depositional currents from tidal to fluvial. The sedimentation took place in an open coast similar to the Korean coast. The presence of neap-spring tidal rhythmites further suggests that a semidiurnal system similar to the modern day Indian Ocean was responsible for the sedimentation. Here, the overall sequence developed during the transgressive phase where barrier ridge succession is succeeded by the tidal

  13. Seagrass sediments reveal the long-term deterioration of an estuarine ecosystem

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2016-01-28

    © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The study of a Posidonia australis sediment archive has provided a record of ecosystem dynamics and processes over the last 600 years in Oyster Harbour (SW Australia). Ecosystem shifts are a widespread phenomenon in coastal areas, and this study identifies baseline conditions and the time-course of ecological change (cycles, trends, resilience and thresholds of ecosystem change) under environmental stress in seagrass-dominated ecosystem. The shifts in the concentrations of chemical elements, carbonates, sediments <0.125 mm and stable carbon isotope signatures (δ13C) of the organic matter were detected between 1850s and 1920s, whereas the shift detected in P concentration occurred several decades later (1960s). The first degradation phase (1850s-1950s) follows the onset of European settlement in Australia and was characterized by a strong increase in sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained particles, driven primarily by enhanced run-off due to land clearance and agriculture in the catchment. About 80% of total seagrass area at Oyster Harbour was lost during the second phase of environmental degradation (1960s until present). The sharp increase in P concentration and the increasing contribution of algae and terrestrial inputs into the sedimentary organic matter pool around 1960s provides compelling evidence of the documented eutrophication of the estuary and the subsequent loss of seagrass meadows. The results presented demonstrate the power of seagrass sedimentary archives to reconstruct the trajectories of anthropogenic pressures on estuarine ecosystem and the associated regime shifts, which can be used to improve the capacity of scientists and environmental managers to understand, predict and better manage ecological change in these ecosystems.

  14. Estuarine sedimentation, sediment character, and foraminiferal distribution in central San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, John L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary; Wong, Florence L.; Fregoso, Theresa; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Central San Francisco Bay is the deepest subembayment in the San Francisco Bay estuary and hence has the largest water volume of any of the subembayments. It also has the strongest tidal currents and the coarsest sediment within the estuary. Tidal currents are strongest over the west-central part of central bay and, correspondingly, this area is dominated by sand-size sediment. Much of the area east of a line from Angel Island to Alcatraz Island is characterized by muddy sand to sandy mud, and the area to the west of this line is sandy. The sand-size sediment over west-central bay furthermore is molded by the energetic tidal currents into bedforms of varying sizes and wavelengths. Bedforms typically occur in water depths of 15-25 m. High resolution bathymetry (multibeam) from 1997 and 2008 allow for subdivision of the west-central bayfloor into four basic types based on morphologic expression: featureless, sand waves, disrupted/man-altered, and bedrock knobs. Featureless and sand-wave morphologies dominate the bayfloor of west-central bay. Disrupted bayfloor has a direct association with areas that are undergoing alteration due to human activities, such as sand-mining lease areas, dredging, and disposal of dredge spoils. Change detection analysis, comparing the 1997 and 2008 multibeam data sets, shows that significant change has occurred in west-central bay during the roughly 10 years between surveys. The surveyed area lost about 5.45 million m3 of sediment during the decade. Sand-mining lease areas within west-central bay lost 6.77 million m3 as the bayfloor deepened. Nonlease areas gained 1.32 million m3 of sediment as the bayfloor shallowed slightly outside of sand-mining lease areas. Furthermore, bedform asymmetry did not change significantly, but some bedforms did migrate some tens of meters. Gravity cores show that the area east of Angel and Alcatraz Islands is floored by clayey silts or silty sand whereas the area to the west of the islands is floored

  15. Clay mineralogy indicates the muddy sediment provenance in the estuarine-inner shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifei; Zou, Xinqing; Liu, Qing; Wang, Chenglong; Ge, Chendong; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    The estuarine-inner shelf mud regions of the East China Sea (ECS) are valuable for studying the source-to-sink processes of fluvial sediments deposited since the Holocene. In this study, we present evidence of the provenance and environmental evolution of two cores (S5-2 and JC07) from the estuarine-inner shelf regions of the ECS over the past 100 years based on 210Pb dating, high-resolution grain size measurements and clay mineral analyses. The results indicate that the clay mineral assemblages of cores S5-2 and JC07 are dominated by illite, followed by kaolinite and chlorite, and present scarce amounts of smectite. A comparison of these clay mineral assemblages with several major sources reveals that the fine sediments on the estuarine-inner shelf of the ECS represent a mixture of provenances associated with the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, as well as smaller rivers. However, the contribution of each provenance has varied greatly over the past hundred years, as indicated by the down-core variability due to strong sediment reworking and transport on the inner shelf and the reduction of the sediment load from the Yangtze River basin. In the mud region of the Yangtze River estuary, the sediment from 1930 to 1956 was primarily derived from the Yangtze River, although the Yellow River was also an important influence. From 1956 to 2013, the Yellow River contribution decreased, whereas the Yangtze River contribution correspondingly increased. In the Zhe-Min mud region, the Yangtze River contributed more sediment than did other rivers from 1910 to 1950; however, the Yangtze River contribution gradually decreased from 1950 to 2013. Moreover, the other small rivers accounted for minor contributions, and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) played an important role in the sediment transport process in the ECS. Our results indicate that the weakening/strengthening of the EAWM and a decrease in the sediment load of the Yangtze River influenced the transport and fate of sediment

  16. Isolation of actinomycetes from mangrove and estuarine sediments of Cochin and screening for antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilda Rosmine

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate and screen actinomycetes for antimicrobial activity from mangroves and estuarine soil samples of Cochin. Methods: In the present study, sediment samples collected from mangroves and various stations of Cochin estuary were pretreated and actinomycetes were isolated on different selective media. The isolates were screened for antibiotic activity by following disc diffusion assay (Kirby-Bauer method against human pathogens, fish pathogens and Gram-positive bacteria. The isolates were identified based on their morphology. Results: Only 2 actinomycete isolates (ER7 and ER10 of the 50 isolates screened had antimicrobial activities against one or more pathogens tested. ER7 isolate showed higher antimicrobial activity as compared to that of ER10 isolate. The maximum inhibition zone of crude extract from ER7 was 16.7 mm. The methanol extract of ER7 showed antimicrobial activity against all the pathogens tested with a maximum zone of 21.0 mm. The isolates with antimicrobial activity were found to belong to the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: There is no significant report on bioactive actinomycetes from the present study areas. Potent antibiotics from the selected isolates could contribute to fight against several human and fish diseases. Further purification, structural elucidation and characterization are recommended to know the quality, novelty and commercial value of these antibiotics. Hence, the mangroves and estuary of Kochi show great promise for the discovery of bioactive actinomycetes.

  17. Simulation of the fate of faecal bacteria in estuarine and coastal waters based on a fractionated sediment transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Liu, Ying

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional depth-integrated numerical model is refined in this paper to simulate the hydrodynamics, graded sediment transport process and the fate of faecal bacteria in estuarine and coastal waters. The sediment mixture is divided into several fractions according to the grain size. A bed evolution model is adopted to simulate the processes of the bed elevation change and sediment grain size sorting. The faecal bacteria transport equation includes enhanced source and sink terms to represent bacterial kinetic transformation and disappearance or reappearance due to sediment deposition or re-suspension. A novel partition ratio and dynamic decay rates of faecal bacteria are adopted in the numerical model. The model has been applied to the turbid water environment in the Bristol Channel and Severn estuary, UK. The predictions by the present model are compared with field data and those by non-fractionated model.

  18. Scaling of standard metabolic rate in estuarine crocodiles Crocodylus porosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Roger S; Gienger, C M; Brien, Matthew L; Tracy, Christopher R; Charlie Manolis, S; Webb, Grahame J W; Christian, Keith A

    2013-05-01

    Standard metabolic rate (SMR, ml O2 min(-1)) of captive Crocodylus porosus at 30 °C scales with body mass (kg) according to the equation, SMR = 1.01 M(0.829), in animals ranging in body mass of 3.3 orders of magnitude (0.19-389 kg). The exponent is significantly higher than 0.75, so does not conform to quarter-power scaling theory, but rather is likely an emergent property with no single explanation. SMR at 1 kg body mass is similar to the literature for C. porosus and for alligators. The high exponent is not related to feeding, growth, or obesity of captive animals. The log-transformed data appear slightly curved, mainly because SMR is somewhat low in many of the largest animals (291-389 kg). A 3-parameter model is scarcely different from the linear one, but reveals a declining exponent between 0.862 and 0.798. A non-linear model on arithmetic axes overestimates SMR in 70% of the smallest animals and does not satisfactorily represent the data.

  19. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: I. Biochemical endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Filipe O; Lima, Gláucia; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    We report on biomarker responses conducted as part of a multi-level assessment of the chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments to the amphipod Gammarus locusta. A companion article accounts for organism and population-level effects. Five moderately contaminated sediments from two Portuguese estuaries, Sado and Tagus, were assessed. Three of them were muddy and two were sandy sediments. The objective was to assess sediments that were not acutely toxic. Three of the sediments met this criterion, the other two were diluted (50% and 75%) with clean sediment until acute toxicity was absent. Following 28-d exposures, the amphipods were analysed for whole-body metal bioaccumulation, metallothionein induction (MT), DNA strand breakage (SB) and lipid peroxidation (LP). Two of the muddy sediments did not cause chronic toxicity. These findings were consistent with responses at organism and population levels that showed higher growth rates and improvement of reproductive traits for amphipods exposed to these two sediments. Two other sediments, one muddy and one sandy, exhibited pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting SB, MT induction (in muddy sediment), survival and reproduction. Potential toxicants involved in these effects were identified. The last sandy sediment exhibited some loss of DNA integrity, however growth was also enhanced. Present results, together with the organism/population-level data, and also benthic communities information, were analysed under a weight-of-evidence approach. By providing evidence of exposure (or lack of it) to contaminants in sediments, the biomarkers here applied assisted in distinguishing toxicants' impacts in test organisms from the confounding influence of other geochemical features of the sediments.

  20. Measuring hypoxia induced metal release from highly contaminated estuarine sediments during a 40 day laboratory incubation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, Joanne L., E-mail: jlbanks@student.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 Australia (Australia); Ross, D. Jeff, E-mail: Jeff.Ross@utas.edu.au [Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Nubeena Crescent, Taroona, Tasmania, 7053 Australia (Australia); Keough, Michael J., E-mail: mjkeough@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 Australia (Australia); Eyre, Bradley D., E-mail: bradley.eyre@scu.edu.au [Centre for Coastal Biogeochemistry, School of Environmental Science and Management, Southern Cross University, PO Box 157, Lismore, NSW, 2480 Australia (Australia); Macleod, Catriona K., E-mail: Catriona.Macleod@utas.edu.au [Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, Nubeena Crescent, Taroona, Tasmania, 7053 Australia (Australia)

    2012-03-15

    Nutrient inputs to estuarine and coastal waters worldwide are increasing and this in turn is increasing the prevalence of eutrophication and hypoxic and anoxic episodes in these systems. Many urbanised estuaries are also subject to high levels of anthropogenic metal contamination. Environmental O{sub 2} levels may influence whether sediments act as sinks or sources of metals. In this study we investigated the effect of an extended O{sub 2} depletion event (40 days) on fluxes of trace metals (and the metalloid As) across the sediment-water interface in sediments from a highly metal contaminated estuary in S.E. Tasmania, Australia. We collected sediments from three sites that spanned a range of contamination and measured total metal concentration in the overlying water using sealed core incubations. Manganese and iron, which are known to regulate the release of other divalent cations from sub-oxic sediments, were released from sediments at all sites as hypoxia developed. In contrast, the release of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc was comparatively low, most likely due to inherent stability of these elements within the sediments, perhaps as a result of their refractory origin, their association with fine-grained sediments or their being bound in stable sulphide complexes. Metal release was not sustained due to the powerful effect of metal-sulphide precipitation of dissolved metals back into sediments. The limited mobilisation of sediment bound metals during hypoxia is encouraging, nevertheless the results highlight particular problems for management in areas where hypoxia might occur, such as the release of metals exacerbating already high loads or resulting in localised toxicity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal contaminated sediments exposed to long-term hypoxia released Mn and Fe pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As flux increased under anoxic conditions Cd, Cu and Zn fluxes occurred only during the first week of hypoxia. Black

  1. Clay mineralogy and source-to-sink transport processes of Changjiang River sediments in the estuarine and inner shelf areas of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifei; Zou, Xinqing; Gao, Jianhua; Wang, Chenglong; Li, Yali; Yao, Yulong; Zhao, Wancang; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    We examined the source-to-sink sediment transport processes from the Changjiang River to the estuarine coastal shelf area by analyzing the clay mineral assemblages in suspended sediment samples from the Changjiang River catchment and surface samples from the estuarine coastal shelf area following the impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) in 2003. The results indicate that the clay mineral compositions throughout the study area are dominated by illite, with less abundant kaolinite and chlorite and scarce smectite. The clay minerals display distinct differences in the tributaries and exhibit obvious changes in the trunk stream compared with the periods before 2003, and the source of sediment has largely shifted to the mid- to lower reaches of the river after 2003. Spatially, the clay mineral assemblages in the estuarine area define two compositionally distinct provinces. Province I covers the mud area of the Changjiang River estuary and the Zhe-Min coastal region, where sediment is primarily supplied by the Changjiang River. Province II includes part of the Changjiang River estuary and the southeastern portion of the study area, where the sediment is composed of terrestrial material from the Changjiang River and re-suspended material from the Huanghe River carried by the Jiangsu coastal current. Moreover, the other smaller rivers in China (including the Oujiang and Minjiang rivers of mainland China and the rivers of West Taiwan) also contribut sediments to the estuarine and inner shelf areas. In general, the clay mineral assemblages in the Changjiang River estuarine area are have mainly been controlled by sediment supplied from upstream of the Changjiang River tributaries. However, since the completion of the TGD in 2003, the mid- to downstream tributaries have become the main source of sediments from the Changjiang catchment into the East China Sea. These analyses further demonstrate that the coastal currents and the decrease in the sediment load of the river

  2. The role of salinity in shaping dissolved inorganic nitrogen and N₂O dynamics in estuarine sediment-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2013-01-15

    We investigated the influence of salinity on sediment inorganic nitrogen dynamics in three Portuguese estuaries (Cávado, Ave and Douro). Anaerobic slurry experiments were run at different salinity treatments (0, 10, and 25) and net changes in concentration of nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide were monitored. Salinity-induced NH₄⁺ sediment desorption was observed at all sites. No significant salinity driven changes in NO₃⁻ concentrations were observed, except for Ave estuarine sediments, where NO₃⁻ consumption increased 10 times as the salinity rose from 0 to 10. In the upper stretches of the three estuaries, N₂O production increased sharply as salinity rose. Although no stimulation of N₂O production was observed in higher salinity areas, the salinity-driven changes in N₂O production are of major concern given the greenhouse characteristics of the gas. The global trend of decreasing freshwater discharge, and therefore increase in salinity, to estuarine systems could thereby exacerbate N₂O production and global warming. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Geomorphic processes in the vicinity of the Venkatapur river mouth, central west coast of India: Implications for estuarine sedimentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, S.R.; Hegde, V.S.; Shalini, G.; Rajawat, A.S.; Girish, K.H.; Jayakumar, S.; Suryanarayana, A.

    of the Venkatapur River mouth, central west coast of India: Implications for estuarine sedimentation. Journal of Coastal Research, 26(5), 925–934. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. We discuss geomorphic processes in the vicinity of river mouths... loads of the rivers, along with the littoral drift due to wave action (Reddy, Hariharan, and Kurian, 1979). In New Mangalore port, it is mainly due to deposition of seabed material brought into suspension by the monsoon waves (Dattatri and Kamath, 1997...

  4. Sediment-bound metals as indicators of anthropogenic change in estuarine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, G F; Gunns, T J; Olmos, M

    2015-12-15

    Sedimentary metal indicators were used to assess the environmental 'health' of 38 estuaries on the central Australian east coast. Unlike many environmental indicators, the mean enrichment quotient (MEQ) provides the pristine condition and magnitude of anthropogenic change in estuarine condition, not confounded by natural spatial and temporal variation. MEQ is the mean normalised surficial concentration of Cu, Pb and Zn divided by their normalised background concentration. MEQs, identified from an extensive sedimentary database (n=2269), were used to derive a Metal Enrichment Index (MEI) comprising five impact categories. Population density and proportion of urbanised catchment were consistent with increased sedimentary metal concentrations, whereas estuarine sensitivity and metal enrichment were poorly correlated. No correlation was established between metal enrichment and estuary type or sedimentary facies. MEI can be used as a tool to meet the needs of policy-makers and estuarine managers by providing a tool by which human-induced change may be measured. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Speciation and Fate of Trace Metals in Estuarine Sediments Under Reduced and Oxidized Conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S A; Day, P A; Esser, B; Randall, S

    2002-10-18

    We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ) or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc) as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm) from a 60-year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975) as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60-year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxy)hydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted ZnS were

  6. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of contaminated estuarine sediments in fish peripheral blood: Laboratory versus in situ studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Pedro M., E-mail: pmcosta@fct.unl.pt [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Neuparth, Teresa S. [CIIMAR-Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Caeiro, Sandra [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Departamento de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Aberta, Rua da Escola Politecnica, 141, 1269-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lobo, Jorge [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Angel DelValls, T. [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Costa, Maria H. [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2011-01-15

    Juvenile Senegalese soles (Solea senegalensis) were exposed to estuarine sediments through 28-day laboratory and in situ (field) bioassays. The sediments, collected from three distinct sites (a reference plus two contaminated) of the Sado Estuary (W Portugal) were characterized for total organic matter, redox potential, fine fraction and for the levels of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro diphenyl tricholoethane plus its main metabolites (DDTs). Genotoxicity was determined in whole peripheral blood by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or 'comet') assay and by scoring erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA). Analysis was complemented with the determination of lipid peroxidation in blood plasma by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) protocol and cell type sorting. The results showed that exposure to contaminated sediments induced DNA fragmentation and clastogenesis. Still, laboratory exposure to the most contaminated sediment revealed a possible antagonistic effect between metallic and organic contaminants that might have been enhanced by increased bioavailability. The laboratory assay caused a more pronounced increase in ENA whereas a very significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in field-tested fish exposed to the reference sediment, which is likely linked to increased lipid peroxidation that probably occurred due to impaired access to food. Influence of natural pathogens was ruled out by unaltered leukocyte counts. The statistical integration of data correlated lipid peroxidation with biological variables such as fish length and weight, whereas the genotoxicity biomarkers were more correlated to sediment contamination. It was demonstrated that laboratory and field bioassays for the risk assessment of sediment contamination may yield different genotoxicity profiles although both provided results that are in overall accordance with

  7. An integrative assessment to determine the genotoxic hazard of estuarine sediments: combining cell and whole-organism responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of the Comet assay in environmental monitoring remains challenging in face of the complexity of environmental stressors, e.g. when dealing with estuarine sediments, that hampers the drawing of cause-effect relationships. Although the in vitro Comet assay may circumvent confounding factors, its application in environmental risk assessment (ERA still needs validation. As such, the present work aims at integrating genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage induced by sediment-bound toxicants in HepG2 cells with oxidative stress-related effects observed in three species collected from an impacted estuary. Distinct patterns were observed in cells exposed to crude mixtures of sediment contaminants from the urban/industrial area comparatively to the ones from the rural/riverine area of the estuary, with respect to oxidative DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage. The extracts obtained with the most polar solvent and the crude extracts caused the most significant oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells, as measured by the FPG (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase-modified Comet assay. This observation suggests that metals and unknown toxicants more hydrophilic than PAHs may be important causative agents, especially in samples from the rural part of the estuary, where oxidative DNA damage was the most significant. Clams, sole and cuttlefish responded differentially to environmental agents triggering oxidative stress, albeit yielding results accordant with the oxidative DNA damage observed in HepG2 cells. Overall, the integration of in vivo biomarker responses and Comet assay data in HepG2 cells yielded a comparable pattern, indicating that the in vitro FPG-modified Comet assay may be an effective and complementary line-of-evidence in ERA even in particularly challenging, natural, scenarios such as estuarine environments.

  8. An integrative assessment to determine the genotoxic hazard of estuarine sediments: combining cell and whole-organism responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro M.; Pinto, Miguel; Vicente, Ana M.; Gonçalves, Cátia; Rodrigo, Ana P.; Louro, Henriqueta; Costa, Maria H.; Caeiro, Sandra; Silva, Maria J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of the Comet assay in environmental monitoring remains challenging in face of the complexity of environmental stressors, e.g., when dealing with estuarine sediments, that hampers the drawing of cause-effect relationships. Although the in vitro Comet assay may circumvent confounding factors, its application in environmental risk assessment (ERA) still needs validation. As such, the present work aims at integrating genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage induced by sediment-bound toxicants in HepG2 cells with oxidative stress-related effects observed in three species collected from an impacted estuary. Distinct patterns were observed in cells exposed to crude mixtures of sediment contaminants from the urban/industrial area comparatively to the ones from the rural/riverine area of the estuary, with respect to oxidative DNA damage and oxidative DNA damage. The extracts obtained with the most polar solvent and the crude extracts caused the most significant oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells, as measured by the formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified Comet assay. This observation suggests that metals and unknown toxicants more hydrophilic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may be important causative agents, especially in samples from the rural part of the estuary, where oxidative DNA damage was the most significant. Clams, sole, and cuttlefish responded differentially to environmental agents triggering oxidative stress, albeit yielding results accordant with the oxidative DNA damage observed in HepG2 cells. Overall, the integration of in vivo biomarker responses and Comet assay data in HepG2 cells yielded a comparable pattern, indicating that the in vitro FPG-modified Comet assay may be an effective and complementary line-of-evidence in ERA even in particularly challenging, natural, scenarios such as estuarine environments. PMID:25540652

  9. Trace element concentrations in surface estuarine and marine sediments along the Mississippi Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Crystal; Duzgoren-Aydin, Nurdan S; Weston, James; Willett, Kristine L

    2012-01-01

    Hurricanes are relatively frequent ecological disturbances that may cause potentially long-term impacts to the coastal environment. Hurricane Katrina hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast in August 2005, and caused a storm surge with the potential to change the trace element content of coastal surface sediments. In this study, surface estuarine and marine sediments were collected monthly following the storm from ten sites along the Mississippi Gulf Coast (Mobile Bay, Grand Bay Bayous Heron and Cumbest, Pascagoula, Ocean Springs, Biloxi Gulf, Back Biloxi Bay, Gulfport Gulf, Gulfport Courthouse Rd, and Gulfport Marina). Concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to evaluate their temporal and spatial variations in the year following Hurricane Katrina. Sediments were characterized by pH, particle size distribution and total carbon and nitrogen content. Trace element contents of the sediments were determined in both Hurricane Katrina would not cause an adverse impact on resident organisms. Instead, the concentrations of trace elements were site-dependent, with specific contaminants relating to the use of the area prior to Hurricane Katrina.

  10. An inversion of the estuarine circulation by sluice water discharge and its impact on suspended sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kirstin; Gerkema, Theo

    2018-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is characterized by a complex topography of branching channels and intertidal flats, in which the interplay between fresh water discharges, wind forcing and the tidal current causes sediment transport rates and direction to be highly variable in space and time. During three field campaigns, indications of a negative estuarine circulation have been found in a channel adjacent to the coast in the Western Dutch Wadden Sea. Contrary to the classical picture of estuarine circulation, a periodic density stratification was observed that builds up during flood and breaks down during ebb. This can be related to a large freshwater source at the mouth of the channel, the sluice in Kornwerderzand. In this study, observations of this phenomenon are presented, and with the help of a numerical model the different drivers for residual suspended matter transport in this area, namely tidal asymmetries in the current velocity and the above mentioned periodic stratification, are investigated. It is found that the residual current in the area of interest points in ebb direction, caused by both the elongated ebb flow phase and the periodic stratification. On the contrary, the stronger flood currents cause a transport of suspended matter in flood direction. This transport is counteracted and therefore diminished by the effects of the sluice discharge.

  11. What multi-beam bathymetric data can tell about morphodynamics and sediment transport in an estuarine environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterscheid, Axel; Reiß, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    The Elbe River Estuary is one of the most important waterways for commercial shipping in Europe. It connects the North Sea with the Port of Hamburg located about 100 km inlands. To secure navigation, the Federal Waterways and Shipping Administration (WSV) is operating a fleet of survey vessels all equipped with a multi-beam echo sounder controlling the required water depths. Beyond navigational purposes, this monitoring is creating a comprehensive and ever-growing data base, which can be used for a consistent morphodynamical description of the river bed. The history of multi-beam records in the Elbe River Estuary reaches back to 2008. At particular river sections where large amounts of fine grained sediments accumulate surveys are taken biweekly; at other sections there are monthly surveys. Locally, sedimentation rates of up to 12 cm per day have been observed within the fairway. The time series of multiple multi-beam records have been analyzed with a particular focus on morphodynamics and sedimentation rates. Here we compare the morphodynamical characteristics of two river sections. The first section is located at the downstream end of the estuarine turbidity zone near the city of Cuxhaven; the second section is located 50 km away at the upstream end of the turbidity zone near the city of Hamburg. These two sections have been selected because in both the morphology of the river bed and the sedimentation processes are strongly influenced by the presence of fine grained sediments. The results show that changing sedimentation rates in both sections are conditioned by different site specific factors, e.g. the dynamic shifting of the turbidity zone along the estuary, which is resulting in a temporarily higher availability of suspended sediments and more intense sedimentation rates in the upper part of the estuary and the respective section. In contrast, in the downstream located river section more intense sedimentation rates could be related to periods of strong north

  12. Effects of thiamphenicol on nitrate reduction and N2O release in estuarine and coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoyu; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Gao, Juan; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate overload is an important driver of water pollution in most estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and thus nitrate reduction processes have attracted considerable attention. Antibiotics contamination is also an emerging environmental problem in estuarine and coastal regions as a result of growing production and usage of antibiotics. However, the effects of antibiotics on nitrate reduction remain unclear in these aquatic ecosystems. In this study, continuous-flow experiments were conducted to examine the effects of thiamphenicol (TAP, a common chloramphenicol antibiotic) on nitrate reduction and greenhouse gas N2O release. Functional genes involved in nitrogen transformation were also quantified to explore the microbial mechanisms of the TAP influence. Production of N2 were observed to be inhibited by TAP treatment, which implied the inhibition effect of TAP on nitrate reduction processes. As intermediate products of nitrogen transformation processes, nitrite and N2O were observed to accumulate during the incubation. Different TAP inhibition effects on related functional genes may be the microbial mechanism for the changes of nutrient fluxes, N2 fluxes and N2O release rates. These results indicate that the antibiotics residues in estuarine and coastal ecosystems may contribute to nitrate retention and N2O release, which could be a major factor responsible for eutrophication and greenhouse effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Iron ore pollution in Mandovi and Zuari estuarine sediments and its fate after mining ban

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kessarkar, P.M.; Suja, S.; Sudheesh, V.; Srivastava, S.; Rao, V.P.

    of sediments from the catchment area, upstream and downstream of these estuaries, and adjacent shelf during peak mining time. Magnetic susceptibility (χ lf) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) values of sediments were highest in upstream...

  14. Activity, Microenvironments, and Community Structure of Aerobic and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Prokaryotes in Estuarine Sediment (Randers Fjord, DK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2006-01-01

    stations where it accounted for 5-16% of the total N2 production and 0.1-0.25% of the total prokaryotic population. These numbers result in cell-specific anammox rates of about 6 fmol N day-1, comparable to literature values. Anammox cells occurred mainly in clusters and were related to the candidate genus......ACTIVITY, MICROENVIRONMENTS, AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC AMMONIUM OXIDIZING PROKARYOTES IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENT (RANDERS FJORD, DK) A. Schramm 1, N.P. Revsbech 1, T. Dalsgaard 2, E. Piña-Ochoa 3, J. de la Torré 4, D.A. Stahl 4, N. Risgaard-Petersen 2 1 Department of Biological...

  15. Persistence, temporal and spatial profiles of ultraviolet absorbents and phenolic personal care products in riverine and estuarine sediment of the Pearl River catchment, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xianzhi; Xiong, Songsong; Ou, Weihui; Wang, Zhifang; Tan, Jianhua; Jin, Jiabin; Tang, Caiming; Liu, Jun; Fan, Yujuan

    2017-02-05

    A variety of personal care products have been classified as emerging contaminants (ECs). Occurrence, fate, spatial and vertical profiles of 13 ultraviolet absorbents, triclocarban (TCC) and its dechlorinated products, triclosan (TCS), 2-phenylphenol and parabens were investigated in riverine and estuarine sediment of the Pearl River catchment, China. Bisphenol A (BPA), a widely applied plasticizer, was also investigated. The ECs were widely present in the bed sediment. TCC was the most abundant with a maximum concentration of 332ngg -1 dry weight. The other prominent ECs included BPA, TCS, octocrylene, and benzotriazole UV stabilizers UV326 and UV328. Treated wastewater effluent was the major source of the ECs in the riverine sediment. TCC, BPA, TCS, methyparaben, UV531, UV326, and UV328 were also detected throughout the estuarine sediment cores, indicating their persistence in the sediment. Temporal trends of the ECs in the sediment cores reflected a combined effect of industrial development, population growth, human life quality improvement, and waste treatment capacity in the Pearl River Delta over the last decades. TCC dechlorination products were frequently detected in the bed sediment with higher levels near treated effluent outlets but only occasionally observed in the sediment cores, suggesting insignificant in-situ TCC dechlorination in the sediment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multi-elemental contamination and historic record in sediments from the Santos-Cubatao Estuarine System, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luiz-Silva, Wanilson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Machado, Wilson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geoquimica; Matos, Rosa H.R. E-mail: wanilson@ige.unicamp.br

    2008-07-01

    This paper records for the first time the contamination history and identifies the sources of 38 elements in sediments from the Santos-Cubatao Estuarine System (SE Brazil), at one of the most industrialized areas in Latin America. The compositions of samples from a 260 cm long sediment core collected in the Morrao River estuary were determined by ICP-MS. Enrichment factors, principal component analysis, correlation matrixes, and the characterization of geochemical signatures permitted a consistent data evaluation. Contaminant elements such as Cr, Mn, Ni, Zn, Ga, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Pb, and Bi were associated with steel plant-derived Fe concentrations, while Be, Ca, Sc, Co, Cu, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta, Th, and U were associated with fertilizer industry-derived P concentrations. An overlap of sedimentary Fe distribution and local steel plant production indicated that Fe is a reliable marker of the contamination history, allowing the estimation of sedimentation rates over a period of 45 years of industrial activities. (author)

  17. Major factors influencing the elemental composition of surface estuarine sediments: the case of 15 estuaries in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil-Homens, M; Vale, C; Raimundo, J; Pereira, P; Brito, P; Caetano, M

    2014-07-15

    Upper sediments (0-5 cm) were sampled in 94 sites of water bodies of the fifteen Portuguese estuaries characterized by distinct settings of climate, topography and lithology, and marked by diverse anthropogenic pressures. Confined areas recognized as highly anthropogenic impacted, as well as areas dominated by erosion or frequently dredged were not sampled. Grain size, organic carbon (Corg), Al and trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined. Normalisation of trace element concentrations to Al and Corg, correlations between elements and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) allowed identifying elemental associations and the relevance of grain-size, lithology and anthropogenic inputs on sediment chemical composition. Whereas grain-size is the dominant effect for the majority of the studied estuaries, the southern estuaries Mira, Arade and Guadiana are dominated by specific lithologies of their river basins, and anthropogenic effects are identified in Ave, Leça, Tagus and Sado. This study emphasizes how baseline values of trace elements in sediments may vary within and among estuarine systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of sediment bioturbation by the estuarine amphipod Corophium volutator on fluoranthene resuspension and transfer into the mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciarelli, S. [National Inst. for Coastal and Marine Management, Middelburg (Netherlands); Straalen, N.M. van [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Ecology and Ecotoxicology; Klap, V.A. [FOM Inst. for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wezel, A.P. van [National Inst. for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    1999-02-01

    To better understand the effects of bioturbation on partitioning and availability of sediment-bound contaminants to infaunal amphipods and mussels, experiments were carried out with fluoranthene-spiked sediment. Treatments included different densities of the estuarine amphipod, Corophium volutator. Total suspended solids (TSS), particulate organic carbon/particulate organic matter (POC/POM) in overlying water, fluoranthene concentrations in sediment, pore water, overlying water, amphipods, and mussels were measured. Bioturbation significantly increased TSS and POC/POM concentrations in overlying water, and this effect became greater at higher animal density and longer exposure time. Mean total aqueous fluoranthene concentrations increased from 2.40 to 4.1 and 5.45 {micro}g/L in the control, low-density, and high-density treatments, respectively, after 10 d of exposure. The particle-bound fraction of fluoranthene in the overlying water from the high-density treatment was two times higher than that from the low-density treatment. Bioturbation did not affect the partitioning of fluoranthene over suspended solids and water, nor did it affect the concentrations in sediment and pore water. This was illustrated by the constancy of sediment-interstitial water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub oc(iw)}), sediment-overlying water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub oc(ow)}), and normalized POC-water partitioning coefficients (log K{sub poc}). Uptake of fluoranthene by filter-feeding mussels (Mytilus edulis) increased linearly with the density of bioturbating amphipods and with exposure time. The difference in concentrations of fluoranthene in mussels between the lowest and highest density of amphipods was more than factor of two. Their results showed that bioturbation significantly increases TSS concentration in the overlying water and consequently the total aqueous concentration of sediment-bound contaminants, which are subsequently accumulated by filter-feeders. The

  19. Recent advances in the use of estuarine meiobenthos to assess contaminated sediment effects in multi-species whole sediment microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Schizas, N.V.; Donelan, T.L. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Many marine meiobenthic taxa (i.e. invertebrates passing a 1-mm sieve but retaining on a 0.063 mm sieve) are ideal for ``whole-sediment`` and porewater bioassay of sedimented pollutants. Annual production of meiobenthos is 5--10 times that of the more commonly studied macrobenthos, and > 95% of all meiobenthos live in the oxic zone of muddy sediments at densities of 4--12 million per M{sup 2}. Most spend their entire lifecycles, burrowing freely and feeding on/within the sediment:porewater matrix, many taxa undergo 10--14 generations per year, most larval/juvenile stages are benthic, and many have easily quantifiable reproductive output. Furthermore, many meiobenthic taxa can be cultured indefinitely over multiple life-cycles within simple sediment microcosms consisting of sealed whole-sediment cores collected intact from intertidal mudflats. The authors describe several recent technical developments exploiting meiofaunal sediment culture for rapid contaminated sediment bioassays of toxicant effects on survival, reproduction and population growth of meiobenthic taxa in whole-sediment microcosms. Currently meiobenthic copepods, nematodes, foraminifers and polychaetes are being continuously cultured to study these parameters under exposure to model sediment-associated toxicants (e.g. cadmium). Bioassays are run for 21-d under flowing seawater. With this approach, fertile benthic copepods (e.g. Amphiascus tenuiremis) can be added to core microcosms to assess survival and growth of a fixed population cohort. All other meiobenthic taxa are enumerated relative to controls and evaluated for toxicant effects on higher order community-level endpoints. This approach exploits meiobenthos` high abundance and rapid reproductive rates to yield on a micro scale better endpoints than much larger sediment mesocosms targeted at macrofaunal endpoints.

  20. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe.

  1. EVALUATION OF RISKS FROM USING POULTRY LITTER TO REMEDIATE AND REUSE CONTAMINATED ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The availability of heavy metals in contaminated sediment evaluated for beneficial reuse, before and after chemical amendment, was evaluated using poultry manure as the amendment. The dredged sediment was only slightly contaminated with heay metals.Availability tests on the amend...

  2. A Random Forest Approach to Predict the Spatial Distribution of Sediment Pollution in an Estuarine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling the magnitude and distribution of sediment-bound pollutants in estuaries is often limited by incomplete knowledge of the site and inadequate sample density. To address these modeling limitations, a decision-support tool framework was conceived that predicts sediment cont...

  3. Factors influencing organochlorine pesticides distribution in the Brisbane River Estuarine sediment, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2017-10-15

    Sediment samples collected from Brisbane River were analysed for organochlorine pesticide residues (OCPs). The factors influencing OCPs distribution in the sediment were investigated using multivariate analytical tools. Thirteen OCPs were detected in the sediment with concentrations ranging between below detection to 83.9ng/g, and detection frequency >90%. With the exception of dieldrin, the OCP inputs appear to be historical and may cause adverse ecological impacts. Multi-criteria ranking of the factors influencing the OCPs (except dieldrin) distribution in the sediment revealed that TOC>silt>intensive urban land use>population>seasons. Dieldrin distribution is significantly influenced by season>TOC>silt>intensive urban land use>population. The study helps to prioritise factors required for managing OCPs contamination in sediments and identification of appropriate mitigation measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Speciation of Co, Ni and Cu in the coastal and estuarine sediments: Some fundamental characteristics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.

    provided a chemically significant description of the kinetics of metals–sediment interactions and correctly predicted the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE) and water exchange rate (k sub(-w)) on the dissociation rate constants of metals...

  5. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Texas Gulf Coast Field Station; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Center for Coastal Studies

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  6. The Effects of Varying Salinity on Ammonium Exchange in Estuarine Sediments of the Parker River, Massachusetts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weston, Nathaniel B.; Giblin, Anne E; Banta, Gary Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects of seasonal salinity changes on sediment ammonium (NH4+) adsorption and exchange across the sediment–water interface in the Parker River Estuary, by means of seasonal field sampling, laboratory adsorption experiments, and modeling. The fraction of dissolvedNH4+relative...... to adsorbedNH4+in oligohaline sediments rose significantly with increased pore water salinity over the season. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that small (∼3) increases in salinity from freshwater conditions had the greatest effect onNH4+adsorption by reducing the exchangeable pool from 69% to 14......% of the totalNH4+in the upper estuary sediments that experience large (0–20) seasonal salinity shifts.NH4+dynamics did not appear to be significantly affected bysalinity in sediments of the lower estuary where salinities under 10 were not measured. We further assessed the importance of salinity...

  7. Estuarine Suspended Sediment Dynamics: Observations Derived from over a Decade of Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Reisinger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Suspended sediment dynamics of Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, a shallow-water wind-driven estuary, were investigated by combining field and satellite measurements of total suspended solids (TSS. An algorithm was developed to transform 500-m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aqua satellite reflectance data into estimated TSS values. The algorithm was developed using a reflectance ratio regression of MODIS Band 1 (red and Band 3 (green with TSS measurements (n = 54 collected by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for Corpus Christi Bay and other Texas estuaries. The algorithm was validated by independently collected TSS measurements during the period of 2011–2014 with an uncertainty estimate of 13%. The algorithm was applied to the period of 2002–2014 to create a synoptic time series of TSS for Corpus Christi Bay. Potential drivers of long-term variability in suspended sediment were investigated. Median and IQR composites of suspended sediments were generated for seasonal wind regimes. From this analysis it was determined that long-term, spatial patterns of suspended sediment in the estuary are related to wind-wave resuspension during the predominant northerly and prevalent southeasterly seasonal wind regimes. The impact of dredging is also apparent in long-term patterns of Corpus Christi Bay as concentrations of suspended sediments over dredge spoil disposal sites are higher and more variable than surrounding areas, which is most likely due to their less consolidated sediments and shallower depths requiring less wave energy for sediment resuspension. This study highlights the advantage of how long-synoptic time series of TSS can be used to elucidate the major drivers of suspended sediments in estuaries.

  8. Leaching properties of estuarine harbor sediment before and after electrodialytic remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Kevin H.; Nystrøm, Gunvor Marie; Aulisio, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    . pH-dependent leaching tests were used to evaluate changes in leaching properties of treated and control sediments. Significant fractions of total concentrations were removed during treatment (35-95% with an average of 75% for all sediments and elements investigated). The release of elements in p......H-dependent leaching tests, however, demonstrated equal or greater leaching from treated sediments in the neutral pH range. Dissolved organic carbon appears to be a significant contributor to post-treatment increases in leaching, and dissolution of significant iron and aluminum sorption sites is hypothesized to also...... play a role. This research highlights the importance of understanding contaminant speciation and availability, as total metals concentrations, in this particular case, do not relate to estimates of the environmental availability of metals (total concentrations were typically two to three orders...

  9. Links between contaminant hotspots in low flow estuarine systems and altered sediment biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Michael D.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Scanes, Peter; Potts, Jaimie; Simpson, Stuart L.; Sim, Vivian X. Y.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2017-11-01

    The urbanisation of coastal zones is a major threat to the health of global estuaries and has been linked to increased contamination (e.g. metals) and excess organic matter. Urban stormwater networks collect and funnel contaminants into waterways at point sources (e.g. stormdrains). Under dry, low flow conditions, these stormwater contaminants can accumulate in sediments over time and result in modifications to benthic sediment biogeochemical processes. To quantify these processes, this field study measured differences in benthic metabolism (CR, GPP, NEM) and sediment-water nutrient fluxes (NH3, NOx, PO4) associated with stormdrains (0 m, 200 m and 1000 m away) and increased water-retention (embayments vs channels). Significant changes to benthic metabolism were detected with distance from stormdrains, and with differences in water-retention rates, above natural spatial and temporal variation. Oxygen consumption was ∼50% higher at stormdrains (0 m) compared to 1000 m away and >70% higher at stormdrains (0 m) located in embayments compared to channels. Oxygen production also appeared to decrease with distance from stormdrains in embayments, but patterns were variable. These changes to benthic metabolism were of a magnitude expected to influence benthic nutrient cycling, but NH3, NOx and PO4 fluxes were generally low, and highly spatially and temporally variable. Overall, metal (Cu) contamination explained most of the variation in sediment biogeochemical processes between embayments and channels, while sediment grain size explained differences in fluxes with distance from stormdrains. Importantly, although there was evidence of increased productivity associated with stormdrains, we also detected evidence of early hypoxia suggesting that systems with legacy stormwater contaminants exist on a tipping point. Future work should investigate changes to sediment processes after a major rainfall event, when large and sudden inputs of potentially toxic contaminants occur

  10. Diatom-derived carbohydrates as factors affecting bacterial community composition in estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Kelly; Hofmann, Tanja A; Smith, Cindy J; Ball, Andrew S; Underwood, Graham J C; Osborn, A Mark

    2007-10-01

    Microphytobenthic biofilms in estuaries, dominated by epipelic diatoms, are sites of high primary productivity. These diatoms exude large quantities of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) comprising polysaccharides and glycoproteins, providing a substantial pool of organic carbon available to heterotrophs within the sediment. In this study, sediment slurry microcosms were enriched with either colloidal carbohydrates or colloidal EPS (cEPS) or left unamended. Over 10 days, the fate of these carbohydrates and changes in beta-glucosidase activity were monitored. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), DNA sequencing, and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis of 16S rRNA sequences were used to determine whether sediment bacterial communities exhibited compositional shifts in response to the different available carbon sources. Initial heterotrophic activity led to reductions in carbohydrate concentrations in all three microcosms from day 0 to day 2, with some increases in beta-glucosidase activity. During this period, treatment-specific shifts in bacterial community composition were not observed. However, by days 4 and 10, the bacterial community in the cEPS-enriched sediment diverged from those in colloid-enriched and unamended sediments, with Q-PCR analysis showing elevated bacterial numbers in the cEPS-enriched sediment at day 4. Community shifts were attributed to changes in cEPS concentrations and increased beta-glucosidase activity. T-RFLP and sequencing analyses suggested that this shift was not due to a total community response but rather to large increases in the relative abundance of members of the gamma-proteobacteria, particularly Acinetobacter-related bacteria. These experiments suggest that taxon- and substrate-specific responses within the bacterial community are involved in the degradation of diatom-derived extracellular carbohydrates.

  11. A study of lead and cadmium speciation in some estuarine and coastal sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Babu, P.V.R.; Sarma, V.V.

    concentrations in the sediments can be a potential threat to benthic organisms and aquatic biota in the system. This study shows that total organic carbon (TOC) is one of the key factors which play a crucial role in controlling speciation of these toxic metals...

  12. Co-existence of Methanogenesis and Sulfate Reduction with Common Substrates in Sulfate-Rich Estuarine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Adler, Michal; Ronen, Zeev; Herut, Barak; Antler, Gilad; Vigderovich, Hanni; Eckert, Werner; Sivan, Orit

    2017-01-01

    The competition between sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogens over common substrates has been proposed as a critical control for methane production. In this study, we examined the co-existence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction with shared substrates over a large range of sulfate concentrations and rates of sulfate reduction in estuarine systems, where these processes are the key terminal sink for organic carbon. Incubation experiments were carried out with sediment samples from the sulfate-methane transition zone of the Yarqon (Israel) estuary with different substrates and inhibitors along a sulfate concentrations gradient from 1 to 10 mM. The results show that methanogenesis and sulfate reduction can co-exist while the microbes share substrates over the tested range of sulfate concentrations and at sulfate reduction rates up to 680 μmol L-1 day-1. Rates of methanogenesis were two orders of magnitude lower than rates of sulfate reduction in incubations with acetate and lactate, suggesting a higher affinity of sulfate reducing bacteria for the available substrates. The co-existence of both processes was also confirmed by the isotopic signatures of δ34S in the residual sulfate and that of δ13C of methane and dissolved inorganic carbon. Copy numbers of dsrA and mcrA genes supported the dominance of sulfate reduction over methanogenesis, while showing also the ability of methanogens to grow under high sulfate concentration and in the presence of active sulfate reduction.

  13. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Susana M. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Moreira-Santos, Matilde [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Guilhermino, Lucia [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Ribeiro, Rui [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: rui.ribeiro@zoo.uc.pt

    2006-01-15

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates.

  14. Quantification of Sterol and Triterpenol Biomarkers in Sediments of the Cananéia-Iguape Estuarine-Lagoonal System (Brazil by UHPLC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Anceski Bataglion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterols and triterpenols present in sedimentary cores from 12 stations along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system were investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS. Ten sterols and three triterpenols were identified and quantified, indicating both natural and anthropogenic sources. The relative distributions of sterol and triterpenol showed that the study area is submitted to organic matter (OM from the Ribeira de Iguape River, seawater, surrounding vegetation, and plankton production. The contribution of these sources depends on the region of the estuarine-lagoonal system and the depth of sediment. Regarding anthropogenic sources, only the samples submitted to freshwater flow from the Ribeira de Iguape River presented concentration of coprostanol higher than the threshold value and diagnostic ratios, coprostanol/(coprostanol + cholestanol and coprostanol/cholesterol, that indicate moderate contamination by domestic sewage in that area of the estuarine-lagoonal system. Therefore, the approach used herein identified the OM sources and its transport along the Cananéia-Iguape estuarine-lagoonal system (Brazil, which is a complex of lagoonal channels located in a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

  15. Rapid toxicity assessment of sediments from estuarine ecosystems: A new tandem in vitro testing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. Thomas; Long, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Microtox?? and Mutatox?? were used to evaluate the acute toxicity and genotoxicity, respectively, of organic sediment extracts from Pensacola Bay and St. Andrew Bay, two estuaries that cover about 273 and 127 km2, respectively, along the Gulf coast of Florida, USA. The sensitivity and selectivity of these two bioluminescent toxicity assays were demonstrated in validation studies with over 50 pesticides, genotoxins, and industrial pollutants, both as single compounds and in complex mixtures. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of insecticides, petroleum products, and polychlorinated biphenyls determined by Microtox all tended to group around the mean EC50 value of 1.2 (0.8) mg/L. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon sensitivity of Mutatox was in general similar to that reported in the Ames test. Surficial sediment samples were collected, extracted with dichloromethane, evaporated and concentrated under nitrogen, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, assayed for acute toxicity and genotoxicity, and compared with reference sediments. Samples with low EC50 values, and determined to be genotoxic, were detected in Massalina Bayou, Watson Bayou, East Bay, and St. Andrew Bay-East in St. Andrew Bay as well as Bayou Grande, Bayou Chico, and Bayou Texar in Pensacola Bay. An overview of these data sets analyzed by Spearman rank correlation showed a significant correlation between acute toxicity and genotoxicity (p < 0.05). Microtox and Mutatox in tandem was a sensitive, cost-effective, and rapid (<24 h) screening tool that identified troublesome areas of pollution and assessed the potential sediment toxicity of lipophilic contaminants in aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Organic matter - A key factor in controlling mercury distribution in estuarine sediment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Sarkar, A.; Vudamala, K.; Naik, R.; Nath, B.N.

    and speciation in different grain size fractions of sediment. 2. Materials and Methods: 2.1. Study area: The Vembanad Lake, situated in Kerala, is the longest (stretching about 90 km) and largest brackish- water lake of India. It is considered as one... µm was collected from the suspension following the method developed by Folk (1980). This was repeated several times for complete removal of this fraction. The remaining suspension was sieved through 25 µm sieve for separating it into size fractions...

  17. A fugacity approach for assessing the bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic compounds from estuarine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Christopher J; Gobas, Frank A P C; Birch, Gavin F

    2008-05-01

    The bioavailability of four sediment-spiked hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs; chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene, chlordane, and Aroclor 1254) was investigated by comparing bioaccumulation by the amphipod Corophium colo with uptake into a thin film of ethylene/vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer. The EVA thin film is a solid-phase extraction medium previously identified as effective at measuring the bioavailable contaminant fraction in sediment. The present study presents the results of 11 separate treatments in which chemical uptake into EVA closely matched uptake into lipid over 10 d. For all compounds, the concentration in EVA was a good approximation for the concentration in lipid, suggesting that this medium would be an appropriate biomimetic medium for assessing the bioaccumulation of HOCs during risk assessment of contaminated sediment. For chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene, limitations on bioaccumulation and toxicity because of low aqueous solubility were observed. The fugacity of the compounds in lipid (flip) and in the EVA thin film (fEVA) also was determined. The ratio of flip to fEVA was greater than one for all chemicals, indicating that all chemicals biomagnified over the duration of the exposure and demonstrating the potential for EVA thin-film extraction to assess trophic transfer of HOCs.

  18. Transfer of chemical elements from a contaminated estuarine sediment to river water. A leaching assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Manuela; Peres, Sara; Magalhães, M. Clara F.

    2014-05-01

    Wastes of a former Portuguese steel industry were deposited during 40 years on the left bank of the Coina River, which flows into the estuary of the Tagus River near Lisbon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of the chemical elements from the contaminated sediment to the river water. A leaching experiment (four replicates) was performed using 1.6 kg/replicate of sediment from a landfill located in the Coina River bank, forming a lagoon subject to tidal influence. River water coming from this lagoon was collected during low tide. This water (200 mL) was added to the moist sediment, contained in cylindrical reactors, and was collected after 24 h of percolation. The leaching experiments were conducted for 77 days being leachates collected at time zero, after 28, 49 and 77 days with the sediment always moist. The sediment was characterized for: pH, electric conductivity (EC), total organic carbon (TOC), extractable phosphorus and potassium, mineral nitrogen, iron from iron oxides (crystalline and non-crystalline) and manganese oxides. Multi-elemental analysis was also made by ICP-INAA. Leachates and river water were analysed for pH, EC, hydrogencarbonate and sulfatetot by titrations, chloride by potentiometry, and multi-elemental composition by ICP-MS. The sediment presented pH=7.2, EC=18.5 dS/m, TOC=147.8 g/kg, high concentrations of extractable phosphorous (62.8 mg/kg) and potassium (1236.8 mg/kg), mineral nitrogen=11.3 mg/kg. The non-crystalline fraction of iron oxides corresponds to 99% (167.5 g Fe/kg) of the total iron oxides, and manganese from manganese oxides was low (52.7 mg/kg). Sediment is considered contaminated. It contained high concentrations (g/kg) of Zn (2.9), Pb (0.9), Cr (0.59), Cu (0.16), As (0.07), Cd (0.005), and Hg (0.001), which are above Canadian values for marine sediments quality guidelines for protection of aquatic life. River water had: pH=8.2, EC=28.6 dS/m, csulfate=1.23 g/L, and [Cl-]=251.6 mg/L. The concentrations of Cd (0

  19. Incremental ecological exposure risks from contaminated sediments in an urban estuarine river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, David F; Iannuzzi, Timothy J

    2005-11-01

    Estuaries in urban regions present unique environmental management challenges. Ecosystems in urban estuaries are typically impacted by habitat loss and degradation, watershed modification, and nonpoint and point sources of many chemicals. Restoring such systems requires an understanding of the relative contribution of various stressors to overall ecological conditions and an understanding of shifting patterns of stress over time. In this article, we present the results of a multiparameter environmental assessment of a quintessential urbanized waterway: the lower Passaic River in the vicinity of Newark, New Jersey, USA. To provide the foundation for effective management decision making, we quantified baseline conditions (habitat losses and degradation), chemical concentrations in sediment and biota relative to published toxic effect levels, direct toxicity of sediments to benthic organisms, and food-web mediated risks to fish-eating birds. Habitat losses have been severe (greater than 85% of wetlands, nearly 100% of the total length of tidal and nontidal tributaries, and 100% of natural shoreline habitat have been lost), resulting in substantial habitat constraints on biota. Despite this, biological communities are present in the lower Passaic. In general, concentrations of toxic chemicals in surface sediments have fallen with time, and natural recovery processes are proceeding. Chemical concentrations remain high enough to impair survival of amphipods, but not amphipod growth or polychaete growth or survival as measured in laboratory bioassays using field-collected sediment. Fish and blue crab body burdens of some metals, PCBs, and the pesticide, DDT, are at concentrations sufficiently high to exceed toxicity thresholds. The resident fish-eating bird--the belted kingfisher--is at exposure risk from some metals, PCBs, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo furans (PCDD/Fs). Migratory waders--the herons and egrets--are not at risk from chemical exposure

  20. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusdado, Pedro; Guedes, Magno; Silva, André; Marques, Francisco; Pinto, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Paulo; Lourenço, André; Mendonça, Ricardo; Santana, Pedro; Corisco, José; Almeida, Susana Marta; Portugal, Luís; Caldeira, Raquel; Barata, José; Flores, Luis

    2016-09-09

    This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus' estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional) human-based sampling.

  1. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Deusdado

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus’ estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional human-based sampling.

  2. Enrichment Factors (EF) on Superficial Sediments of Santos Estuarine System, Southeasthern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. S. M.; Salaroli, A. B.; Mahiques, M.; Figueira, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Baixada Santista, located at southeastern Brazilian coast, hosts the largest harbor of South America, it is also the third most heavily populated region in São Paulo state. Many industries and domestic sewage have been contaminating the environment with heavy metals and arsenic since industrial revolution. This has been a major concern worldwide due to its toxicity and persistence. Levels of metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Fe, Mn, Sc, V) and As were determinated on 180 samples of surface sediments, by acid digestion and quantified by ICP-OES to assess enrichment factors in order to know the anthropogenic contribution of the investigated elements. The levels of metals indicated absence of contamination, but a higher enrichment of As (approximately 9.5) near Bertioga city. Ni and Cr had values between 0.5 - 2.0, Cu and Zn between 0.6 - 4.0 and 0.9 - 7.5 for Pb. Despite As, all others metals showed higher enrichment in Santos - São Vicente Estuary, especially near Cubatão. The analysis of the enrichment factor of As indicate that these values could be due to natural processes of weathering and sedimentation, meanwhile the other metals could be from antropogenic sources, since thoses values were found near industrial area.

  3. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusdado, Pedro; Guedes, Magno; Silva, André; Marques, Francisco; Pinto, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Paulo; Lourenço, André; Mendonça, Ricardo; Santana, Pedro; Corisco, José; Almeida, Susana Marta; Portugal, Luís; Caldeira, Raquel; Barata, José; Flores, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus’ estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional) human-based sampling. PMID:27618060

  4. Short-Term Nitrogen and Phosphorus Release during the Disturbance of Surface Sediments: A Case Study in an Urbanised Estuarine System (Gold Coast Broadwater, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J.K. Dunn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of sediment disturbances on nutrient loadings is important for the management of estuarine settings. This study investigated the initial influence of sediment disturbance on water column nutrient concentrations in a shallow estuarine setting within the Gold Coast Broadwater, using a laboratory-based approach. Undisturbed sediment cores (200 mm Ø × 330 mm length, plexiglass were incubated before and after being subjected to a disturbance event, to investigate the effect on the immediate and subsequent short-term water column nutrient concentrations. Sediment NH4+bio and PO43−bio concentrations ranged from 150 to 478 and 1.50 to 8.56 nmol g−1 dry wt, respectively. Water column NH4+ concentrations underwent the greatest increase (>1000% or approx. 14 times greater immediately following disturbance, with mean effluxes increasing by >300%. Thereafter, water column NH4+ concentrations and efflux rates declined to near initial pre-disturbance concentrations. Water column NH4+ concentrations accounted for 0.58%–5.50% of the depth-integrated sediment NH4+bio concentration, indicating mobilization of the sediment bound exchangeable NH4+. The observed changes in PO43− concentrations and fluxes were much lower in comparison to those observed for N-species. Following disturbance, increases in the water column PO43− concentration accounted for 7.16%–8.22% depth-integrated sediment bioavailable PO43− at +1 and +2 hours, and 5.65% at +7 hours, respectively. These results provide important insight into the potential implications of disturbance events, such as vessel activities and dredging operations, within the case study region, providing information for potential management options and relevant water quality concerns.

  5. The Effects of Salinity on Nitrogen Losses from an Oligohaline Estuarine Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giblin, Anne E.; Weston, Nathaniel B.; Banta, Gary Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Benthic respiration, sediment–water nutrient fluxes, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in the upper section of the Parker River Estuary from 1993 to 2006. This site experiences large changes in salinity over both short and long time scales....... Sediment respiration ranged from 6 to 52 mmol m−2 day−1 and was largely controlled by temperature. Nutrient fluxes were dominated by ammonium fluxes, which ranged from a small uptake of −0.3 to an efflux of over 8.2 mmol N m−2 day−1. Ammonium fluxes were most highly correlated with salinity and laboratory...... experiments demonstrated that ammonium fluxes increased when salinity increased. The seasonal pattern of DNRA closely followed salinity. DNRA rates were extremely low in March, less than 0.1 mmol m−2 day−1, but increased to 2.0 mmol m−2 day−1 in August. In contrast, denitrification rates were inversely...

  6. A Random Forest approach to predict the spatial distribution of sediment pollution in an estuarine system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Walsh

    Full Text Available Modeling the magnitude and distribution of sediment-bound pollutants in estuaries is often limited by incomplete knowledge of the site and inadequate sample density. To address these modeling limitations, a decision-support tool framework was conceived that predicts sediment contamination from the sub-estuary to broader estuary extent. For this study, a Random Forest (RF model was implemented to predict the distribution of a model contaminant, triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxyphenol (TCS, in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA. TCS is an unregulated contaminant used in many personal care products. The RF explanatory variables were associated with TCS transport and fate (proxies and direct and indirect environmental entry. The continuous RF TCS concentration predictions were discretized into three levels of contamination (low, medium, and high for three different quantile thresholds. The RF model explained 63% of the variance with a minimum number of variables. Total organic carbon (TOC (transport and fate proxy was a strong predictor of TCS contamination causing a mean squared error increase of 59% when compared to permutations of randomized values of TOC. Additionally, combined sewer overflow discharge (environmental entry and sand (transport and fate proxy were strong predictors. The discretization models identified a TCS area of greatest concern in the northern reach of Narragansett Bay (Providence River sub-estuary, which was validated with independent test samples. This decision-support tool performed well at the sub-estuary extent and provided the means to identify areas of concern and prioritize bay-wide sampling.

  7. Integrated assessment of estuarine sediment quality based on a multi-biomarker approach in the bivalve Scrobicularia plana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankoua, O Fossi; Buffet, Pe; Amiard, J C; Berthet, B; Mouneyrac, C; Amiard-Triquet, C

    2013-02-01

    The bivalve Scrobicularia plana has been proposed as a sentinel species for the assessment of estuarine sediment quality. The aim of this study was to test the responsiveness of a set of biomarkers in bivalves originating from a moderately contaminated site (Loire estuary, France) and a comparatively cleaner site (Bay of Bourgneuf, France) used as reference. Temporal fluctuations were examined in animals collected on eight occasions from March 2008 to October 2009 for the determination of biochemical (MTs, GST, AChE), physiological (energy reserves as glycogen and lipids, condition, hepato-somatic and gonado-somatic indices), and behavioural biomarkers (burrowing). Metals in clams were examined with the aim of understanding the variations in MT concentrations. The current findings indicate that among biochemical markers MTs must be used in a precautionary fashion, and comparison with a reference site remains indispensable together with an appreciation of any salinity effects. Clearer responses were obtained for GST activity which contributes to defence against organic compounds. However, any such defence was not sufficient to ensure total protection since a number of impairments were observed at the individual level (burrowing behaviour, condition index, gonado-somatic index). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) illustrated higher levels of stress in clams collected from the Loire estuary compared to those gathered from the reference site at most of the sampling periods. The interpretation of responses involved in the cascade of energetic events (from available food, digestive enzyme activities, energy reserves to condition and reproductive status) is complex but did reveal disturbances in the Loire estuary which is far from being the most contaminated estuary in France and over the world. However, no links can be established between effects at individual and supra-individual levels in organisms in the Loire estuary, even in the case of a small oil spill which

  8. SEDIMENT TOXICITY ASSESSMENT: COMPARISON OF STANDARD AND NEW TESTING DESIGNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard methods of sediment toxicity testing are fairly well accepted; however, as with all else, evolution of these methods is inevitable. We compared a standard ASTM 10-day amphipod toxicity testing method with smaller, 48- and 96-h test methods using very toxic and reference ...

  9. North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve’s (NERR) Estuarine Surface Water Nutrient, Suspended Sediment, and Chlorophyll a Data for the North Inlet and Winyah Bay Estuaries, Georgetown, South Carolina: 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — National Estuarine Research Reserve System The National Estuarine Research Reserve System was established by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (as amended) and...

  10. Spatio-temporal distribution of major and trace metals in estuarine sediments of Dhamra, Bay of Bengal, India--its environmental significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, D R; Panda, C R

    2015-01-01

    The research depicts the spatial and temporal variation of major and trace metals in marine sediments at various monitoring stations of Dhamra estuary, Bay of Bengal, Odisha. The concentration and distribution of selected metals in surface sediments of the estuary were studied in order to assess the spatial extent of anthropogenic inputs viz., mining activities and to estimate the effects of seasonal variations on geochemical processes in this particular tropical estuarine system. Surface sediments reflect the presence of trace and major metals in parts per million, and the concentrations vary in the range of Cu (0.083 to 127.2), Ni (17.35 to 122.8), Co (1.2 to 31.58), Pb (0.8 to 95.86), Zn (12.1 to 415), Cd (0 to 11) and Cr (35.21 to 5,890), Fe (7,490 and 169,100), Mn (20 to 69,188), Ca (10 to 10,520), Mg (990 to 28,750), Na (300 to 51,700), and K (1,100 to 30,010). The comparison of spatial distribution of metal contents using GIS in marine sediments indicates that there is a substantial anthropogenic input in the Dhamra estuary. The enrichment of Cr is ascribed to the sedimentation of Brahmani River, passing through the mining region and discharging Cr pollutant to the sea. Similarly, the sources of Cd are attributable to corrosion-resistant paints used by a large number of trawlers. Contamination factor has been calculated for various metals to assess the degree of pollution. As per Hakanson's classification, Cr indicates very high contamination with considerable contamination of Cd, whereas moderate contamination of Pb, Zn, and Mn are observed in marine sediments. Pollution load index also indicate that there is deterioration of site quality in premonsoon season, which almost attains the baseline level in post monsoon and perfection in monsoon season (Tomlinson et al. (Helgolander Wissenschaftliche Meeresuntersuchungen, 33, 566-572, 1980)). The geoaccumulation index shows that the metal concentrations in sediments can be considered as background levels except

  11. Speciation and fate of trace metals in estuarine sediments under reduced and oxidized conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser Brad

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm from a 60 year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975 as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60 year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxyhydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted

  12. Trace metals and other constitutive components in two sediment cores from a remote glacier-fed estuarine lagoon in southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, R.; Rudolph, A.

    2004-02-01

    Laguna San Rafael is an estuarine basin at the base of an active glacier in the process of regression, which forms part of Chile's remote Northern Ice Fields. The basin is about 140 m in maximum depth and is connected indirectly to the coastal zone by narrow channels. The present report presents preliminary data obtained from the first two sediment cores obtained from the center of Laguna San Rafael as "samples of opportunity" on an oceanographic cruise. Results from the samples are of unusual interest due to the remote location, absence of anthropogenic insult, and need to obtain background data prior to expansion of development of tourism in the area. The sediment cores were obtained from the deepest portion of the lagoon and later examined at six levels through the core. One sediment core was analyzed for organic carbon, organic nitrogen and total phosphorus and the second was analyzed for nine metals, two metal oxides, and silicon dioxide. The sediments were formed of gray-green, well-selected clay minerals, and contained low levels of C and N. There was little variation in the distribution of trace metals throughout the core. Sediment metal abundances were Ba > V > Zn > Cr > Cu ≥ Ni > Co > Pb > Cd. Concentrations were relatively low compared with the results observed from comparable fjords, with the exception of unexplained high values obtained for sedimentary Ba, V, and Zn.

  13. A method to assess the evolution and recovery of heavy metal pollution in estuarine sediments: Past history, present situation and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, Javier F; Claramunt, Inigo; García-Alba, Javier; Pérez, María Luisa; García, Andrés

    2017-11-15

    A methodology to assess the historical evolution and recovery of heavy metal pollution in estuarine sediments was developed and is presented here. This approach quantifies the distribution of heavy metals in sediment cores, and investigates the influence of anthropogenic activities and/or core locations on the heavy metal pollution, by proposing and using sediment quality indices and polynomial regressions. The method has been applied to the Suances Estuary confirming its suitability as a comprehensive and practical management tool. In this estuary, the evolution of heavy metal pollution (since 1997-1998 to 2015) pointed out the deeper the sediments, the more polluted, indicating a recovery at the upper layers due to the closure and ending of washing discharges from mining, and the reduction of metal loads from industrial wastewaters. In terms of global pollution, the intertidal and subtidal sediments will require 43.1±2.8 and 8.6±0.6years to be unpolluted, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of diel period and tow duration on estuarine fauna sampled with a beam trawl over bare sediment: Consequences for designing more reliable and efficient surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotherham, Douglas; Gray, Charles A.; Johnson, Daniel D.; Lokys, Paul

    2008-06-01

    The effects of diel period and tow duration (5, 10 and 20 min) on samples of estuarine fauna in a beam trawl, were tested over bare sediment in Tuggerah Lake (New South Wales, Australia). Mean catch rates (numbers of fish caught 5 min -1) were significantly larger at night for the total numbers of individuals and abundant, economically important species of fish and invertebrates (e.g. Gerres subfasciatus, Metapenaeus macleayi, Penaeus plebejus). Greater proportions of larger fish were also caught at night for some species (e.g. G. subfasciatus, Acanthopagrus australis, Rhabdosargus sarba), but not across all tow durations. Multivariate analyses detected dissimilarities in the composition and structure of assemblages between diel periods, which were driven by species caught predominately, or in larger proportions, at night. Short tows (5 min) were more efficient than longer tows (10 or 20 min) for sampling the diversity of species (i.e. most species were caught in the first 5 min of a tow). There were, however, no clear or consistent patterns relating to the effect of tow duration on the catch rates of other variables, the size ranges of abundant species, or the structure and composition of assemblages. Our data confirm that at night, bare sediment is an important habitat for a wide size- and species-range of estuarine fish and invertebrates. In future, more cost-effective and reliable information concerning these taxa would be achieved by sampling with the beam trawl at night, using tow durations of 5 min. We also highlight a problem inherent in the design of many studies of diel variation of fauna (i.e. the potential non-independence of data among day and night periods) and discuss its solution.

  15. Rare-earth-element fractionation patterns in estuarine sediments as a consequence of acid mine drainage: A case study in SW Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, N.; Borrego, J.; Carro, B.; Grande, J. A.; Torre, M. L. de la; Valente, T.

    2011-07-01

    Processes of seawater dilution and acid neutralization cause significant effects upon REE fractionation between the aqueous solution and sediments. This study describes the results of a recent investigation into such processes in the sediments of the Tinto and Odiel estuary. The results show differences in behaviour between light REEs (LREEs) and middle and heavy REEs (MREEs and HREEs). A relative depletion in La is observed as a consequence of the low pH values, which prevents the separation of LREEs from solution to the suspended matter. When acid neutralization occurs, on the other hand, an increase in the La content is related to the preferential separation of LREEs compared to MREEs and HREEs. Under these conditions three main fractionation patterns were distinguished: the first shows a slightly MREEenriched shape in sediments deposited in the fluvial zone; the second displays significant depletion in LREEs and a nearly flat tendency in MREEs and HREEs towards the estuarine mixing zone; and the third is enriched in total REEs and shows a relative increase in LREEs and MREEs. The evolution of these patterns reveals that pH is the key variable controlling REE fractionation in environments affected by acid mine drainage. (Author) 55 refs.

  16. The influence of pH and salinity on the toxicity of heavy metals in sediment to the estuarine clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Inmaculada; DelValls, T Angel; Forja, Jesús M; Gómez-Parra, Abelardo

    2004-05-01

    An approach is presented for determining the influence of two key variables, pH and salinity (S), on the toxicity of four common heavy metals bound to sediments in estuaries. Two samples of environmental sediment taken from two estuaries in southern Spain (the Huelva estuary and the Guadalquivir River estuary), together with a dilution of toxic mud from the Aznalcóllar (Spain) mining spill (April 1998) were used to determine their toxicity at different values of pH (6.5, 7.5, and 8.5) and salinity (10, 20, and 30) on the estuarine clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Two different endpoints, sublethal, indicated by clam reburial (median effective burial time [ET50]), and relative mortality (median lethal concentration [LC50]), were used to quantify the toxicity associated with the heavy metals. Neither salinity nor pH was found to influence the toxic responses measured by the behavioral endpoint (ET50). However, a strong effect on the LC50 related to pH and salinity was detected, with the toxicity of the heavy metals being increased at low values of both variables (pH = 6.5 and S = 10). The mechanism of heavy metals uptake through water may explain this influence of pH and salinity on the lethal toxicity detected. The results show differences in the toxicity of these heavy metals bound to sediments depending on whether the origin of metal contamination is chronic or acute.

  17. Diversity and spatial distribution of sediment ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeota in response to estuarine and environmental gradients in the Changjiang Estuary and East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongyue; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Sun, Jin; Li, Tiegang; Zhang, Zhinan; Yang, Guanpin

    2008-07-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have recently been found to be potentially important in nitrogen cycling in a variety of environments, such as terrestrial soils, wastewater treatment reactors, marine waters and sediments, and especially in estuaries, where high input of anthropogenic nitrogen is often experienced. The sedimentary AOA diversity, community structure and spatial distribution in the Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea were studied. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated that the archaeal amoA genotype communities could be clustered according to sampling transects, and the station located in an estuarine mixing zone harboured a distinct AOA community. The distribution of AOA communities correlated significantly with the gradients of surface-water salinity and sediment sorting coefficient. The spatial distribution of putative soil-related AOA in certain sampling stations indicated a strong impact of the Changjiang freshwater discharge on the marine benthic microbial ecosystem. Besides freshwater, nutrients, organic matter and suspended particles, the Changjiang Diluted Water might also contribute to the transport of terrestrial archaea into the seawater and sediments along its flow path.

  18. Ardra profiles of bacteria and archaea in mangrove sediments with different levels of contamination in the estuarine complex of Paranaguá, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gérikas Ribeiro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove's sediments from the coastal areas under human activities may contain significant contaminations by hydrocarbons, even when there are no visual evidences of it. The microorganisms are essential to these ecosystems, especially in the control of their chemical environment. Sediment samples were collected in two regions under different environment conditions (pristine and contaminated of the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (Paranaguá Bay and Laranjeiras Bay, Brazil. Aliphatic hydrocarbons were determined by the GC-FID to assess the status of contamination of the studied areas. The total DNA was extracted from these samples. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by the PCR reactions with the pair of primers 21F and 958R for the archaeal domain, and 27F and 1492R for the bacterial domain. Comparisons of communities were made by the ARDRA technique, using the HinfI restriction enzyme. The phosphate concentration showed significant differences between the two regions. The aliphatic hydrocarbons analysis showed the presence of unresolved complex mixture (UCM, an indicator of oil contamination, in the samples from the Paranaguá Bay, which was corroborated by the concentration of total aliphatic hydrocarbons. The ARDRA profile indicated that the structure of archaeal and bacterial communities of the sampled areas was very similar. Therefore, the anthropogenic influences in the Paranaguá Bay showed to be not sufficient to produce disturbances in the prokaryotic dominant groups.

  19. Histological biomarkers in liver and gills of juvenile Solea senegalensis exposed to contaminated estuarine sediments: A weighted indices approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Pedro M., E-mail: pmcosta@fct.unl.pt [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Diniz, Mario S. [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Caeiro, Sandra [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Departamento de Ciencias Exactas e Tecnologicas, Universidade Aberta, Rua Fernao Lopes, 9, 1000-132 Lisboa (Portugal); Lobo, Jorge [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); DelValls, T. Angel [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Costa, M. Helena [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2009-05-05

    Young juvenile Solea senegalensis were exposed to three sediments with distinct contamination profiles collected from a Portuguese estuary subjected to anthropogenic sources of contamination (the Sado estuary, western Portugal). Sediments were surveyed for metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc), a metalloid (arsenic) and organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and a pesticide, dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane plus its metabolites), as well as total organic matter, redox potential and particle fine fraction. The fish were exposed to freshly collected sediments in a 28-day laboratorial assay and collected for histological analyses at days 0 (T{sub 0}), 14 (T{sub 14}) and 28 (T{sub 28}). Individual weighted histopathological indices were obtained, based on presence/absence data of eight and nine liver and gill pathologies, respectively, and on their biological significance. Although livers sustained more severe lesions, the sediments essentially contaminated by organic substances caused more damage to both organs than the sediments contaminated by both metallic and organic contaminants, suggesting a possible synergistic effect. Correlation analyses showed that some alterations are linked, forming distinctive histopathological patterns that are in accordance with the severity of lesions and sediment characteristics. The presence of large eosinophilic bodies in liver and degeneration of mucous cells in gills (a first-time described alteration) were some of the most noticeable alterations observed and were related to sediment organic contaminants. Body size has been found to be negatively correlated with histopathological damage in livers following longer term exposures. It is concluded that histopathological indices provide reliable and discriminatory data even when biomonitoring as complex media as natural sediments. It is also concluded that the effects of contamination may result not only from toxicant

  20. Carbohydrates, uronic acids and alkali extractable carbohydrates in contrasting marine and estuarine sediments: Distribution, size fractionation and partial chemical characterization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khodse, V.B.; Fernandes, L.; Bhosle, N.B.; Sardessai, S.

    Concentration, size fractionation and monosaccharide composition of carbohydrates and uronic acids were investigated in contrasting sediments of the Mandovi estuary (ME), Arabian Sea (AS) and the Bay of Bengal (BOB). Concentrations...

  1. Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J I Ellis; D Clark; J Atalah; W Jiang; C Taiapa; M Patterson; J Sinner; J Hewitt

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentation, nutrients and metal loading to coastal environments are increasing, associated with urbanization and global warming, hence there is a growing need to predict ecological responses to such change...

  2. Modeling the fate of p,p'-DDT in water and sediment of two typical estuarine bays in South China: Importance of fishing vessels' inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Xianming; Bao, Lian-Jun; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-05-01

    Antifouling paint applied to fishing vessels is the primary source of dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) to the coastal marine environments of China. With the aim to provide science-based support of potential regulations on DDT use in antifouling paint, we utilized a fugacity-based model to evaluate the fate and impact of p,p'-DDT, the dominant component of DDT mixture, in Daya Bay and Hailing Bay, two typical estuarine bays in South China. The emissions of p,p'-DDT from fishing vessels to the aquatic environments of Hailing Bay and Daya Bay were estimated as 9.3 and 7.7 kg yr(-1), respectively. Uncertainty analysis indicated that the temporal variability of p,p'-DDT was well described by the model if fishing vessels were considered as the only direct source, i.e., fishing vessels should be the dominant source of p,p'-DDT in coastal bay areas of China. Estimated hazard quotients indicated that sediment in Hailing Bay posed high risk to the aquatic system, and it would take at least 21 years to reduce the hazards to a safe level. Moreover, p,p'-DDT tends to migrate from water to sediment in the entire Hailing Bay and Daya Bay. On the other hand, our previous research indicated that p,p'-DDT was more likely to migrate from sediment to water in the maricultured zones located in shallow waters of these two bays, where fishing vessels frequently remain. These findings suggest that relocating mariculture zones to deeper waters would reduce the likelihood of farmed fish contamination by p,p'-DDT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary assimilation of cadmium associated with bacterial exopolymer sediment coatings by the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus: Effects of Cd concentration and salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlekat, C.E.; Decho, Alan W.; Chandler, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial extracellular substances (also known as exopolysaccharides, or EPS) may serve as vectors for trophic transfer of metals in benthic systems because these ubiquitous sediment coatings can sorb high concentrations of toxic metals, and because many benthic invertebrates assimilate EPS sediment coatings upon ingestion. We conducted 3 sets of experiments to determine the assimilative bioavailability of EPS-associated Cd to the benthic amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus as a function of Cd concentration and salinity. Bioavailability was measured as L. plumulosus Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) from EPS-coated silica (EPS-Si) and from uncoated silica (NC-Si) using modified pulse-chase methods with the gamma-emitting radioisotope 109Cd. Cd AE was significantly greater from NC-Si than from EPS-Si at 7.5???, but not at 2.5 or 25???. Overall, Cd AE from EPS-Si was between 15.1 and 21.5%. Because EPS-Si sorbed more Cd than NC-Si, EPS coatings magnified the amount of Cd amphipods accumulated at each salinity by up to a factor of 10. Salinity did not directly affect Cd AE from EPS-Si, but because Cd-EPS partitioning increased with decreasing salinity, amphipods accumulated more Cd from EPS at the lowest Cd-EPS incubation salinity (2.5 ???) than at higher salinities (7.5 and 25 ???). Finally, Cd concentration in EPS exhibited an inverse relationship with Cd AE at 2.5 ???, but not at 25 ???. Specifically, Cd AE was 12 times greater at 1 compared with 10 ??g Cd ??g-1 EPS. Together, these results show that estuarine benthos can accumulate Cd from EPS sediment coatings, but that the degree to which this phenomenon occurs is dependent upon seawater salinity and Cd concentration in EPS.

  4. Application of a benthic euryhaline amphipod, Corophium sp., as a sediment toxicity testing organism for both freshwater and estuarine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyne, R V; Everett, D A

    1998-01-01

    The use of an as-yet-undescribed euryhaline Corophium sp. amphipod as a sediment toxicity testing organism was assessed. The species was found to be ubiquitous in many tidal areas of the Hawkesbury River catchment. The salinity of habitat sites ranged from 0.1 to 24 ppt, sediment total organic carbon (TOC) ranged from 0.4% to 3.5%, and the fines content (Corophium sp. was assessed by using copper chloride and ammonium chloride as reference toxicants in a 96-h static water-only test and a 10-day static sediment test. The LC50 for copper in freshwater-only exposures was 80 to 86 microg/L, using adult animals collected from the field. In contrast, the LC50 for copper in freshwater sediment and the sediment pore water were 840 mg/kg (dry weight) and 99 microg/L, respectively. The LC50 for ammonia (total) in freshwater-only at pH 7 was 5.5 mg/L. In contrast, the LC50 for ammonia (total) in freshwater sediment and the sediment pore water were 110 mg/kg (dry weight) and 6 mg/L, respectively. Laboratory cultures of 5 per thousand to 15 per thousand salinity were optimal for supporting the release of juveniles. Juveniles collected from laboratory cultures had a LC50 for copper in 5 per thousand and 10 per thousand salinity of 9 microg/L and 28.5 microg/L, respectively, in water-only exposures. The juveniles would be suitable for use in the development of a chronic sediment toxicity test with growth as the endpoint.

  5. Influence of Trypaea australiensis population density on benthic metabolism and nitrogen dynamics in sandy estuarine sediment: A mesocosm simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Mark A.; Welsh, David T.; Dunn, Ryan J. K.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    Laboratory mesocosm incubations were undertaken to investigate the influence of natural densities of the thalassinidean shrimp, Trypaea australiensis (marine yabby) on sediment oxygen demand (SOD), inorganic nutrient fluxes, and the N-cycle processes of nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Mesocosms (~ 0.1 m 2 × 55 cm deep) of sieved, natural T. australiensis inhabited sands were continually flushed with fresh seawater and pre-incubated for two weeks prior to being assigned to one of three treatments; control (no additions), low yabby density (40 T. australiensis m - 2 ) or high yabby density (80 T. australiensis m - 2 ). Thereafter, SOD and sediment-water column inorganic nutrient fluxes were determined periodically over a 38 day period. On the final day rates of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were also determined using the 15N-isotope pairing technique. Yabbies consistently and significantly ( p water column nitrate concentration. Indeed, nitrate reduction processes became an increasingly unimportant element with increasing yabby density with for example, N 2 generated by coupled nitrification-denitrification representing 11.5, 5.2 and 2.8% of the total inorganic-N recycled to the water column in the control, low density and high density yabby treatments, respectively. Overall, the major influence of T. australiensis in the studied low organic matter content, sandy sediments was to enhance coupling between the benthic and pelagic systems through increased rates of inorganic nitrogen regeneration in the sediment and enhanced export of this nitrogen to the water column. Our results also suggest that the influences of organisms such as T. australiensis which form deep, extensive and complex burrow systems where irrigation rates differ greatly between different burrow sections, may be more complex than those recorded for infauna which form simple U-shaped burrows. Additionally

  6. Estuarine and marine geology (2011-2015)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Chakraborty, P.

    ) of toxic metals gradually increase with increasing total metal loading in estuarine sediments. Quality and quantity of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) is one of the key factors which play a crucial role in controlling speciation of trace/toxic metal...

  7. Physicochemical Factors Influence the Abundance and Culturability of Human Enteric Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Organisms in Estuarine Water and Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Hassard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To assess fecal pollution in coastal waters, current monitoring is reliant on culture-based enumeration of bacterial indicators, which does not account for the presence of viable but non-culturable or sediment-associated micro-organisms, preventing effective quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA. Seasonal variability in viable but non-culturable or sediment-associated bacteria challenge the use of fecal indicator organisms (FIOs for water monitoring. We evaluated seasonal changes in FIOs and human enteric pathogen abundance in water and sediments from the Ribble and Conwy estuaries in the UK. Sediments possessed greater bacterial abundance than the overlying water column, however, key pathogenic species (Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp., hepatitis A virus, hepatitis E virus and norovirus GI and GII were not detected in sediments. Salmonella was detected in low levels in the Conwy water in spring/summer and norovirus GII was detected in the Ribble water in winter. The abundance of E. coli and Enterococcus spp. quantified by culture-based methods, rarely matched the abundance of these species when measured by qPCR. The discrepancy between these methods was greatest in winter at both estuaries, due to low CFU's, coupled with higher gene copies (GC. Temperature accounted for 60% the variability in bacterial abundance in water in autumn, whilst in winter salinity explained 15% of the variance. Relationships between bacterial indicators/pathogens and physicochemical variables were inconsistent in sediments, no single indicator adequately described occurrence of all bacterial indicators/pathogens. However, important variables included grain size, porosity, clay content and concentrations of Zn, K, and Al. Sediments with greater organic matter content and lower porosity harbored a greater proportion of non-culturable bacteria (including dead cells and extracellular DNA in winter. Here, we show the link between physicochemical

  8. Physicochemical Factors Influence the Abundance and Culturability of Human Enteric Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Organisms in Estuarine Water and Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassard, Francis; Andrews, Anthony; Jones, Davey L; Parsons, Louise; Jones, Vera; Cox, Brian A; Daldorph, Peter; Brett, Howard; McDonald, James E; Malham, Shelagh K

    2017-01-01

    To assess fecal pollution in coastal waters, current monitoring is reliant on culture-based enumeration of bacterial indicators, which does not account for the presence of viable but non-culturable or sediment-associated micro-organisms, preventing effective quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). Seasonal variability in viable but non-culturable or sediment-associated bacteria challenge the use of fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) for water monitoring. We evaluated seasonal changes in FIOs and human enteric pathogen abundance in water and sediments from the Ribble and Conwy estuaries in the UK. Sediments possessed greater bacterial abundance than the overlying water column, however, key pathogenic species (Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp., hepatitis A virus, hepatitis E virus and norovirus GI and GII) were not detected in sediments. Salmonella was detected in low levels in the Conwy water in spring/summer and norovirus GII was detected in the Ribble water in winter. The abundance of E. coli and Enterococcus spp. quantified by culture-based methods, rarely matched the abundance of these species when measured by qPCR. The discrepancy between these methods was greatest in winter at both estuaries, due to low CFU's, coupled with higher gene copies (GC). Temperature accounted for 60% the variability in bacterial abundance in water in autumn, whilst in winter salinity explained 15% of the variance. Relationships between bacterial indicators/pathogens and physicochemical variables were inconsistent in sediments, no single indicator adequately described occurrence of all bacterial indicators/pathogens. However, important variables included grain size, porosity, clay content and concentrations of Zn, K, and Al. Sediments with greater organic matter content and lower porosity harbored a greater proportion of non-culturable bacteria (including dead cells and extracellular DNA) in winter. Here, we show the link between physicochemical variables and

  9. Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J I; Clark, D; Atalah, J; Jiang, W; Taiapa, C; Patterson, M; Sinner, J; Hewitt, J

    2017-09-20

    Sedimentation, nutrients and metal loading to coastal environments are increasing, associated with urbanization and global warming, hence there is a growing need to predict ecological responses to such change. Using a regression technique we predicted how maximum abundance of 20 macrobenthic taxa and 22 functional traits separately and interactively responded to these key stressors. The abundance of most taxa declined in response to sedimentation and metal loading while a unimodal response was often associated with nutrient loading. Optimum abundances for both taxa and traits occurred at relatively low stressor levels, highlighting the vulnerability of estuaries to increasing stressor loads. Individual taxa were more susceptible to stress than traits, suggesting that functional traits may be less sensitive for detecting changes in ecosystem health. Multiplicative effects were more common than additive interactions. The observed sensitivity of most taxa to increasing sedimentation and metal loading and the documented interaction effects between multiple stressors have important implications for understanding and managing the ecological consequences of eutrophication, sedimentation and contaminants on coastal ecosystems.

  10. Microplastic pollution in Vembanad Lake, Kerala, India: The first report of microplastics in lake and estuarine sediments in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruthy, S; Ramasamy, E V

    2017-03-01

    We present the first study of microplastics in the sediments of Vembanad Lake, a Ramsar site in India. Microplastics are emerging pollutants of increasing environmental concern with a particle size of microplastics pollution on the environment and biota is not well known. Vast data exist in the literature on marine microplastics while reports on freshwater ecosystems are scarce. In this context, to examine the occurrence of microplastic particles (MPs) in the Vembanad Lake, samples were collected from ten sites and processed for microplastic extraction through density separation. Identification of the polymer components of MPs was done using micro Raman spectroscopy. MPs were recovered from all sediment samples, indicating their extensive distribution in the lake. The abundance of MPs recorded from the sediment samples is in the range of 96-496 particles m -2 with a mean abundance of 252.80 ± 25.76 particles m -2 . Low density polyethylene has been identified as the dominant type of polymer component of the MPs. As clams and fishes are the major source of protein to the local population, the presence of MPs in the lake becomes critically important, posing a severe threat of contaminating the food web of this lake. This study, being the first report from India on MPs in lake sediments, provide impetus for further research on the distribution and impact of this emerging pollutant on the biota of many aquatic systems spread across India. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading

    KAUST Repository

    Ellis, Joanne

    2017-09-14

    Sedimentation, nutrients and metal loading to coastal environments are increasing, associated with urbanization and global warming, hence there is a growing need to predict ecological responses to such change. Using a regression technique we predicted how maximum abundance of 20 macrobenthic taxa and 22 functional traits separately and interactively responded to these key stressors. The abundance of most taxa declined in response to sedimentation and metal loading while a unimodal response was often associated with nutrient loading. Optimum abundances for both taxa and traits occurred at relatively low stressor levels, highlighting the vulnerability of estuaries to increasing stressor loads. Individual taxa were more susceptible to stress than traits, suggesting that functional traits may be less sensitive for detecting changes in ecosystem health. Multiplicative effects were more common than additive interactions. The observed sensitivity of most taxa to increasing sedimentation and metal loading and the documented interaction effects between multiple stressors have important implications for understanding and managing the ecological consequences of eutrophication, sedimentation and contaminants on coastal ecosystems.

  12. The influence of salinity on the abundance, transcriptional activity, and diversity of AOA and AOB in an estuarine sediment: a microcosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Lujun; Dai, Tianjiao; Tian, Jinping; Wen, Donghui

    2015-11-01

    Estuarine sediment-seawater microcosms were established to evaluate the influence of salinity on the population, transcriptional activity, and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). AOA was found to show the most abundant and the highest transcriptional activity under moderate salinity; on the other hand, AOB abundance was not sensitive to salinity variation but showed the highest transcriptional activity in the low-salinity microcosms. AOA exhibited more advantages than AOB on growth and ammonia-oxidizing activity under moderate- and high-salinity environments. The highest richness and diversity of active AOA were found under salinity of 15 psu. All the active AOA detected under the salinities studied were clustered into Nitrosopumilus maritimus linage, with the composition shifted from N. maritimus C12 cluster, N. maritimus like 1.1 cluster, N. maritimus SCM1 cluster, and N. maritimus like 1.2 cluster to N. maritimus C12 and N. maritimus A10 clusters when salinity was increased from 5 to 30 psu.

  13. Faecal sterols as indicators of sewage contamination in estuarine sediments of the Tay Estuary, Scotland: an extended baseline survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, A. D.; Patton, D.

    2005-06-01

    Sterol ratios are used to identify sources, occurrence and partitioning of faecal matter in sediments of the Tay Estuary, Scotland. The 5β/(5α+5β) ratio is used to discriminate between sewage and biogenic sterol sources by comparing the concentrations of coprostanols to cholesterol plus coprostanols. This index shows unambiguous sewage pollution in the Invergowrie Bay area (values >0.7). The coprostanol/epicoprostanol index is used to differentiate between human and non-human faecal inputs. Ratios confirmed the primary source as human-derived faecal material. The coprostanol/cholesterol ratio was calculated in order to elucidate the contribution of different biogenic sources to the sedimentary sterol budget. Ratios of >1 clearly indicate faecal sterol sources. Invergowrie Bay displayed no sterol signature other than sewage. A biogenic source of cholesterol influenced total sterol concentrations upstream of the City of Dundee. Attention is directed to the potential role of density fronts in compartmentalization of faecal material in bottom sediments.

  14. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on the communities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in estuarine marsh sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemaneh eZeleke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant invasion on the microorganisms of soil sediments is very important for estuary ecology. The community structures of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB as a function of Spartina alterniflora invasion in Phragmites australis-vegetated sediments of the Dongtan wetland in the Yangtze River estuary, China, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA and dissimilatory sulfite-reductase (dsrB genes. Sediment samples were collected from two replicate locations, and each location included three sampling stands each covered by monocultures of P. australis, S. alterniflora and both plants (transition stands, respectively. qPCR analysis revealed higher copy numbers of mcrA genes in sediments from S. alterniflora stands than P. australis stands (5- and 7.5-fold more in the spring and summer, respectively, which is consistent with the higher methane flux rates measured in the S. alterniflora stands (up to 8.01 ± 5.61 mg m-2 h-1. Similar trends were observed for SRB, and they were up to two orders of magnitude higher than the methanogens. Diversity indices indicated a lower diversity of methanogens in the S. alterniflora stands than the P. australis stands. In contrast, insignificant variations were observed in the diversity of SRB with the invasion. Although Methanomicrobiales and Methanococcales, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated in the salt marsh, Methanomicrobiales displayed a slight increase with the invasion and growth of S. alterniflora, whereas the later responded differently. Methanosarcina, the metabolically diverse methanogens, did not vary with the invasion of, but Methanosaeta, the exclusive acetate utilizers, appeared to increase with S. alterniflora invasion. In SRB, sequences closely related to the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae dominated in the salt marsh, although they displayed minimal changes with the S

  15. Accumulation and partitioning of seven trace metals in mangroves and sediment cores from three estuarine wetlands of Hainan Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yao-Wen; Yu, Ke-Fu; Zhang, Gan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-06-15

    Trace metals in mangrove tissues (leaf, branch, root and fruit) of nine species and sediments of ten cores collected in 2008 from Dongzhai Harbor, Sanya Bay and Yalong Bay, Hainan Island, were analyzed. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg and As in surface sediments were 14.8, 24.1, 57.9, 0.17, 29.6, 0.08 and 9.7 μg g(-1), whereas those in mangrove tissues were 2.8, 1.4, 8.7, 0.03, 1.1, 0.03, and 0.2 μg g(-1), respectively. Compared to those from other typical mangrove wetlands of the world, the metal levels in Hainan were at low- to median-levels, which is consistent with the fact that Hainan Island is still in low exploitation and its mangroves suffer little impact from human activities. Metal concentrations among different tissues of mangroves were different. In general, Zn and Cu were enriched in fruit, Hg was enriched in leaf, Pb, Cd and Cr were enriched in branch, and As was enriched in root. The cycle of trace metals in mangrove species were estimated. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) followed the sequence of Hg (0.43)>Cu (0.27)>Cd (0.22)>Zn (0.17)>Pb (0.07)>Cr (0.06)>As (0.02). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An experimental study on dredge spoil of estuarine sediments in the bay of seine (France): A morphosedimentary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmin, Stella; Lesueur, Patrick; Dauvin, Jean Claude; Samson, Sandrine; Tournier, Patrice; Gallicher Lavanne, Albert; Dubrulle-Brunaud, Carole; Thouroude, Coralie

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the consequences of dredging on estuarine morphology and its sedimentary dynamics are common, but the impacts of dumping dredge spoil in coastal open settings are rarely found in scientific literature. An experimental study was conducted over the period 2012-2013 to monitor the physical impacts of dredged material dumped at two adjacent sites (one million cubic metres at each) on the inner shelf of the Bay of Seine in France (eastern part of the English Channel, La Manche). As recently reinforced in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), knowledge on the location and intensity of human impacts (e.g. on marine ecosystems) is critical for effective marine management and conservation. So, two methods of disposition were tested to evaluate the impacts of dumping on the environment and thus propose recommendations for future dumping. The strategy is based on a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) approach, in which the spatio-temporal variability was studied by analysing the morphological and sedimentological characteristics over a period of 28 months, from November 2011 to April 2014, also including recovery of the seafloor after cessation of the dumping activities. The first experimental dumping operation (MASED) was carried out regularly for 8 months at a single point and generating a conical deposit of 5 m in height, while the second dumping (MABIO) lasted for 12 months involving four steps in the dumping process. In the second case, a wider area was covered, leading to the formation of a smaller deposit of 2 m in height. The dumped deposits consisted of muddy fine sand, whereas the inner shelf seafloor in this area is covered with fine to medium sand. As a result, muddy fine sand accumulated at or near the two dumping sites, with a maximum mud (i.e. particles4 Φ) content of 50% compared tostudy area. For the latter, a spreading of fine particles was observed extending from the conical deposit towards the south west. To favour long

  17. Urban rivers as conveyors of hydrocarbons to sediments of estuarine areas: source characterization, flow rates and mass accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauad, Cristiane R; Wagener, Angela de L R; Massone, Carlos G; Aniceto, Mayara da S; Lazzari, Letícia; Carreira, Renato S; Farias, Cássia de O

    2015-02-15

    Aliphatic (n-C12-n-C40, unresolved complex mixture, resolved peaks) and aromatic hydrocarbons (46 PAH) were investigated in suspended particulate matter (SPM) sampled over eleven months in six of the major rivers and two channels of the Guanabara Bay Basin. PAH flow rates of the most contaminated rivers, the contribution to the PAH sediment load of the receiving bay, and the main sources of hydrocarbons were determined. PAH (38) ranged from 28 ng L(-1) to 11,514 ng L(-1). Hydrocarbon typology and statistical evaluation demonstrated contribution of distinct sources in different regions and allowed quantification of these contributions. Total flow rate for the five major rivers amounts to 3 t year(-1) and responds for 30% of the total PAH annual input into the northern area of the Guanabara Bay. For the first time PAH mass deposited in the bay sediments has been estimated and shall serve as base for decision making and source abatement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution of nitrogenous nutrients and denitrifiers strains in estuarine sediment profiles of the Tanshui River, northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L. F.; Shieh, W. Y.; Wu, W. F.; Chen, C.-P.

    2006-09-01

    Chemical profiles of both oxidized (nitrate and sulfate) and reduced (ammonium, sulfide, acid-volatile sulfide [AVS], and pyrite) materials and the corresponding distribution of denitrifier microbial communities were measured at low tide in sediments at Guandu in the estuary of the Tanshui River, northern Taiwan in August 2002. Denitrifier strains were isolated for physiological and phylogenic analyses. Based on the distribution of nitrogenous compounds and denitrifier abundances, the vertical profile of Guandu sediments could be separated into four layers: a mixed layer (the top 1 cm of depth, respectively containing 0.82-2.37 and 535.9-475.0 μM of nitrate and ammonium), a nitrate-concentrated layer (1-5 cm in depth, 2.37-0.53 and 475.0-1192.1 μM, respectively), a denitrifier-aggregation layer (5-7 cm in depth, 0.53-0.72 and 1192.1-1430.1 μM, respectively), and an ammonium-enriched layer (7-12 cm in depth, 0.72-0.78 and 1430.1-2196.6 μM, respectively). Denitrifier strains were detected in all layers except for the mixed layer. A variety of metabolic processes by these strains may occur in different layers. Bacillus jeotgali-, Bacillus sphaericus-, and Bacillus firmus-related strains isolated from the nitrate-concentrated layer may be involved in the nitrification-denitrification coupling process due to the relatively low nitrate concentrations (maximum = 2.37 μM), and may contribute to denitrification not nitrification. Bacillus bataviensis- and B. jeotgali-related strains isolated from the denitrifier-aggregation layer comprised the predominant denitrifier population (3.64 × 10 4 cells/g of denitrifier abundance). They possess the ability of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Bacillus jeotgali-related strains and two newly identified strains of GD0705 and GD0706 isolated from the ammonium-enriched layer possibly use fermentative processes as the main metabolic pathway instead of denitrification when nitrate is scarce, and this further

  19. Mercury in river, estuarine and seawaters - Is it possible to decrease realist environmental concentrations in order to achieve environmental quality standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Daniela S; Lopes, Cláudia B; Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L; Vale, Carlos; Trindade, Tito; Pereira, Maria E

    2016-12-01

    Dithiocarbamate-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2/SiDTC) have been investigated as a convenient and effective sorbent for mercury removal from river, estuarine and sea waters, and their capability to decrease realistic environmental concentrations to the new environmental quality standards was evaluated. The sorption kinetics was well described by the Elovich model and the initial sorption rate was dependent of the sorbent dose. Except for river water sample, the Fe3O4@SiO2/SiDTC particles uptake 99.9% or more of the Hg(II) in the waters (initially at the concentration of 50 μg/L), allowing to reach residual concentrations lower than the new environmental quality standards (70 ng/L) with only 10 mg/L of sorbent material. The distribution coefficients of mercuric ions between the magnetic particles and the different natural water types were above 103 mL/g for the river water and above 105 mL/g for the estuarine and sea waters. The differences observed between the water types can be attributed to different water composition (effect of the matrix), which plays an important role in the efficiency of the water treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Study on the Environmental Standard of Sediment on the Bottom of the Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Yoo, Hye Jin [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    Sediment on the bottom of the water has been considered one of the water pollutants in the environmental management of Korea so treated as a management on pollutants, as you can see the examples in the dragging operation in the polluted sea area. To healthily maintain and conserve the water ecosystem including bottom living things in the water, sediment on the bottom of the water should be recognized as the independent medium, which should maintain the certain quality like the water, the atmosphere, and soil, rather than the source of water pollution. Such recognition means that the management of sediment on the bottom of the water should change the fragmentary goal, centered the post management focusing on the water management, to the ecosystematic goal including the bottom living things. In a point of the view, this study has a great significance to suggest not only the final goal for the management of sediment on the bottom of the water but also the necessity of developing the environmental standard of the sediment on the bottom of the water, which is a standard of the management or judgment in the actual managing the sediment on the bottom of the water - an estimation on the pollution of sediment, a removal of the polluted sediment, a purification of sediment, and an abandonment of the dragged sediment -, and the development measures. Considering the situation that even the basic scheme related to the management of sediment is not prepared in the Government level, the concept of the environmental standard of sediment, the foreign example of the environmental standard of sediment, the current state of the domestic sediment pollution, and the development scheme of the environmental standard in this study must be the important foundation to establish the management system of sediment in the Government level. 121 refs., 10 figs., 45 tabs.

  1. The effect of wind waves on spring-neap variations in sediment transport in two meso-tidal estuarine basins with contrasting fetch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen; Bryan, Karin R.; Mullarney, Julia C.

    2017-03-01

    Higher-energy episodic wind-waves can substantially modify estuarine morphology over short timescales which are superimposed on lower-energy but long-term tidal asymmetry effects. Theoretically, wind waves and tidal currents change the morphology through their combined influence on the asymmetry between bed shear stress, τmax, on the flood and ebb tide, although the relative contribution of such wind-wave events in shaping the long-term morphological evolution in real estuaries is not well known. If the rising tide reaches sufficiently high water depths, τmax decreases as water depth increases because of the depth attenuation of wave orbital velocities. However, this effect is opposed by the increase in τmax associated with the longer fetch occurring at high tide, which allows the generation of larger waves. Additionally, these effects are superimposed on the spring-neap variations in current associated with changes to tidal range. By comparing two mesotidal basins in the same dendritic estuary, one with a large fetch aligned with the prevailing wind direction and one with only a small fetch, we show that for a sufficiently large fetch even the small and frequently occurring wind events are able to create waves that are capable of changing the morphology ('morphologically significant'). Conversely, in the basin with reduced fetch, these waves are generated less frequently and therefore are of reduced morphological significance. Here, we find that although tidal current should be stronger during spring tides and alter morphology more, on average the reduced fetch and increased water depth during spring tides mean that the basin-averaged intertidal τmax is similar during both spring and neap tides. Moreover, in the presence of wind waves, the duration of slack water is reduced during neap tides relative to spring tides, resulting in a reduced chance for accretion during neap tides. Finally, τmax is lower in the subtidal channels during neaps than springs but of

  2. Widespread Distribution of Dehalococcoides mccartyi in the Houston Ship Channel and Galveston Bay, Texas, Sediments and the Potential for Reductive Dechlorination of PCDD/F in an Estuarine Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte; Brinkmeyer, Robin; Yeager, Kevin M; Schindler, Kimberly; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Louchouarn, Patrick; Santschi, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    Sediments in the Houston Ship Channel and upper Galveston Bay, Texas, USA, are polluted with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/F; ≤46,000 ng/kg dry weight (wt.)) with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic congener, contributing >50 % of the total toxic equivalents (TEQ) at most locations. We measured PCDD/F concentrations in sediments and evaluated the potential for enhanced in situ biodegradation by surveying for Dehalococcoides mccartyi, an obligate organohalide respiring bacterium. Dehalococcoides spp. (98 % similar to D. mccartyi) and 22 other members of the class Dehalococcoidia were predominant 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) phylotypes. Dehalococcoides spp. were also present in the active fraction of the bacterial community. Presence/absence PCR screening detected D. mccartyi in sediment cores and sediment grab samples having at least 1 ng/kg dry wt. TEQ at salinities ranging from 0.6 to 19.5 PSU, indicating that they are widespread in the estuarine environment. Organic carbon-only and organic carbon + sulfate-amended sediment microcosm experiments resulted in ∼60 % reduction of ambient 2,3,7,8-TCDD in just 24 months leading to reductions in total TEQs by 38.4 and 45.0 %, respectively, indicating that 2,3,7,8-TCDD degradation is occurring at appreciable rates.

  3. Convergence of estuarine channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronkers, Job

    2017-07-01

    Tide-dominated coastal plain estuaries have typically up-estuary convergent tidal channels. Analysis of estuarine characteristics indicates a dependence of the convergence length on relative tidal amplitude, relative intertidal area and river flow velocity. In order to explain these relationships we investigate a condition for continuity of net sediment transport throughout the estuary, corresponding to morphodynamic equilibrium. We show, by using an analytical solution of the tidal equations, that this condition is equivalent to a condition on the convergence length. This condition is evaluated for 21 estuaries in different regions of the world. It appears that the convergence length determined in this way can explain observed convergence lengths for the considered set of estuaries. The dependence of the convergence length on different estuarine characteristics is analysed by solving the fully coupled hydro-morphodynamic equations. We show that this dependence limits the range of variation of the tidal velocity amplitude. The analysis provides insight in the morphological response of estuaries to human interventions. The condition can easily be evaluated to yield an estimate of this response.

  4. Composition and functioning of iron-reducing communities in two contrasting environments, i.e. a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer and estuarine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, B.

    2006-01-01

    The research in this thesis is to advance the mechanistic understanding of the geochemical, environmental and ecophysiological factors control on the activity of Fe (III)-reducing microbial populations in two contrasting environments, an aquifer polluted by a neighbouring landfill, and the estuarine

  5. Mercury in estuarine sediments of the Manguaba and Botafogo River : A background and baseline values proposition in comparison to relatively well preserved and polluted aquatic systems under tropical countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marta

    2013-04-01

    Mercury in estuarine sediments of the Manguaba and Botafogo River : A background and baseline values proposition in comparison to relatively well preserved and polluted aquatic systems under tropical countries Lima, Marta1; Menor, Eldemar2; Lima, Enjolras3; Neumann, Virginio4 1MFGTransportes, Brazil; 2Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil 3Servico Geologico do Brasil-CPRM, Brazil 4Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil Heavy metal (HM) concentrations in estuarine sediments of the Botafogo and Manguaba river, North-eastern Brazil were investigated on basis of samples from a bottom core drill performed 4km from the mouth of the rivers. Total sediments (TS) of the sliced profiles (62 cm, Botafogo river and 87 cm, Manguaba river ) were submitted to chemical analysis (51 elements), mineralogical analysis (XRD) and statistical study, followed by stoichiometric calculations. Geochronologic determinations of 210Pb allowed studying the evolution of the contamination level approximately 150 year-old interval in the Botafogo river. Mercury (Hg) and Arsenic (As) are emphasized because of a chlorine-soda industry that dumps its effluents about 15 km upstream of the estuary and extensive cultivation of sugarcane existent in this watershed. Hg background in pelitic total sediments (PTS) was certain established considering the Hg content (126 ppb) in sedimentary intervals previous to 1910. The production of chlorine-soda (since 1963) coincides with a drastic increase of the Hg concentrations and contemporary values around 6.000 ppb, without interruption in the pollutant process. The conclusions found that the Hg was the main indicator of anthropogenic contribution in the sediments of the Botafogo river. On the other hand, an increase in the Hg-As concentrations has been observed at the last decades due to an increase of the clay mineral fraction in TS of the Manguaga river. This scenario indicates that the accumulation of HM has been constant since the last decades, under a

  6. Ecology of Estuarine Macrobenthos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herman, P.M.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Koppel, J. van de; Heip, C.H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Macrobenthos is an important component of estuarine ecosystems. Based on a cross-system comparison, we show that estuarine macrobenthos may directly process a significant portion of the system-wide primary production, and that estuarine macrobenthic biomass may be predicted from primary production

  7. Chemistry and behaviour of B, Ca and Mg in interstitial waters of sediments from the coastal and estuarine regions of Mandovi river along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; SenGupta, R.

    processes. Salinity remains high in most of the sediments rich in clay and silt as compared to the sandy sediments, due to the semi-permeable character of clay and silt. Organic carbon in sediments (av. 1.6%) does not seem to indicate a definite relation...

  8. Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program (DCERP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-19

    DeGroodt. 1989. The mutual relationship between the monitoring and modeling of estuarine ecosystems. Helgoländer Meeresuntersuchungen 43:537–548. Duarte...hypoxia, anoxia Crustaceans (infaunal only) - negative response for high sediment toxicity, organic enrichment, shoreline disturbance, hypoxia, anoxia

  9. Relationship between Concentration of Chemical Substances in Estuarine Sediments and Concentration of Vitellogenin in Mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus) and Common Goby (Acanthogobius flavimanus) Serum

    OpenAIRE

    Takao, Yuji; Kuwahara, Kazuko; Nagae, Masaki; Soyano, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Sediments, mudskippers, and common gobies were collected from the estuaries of nine rivers along the coast of the Ariake Sea in the northwestern part of Kyushu. The sediments were analyzed for alkylphenols, organotin compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Then, male mudskippers and common gobies were analyzed for serum vitellogenin concentration. Sediments from the estuary of the Omuta River, which has residential areas in its upper reaches and many large-scale chemical plants in it...

  10. Influence of copper oxide nanoparticle shape on bioaccumulation, cellular internalization and effects in the estuarine sediment-dwelling polychaete, Nereis diversicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thit, Amalie; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Købler, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Microscopy of gut sections indicated limited presence of CuO NP-like objects in the gut lumen, but evidence on whether accumulated Cu from CuO NP exposure was internalized as particles was not conclusive. Overall, bioavailability and avoidance was not influenced by particle shape or size, whereas Cu form (Cu......CuO nanoparticles (NPs) released into the aquatic environment will likely accumulate in the sediment. Here we synthesized and characterized CuO NPs with different shapes and thus sizes: spheres, rods and spindles. Nereis diversicolor were exposed for 10 days to control sediment or sediment spiked...

  11. REE in suspended particulate matter and sediment of the Zuari estuary and adjacent shelf, western India: Influence of mining and estuarine turbidity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shynu, R.; Rao, V.P.; Parthiban, G.; Balakrishnan, S.; Narvekar, T.; Kessarkar, P.M.

    Concentrations of Al, Fe, Mn and rare earth elements (REE) were measured in 122 samples of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and 70 surficial sediments from the Zuari estuary and the adjacent shelf to understand their distribution, provenance...

  12. Can turbidity caused by Corophium volutator (Pallas) activity be used to assess sediment toxicity rapidly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Andrew D; Greenwood, Naomi; Grant, Alastair

    2003-04-01

    The standard toxicity test organism, Corophium volutator, exhibits a behavioural response to contaminated sediments that causes increased turbidity of overlying water. We quantify the effects of this response to an estuarine sediment spiked with copper and hydrocarbon contaminated sediments from an oil installation in the North Sea. Turbidity measured 24 h after the start of a toxicity test shows a strong relationship with contaminant concentrations and with mortality after 10 days. Turbidity measurements can therefore give a rapid indication of sediment toxicity, permitting a reduction in storage time of sediments to be used in dilution series and toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) tests, reducing the likelihood of contaminants degrading prior to testing.

  13. Marine and estuarine porewater toxicity testing -- species and end point comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Robertson, L. [NBS, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). NFCR Field Research Station

    1994-12-31

    As part of their continuing development and evaluation of the porewater toxicity test approach for assessing the quality of marine and estuarine sediments, a variety of studies involving species and endpoint comparisons as well as validation studies have recently been conducted. The results from numerous extensive sediment quality assessment surveys have demonstrated that porewater toxicity tests are considerably more sensitive than the standard solid-phase tests and invariably exhibit a higher degree of concordance with sediment quality assessment guidelines than the standard tests. Species that have been evaluated for use in testing marine and estuarine pore water include a life-cycle test with the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus, survival and hatching success with embryo-larval stages of red drum Sciaaenops ocellatus, survival of nauplii stages of the harpacticoid copepod Longipedia sp., and three different assays (fertilization, embryological development, and cytogenetic) with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata. The different species and end points have been compared using sediment pore water from a variety of contaminated sites. Although the results of tests with the different species and end points were often comparable, in general, the sea urchin embryological development assay appears to be the most sensitive porewater test evaluated thus far in their laboratory.

  14. Assessing and modeling sediment mobility in estuarine and coastal settings due to extreme climate events from natural short-lived isotope distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaleb, Bassam; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Ruiz Fernandez, Ana-Carolina; Sanchez Cabeza, Joan-Albert

    2016-04-01

    Climatic events (e.g. floods, storminess) and management activities (e.g. dredging) may result in the burial or removal and re-suspension of sediments in estuaries and coastal areas. When such sediments are contaminated, such processes may either help restoring better chemical environments or lead to their long-term contamination. Geochemical signatures in surface sediments may help identifying such sedimentological events. However, short-lived isotope data are generally required to set time-constraints on their occurrence. Whereas 210Pb and radioactive fallout isotope contents can help setting time constraints at ~50 to ~100 yr-time scales, natural disequilibria in the 232Th-228Ra-228Th sequence do provide information on processes which occurred within the last 30 yrs, as illustrated in the present study. Box-cored sediments from the Saguenay Fjord and lower estuary of the St. Lawrence (Canada) as well as from estuaries and lagoons from the Sinaloa Coast (Mexico) are used to document the behavior of these isotopes either under relatively steady conditions (St. Lawrence estuary) or under high-frequency extreme climate events (storms and floods; Saguenay Fjord, Coastal Sinaloa). 228Th/232Th activity ratios were determined by chemical extraction of Th and alpha counting of unspiked samples, rapidly after sampling (228Th/232Th). The activity of the intermediate isotope 228Ra was then estimated based on replicate measurements on aliquot samples made a few years later. Under steady conditions, core-top sediment shows an excess in 228Th vs 232Th (AR ~ 1.6), whereas the intermediate 228Ra depicts a deficit vs its parent 232Th (AR ~0.6). Downcore, radioactive decay carries rapidly 228Th-activities to those of the parent 228Ra within about 10 yrs (i.e., ~ 5 half-lives of 228Th), then both move during the next ~20 yrs (~ i.e., ~ 5 half-lives of 228Ra, when added to the 10 yrs of 228Th-excess) towards secular equilibrium with the parent long-lived 232Th. A few algorithms

  15. Impact of terrestrial mining and intensive agriculture in pollution of estuarine surface sediments: Spatial distribution of trace metals in the Gulf of Urabá, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo Toro, Pedro Pablo; Vásquez Bedoya, Luis Fernando; Correa, Iván Darío; Bernal Franco, Gladys Rocío; Alcántara-Carrió, Javier; Palacio Baena, Jaime Alberto

    2016-10-15

    The Gulf of Urabá (northwestern Colombia) is a geostrategic region, rich in biodiversity and natural resources. Its economy is mainly based on agribusinesses and mining activities. In this research is determined the impact of these activities in bottom surface sediments of the estuary. Thus, grain size, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, carbonates, Ag, Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations from 17 surface sediment samples were obtained and enrichment factors (EF) as well as geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) were calculated to determine the contamination level in the gulf. EF and Igeo values revealed that the estuary is extremely contaminated with Ag and moderately contaminated with Zn. Therefore, the observed enrichment of Ag may be explained as a residue of the extraction of gold and platinum-group metals and the enrichment with Zn associated mainly to pesticides used in banana plantations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation through column leaching tests of metal release from contaminated estuarine sediment subject to CO₂ leakages from Carbon Capture and Storage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, M Cruz; Galan, Berta; Coz, Alberto; Vandecasteele, Carlo; Viguri, Javier R

    2012-12-01

    The pH change and the release of organic matter and metals from sediment, due to the potential CO(2) acidified seawater leakages from a CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) site are presented. Column leaching test is used to simulate a scenario where a flow of acidified seawater is in contact with recent contaminated sediment. The behavior of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and metals As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, with liquid to solid (L/S) ratio and pH is analyzed. A stepwise strategy using empirical expressions and a geochemical model was conducted to fit experimental release concentrations. Despite the neutralization capacity of the seawater-carbonate rich sediment system, important acidification and releases are expected at local scale at lower pH. The obtained results would be relevant as a line of evidence input of CCS risk assessment, in an International context where strategies to mitigate the climate change would be applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The contribution of Mytilus sp. in radionuclide transfer between water column and sediments in the estuarine and delta systems of the Rhone river

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontier, G.; Sacher, M. (IPSN-SERM, La Seyne sur mer (France). Service d' Etudes et de Recherche sur l' Environnement); Grenz, C. (Station Marine d' Endoume, Marseille (France). Centre d' Oceanologie de Marseille); Calmet, D. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1992-06-01

    The fate of three radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 106}Ru) has been studied in the spreading area of the Rhone river and the nearby Gulf of Fos. The role of filter-feeders, such as Mytilus sp., in this fate was investigated by periodically sampling the water column, molluscs and underlying sediments during 1986 and 1987. Results show that radionuclides may be a valuable tracer for Rhone river effluents entering the coastal area either in sediments or in the flesh of filter feeders. For example, tritium levels in the organic matter of superficial sediment decreases from the river mouth (3113 Bq 1{sup -13}H of combustion water) to more offshore areas (219 Bq 1{sup -13}H). This phenomenon is related to the settling characteristics of suspended matter in such areas. In areas with high biological activity, the role of filter feeders seems to dominate the transfer of radionuclides from the water column to the bottom, due to concentration of these elements in bio-deposits. Deposition rates ranged from 13-50 Bq m{sup -2}d{sup -1137}Cs for September and May respectively. This transfer undergoes temporal fluctuations correlated with seasonal variations of the main hydrobiological parameters. (Author).

  18. Depositional record of trace metals and degree of contamination in core sediments from the Mandovi estuarine mangrove ecosystem, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Vethamony, P.; ManiMurali, R.; Fernandes, B.

    a hand-operated corer on 8 January 2013 (Figure 1). Sampling locations were identified using a hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS). Soon after collection, the cores were sectioned into 2.5 cm intervals using a plastic knife from the surface.... The sub-samples were sealed in clean plastic bags, labelled and stored in an icebox for further laboratory analyses. 15 g of sediment samples were treated overnight by adding 20 ml of 10% Na-Hexa metaphosphate solution. The sand contents were...

  19. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Primary Sedimentation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles County Community Coll., La Plata, MD.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the primary sedimentation process of wastewater treatment plants. The primary sedimentation process involves removing settleable and suspended solids, in part, from wastewater by gravitational forces, and scum and other floatable solids from wastewater by mechanical means. Step-by-step…

  20. Temporal changes of accretion rates on an estuarine salt marsh during the late Holocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, A. S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2007-01-01

    The temporal variability of estuarine sedimentation has been investigated in the northernmost part of theWadden Sea (Denmark), using an estuarine sedimentary sequence at Ho Havn. The sedimentary sequence appears to have been deposited within the last ~2000 yr based on detailed luminescence dating...

  1. Needs Assessment for the Use of NASA Remote Sensing Data in the Development and Implementation of Estuarine and Coastal Water Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Bruce; Underwood, Lauren; Ellis, Chris; Lehrter, John; Hagy, Jim; Schaeffer, Blake

    2010-01-01

    The goals of the project are to provide information from satellite remote sensing to support numeric nutrient criteria development and to determine data processing methods and data quality requirements to support nutrient criteria development and implementation. The approach is to identify water quality indicators that are used by decision makers to assess water quality and that are related to optical properties of the water; to develop remotely sensed data products based on algorithms relating remote sensing imagery to field-based observations of indicator values; to develop methods to assess estuarine water quality, including trends, spatial and temporal variability, and seasonality; and to develop tools to assist in the development and implementation of estuarine and coastal nutrient criteria. Additional slides present process, criteria development, typical data sources and analyses for criteria process, the power of remote sensing data for the process, examples from Pensacola Bay, spatial and temporal variability, pixel matchups, remote sensing validation, remote sensing in coastal waters, requirements for remotely sensed data products, and needs assessment. An additional presentation examines group engagement and information collection. Topics include needs assessment purpose and objectives, understanding water quality decision making, determining information requirements, and next steps.

  2. Studies on sup(226) Ra and sup(210) Pb activities and the concentration factors of sup(226) Ra in the surface organic layers of the estuarine sediments of Mindola and Purna rivers in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joshi, L.U.; Zingde, M.D.; Desai, B.N.

    consumed by humans The sampling techniques, experimental procedures and the distribution of the isotopes of sup(226) Ra and sup(210) Pb in the estuarine regions and the concentration factors of sup(226) Ra in the region are detailed....

  3. Estuarine Food for Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    M�ller-Solger, A. B.; M�ller-Navarra, D. B.

    2002-12-01

    Recent research in animal and human nutrition has shown the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) such as the n-3 LC-PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These LC-PUFA are needed for healthy development and functioning of the nervous and vascular systems. De novo synthesis or elongation to LC-PUFA in animals is inefficient at best; thus sufficient amounts of these PUFA must be supplied by food sources. Algae, especially diatoms, dinoflagellates, and cryptophytes, are the quantitatively most important producers of EPA and DHA. These types of algae often dominate estuarine producer communities. The upper San Francisco Estuary is no exception, and we found its LC-PUFA-rich phytoplankton biomass, but not the quantitatively prevalent terrestrial plant detritus, to be highly predictive of zooplankton (Daphnia) growth. In contrast, in freshwater lakes dominated by relatively LC-PUFA-poor phytoplankton, EPA, not total phytoplankton biomass, best predicted Daphnia growth. The commonly high abundance of LC-PUFA-rich algae in estuaries may help explain the high trophic efficiencies in these systems and resulting high consumer production. Moreover, LC-PUFA-rich estuarine food resources may also provide essential nutrition and associated health and evolutionary benefits to land-dwelling consumers of such foods, including humans. Ensuring LC-PUFA-rich, uncontaminated estuarine production is thus an important goal for estuarine restoration and a convincing argument for estuarine conservation.

  4. Evaluation of Erosion Potential of Estuarine Sediments in NY/NJ Harbor (Impact of In-Situ Stabilization on the Remediation of Soft Sediments - A preamble to Erosion Testing and Evaluation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of the project are to perform a review of existing in-situ techniques of sediment erosion potential evaluation in contaminated "superfund" sites in the United States and those from Europe and Japan and the applicability of soft ...

  5. Reversing tidal flow and estuarine morphodynamics in the Metronome laboratory flume

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinhans, M. G.; Leuven, J.R.F.W.; L. Braat; Vegt, M.; van Maarseveen, M.C.G.; Markies, H.; Roosendaal, C.; Eijk, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective is to test a novel experimental principle for creating reversing tidal flows of sufficient strength to cause estuarine morphodynamics. The study of estuarine morphodynamics has hitherto been limited to field observation and numerical modelling, whilst fluvial morphodynamics have additionally been studied by scale experiments with the same sediment mobility as the prototype, here defined by the Shields number. The most important reason is the difficulty of downscaling sediment si...

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions from estuarine intertidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Markusse, R.M.; Vlug, T.; Nat, F.J.W.A. van der

    1995-01-01

    From September 1990 through December 1991 nitrous oxide flux measurements were made at 9 intertidal mud flat sites in the Scheldt Estuary. Nitrous oxide release rates were highly variable both between sites and over time at any one site. Annual nitrous oxide fluxes vary from about 10 mmol N m-2 at

  7. Standard operating procedures for collection of soil and sediment samples for the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shawn C.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Jones, Daniel K.; Benzel, William M.; Griffin, Dale W.; Loftin, Keith A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Cohl, Jonathan A.

    2015-12-17

    An understanding of the effects on human and ecological health brought by major coastal storms or flooding events is typically limited because of a lack of regionally consistent baseline and trends data in locations proximal to potential contaminant sources and mitigation activities, sensitive ecosystems, and recreational facilities where exposures are probable. In an attempt to close this gap, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has implemented the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy pilot study to collect regional sediment-quality data prior to and in response to future coastal storms. The standard operating procedure (SOP) detailed in this document serves as the sample-collection protocol for the SCoRR strategy by providing step-by-step instructions for site preparation, sample collection and processing, and shipping of soil and surficial sediment (for example, bed sediment, marsh sediment, or beach material). The objectives of the SCoRR strategy pilot study are (1) to create a baseline of soil-, sand-, marsh sediment-, and bed-sediment-quality data from sites located in the coastal counties from Maine to Virginia based on their potential risk of being contaminated in the event of a major coastal storm or flooding (defined as Resiliency mode); and (2) respond to major coastal storms and flooding by reoccupying select baseline sites and sampling within days of the event (defined as Response mode). For both modes, samples are collected in a consistent manner to minimize bias and maximize quality control by ensuring that all sampling personnel across the region collect, document, and process soil and sediment samples following the procedures outlined in this SOP. Samples are analyzed using four USGS-developed screening methods—inorganic geochemistry, organic geochemistry, pathogens, and biological assays—which are also outlined in this SOP. Because the SCoRR strategy employs a multi-metric approach for sample analyses, this

  8. Variabilidade espacial e sazonal da concentração de elementos-traço em sedimentos do sistema estuarino de Santos-Cubatão (SP Spatial and seasonal variability of trace-element concentrations in sediments from the Santos-Cubatão estuarine system, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanilson Luiz-Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-element analyses of sediment samples from the Santos-Cubatão Estuarine System were carried out to investigate the spatial and seasonal variability of trace-element concentrations. The study area contains a rich mangrove ecosystem that is a habitat for tens of thousands of resident and migratory birds, some of them endangered globally. Enrichments of metals in fine-grained surface sediments are, in decreasing order, Hg, Mn, La, Ca, Sr, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ba, Cu, Cr, Fe, Nb, Y, Ni and Ga, relative to pre-industrial background levels. The maximum enrichment ranged from 49 (Hg to 3.1 (Ga. Mercury concentrations were greater in the Cubatão river than in other sites, while the other elements showed greater concentrations in the Morrão river. Concentrations of Mn were significantly greater in winter and autumn than in summer and spring. However, other elements (e.g. Cd and Pb showed the opposite, with greater concentrations in summer and spring. This study suggests that seasonal changes in physical and chemical conditions may affect the degree of sediment enrichment and therefore make the assessment of contamination difficult. Consequently, these processes need to be considered when assessing water quality and the potential contamination of biota.

  9. Spatial and seasonal variability of trace-element concentrations in sediments from the Santos-Cubatao estuarine system, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Variabilidade espacial e sazonal da concentracao de elementos-traco em sedimentos do sistema estuarino de Santos-Cubatao (SP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luiz-Silva, Wanilson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: wanilson@ige.unicamp.br; Matos, Rosa Helena Ribeiro; Kristosch, Giane Chaves [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia; Machado, Wilson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geoquimica

    2006-03-15

    Multi-element analyses of sediment samples from the Santos-Cubatao Estuarine System were carried out to investigate the spatial and seasonal variability of trace-element concentrations. The study area contains a rich mangrove ecosystem that is a habitat for tens of thousands of resident and migratory bi some of them endangered globally. Enrichments of metals in fine-grained surface sediments are, in decreasing order, Hg, Mn, La, Ca, Sr, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ba, Cu, Cr, Fe, Nb, Y, Ni and Ga, relative to pre-industrial background levels. The maximum enrichment ranged from 49 (Hg) to 3.1 (Ga). Mercury concentrations were greater in the Cubatao river than in other sites, while the other elements showed greater concentrations in the Morrao river. Concentrations of Mn were significantly greater in winter and autumn than in summer and spring. However, other elements (e.g. Cd and Pb) showed the opposite, with greater concentrations in summer and spring. This study suggests that seasonal changes in physical and chemical conditions may affect the degree of sediment enrichment and therefore make the assessment of contamination difficult. Consequently, these processes need to be considered when assessing water quality and the potential contamination of biota.(author)

  10. Standardization of a chronic sediment toxicity test with Chironomus riparius -- An EU collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.; Grootelaar, L.; Guchte, C. van de [WRc Medmenham, Marlow (United Kingdom)]|[RIZA, Lelystad (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Because of the need for sensitive measures of low level contaminants in European sediments, a chronic sediment toxicity test method, using Chironomus riparius has been developed as part of a collaborative program for the European Commission. The protocol is a partial life cycle test exposing the animals from egg stage to pre-emergence in sediment-water systems. In 1995 the protocol was ring tested in several laboratories in Europe, the US and Canada using the moth-proofer permethrin as a model substance. This was spiked into a natural sediment using a spiking protocol also developed in this program. Results of the ring test and details of the protocols will be presented.

  11. Maximum standard metabolic rate corresponds with the salinity of maximum growth in hatchlings of the estuarine northern diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin): Implications for habitat conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher L.

    2018-01-01

    I evaluated standard metabolic rates (SMR) of hatchling northern diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) across a range of salinities (salinity = 1.5, 4, 8, 12, and 16 psu) that they may encounter in brackish habitats such as those in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. Consumption of O2 and production of CO2 by resting, unfed animals served as estimates of SMR. A peak in SMR occurred at 8 psu which corresponds closely with the salinity at which hatchling growth was previously shown to be maximized (salinity ∼ 9 psu). It appears that SMR is influenced by growth, perhaps reflecting investments in catabolic pathways that fuel anabolism. This ecophysiological information can inform environmental conservation and management activities by identifying portions of the estuary that are bioenergetically optimal for growth of hatchling terrapins. I suggest that conservation and restoration efforts to protect terrapin populations in oligo-to mesohaline habitats should prioritize protection or creation of habitats in regions where average salinity is near 8 psu and energetic investments in growth appear to be maximized.

  12. Monitoring nekton as a bioindicator in shallow estuarine habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposa, Kenneth B; Roman, Charles T; Heltshe, James F

    2003-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of estuarine nekton has many practical and ecological benefits but efforts are hampered by a lack of standardized sampling procedures. This study provides a rationale for monitoring nekton in shallow (nekton assemblages that each habitat supports. Extensive sampling with quantitative enclosure traps that estimate nekton density is suggested. These gears have a high capture efficiency in most habitats and are small enough (e.g., 1 m2) to permit sampling in specific microhabitats. Other aspects of nekton monitoring are discussed, including spatial and temporal sampling considerations, station selection, sample size estimation, and data collection and analysis. Developing and initiating long-term nekton monitoring programs will help evaluate natural and human-induced changes in estuarine nekton over time and advance our understanding of the interactions between nekton and the dynamic estuarine environment.

  13. Trace elements in near-shore sediments along the east and west coasts of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Alagarsamy, R.; Kaisary, S.; Mesquita, A.

    -shore sediments and the riverine sediments implies that the colloids of Fe and Mn hydroxides are formed in the estuarine environment, transported through the mouth regions without any modification along with their adsorbed elements and are deposited in the near...

  14. Gas-charged sediments in shallow waters off Redi along the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subbaraju, L.V.; Wagle, B.G.

    -estuarine conditions. These gas-charged sediments pose a potintial hazard for the offshore engineering constructions. Hence, the detection of these sediments forms an essential part of any offshroe site investiation programmes....

  15. Studies on organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous in the sediments of Mandovi Estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nasnolkar, C.M.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    Sediment organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and hydrography of the overlying waters of the estuarine region in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India have been studied. The relationship of carbon and nutrients with sediment characteristics...

  16. Isochron of Holocene fluvial and estuarine (Qfe) sediment thickness beneath the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and Northern Cape Cod Bay (qfeiso Esri binary grid; UTM, Zone 19N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  17. Isopach of Holocene fluvial and estuarine (Qfe), nearshore marine (Qmn), and deepwater marine (Qmd) sediment thickness beneath Vineyard and western Nantucket Sounds, Massachusetts (Esri binary grid; UTM, Zone 19N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geologic, sediment texture, and physiographic zone maps characterize the sea floor of Vineyard and western Nantucket Sounds, Massachusetts. These maps were derived...

  18. Satellite estimates of wide-range suspended sediment concentrations in Changjiang (Yangtze) estuary using MERIS data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, F.; Verhoef, W.; Zhou, Y.; Salama, M.S.; Liu, X.

    2010-01-01

    The Changjiang (Yangtze) estuarine and coastal waters are characterized by suspended sediments over a wide range of concentrations from 20 to 2,500 mg l-1. Suspended sediment plays important roles in the estuarine and coastal system and environment. Previous algorithms for satellite estimates of

  19. Estuarine and coastal connectivity of an estuarine-dependent fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study used acoustic telemetry to assess the usage of multiple estuaries and coastal waters by the estuarine-dependent spotted grunter Pomadasys commersonnii. Twenty-six adult fish were tagged with acoustic transmitters in the Kariega and Bushmans estuaries, South Africa, and their movements along a 300-km ...

  20. Reductive Dechlorination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Marine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sowers, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    ... Community by Comparative Sequence Analysis of Genes Coding for 16S rRNA, Microbial Reductive Dechlorination of Aroclor 1260 in Anaerobic Slurries of Estuarine Sediments, Differential RFLP patterns of PCR...

  1. Benthic estuarine communities in Brazil: moving forward to long term studies to assess climate change impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Fraga Bernardino

    Full Text Available Abstract Estuaries are unique coastal ecosystems that sustain and provide essential ecological services for mankind. Estuarine ecosystems include a variety of habitats with their own sediment-fauna dynamics, all of them globally undergoing alteration or threatened by human activities. Mangrove forests, saltmarshes, tidal flats and other confined estuarine systems are under increasing stress due to human activities leading to habitat and species loss. Combined changes in estuarine hydromorphology and in climate pose severe threats to estuarine ecosystems on a global scale. The ReBentos network is the first integrated attempt in Brazil to monitor estuarine changes in the long term to detect and assess the effects of global warming. This paper is an initial effort of ReBentos to review current knowledge on benthic estuarine ecology in Brazil. We herein present and synthesize all published work on Brazilian estuaries that has focused on the description of benthic communities and related ecological processes. We then use current data on Brazilian estuaries and present recommendations for future studies to address climate change effects, suggesting trends for possible future research and stressing the need for long-term datasets and international partnerships.

  2. Fine sediment transport into the hyperturbid lower Ems River : The role of channel deepening and sediment-induced drag reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Maren, D.S.; Winterwerp, J.C.; Vroom, J.

    2015-01-01

    Deepening of estuarine tidal channels often leads to tidal amplification and increasing fine sediment import. Increasing fine sediment import, in turn, may lower the hydraulic drag (due to a smoother muddy bed and/or sediment-induced damping of turbulence), and therefore, further strengthen tidal

  3. History and sensitivity comparison of two standard whole-sediment toxicity tests with crustaceans: the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens microbiotest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cooman W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review first details the development of the test procedures with Hyalella azteca which historically emerged as one of the recommended test species for whole-sediment assays and its gradual standardization and endorsement by national and international organizations. The sensitivity and precision of the H. azteca test for application on chemicals and on real world sediments is discussed. The review subsequently addresses the development of the whole sediment microbiotest with the ostracod crustacean Heterocypris incongruens with larvae of this test species hatched from dormant eggs (cysts, rendering this assay stock culture/maintenance free. The application of the 6-day ostracod microbiotest on sediments in Canada and in Belgium is discussed, as well as its endorsement by the ISO subsequent to an extensive international interlaboratory ring test. The sensitivity of the amphipod and ostracod tests is compared by data from studies in which both assays were applied in parallel. A comparison of more than 1000 ostracod/amphipod data pairs of a 12-year river sediment monitoring study in Flanders/Belgium confirmed that both whole-sediment assays have a similar sensitivity and that the 6-day ostracod microbiotest is a valuable and cost-effective alternative to the 10−14 day amphipod test for evaluation of the toxic hazard of polluted sediments.

  4. Fundamentals of estuarine physical oceanography

    CERN Document Server

    Bruner de Miranda, Luiz; Kjerfve, Björn; Castro Filho, Belmiro Mendes de

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the complex system functions, variability and human interference in ecosystem between the continent and the ocean. It focuses on circulation, transport and mixing of estuarine and coastal water masses, which is ultimately related to an understanding of the hydrographic and hydrodynamic characteristics (salinity, temperature, density and circulation), mixing processes (advection and diffusion), transport timescales such as the residence time and the exposure time. In the area of physical oceanography, experiments using these water bodies as a natural laboratory and interpreting their circulation and mixing processes using theoretical and semi-theoretical knowledge are of fundamental importance. Small-scale physical models may also be used together with analytical and numerical models. The book highlights the fact that research and theory are interactive, and the results provide the fundamentals for the development of the estuarine research.

  5. Metal and trace element sediment assessment from two estuarine systems: Santos/Sao Vicente and Cananeia, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Avaliacao da concentracao de metais e outros elementos de interesse em amostras de sedimentos dos estuarios de Santos/Sao Vicente e Cananeia, estado de Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Eduardo Paulo de

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated some toxic metals such as Cd, Hg and Pb and some other major and trace elements in surface sediment samples, from two different systems under different degrees of anthropogenic actions: the estuarine system of Santos/Sao Vicente and the southern part of the Cananeia estuary, both on the Sao Paulo state coast. Sediment samples were collected in 16 stations in the Santos/Sao Vicente estuary and 13 stations in the Cananeia estuary, during summer and winter of 2005 and 2006, in both estuaries. Three analytical techniques were used: NAA, AAS and ICP OES. NAA was used for the quantification of major element concentration levels (Ca, Fe and Na), trace elements (As, Ba, Br, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Hf, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U, and Zn and rare earths elements La, Ce, Eu, Nd, Sm, Lu, Tb, Yb). ICP OES was used for determination of the concentration levels of Al, Ba, Be, Bi, B, Cd, Co, Pb, Cu, Cr, Sn, Sr, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Tl, Ti, V and Zn. AAS for Cd and Pb quantification through graphite furnace (GF AAS) and Hg through cold vapor generation (CV AAS). Methodology validation according to precision and accuracy was performed by reference material analyses for the three analytical techniques used. Detection and quantification limits were calculated for each element evaluated. Seasonal variations (summer and winter), spatial and temporal (2005 e 2006) variations of metals and trace elements were also evaluated. In the Santos estuary, in general, metal and trace element concentrations , organic matter content and % of pelitic fraction found in the Santos channel (area 1) were higher than those of the Santos Bay (area 2) and Sao Vicente channel (area 3). Area 1 suffers high impact from industrial activities from the Cubatao region and Santos port. The sediments from station 14 (area 3, Sao Vicente channel), showed the same behavior of those from area 1, suffering influence from the industrial pole and located in a mangrove area. In comparison with TEL and PEL

  6. Shifts in the community structure and activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria along an estuarine salinity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanling; Jiang, Xiaofen; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Lin, Xianbiao; Gao, Juan; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a major microbial pathway for nitrogen (N) removal in estuarine and coastal environments. However, understanding of anammox bacterial dynamics and associations with anammox activity remains scarce along estuarine salinity gradient. In this study, the diversity, abundance, and activity of anammox bacteria, and their potential contributions to total N2 production in the sediments along the salinity gradient (0.1-33.8) of the Yangtze estuarine and coastal zone, were studied using 16S rRNA gene clone library, quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, and isotope-tracing technique. Phylogenetic analysis showed a significant change in anammox bacterial community structure along the salinity gradient (P bacterial abundance ranged from 3.67 × 105 to 8.22 × 107 copies 16S rRNA gene g-1 and related significantly with salinity (P bacterial abundance (P Sediment organic matter was also recognized as an important factor in controlling the relative role of anammox to total N2 production in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal zone. Overall, our data demonstrated a biogeographical distribution of anammox bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity along the estuarine salinity gradient and suggested that salinity is a major environmental control on anammox process in the estuarine and coastal ecosystems.

  7. 15 CFR 921.3 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... System biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. 921.3 Section 921.3 Commerce and... biogeographic classification scheme and estuarine typologies. (a) National Estuarine Research Reserves are... classification scheme based on regional variations in the nation's coastal zone has been developed. The...

  8. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Activated Sludge - Aeration & Sedimentation Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, George J.

    This guide for developing standard operating job procedures for wastewater treatment facilities is devoted to the activated sludge aeration and sedimentation process. This process is for conversion of nonsettleable and nonfloatable materials in wastewater to settleable, floculated biological groups and separation of the settleable solids from the…

  9. Transient controls on estuarine SPM fluxes: case study in the Dee Estuary, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoudry, Laurent; Williams, Megan; Todd, David

    2017-04-01

    Estuaries are a critical interface between land and coastal ocean across which freshwater, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and consequently terrestrial carbon, nutrients and anthropogenic contaminants are exchanged. Suspended particulate matter is closely linked to estuarine turbidity; it affects water quality and estuarine ecology; and it contributes to overall estuarine sediment budgets. However, predicting the response of estuarine ecosystems to climate change and human interventions remains difficult partly due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of SPM concentrations and fluxes across time scales from intratidal to seasonal and interannual variability. We investigate the dynamics of suspended sediment and suspended particulate matter in a hypertidal estuary with a maximum tidal range in excess of 10 m and tidal currents reaching over 1 m/s: the Dee Estuary. This estuary is located in northwest England and outflows in Liverpool Bay, itself in the eastern Irish Sea. The Dee Estuary is a funnel-shaped, coastal plain estuary, which is about 30 km long with a maximum width of 8.5 km at the mouth, and consists of mixed sediments. We focus on field observations, collected during several campaigns in the channels of the Dee Estuary from 2004 to 2009 using acoustic and optical instrumentation, which provide intratidal measurements of flow velocity and suspended sediment, and thus sediment fluxes, over approximately a month. Measurements in February-March 2008 highlight three distinct hydrodynamic regimes: a current dominant regime at neap tides (14-21 February); a combined wave-current regime at spring tides (21-29 February); and a wave dominant regime at neap tide (1-4 March). While analysis of tidal distortion and dominance predicts weak ebb dominant channels, the observations yield flood dominant sediment transport. The net sediment flux exhibits a two-layer structure - import near the bed, export near the surface - that is consistent with the residual

  10. A potential new estuarine amphipod test species from Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintino, V.M.S.; Re, A. [Univ. de Aveiro (Portugal). Dept. Biologia

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity testing is of recognized value, however tests do not exist for all ecoregions. In particular, there is a paucity of test species for estuarine conditions. To date such testing has been conducted using either Microtox or the Pacific amphipod, Eohaustorius estuarius. There are no other test species for which developed tests exist, which can tolerate the full range of estuarine salinities (0 to 35 ppt). The authors report testing with the Atlantic amphipod, Corophium multisetosum, which can survive well from 0 to 35 ppt. At the time of writing this abstract, initial testing has indicated appropriate dose-response relationships with the reference toxicant cadmium chloride, and an acute 10-day protocol has been successfully conducted at a range of test temperatures (15--22 C) and with salinities of 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6, 3.2, 6.5, 12.5, 25.0, 50.0 and 100.0%. Work presently underway and expected to be reported at the World Congress includes finalization of methods development for acute (10-d static) testing, namely the sensitivity to a range of fines content in the sediment, and initiation of chronic (growth, reproduction success) testing.

  11. Heavy metal concentration in mangrove surface sediments from the north-west coast of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cadena, J C; Andrade, S; Silva-Coello, C L; De la Iglesia, R

    2014-05-15

    Mangrove ecosystems are coastal estuarine systems confined to the tropical and subtropical regions. The Estero Salado mangrove located in Guayaquil, Ecuador, has suffered constant disturbances during the past 20 years, due to industrial wastewater release. However, there are no published data for heavy metals present in its sediments and the relationship with anthropogenic disturbance. In the present study, metal concentrations were evaluated in surface sediment samples of the mangrove, showing that B, Cd, Cu, Pb, Se, V, and Zn levels exceeded those declared in international environmental quality standards. Moreover, several metals (Pb, Sn, Cd, Ag, Mo, Zn and Ni) could be linked to the industrial wastewater present in the studied area. In addition, heavy metal levels detected in this mangrove are higher than previous reports on mangrove sediments worldwide, indicating that this mangrove ecosystem is one of the most disrupted on earth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics and landcover of estuarine boundaries: implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated whether the current lateral boundary for estuaries in South Africa, i.e. the estuarine functional zone (EFZ), includes all estuarine habitats. The EFZ covers 173 930 ha in 304 estuaries/outlets nationally. Field surveys and analysis of available aerial images showed that 82 (12 956.70 ha) of these ...

  13. Intertidal to subtidal distribution of benthic macrofauna in an estuarine beach of Babitonga Bay, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Pagliosa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the spatial variation of a macrofaunal community along the intertidalsubtidal gradient of an estuarine beach located at the mouth of Babitonga Bay, in Southern Brazil. The fauna and sediment were sampled at 0, 5, 10, and 20 m depths in three transects. Differences in benthic assemblages among the depths were found to be significant and related to the major local processes of sediment changes. The analysis of taxa composition showed an impoverished community subject to wave action and erosionaccretion dynamics at landward stations (0 and 5 m depths. Seaward macrofauna (10 and 20 m depths inhabiting sediments with higher organic content and poorly-sorted sands were more diverse and numerically dominated by ophiuroids and by cirratulid (Tharyx sp. and maldanid (Clymenella brasiliensis polychaetes. A breakdown in the zonation patterns of environment and community was detected where sediments produced by a creek outlet enabled increasing stability and higher densities of the soft bottom anthozoa Edwardsia sp. and the polychaete Lumbrineris atlantica. Additionally, the sediments with an excessive amount of fine particles were densely colonized (mean of 22,400 individuals.m-2 by C. brasiliensis. The local sediment characteristics were related to maldanid sediment-reworking. The macrofaunal species compositions along the sandy beaches at the mouths of the southern Brazilian estuarine systems were compared.

  14. Validation of a new standardized test method for the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: Determining the chronic effects of silver in sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lisa N; Novak, Lesley; Rendas, Martina; Antunes, Paula M C; Scroggins, Rick P

    2016-10-01

    Environment Canada has developed a new 42-d sediment toxicity test method that includes a reproduction test endpoint with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Because of concerns that existing standard methodologies, whereby adults are transferred to a water-only exposure before release of their first brood at day 28, will lead to internal contaminant depuration and loss of sensitivity, the Environment Canada methodology conducts the entire exposure in sediment. To demonstrate applicability of the method for assessing the toxicity of chemical-spiked sediment, H. azteca were exposed for 42 d to sediment amended with silver nitrate (AgNO3 ). Mortality was significantly higher at the highest sediment concentration of Ag (2088 mg/kg dry wt); however, there was no significant reduction in biomass or reproduction as a result of Ag exposure despite significant bioaccumulation. Based on Ag measurements and speciation modeling, the principle route of Ag exposure was likely through the ingestion of complexed colloidal or particulate Ag. The techniques used to recover young amphipods from sediment were critical, and although this effort can be labor intensive (20-45 min/replicate), the technicians demonstrated 91% recovery in blind trials. For the first time, Environment Canada will require laboratories to report their recovery proficiency for the 42-d test-without this information, data will not be accepted. Overall, the reproduction test will be more applicable when only a few chemical concentrations need to be evaluated in laboratory-amended sediments or for field-collected contaminated site assessments (i.e., contaminated site vs reference site comparisons). Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2430-2438. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  15. SedCT: MATLAB™ tools for standardized and quantitative processing of sediment core computed tomography (CT) data collected using a medical CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, B. T.; Stoner, J. S.; Wiest, J.

    2017-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of sediment cores allows for high-resolution images, three-dimensional volumes, and down core profiles. These quantitative data are generated through the attenuation of X-rays, which are sensitive to sediment density and atomic number, and are stored in pixels as relative gray scale values or Hounsfield units (HU). We present a suite of MATLAB™ tools specifically designed for routine sediment core analysis as a means to standardize and better quantify the products of CT data collected on medical CT scanners. SedCT uses a graphical interface to process Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) files, stitch overlapping scanned intervals, and create down core HU profiles in a manner robust to normal coring imperfections. Utilizing a random sampling technique, SedCT reduces data size and allows for quick processing on typical laptop computers. SedCTimage uses a graphical interface to create quality tiff files of CT slices that are scaled to a user-defined HU range, preserving the quantitative nature of CT images and easily allowing for comparison between sediment cores with different HU means and variance. These tools are presented along with examples from lacustrine and marine sediment cores to highlight the robustness and quantitative nature of this method.

  16. Distribution and persistence of the anti sea-lice drug teflubenzuron in wild fauna and sediments around a salmon farm, following a standard treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Ole B; Lunestad, Bjørn T; Hannisdal, Rita; Bannister, Raymond; Olsen, Siri; Tjensvoll, Tore; Farestveit, Eva; Ervik, Arne

    2015-03-01

    The salmon louse (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) is a challenge in the farming of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). To treat an infestation, different insecticides are used like the orally administered chitin synthetase inhibitor teflubenzuron. The concentrations and distribution of teflubenzuron were measured in water, organic particles, marine sediment and biota caught in the vicinity of a fish farm following a standard medication. Low concentrations were found in water samples whereas the organic waste from the farm, collected by sediment traps had concentrations higher than the medicated feed. Most of the organic waste was distributed to the bottom close to the farm but organic particles containing teflubenzuron were collected 1100 m from the farm. The sediment under the farm consisted of 5 to 10% organic material and therefore the concentration of teflubenzuron was much lower than in the organic waste. Teflubenzuron was persistent in the sediment with a stipulated halflife of 170 days. Sediment consuming polychaetes had high but decreasing concentrations of teflubenzuron throughout the experimental period, reflecting the decrease of teflubenzuron in the sediment. During medication most wild fauna contained teflubenzuron residues and where polychaetes and saith had highest concentrations. Eight months later only polychaetes and some crustaceans contained drug residues. What dosages that induce mortality in various crustaceans following short or long-term exposure is not known but the results indicate that the concentrations in defined individuals of king crab, shrimp, squat lobster and Norway lobster were high enough shortly after medication to induce mortality if moulting was imminent. Considering food safety, saith and the brown meat of crustaceans contained at first sampling concentrations of teflubenzuron higher than the MRL-value set for Atlantic salmon. The concentrations were, however, moderate and the amount of saith fillet or brown meat of crustaceans to be

  17. Biogenic silica in tidal freshwater marsh sediments and vegetation (Schelde estuary, Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyf, E.; van Damme, S.; Gribsholt, B.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meire, P.

    2005-01-01

    To date, estuarine ecosystem research has mostly neglected silica cycling in freshwater intertidal marshes. However, tidal marshes can store large amounts of biogenic silica (BSi) in vegetation and sediment. BSi content of the typical freshwater marsh plants Phragmites australis, Impatiens

  18. Residual fluxes of water, salt and suspended sediment in the Beypore Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, N.; Revichandran, C.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Josanto, V.

    The monthly trends of the residual fluxes of salt and water and the transportation of suspended sediments in the Beypore estuarine system, Kerala, India were examined. At the river mouth the water flux was directed seaward during the postmonsoon...

  19. The use of Monte Carlo analysis for exposure assessment of an estuarine food web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Shear, N.M.; Harrington, N.W.; Henning, M.H. [McLaren/Hart Environmental Engineering Corp., Portland, ME (United States). ChemRisk Div.

    1995-12-31

    Despite apparent agreement within the scientific community that probabilistic methods of analysis offer substantially more informative exposure predictions than those offered by the traditional point estimate approach, few risk assessments conducted or approved by state and federal regulatory agencies have used probabilistic methods. Among the likely deterrents to application of probabilistic methods to ecological risk assessment is the absence of ``standard`` data distributions that are considered applicable to most conditions for a given ecological receptor. Indeed, point estimates of ecological exposure factor values for a limited number of wildlife receptors have only recently been published. The Monte Carlo method of probabilistic modeling has received increasing support as a promising technique for characterizing uncertainty and variation in estimates of exposure to environmental contaminants. An evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of estuarine organisms was conducted in order to identify those variables that most strongly influence uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values for polychaetes (Nereis sp.), mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in east coast estuaries were identified. Understanding the variation in such factors, which include feeding rate, growth rate, feeding range, excretion rate, respiration rate, body weight, lipid content, food assimilation efficiency, and chemical assimilation efficiency, is critical to the understanding the mechanisms that control the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in aquatic organisms, and to the ability to estimate bioaccumulation from chemical exposures in the aquatic environment.

  20. Meta-analysis of estuarine nurseries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Densities of juvenile fishery species and other animals (all generally 100 mm total length) were summarized for shallow estuarine areas along coastal Texas and...

  1. Microbial degradation of pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benotti, Mark J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Brownawell, Bruce J. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States)], E-mail: bruce.brownawell@sunysb.edu

    2009-03-15

    Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 pharmaceuticals in estuarine and coastal surface water samples. Antipyrine, carbamazepine, cotinine, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim were the most refractory (half-lives, t{sub 1/2} = 35 to >100 days), making them excellent candidates for wastewater tracers. Nicotine, acetaminophen, and fluoxetine were labile across all treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 0.68-11 days). Caffeine, diltiazem, and nifedipine were also and relatively labile in all but one of the treatments (t{sub 1/2} = 3.5-13 days). Microbial degradation of caffeine was further confirmed by production {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The fastest decay of non-refractory compounds was always observed in more sewage-affected Jamaica Bay waters. Degradation rates for the majority of these pharmaceuticals are much slower than reported rates for small biomolecules, such as glucose and amino acids. Batch sorption experiments indicate that removal of these soluble pharmaceuticals from the water column to sediments is a relatively insignificant removal process in these receiving waters. - Microbial degradation rates were measured for 19 structurally variable pharmaceuticals in wastewater-impacted estuarine and coastal seawater.

  2. Abundance and Distribution of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Coastal and Estuarine Sediments—a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassard, Francis; Gwyther, Ceri L.; Farkas, Kata; Andrews, Anthony; Jones, Vera; Cox, Brian; Brett, Howard; Jones, Davey L.; McDonald, James E.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2016-01-01

    The long term survival of fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) and human pathogenic microorganisms in sediments is important from a water quality, human health and ecological perspective. Typically, both bacteria and viruses strongly associate with particulate matter present in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. This association tends to be stronger in finer textured sediments and is strongly influenced by the type and quantity of clay minerals and organic matter present. Binding to particle surfaces promotes the persistence of bacteria in the environment by offering physical and chemical protection from biotic and abiotic stresses. How bacterial and viral viability and pathogenicity is influenced by surface attachment requires further study. Typically, long-term association with surfaces including sediments induces bacteria to enter a viable-but-non-culturable (VBNC) state. Inherent methodological challenges of quantifying VBNC bacteria may lead to the frequent under-reporting of their abundance in sediments. The implications of this in a quantitative risk assessment context remain unclear. Similarly, sediments can harbor significant amounts of enteric viruses, however, the factors regulating their persistence remains poorly understood. Quantification of viruses in sediment remains problematic due to our poor ability to recover intact viral particles from sediment surfaces (typically bacteria and viruses into the water column during sediment resuspension also represents a risk to water quality. In conclusion, our poor process level understanding of viral/bacterial-sediment interactions combined with methodological challenges is limiting the accurate source apportionment and quantitative microbial risk assessment for pathogenic organisms associated with sediments in aquatic environments. PMID:27847499

  3. Field evaluation of the error arising from inadequate time averaging in the standard use of depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Wright, Scott A.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Several common methods for measuring suspended-sediment concentration in rivers in the United States use depth-integrating samplers to collect a velocity-weighted suspended-sediment sample in a subsample of a river cross section. Because depth-integrating samplers are always moving through the water column as they collect a sample, and can collect only a limited volume of water and suspended sediment, they collect only minimally time-averaged data. Four sources of error exist in the field use of these samplers: (1) bed contamination, (2) pressure-driven inrush, (3) inadequate sampling of the cross-stream spatial structure in suspended-sediment concentration, and (4) inadequate time averaging. The first two of these errors arise from misuse of suspended-sediment samplers, and the third has been the subject of previous study using data collected in the sand-bedded Middle Loup River in Nebraska. Of these four sources of error, the least understood source of error arises from the fact that depth-integrating samplers collect only minimally time-averaged data. To evaluate this fourth source of error, we collected suspended-sediment data between 1995 and 2007 at four sites on the Colorado River in Utah and Arizona, using a P-61 suspended-sediment sampler deployed in both point- and one-way depth-integrating modes, and D-96-A1 and D-77 bag-type depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers. These data indicate that the minimal duration of time averaging during standard field operation of depth-integrating samplers leads to an error that is comparable in magnitude to that arising from inadequate sampling of the cross-stream spatial structure in suspended-sediment concentration. This random error arising from inadequate time averaging is positively correlated with grain size and does not largely depend on flow conditions or, for a given size class of suspended sediment, on elevation above the bed. Averaging over time scales >1 minute is the likely minimum duration required

  4. Including Flocculation in a Numerical Sediment Transport Model for a Partially-Mixed Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpley, D.; Harris, C. K.; Friedrichs, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Particle settling velocity impacts the transport of suspended sediment to the first order but fine-grained material like muds tend to form loosely bound aggregates (flocs) whose settling velocity can vary widely. Properties of flocculated sediment such as settling velocity and particle density are difficult to predict because they change in response to several factors including salinity, suspended sediment concentration, turbulent mixing, and organic content. Knowledge of the mechanisms governing flocculation of cohesive sediment is rapidly expanding; especially in response to recent technical advances. As the understanding of particle dynamics progresses, numerical models describing flocculation and break-up are being developed with varying degrees of complexity. While complex models capture the dynamics of the system, their computational costs may prohibit their incorporation into larger model domains. It is important to determine if the computational costs of intricate floc models are justifiable compared to simpler formulations. For this study, we implement an idealized two-dimensional model designed to represent a longitudinal section of a partially mixed estuary that neglects across-channel variation but exhibits salinity driven estuarine circulation. The idealized domain is designed to mimic the primary features of the York River, VA. Suspended load, erosion and deposition are calculated within the sediment transport routines of the COAWST modeling system. We compare different methods for prescribing settling velocity of fine-grained material. The simplest, standard model neglects flocculation dynamics while the complex treatment is a size-class-based flocculation model (FLOCMOD). Differences in tidal and daily averages of suspended load, bulk settling velocity and bed deposition are compared between the standard and FLOCMOD runs, to examine the relative impact of flocculation on sediment transport patterns. We expect FLOCMOD to have greater variability and

  5. Methanolobus taylorii sp nov, a new methylotropic, estuarine methanogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Boone, David R.

    1994-01-01

    Strain GS-16T (T = type strain) is a methylotrophic methanogen that was isolated from estuarine sediments from San Francisco Bay (4) and has been deposited in the Oregon Collection of Methanogens (Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland) as strain OCM 5ST. This strain was isolated by using dimethyl sulfide as the catabolic substrate (4), but it can also grow on methylamines (13) and methanethiol (8, 9) and grew when it was inoculated into MSHA medium (6) supplemented with 20 mM methanol as the sole catabolic substrate. Strain GS-16T cells form methane from methylmercury (12) and dimethylselenide (16), although they cannot grow on these substrates, and form traces of ethane from diethyl sulfide (15). Methanogenesis from trimethylamine is inhibited by methyl fluoride (11) and methyl bromide (14), but not by dimethyl ether (1 1).

  6. How can climate change and engineered water conveyance affect sediment dynamics in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minikowski Achete, F.; van der Wegen, M.; Roelvink, D.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration is an important estuarine health indicator. Estuarine ecosystems rely on the maintenance of habitat conditions, which are changing due to direct human impact and climate change. This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change relative to engineering

  7. Distribution and persistence of the anti sea-lice drug teflubenzuron in wild fauna and sediments around a salmon farm, following a standard treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Ole B. [Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Lunestad, Bjørn T.; Hannisdal, Rita [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, P.O. Box 2029 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Bannister, Raymond; Olsen, Siri [Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Tjensvoll, Tore [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, P.O. Box 2029 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Farestveit, Eva; Ervik, Arne [Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, N-5817 Bergen (Norway)

    2015-03-01

    The salmon louse (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) is a challenge in the farming of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). To treat an infestation, different insecticides are used like the orally administered chitin synthetase inhibitor teflubenzuron. The concentrations and distribution of teflubenzuron were measured in water, organic particles, marine sediment and biota caught in the vicinity of a fish farm following a standard medication. Low concentrations were found in water samples whereas the organic waste from the farm, collected by sediment traps had concentrations higher than the medicated feed. Most of the organic waste was distributed to the bottom close to the farm but organic particles containing teflubenzuron were collected 1100 m from the farm. The sediment under the farm consisted of 5 to 10% organic material and therefore the concentration of teflubenzuron was much lower than in the organic waste. Teflubenzuron was persistent in the sediment with a stipulated halflife of 170 days. Sediment consuming polychaetes had high but decreasing concentrations of teflubenzuron throughout the experimental period, reflecting the decrease of teflubenzuron in the sediment. During medication most wild fauna contained teflubenzuron residues and where polychaetes and saith had highest concentrations. Eight months later only polychaetes and some crustaceans contained drug residues. What dosages that induce mortality in various crustaceans following short or long-term exposure is not known but the results indicate that the concentrations in defined individuals of king crab, shrimp, squat lobster and Norway lobster were high enough shortly after medication to induce mortality if moulting was imminent. Considering food safety, saith and the brown meat of crustaceans contained at first sampling concentrations of teflubenzuron higher than the MRL-value set for Atlantic salmon. The concentrations were, however, moderate and the amount of saith fillet or brown meat of crustaceans to be

  8. Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices - 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This NERL-Cincinnati publication, “Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices - 2nd Edition” was prepared as the continuation of an initiative to gather together under a single cover a compendium of standardized laborato...

  9. Nitrous-Oxide Emissions from Estuarine Intertidal Sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Markusse, R.M.; Vlug, T.; Van der Nat, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    From September 1990 through December 1991 nitrous oxide flux measurements were made at 9 intertidal mud flat sites in the Scheldt Estuary. Nitrous oxide release rates were highly variable both between sites and over time at any one site. Annual nitrous oxide fluxes vary from about 10 mmol N m(-2) at

  10. Influence of Oceanic and Estuarine Drivers on Wetland Shoreline Change: Moving Towards a Framework for Assessment of Coastal Erosion Hazards Along Sheltered Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, N. G.; Smith, K. E. L.; Doran, K. S.; Smith, C. G.; Stockdon, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    Barrier island and estuarine habitats act as natural buffers to wave energy and reduce erosion of mainland coasts; however, estuarine wetlands are under increasing threat from shoreline destabilization and erosion due to rising sea level and storms. Currently, the USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards estimates the vulnerability of shorelines to hurricane erosion hazards by combining physical parameters of dune, beach, and shoreline morphology with storm hydrodynamic predictions. These hazard assessments are limited to ocean-side sandy beaches. However, with the increasing availability of water-penetrating lidar and vegetation filtering algorithms, as well as estuarine wave and hydrodynamic modeling, extending physical process analyses and risk assessments to estuarine and back-barrier shorelines is possible. In this study, we investigate the relationship between shoreline type, sediment supply rate, long-term erosion rates, and shoreline geophysical features. We focus on long-term changes, such as those associated with barrier island landward migration, which is dominated by the processes of storm overwash and sea-level rise. This migration means that the long-term changes in estuarine and ocean-facing shorelines can be correlated. We focus on understanding these correlations with estuarine drivers of wetland shoreline erosion and accretion, such as waves, sediment supply, and shoreline features. Quantitatively assessing the variance of estuarine shoreline behavior relative to oceanic shorelines will improve knowledge of estuarine shoreline susceptibility to storm-induced erosion, help fine-tune estimates of future forecasts of coastal change, and provide an initial framework for estimating erosion hazards along sheltered coasts.

  11. Tidal variations in the Sundarbans estuarine system, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterjee, M.; Shankar, D.; Sen, G.K.; Sanyal, P.; Sundar, D.; Michael, G.S.; Chatterjee, A.; Amol, P.; Mukherjee, D.; Suprit, K.; Mukherjee, A.; Vijith, V.; Chatterjee, S.; Basu, A.; Das, M.; Chakraborti, S.; Kalla, A.; Misra, S.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Mandal, G.; Sarkar, K.

    Situated in the eastern coastal state of West Bengal, the Sundarbans Estuarine System (SES) is India’s largest monsoonal, macro-tidal delta-front estuarine system. It comprises the southernmost part of the Indian portion of the Ganga...

  12. Rising tides, cumulative impacts and cascading changes to estuarine ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Theresa A; Hillman, Jenny R; Thrush, Simon F

    2017-08-31

    In coastal ecosystems, climate change affects multiple environmental factors, yet most predictive models are based on simple cause-and-effect relationships. Multiple stressor scenarios are difficult to predict because they can create a ripple effect through networked ecosystem functions. Estuarine ecosystem function relies on an interconnected network of physical and biological processes. Estuarine habitats play critical roles in service provision and represent global hotspots for organic matter processing, nutrient cycling and primary production. Within these systems, we predicted functional changes in the impacts of land-based stressors, mediated by changing light climate and sediment permeability. Our in-situ field experiment manipulated sea level, nutrient supply, and mud content. We used these stressors to determine how interacting environmental stressors influence ecosystem function and compared results with data collected along elevation gradients to substitute space for time. We show non-linear, multi-stressor effects deconstruct networks governing ecosystem function. Sea level rise altered nutrient processing and impacted broader estuarine services ameliorating nutrient and sediment pollution. Our experiment demonstrates how the relationships between nutrient processing and biological/physical controls degrade with environmental stress. Our results emphasise the importance of moving beyond simple physically-forced relationships to assess consequences of climate change in the context of ecosystem interactions and multiple stressors.

  13. Tungsten-molybdenum fractionation in estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerin, T. Jade; Helz, George R.; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) concentrations were measured in surface waters and sediment pore waters of Terrebonne Bay, a shallow estuary in the Mississippi River delta, to investigate the biogeochemical processes that fractionate these Group 6 elements relative to one another during transit from weathering to sedimentary environments. Although many of the chemical properties of W and Mo are similar, the two elements behave autonomously, and the fractionation mechanisms are only partly understood. In sulfidic pore waters, dissolved Mo is depleted relative to river water-seawater mixtures, whereas dissolved W is >10-fold enriched. Reductive dissolution of poorly crystalline phases like ferrihydrite, which is a preferential host of W relative to Mo in grain coatings on river-borne particles, can explain the dissolved W enrichment. Dissolved W becomes increasingly enriched as H2S(aq) rises above about 60 μM due to transformation of WO42- to thiotungstates as well as to additional reductive dissolution of phases that host W. In contrast, as rising sulfide transforms MoO42- to thiomolybdates in pore waters, dissolved Mo is suppressed, probably owing to equilibration with an Fe-Mo-S phase. This putative phase appears to control the aqueous ion product, Q = [Fe2+][MoS42-]0.6 [H2S0]0.4/[H+]0.8, at a value of 10-7.78. Concentrations of dissolved W and Mo in pore waters bear no relation to concentrations in surface waters of the same salinity. In surface waters, dissolved Mo is nearly conserved in the estuarine mixing zone. Dissolved W appears also to be conserved except for several cases where W may have been enhanced by exchange with underlying, W-rich pore waters. With increasing salinity, the molar Mo/W ratio rises from about 10 to about 1000 in surface waters whereas it is mostly sequestration on river-borne particles and its subsequent release to sulfidic pore waters after the particles are deposited in the delta and become subject to reductive

  14. EXTRACTION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: IMPLICATIONS ON FATE AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT. (R825513C007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five methods were used for the extraction of hexachlorobutadiene and chlorobenzenes from a contaminated estuarine sediment. The following extraction methods were used: Soxhlet extraction, sonication and solvent extraction, sequential solvent extraction, saponification and solv...

  15. TOP DOWN CONTROL OF THE MICROBIAL LOOP IN ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top Down Control of the Microbial Loop in Estuarine Plankton (Abstract). To be presented at the 16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R846).We examined the effects...

  16. Heavy metals and TPH effects on microbial abundance and diversity in two estuarine areas of the southern-central coast of São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Aline Bartelochi; Pagnocca, Fernando Carlos; Pinheiro, Marcelo Antonio Amaro; Fontes, Roberto Fioravanti Carelli; de Oliveira, Ana Júlia Fernandes Cardoso

    2015-07-15

    Coastal areas may be impacted by human and industrial activities, including contamination by wastewater, heavy metals and hydrocarbons. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of hydrocarbons (TPH) and metals on the microbiota composition and abundance in two estuarine systems in the coast of São Paulo: the Santos (SE) and Itanhaém (IE) estuaries. The SE was found to be chronically contaminated by heavy metals and highly contaminated by hydrocarbons. This finding was correlated with the increased density of cyanobacteria in sediments and suggests the possible use of cyanobacteria for bioremediation. These contaminants influence the density and composition of estuarine microbiota that respond to stress caused by human activity. The results are troubling because quantitative and qualitative changes in the microbiota of estuarine sediments may alter microbiological processes such as decomposition of organic matter. Moreover, this pollution can result in damage to the environment, biota and human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Contribution of primary producers to mercury trophic transfer in estuarine ecosystems: possible effects of eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, J P; Pereira, M E; Duarte, A C; Pardal, M A

    2009-08-01

    There is an ongoing eutrophication process in the Ria de Aveiro coastal lagoon (Portugal), with progressive replacement of rooted primary producers for macroalgae. Taking advantage of a well-defined environmental contamination gradient, we studied mercury accumulation and distribution in the aboveground and the belowground biomass of several salt marsh plants, including the seagrass species Zostera noltii and the dominant green macroalgal species Enteromorpha sp. The results of these experiments were then placed into the context of the estuarine mercury cycle and transport from the contaminated area. All salt marsh plants accumulated mercury in the root system, with Halimione portulacoides showing the highest levels, with up to 1.3 mg kg(-1) observed in the most contaminated area. Belowground/aboveground ratios were generally below 0.4, suggesting that salt marsh plants are efficient immobilizers and retainers of mercury agents. Moreover, due to their sediment accretion capacities, salt marsh plants seem to play an important role in the sequestration of mercury in estuarine sediments. Seagrasses, on the other hand, accumulated considerable amounts of mercury in the aboveground biomass with belowground/aboveground ratios reaching as high as 1.4. These results may be due to their different routes of uptake (roots and foliar uptake) which suggests that seagrass meadows can be an important agent in the export of mercury from contaminated areas, considering the high aboveground biomass replacement rates. Rooted macrophytes accumulate less mercury in their aboveground biomass than macroalgae. The change of primary producer dominance due to eutrophication can originate a 4- to 5-fold increase in primary producer associated mercury. This mercury would be available for export, making it bioavailable to estuarine food webs, which stresses the need to reverse the current eutrophic status of estuarine systems.

  18. Modeling Benthic Sediment Processes to Predict Water ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benthic sediment acts as a huge reservoir of particulate and dissolved material (within interstitial water) which can contribute to loading of contaminants and nutrients to the water column. A benthic sediment model is presented in this report to predict spatial and temporal benthic fluxes of nutrients and chemicals in Narragansett Bay. A benthic sediment model is presented in this report to identify benthic flux into the water column in Narragansett Bay. Benthic flux is essential to properly model water quality and ecology in estuarine and coastal systems.

  19. Development of standard leaching tests for organic pollutants in soils, sediments and granular waste materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comans, R.N.J. (ed.); Roskam, G.; Oosterhoff, A.; Shor, L. [ECN Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands); Wahlstroem, M.; Laine-Ylijoki, J.; Pihlajaniemi, M.; Ojala, M. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT, Espoo (Finland); Broholm, K.; Villholth, K.; Hjelmar, O. [DHI Water and Environment, Hoersholm (Denmark); Heimovaara, T.; Keijzer, J.; Keijzer, H. [IWACO, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2001-12-01

    The major objective of this project is to develop scientifically-based, yet practical, standardised procedures to test the leaching of organic contaminants from contaminated soils, sediments, and granular waste materials. The project focuses on the relatively non-volatile organic contaminants, of which polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), (chloro)phenols and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are typical and commonly found examples. The project is broken down into three major Work Packages. The first Work Package (WP) focuses on the mechanistic processes that control the solid/liquid partitioning and leaching of the organic contaminants, the second WP on the actual development of leaching test procedures and the third WP on the Round Robin testing of the draft procedures by the participating and possibly additional laboratories.

  20. The decomposition of estuarine macrophytes under different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-29

    Apr 29, 2013 ... habitat destruction and over-exploitation of resources (Snow and Adams, 2007). It is critical to manage ... position of biotic communities (e.g. macrophytes) (Snow and. Adams, 2007). In estuarine systems ... sure to waves and currents, and substratum type (Pedersen and. Borum, 1996). In recent history, the ...

  1. Transfer of gold nanoparticles from the water column to the estuarine food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, John L.; Craig, Preston; Hexel, Cole; Sisco, Patrick; Frey, Rebecca; Pennington, Paul L.; Fulton, Michael H.; Scott, I. Geoff; Decho, Alan W.; Kashiwada, Shosaku; Murphy, Catherine J.; Shaw, Timothy J.

    2009-07-01

    Within the next five years the manufacture of large quantities of nanomaterials may lead to unintended contamination of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The unique physical, chemical and electronic properties of nanomaterials allow new modes of interaction with environmental systems that can have unexpected impacts. Here, we show that gold nanorods can readily pass from the water column to the marine food web in three laboratory-constructed estuarine mesocosms containing sea water, sediment, sea grass, microbes, biofilms, snails, clams, shrimp and fish. A single dose of gold nanorods (65 nm length × 15 nm diameter) was added to each mesocosm and their distribution in the aqueous and sediment phases monitored over 12 days. Nanorods partitioned between biofilms, sediments, plants, animals and sea water with a recovery of 84.4%. Clams and biofilms accumulated the most nanoparticles on a per mass basis, suggesting that gold nanorods can readily pass from the water column to the marine food web.

  2. Hydrodynamic conditioning of diversity and functional traits in subtidal estuarine macrozoobenthic communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Daphne; Lambert, Gwladys I.; Ysebaert, Tom; Plancke, Yves M. G.; Herman, Peter M. J.

    2017-10-01

    Variations in abundance and diversity of estuarine benthic macrofauna are typically described along the salinity gradient. The influence of gradients in water depth, hydrodynamic energy and sediment properties are less well known. We studied how these variables influence the distribution of subtidal macrofauna in the polyhaline zone of a temperate estuary (Westerschelde, SW Netherlands). Macrofauna density, biomass and species richness, combined in a so-called ecological richness, decreased with current velocities and median grain-size and increased with organic carbon of the sediment, in total explaining 39% of the variation. The macrofauna community composition was less well explained by the three environmental variables (approx. 12-15% in total, with current velocity explaining approx. 8%). Salinity, water depth and distance to the intertidal zone had a very limited effect on both ecological richness and the macrofauna community. The proportion of (surface) deposit feeders (including opportunistic species), decreased relative to that of omnivores and carnivores with increasing current velocity and sediment grain-size. In parallel, the proportion of burrowing sessile benthic species decreased relative to that of mobile benthic species that are able to swim. Correspondingly, spatial variations in hydrodynamics yielded distinct hotspots and coldspots in ecological richness. The findings highlight the importance of local hydrodynamic conditions for estuarine restoration and conservation. The study provides a tool based on a hydrodynamic model to assess and predict ecological richness in estuaries.

  3. A preliminary study on estimating extra-cellular nitrate reductase activities in estuarine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant H. K.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes catalyzing ammonium (NH4+/nitrate (NO3– into nitrous oxide (N2O/molecular nitrogen (N2, play critical roles in water quality management. The objective of this paper was to investigate the role of extra-cellular enzymes in cycling of nitrogen (N in aquatic systems. It appears that N in estuaries, salt marshes, etc., does not stay long enough to be available for uptake, thus, creating N limited conditions. This study showed that indigenous extra-cellular nitrate reductase along with others involved in N transformations in the waters/sediments of estuarine systems can cause complete removal of NH4+ and NO3– from the waters and available NH4+ and NO3– from the sediments. These results indicate that due to high extra-cellular nitrate reductase and other enzymes associated with N transformations in sediments/waters, substantial amounts of NH4+ and NO3– can be quickly lost from the systems as N2O and/or nitric oxide (NO, in turn, creating N limited conditions in estuarine systems. Such high activities of indigenous nitrate reductase and others are useful in removing readily bioavailable N from the systems, thereby avoidance of eutrophic conditions. However, they might contribute in increasing the N2O, a potent greenhouse gas with global warming potential (GWP of 296, in the atmosphere.

  4. Linkages between the spatial toxicity of sediments and sediment dynamics in the Yangtze River Estuary and neighboring East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinjuan; Shi, Huahong; Dai, Zhijun; Mei, Xuefei; Zong, Haibo; Yang, Hongwei; Hu, Lingling; Li, Shushi

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic activities are driving an increase in sediment contamination in coastal areas. This poses significant challenges for the management of estuarine ecosystems and their adjacent seas worldwide. However, few studies have been conducted on how dynamic mechanisms affect the sediment toxicity in the estuarine environment. This study was designed to investigate the linkages between sediment toxicity and hydrodynamics in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) area. High sediment toxicity was found in the Yangtze River mouth (Region I), the depocenter of the Yangtze River Delta (Region II), and the southeastern area of the adjacent sea (Region III), while low sediment toxicity was found in the northeastern offshore region (Region IV). A spatial comparison analysis and regression model indicated that the distributed pattern of sediment toxicity was likely related to hydrodynamics and circumfluence in the East China Sea (ECS) shelf. Specifically, high sediment toxicity in Region I may be affected by the Yangtze River Pump (YRP) and the low hydrodynamics there, and high toxicity in Region II can be influenced by the low sediment dynamics and fine sediment in the depocenter. The high sediment toxicity in Region III might be related to the combination of the YRP and Taiwan Warm Current, while the low toxicity in Region IV may be influenced by the local coarse-grained relict sand with strong sediment dynamics there. The present research results further suggest that it is necessary to link hydrodynamics and the spatial behavior of sediment and sediment-derived pollutants when assessing the pollution status of estuarine environments, especially for those mega-estuaries and their neighboring ocean environments with complex waves, tides and ocean currents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Louisiana crude oil on the sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) during a life-cycle exposure to laboratory oiled sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Sandy; Hemmer, Becky L; Lilavois, Crystal R; Krzykwa, Julie; Almario, Alex; Awkerman, Jill A; Barron, Mace G

    2016-11-01

    Determining the long-term effects of crude oil exposure is critical for ascertaining population-level ecological risks of spill events. A 19-week complete life-cycle experiment was conducted with the estuarine sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) exposed to reference (uncontaminated) sediment spiked with laboratory weathered South Louisiana crude (SLC) oil at five concentrations as well as one unspiked sediment control and one seawater (no sediment) control. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to the oiled sediments at measured concentrations of fish were assessed for growth, survival, and reproduction. Resulting F1 embryos were then collected, incubated, and hatched in clean water to determine if parental full life-cycle exposure to oiled sediment produced trans-generational effects. Larvae experienced significantly reduced standard length (5-13% reduction) and wet weight (13-35% reduction) at concentrations at and above 50 and 103 mg tPAH/kg sediment, respectively. At 92 and 132 days post hatch (dph), standard length was reduced (7-13% reduction) at 199 and 109 mg tPAH/kg dry sediment, respectively, and wet weight for both time periods was reduced at concentrations at and above 109 mg tPAH/kg dry sediment (21-38% reduction). A significant reduction (51-65%) in F0 fecundity occurred at the two highest test concentrations, but no difference was observed in F1 embryo survival. This study is the first to report the effects of chronic laboratory exposure to oiled sediment, and will assist the development of population models for evaluating risk to benthic spawning fish species exposed to oiled sediments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1627-1639, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Two dimensional mapping of iron release in marine sediments at submillimetre scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thibault de Chanvalon, A.; Metzger, A.; Mouret, A.; Knoery, J.; Geslin, E.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal and shelf sediments are considered as an important source of dissolved iron to the ocean. Here, we present a new numerical approach to estimate geochemical fluxes and production rates in an estuarine sediment at sub-millimetre resolution. This approach is based on application of

  7. Infrastructure effects on estuarine wetlands increase their vulnerability to sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose; Saco, Patricia; Sandi, Steven; Saintilan, Neil; Riccardi, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    At the regional and global scales, coastal management and planning for future sea level rise scenarios is typically supported by modelling tools that predict the expected inundation extent. These tools rely on a number of simplifying assumptions that, in some cases, may result in important miscalculation of the inundation effects. One of such cases is estuarine wetlands, where vegetation strongly depends on both the magnitude and the timing of inundation. Many coastal wetlands display flow restrictions due to infrastructure or drainage works, which produce alterations to the inundation patterns that can not be captured by conventional models. In this contribution we explore the effects of flow restrictions on inundation patterns under sea level rise conditions in estuarine wetlands. We use a spatially-distributed dynamic wetland ecogeomorphological model that not only incorporates the effects of flow restrictions due to culverts, bridges and weirs as well as vegetation, but also considers that vegetation changes as a consequence of increasing inundation. We also consider the ability of vegetation to capture sediment and produce accretion. We apply our model to an estuarine wetland in Australia and show that our model predicts a much faster wetland loss due to sea level rise than conventional approaches.

  8. Multiscale physical processes of fine sediment in an estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study presented in this book investigates micro- and macro- scale physical processes of a large-scale fine sediment estuarine system with a moderate tidal range as well as a highly seasonal-varying freshwater inflow. Based on a series measured, experimented and modeled results, the research

  9. Evolution of the floc size distribution of cohesive sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mietta, F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the flocculation process of cohesive sediment (mud) and in particular on the time evolution of the floc size distribution. Mud is mainly observed in estuarine environment and its settling velocity is strongly affected by its floc size distribution. Small flocs (1-50

  10. Organic carbon in the sediments of Mandovi estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    Total organic carbon (TOC) in surficial sediments in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India varies widely from 0.1 to 3% (av. 1.05%). Highest values of TOC (2.4-3%) lie close to the mouth region and indicate no definite trend in its variation in the estuarine...

  11. Hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú estuary - Brazil: pre jetty conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Siegle; SCHETTINI, Carlos A. F.; KLEIN, Antonio H. F.; Toldo Jr.,Elírio E.

    2009-01-01

    Estuarine hydrodynamics is a key factor in the definition of the filtering capacity of an estuary and results from the interaction of the processes that control the inlet morphodynamics and those that are acting in the mixing of the water in the estuary. The hydrodynamics and suspended sediment transport in the Camboriú estuary were assessed by two field campaigns conducted in 1998 that covered both neap and spring tide conditions. The period measured represents the estuarine hydrodynamics an...

  12. Current Status of the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic APTS from Continental Sediments and Correlation with Standard Marine Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, D. V.; Olsen, P. E.; Muttoni, G.

    2014-12-01

    A reproducible geomagnetic polarity template for the Late Triassic and earliest Jurassic continues to be that determined from ~5,000 meters of cored section in the Newark basin and ~2,500 meters of outcrop section in the Hartford basin, sampled at nominal ~20 kyr intervals according to a well-developed climate cyclicity that characterizes the lacustrine strata present in all but the fluviatile portions of the basins [Kent & Olsen, 1999, 2008 JGR]. The age model is based on the 405 kyr Milankovich climate cycle and pegging the sequence to high precision U-Pb dating of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) at 201.6 to 200.9 Ma [Blackburn+2013 Science], the initiation of which is practically coincident with the end-Triassic extinction level (formerly set to 202 Ma) and within a climatic precession cycle after magnetochron E23r. The resulting astrochronostratigraphic polarity time scale (APTS) has 66 Poisson-distributed polarity intervals from chrons E8r (~225 Ma) to H27n (~199 Ma) with a constant sediment-accumulation rate extrapolation to chron E1r (~233 Ma). Magnetostratigraphic correlations from the most complete and usually the thickest Tethyan marine sections suggest that the Carnian/Norian boundary occurs within ~E7n [Channell+2003 PPP; Muttoni+2004 GSAB] at an APTS age of 227.5 Ma and for the Norian/Rhaetian boundary anywhere from E16n [Husing+2011 EPSL] at ~210.5 Ma to E20r [Maron+2014 Geology] at ~205.4 Ma depending on choice of conodont taxa, whereas the Hettangian/Sinemurian boundary can be placed at ~199.5 Ma within the marine equivalent of H25r [Husing+2014 EPSL]. These APTS ages are in substantive agreement with available high-precision dates in marine strata for the late Carnian [231 Ma: Furin+2006 Geology], latest Norian [205.5 Ma: Wotslaw+2014 Geology], and the boundaries of the Triassic/Jurassic [201.3 Ma: Guex+2012 PPP] and the Hettangian/Sinemurian [199.5 Ma: Schaltegger+2008 EPSL]. Carnian magnetostratigraphy needs to be improved but

  13. Recolonization of macrozoobenthos on defaunated sediments in a hypertrophic brackish lagoon: effects of sulfide removal and sediment grain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Gen

    2014-04-01

    Influences of sediment types on recolonization of estuarine macrozoobenthos were tested using enclosures in a hypertrophic lagoon. Three types of azoic sediment, sand (S), sulfide-rich mud (M), and mud removed of sulfide through iron addition (MFe), were set in field for 35 days during a hypoxic period. A total of 14 taxa including opportunistic polychaetes and amphipods occurred. Infaunal community in S treatment was characterized by highest diversity, total density and biomass, and population density of five dominant taxa, while those parameters were lowest in M treatment. Sulfide removal in MFe treatment achieved much higher density, biomass, and population densities of several taxa in the sediment. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that the established community structure was unique to each treatment. These imply that dissolved sulfide level as well as sediment grain size is a key determinant for the community composition and recolonization speed of early colonists in estuarine soft-bottom habitats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the performance of two spontaneous sedimentation techniques for the diagnosis of human intestinal parasites in the absence of a gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Alessandra Queiroga; Abellana, Rosa; Pereira-da-Silva, Hélio Doyle; Santos, Ivanildes; Serra, Paula Taquita; Julião, Genimar Rebouças; Orlandi, Patricia Puccinelli; Ascaso, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Performance evaluation of diagnostic tests is critical in the search for accurate diagnoses. A gold standard test is usually absent in parasitology, thus rendering satisfactory assessment of diagnostic accuracy difficult. Moreover, reliability (assessed by the study of repeatability) is a rarely studied characteristic of diagnostic tests. This study compared and evaluated the performance (repeatability, concordance and accuracy) of the spontaneous sedimentation technique (SST) and the Paratest for the diagnosis of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica complex, Blastocystis spp., Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Calodium hepaticum. Fecal samples of 143 individuals were separated into three replicates for each test. Concordance and homogeneity of the results between replicates of each test and between tests were evaluated. Proportions of positives, sensitivity and specificity were estimated using a Bayesian Latent Class Model. High repeatability of both tests was found for the detection of intestinal parasites, except for Blastocystis spp. and hookworm. Concordance between tests was generally high (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.72-0.88), except for Blastocystis spp., hookworm and T. trichiura. The Paratest detected more cases of Blastocystis spp. and fewer of hookworm than the SST. The tests were quite discordant in the detection of T. trichiura. A low sensitivity (39.4-49.2% for SST, 35.8-53.8% for Paratest) and a high specificity (93.2-97.2%) were found for both tests. The Paratest presented a slightly higher sensitivity for the diagnosis of Blastocystis spp. (53.8%), and SST did so for hookworm (49.2%). This is the first study on repeatability and accuracy (using a Bayesian approach) of two spontaneous sedimentation techniques. These results suggest underdiagnosis of little dense parasitic forms due to technical limitations in both tests. We conclude that the combined study of repeatability, concordance and accuracy is a key

  15. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; Scharler, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N) and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N) was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N) and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N). These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that estuarine

  16. How functional traits of estuarine macrobenthic assemblages respond to metal contamination?

    KAUST Repository

    Piló, D.

    2016-08-06

    The effects of metal contamination on estuarine macrobenthic communities were investigated using the Biological Traits Analysis (BTA). The study was carried out in the Tagus estuary (western Portugal). Samples of macrobenthic communities and associated environmental variables were taken in four surveys (September 2012, and February, May and October 2013) across the contamination gradient from three main zones: a slightly contaminated, a moderately contaminated and a highly contaminated zone. Functional traits for the most abundant species were assigned using seven categories based on “Feeding mode”, “Life span”, “Body size”, “Motility”, “Position in sediments”, “Larval type” and “AMBI ecological group”. To investigate whether the macroinvertebrate community structure was associated with the environmental parameters and biological traits an integrative multivariate analysis, combining the RLQ analysis and the fourth-corner method, was applied. Within this analysis, human-induced estuarine variables (metals) were rendered independent from natural ones (sediment fine particles) through partial correlations. Following this approach, it was possible to decouple the effects of two typically highly correlated environmental descriptors with different origins. Overall, the study identified significant relationships between sediment environmental descriptors and the functional traits of macrobenthic communities. Further, RLQ/Fourth-corner combined analysis successfully isolated the traits and corresponding species that were most correlated with the measured concentration of trace metals in sediments, supporting the knowledge that benthic organisms exhibit distinct responses to different levels of disturbance. A shift in species dominance occurred along the contamination gradient with epifaunal tolerant species with very small size, long life span, and crawling motility dominating the highest contaminated area. This area was also related with

  17. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ortega-Cisneros

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N. These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that

  18. Heavy metal concentration of river sediment in the light of the environmental quality standard value of Japan from the river in and around the Tokyo Japan: A case study at the Tama, Tsurumi, Edo and Ara rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Matsumoto, I.

    2008-12-01

    The river sediment is basically composed of clastic materials derived from the surface of the Earth. Purpose of our study is clarify the quantitative estimation of ratio of influence given to river sediment of nature and human activity by using of heavy metals. We show the geochemical and geological characteristics of stream sediments from the Tama, Tsurumi, Edo and Ara Rivers that flow in Tokyo bay, Japan. We show research results of the degree of contamination in above four rivers that are the relativery polluted river in Japan. Sediment samples collected from various points along the upper and lower streams were subjected to content analysis and elution analysis (using liquate (flow) out test) on the heavy metals like Cd, CN, Pb, Cr(6+), As and Hg from the river sediment for the purpose of environment assessment. Content of Cd, CN, Pb, Cr(6+), As, and Hg except Pb was above the environmental quality limit in few locations of the Tsurumi river. However, in the down-river part (mouth region) Pb-concentration was 10 times higher than at the source regions as the result of human impact; for Hg the same tendency was detected at the all rivers. This study is the first research that investigated river sediment in the light of the envirnomental quality standard in Tokyo area, Japan.

  19. An Integrated Field and Laboratory Study of the Bioavailability of Metal Contaminants in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    were conducted using a Carlo Erba 1500 Elemental Analyzer on sediment samples that were dried (50 °C), ground, and sieved through a 150 µm nylon mesh...combustion and industrial activities ( Cullen and Reimer, 1989). Arsenic has been shown to accumulate in high concentrations in estuarine sediments and in...resident benthic fauna and has been implicated in risk assessments as a priority pollutant in many coastal sediments (Chen et al., 2000b; Cullen

  20. Concentrations of radionuclides in coastal sediments from the Bay of Bengal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, A.K.M.; Bilkis, A.B.; Roy, S.; Sikder, M.D.H.; Idriss Ali, K.M. [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Safiullah, S. [Department of Chemistry, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    1994-10-20

    The natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium series as well as {sup 40}K have been determined by gamma-spectroscopy on core-profile sediments collected from the Karnafuli estuarine zone in the Bay of Bengal. The specific activity levels of the estuarine deposits are measured. The observed contents of the radionuclides present in the sediments are greatly influenced by the geomorphological conditions in the area and show the presence of concentrations of thorium and uranium radionuclides. Elevated concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K values observed in the sediments may be due to the anthropogenic input of phosphate fertilizers (gypsum) into the estuarine zone from agricultural lands and wastes in the vicinity. The results have been compared with the global radioactivity measurements and evaluated.

  1. Toward Understanding the Dynamics of Microbial Communities in an Estuarine System

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2014-04-14

    Community assembly theories such as species sorting theory provide a framework for understanding the structures and dynamics of local communities. The effect of theoretical mechanisms can vary with the scales of observation and effects of specific environmental factors. Based on 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing, different structures and temporal succession patterns were discovered between the surface sediments and bottom water microbial communities in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE). The microbial communities in the surface sediment samples were more diverse than those in the bottom water samples, and several genera were specific for the water or sediment communities. Moreover, water temperature was identified as the main variable driving community dynamics and the microbial communities in the sediment showed a greater temporal change. We speculate that nutrient-based species sorting and bacterial plasticity to the temperature contribute to the variations observed between sediment and water communities in the PRE. This study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the microbial community structures in a highly dynamic estuarine system and sheds light on the applicability of ecological theoretical mechanisms.

  2. Status of the estuarine fish fauna in the St Lucia Estuarine System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lake St Lucia Estuarine System, South Africa, has been under pressure due to recent drought conditions, which led to extreme low lake levels, hypersaline conditions and closure of the mouth. The estuary mouth closed in June 2002 and has remained so for more than two-and-a-half years. A lack of information on ...

  3. Estuarine consumers utilize marine, estuarine and terrestrial organic matter and provide connectivity among these food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The flux of organic matter (OM) across ecosystem boundaries can influence estuarine food web dynamics and productivity. However, this process is seldom investigated taking into account all the adjacent ecosystems (e.g. ocean, river, land) and different hydrological settings (i.e....

  4. The role of estuarine type in characterizing early stage fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assemblages of early stage fishes (larval and early juvenile stages) were investigated and compared in seven permanently open and five intermittently open estuarine systems on the warm temperate Eastern Cape coast of South Africa. Estuarine type, by virtue of mouth state and prevailing physico chemical conditions, ...

  5. Impact evaluation of the liquid effluent disposal of the Duque de Caxias Refinery (REDUC) in fluvial waters and sediments, RJ, Brazil; Avaliacao do impacto do descarte de efluentes liquidos da Refinaria Duque de Caxias (REDUC) sobre aguas e sedimentos fluviais, RJ, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidone, Edison Dausacker; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal; Cordeiro, Renato Campello [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Gamboa, Carla Maria; Camaz, Fernando Ribeiro; Jorge, Fabricio Goncalves [PETROBRAS/REDUC, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, RJ (Brazil). Refinaria de Duque de Caxias; Carvalho, Maria de Fatima B. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the contribution of the liquid effluents of the Duque de Caxias Refinery (REDUC) in the water and sediment contamination in the estuarine Iguacu-Sarapui system, a tributary of the Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Since 2002 is being conducted a quarterly monitoring of some parameters in water, river sediments and treated liquid effluent, such as: pH, suspended solids, total sedimented solids, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, oil and grease (O and G), phenols, sulfide, ammonia, metals and metalloids (V, Cr, Pb, Ni, Cu, Cd, Zn, Hg, As, Se , Co, Fe, Mn), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, coprostanol and cholesterol (indicators of domestic wastes). The obtained results show that the effluents meet the legal standards and the treated liquid effluents from REDUC in the estuarine system have little or no impact on river water quality. The higher levels of contaminants detected in water and sediments samples are directly related to untreated domestic sewage from urban areas. (author)

  6. Impact of intertidal area characteristics on estuarine tidal hydrodynamics: A modelling study for the Scheldt Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, J.; Smolders, S.; Meire, P.; Temmerman, S.

    2017-11-01

    effects of tidal prism decrease upstream and tidal prism increase downstream of additional storage areas, our model results indicate a reduction in tidal prism far downstream of intertidal storage areas as a result of a decreasing tidal range. This study may assist estuarine managers in assessing the impact of marsh restoration and managed shoreline realignment projects, as well as with the morphological management of estuaries through dredging and disposal of sediment on intertidal areas.

  7. Characteristics and landcover of estuarine boundaries: implications for the delineation of the South African estuarine functional zone

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Veldkornet, DA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether the current lateral boundary for estuaries in South Africa, i.e. the estuarine functional zone (EFZ), includes all estuarine habitats. The EFZ covers 173 930 ha in 304 estuaries/outlets nationally. Field surveys...

  8. Coastal sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubel, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Several important coastal sedimentation problems are identified. Application of existing or anticipated remote sensing techniques to examine these problems is considered. Specifically, coastal fine particle sediment systems, floods and hy hurricanes and sedimentation f of coastal systems, routes and rates of sediment transport on continental shelves, and dredging and dredged material disposal are discussed.

  9. Site-specific features influence sediment stability of intertidal flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defew, Emma C.; Tolhurst, Trevor J.; Paterson, David M.

    The factors that influence the sediment stability and the transport of estuarine mudflats are not yet fully understood but knowledge of them is essential in coastal engineering applications and pollution ecology studies. The suggestion that variation in predictive models of sediment stability might be due to site-specific characteristics is investigated using data from four estuarine mudflats (Eden Estuary, Scotland, the Biezelingsche Ham, Zandkreek, and Molenplaat mudflats in The Netherlands). These estuaries differ in their environmental conditions, macrofaunal species composition and local features (e.g. Enteromorpha mats, migratory biofilms). Stable and unstable sediments were compared, and mean chlorophyll-a concentrations and granulometry of the sediments were significantly different between the two groups. Step-wise multiple linear regressions were applied to the sediment stability data of all sites to establish the influences on erosion threshold of microphytobenthic biomass, water content, granulometry, organic carbon content and the abundance of dominant macrofaunal species. The stability of each site was influenced by different factors. Sediment stability of the Eden Estuary was affected by the Enteromorpha bloom; Biezelingsche Ham was influenced by the highly migratory nature of the diatom biofilms and the abundance of Corophium volutator; the polychaete worm Arenicola marina had a net negative effect on sediment stability of the Zandkreek; and the Molenplaat was influenced by microphytobenthic biomass. This research highlights the need for site-specific calibration of models and suggests that a universal proxy parameter for sediment stability is unlikely to be obtained.

  10. Challenging paradigms in estuarine ecology and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M.; Whitfield, A. K.

    2011-10-01

    For many years, estuarine science has been the 'poor relation' in aquatic research - freshwater scientists ignored estuaries as they tended to get confused by salt and tides, and marine scientists were more preoccupied by large open systems. Estuaries were merely regarded by each group as either river mouths or sea inlets respectively. For the past four decades, however, estuaries (and other transitional waters) have been regarded as being ecosystems in their own right. Although often not termed as such, this has led to paradigms being generated to summarise estuarine structure and functioning and which relate to both the natural science and management of these systems. This paper defines, details and affirms these paradigms that can be grouped into those covering firstly the science (definitions, scales, linkages, productivity, tolerances and variability) and secondly the management (pressures, valuation, health and services) of estuaries. The more 'science' orientated paradigms incorporate the development and types of ecotones, the nature of stressed and variable systems (with specific reference to resilience and redundancy), the relationship between generalists and specialists produced by environmental tolerance, the relevance of scale in relation to functioning and connectivity, the sources of production and degree of productivity, the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning and the stress-subsidy debates. The more 'management' targeted paradigms include the development and effects of exogenic unmanaged pressures and endogenic managed pressures, the perception of health and the ability to manage estuaries (related to internal and external influences), and the influence of all of these on the production of ecosystem services and societal benefits.

  11. Estuarine Salinity Mapping From Airborne Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J. P.; Gao, Y.; Cook, P. L. M.; Ye, N.

    2016-12-01

    Estuaries are critical ecosystems providing both ecological habitat and human amenity including boating and recreational fishing. Salinity gradients, caused by the mixing of fresh and salt water, exert an overwhelming control on estuarine ecology and biogeochemistry as well as being a key tracer for model calibration. At present, salinity monitoring within estuaries typically uses point measurements or underway boat-based methods, which makes sensing of localised phenomena such as upwelling of saline bottom water difficult. This study has pioneered the use of airborne radiometry (passive microwave) sensing as a new method to remotely quantify estuarine salinity, allowing rapid production of high resolution surface salinity maps. The airborne radiometry mapping was conducted for the Gippsland Lakes, the largest estuary in Australia, in February, July, October and November of 2015, using the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR). Salinity was retrieved from the brightness temperature collected by PLMR with results validated against boat sampling conducted concurrently with each flight. Results showed that the retrieval accuracy of the radiative transfer model was better than 5 ppt for most flights. The spatial, temporal and seasonal variations of salinity observed in this study are also analysed and discussed.

  12. Triclosan alterations of estuarine phytoplankton community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckney, James L; Thompson, Laura; Hylton, Sarah

    2017-06-15

    Antimicrobial additives in pharmaceutical and personal care products are a major environmental concern due to their potential ecological impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Triclosan (TCS) has been used as an antiseptic, disinfectant, and preservative in various media. The sublethal and lethal effects of TCS on estuarine phytoplankton community composition were investigated using bioassays of natural phytoplankton communities to measure phytoplankton responses to different concentrations of TCS ranging from 1 to 200μgl -1 . The EC 50 (the concentration of an inhibitor where the growth is reduced by half) for phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chlorophytes, cryptophytes) examined in this ranged from 10.7 to 113.8μg TCS l -1 . Exposures resulted in major shifts in phytoplankton community composition at concentrations as low as 1.0μg TCS l -1 . This study demonstrates estuarine ecosystem sensitivity to TCS exposure and highlights potential alterations in phytoplankton community composition at what are typically environmental concentrations of TCS in urbanized estuaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sediment toxicity assessment in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) using Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) fertilization and embryo bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi Ghirardini, A; Arizzi Novelli, A; Tagliapietra, D

    2005-09-01

    The capacity of two toxicity bioassays (fertilization and embryo toxicity tests) to discriminate sediment toxicity using the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus was tested in five stations with different levels of pollution in the Lagoon of Venice. Two stations were located in estuarine sites, two in the industrial zone, and one in a site at the top of our quality gradient (reference). Elutriate was chosen as sediment matrix to assess the potential effects of bioavailable pollutants in the water column as a consequence of sediment resuspension (dredging and dumping, fishing gear, etc.). An experimental design based on Quality Assurance/Quality Control procedures (QA/QC) was adopted in order to set the methodological basis for an effective use of these bioassays in monitoring programs. Results revealed both higher embriotoxicity than spermiotoxicity in all stations and the efficacy of combined use of both toxicity bioassays in discriminating differing pollution/bioavailability between stations and periods. The good representativeness of the integrated sampling scheme and the standardization of all experimental phases yielded high precision of results. Clear Toxicity Fingerprints were evidenced for the investigated sites through the combined use of both bioassays. A good fit between ecotoxicological data and chemical contamination levels was found, except for unnatural sediment texture.

  14. Influence of increasing temperature and salinity on herbicide toxicity in estuarine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Marie E; Danese, Loren E; Baird, Thomas D

    2013-07-01

    Ecological risk assessments are, in part, based on results of toxicity tests conducted under standard exposure conditions. Global climate change will have a wide range of effects on estuarine habitats, including potentially increasing water temperature and salinity, which may alter the risk assessment of estuarine pollutants. We examined the effects of increasing temperature and salinity on the toxicity of common herbicides (irgarol, diuron, atrazine, and ametryn) to the phytoplankton species Dunaliella tertiolecta. Static 96-h algal bioassays were conducted for each herbicide under four exposure scenarios: standard temperature and salinity (25°C, 20 ppt), standard temperature and elevated salinity (25°C, 40 ppt), elevated temperature and standard salinity (35°C, 20 ppt), and elevated temperature and elevated salinity (35°C, 40 ppt). The endpoints assessed were algal cell density at 96 h, growth rate, chlorophyll a content, lipid content, and starch content. Increasing exposure temperature reduced growth rate and 96-h cell density but increased the cellular chlorophyll and lipid concentrations of the control algae. Exposure condition did not alter starch content of control algae. Herbicides were found to decrease growth rate, 96 h cell density, and cellular chlorophyll and lipid concentrations, while starch concentrations increased with herbicide exposure. Herbicide effects under standard test conditions were then compared with those observed under elevated temperature and salinity. Herbicide effects on growth rate, cell density, and starch content were more pronounced under elevated salinity and temperature conditions. To encompass the natural variability in estuarine temperature and salinity, and to account for future changes in climate, toxicity tests should be conducted under a wider range of environmental conditions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cadmium and lead levels along the estuarine ecosystem of Tigre River-San Andres Lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Sauceda, María de la Luz; Pérez-Castañeda, Roberto; Sánchez-Martínez, Jesús Genaro; Aguirre-Guzmán, Gabriel

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium and lead levels were evaluated in water and sediment along the estuarine ecosystem of Tigre River-San Andres Lagoon (Gulf of Mexico) during September to December 2009. Significant highest metal concentration in water (0.45 mg L(-1) Cd and 3.94 mg L(-1) Pb) and sediment (2.83 mg kg(-1) Cd and 6.61 mg kg(-1) Pb) were found at the mouth of the Tigre River, where the fishing town of El Moron is located. Cadmium levels in sediment were above limits associated with adverse biological effects on aquatic fauna, so negative impacts on natural populations of aquatic organisms would be expected to occur. This in turn could affect the fishery resources inhabiting this ecosystem.

  16. Urban Estuarine Beaches and Urban Water Cycle Seepage: The Influence of Temporal Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgia Costa-Dias

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperate estuarine beaches are an asset to coastal cities. Being located within the transition zone where the river meets the sea can provide several environmental benefits such as warm water temperature during the summer, flat waters, protection from coastal upwelling-induced morning fog, as well as additional recreational and cultural values. In this study we address a major question—can the urban water cycle impair the water quality dynamics during a bathing season in a temperate Atlantic estuary (Douro, Northwest Portugal? Water quality was assessed according to the EU legal criteria at different time scales. No daily, weekly, or monthly patterns for microbiological descriptors were found, which rather followed the hourly tidal dynamics. Quality decreased during high tide, affecting potentially 800+ beach-users during mid-summer weekends (4 m2 per person. Low water quality was transported upstream from highly populated urban areas. Therefore, the understanding of the dynamics of estuarine systems is essential to adapt the standard official approach, and the obtained results can be used to draw policy recommendations to improve the sampling strategy, aiming for more accurate assessment of the water quality to reduce the risk hazard of estuarine beaches.

  17. Incorporation of Fine-Grained Sediment Erodibility Measurements into Sediment Transport Modeling, Capitol Lake, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Elias, Edwin; Jones, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Capitol Lake was created in 1951 with the construction of a concrete dam and control gate that prevented salt-water intrusion into the newly formed lake and regulated flow of the Deschutes River into southern Puget Sound. Physical processes associated with the former tidally dominated estuary were altered, and the dam structure itself likely caused an increase in retention of sediment flowing into the lake from the Deschutes River. Several efforts to manage sediment accumulation in the lake, including dredging and the construction of sediment traps upriver, failed to stop the lake from filling with sediment. The Deschutes Estuary Feasibility Study (DEFS) was carried out to evaluate the possibility of removing the dam and restoring estuarine processes as an alternative ongoing lake management. An important component of DEFS was the creation of a hydrodynamic and sediment transport model of the restored Deschutes Estuary. Results from model simulations indicated that estuarine processes would be restored under each of four restoration alternatives, and that over time, the restored estuary would have morphological features similar to the predam estuary. The model also predicted that after dam-removal, a large portion of the sediment eroded from the lake bottom would be deposited near the Port of Olympia and a marina located in lower Budd Inlet seaward of the present dam. The volume of sediment transported downstream was a critical piece of information that managers needed to estimate the total cost of the proposed restoration project. However, the ability of the model to predict the magnitude of sediment transport in general and, in particular, the volume of sediment deposition in the port and marina was limited by a lack of information on the erodibility of fine-grained sediments in Capitol Lake. Cores at several sites throughout Capitol Lake were collected between October 31 and November 1, 2007. The erodibility of sediments in the cores was later determined in the

  18. Norovirus distribution within an estuarine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Jennifer; Vinjé, Jan; Guadagnoli, Dominic; Lipp, Erin K

    2009-09-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) has been studied extensively as an important cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. While oysters are a primary vehicle for infection, few studies have examined the wider distribution of NoV in the estuarine environment. Active shellfish-harvesting areas in Georgia were examined for the prevalence, genotype diversity, and concentrations of NoV in a variety of estuarine sample types over the course of 1 year. Of the 225 samples (9 oyster, 72 water, 72 63- to 200-microm plankton, and 72 >200-microm plankton) collected from 12 stations across two estuaries, 21 samples (9.3%) tested positive for NoV. By sample type, 55.0% (5/9) of oysters, 8.3% (6/72) of water samples, 11.1% (8/72) of 63- to 200-microm plankton samples, and 2.8% (2/72) of >200-microm plankton samples were positive for human NoV. The two NoV-positive >200-microm plankton samples, which contained mainly zooplankton, had the greatest quantity of NoV genomes (3.5 x 10(13) and 1.7 x 10(15) genomes g(-1)) of any sample tested. The majority, 90.5% (19/21), of the samples tested positive for genogroup I NoV, and only 9.5% (2/21) of the samples tested positive for genogroup II. The high concentrations of NoV in plankton samples compared to water and oyster samples were unexpected and provide new insights into the presence and distribution of human NoV in the water environment.

  19. Norovirus Distribution within an Estuarine Environment▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Jennifer; Vinjé, Jan; Guadagnoli, Dominic; Lipp, Erin K.

    2009-01-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) has been studied extensively as an important cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. While oysters are a primary vehicle for infection, few studies have examined the wider distribution of NoV in the estuarine environment. Active shellfish-harvesting areas in Georgia were examined for the prevalence, genotype diversity, and concentrations of NoV in a variety of estuarine sample types over the course of 1 year. Of the 225 samples (9 oyster, 72 water, 72 63- to 200-μm plankton, and 72 >200-μm plankton) collected from 12 stations across two estuaries, 21 samples (9.3%) tested positive for NoV. By sample type, 55.0% (5/9) of oysters, 8.3% (6/72) of water samples, 11.1% (8/72) of 63- to 200-μm plankton samples, and 2.8% (2/72) of >200-μm plankton samples were positive for human NoV. The two NoV-positive >200-μm plankton samples, which contained mainly zooplankton, had the greatest quantity of NoV genomes (3.5 × 1013 and 1.7 × 1015 genomes g−1) of any sample tested. The majority, 90.5% (19/21), of the samples tested positive for genogroup I NoV, and only 9.5% (2/21) of the samples tested positive for genogroup II. The high concentrations of NoV in plankton samples compared to water and oyster samples were unexpected and provide new insights into the presence and distribution of human NoV in the water environment. PMID:19581478

  20. Estuarine response of fluoride - Investigations in Azhikode Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Concentrations of fluoride in Azhikode estuarine region (Kerala, India) were measured as a function of chlorinity during the different seasons. The type of behaviour indicated that fluoride was regulated by sea water incursion alone. Fluoride...

  1. Estuarine use by spotted grunter Pomadasys commersonnii in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estuarine use by spotted grunter Pomadasys commersonnii in a South African estuary, as determined by acoustic telemetry. A-R Childs, PD Cowley, TF Næsje, AJ Booth, WM Potts, EB Thorstad, F Økland ...

  2. GoM Coastal and Estuarine Biopsy Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Small vessel surveys are conducted within estuarine and nearshore coastal waters to collect tissue biopsy samples from bottlenose dolphins. Visual surveys are...

  3. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Estuarine Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational po...

  4. Fungal activity in Mangalvan: an estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prabhakaran, N.; Gupta, R.; Kutty, M.K.

    of the mangrove vegetation by these fungi the detritus load is increased, contributing substantially to the food web of this important estuarine ecosystem. Thirty-one fungal isolates were recorded from the soil and 27 from decaying leaves, stems, roots...

  5. 75 FR 65613 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... ecological communities in support of the Bay's growing population: climate change, species interactions... Ocean Service, Estuarine Reserves Division, 1305 East-West Highway, N/ORM5, 10th floor, Silver Spring...

  6. SPECIES INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ESTUARINE DETRITIVORES: INHIBITION OR FACILITATION?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native Hawaiian estuarine detritivores; the prawn Macrobrachium grandimanus, and the neritid gastropod Neritina vespertina, were maintained in flow-through microcosms with conditioned leaves from two riparian tree species, Hau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and guava (Psidium guajava). Th...

  7. NOAA's Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Data Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1985, NOAA launched the Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Program to develop a consistent data base on the distribution, relative abundance, and life...

  8. Estuarine Shoreline and Barrier-Island Sandline Change Assessment Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment Dataset was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island sandline and...

  9. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  10. Effect of copper and cadmium on three Malaysian tropical estuarine invertebrate larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, S; Patel, T R; Colbo, M H

    1997-03-01

    Three species of tropical estuarine invertebrates were exposed to copper sulfate and cadmium chloride to investigate their potential as test specimens for sediment toxicity assays in the South-east Asian regions. The larvae of the reef sea urchin (Diadema setosum), the oyster (Crassostrea iradalei), and the mud crab (Scylla seratta Forskall) were used in the 48-hr assays with copper and cadmium as reference toxicants. In addition the sea urchin were tested for end point measurements at different stages of the larval development and a 60-min sperm bioassay. The study revealed that the sea urchin first cleavage, which is an assay end point and which takes place about 1 hr after fertilization, was the most sensitive stage for both toxicants, with copper being more toxic than cadmium. Sensitivity comparisons between the three invertebrate larvae revealed the mud crab zoea larvae to be most sensitive for cadmium with an LC50 value of 0.078 microgram/ml, while the sea urchin was more sensitive for copper, with EC50 values of 0.01 microgram/ml at the first cleavage stage and 0.04 microgram/ml at the pluteus larva stage. All the invertebrates tested gave responses that made them suitable test organisms for metal bioassays in the tropical estuarine environment.

  11. Assessment of sediment contamination in an impacted estuary: differential effects and adaptations of sentinel organisms and implications for biomonitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Pedro M.; Gonçalves, C.; Martins, M.; Rodrigo, Ana; Carreira, S.; Costa, Maria Helena; Caeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Conferência realizada em Lisboa, de 6-9 November de 2013 Estuarine pollution is reflected in the concentration of toxicants in sediments, depending on their geochemical properties, since sediments trap substances from the water column, either dissolved or bound to suspended matter. However, determining risk of sediment contaminants to biota has many constraints. For such reason, integrative approaches are keystone. Taking the Sado estuary (SW Portugal) as a case study, contrasted to a refe...

  12. Impact of boat generated waves over an estuarine intertidal zone of the Seine estuary (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloffre, Julien; Lafite, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Water movements in macrotidal estuaries are controlled by the tidal regime modulated seasonally by the fluvial discharge. Wind effect on hydrodynamics and sediment transport is also reported at the mouth. Besides estuaries are frequently man altered our knowledge on the human impact on hydrodynamics and sediment transport is less extended. As an example on the Seine estuary (France) port authorities have put emphasis on facilitating economic exchanges by means of embankment building and increased dredging activity over the last century. These developments led to secure sea vessel traffic in the Seine estuary but they also resulted in a change of estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport features. Consequences of boat generated waves are varied: increased water turbidity and sediment transfer, release of nutrient and contaminants in the water column, harmful to users, ecosystems and infrastructures generating important maintenance spending. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of boat generated waves on sediment transport over an intertidal area. The studied site is located on the left bank in the fluvial part of the Seine estuary. On this site the maximum tidal range ranges between 1.25 and 3.5m respectively during neap and spring tide. The sampling strategy is based on continuous ADV acquisition at 4Hz coupled with turbidimeter and altimeter measurements (1 measurement every minute) in order to decipher sediment dynamics during one year. Our results indicate that sediment dynamics are controlled by river flow while medium term scale evolution is dependent on tidal range and short term dynamics on sea-vessels waves. 64% of boat passages generated significant sediment reworking (from few mm.min-1 to 3cm.min-1). This reworking rate is mainly controlled by two parameters: (i) water height on the site and (ii) vessels characteristics; in particular the distance between seabed and keel that generate a Bernoulli wave (with maximum amplitude of 0.6m

  13. A Model Study of the Salish Sea Estuarine Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    A Model Study of the Salish Sea Estuarine Circulation* DAVID A. SUTHERLAND1 AND PARKER MACCREADY School of Oceanography, University of Washington... Salish Sea , which encompasses the estuarine systems of Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Strait of Georgia, is described for the year...freshwater exported by not only Puget Sound but the Strait of Georgia (SoG) to the north as well. The region as a whole is known as the Salish Sea

  14. Determination of Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu in Sediment Compartments by Sequential Extraction and Isotope Dilution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardolinski Paulo C. F. C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Trace concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in four different sediment fractions extracted in sequence were determined by isotope dilution inductively coupled mass spectrometry (IDICPMS. The metals from each fraction were extracted following the sequential extraction procedure recommended by the Bureau Commun de Référence (BCR of the Commission of the European Communities. As an alternative to external calibration, the elements were quantified by spiking the extracted solutions with 112Cd, 63Cu, 208Pb and 66Zn and application of isotope dilution. The proposed approach was applied to a sample collected from a lake and two standard reference materials, NIST2704 river sediment from the National Institute of Standards & Technology and the BCR-277 estuarine sediment. Detection limits, for each extracted solution, varied from 0.31 to 0.53 mug L¹ for Cd, 0.92 to 2.9 mug L¹ for Cu, 0.22 to 1.1 mug L¹ for Pb and 1.3 to 7.6 mug L¹ for Zn. The sum of the metals concentration in the different fractions was compatible with 95% confidence level found amounts obtained with complete digestion of the samples and with the certified values of the standard reference materials.

  15. A bacterial community-based index to assess the ecological status of estuarine and coastal environments

    KAUST Repository

    Aylagas, Eva

    2016-10-23

    Biotic indices for monitoring marine ecosystems are mostly based on the analysis of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Due to their high sensitivity to pollution and fast response to environmental changes, bacterial assemblages could complement the information provided by benthic metazoan communities as indicators of human-induced impacts, but so far, this biological component has not been well explored for this purpose. Here we performed 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to analyze the bacterial assemblage composition of 51 estuarine and coastal stations characterized by different environmental conditions and human-derived pressures. Using the relative abundance of putative indicator bacterial taxa, we developed a biotic index that is significantly correlated with a sediment quality index calculated on the basis of organic and inorganic compound concentrations. This new index based on bacterial assemblage composition can be a sensitive tool for providing a fast environmental assessment and allow a more comprehensive integrative ecosystem approach for environmental management. © 2016.

  16. Optical dating of young tidal sediments in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, A. S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2007-01-01

     We have tested the applicability of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to the dating of young estuarine sediments (210Pb dating. The degree of bleaching before deposition...... is investigated by examining the age trend in various sediment cores, and where possible, by comparison with independent age control provided by 210Pb dating. The consistency between optical ages and 210Pb ages is shown to be satisfactory on a time-scale down to only a few years. We conclude that OSL provides...... reliable and reproducible results in cores from sub-, inter- and supra-tidal sediments, ranging from only a few years up to ~1000 years old, confirming its value in the estimation of estuarine accretion rates. With OSL it is, for the first time, possible to date sediment cores from silty and sandy tidal...

  17. Contributions of Abiotic and Biotic Processes to the Aerobic Removal of Phenolic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in a Simulated Estuarine Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Cheng, Qiao; Tam, Nora F Y; Lin, Li; Su, Weiqi; Luan, Tiangang

    2016-04-19

    The contributions of abiotic and biotic processes in an estuarine aquatic environment to the removal of four phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were evaluated through simulated batch reactors containing water-only or water-sediment collected from an estuary in South China. More than 90% of the free forms of all four spiked EDCs were removed from these reactors at the end of 28 days under aerobic conditions, with the half-life of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) longer than those of propylparaben (PP), nonylphenol (NP) and 17β-estradiol (E2). The interaction with dissolved oxygen contributed to NP removal and was enhanced by aeration. The PP and E2 removal was positively influenced by adsorption on suspended particles initially, whereas abiotic transformation by estuarine-dissolved matter contributed to their complete removal. Biotic processes, including degradation by active aquatic microorganisms, had significant effects on the removal of EE2. Sedimentary inorganic and organic matter posed a positive effect only when EE2 biodegradation was inhibited. Estrone (E1), the oxidizing product of E2, was detected, proving that E2 was removed by the naturally occurring oxidizers in the estuarine water matrixes. These results revealed that the estuarine aquatic environment was effective in removing free EDCs, and the contributions of abiotic and biotic processes to their removal were compound specific.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF POSSIBLE INDIRECT RISK OF NATURALLY OCCURING MERCURY AND CADMIUM THROUGH Mugil Sp. AND Geloina sp. CONSUMPTION IN SEGARA ANAKAN ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Noegrohati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine ecosystem of Segara Anakan is located in south coast of Central Java, shielded from Indian Ocean by Nusakambangan island. The ecosystem of Segara Anakan estuary, Central Java, Indonesia, is influenced by fresh water inflow from Citanduy river basin and Indian sea water mostly by tidal actions through the western opening. The runoff materials continuously entering Segara Anakan from Citanduy catchment area, which geologically consist of weathering products of quarternary volcanic rocks from Galunggung mountain, West Java. Therefore various natural heavy metal contaminants are bound to the estuarine sediments, redistributed and accumulated within the ecosystem. In the present work, the effects of environmental stresses to mercury and cadmium abiotic distribution, and their availability to biotic ecosystems were studied, and consumers indirect risk assesment was carried out. In the laboratory scale studies on the distribution of mercury and cadmium in an estuarine simulation of water-field sediment, it was observed that the metal distribution coefficient decreases as the salinity and the acidity of the medium increases. Monitoring results confirmed that the highest levels of Hg and Cd in water and sediment samples were obtained in dry season. Consequently, the highest levels of Hg and Cd in biotic ecosystem, represented by Mugil sp. and Geloina sp., also obtained in dry season. The body burden of Hg in people of Segara Anakan villages, as indicated by the levels in hair and mother milk samples, taken at the end of the study (dry season 2004, were relatively low, but the levels of Cd in mother milk samples were significantly higher than that of control samples of Jogyakarta (P = 0.05. Consequently, the risk quotient for babies were exceeding the FAO/WHO PTWI. Based on the risk assessment carried out for babies and adults, at the present time it is advisable to consume Mugil sp. and Geloina sp., taken in wet season only and not in dry

  19. Impact of predation on the polychaete Hediste diversicolor in estuarine intertidal flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Susana; Granadeiro, José Pedro; Vinagre, Catarina; França, Susana; Cabral, Henrique N.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2008-07-01

    In estuarine sediment flats benthic macroinvertebrates are intensively consumed by a variety of predators, such as aquatic birds and nekton (mostly fish and crustaceans). However, there is still a lack of conclusive studies that evaluate if this predation has a relevant impact on the populations of those invertebrates, which are a key element of the estuarine food chain. In the Tagus estuary we experimentally tested and quantified the impact of predation on the polychaete Hediste diversicolor, one of the most important prey for a variety of predators in many estuaries. Using an exclusion experiment, we compared the seasonal variation in the densities of H. diversicolor from February to November in sediment plots (1) available to both bird and nekton predators, (2) just to nekton, and (3) without predators. We also followed changes in the abundance of potential predators throughout the study. The lowest densities were systematically observed in the plots accessible to all predators, followed by those which excluded just birds, and finally by those that excluded all predators. The exclosures were in place for 9 months, at the end of which the average density of H. diversicolor in the plots protected from all predators was eight times greater than in those without any protection. These results demonstrate that predation had a major impact on the densities of H. diversicolor. The relative importance of bird and nekton predation varied along the study, and this seems to be determined by different peaks of abundance of the two types of predators. However, when present in high densities, birds and nekton seem to have a similar impact on H. diversicolor. Our results suggest that predation is a key factor on the population dynamics of H. diversicolor. In addition, the levels of predation that we observed suggest that this polychaete can be a limited resource, and this could have major ecological consequences for predators for which it is a key prey.

  20. Sediment abiotic patterns in current and newly created intertidal habitats from an impacted estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beauchard, O.; Teuchies, J.; Jacobs, S.; Struyf, E.; Van der Spiet, T.; Meire, P.

    2014-01-01

    The controlled reduced tide system (CRT) is a new technique for restoring tidal marshes and is being tested in the Schelde estuary (Belgium). Biogeochemical processes within a CRT were hypothesized to support and improve several estuarine functions such as sediment trapping and nutrient burial. In

  1. Anomalous behaviour of uranium isotopes in backwater sediments of Zuari river

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joshi, L.U.; Zingde, M.D.; Abidi, S.A.H.

    The surface leaching of the labile component of uranium has been carried out in estuarine sediments of Zuari River in Goa, India The measurements of alpha activities of sup(238) U, sup(235) U and sup(234) U in the leachates indicated a remarkable...

  2. Changes in N cycling induced by Ulva detritus enrichment of sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgal accumulation and decomposition in shallow water environments typically result in an increase in the organic matter content of the sediment, affecting both benthic metabolism and nutrient dynamics. The present study investigates how a pulse addition of Ulva detritus to estuarine sedimen...

  3. Microtox as an indicator of sediment toxicity in southeastern estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLorenzo, M.E. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Ringwood, A.H. [Marine Resources Research Inst., Charleston, SC (United States); Ross, P.E. [The Citadel, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sediment quality is an important factor in the health of an aquatic environment. Microtox has proven to be a sensitive, quick and repeatable method for analyzing sediment toxicity. The Microtox bioassay was used as an estuarine sediment toxicity test in the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) of the southeast (Carolinian Province) during the 1993--1995 sampling seasons. Photobacterium phosphoreum, naturally bioluminescent bacteria, were exposed to sediments and EC50 values were obtained by measuring decreases in light production. The correlation between Microtox-generated EC50 values and the sediment chemistry of 24 EMAP sites in South Carolina and Georgia was evaluated. Multivariate analyses were used to determine the variables most influential in differentiating the sites. Concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, pesticides, metals, and other abiotic variables were considered in the analyses.

  4. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological evaluation of estuarine water quality during a dredging operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Sandro R.; Correa, Albertina X.R.; Schettini, Carlos A.F.; Schwingel, Paulo R.; Sperb, Rafael M.; Radetski, Claudemir M. [Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas da Terra e do Mar, Univ. do Vale do Itajai, Itajai, SC (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Most of the information concerning the effects of contaminated sediments on estuarine organisms deals with the impacts of bed forming sediments. The ecotoxicological potential at the time of a dredging operation is more difficult to assess, and few studies have dealt specifically with resuspended contaminated sediments. The aim of this study was to determine whether release of contaminants through sediment resuspension during a dredging operation in the Itajai-acu estuary (Brazil) changed the water quality classification and had an ecotoxicological impact on the near-field water column during the critical moment of this operation. Materials and methods: Waters from two sites (control and dredged sites) were analyzed for physicochemical parameters before, during, and after a dredging operation. In parallel, a short-term, sensitive battery of biotests (bacteria, algae, and daphnids) was performed with water samples before and during this operation according to the ISO bioassay protocols. Results and discussion: No short-term toxicity was observed with waters collected before or during the dredging operation. The results showed that desorption of contaminants from suspended particles of sediments with a low level of contamination during a dredging operation lowered the water quality in the near-field water column but that this did not promote significant acute toxicity effects on the organisms tested. Conclusions: More detailed studies are needed (e.g., the question of the reliability of biotests under turbulent, particle-rich conditions) to fully understand this complex issue regarding water column ecotoxicity during the whole dredging operation and to support decisions on the management of dredging activities. (orig.)

  5. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ana R; Richardson, Tammi L; Pinckney, James L

    2015-11-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC50s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L(-1), 240 mg L(-1) for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L(-1) for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC50 of 80 mg L(-1). Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of Trace Metals Contamination of Surface Water and Sediment: A Case Study of Mvudi River, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua N. Edokpayi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Trace metals contamination of rivers and sediments remains a global threat to biodiversity and humans. This study was carried out to assess the variation pattern in trace metals contamination in Mvudi River water and sediments for the period of January–June 2014. Metal concentrations were analyzed using an inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer after nitric acid digestion. A compliance study for the water samples was performed using the guidelines of the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF of South Africa and the World Health Organization (WHO. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA sediment quality guidelines for marine and estuarine sediments and the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment sediment guidelines (CCME for freshwater sediments were used to determine the possible toxic effects of the metals on aquatic organisms. pH (7.2–7.7 and conductivity (10.5–16.1 mS/m values complied with DWAF and WHO standards for domestic water use. Turbidity values in nephelometric turbidity units (NTU were in the range of 1.9–429 and exceeded the guideline values. The monthly average levels of trace metals in the water and sediments of Mvudi River were in the range of: Al (1.01–9.644 mg/L and 4296–5557 mg/kg, Cd (0.0003–0.002 mg/L and from below the detection limit to 2.19 mg/kg, Cr (0.015–0.357 mg/L and 44.23–149.52 mg/kg, Cu (0.024–0.185 mg/L and 13.22–1027 mg/kg, Fe (0.702–2.645 mg/L and 3840–6982 mg/kg, Mn (0.081–0.521 mg/L and 279–1638 mg/kg, Pb (0.002–0.042 mg/L and 1.775-4.157 mg/kg and Zn (0.031–0.261 mg/L and 14.481–39.88 mg/kg. The average concentrations of Al, Cr, Fe, Mn and Pb in the water samples exceeded the recommended guidelines of DWAF and WHO for domestic water use. High concentrations of Al and Fe were determined in the sediment samples. Generally, the concentrations of Cd, Cr and Cu in the sediments exceeded the corresponding effect range low

  7. Variations of sediment toxicity in a tidal estuary: a case study of the South Passage, Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinjuan; Shi, Huahong; Dai, Zhijun; Mei, Xuefei

    2015-06-01

    Sediments in estuaries, especially those containing a large reservoir of contaminants released from urban and industrial activities, have had great impacts on benthic fauna and associated species. A better understanding of the toxicity of contaminants in estuarine sediments is of great significance to ecological assessments. Here, based on the collected sediments from neap to spring tides in the South Passage, Changjiang Estuary, the toxicity of the sediments was first studied using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The results showed that the extracts of estuarine sediments induced multiple malformations in the embryos and that the phenotypes of malformation had two distinct patterns of variations corresponding to the tidal cycles. The phenotypes in the first pattern were dominated by hypopigmentation and edema of the heart, and the pattern was mainly controlled by fine-grained fractions. The phenotypes in the second pattern were dominated by edema of the heart and enlarged proctodeum, and it was mostly controlled by coarse-grain fractions. The sediment toxicity was higher during the spring and flood tides, which may be influenced by the grain size and sediment resuspension. Furthermore, obvious periodicities existed in the changes of the percentages of hatching (14-16 h and 6 h), enlarged proctodeum (15-18 h), and bent tail (5-7 h) due to the influence of tidal cycles. Moreover, our results also suggested that FETAX is an appropriate cost-effective biological monitoring tool to assess estuarine ecological health in contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of bio-physical cohesive substrates on sediment winnowing and bedform development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Leiping; Parsons, Daniel; Manning, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Existing sediment transport and bedform size predictions for natural open-channel flows in many environments are seriously impeded by a lack of process-based knowledge concerning the dynamics of complex bed sediment mixtures comprising cohesionless sand and biologically-active cohesive muds. A series of flume experiments (14 experimental runs) with different substrate mixtures of sand-clay-EPS (Extracellular Polymeric Substance) are combined with a detailed estuarine field survey (Dee estuary, NW England) to investigate the development of bedform morphologies and characteristics of suspended sediment over bio-physical cohesive substrates. The experimental results indicate that winnowing and sediment sorting can occur pervasively in bio-physical cohesive sediment - flow systems. Importantly however, the evolution of the bed and bedform dynamics, and hence turbulence production, is significantly reduced as bed substrate cohesivity increases. The estuarine subtidal zone survey also revealed that the bio-physical cohesion provided by both the clay and microorganism fractions in the bed plays a significant role in controlling the interactions between bed substrate and sediment suspension, deposition and bedform generation. The work will be presented here concludes by outlining the need to extend and revisit the effects of cohesivity in morphodynamic systems and the sets of parameters presently used in numerical modelling, particularly in the context of the impact of climate change on estuarine and coastal systems.

  9. Reversing tidal flow and estuarine morphodynamics in the Metronome laboratory flume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.; Leuven, J.R.F.W.; Braat, L.; van der Vegt, M.; van Maarseveen, M.C.G.; Markies, H.; Roosendaal, C.; van Eijk, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective is to test a novel experimental principle for creating reversing tidal flows of sufficient strength to cause estuarine morphodynamics. The study of estuarine morphodynamics has hitherto been limited to field observation and numerical modelling, whilst fluvial morphodynamics have

  10. Studies on growth and age of bivalves from temperate and tropical estuarine ecosystems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    Comparison of growth progression and age composition of Abra alba and Nuculana minuta from temperate estuarine ecosystem with Meretrix casta and Paphia malabarica from tropical estuarine environment, revealed that the annual growth rate in tropical...

  11. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2...

  12. How can climate change and engineered water conveyance affect sediment dynamics in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achete, Fernanda; Van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Jan Adriaan; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration is an important estuarine health indicator. Estuarine ecosystems rely on the maintenance of habitat conditions, which are changing due to direct human impact and climate change. This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change relative to engineering measures on estuarine fine sediment dynamics and sediment budgets. We use the highly engineered San Francisco Bay-Delta system as a case study. We apply a process-based modeling approach (Delft3D-FM) to assess the changes in hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics resulting from climate change and engineering scenarios. The scenarios consider a direct human impact (shift in water pumping location), climate change (sea level rise and suspended sediment concentration decrease), and abrupt disasters (island flooding, possibly as the results of an earthquake). Levee failure has the largest impact on the hydrodynamics of the system. Reduction in sediment input from the watershed has the greatest impact on turbidity levels, which are key to primary production and define habitat conditions for endemic species. Sea level rise leads to more sediment suspension and a net sediment export if little room for accommodation is left in the system due to continuous engineering works. Mitigation measures like levee reinforcement are effective for addressing direct human impacts, but less effective for a persistent, widespread, and increasing threat like sea level rise. Progressive adaptive mitigation measures to the changes in sediment and flow dynamics resulting from sea level rise may be a more effective strategy. Our approach shows that a validated process-based model is a useful tool to address long-term (decades to centuries) changes in sediment dynamics in highly engineered estuarine systems. In addition, our modeling approach provides a useful basis for long-term, process-based studies addressing ecosystem dynamics and health.

  13. RESULTS OF SOLID PHASE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS WITH REDUCED SEDIMENT VOLUMES FOR SEDIMENT TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development and standardization of sediment toxicity test methods for freshwater organisms have been underway for several years. Both EPA and ASTM have published methods for assessing the short-term (e.g., 10-d) toxicity of sediments to two benthic freshwater organisms (Hyalella ...

  14. Site-specific features influence sediment stability of intertidal flats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Defew

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The factors that influence the sediment stability and the transport of estuarine mudflats are not yet fully understood but knowledge of them is essential in coastal engineering applications and pollution ecology studies. The suggestion that variation in predictive models of sediment stability might be due to site-specific characteristics is investigated using data from four estuarine mudflats (Eden Estuary, Scotland, the Biezelingsche Ham, Zandkreek, and Molenplaat mudflats in The Netherlands. These estuaries differ in their environmental conditions, macrofaunal species composition and local features (e.g. Enteromorpha mats, migratory biofilms. Stable and unstable sediments were compared, and mean chlorophyll-a concentrations and granulometry of the sediments were significantly different between the two groups. Step-wise multiple linear regressions were applied to the sediment stability data of all sites to establish the influences on erosion threshold of microphytobenthic biomass, water content, granulometry, organic carbon content and the abundance of dominant macrofaunal species. The stability of each site was influenced by different factors. Sediment stability of the Eden Estuary was affected by the Enteromorpha bloom; Biezelingsche Ham was influenced by the highly migratory nature of the diatom biofilms and the abundance of Corophium volutator; the polychaete worm Arenicola marina had a net negative effect on sediment stability of the Zandkreek; and the Molenplaat was influenced by microphytobenthic biomass. This research highlights the need for site-specific calibration of models and suggests that a universal proxy parameter for sediment stability is unlikely to be obtained. Keywords: sediment stability; erosion threshold; cohesive strength meter; microphytobenthos; Enteromorpha spp.

  15. Estuarine shoreline and sandline change model skill and predicted probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E. L.; Passeri, Davina; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2016-01-01

    The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline and sandline change for study areas in Virginia, Maryland, and New Jersey. The models examined the influence of hydrologic and physical variables related to long-term and event-driven (Hurricane Sandy) estuarine back-barrier shoreline and overwash (sandline) change. Input variables were constructed into a Bayesian Network (BN) using Netica. To evaluate the ability of the BN to reproduce the observations used to train the model, the skill, log likelihood ratio and probability predictions were utilized. These data are the probability and skill metrics for all four models: the long-term (LT) back-barrier shoreline change, event-driven (HS) back-barrier shoreline change, long-term (LT) sandline change, and event-driven (HS) sandline change.

  16. Building a new regulatory paradigm for coastal and estuarine acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, J.; Cai, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification regulation generally falls under the authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA, P.L. 92-500). The CWA has been a powerful tool to improve the country's water quality, but it is most adept at addressing point-source pollutants and contaminants. It requires policymakers to determine "natural levels" of the target pollutant and to attribute changes in water quality to a specific source, both of which are tough or impossible tests for the diffuse carbon imbalance that is associated with ocean acidification, even if we could easily identify the threshold level for harm to organisms (Boehm, 2015). Even where regulators have tried to apply CWA to address acidification, they have been confronted by a lack of baseline data, an inability to specifically identify sources within their jurisdiction, and the fact that existing water quality standards do not capture the impairments that are associated with ocean acidification (Cooley, 2015). In fact, there was a lawsuit brought by the Center for Biological Diversity against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) alleging the agency had failure to regulate this issue. In the end, the courts sided with the EPA, and it continues to struggle with how to use pH and/or saturation state to define a point at which a water body becomes impaired and a threat to sea-life and natural resources. We present an analysis of the complexities related to regulating ocean acidification, the history of work in this area, and suggest a solution that can be tailored to fit unique coastal and estuarine characteristics.

  17. Invasive Marine and Estuarine Animals of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    displace local fauna . Such effects may occur immediately, after some period of delay, or never be realized at all depending on the characteristics...has become the dominant infaunal species in the bay, displacing native fauna (Carlton et al. 1990, Nichols et al. 1990, Lee et al. 2003). It may be...intertidal and subtidal sediments from Siberia to the Red Sea and is now found in Australia, New Zealand, the eastern Mediterranean, and southern France

  18. The chemical, physical and structural properties of estuarine ice in Great Bay, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meese, D.A.; Gow, A.J.; Mayewski, P.A.; Ficklin, W.; Loder, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide general information on the chemical, physical and structural properties of estuarine ice and show how it compares with sea ice found at higher latitudes in order to determine whether the ice in Great Bay can be used as an analog in the study of arctic sea ice. Ice cores and water samples were collected during the 1983-1984 winter season at Adams Point in Great Bay, New Hampshire. Concentrations of chloride, nitrogen (as nitrate and nitrite), bromide, phosphate, sulfate and silicate were determined for samples chosen on the basis of identifiable stratigraphic layers (i.e. bubble size and shape, sediment layers, etc.). Similarities between ice formation in Great Bay and those in the arctic regions include the nature of the freezing process and the ice types produced. In addition, the distribution and concentration of chemical constituents were found to be similar to those observed in arctic sea ice. Factors affecting the chemistry of the ice in Great Bay include rainfall during the freezing season, the presence of sediment layers in the ice cores, the nature of incorporation of brine into the crystal structure of the ice and the drainage of brine. ?? 1987.

  19. Contribution of Spartina maritima to the reduction of eutrophication in estuarine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Ana I. [IO - Institute of Oceanography, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); IMAR - Institute of Marine Research, Department of Zoology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)], E-mail: aisousa@fc.ul.pt; Lillebo, Ana I. [CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Cacador, Isabel [IO - Institute of Oceanography, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Pardal, Miguel A. [IMAR - Institute of Marine Research, Department of Zoology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2008-12-15

    Salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, performing important ecosystem functions, particularly nutrient recycling. In this study, a comparison is made between Mondego and Tagus estuaries in relation to the role of Spartina maritima in nitrogen retention capacity and cycling. Two mono-specific S. maritima stands per estuary were studied during 1 yr (biomass, nitrogen (N) pools, litter production, decomposition rates). Results showed that the oldest Tagus salt marsh population presented higher annual belowground biomass and N productions, and a slower decomposition rate for litter, contributing to the higher N accumulation in the sediment, whereas S. maritima younger marshes had higher aboveground biomass production. Detritus moved by tides represented a huge amount of aboveground production, probably significant when considering the N balance of these salt marshes. Results reinforce the functions of salt marshes as contributing to a reduction of eutrophication in transitional waters, namely through sedimentation processes. - The crucial capacity of salt marshes to retain nitrogen, thus reducing eutrophication, greatly depends on the salt marsh maturity, rather than the estuarine system.

  20. Aggregation, sedimentation, dissolution and bioavailability of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand their fate and transport in estuarine systems, the aggregation, sedimentation, and dissolution of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in seawater were investigated. Hydrodynamic size increased from 40 to 60 nm to >1 mm within 1 h in seawater, and the aggregates were highly polydispersed. Their sedimentation rates in seawater were measured to be 4–10 mm/day. Humic acid (HA), further increased their size and polydispersity, and slowed sedimentation. Light increased their dissolution and release of dissolved Cd. The ZnS shell also slowed release of Cd ions. With sufficient light, HA increased the dissolution of QDs, while with low light, HA alone did not change their dissolution. The benthic zone in estuarine systems is the most probable long-term destination of QDs due to aggregation and sedimentation. The bioavailability of was evaluated using the mysid Americamysis bahia. The 7-day LC50s of particulate and dissolved QDs were 290 and 23 μg (total Cd)/L, respectively. For mysids, the acute toxicity appears to be from Cd ions; however, research on the effects of QDs should be conducted with other organisms where QDs may be lodged in critical tissues such as gills or filtering apparatus and Cd ions may be released and delivered directly to those tissues. Because of their increasing use and value to society, cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) will inevitably find their way into marine systems. In an effort to understand the fate and transport of CdSe QDs in estuar

  1. Ubiquity of microplastics in coastal seafloor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, S D; Sinclair, M; Levi, C J; Reeves, S E; Edgar, G J

    2017-08-15

    Microplastic pollutants occur in marine environments globally, however estimates of seafloor concentrations are rare. Here we apply a novel method to quantify size-graded (0.038-4.0mm diam.) concentrations of plastics in marine sediments from 42 coastal and estuarine sites spanning pollution gradients across south-eastern Australia. Acid digestion/density separation revealed 9552 individual microplastics from 2.84l of sediment across all samples; equating to a regional average of 3.4 microplastics·ml -1 sediment. Microplastics occurred as filaments (84% of total) and particle forms (16% of total). Positive correlations between microplastic filaments and wave exposure, and microplastic particles with finer sediments, indicate hydrological/sediment-matrix properties are important for deposition/retention. Contrary to expectations, positive relationships were not evident between microplastics and other pollutants (heavy metals/sewage), nor were negative relationships with neighbouring reef biota detected. Rather, microplastics were ubiquitous across sampling sites. Positive associations with some faunal-elements (i.e. invertebrate species richness) nevertheless suggest high potential for microplastic ingestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fatty acids in an estuarine mangrove ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel M Alikunhi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Los ácidos grasos se han utilizado con éxito para estudiar la transferencia de materia orgánica en las redes alimentarias costeras y estuarinas. Para delinear las interacciones tróficas en las redes, se analizaron perfiles de ácidos grasos en las especies de microbios (Azotobacter vinelandii y Lactobacillus xylosus, camarones (Metapenaeus monoceros y Macrobrachium rosenbergii y peces (Mugil cephalus, que están asociadas con la descomposición de las hojas de dos especies de mangle, Rhizophora apiculata y Avicennia marina. Los ácidos grasos, con excepción de los de cadena larga, exhiben cambios durante la descomposición de las hojas de mangle, con una reducción de los ácidos grasos saturados y un aumento de los monoinsaturados. Los ácidos grasos ramificados están ausentes en las hojas de mangle sin descomponer, pero presentes de manera significativa en las hojas descompuestas, en camarones y peces, representando una fuente importante para ellos. Esto revela que los microbios son productores dominantes que contribuyen significativamente con los peces y camarones en el ecosistema de manglar. Este trabajo demuestra que los marcadores biológicos de los ácidos grasos son una herramienta eficaz para la identificación de las interacciones tróficas entre los productores dominantes y consumidores en este manglar.Fatty acids have been successfully used to trace the transfer of organic matter in coastal and estuarine food webs. To delineate these web connections, fatty acid profiles were analyzed in species of microbes (Azotobacter vinelandii, and Lactobacillus xylosus, prawns (Metapenaeus monoceros and Macrobrachium rosenbergii and finfish (Mugil cephalus, that are associated with decomposing leaves of two mangrove species, Rhizophora apiculata and Avicennia marina. The fatty acids, except long chain fatty acids, exhibit changes during decomposition of mangrove leaves with a reduction of saturated fatty acids and an increase of

  3. Spatial variability of metal bioaccumulation in estuarine killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) at the Callahan mine superfund site, Brooksville, ME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Hannah J; Buckman, Kate L; Bugge, Deenie M; Chen, Celia Y

    2013-11-01

    The former Callahan Mine Site in Brooksville, ME, is an open-pit, hardrock mine site in an intertidal system, thus providing a unique opportunity to evaluate how metal-enriched sediments and overlying water impact estuarine food webs. Copper, zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations in sediment, whole water, and Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were evaluated at sites in Goose Pond (GP; Callahan Mine Site) and at reference sites. The metal concentrations of sediment, water, and fish were spatially distinct and significantly greater at the mine site than in the reference estuary. Sediment concentrations were particularly elevated and were above probable effects levels for all four metals adjacent to the tailings pile. Even in this well-mixed system, water metal concentrations were significantly elevated adjacent to the tailings pile, and concentrations of Cu and Zn were above ambient water-quality criteria for chronic marine exposure. Neither organic matter in the sediment nor salinity or pH of the water explained the metal concentrations. Adjacent to the tailings pile, killifish metal body burdens were elevated and were significantly related to both sediment and aqueous concentrations. In conclusion, (1) the contaminated sediment and seepage from the tailings impoundment and waste rock pile no. 3 create a continual flux of metals into the water column, (2) the metals are bioavailable and bioconcentrating as evident in the killifish tissue concentrations, and (3) Callahan Mine is directly affecting metal bioaccumulation in fauna residing in the GP estuary and, potentially, in Penobscot Bay by the way of “trophic nekton relay.”

  4. Estimates of natural salinity and hydrology in a subtropical estuarine ecosystem: implications for Greater Everglades restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Frank E.; Wingard, G. Lynn; Pitts, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the natural patterns of freshwater flow into estuarine ecosystems occurred in many locations around the world beginning in the twentieth century. To effectively restore these systems, establishing a pre-alteration perspective allows managers to develop science-based restoration targets for salinity and hydrology. This paper describes a process to develop targets based on natural hydrologic functions by coupling paleoecology and regression models using the subtropical Greater Everglades Ecosystem as an example. Paleoecological investigations characterize the circa 1900 CE (pre-alteration) salinity regime in Florida Bay based on molluscan remains in sediment cores. These paleosalinity estimates are converted into time series estimates of paleo-based salinity, stage, and flow using numeric and statistical models. Model outputs are weighted using the mean square error statistic and then combined. Results indicate that, in the absence of water management, salinity in Florida Bay would be about 3 to 9 salinity units lower than current conditions. To achieve this target, upstream freshwater levels must be about 0.25 m higher than indicated by recent observed data, with increased flow inputs to Florida Bay between 2.1 and 3.7 times existing flows. This flow deficit is comparable to the average volume of water currently being diverted from the Everglades ecosystem by water management. The products (paleo-based Florida Bay salinity and upstream hydrology) provide estimates of pre-alteration hydrology and salinity that represent target restoration conditions. This method can be applied to any estuarine ecosystem with available paleoecologic data and empirical and/or model-based hydrologic data.

  5. Biomarker responses and PAH ratios in fish inhabiting an estuarine urban waterway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rafael Mendonça; Sadauskas-Henrique, Helen; de Almeida-Val, Vera Maria Fonseca; Val, Adalberto Luis; Nice, Helen Elizabeth; Gagnon, Marthe Monique

    2017-10-01

    Many cities worldwide are established adjacent to estuaries and their catchments resulting in estuarine contamination due to intense anthropogenic activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate if fish living in an estuarine urban waterway were affected by contamination, via the measurement of a suite of biomarkers of fish health. Black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) were sampled in a small urban embayment and a suite of biomarkers of fish health measured. These were condition factor (CF), liver somatic index (LSI), gonadosomatic index (GSI), hepatic EROD activity, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biliary metabolites, serum sorbitol dehydrogenase (s-SDH) and branchial enzymes cytochrome C oxidase (CCO), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities. The biomarkers of exposure EROD activity, and pyrene- and B(a)P-type biliary metabolites confirmed current or recent exposure of the fish and that fish were metabolizing contaminants. Relative to a reference site, LSI was higher in fish collected in the urban inlet as was the metabolic enzyme LDH activity. CF, GSI, s-SDH, CCO, and naphthalene-type metabolites were at similar levels in the urban inlet relative to the reference site. PAH biliary metabolite ratios of high-molecular-weight to low-molecular-weight suggest that fish from the urban inlet were exposed to pyrogenic PAHs, likely from legacy contamination and road runoff entering the embayment. Similarly, the sediment PAH ratios and the freshness indices suggested legacy contamination of a pyrogenic source, likely originating from the adjacent historic gasworks site and a degree of contamination of petrogenic nature entering the inlet via storm water discharge. Biomarkers of exposure and effect confirmed that black bream collected in the Claisebrook Cove inlet, Western Australia, are currently exposed to contamination and are experiencing metabolic perturbations not observed in fish collected at a nearby reference site. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. White willow sexual regeneration capacity under estuarine conditions in times of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus-Michalczyk, Heike; Hanelt, Dieter; Denstorf, Julian; Jensen, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Tidal wetlands provide both habitats for coastal populations and wildlife, and ecosystem services for human welfare. Building with nature regarding cost-effective coastal protection is of increasing interest. Much research has been carried out on plant reproduction capacities in mangroves and salt marshes, but less is known on this issue in tidal freshwater wetlands. Willows are being successfully used for bank stabilization in riverine habitats, however, today white willow softwood forests in tidal wetlands are highly fragmented, and restoration is required e.g. by the European Habitats Directive. Recently, tolerance to increasing salinity and tidal flooding was found for vegetative propagules of floodplain willows. However, the establishment of autochthonous sexual recruits is necessary to conserve the genetic diversity of local populations, and thus may be preferable in restoration. The germination and early seedling establishment of Salix alba (white willow) was experimentally studied under simulated estuarine conditions. The species tolerance to increasing salinity (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2) was tested in a climate chamber, and its tolerance to flooding at different tidal treatments (control, spring tide, daily tide 15 min and 2 h flooding) in the greenhouse. Germination was neither affected by increasing salinity nor by tidal flooding. Salix seedlings established up to salinity 1.5, but cotyledon performance and radicle growth was largely reduced at salinity 2. Under tidal flooding, seedling growth was similar in all treatments. However, in the treatments with daily tides seedling anchorage in the substrate took more than two weeks, and fewer seedlings reached a suitable length to approach the high water line. We assess S. alba sexual regeneration under estuarine conditions as generally possible. Further studies are needed on the effects of sedimentation-erosion processes on willow establishment in the field, especially on feedbacks between Salix survival and

  7. Mercury profiles in sediment from the marginal high of Arabian Sea: An indicator of increasing anthropogenic Hg input

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Vudamala, K.; Chennuri, K.; Armoury, K.; Linsy, P.; Ramteke, D.; Sebastian, T.; Jayachandran, S.; Naik, C.; Naik, R.; Nath, B.N.

    P, et al (2008) Sulfide and iron control on mercury speciation in anoxic estuarine sediment slurries. Mar Chem 111:214–220. Hare A, Stern G a, Macdonald RW, et al (2008) Contemporary and preindustrial mass budgets of mercury in the Hudson Bay...

  8. Transverse structure of tidal flow, residual flow and sediment concentration in estuaries: sensitivity to tidal forcing and water depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijts, K.M.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831867; de Swart, H.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449725; Schramkowski, G.P.; Schuttelaars, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical and a numerical model are used to understand the response of velocity and sediment distributions over Gaussian-shaped estuarine cross-sections to changes in tidal forcing and water depth. The estuaries considered here are characterized by strong mixing and a relatively weak

  9. Sediment Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stoll, R

    2001-01-01

    ... variables such as porosity and grain-size distribution. The model is based on the classical Biot theory extended to take into account various mechanisms of energy loss that are known to be important in marine sediments...

  10. Oxygen consumption of the estuarine round herring Gilchristella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    species to the flow of energy through the food chain, it is important, in estuarine ecological studies, to assess the response of the metabolic rate to changes in environmental factors. In this study, which forms part of a detailed research programme into the biology of G. aestuarius in the Swart- kops estuary, Port Elizabeth, the ...

  11. The biology and taxonomic status of an estuarine population of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biology and taxonomic status of an estuarine population of Pranesus pinguis (Lacépède) (Teleostei: Atherinidae) in south east Africa. ... The structure and dimensions of the gill rakers related to the diet indicate that, although P. pinguis feeds mainly by capturing individual prey, it is also a facultative filter feeder.

  12. Does biodiversity of estuarine phytoplankton depend on hydrology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, JG; Wolff, WJ; Simas, TC; Bricker, SB

    2005-01-01

    Phytoplankton growth in estuaries is controlled by factors such as flushing, salinity tolerance, light, nutrients and grazing. Here, we show that biodiversity of estuarine phytoplankton is related to flushing, and illustrate this for some European estuaries. The implications for the definition of

  13. 76 FR 40338 - National Estuarine Research Reserve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... habitat conservation, water quality, community resilience, and public access. Since the last approved... vegetation, water quality, and invasive species. In addition to programmatic and staffing advances, the.../index.html . The revised management plan for the Old Woman Creek, OH National Estuarine Research Reserve...

  14. Marine and estuarine methylotrophs: Their abundance, activity and identity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Faria, D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    % at an optimum pH of 6 or 7. Methanol, when used as an additional carbon source, in the presence of nutrient broth concentration ranging from 0.08 to 0.4%, enhanced growth by 129% and respiration by 177% in estuarine isolates. Biochemical and physiological...

  15. Assessment of recreational boat-angling in a large estuarine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An access point study was conducted from June 2002 to May 2003 to collect fishing effort, catch, catch composition and socio-economic information from the recreational estuarine boat-fishery in Richards Bay Harbour on the east coast of South Africa. An estimated 10 977 individual angler-outings were undertaken annually ...

  16. The vertical migration behaviour of estuarine plankton | Grindley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of investigations on the vertical migration behaviour of estuarine zooplankton have been carried out in recent years. Several of these investigations have been carried out in collaboration with other zoologists and the detailed findings are being published separately. The work is reviewed here and an attempt is ...

  17. The population dynamics of the estuarine isopod Exosphaeroma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population dynamics of the estuarine isopod, Exosphaeroma hylocoetes, was investigated monthly from February 2006 to August 2007 in three temporarily open/closed Eastern Cape estuaries, the East and West Kleinemonde and Kasouga Estuaries. Mean isopod abundances and biomasses ranged between 0 and ...

  18. Tidal variations in the Sundarbans Estuarine System, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 4. Tidal variations in the Sundarbans Estuarine System, India. Meenakshi Chatterjee D Shankar G K Sen P Sanyal D Sundar G S Michael Abhisek Chatterjee P Amol Debabrata Mukherjee K Suprit A Mukherjee V Vijith Siddhartha Chatterjee Anwesha ...

  19. Wind-driven estuarine turbidity maxima in Mandovi Estuary, central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    driven estuarine turbidity maxima in Mandovi Estuary, central west coast of India. Pratima M Kessarkar V Purnachandra Rao R Shynu Ishfaq Mir Ahmad Prakash Mehra G S Michael D Sundar. Volume 118 Issue 4 August 2009 pp 369-377 ...

  20. Variability in estuarine water temperature gradients and influence on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variability in estuarine water temperature gradients and influence on the distribution of zooplankton: a biogeographical perspective. TH Wooldridge, SHP Deyzel. Abstract. Structure and variability of water temperature gradients and potential influence on distribution of two tropical zooplankters (the mysid Mesopodopsis ...

  1. A preliminary assessment of impacts on estuarine associated fauna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These factors have severely impacted on the fauna of the aquatic systems in the area, particularly the fish but also the macrocrustacea and benthos. Preliminary results show that the structure of the interlinked marine-estuarine-river-coastal lakes ecosystem has been disrupted due to a cessation of migratory movements by ...

  2. Macrophytes in estuarine gradients : Flow through flexible vegetation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic plants –or macrophytes- are an important part of coastal, estuarine and freshwater ecosystems worldwide, both from an ecological and an engineering viewpoint. Their meadows provide a wide range of ecosystem services: forming a physical protection of the shoreline, enhancing water quality and

  3. Benthic foraminiferal biocoenoses in the estuarine regimes of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    and the connecting long and narrow Cumbarjua canal of Goa, India. The lower reaches of the rivers are paved with a substrate consisting mostly of sand while it is silty-sand in the upper estuarine zones and clayey in the canal zone. The living Foraminifera...

  4. Non-indigenous marine and estuarine species in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    An overview is presented of non-indigenous marine and estuarine plant and animal species recorded from The Netherlands. In this list both exotic species from outside NW Europe and non-indigenous species from elsewhere in NW Europe are enumerated. Species that have been suggested to be non-indigenous

  5. Management options for restoring estuarine dynamics and implications for ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ysebaert, Tom; Hoek, van der Dirk Jan; Wortelboer, Rick; Wijsman, Jeroen W.M.; Tangelder, Marijn; Nolte, Arno

    2016-01-01

    The Delta Works, a series of dams and barriers constructed in the 1960's-1980's changed the estuarine landscape of the Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt delta (SW Netherlands) into more stagnant and disengaged freshwater, brackish water or saltwater lakes. The remaining tidal systems were adapted by building a

  6. A box model for representing estuarine physical processes in Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Whitney, Michael M.; Bryan, Frank O.; Tseng, Yu-heng

    2017-04-01

    Appropriately treating riverine freshwater discharge into the oceans in Earth system models is a challenging problem. Commonly, the river runoff is discharged into the ocean models with zero salinity and arbitrarily distributed either horizontally or vertically over several grid cells. Those approaches entirely neglect estuarine physical processes that modify river inputs before they reach the open ocean. In order to realistically represent riverine freshwater inputs in Earth system models, a physically based Estuary Box Model (EBM) is developed to parameterize the mixing processes in estuaries. The EBM represents the estuary exchange circulation with a two-layer box structure. It takes as input the river volume flux from the land surface model and the subsurface salinity at the estuary mouth from the ocean model. It delivers the estuarine outflow salinity and net volume flux into and out of the estuary to the ocean model. An offline test of the EBM forced with observed conditions for the Columbia River system shows good agreement with observations of outflow salinity and high-resolution simulations of the exchange flow volume flux. To illustrate the practicality of use of the EBM in an Earth system model, the EBM is implemented for all coastal grid cells with river runoff in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Compared to the standard version of CESM, which treats runoff as an augmentation to precipitation, the EBM increases sea surface salinity and reduces stratification near river mouths. The EBM also leads to significant regional and remote changes in CESM ocean surface salinities.

  7. Visual Sedimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Huron, Samuel; Vuillemot, Romain; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We introduce Visual Sedimentation, a novel design metaphor for visualizing data streams directly inspired by the physical process of sedimentation. Visualizing data streams (e. g., Tweets, RSS, Emails) is challenging as incoming data arrive at unpredictable rates and have to remain readable. For data streams, clearly expressing chronological order while avoiding clutter, and keeping aging data visible, are important. The metaphor is drawn from the real-world sedimentat...

  8. The use of acoustic doppler meters to estimate sediment and nutrient concentrations in freshwater inflows to Texas coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullmar Lucena; Micheal Lee

    2016-01-01

    Excessive sediment and nutrient loading are among the leading causes of impairment in water bodies of the United States due to their effect on biologic productivity, water quality, and aquatic food webs. Understanding the nutrient and suspended sediment loads affecting estuarine waters is fundamental to the assessment of the physical, chemical, and biological processes...

  9. Does sediment grain size affect diatom grazing by harpacticoid copepods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troch, Marleen; Houthoofd, Lieven; Chepurnov, Victor; Vanreusel, Ann

    2006-04-01

    Estuarine soft sediments support a diverse group of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms though the role of the sediment per se for the functioning of these organisms remains largely unknown. The present study aimed to test the effect of sediment grain size on the grazing activities of harpacticoid copepods. In controlled experiments, two common intertidal harpacticoid species (Paramphiascella fulvofasciata and Nitokra spinipes) were each offered a mix of two benthic diatom species (Navicula phyllepta and Seminavis robusta) in different sedimentary conditions. Several microcosms were created using a variety of sediment types, including fine silt (grained sands (125-250, 250-450, 100-300 microm), artificial 'sediments' of glass beads (250-500, 2000 microm) and even the absence of sediment was tested. The diatoms were enriched in the stable carbon (13)C to facilitate tracing in the harpacticoids. Both copepod species were able to graze on the diatoms with highest uptake when sediment was absent. In contrast, both harpacticoid species showed no uptake in silty conditions. In general, grazing was favoured when mean sediment grain size increased. The strong negative effect of fine grains on the grazer's efficiency can be explained by the resulting differences in the structure (and accessibility) of the diatom biofilm on the one hand and the mobility of the grazer on the other hand. In view of the subtle equilibrium between primary producers and grazers, these results might have important implications for the effect of siltation of tidal flats due to, e.g., human activities.

  10. Trace element contamination in the nearshore sediments of the Tamiraparani estuary, Southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magesh, N S; Chandrasekar, N; Krishnakumar, S; Simon Peter, T

    2017-03-15

    The present study focused on the elemental distribution of nearshore environment and to understand the interrelationship between different parameters such as trace elements, organic matter, calcium carbonate and sediment texture. For this purpose, 24 surface samples were collected from the nearshore environment using a stainless steel Van Veen grab sampler. The above said parameters indicate that nearshore sediment transport, contaminants from estuarine source and anthropogenic activities deteriorates the sediment quality in the nearshore area. The enrichment factor reveals that the sediments are enriched with Pb, Co, Ni and Cr, whereas the geoaccumulation index highlights that the sediments are polluted with Pb, Ni and Co. The elevated concentration of Pb in the nearshore sediments are possibly from the port activities and thermal power plants situated in the north of the study area. Proper management of industrial effluents is needed to curb further metal pollution in the nearshore environment off Tamiraparani estuary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide transformations in sediments along a salinity gradient in the Weser Estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael; Gieseke, Armin; de Beer, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    , a brackish water site with fluctuating salinity, and a marine site, the effects of environmental changes in nitrogen availability and salinity on microscale sediment dynamics were examined. Generally, sediment levels of intermediates were low: 1 to 25 µM NO2- and 0 to 8 µM N2O. However, significant variation......The dynamics of the nitrogen intermediates N2O and NO2- in estuarine sediments were studied along a salinity gradient in the eutrophied Weser Estuary (Germany) using microsensors for N2O, NO2-, NOx-, and O2. During dark incubations in the laboratory of sediment samples from a freshwater site...... was found in accumulation patterns and in the potential of the residing microbial community to control sediment releases of the intermediates. At fresh- and brackish water sites, NO2- production was found in the anoxic denitrification zone, and release from the sediments was effectively prevented...

  12. Risks to human health and estuarine ecology posed by pulling out creosote-treated timber on oyster farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul T

    2008-01-31

    Five oyster farms in Port Stephens, Australia were studied to identify consequences of using creosote-treated posts and the risks posed by removing the posts. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenols in sediments, timber, water and oyster tissue. Before posts were removed, the total PAHs in surface sediment on farms was 24.1 mgkg(-1) dry weight. This increased to 45.5 mgkg(-1) dry weight after the posts were pulled out and remained significantly higher 6 months later at 59.7 mgkg(-1) dry weight. A similar increase was found in deeper sediments. The sediment attached to creosote-treated posts had a total concentration of PAHs of 484-2642 mgkg(-1) dry weight, while the corresponding value for the sediment on tar-treated posts was only 30.7 mgkg(-1) dry weight. The surface timber of creosote-treated posts had high levels of PAHs and an average post contained 43 g of PAHs. The total PAHs dispersed to the environment when a creosote-treated post was pulled out was at least 0.67 g. The main species were PAHs with low-molecular weights: fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, acenaphthylene and chrysene. Benzo(a)pyrene represented 1-10% of PAHs in most samples. Bioassays with creosote-contaminated sediment revealed that Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerate) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) accumulated PAHs at (mgkg(-1) wet tissue weight): 11.3-15.3 and 35.5-47.9, respectively, when exposed for 5 days to water with contaminants needs to be managed in light of risks to human health and estuarine ecology.

  13. Process-based morphodynamic modeling of the Yangtze Estuary at a decadal timescale: Controls on estuarine evolution and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hua Long; Ding, Ping Xing; Wang, Zheng Bing; Ge, Jian Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the decadal morphodynamic evolution of estuaries and deltas and their controls is of vital importance regarding management for estuarine function and sustainable development. This work addresses this issue by applying a process-based model system (Delft3D) to hindcast and then forecast the morphodynamic evolution of the Yangtze Estuary at a decadal timescale. Forced by the river and tides, the model considers sand-mud mixture and the variations of river water discharge and sediment discharge. The morphodynamic model is validated against three periods, i.e., an accretion period (1958-1978), an erosion period (1986-1997) and a recent accretion period with human activities (2002 - 2010). Model results show good performance with respect to spatial erosion and deposition patterns, sediment volume changes, and hypsometry curves. The model reveals quite different behaviors for mud transport between the dry and wet seasons, which is subject to the prescription of river boundary conditions and bed composition. We define six scenarios to project evolution to the year 2030 under decreased river inputs and increased relative sea level. The simulations reveal that overwhelming amount of erosion will likely occur in the inner and mouth bar area of the estuary. Particularly, the mouth zone will shift from net deposition before 2010 to net erosion by 2030, mainly because of decreasing sediment supply. Changes in water discharge have minor effects on the projected trend. Net erosion will be considerable when the sediment supply is extremely low (100 Mt yr- 1) due to the abundance of erodible modern sediment in the Yangtze Estuary. Erosion within the mouth bar area may be unexpected, including the deepening of the tidal inlet at East Chongming mudflat and the formation of a flood channel on the seaward side of Jiuduansha Shoal. Overall, the model results provide valuable information for sustainable delta management under changing conditions for both the Yangtze system

  14. Drivers of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems: Discoveries from four decades of study in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, J.E.; Jassby, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    Poised at the interface of rivers, ocean, atmosphere and dense human settlement, estuaries are driven by a large array of natural and anthropogenic forces. San Francisco Bay exemplifies the fast-paced change occurring in many of the world's estuaries, bays and inland seas in response to these diverse forces. We use observations from this particularly well-studied estuary to illustrate responses to six drivers that are common agents of change where land and sea meet: water consumption and diversion; human modification of sediment supply; introduction of non-native species; sewage input; environmental policy; and climate shifts. In San Francisco Bay, responses to these drivers include, respectively, shifts in the timing and extent of freshwater inflow and salinity intrusion; decreasing turbidity; restructuring of plankton communities; nutrient enrichment; elimination of hypoxia and reduced metal contamination of biota; and food web changes that decrease resistance of the estuary to nutrient pollution. Detection of these changes and discovery of their causes through environmental monitoring have been essential for establishing and measuring outcomes of environmental policies that aim to maintain high water quality and sustain services provided by estuarine-coastal ecosystems. The wide range of variability time scales and the multiplicity of interacting drivers place heavy demands on estuarine monitoring programs. But the San Francisco Bay case study illustrates why the imperative for monitoring has never been greater.

  15. LIGHT-INDUCED MOTILE RESPONSES OF THE ESTUARINE BENTHIC DIATOMS NAVICULA PERMINUTA AND CYLINDROTHECA CLOSTERIUM (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Deirdre H; Brownlee, Colin; Taylor, Alison R; Geider, Richard J; Underwood, Graham J C

    2009-06-01

    Motility of estuarine epipelic (mud-inhabiting) diatoms is an important adaptation to living in biofilms present within fine sediments. Motility allows cells to migrate within the photic zone in response to a wide range of environmental stimuli. The motile responses of two species of benthic diatoms to photon fluence rates and spectral quality were investigated. Cultures of Navicula perminuta (Grunow) in van Heurck and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ehrenb.) J. C. Lewin et Reimann both exhibited photoaccumulation at ∼200 μmol · m(-2)  · s(-1) and photodispersal from photon flux densities (PFDs) of ∼15 μmol · m(-2)  · s(-1) . Photokinesis (changing cell speed) contributed toward photodispersal for both species, and red light (λ = 681-691 nm) was most effective at inducing this process. N. perminuta showed a phototactic (directional) response, with active movement in response to a light gradient. Although this response was exhibited in white light, these directional responses were only elicited by wavelengths from 430 to 510 nm. In contrast, C. closterium did not exhibit phototaxis under any light conditions used in this study. Motile benthic diatoms thus exhibit complex and sophisticated responses to light quantity and quality, involving combinations of photokinesis and phototaxis, which can contribute toward explaining the patterns of large-scale cell movements observed in natural estuarine biofilms. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  16. Peracarid assemblages of Zostera meadows in an estuarine ecosystem (O Grove inlet, NW Iberian Peninsula): spatial distribution and seasonal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquete, Patricia; Moreira, Juan; Troncoso, Jesús S.

    2011-12-01

    The Galician rias are singular and complex estuarine systems of great economic importance. Seagrasses are key elements of the ecosystem and favor the maintenance of high species diversity in benthic communities. Nevertheless, the ecological role of seagrass meadows in the Galician rias has been only partially assessed. Peracarid crustaceans are an important component of soft-bottom faunas and have great importance for the structure of benthic assemblages. In this work, species diversity, patterns of distribution and seasonal fluctuations of peracarids (Crustacea, Peracarida) are studied in estuarine sediments colonized by two species of Zostera ( Z. marina and Z. noltii) at the O Grove inlet (Ría de Arousa, Galicia, NW Iberian Peninsula). The spatial distribution of peracarid assemblages was characterized by high numerical dominances due to a few species, particularly tanaidaceans. The temporal study at a Z. marina meadow showed a strongly seasonal pattern defined by great fluctuations of the amphipod population, the latter being the dominant group in abundance and number of species. The highest numbers of species and individuals were observed in September, with minimum values in March. Analyses pointed out a high correlation among the granulometric features of the studied bottoms and the faunistic attributes. Nevertheless, the presence of the seagrasses should influence in a major way the hydrodynamic and sedimentary features of the habitat and utterly the spatial and temporal patterns observed in the peracarid assemblage in the O Grove inlet.

  17. High tides and rising seas: potential effects on estuarine waterbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, R.M.; Sanders, G.M.; Prosser, D.J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Greenberg, Russell; Maldonado, Jesus; Droege, Sam; McDonald, M.V.

    2006-01-01

    breeding range in the mid-Atlantic and their saltmarsh specialization. At a scale of 1?2 decades, vegetation changes (saltmeadow cordgrass [Spartina patens] and salt grass [Distichlis spicata] converting to smooth cordgrass [Spartina alternifl ora]), interior pond expansion and erosion of marshes will reduce nesting habitat for many of these species, but may enhance feeding habitat of migrant shorebirds and/or migrant or wintering waterfowl. At scales of 50?100 yr, reversion of marsh island complexes to open water may enhance populations of open-bay waterfowl, e.g., Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola) and Canvasback (Aythya valisneria), but reduce nesting habitats dramatically for the above named marsh-nesting species, may reduce estuarine productivity by loss of the detrital food web and nursery habitat for fish and invertebrates, and cause redistribution of waterfowl, shorebirds, and other species. Such scenarios are more likely to occur in the mid- and north Atlantic regions since these estuaries are lower in sediment delivery on average than those in the Southeast. A simple hypothetical example from New Jersey is presented where waterbirds are forced to shift from submerged natural marshes to nearby impoundments, resulting in roughly a 10-fold increase in density. Whether prey fauna are sufficiently abundant to support this level of increase remains an open question, but extreme densities in confined habitats would exacerbate competition, increase disease risk, and possibly increase predation.

  18. Sediment dynamics of an artificially deepened mesotidal coastal lagoon: An environmental magnetic investigation of Tauranga Harbour, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badesab, Firoz; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Briggs, Roger M.; Bryan, Karin R.; Just, Janna; Müller, Hendrik

    2017-07-01

    Tauranga Harbour, New Zealand's largest barrier-enclosed coastal lagoon, comprises two sub-basins with separate catchments, inlets and tidal channel systems. This study sets out to assess and investigate the sediment dispersal system of Tauranga Harbour using standard environmental magnetic and sedimentological methods. Compilations of rock magnetic and grain size data of surficial sediments collected from inflowing rivers, various estuarine environments (estuaries, tidal flats and tidal channels) and the adjacent nearshore mirror the net and differential sediment fluxes into and through the two sub-basins of this lagoon. For all studied depositional environments, the magnetogranulometric ratios SIRM/κ and ARM/κ are positively correlated with magnetic mineral content (SIRM, ARM, χ) in the sense that larger magnetic particles are associated with higher magnetic enrichment. Grain-size analyses show that magnetic enrichment during particle transport and deposition can result from grain-size as well as from grain-density fractionation. The periodically changing accumulation/erosion conditions provide for a selective retention of specific grain sizes and an enhancement of the heavier magnetic mineral particles. Magnetic crystal size and clastic grain size correlate poorly over the whole study area, but group within similar depositional environments. Coarser magnetic and clastic grain sizes and higher magnetite enrichment in the southern sub-basin can be reconciled with episodic flood runoff of the Wairoa River and a much larger, artificially deepened southern tidal inlet which likely enables higher tidal current velocities. Our approach of combining magnetic and clastic grain-size could be successfully implemented to establish a conceptual model of sediment dynamics and gravitational sorting within Tauranga Harbour.

  19. Modern diatom assemblages as tools for paleoenvironmental reconstruction: a case study from estuarine intertidal zones in southern Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana; Boski, Tomasz; Moura, Delminda; Szkornik, Katie; Witkowski, Andrzej; Connor, Simon; Laut, Lazaro; Sobrinho, Frederico; Oliveira, Sónia

    2017-04-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae that live in saline, brackish and freshwater environments, either floating in the water column or associated with various substrates (e.g., muddy and sandy sediments). Diatoms are sensitive to changes in environmental variables such as salinity, sediment texture, nutrient availability, light and temperature. This characteristic, along with their short lifespan, allows diatoms to quickly respond to environmental changes. Since the beginning of the 20th century, diatoms have been widely used to study the Holocene evolution of estuaries worldwide, particularly to reconstruct ecological responses to sea-level and climate changes. However, diatoms have been poorly studied in estuarine intertidal zones, due to the complexity of these environments, which have both fluvial and marine influences. The aim of this study was to understand diatom diversity and spatial distribution in intertidal zones from two geomorphologically and hydrologically distinct estuaries. Sediment samples were collected from within the intertidal zones along the Arade and Guadiana River estuaries in southern Iberia. The sampling points embraced almost all the tidal and salinity gradients of both estuaries, capturing the highest possible environmental variability and hence of diatom assemblages. At each sampling point, the salinity and pH of the sediment interstitial water were measured. The sediment samples were subdivided for diatom identification, textural analysis and organic matter determination. All sampling points were georeferenced by DGPS and the duration of tidal inundation was calculated for each site. Following diatom identification, the data were analysed statistically (i.e. cluster analysis, PCA, DCA and RDA). The present study revealed that there is a great diatom diversity in both estuaries (418 species), with several species new to science. The most important diatom species (with abundances higher or equal to 5%) occur in five ecological groups, which are

  20. Marine and estuarine natural microbial biofilms: ecological and biogeochemical dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Roger Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine and estuarine microbial biofilms are ubiquitously distributed worldwide and are increasingly of interest in basic and applied sciences because of their unique structural and functional features that make them remarkably different from the biota in the plankton. This is a review of some current scientific knowledge of naturally occurring microbial marine and estuarine biofilms including prokaryotic and microeukaryotic biota, but excluding research specifically on engineering and applied aspects of biofilms such as biofouling. Because the microbial communities including bacteria and protists are integral to the fundamental ecological and biogeochemical processes that support biofilm communities, particular attention is given to the structural and ecological aspects of microbial biofilm formation, succession, and maturation, as well as the dynamics of the interactions of the microbiota in biofilms. The intent is to highlight current state of scientific knowledge and possible avenues of future productive research, especially focusing on the ecological and biogeochemical dimensions.

  1. Long-term fluctuations in population of Semibalanus balanoides (L. (Crustacea in the estuarine zone of the Kola Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitina V. S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The intertidal population of the barnacles Semibalanus balanoides has been explored in the estuarine zone of the Tuloma River at the end of the Kola Bay for the first time. Barnacles S. balanoides are typical species for the littoral zone of the northern seas, they populate both the high and low salinity areas along the coast of the Barents Sea. The ecology and distribution of barnacle population in estuarine intertidal zones of the Barents Sea are not studied previously, and under the critical salinity conditions of any estuary, in particular. The investigation have been carried out on the littoral of the western (left shore of the southern tribe of the Kola Bay – the estuary section from the Tuloma bridge to the Cape Elovy. The studied site is a sandy-boulder beach with stony bars, its length is about 1 150 m, the area is about 126 500 m2. Counting the number of S. balanoides in clusters has been performed on site (without removal of the copepods from the population by the standard method for intertidal sampling. Simultaneously with the defining the number of barnacles for the period 2003–2014, the measurements of salinity and temperature of water and air have been made. The peculiarity of the estuarine barnacle population is their complete absence in the upper horizon of the littoral, and in the middle and the lower horizons they are found only within the channels of the littoral streams (3–20 specimens in the sample. For the first time the abundance and biomass of barnacles S. balanoides in this estuarine population has been determined, and the causes of their narrow-local distribution on the estuary littoral of the Tuloma River have been revealed. The main ecological factors determining the abundance and specific distribution of barnacles under the conditions of estuarine littoral have been established. The regular increase in the density of adult S. balanoides settlements along the gradient of water salinity from the Tuloma River to

  2. Coastal and estuarine resources of Bangladesh: management and conservation issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hena M. Kamal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The coastal area of Bangladesh includes a number of bays into which different types of rivers empty, creating an estuarine ecosystem adjacent to the shore. The main estuarine systems are Brahmaputra-Megna (Gangetic delta, Karnaphuly, Matamuhuri, Bakkhali and Naf rivers, which are comprised of mangroves, salt marshes, seagrass, seaweeds, fisheries, coastal birds, animals, coral reefs, deltas, salt beds, minerals and sand dunes. The estuarine environment, which serves as feeding, breeding and nursery grounds for a variety of animals, varies according to the volume of discharge of the river and tidal range. It is highly productive in terms of nutrient input from different sources that promotes other living resources in the estuaries. Drought conditions exist during the winter months, i.e. November to February, and effective rainfall is confined to the monsoon period, i.e. May to June. Changes in salinity and turbidity depend on annual rainfall. The colour of most estuarine waters is tea brown or brown due to heavy outflows during the monsoon. The tidal mixing and riverine discharge governs the distribution of the hydrological parameters. The pH of these waters is reported to be slightly alkaline (>7.66 and dissolved oxygen (<6.0 mg/l shows an inverse relationship to temperature. Studies of plankton have indicated two periods of maximum abundance, i.e. February-March and August-September. The abundance of fish and shrimp larvae varies in number and composition with season. Many marine and freshwater species are available in various types of coastal brackish water, which depend on monsoonal activities and local environmental conditions.

  3. Macrophytes in estuarine gradients: Flow through flexible vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic plants –or macrophytes- are an important part of coastal, estuarine and freshwater ecosystems worldwide, both from an ecological and an engineering viewpoint. Their meadows provide a wide range of ecosystem services: forming a physical protection of the shoreline, enhancing water quality and harbouring many other organisms. Unfortunately, these vegetations such as salt marshes, seagrasses or mangroves have been on the decline as a result of anthropogenic pressure and climate change, d...

  4. DCERP Defense Coastal/Estuarine Research Program Workshop Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    of its wastewater treatment plants into a single, more efficient treatment plant. As a result, effluent nutrient load has been significantly reduced...regions (including submerged aquatic vegetation, macroalgae and microalgae ) • Estuarine and riverine water column • Beach and dunes • Surf zone...indicators, both in terms of ecological health and human impacts. • Phytoplankton and benthic microalgae species, especially bloom-forming ones that

  5. TNT Biodegradation by Natural Microbial Assemblages at Estuarine Frontal Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    PAHs, PCBs, TCE, BTEX) and inorganic (e.g. metals, radionuclides) contaminants (see review by Brar et al. 2006). Over the past three decades, most...studies) rather than field ecology of estuarine and marine systems (Spain et al. 2000). As seen with virtually all contaminants , the application of... cyanobacteria or fungi (see review in Spain et al. 2000). Recently, there have been some reports using natural microbial assemblages from freshwater systems

  6. Coevolution of hydraulic, soil and vegetation processes in estuarine wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivisonno, Franco; Rodriguez, Jose F.; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saco, Patricia; Stenta, Hernan

    2014-05-01

    Estuarine wetlands of south eastern Australia, typically display a vegetation zonation with a sequence mudflats - mangrove forest - saltmarsh plains from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient. Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitats for fish and many terrestrial species. They also have a carbon sequestration capacity that surpasess terrestrial forest. Estuarine wetlands respond to sea-level rise by vertical accretion and horizontal landward migration, in order to maintain their position in the tidal frame. In situations in which buffer areas for landward migration are not available, saltmarsh can be lost due to mangrove encroachment. As a result of mangrove invasion associated in part with raising estuary water levels and urbanisation, coastal saltmarsh in parts of south-eastern Australia has been declared an endangered ecological community. Predicting estuarine wetlands response to sea-level rise requires modelling the coevolving dynamics of water flow, soil and vegetation. This paper presents preliminary results of our recently developed numerical model for wetland dynamics in wetlands of the Hunter estuary of NSW. The model simulates continuous tidal inflow into the wetland, and accounts for the effect of varying vegetation types on flow resistance. Coevolution effects appear as vegetation types are updated based on their preference to prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. The model also considers that accretion values vary with vegetation type. Simulations are driven using local information collected over several years, which includes estuary water levels, accretion rates, soil carbon content, flow resistance and vegetation preference to hydraulic conditions. Model results predict further saltmarsh loss under current conditions of moderate increase of estuary water levels.

  7. Managing bay and estuarine ecosystems for multiple services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, Lisa A.; Lester, Sarah E.; Ambrose, Richard; Andren, Anders; Beyeler, Marc; Connor, Michael S.; Eckman, James E.; Costa-Pierce, Barry A.; Gaines, Steven D.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Lenihan, Junter S.; Parrish, Julia; Peterson, Mark S.; Scaroni, Amy E.; Weis, Judith S.; Wendt, Dean E.

    2013-01-01

    Managers are moving from a model of managing individual sectors, human activities, or ecosystem services to an ecosystem-based management (EBM) approach which attempts to balance the range of services provided by ecosystems. Applying EBM is often difficult due to inherent tradeoffs in managing for different services. This challenge particularly holds for estuarine systems, which have been heavily altered in most regions and are often subject to intense management interventions. Estuarine managers can often choose among a range of management tactics to enhance a particular service; although some management actions will result in strong tradeoffs, others may enhance multiple services simultaneously. Management of estuarine ecosystems could be improved by distinguishing between optimal management actions for enhancing multiple services and those that have severe tradeoffs. This requires a framework that evaluates tradeoff scenarios and identifies management actions likely to benefit multiple services. We created a management action-services matrix as a first step towards assessing tradeoffs and providing managers with a decision support tool. We found that management actions that restored or enhanced natural vegetation (e.g., salt marsh and mangroves) and some shellfish (particularly oysters and oyster reef habitat) benefited multiple services. In contrast, management actions such as desalination, salt pond creation, sand mining, and large container shipping had large net negative effects on several of the other services considered in the matrix. Our framework provides resource managers a simple way to inform EBM decisions and can also be used as a first step in more sophisticated approaches that model service delivery.

  8. Influence of macrobenthos on chemical diagenesis of marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, R.C.

    1977-05-01

    Diagenetic reactions involving the decomposition of organic matter and the dissolution, mobilization, and reprecipitation of metals sensitive to oxidation-reduction reactions, are most intense and rapid in the upper 1 m and especially the upper 10 cm of marine sediment. It is in this upper zone where most benthic organisms live and interact with sediments and where exchange rates of dissolved and particulate material between sediment and overlying water are largely determined. In Long Island Sound, U.S.A., both spatial and temporal trends in sediment chemistry and the flux of material out of the bottom demonstrate the control of diagenesis by bottom fauna. /sup 234/Th//sup 238/U disequilibrium studies demonstrate that particle reworking rates near the sediment-water interface vary both temporally and spatially in the Sound. The most rapid reworking occurs in protobranch-inhabited bottom areas as do the highest /sup 234/Th inventories. Excess /sup 234/Th profiles in the sediment allow determination of the rates of selected diagenetic reactions, such as Mn/sup + +/ production, near the sediment surface. Both the /sup 234/Th disequilibrium and flux measurements indicate that intra-estuarine redistribution of metals continually takes place.

  9. Evaluation of sediment toxicity in different Portuguese estuaries: Ecological impact of metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafim, A.; Company, R.; Lopes, B.; Pereira, C.; Cravo, A.; Fonseca, V. F.; França, S.; Bebianno, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2013-09-01

    Estuaries are exposed to multiple sources of different pollutants which tend to be trapped in sediments. Estuarine sediments can become reservoirs of contaminants that under certain circumstances may be released back to the water column, increasing their availability to the biota. Therefore, assessing sediment quality, of which toxicity testing is one of the lines-of-evidence, is a key element in ecological risk assessment strategies for these ecosystems. The use of Vibrio fischeri as luminescence bacteria is particularly effective in evaluating contaminated sediment. In this study, the ecotoxicity of sediments from five Portuguese estuaries (Aveiro, Tejo, Sado, Mira and Guadiana), was evaluated with a bioassay considering the 50% bioluminescence reduction of V. fischeri bacterium (EC50). Also, the levels of metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants (PAHs) were determined in the same sites. Moreover the Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient index (SQG-Q) was assessed for all sediments. The EC50 values varied significantly between estuaries but were strongly correlated with the metal concentrations in the different sites. In general Tejo estuary show higher toxicity levels compared to the other estuaries (5-min EC50 values of 5.6 mg mL-1). The integration of sediment contamination data shows that regarding the metallic contamination all sites are moderately impacted, with a higher SQG-Q in the Tejo estuary. On the other hand, when this index is applied to the PAHs levels, all sites are considered unimpacted. This suggests that metal contaminants are the most significant cause of toxicity in these sediments. Nevertheless, other factors can be relevant for this outcome due to the geochemical complexity of estuarine sediments (which affects contaminant speciation and bioavailability) and probably the presence of multiple xenobiotics in these sediments.

  10. Levels, distributions and sources of veterinary antibiotics in the sediments of the Bohai Sea in China and surrounding estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghua; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Lianzhen; Fu, Chuancheng; Tu, Chen; Huang, Yujuan; Wu, Longhua; Tang, Jianhui; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-08-15

    Veterinary antibiotics are emerging contaminants of concern. A total of 139 samples comprising 104 marine sediments and 35 estuarine sediments were collected from the Bohai Sea area and analyzed for seventeen antibiotics. The results reveal that the presence and concentration of antibiotics were generally higher in the estuaries than in the sea. The highest antibiotic concentration, 4695μgkg(-1) of oxytetracycline, occurred in the estuarine sediment from Ziya New River. Bohai Bay and Laizhou Bay and the surrounding estuaries had higher concentrations of antibiotics. However, low levels of antibiotics detected were detected in Liaodong Bay in contrast to the high concentrations present in the surrounding estuaries. Spatial heterogeneity and principal component analysis suggest a large impact of terrestrial sources of the antibiotics contaminating the Bohai Sea. Risk quotients indicate that current levels of norfloxacin and oxytetracycline might be potentially hazardous to sensitive biota both in the Bohai Sea and in its surrounding estuaries. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Geochemical assessment of heavy metals pollution in surface sediments of Vellar and Coleroon estuaries, southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethaji, S; Kalaivanan, R; Arya Viswam; Jayaprakash, M

    2017-02-15

    Surface sediments were collected from Vellar and Coleroon estuaries for determine sediment texture, calcium carbonate, organic matter and heavy metals. Pollution indices such as pollution load index (PLI), contamination factor (CF), enrichment factor (EF) and geo-accumulation index (Igeo) were done for this study to know the level of heavy metals pollution in the estuarine ecosystem. Pearson correlation matrix and factor were used to assess the relationship and source of heavy metals in the estuarine sediments. The results of PLI values reveal that the study area was polluted by all the heavy metals. The calculated values of CF and Igeo followed the decreasing order Cu>Ni>Pb>Co>Cr>Zn>Mn>Fe and illustrate that Cu, Ni and Pb are contaminated due to anthropogenic sources in both estuaries. Correlation and factor analysis suggest that FeMn oxyhydroxides, organic matter and fine particles are responsible for high concentration of heavy metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Competition for sulfate and ethanol among Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfovibrio species isolated from intertidal sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Geerligs, H.J.; Sijtsma, L.; Veldkamp, H.

    1984-02-01

    Competition for sulfate and ethanol among Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfovibrio species isolated from estuarine sediments was studied in energy-limited chemostats. Desulfovibrio baculatus was the most successful competitor for limiting amounts of sulfate and ethanol, followed by Desulfobulbus propionicus. The success of Desulfovibrio baculatus was dependent on the availability of sufficient iron. Of the three species studied, Desulfobacter postgatei was the least successful competitor for limiting amounts of sulfate. Although stimulating the growth of Desulfobacter postgatei, addition of Ca-saturated illite particles to culture media did not affect the outcome of competition for sulfate. Thus, under sulfate limitation acetate accumulated. This phenomenon was briefly discussed in relation to the flow of electrons during anaerobic mineralization in marine and estuarine sulfate-limited sediments. 30 references.

  13. Characterisation of the suspended particulate matter in a stratified estuarine environment employing complementary techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Luis P.; Marino, Beatriz M.; Szupiany, Ricardo N.; Gallo, Marcos N.

    2017-09-01

    The ability to predict the sediment and nutrient circulation within estuarine waters is of significant economic and ecological importance. In these complex systems, flocculation is a dynamically active process that is directly affected by the prevalent environmental conditions. Consequently, the floc properties continuously change, which greatly complicates the characterisation of the suspended particle matter (SPM). In the present study, three different techniques are combined in a stratified estuary under quiet weather conditions and with a low river discharge to search for a solution to this problem. The challenge is to obtain the concentration, size and flux of suspended elements through selected cross-sections using the method based on the simultaneous backscatter records of 1200 and 600 kHz ADCPs, isokinetic sampling data and LISST-25X measurements. The two-ADCP method is highly effective for determining the SPM size distributions in a non-intrusive way. The isokinetic sampling and the LISST-25X diffractometer offer point measurements at specific depths, which are especially useful for calibrating the ADCP backscatter intensity as a function of the SPM concentration and size, and providing complementary information on the sites where acoustic records are not available. Limitations and potentials of the techniques applied are discussed.

  14. ECOLOGICAL DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN SYMPATRIC PSEUDOCRYPTIC SPECIES IN THE ESTUARINE BENTHIC DIATOM NAVICULA PHYLLEPTA (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanelslander, Bart; Créach, Véronique; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Ernst, Anneliese; Chepurnov, Victor A; Sahan, Emel; Muyzer, Gerard; Stal, Lucas J; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of cryptic and pseudocryptic species, often living in sympatry, is widespread among microalgae. This phenomenon raises important questions about niche partitioning between these closely related species. To date, however, few studies have addressed the ecological mechanisms underlying sympatry in cryptic and pseudocryptic species. As a result, we have only a limited understanding of the factors that govern their distribution along environmental gradients. Here, we used the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 18S rRNA gene, and the RUBISCO LSU (rbcL) chloroplast gene sequence data together with cell wall morphology to show that estuarine populations of the widespread and common benthic diatom Navicula phyllepta Kütz. consist of pseudocryptic species. Growth rate measurements in function of salinity showed that N. phyllepta strains assigned to the different species differed in their tolerance to low salinities (<5 practical salinity units, psu), which was reflected by their different (but widely overlapping) distribution in the Westerschelde estuary (the Netherlands). Multiple regression analyses of the factors determining the abundance of the different species in field samples revealed that, in addition to salinity, sediment type and ammonium concentrations were probably equally important. Our results show that N. phyllepta sensu lato comprises different species with specialized ecophysiological characteristics rather than generalists with a broad adaptability to different environmental conditions. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  15. Natural radionuclides in the Brazilian coast region: 1. Estuarine complex Cananeia-Iguape, Sao Paulo State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, E.J. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Silva Neto, Paulo C.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Ribeiro, Andreza P., E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: biologofabiano10@gmail.com, E-mail: ptpoli@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Mangrove forests are of utmost important ecosystems for biogeochemical transport processes in a global scale because of the preferential transport via sediments and organic matter from continents to oceans. Such ecosystems are the richest biodiversity areas, in which bioaccumulation of chemical substances can be expected for some species, in this case, there is a lack of knowledge of natural radionuclides accumulation in mangrove vegetation. This work encompasses the first results obtained for the Estuarine Complex Cananeia-Iguape, a peculiar coast area of the Sao Paulo State, Brazil. In 2011, leaf samples of Rhyzophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa trees with perimeter at the breast height higher than 15 cm were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual Ilha do Cardoso. Sample preparation consisted of leaf washing, oven-drying, milling in porcelain mortar at the particle size lower than 0.5 mm. Portions of 10 g were transferred to polyethylene vials of appropriate geometry for the analysis by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Reference materials were analyzed together to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure. K-40 was preferentially allocated in leaves. Some accumulation in leaves was noticed for Pb-210 and Ac-228 depending on the species, indicating differences of radionuclide distribution in the mangrove vegetation. (author)

  16. Distributions of key exposure factors controlling the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals in an estuarine food web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannuzzi, T.J.; Harrington, N.W.; Shear, N.M.; Curry, C.L.; Carlson-Lynch, H.; Henning, M.H. [ChemRisk, Portland, ME (United States); Su, S.H. [Bailey Research Associates, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Rabbe, D.E. [Chemical Land Holdings, Inc., Kearny, NJ (United States)

    1996-11-01

    A critical evaluation of literature on the behavior, physiology, and ecology of common estuarine organisms was conducted in an attempt to develop probabilistic distributions for those variables that influence the uptake of xenobiotic chemicals from sediments, water, and food sources. The ranges, central tendencies, and distributions of several key parameter values were identified for dominant organisms from various trophic levels, including the polychaete Nereis virens, mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and striped bass (Morone saxatilis). The exposure factors of interest included ingestion rate for various food sources, growth rate, respiration rate, excretion rate, body weight, wet/dry weight ratio, lipid content, chemical assimilation efficiency, and food assimilation efficiency. These exposure factors are critical to the execution of mechanistic food web models, which, when properly calibrated, can be used to estimate tissue concentrations of nonionic chemicals in aquatic organisms based on knowledge of the bioenergetics and feeding interactions within a food web and the sediment and water concentrations of chemicals. In this article the authors describe the use of distributions for various exposure factors in the context of a mechanistic bioaccumulation model that is amenable to probabilistic analyses for multiple organisms within a food web. A case study is provided which compares the estimated versus measured concentrations of five polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in a representative food web from the tidal portion of the Passaic River, New Jersey, USA. The results suggest that the model is accurate within an order of magnitude or less in estimating the bioaccumulation of PCBs in this food web without calibration. The results of a model sensitivity analysis suggest that the input parameters which most influence the output of the model are both chemical and organism specific.

  17. Photosynthesis in estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos is limited by inorganic carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sónia; Cartaxana, Paulo; Máguas, Cristina; Marques da Silva, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability on photosynthesis were studied in two estuarine intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) communities and in the model diatom species Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Kinetics of DIC acquisition, measured with a liquid-phase oxygen electrode, showed higher K(1/2)(DIC) (0.31 mM) and Vm (7.78 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)) for MPB suspensions than for P. tricornutum (K(1/2)(DIC) = 0.23 mM; Vm = 4.64 nmol min(-1) µg (Chl a)(-1)), suggesting the predominance of species with lower affinity for DIC and higher photosynthetic capacity in the MPB. The net photosynthetic rate of the MPB suspensions reached saturation at a DIC concentration of 1-1.5 mM. This range was lower than the concentrations found in the interstitial water of the top 5-mm sediment layer, suggesting no limitation of photosynthesis by DIC in the MPB communities. Accordingly, carbon isotope discrimination revealed a moderate activity of CO2-concentrating mechanisms in the MPB. However, addition of NaHCO3 to intact MPB biofilms caused a significant increase in the relative maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (rETR max) measured by imaging pulse-amplitude modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence. These results suggest local depletion of DIC at the photic layer of the sediment (the first few hundred µm), where MPB cells accumulate during diurnal low tides. This work provides the first direct experimental evidence of DIC limitation of photosynthesis in highly productive intertidal MPB communities.

  18. Sediment Acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-02

    approximately one grain size (0.35 mm) out of 600 grain size total. The experiment was repeated with a 2.54 cm thick layer of water filled polyurethane foam ...Kaolinite Clay for Shear Waves 70 it vi .- m -77- I. INTRODUCTION A determination of the viscoelastic properties of ocean sediments can be made by...temperature of these additional viscoelastic properties have not been studied in detail. This section contains shear wave and compressional wave data

  19. Heavy metals in surface sediments from nine estuaries along the coast of Bohai Bay, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guanghong; Shang, Jingmin; Pan, Ling; Wang, Zhongliang

    2014-05-15

    Concentrations of heavy metals in river water and sediment were investigated in nine estuaries along the coast of Bohai Bay, Northern China. Multivariate statistical techniques such as principal component analysis and cluster analysis, in combination with metal concentration analysis and correlation analysis, were used to identify the possible sources of the metals and the pollution pattern in nine estuaries along the coast of Bohai Bay. The environmental risks of metals, evaluated by sediment quality guidelines and background values, revealed Hg contamination in the estuaries. However, levels of Cd in estuarine sediments were low, and they were less than those levels in river sediments, partly due to the high mobility and dilution of river or seawater. Cd did not contribute to sediment deposits in estuaries. High organic matter from effluents from large municipal sewage treatment plants was predominantly responsible for restricting Hg mobility from the river to Bohai Bay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metals in crab, oyster and sediment in two South Carolina estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    The blue crab Callinectes sapidus and the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica have the ability to concentrate metals from the marine environment. From August 1979 to May 1981, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc concentrations were determined quarterly for crab, oyster, and bottom sediment from two estuarine areas in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina. The results of the analyses indicate that crab muscle and oyster meats obtained from locations nearest domestic and industrial activities have the highest Cu and Zn concentrations.

  1. Suspended sediment diffusion mechanisms in the Yangtze Estuary influenced by wind fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Zhou, Yunxuan; Shen, Fang

    2018-01-01

    The complexity of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) distribution and diffusion has been widely recognized because it is influenced by sediment supply and various hydrodynamic forcing conditions that vary over space and over time. Sediment suspended by waves and transported by currents are the dominant sediment transport mechanisms in estuarine and coastal areas. However, it is unclear to what extent the SSC distribution is impacted by each hydrodynamic factor. Research on the quantitative influence of wind fields on the SSC diffusion range will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of sediment transport change and sedimentary geomorphic evolution. This study determined SSC from three Envisat Medium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer acquisitions, covering the Yangtze Estuary and adjacent water area under the same season and tidal conditions but with varying wind conditions. SSC was examined based on the Semi-Empirical Radiative Transfer model, which has been well validated with the observation data. Integrating the corresponding wind field information from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts further facilitated the discussion of wind fields affecting SSC, and in turn the influence of water and suspended sediment transportation and diffusion in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal area. The results demonstrated that the SSC present much more distinctive fluvial features in the inner estuary and wind fields are one of the major factors controlling the range of turbid water diffusion.

  2. The morphological development of newly inundated intertidal areas: the mechanisms driving the early evolution of an estuarine environment designed and constructed by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jonathan; Burgess, Heidi; Cundy, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    elevation excavated during site construction, drained by a series of natural and engineered channels. Results indicate different rates and patterns of sedimentation and resulting morphology across the site. Near the breach continuous sedimentation of > 15cm over a 1 year period was measured, compared to rhythmic periods of accretion and erosion inland. These variations have been related to site design, former land-use and different sediment sources. The evolution of developing creek networks, formed by pluvial action and sediment "piping", are controlled by unconformities found in the sub-surface sediment related to Holocene site evolution. Analysis of the sedimentary processes and subsequent morphological development of these areas provides a new insight into coastal and estuarine evolution in an anthropogenically designed and constructed estuarine environment.

  3. Dispersion, Speciation, and Pollution Assessment of Heavy Metals Pb and Zn in Surface Sediment from Disturbed Ecosystem of Jeneberang Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najamuddin; Surahman

    2017-10-01

    Surface sediments were collected from seventeen stations in Jeneberang waters (riverine, estuarine, and marine). Lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, and the speciation of metals was obtained by a sequential extraction procedure. Dispersion of Pb and Zn were found higher in the riverine and marine samples than the estuarine samples. Following speciation, the metals were found similar composition of fraction in the riverine and estuarine samples but any different in the marine samples. The results indicated that there is a change of dispersion pattern and speciation composition of metals due to the presence of the dam that lies at the boundary between the estuary and the river. The toxicity unit was indicated low toxicity level; pollution level was in weakly to moderately polluted while the aquatic environment risk attributed were no risky to light risk.

  4. Super(210) Pb based trace element fluxes in the nearshore and estuarine sediments off Bombay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, P.; Borole, D.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    , suggested that the majority of the anthropogenic metals were either exported beyond the creek and nearshore region thus making the THC a passive link between the land and the sea for trace metals or largely removed prior to their entering the THC proper...

  5. A multi-method approach for the study of lanthanum speciation in coastal and estuarine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Babu, P.V.R.; Sarma, V.V.

    of the chemical reagents used for mercury extraction. Analytica Chimica Acta 631, 1-12. Jardine, P.M., Sparks, D.L., 1984. Potassium-calcium exchange in a multireactive soil system: I. Kinetics, Soil Science Society of America Journal 48, 39-45. Jordan, D....H., Reghenzani, J.R., Asher, C.J., 1990. Rare earth in Chinese agriculture. Report to the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, Victoria. Turekian, K. K., Wedepohl, K. H., 1961. Distribution of the elements in some major units...

  6. Arsenic enrichment in estuarine sediments-impact of iron and manganese mining

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, M.; Joseph, T.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, K.K.C.; Paimpillii, J.S.

    River Mandovi and Zuari, Goa (west coast of India) are flowing through iron and manganese mining areas and are heavily used for iron and manganese ore transport. This region generates 25-30 million tons of mining rejects per year. The iron ore...

  7. Microbial community structure of surface sediments from a tropical estuarine environment using next generation sequencing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Kuchi, N.; Kale, D.; Anil, A.C.

    ). The decomposition of organic matter by microbes is a key process of carbon cycling in aquatic ecosystems (Stern et al., 2007). The world’s oceans harbour different microbial communities of Bacteria, Archaea, protists, and unicellular fungi which account for most...., 2006. Microbial diversity in the deep sea and the underexplored “rare biosphere”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103, 12115-12120. Stern, J., Wang, Y., Gu, B., Newman, J., 2007. Distribution and turnover of carbon in natural and constructed wetlands...

  8. Biological Processes Affecting Bioaccumulation, Transfer, and Toxicity of Metal Contaminants in Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    and Cd because of their importance in DoD sites and other industrial point sources. Hg comes from the combustion of fossil fuels, cadmium from...described in Dutton et al. (2011) (Dutton and Fisher). At the end of feeding the initial radioactivity was recorded and regular timepoints were taken...effects of Release, pH, and food on the zooplankton, Simocephalus vetulus and larval amphibian , Rana pipiens. Ecotoxicol and Environ Safety 71: 209

  9. Mercury bioremoval by Yarrowia strains isolated from sediments of mercury-polluted estuarine water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetibo, Ganiyu Oladunjoye; Ishola, Shakirat Titilayo; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Ilori, Matthew Olusoji; Endo, Ginro

    2015-04-01

    Difference in mercuric ion removal by resting and growing cells of two mercury-resistant yeast strains, identified as Yarrowia spp. (strains Idd1 and Idd2), were studied. Resting cells of strain Idd2 exhibited high maximum Hg(2+) removal capacity (59 mg mercury per g dry cell weight [gdw(-1)]) by adsorption than those of resting cells of strain Idd1 (32 mg gdw(-1)). The resting cells of strain Idd2 exhibited a higher Hg(2+) desorption capacity using CaCl2 (68 %) and EDTA (48 %) than strain Idd1, depicting weaker binding of Hg(2+) onto strain Idd2 unlike strain Idd1. The actively growing yeast cells showed opposite Hg removal characteristics to those of the resting cells. Strain Idd1 adsorbed less Hg(2+) from culture medium supplemented with Hg(2+) than strain Idd2. However, the growing strain Idd1 reduced and vaporized 27 % of supplemented Hg(2+) as metallic mercury (Hg(0)), while the growing strains Idd2 vaporized 15 % of the supplemented Hg(2+). These two yeast strains are potential biotechnological tools for the eventual bioremediation of polluted aquatic systems.

  10. Evaluation of a tidal flat sediment nourishment as estuarine management measure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, van der J.; Reinders, J.; Rooijen, van A.; Holzhauer, H.; Ysebaert, T.

    2015-01-01

    The tidal flats in the Eastern Scheldt tidal basin (The Netherlands) are eroding as a result of the construction of the storm surge barrier. These intertidal areas are important foraging grounds for birds and therefore it is important to mitigate the negative effects of erosion. As a pilot, a

  11. Evaluation of a tidal flat sediment nourishment as estuarine management measure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Reinders, J.; van Rooijen, A.; Holzhauer, Harriette; Ysebaert, T.

    2015-01-01

    The tidal flats in the Eastern Scheldt tidal basin (The Netherlands) are eroding as a result of the construction of the storm surge barrier. These intertidal areas are important foraging grounds for birds and therefore it is important to mitigate the negative effects of erosion. As a pilot, a small

  12. Fungal phylogenetic diversity in estuarine sediments of Gautami Godavari River, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandavilli, R.; Meena, R.; Shenoy, B.D.

    for the survival of several species of flora and fauna, which are native to this environment (Krishnamurthy et al. 1987). Mangroves provide a supportive environment for several practices such as fish farming etc. Fungal biodiversity, especially in dynamic...

  13. (Bio)degradation of RDX and HMX in Marine/Estuarine Water and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    absent in other known Shewanella species, and distinguishes itself by the presence of arginine dehydrolase, omithine decarboxylase and chitinase , and...groundwater contaminated with RDX near an ammunition plant in Iowa, US. The second major significant contribution of the present work is the potential

  14. Sulfur and oxygen isotope tracing of sulfate driven anaerobic methane oxidation in estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antler, Gilad; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Herut, Barak; Davies, Alicia; Rennie, Victoria C. F.; Sivan, Orit

    2014-04-01

    We use multiple stable isotope measurements in two highly stratified estuaries located along the Mediterranean coast of Israel (the Yarqon and the Qishon) to explore the consumption of sulfate through the anaerobic oxidation of methane (sulfate-driven AOM). At both sites, pore fluid sulfate is rapidly consumed within the upper 15-20 cm. Although the pore fluid sulfate and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration profiles change over a similar range with respect to depth, the sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the pore fluid sulfate and the carbon isotopes in the pore fluid DIC are fundamentally different. This pore fluid isotope geochemistry indicates that the microbial mechanism of sulfate reduction differs between the studied sites. We suggest that in the Yarqon estuary, sulfate is consumed entirely through AOM, whereas in the Qishon, both AOM and bacterial sulfate reduction through organic matter oxidation coexist. These results have implications for understanding the microbial mechanisms behind sulfate-driven AOM. Our data compilation from marine and marginal marine environments supports the conclusion that the intracellular pathways of sulfate reduction varies among environments with sulfate-driven AOM. The data can be used to elucidate new pathways in the cycling of methane and sulfate, and the findings are applicable to the broader marine environment.

  15. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J; Dong, Liang F; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J; Nedwell, David B

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon...

  16. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Beach Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Event-driven beach sandline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  17. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Beach Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Long-term sandline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  18. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Beach Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Event-driven backshore shoreline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  19. Contaminant Interactions and Biological Effects of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Benthic Estuarine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Ashley Nicole

    Island Sound (LIS) sediment to test 25% NBH sediment, 50% NBH sediment, 75% NBH sediment, and 100% NBH sediment. The results of this work showed increased organism survival and decreased bioaccumulation of PCBs in treatments amended with SWNT, with the greatest reduction observed in the 25% NBH sediment treatment group amended with 10 mg SWNT/g dry sediment. Polyethylene (PE) passive samplers indicated a reduction of interstitial water (ITW) PCB concentration of greater than 90% in the 25% NBH sediment + 10 mg SWNT/g dry sediment amendment. The ITW concentration was reduced because PCBs were not desorbing from the SWNT. Lower bioavailability leads to reduced potential for toxic effects, supporting the observation of increased survival and decreased bioaccumulation. Once in the sediment, not only are SWNT not bioavailable, they act as a highly sorptive phase, such as black carbon (BC), into which hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), such as PCBS and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), can partition, thereby reducing the toxicity and bioavailability of co-occurring HOCs. To more fully understand the impact of SWNT in this environment, their biodegradability also needs to be investigated. Biodegradation of SWNT could lead to release and/or transformation of sorbed HOCs as well as a change in the inherent transport, toxicity, and bioaccumulation of SWNT in the estuarine environment. Because the persistence of SWNT will be a primary determinant of the fate of these materials in the environment, I conducted experiments to determine if the fungus Trametes versicolor, the natural bacterial communities present in NBH sediment, and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge could degrade or mineralize oxidized 14C-SWNT. Over a six month time period, no significant degradation or mineralization was observed. In all treatments, approximately 99% of the 14C-SWNT remained associated with the solid phase, with only approximately 0.8% of added 14C present as dissolved species

  20. The development and application of landscape evolution models to coupled coast-estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chloe; Coulthard, Tom; Parsons, Daniel R.; Manson, Susan; Barkwith, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Landscape Evolution Models (LEMs) are proven to be useful tools in understanding the morphodynamics of coast and estuarine systems. However, perhaps owing to the lack of research in this area, current models are not capable of simulating the dynamic interactions between these systems and their co-evolution at the meso-scale. Through a novel coupling of numerical models, this research is designed to explore coupled coastal-estuarine interactions, controls on system behaviour and the influence that environmental change could have. This will contribute to the understanding of the morphodynamics of these systems and how they may behave and evolve over the next century in response to climate changes, with the aim of informing management practices. This goal is being achieved through the modification and coupling of the one-line Coastline Evolution Model (CEM) with the hydrodynamic LEM CAESAR-Lisflood (C-L). The major issues faced with coupling these programs are their differing complexities and the limited graphical visualisations produced by the CEM that hinder the dissemination of results. The work towards overcoming these issues and reported here, include a new version of the CEM that incorporates a range of more complex geomorphological processes and boasts a graphical user interface that guides users through model set-up and projects a live output during model runs. The improved version is a stand-alone tool that can be used for further research projects and for teaching purposes. A sensitivity analysis using the Morris method has been completed to identify which key variables, including wave climate, erosion and weathering values, dominate the control of model behaviour. The model is being applied and tested using the evolution of the Holderness Coast, Humber Estuary and Spurn Point on the east coast of England (UK), which possess diverse geomorphologies and complex, co-evolving sediment pathways. Simulations using the modified CEM are currently being completed to

  1. Habitat loss and gain: Influence on habitat attractiveness for estuarine fish communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Eva; Ramos, Sandra; Elliott, Michael; Franco, Anita; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2017-10-01

    Habitat structure and complexity influence the structuring and functioning of fish communities. Habitat changes are one of the main pressures affecting estuarine systems worldwide, yet the degree and rate of change and its impact on fish communities is still poorly understood. In order to quantify historical modifications in habitat structure, an ecohydrological classification system using physiotopes, i.e. units with homogenous abiotic characteristics, was developed for the lower Lima estuary (NW Portugal). Field data, aerial imagery, historical maps and interpolation methods were used to map input variables, including bathymetry, substratum (hard/soft), sediment composition, hydrodynamics (current velocity) and vegetation coverage. Physiotopes were then mapped for the years of 1933 and 2013 and the areas lost and gained over the 80 years were quantified. The implications of changes for the benthic and demersal fish communities using the lower estuary were estimated using the attractiveness to those communities of each physiotope, while considering the main estuarine habitat functions for fish, namely spawning, nursery, feeding and refuge areas and migratory routes. The lower estuary was highly affected due to urbanisation and development and, following a port/harbour expansion, its boundary moved seaward causing an increase in total area. Modifications led to the loss of most of its sandy and saltmarsh intertidal physiotopes, which were replaced by deeper subtidal physiotopes. The most attractive physiotopes for fish (defined as the way in which they supported the fish ecological features) decreased in area while less attractive ones increased, producing an overall lower attractiveness of the studied area in 2013 compared to 1933. The implications of habitat alterations for the fish using the estuary include potential changes in the nursery carrying capacity and the functioning of the fish community. The study also highlighted the poor knowledge of the impacts of

  2. Modelling the morphodynamics and co-evolution of coast and estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chloe; Coulthard, Tom; Parsons, Daniel R.; Manson, Susan; Barkwith, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The morphodynamics of coast and estuarine environments are known to be sensitive to environmental change and sea-level rise. However, whilst these systems have received considerable individual research attention, how they interact and co-evolve is relatively understudied. These systems are intrinsically linked and it is therefore advantageous to study them holistically in order to build a more comprehensive understanding of their behaviour and to inform sustainable management over the long term. Complex environments such as these are often studied using numerical modelling techniques. Inherent from the limited research in this area, existing models are currently not capable of simulating dynamic coast-estuarine interactions. A new model is being developed through coupling the one-line Coastline Evolution Model (CEM) with CAESAR-Lisflood (C-L), a hydrodynamic Landscape Evolution Model. It is intended that the eventual model be used to advance the understanding of these systems and how they may evolve over the mid to long term in response to climate change. In the UK, the Holderness Coast, Humber Estuary and Spurn Point system offers a diverse and complex case study for this research. Holderness is one of the fastest eroding coastlines in Europe and research suggests that the large volumes of material removed from its cliffs are responsible for the formation of the Spurn Point feature and for the Holocene infilling of the Humber Estuary. Marine, fluvial and coastal processes are continually reshaping this system and over the next century, it is predicted that climate change could lead to increased erosion along the coast and supply of material to the Humber Estuary and Spurn Point. How this manifests will be hugely influential to the future morphology of these systems and the existence of Spurn Point. Progress to date includes a new version of the CEM that has been prepared for integration into C-L and includes an improved graphical user interface and more complex

  3. Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. M.; Keiser, K.; Graves, S. J.; Conover, H.; Ebersole, S.

    2009-12-01

    and hurricanes on sediment disturbance, suspension, transport, and deposition in the north central Gulf of Mexico. At least five end user organizations plus the UAHuntsville’s Information Technology and Systems Center and the Geological Survey of Alabama project team, will use the products to improve measurements of water quality (Dauphin Island Sea Lab); assess sedimentation during storm events and its impact on critical coastal habitats (Alabama Department of Conservation); assess sedimentation versus sea level rise in natural marshes (Department of the Interior); and improve understanding of the impact of sediment and sediment deposits on water quality, living resources, and habitats of the estuarine environment (Mobile Bay National Estuary Program); and assess storm surge effects on coastal ecosystems (NOAA Center for Coastal Ocean Research). The products will be managed and accessed through the SANDS Portal, an on-line data repository with a user interface customized to provide data and information for specific storm events. By making multi-spectral satellite products available for multiple common storm events, SANDS will provide end users the opportunity to better analyze, detect, and identify compositions and patterns of suspended sediment and sediment deposits.

  4. Mapping coastal & estuarine vegetation using VHR satellite imagery in St Lucia

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lück-Vogel, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The iSimangaliso Wetland Park in which the St Lucia estuary is embedded hosts the largest estuarine system in Africa (155 000 Ha). Remote sensing mapping of the composition of the otherwise largely inaccessible estuarine vegetation provides a...

  5. 15 CFR 921.52 - Promotion and coordination of estuarine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. 921.52 Section 921.52 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... Research Projects § 921.52 Promotion and coordination of estuarine research. (a) NOAA will promote and...

  6. A survey of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in estuarine waters and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined whether the estuarine and freshwater environment in Beira, Mozambique, serves as a reservoir of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139. Ninety-nine estuarine water samples were collected at 6 sites in Beira. An additional 54 samples were collected from rural areas around Beira which included 3 freshwater ...

  7. Development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for North and South Atlantic littoral zones: comparison against national and international sediment quality benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueri, R B; Cesar, A; Abessa, D M S; Torres, R J; Morais, R D; Riba, I; Pereira, C D S; Nascimento, M R L; Mozeto, A A; DelValls, T A

    2009-10-15

    We aimed to develop site-specific sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for two estuarine and port zones in Southeastern Brazil (Santos Estuarine System and Paranaguá Estuarine System) and three in Southern Spain (Ría of Huelva, Bay of Cádiz, and Bay of Algeciras), and compare these values against national and traditionally used international benchmark values. Site-specific SQGs were derived based on sediment physical-chemical, toxicological, and benthic community data integrated through multivariate analysis. This technique allowed the identification of chemicals of concern and the establishment of effects range correlatively to individual concentrations of contaminants for each site of study. The results revealed that sediments from Santos channel, as well as inner portions of the SES, are considered highly polluted (exceeding SQGs-high) by metals, PAHs and PCBs. High pollution by PAHs and some metals was found in São Vicente channel. In PES, sediments from inner portions (proximities of the Ponta do Félix port's terminal and the Port of Paranaguá) are highly polluted by metals and PAHs, including one zone inside the limits of an environmental protection area. In Gulf of Cádiz, SQGs exceedences were found in Ria of Huelva (all analysed metals and PAHs), in the surroundings of the Port of Cádiz (Bay of Cádiz) (metals), and in Bay of Algeciras (Ni and PAHs). The site-specific SQGs derived in this study are more restricted than national SQGs applied in Brazil and Spain, as well as international guidelines. This finding confirms the importance of the development of site-specific SQGs to support the characterisation of sediments and dredged material. The use of the same methodology to derive SQGs in Brazilian and Spanish port zones confirmed the applicability of this technique with an international scope and provided a harmonised methodology for site-specific SQGs derivation.

  8. Seasonal variation of surface sediments composition in Mondego River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Vale, Carlos; Ferreira, Ana Maria; Pereira, Eduarda; Pardal, Miguel Angelo; Marques, João Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of major (Al, Si, Ca, Mg, Fe), minor (Mn), and trace elements (Zn, Pb, Cr, Cu, Ag, Cd, Hg) and organochlorine compounds (PCB congeners, pp'DDT, and metabolites) were determined in 24 samples of surface sediments (0-5 cm) collected along the Mondego River estuary in two periods: February and August 2003. All sediment samples showed low levels of contamination reflecting the weak industrialization of the region. Higher incorporation of elements (Mg, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu, Cd, Hg) and DDT was registered in muds deposited in the inner part of the south channel. Sediments of the rest of the estuary are coarser (mean Si/Al ratio around 11) and showed much lower Me/Al ratios. Concentrations of Mn, Pb, Ag, and PCB showed no geographical distribution tendency. However, Pb, Cu, Ag, Zn, Cd ratios to Al and PCB concentrations were higher in coarser sediments collected in February than in August. In addition, the lower chlorinated CBs (tri + tetra-CB) showed a higher proportion in sediments collected in February, due to its higher mobility and low contamination in the area. The results obtained in this river-dominated estuarine system, with weak local contamination sources, indicate that chemical composition of surface sediments reflects the diffuse source of contaminants associated with the rainy season.

  9. North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve's (NERR) Estuarine Water Quality Data for the North Inlet and Winyah Bay Estuaries, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1993-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The North Inlet Estuary and the adjacent lower northeastern section of the Winyah Bay Estuary were designated as part of the National Estuarine Research Reserve...

  10. Transport of persistent organic pollutants by microplastics in estuarine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastics represent an increasing source of anthropogenic contamination in aquatic environments, where they may also act as scavengers and transporters of persistent organic pollutants. As estuaries are amongst the most productive aquatic systems, it is important to understand sorption behaviour and transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) by microplastics along estuarine gradients. The effects of salinity sorption equilibrium kinetics on the distribution coefficients (Kd) of phenanthrene (Phe) and 4,4‧-DDT, onto polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and onto polyethylene (PE) were therefore investigated. A salinity gradient representing freshwater, estuarine and marine conditions, with salinities corresponding to 0 (MilliQ water, 690 μS/cm), 8.8, 17.5, 26.3 and 35 was used. Salinity had no significant effect on the time required to reach equilibrium onto PVC or PE and neither did it affect desorption rates of contaminants from plastics. Although salinity had no effect on sorption capacity of Phe onto plastics, a slight decrease in sorption capacity was observed for DDT with salinity. Salinity had little effect on sorption behaviour and POP/plastic combination was shown to be a more important factor. Transport of Phe and DDT from riverine to brackish and marine waters by plastic is therefore likely to be much more dependent on the aqueous POP concentration than on salinity. The physical characteristics of the polymer and local environmental conditions (e.g. plastic density, particle residence time in estuaries) will affect the physical transport of contaminated plastics. A transport model of POPs by microplastics under estuarine conditions is proposed. Transport of Phe and DDT by PVC and PE from fresh and brackish water toward fully marine conditions was the most likely net direction for contaminant transport and followed the order: Phe-PE >> DDT-PVC = DDT-PE >> Phe-PVC.

  11. A checklist of malacofauna of the Vellar Estuarine Mangroves, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kesavan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey conducted to know the diversity of malacofauna in Vellar estuarine mangroves (southeast coast of India. In this study, 13 species of molluscs (10 species of gastropods - Melampus ceylonicus, Cerithidea cingulata, Cassidula nucleus, Pythia plicata, Neritina (Dostia violacea, Littorina scabra, Littorina melanostoma, Ellobium aurisjudae, C. obtusa T. telescopium and Assiminea nitida and 3 species of bivalves - Perna viridis, Crassostrea madrasensis and Modiolus metcalfei were recorded. M. pulchella, C. obtusa, L. scabra and N. violacea were found arboreal. T. telescopium, C. cingulata and E. aurisjudae were found crawling on the intertidal mud.

  12. Fate of colloids during estuarine mixing in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Viers, J.; Gordeev, V. V.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Chupakov, A. V.; Vorobieva, T. Y.; Candaudap, F.; Causserand, C.; Lanzanova, A.; Zouiten, C.

    2014-02-01

    The estuarine behavior of organic carbon (OC) and trace elements (TE) was studied for the largest European sub-Arctic river, which is the Severnaya Dvina; this river has a deltaic estuary covered in ice during several hydrological seasons: summer (July 2010, 2012) and winter (March 2009) baseflow, and the November-December 2011 ice-free period. Colloidal forms of OC and TE were assessed for three pore size cutoffs (1, 10, and 50 kDa) using an in situ dialysis procedure. Conventionally dissolved (important result of this study is the elucidation of the behavior of the "truly" dissolved low molecular weight LMWmicronutrients from the land to the ocean may increase.

  13. Dissolved oxygen levels in estuarine and coastal waters around Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Shane; McDermott, Georgina; Wilkes, Robert

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the status of summer oxygen conditions in estuarine and coastal waters around Ireland between 2003 and 2007. Of the 95 water bodies surveyed, 85 had oxygen levels sufficient to support aquatic life. This corresponds to a surface area of 3125 km(2) or 99.4% of the total area assessed. Ten water bodies, representing a surface area of 20.2 km(2), were deficient in oxygen but still capable of supporting most aquatic life. No evidence of hypoxia (Nitrates and Urban Waste Water Treatment Directives, together with those of the Water Framework Directive, should ensure areas of oxygen deficiency are eliminated from Irish waters.

  14. Effects of zinc pyrithione and copper pyrithione on microbial community function and structure in sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, DG; Dahllof, I.; Nielsen, LP

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the new antifouling biocides, zinc pyrithione (ZPT) and copper pyrithione (CPT), on microbial communities in estuarine sediments were studied in microcosms. As functional endpoints, fluxes of nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, HPO42-, Si(OH)(4)) and protein synthesis ([C-14] leucine...... incorporation) were used, whereas molecular fingerprinting methods (polymerase chain reaction/ denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) were used to describe the bacterial community structure. The lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) for ZPT was 0.001 nmol/g dry sediment for the phosphate flux and total...

  15. Hydrous Ferric Oxides in Sediment Catalyze Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species during Sulfide Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah A. Murphy; Shengnan Meng; Benson M. Solomon; Dewamunnage M.C. Dias; Timothy J. Shaw; John L Ferry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This article describes the formation of reactive oxygen species as a result of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by Fe(III)-containing sediments suspended in oxygenated seawater over the pH range 7.00 and 8.25. Sediment samples were obtained from across the coastal littoral zone in South Carolina, US, at locations from the beach edge to the forested edge of a Spartina dominated estuarine salt marsh and suspended in aerated seawater. Reactive oxygen species (superoxide and hydrog...

  16. Mysid (Crustacea: Mysidacea Distribution in the Bolgoda Estuarine System and Lunawa Lagoon, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Punchihewa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mysids are one of the most abundant and important fauna in estuarine hyperbenthic communities. They form important links in estuarine food chains and play a critical role in the cycling of energy within estuarine systems. Therefore, it is important to recognize the distribution of estuarine mysids in Sri Lanka. The present study was undertaken in Bolgoda estuarine system and Lunawa lagoon, in order to find out the distribution of mysids in these brackish water systems. Reconnaissance surveys were conducted, in Bolgoda North Lake, Panadura estuary of the Bolgoda estuarine system and the Lunawa lagoon from April 2012 to February 2013. The samples were collected using a hand held dip net, during day time at low tide along an eighty meter transect at the boundary of the estuarine waters. Mesopodopsis zeylanica was the only mysid species observed from the low water areas of the lagoon along the boundary of the stream. In each collection, it was recorded, higher percentages of females than the males. Mysids were recoded only from unpolluted areas and they were absent, where Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth was widespread. The findings of this analysis could be used to establish the fact that boundary condition and polluted condition are having a great effect on presence of mysids. It may be due to their specific niche requirements and specialized habitats. Accordingly, mysids serve as pollution indicator species in estuarine ecosystems. An immediate management strategy is required in protecting the Bolgoda estuarine systems from dumping household pollutants as well as other pollutants and complete elimination of the invader plants like E. crassipes, in order to protect estuarine biodiversity.INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENT  Volume-6, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2016/17, page: 23-30

  17. An evaluation of temporal changes in sediment accumulation and impacts on carbon burial in Mobile Bay, Alabama, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    The estuarine environment can serve as either a source or sink of carbon relative to the coastal ocean carbon budget. A variety of time-dependent processes such as sedimentation, carbon supply, and productivity dictate how estuarine systems operate, and Mobile Bay is a system that has experienced both natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influenced depositional processes and carbon cycling. Sediments from eight box cores provide a record of change in bulk sediment accumulation and carbon burial over the past 110 years. Accumulation rates in the central part of the basin (0.09 g cm−2) were 60–80 % less than those observed at the head (0.361 g cm−2) and mouth (0.564 g cm−2) of the bay. Sediment accumulation in the central bay decreased during the past 90 years in response to both anthropogenic (causeway construction) and natural (tropical cyclones) perturbations. Sediment accumulation inevitably increased the residence time of organic carbon in the oxic zone, as observed in modeled remineralization rates, and reduced the overall carbon burial. Such observations highlight the critical balance among sediment accumulation, carbon remineralization, and carbon burial in dynamic coastal environments. Time-series analysis based solely on short-term observation would not capture the long-term effects of changes in sedimentation on carbon cycling. Identifying these relationships over longer timescales (multi-annual to decadal) will provide a far better evaluation of coastal ocean carbon budgets.

  18. Sources of sediment to the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Farnsworth, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    The sources of sediment to the Southern California Bight were investigated with new calculations and published records of sediment fluxes, both natural and anthropogenic. We find that rivers are by far the largest source of sediment, producing over 10 ?? 106 t/yr on average, or over 80% of the sediment input to the Bight. This river flux is variable, however, over both space and time. The rivers draining the Transverse Ranges produce sediment at rates approximately an order of magnitude greater than the Peninsular Ranges (600-1500 t/km2/yr versus rivers represent only 23% of the total Southern California watershed drainage area, they are responsible for over 75% of the total sediment flux. River sediment flux is ephemeral and highly pulsed due to the semiarid climate and the influence of infrequent large storms. For more than 90% of the time, negligible amounts of sediment are discharged from the region's rivers, and over half of the post-1900 sediment load has been discharged during events with recurrence intervals greater than 10 yr. These rare, yet important, events are related to the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and the majority of sediment flux occurs during ENSO periods. Temporal trends in sediment discharge due to land-use changes and river damming are also observed. We estimate that there has been a 45% reduction in suspended-sediment flux due to the construction of dams. However, pre-dam sediment loads were likely artificially high due to the massive land-use changes of coastal California to rangeland during the nineteenth century. This increase in sediment production is observed in estuarine deposits throughout coastal California, which reveal that sedimentation rates were two to ten times higher during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries than during pre-European colonization. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  19. Hourly and daily variation of sediment redox potential in tidal wetland sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, W. James

    1999-01-01

    Variation of electrochemical oxidation-reduction (redox) potential was examined in surface salt march sediments under conditions of flooding and tidal simulation in mesocosms and field sites. Time series were generated of redox potential measured in sediment profiles at 2-10 cm depth using combination Pt-Ag/AgCl (ORP) electrodes. Redox potential data were acquired at rapid rates (1-55 samples/h) over extended periods (3-104 days) along with similar times series of temperature (water, air, soil) and pH. It was found that redox potential vaired as a result of water level changes and was unrelated to diurnal changes in temperature or pH, the latter of which changed by 370 mV redox potential decrease in under 48 hours). Attenuatoin of microbial activity by [gamma] y-radiation and toxic chemicals elimintated this response. In tidal salt marsh mesocosms where the sediment-plant assemblages were exposed to a simulated diurnal tide, redox potenial oscillations of 40-300 mV amplitude were recoded that has the same periodicity as the flood-drain cycle. Periodic redoc potential time series were observed repeatedly in sediments receiving tidal pulsing but not in those sediments exposed to static hydrological conditions. Data collected over 12 days from a coastal marsh site experiencing diurnal tides showed similar fluctuations in redox potential. Data from the experimentents indicated that (a) redox potential can be a dynamic, nonlinear variable in coastal and estuarine wetland sediments over hourly and daily scales, and the designs of biogeochemical experiments should reflect this, (b) redox potential can change rapidly and signigicantly in coastal wetland sediments in response of flooding and draining, (c) microbial community processes are primarily determinants of the time course of redox potential in wetland sediments, and elimination of inhibition of microbial activity (e.g. by pollutants) can significantly alter that behavior, and (d) fast redox potential dynamics appear

  20. New climatic targets against global warming: will the maximum 2 °C temperature rise affect estuarine benthic communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Daniel; Grilo, Tiago Fernandes; Baptista, Joana; Coelho, João Pedro; Lillebø, Ana Isabel; Cássio, Fernanda; Fernandes, Isabel; Pascoal, Cláudia; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Dolbeth, Marina

    2017-06-20

    The Paris Agreement signed by 195 countries in 2015 sets out a global action plan to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to remain below 2 °C. Under that premise, in situ experiments were run to test the effects of 2 °C temperature increase on the benthic communities in a seagrass bed and adjacent bare sediment, from a temperate European estuary. Temperature was artificially increased in situ and diversity and ecosystem functioning components measured after 10 and 30 days. Despite some warmness effects on the analysed components, significant impacts were not verified on macro and microfauna structure, bioturbation or in the fluxes of nutrients. The effect of site/habitat seemed more important than the effects of the warmness, with the seagrass habitat providing more homogenous results and being less impacted by warmness than the adjacent bare sediment. The results reinforce that most ecological responses to global changes are context dependent and that ecosystem stability depends not only on biological diversity but also on the availability of different habitats and niches, highlighting the role of coastal wetlands. In the context of the Paris Agreement it seems that estuarine benthic ecosystems will be able to cope if global warming remains below 2 °C.

  1. Study of Sound Attenuation in Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    experimental difficulties. In the ocean, the sediment is inaccesible , the propagation path is inhomoveneonis, and information on lavering usually has to... STANDARDS 1963 A RFPRODUCED AT GOVERNMENT EXPENSE Ln ~STUDY OF SOUND ATTENUATION IN SEDIMENTS Stephen R. Addison and Henry F. Bass PARGUM Report 84-03*A 4*I...measured porosity decreased to 0.39. The standard deviation in all these porosity measurements was 0.01. A porosity of 0.40 is used in all subsequent

  2. Estuarine and lagoon biodiversity and their natural goods and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, A.; Elliott, M.; West, R. J.; Wilson, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Assessing and monitoring ecosystem quality status and service provision of aquatic ecosystems is an increasingly important area of scientific, socio-economical and political interest. Contributions from two related meetings organized by the Estuarine & Coastal Sciences Association (ECSA) and the Euro-Mediterranean Lagoon Federation (EUROMEDLAG) address this area of interest in estuaries and lagoons, dominant types of transitional waters, by an integration of holistic and reductionistic approaches. In this context, we synthesise the key points raised by the contributions given at the two meetings to emphasise that transitional waters have emergent properties, which support their classification as an aquatic realm different from both freshwater and marine ones. They provide crucial ecosystem services, such as food provision and support for nutrient cycling, whose value and underlying mechanisms have been addressed with particular reference to estuarine ecosystems. The experimental studies show the mechanistic relationships and the responses of ecosystem functions and biodiversity to contrasting/changing environmental conditions with human activities as key drivers affecting both biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service provision.

  3. Isolation of heterotrophic diazotrophic bacteria from estuarine surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnelid, Hanna; Harder, Jens; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Riemann, Lasse

    2014-10-01

    The wide distribution of diverse nitrogenase (nifH) genes affiliated with those of heterotrophic bacteria in marine and estuarine waters indicates ubiquity and an ecologically relevant role for heterotrophic N2 -fixers (diazotrophs) in aquatic nitrogen (N) cycling. However, the lack of cultivated representatives currently precludes an evaluation of their N2 -fixing capacity. In this study, microoxic or anoxic N-free media were inoculated with estuarine Baltic Sea surface water to select for N2 -fixers. After visible growth and isolation of single colonies on oxic plates or in anoxic agar tubes, nifH gene amplicons were obtained from 64 strains and nitrogenase activity, applying the acetylene reduction assay, was confirmed for 40 strains. Two strains, one Gammaproteobacterium affiliated with Pseudomonas and one Alphaproteobacterium affiliated with Rhodopseudomonas were shown to represent established members of the indigenous diazotrophic community in the Baltic Sea, with abundances of up to 7.9 × 10(4) and 4.7 × 10(4)  nifH copies l(-1) respectively. This study reports media for successful isolation of heterotrophic diazotrophs. The applied methodology and the obtained strains will facilitate future identification of factors controlling heterotrophic diazotrophic activity in aquatic environments, which is a prerequisite for understanding and evaluating their ecology and contribution to N cycling at local and regional scales. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Interpretation of benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes in subtidal estuarine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-M. Paulet

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we present a novel approach for the interpretation of stable isotope signatures recorded in benthic foraminifera from subtidal estuarine environments. The stable isotopic composition (δ18O and δ13C of living Ammonia tepida and Haynesina germanica is examined at four stations in the Auray River estuary (Gulf of Morbihan, France sampled in two contrasting seasons, spring 2006 and winter 2007. Comparing benthic foraminiferal δ18O measurements with theoretical oxygen isotopic equilibrium values, calculated on the basis of water temperature and salinity measurements in the upper and lower estuary, i.e., T-S-δ18Oeq. diagrams, strongly suggests that foraminiferal faunas sampled at the four stations calcified during different periods of the year. This interpretation can be refined by using the benthic foraminiferal δ13C, which is mainly determined by the mixing of sea and river water. In the upper estuary foraminifera mainly calcified in early spring and winter, whereas in the lower estuary calcification mainly took place in spring, summer and autumn. This new method provides insight into the complexity of estuarine benthic foraminiferal stable isotope records. In addition, it can also be used to obtain new information on preferred calcification periods of benthic foraminiferal taxa in different parts of the estuary.

  5. Simulating effects of highway embankments on estuarine circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional depth-averaged, finite-difference, numerical model was used to simulate tidal circulation and mass transport in the Port Royal Sound. South Carolina, estuarine system. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the utility of the Surface-Water. Integrated. Flow and Transport model (SWIFT2D) for evaluating changes in circulation patterns and mass transport caused by highway-crossing embankments. A model of subregion of Port Royal Sound including the highway crossings and having a grid size of 61 m (200ft) was derived from a 183-m (600-ft) model of the entire Port Royal Sound estuarine system. The 183-m model was used to compute boundary-value data for the 61-m submodel, which was then used to simulate flow conditions with and without the highway embankments in place. The numerical simulations show that, with the highway embankment in place, mass transport between the Broad River and Battery Creek is reduced and mass transport between the Beaufort River and Battery Creek is increased. The net result is that mass transport into and out of upper Battery Creek is reduced. The presence of the embankments also alters circulation patterns within Battery Creek.

  6. Influence of estuarine processes on spatiotemporal variation in bioavailable selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robin; Luoma, Samuel N.; Elrick, Kent A.; Carter, James L.; van der Wegen, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes (physical, chemical and biological) challenge our ability to quantify and manage the ecological risk of chemical contaminants in estuarine environments. Selenium (Se) bioavailability (defined by bioaccumulation), stable isotopes and molar carbon-tonitrogen ratios in the benthic clam Potamocorbula amurensis, an important food source for predators, were determined monthly for 17 yr in northern San Francisco Bay. Se concentrations in the clams ranged from a low of 2 to a high of 22 μg g-1 over space and time. Little of that variability was stochastic, however. Statistical analyses and preliminary hydrodynamic modeling showed that a constant mid-estuarine input of Se, which was dispersed up- and down-estuary by tidal currents, explained the general spatial patterns in accumulated Se among stations. Regression of Se bioavailability against river inflows suggested that processes driven by inflows were the primary driver of seasonal variability. River inflow also appeared to explain interannual variability but within the range of Se enrichment established at each station by source inputs. Evaluation of risks from Se contamination in estuaries requires the consideration of spatial and temporal variability on multiple scales and of the processes that drive that variability.

  7. Coordination and standardization of federal sedimentation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glysson, G. Douglas; Gray, John R.

    1997-01-01

    In August 1964, the Bureau of the Budget issued Circular A-67 to set forth guidelines for the coordination of water-data acquisition activities throughout the Federal government. The U.S. Department of the Interior was assigned the task of implementing Circular A-67, which in turn redelegated this responsibility to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Delegation of the lead responsibility for water-data coordination to the USGS occurred because of its historical role as the primary agency for water-data acquisition in the United States. To provide overall leadership for implementing the provisions of Circular A-67, the USGS established the Office of Water Data Coordination in the Water Resources Division (WRD). In addition, regional and district offices of the WRD were delegated responsibility for coordinating water data within their geographic areas of responsibility. On December 10, 1991, the Office of Management and Budget issued OMB Number Memorandum M-92-01, which expands the USGS's coordination role to encompass all water information. This includes data critical to water resources in the following categories: - surface- and ground-water quality and quantity,

  8. SORPTION-DESORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF HEAVY METALS AND THEIR AVAILABILITY FROM THE SEDIMENT OF SEGARA ANAKAN ESTUARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Noegrohati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Estuarine sediments are increasingly recognized as both a carrier and a possible source of heavy metals in pollution of aquatic ecosystems. The bioavailability of heavy metal from sediments, however, is a long-standing impediment of questions in determining the metal effects in ecosystems. The fraction considered as available heavy metal are both the dissolved heavy metal and the exchangable cations. The main objective of this study is to understand the extent of heavy metal availability from sediments in estuarine ecosystem. It was found that the availability of heavy metals, i.e. copper, zinc, cadmium, and mercury in the estuarine ecosystem investigated, are governed by the relative strength of the electrostatic attraction of their complexation to the ligands present both in the sediment and the overlaying waters. Under simulated estuarine ecosystem, it was observed that Cu and Zn prefer to form organo-complex through ligand exchange, while Cd and Hg tend to form chloro-complex through electrostatic interaction. Therefore, the availability of Hg and Cd is higher in more saline overlaying water. On the contrary, the availability of Cu and Zn is lower in more saline overlaying waters, as indicated by their respective water-sediment distribution coefficient, KD. Similar behaviour of heavy metal was observed in natural field conditions of Segara Anakan estuary. Due to the higher salinity of the overlaying water, the availability of Cd and Hg in dry season was higher than in wet season, while Zn was more available in wet season due to the higher input of organic matters from the inland. The patterns of heavy metal release from the sediment are consistent to that obtained in experiments of the undisturbed simulation, where highest release was obtained for Cd. Surprisingly, it was found that even though Cd was not detected in the sediment, higher level of Cd in water medium was observed in dry season, and Cu seems to retain in the sediment in both

  9. DNRA in intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoyu; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Zheng, Yanling; Gao, Juan; Jiang, Xiaofen; Wang, Rong; Yu, Chendi; Lin, Xianbiao

    2017-08-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) plays an important role in regulating the fate of reactive nitrogen in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. In this work, intertidal sediments of the Yangtze Estuary were collected in January and August 2015. Potential rates of DNRA and associated functional gene were investigated with nitrogen isotope-tracing and molecular techniques. The measured DNRA rates ranged from 0.14 to 5.57 μmol 15N kg-1 h-1 in the intertidal sediments. DNRA rates were tightly related to abundance of nrfA gene (p organic matter and NO2-, suggesting that these substrates stimulated the metabolism of DNRA microorganisms. On the other hand, the correlation between abundances of nrfA gene and Fe2+ and sulfide in the RDA analysis implied that oxidation of both Fe2+ and sulfide can enhance fermentative DNRA by providing extra free energy. DNRA converted approximately 2.29 × 105 t of nitrate to ammonia annually in the sampling area of the Yangtze Estuary, and most of the converted ammonium was retained in the estuarine ecosystem. DNRA may further contribute to eutrophication in the Yangtze Estuary and also in the other hypereutrophic estuaries.

  10. Development and application of a marine sediment porewater toxicity test using algal spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, R. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Carr, R.S. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An acute pore water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of marine macroalgae as endpoints was developed to indicate the presence of toxic compounds in marine/estuarine and sediment porewater samples. Zoospores collected from Ulva fasciata and U. lactuca were used as test organisms. Preliminary results with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a reference toxicant) indicate that zoospores germination and growth of embryonic gametophytes are as sensitive as the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development toxicity tests. Algal germination and growth data for copper, mercury and other metals will be presented. The results of tests utilizing this algal assay with sediment pore water from contaminated sediments will be compared with more traditional sediment toxicity test methods.

  11. Fingerprinting of bed sediment in the Tay Estuary, Scotland: an environmental magnetism approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Jenkins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sediment fingerprinting is commonly used for sediment provenance studies in lakes, rivers and reservoirs and on hillslopes and floodplains. This investigation explores the mixing of terrestrial and marine-derived sediment in the Tay Estuary, Scotland, using mineral magnetic attributes for fingerprinting. Samples representative of the estuary sediments and of four sources (end-members were subjected to a suite of magnetic susceptibility and remanence measurements. Sediment samples from the beds of the Rivers Tay and Earn represented fluvial inputs while samples from the Angus and Fife coasts represented marine input. Multivariate discriminant and factor analysis showed that the sources could be separated on the basis of six magnetic parameters in a simple multivariate unmixing model to identify source contributions to estuarine bed sediments. Multi-domain magnetite signatures, characteristic of unweathered bedrock, dominate the magnetic measurements. Overall contributions of 3% from the River Earn, 17% from the River Tay, 29% from the Angus coast and 51% from the Fife coast source end-members, demonstrated the present-day regime of marine sediment derivation in the Tay Estuary. However, this conceals considerable spatial variability both along-estuary and in terms of sub-environments, with small-scale variations in sediment provenance reflecting local morphology, particularly areas of channel convergence. Keywords: bed sediment, environmental magnetism, fingerprinting, Tay Estuary, Scotland

  12. Shallow sublittoral benthic communities of the Laguna Estuarine System, South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fonseca

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment properties, microphytobenthos biomass (chlorophyll a and phaeopigments, and the structure of the benthic communities of the three main lagoons (Mirim, Imaruí and Santo Antonio of the Laguna Estuarine System, South Brazil, were analyzed during summer and winter. Microphytobenthos biomass did not differ significantly among the lagoons, but showed higher values in the summer. The macrofauna was characterized by low species richness and the dominance of the gastropod Heleobia australis, the tanaidean Kalliapseudes schubartti and the bivalve Erodona mactroides. The meiofauna was composed of 20 higher taxa and the nematodes dominated in all the lagoons and periods. Desmodora (Desmodora sp.1, Terschllingia sp. and Microlaimus sp. were numerically the most important among the 74 nematode species registered. This study showed that, in the Laguna Estuarine System, differences in the benthos among lagoons and periods were dependent on the fauna component analyzed. Whilst macrofauna and nematodes were significantly more diverse in the inner stations, in the Mirim Lagoon, the number of meiofauna taxa did not differ significantly among the lagoons and the diversity and evenness were highest in Santo Antonio. These results were a response of the fauna to the salinity oscillations coupled with the heterogeneity of the sediment in the lagoons. The temporal variability of the fauna, macrofauna being more abundant in the summer and meiofauna in the winter, could be related to the different life strategies of these groups.Propriedades do sedimento, biomassa microfitobêntica (clorofila a e feopigmentos, e a estrutura das comunidades bênticas das três principais lagoas (Mirim, Imaruí e Santo Antonio do Sistema Estuarino de Laguna, sul do Brasil, foram analisadas durante o verão e inverno. A biomassa microfitobêntica não diferiu significativamente entre as lagoas, mas seus valores foram maiores no verão. A macrofauna foi caracterizada pela baixa

  13. Evaluating potential man-induced changes in fish communities at estuarine and surf-zone areas: a long-term case study in Southern Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic impacts as environmental degradation and fisheries have been historically associated with changes in structure and dynamics of fish assemblages. A fundamental requisite to evaluate such man-induced changes on fish assemblages is the analysis of long-term time series that allow factoring out inter-annual and decadal natural variations in physical and biotic factors. Based on a standardized monthly long-term database (1997-2012 of experimental fish collections at shallow waters of estuarine and adjacent surf-zone areas of sub-tropical coastal lagoon in southern Brazil (32ºS-52ºW, we evaluated long-term trends in fish abundance and diversity and their correlates with fisheries and environmental factors. Overall species composition and species richness (S at both estuarine (95 and surf-zone (54 were quite similar across years (similarity=52.1 ± 5.8 SD, but there was high inter-annual variability correlated with local (temperature, salinity, regional (precipitation and global (ENSO factors. In the estuary, species richness decreased substantially between 2002 (S=45 and 2012 (S=22, and there were marked variability in abundance across years (CPUE mean =92.3; Min=34.5; Max=163.4. A contrasting pattern was observed at the surf-zone, with lower inter-annual variation in species richness, a marked decrease in fish abundance (CPUE mean=101.9; Min=31.3; Max=221.5. Bayesian generalized additive models (GAMs corroborate with those results and revealed a decrease in both species richness and abundance of both estuarine and adjacent surf-zone areas. Environmental conditions explained only partially the observed inter-annual and decadal variability in both estuarine and marine fish assemblages. Man-made changes associated with habitat loss and increasing fishing pressure could be responsible by some of long-term variations observed in these fish assemblages.

  14. Sediment quality in the Atlantic coast of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Inmaculada; Casado-Martínez, Carmen; Forja, Jesús M; DelValls, Angel

    2004-02-01

    Sediments from the Atlantic coast of Spain have been studied to evaluate environmental quality by using an integrated approach including chemical and toxicological data. Sediment samples were collected in four littoral ecosystems located in Spain, Bay of Cádiz, Guadalquivir River estuary, Ría of Huelva, and Ría of Coruña. To characterize the sediments, organic carbon, granulometric content, total sulfide, eight trace metals (Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, As, Ni, and Cr), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured. The toxicity of sediments was assessed with the amphipod Ampelisca brevicornis, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum, juveniles of the fish Solea senegalensis, populations of the estuarine rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, and populations of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox). The results obtained show that in general, stations located in the Ría of Huelva were associated with heavy metal contamination and with the highest toxicity. Only chronic toxicity tests were capable of identifying the effects associated with PCB concentrations. The sediment quality guidelines calculated by means of a multivariate analysis approach for contaminants not associated with biological effects (mg/kg) are Hg, 0.54; Cd, 0.51; Pb, 260; Cu, 209; Zn, 513; As, 27.4; and total PCBs, 0.05.

  15. A research program in determination of heavy metals in sediments and benthic species in relation to nuclear power plant operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy metals in the estuarine environment can be toxic to fish and shellfish early life history stages and concentrations build up to levels of concern in marketable shellfish. The present survey was begun just before startup in 1974 of the 1900 megawatt Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant on the Chesapeake Bay in order to assess and understand factors relating to heavy metal accumulation in estuarine biota. Oysters were collected in large numbers at test and reference sites in June 1974 to 77 and individually analyzed for copper and zinc. Oyster copper and zinc concentrations were correlated with salinity read at time of collection. The relationship of oyster age to metal concentration was examined with two sets of oysters of known age and genetic origin (laboratory spawned). Copper sorption by typical mid Bay sediments, and field studies on cadmium concentrations in sediments were examined.

  16. Consistency between 2D-3D Sediment Transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaret, Catherine; Jodeau, Magali

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport models have been developed and applied by the engineering community to estimate transport rates and morphodynamic bed evolutions in river flows, coastal and estuarine conditions. Environmental modelling systems like the open-source Telemac modelling system include a hierarchy of models from 1D (Mascaret), 2D (Telemac-2D/Sisyphe) and 3D (Telemac-3D/Sedi-3D) and include a wide range of processes to represent sediment flow interactions under more and more complex situations (cohesive, non-cohesive and mixed sediment). Despite some tremendous progresses in the numerical techniques and computing resources, the quality/accuracy of model results mainly depend on the numerous choices and skills of the modeler. In complex situations involving stratification effects, complex geometry, recirculating flows… 2D model assumptions are no longer valid. A full 3D turbulent flow model is then required in order to capture the vertical mixing processes and to represent accurately the coupled flow/sediment distribution. However a number of theoretical and numerical difficulties arise when dealing with sediment transport modelling in 3D which will be high-lighted : (1) Dependency of model results to the vertical grid refinement and choice of boundary conditions and numerical scheme (2) The choice of turbulence model determines also the sediment vertical distribution which is governed by a balance between the downward settling term and upward turbulent diffusion. (3) The use of different numerical schemes for both hydrodynamics (mean and turbulent flow) and sediment transport modelling can lead to some inconsistency including a mismatch in the definition of numerical cells and definition of boundary conditions. We discuss here those present issues and present some detailed comparison between 2D and 3D simulations on a set of validation test cases which are available in the Telemac 7.2 release using both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments.

  17. Ecoengineering with Ecohydrology: Successes and failures in estuarine restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael; Mander, Lucas; Mazik, Krysia; Simenstad, Charles; Valesini, Fiona; Whitfield, Alan; Wolanski, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Ecological Engineering (or Ecoengineering) is increasingly used in estuaries to re-create and restore ecosystems degraded by human activities, including reduced water flow or land poldered for agricultural use. Here we focus on ecosystem recolonization by the biota and their functioning and we separate Type A Ecoengineering where the physico-chemical structure is modified on the basis that ecological structure and functioning will then follow, and Type B Ecoengineering where the biota are engineered directly such as through restocking or replanting. Modifying the physical system to create and restore natural processes and habitats relies on successfully applying Ecohydrology, where suitable physical conditions, especially hydrography and sedimentology, are created to recover estuarine ecology by natural or human-mediated colonisation of primary producers and consumers, or habitat creation. This successional process then allows wading birds and fish to reoccupy the rehabilitated areas, thus restoring the natural food web and recreating nursery areas for aquatic biota. We describe Ecohydrology principles applied during Ecoengineering restoration projects in Europe, Australia, Asia, South Africa and North America. These show some successful and sustainable approaches but also others that were less than successful and not sustainable despite the best of intentions (and which may even have harmed the ecology). Some schemes may be 'good for the ecologists', as conservationists consider it successful that at least some habitat was created, albeit in the short-term, but arguably did little for the overall ecology of the area in space or time. We indicate the trade-offs between the short- and long-term value of restored and created ecosystems, the success at developing natural structure and functioning in disturbed estuaries, the role of this in estuarine and wetland management, and the costs and benefits of Ecoengineering to the socio-ecological system. These global case

  18. Hindcasting of decadal‐timescale estuarine bathymetric change with a tidal‐timescale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Neil K.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Hindcasting decadal-timescale bathymetric change in estuaries is prone to error due to limited data for initial conditions, boundary forcing, and calibration; computational limitations further hinder efforts. We developed and calibrated a tidal-timescale model to bathymetric change in Suisun Bay, California, over the 1867–1887 period. A general, multiple-timescale calibration ensured robustness over all timescales; two input reduction methods, the morphological hydrograph and the morphological acceleration factor, were applied at the decadal timescale. The model was calibrated to net bathymetric change in the entire basin; average error for bathymetric change over individual depth ranges was 37%. On a model cell-by-cell basis, performance for spatial amplitude correlation was poor over the majority of the domain, though spatial phase correlation was better, with 61% of the domain correctly indicated as erosional or depositional. Poor agreement was likely caused by the specification of initial bed composition, which was unknown during the 1867–1887 period. Cross-sectional bathymetric change between channels and flats, driven primarily by wind wave resuspension, was modeled with higher skill than longitudinal change, which is driven in part by gravitational circulation. The accelerated response of depth may have prevented gravitational circulation from being represented properly. As performance criteria became more stringent in a spatial sense, the error of the model increased. While these methods are useful for estimating basin-scale sedimentation changes, they may not be suitable for predicting specific locations of erosion or deposition. They do, however, provide a foundation for realistic estuarine geomorphic modeling applications.

  19. Facies-related baryte mineralization bearing Cu-Zn sulfides in Miocene estuarine deposits of the upper Rhein Graben (Wetterau, Central Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, H. G.; Berner, Z.; Kaufholt, S.; Weber, B.; Metz, U.

    2013-10-01

    Baryte with or without base metal sulfides is quite common in sediments deposited in open marine environments or in continental sedimentary basins. Its precipitation is caused by hydrothermal processes, related to diagenesis, and frequently mediated by biogenic processes. The current study is focused on siliciclastic sandstones of Miocene (Aquitanian) age in an estuarine environment in the Wetterau region of the Rhein Graben, central Germany. In the estuarine environment only the central basin and the landward delta are host to a diagenetic and subsequent hydrothermal mineralization. Diagenesis took place under near-ambient (T ≈ 25 °C) conditions and resulted in strong pyritization (- 0.75 5) in the central basin. Diagenesis is more landward represented by a pervasive silicification (pH Cu-Zn-(Sb) minerals (0.75 < Eh < 0/5 < pH < 11), silicification and kaolinization (2 < pH < 9.5) and eventually by the formation of gibbsite (3 < pH < 8). At the transition from the delta to the estuarine funnel, baryte is of very widespread occurrence. Its variegated texture and crystal morphology allow for a precise determination of the hydraulic system as marine phreatic, freshwater phreatic, and freshwater vadose. The narrow size of the rift graben and its sealing against the open sea fostered concentration of Ba and enhanced the redox processes. Hypogene brines along with Miocene volcanic activity provided the metals, and marine ingressions in this transitional environment supplied the sulfur. Sulfides were concentrated in the finer-grained rocks because of their enrichment in organic material, while sulfates accumulated in the more permeable coarser sandstones.

  20. Efficiencies of MUSLE-S, MUSLT, USLE-M and AOF Models for Storm-wise Sediment Yield Estimation in Standard Plats (Case Study: Sefiddasht Research Site of Semnan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kargar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion and sediment production are among most important problems in developing countries including Iran. In this study it has been endeavored that applicability of four (AOF, MUSLE-S, MUSLT and USLE-M models is investigated in Srfiddasht Research Site, Semnan province, at event scale to estimate the sediment. For this, all required variables and inputs of the model have been calculated in the watershed and the estimations from considering statistical models with measured sediments of 15 cloudbursts have been compared. The results for t-student correlation test showed that there is no significant difference (at 1% between MUSLT, MUSLE-S models and measured sediment. Based on these, it can be said that in this study, the results from these two models have higher accuracies to estimate the sediment from cloudbursts than other methods. Also, the results of evaluation and efficiency of the model using Nash-Suttcliffe criterion and root relative mean squared error (RRMSE statistic showed that MUSLE-S and MUSLT models have higher efficiencies than other models and inefficiencies of USLE-M and AOF models to estimate sediments from cloudburst have been confirmed in the studied research station in this study.

  1. Artificial structures in sediment-dominated estuaries and their possible influences on the ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Markus A; Scholle, Jörg; Teschke, Katharina

    2014-08-01

    Artificial substrates are omnipresent today in most estuaries mostly in form of massive rip-rap used for groynes and jetties. In the Weser estuary, Germany, 60% of the shoreline is covered with such artificial substrates while, natural rocky substrate is lacking, as in all Wadden Sea estuaries. This large quantity of artificial substrates may be colonized by a benthic hard-substrate community which differs from the local natural soft-substrate assemblage. In this study we examined species compositions, abundances, biomass, and numbers of species of subtidal benthic communities on groynes and in the natural habitat, the sediment, along the salinity gradient of the Weser estuary. Species composition changed on both substrates significantly with salinity and was also significantly different between the substrates. In a comparison with the sediment, the groynes did not provide any benefit for non-indigenous nor for endangered species in terms of abundance, biomass, and number of species, but represent habitats with higher total abundances and biomass; though some non-indigenous species even occurred exclusively on groynes. In particular, groynes supported filter-feeding organisms which play an important role by linking benthic and pelagic food webs. The dominance of the suspension feeders affects crucial estuarine ecosystem services and may have important implications for the estuarine management by altering the estuarine ecological quality status. Hence, artificial substrates should be considered in future conservation planning and in ecological quality monitoring of the benthic fauna according to the European Water Framework Directive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estuarine Alkenones: A High-Resolution Record of Sea-Surface Temperature from Narragansett Bay over the Past Millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salacup, J.; Farmer, J. R.; Herbert, T.; Prell, W. L.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present a Uk’37 sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstruction from Narragansett Bay, RI. We analyzed sediments from three geographically separated cores for Uk’37, the concentration of C37 alkenones (C37-total), widely accepted as a paleo-productivity proxy, and elemental carbon and nitrogen concentrations. Our age model suggests our archives cover at least the past 600 years with a sampling resolution of 6-8 years. In contrast to alkenone profiles reported from the much lower salinity Chesapeake Bay, the alkenone fingerprint in Narragansett Bay lacks significant contributions from the C37:4 ketone and is consistent with production by open-ocean haptophytes (in all likelihood, E. huxleyi). Comparison of the results from each of the three cores yields temperature offsets consistent with instrumental SST gradients within Narragansett Bay suggesting sedimentary alkenones were produced locally, rather than being produced in, and advected from, the nearby Atlantic Ocean. Absolute SSTs vary by up to 1°C on decadal timescales and by up to 3.5°C over the entire record. On centennial timescales, SSTs increase by ~0.5°C between ~1450 and 1600 before declining by 1-1.5°C between 1600 and the mid-1800s perhaps recording the local expression of the Little Ice Age. Productivity, inferred from C37-total, is steady throughout the Bay from ~1450 to ~1725. However, after 1725 concentrations increase in the upper Bay but not in the lower, suggesting changes in land-use and runoff may have influenced alkenone production. Sedimentary alkenones, synthesized by a limited number of coccolithophorids, are the basis of the Uk’37 SST proxy, traditionally employed in climate reconstructions from open-ocean sediments. This work suggests that alkenones preserved in shallow-water sediments, like those of Narragansett Bay, may provide a new opportunity for reconstructing estuarine and coastal temperatures in other muddy high-deposition-rate settings.

  3. Developing a biomonitoring tool for fine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Matt; Bilotta, Gary; Brazier, Richard; Extence, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Sediment is an essential component of freshwater ecosystems; however anthropogenic activities can lead to elevated sediment delivery which can impact on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of these ecosystems. Ultimately, this can result in a loss of ecosystem services worth more than 1.7 trillion per annum. As such it is important that sediment, which is one of the most commonly attributed causes of water quality impairment globally, is managed in order to minimise these impacts. The current EU environmental quality standard for sediment (monitored in the form of suspended solids) is 25 mg L-1 for all environments. It is widely recognised that this standard is unsuitable and not ecologically relevant. Furthermore, it requires a substantial resource investment to monitor sediment in this form as part of national and international water resource legislation. In recognition of this the development of sediment-specific biomonitoring tools is receiving increasing attention. The Proportion of Sediment-Sensitive Invertebrates (PSI) index is one such tool that is designed to indicate levels of fine sediment (

  4. Fate of N,N-Bis-(2,4,6-Trichlorophenyl)-Urea in a Freshwater Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    sediments of Canal Creek, an estuarine system within the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland. Initial gas-chromatographic studies by Hydroponics ... advantages of this technique include chromatographic separation of interfering compounds and the short temporal lag In the generation of the saturated...solution and the analysis of analyte ( May and Wasik.1978; May et al. 1978 ). The latter advantage may be Important if the analyte is not stable in

  5. Sediment balance of intertidal mudflats in a macrotidal estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    lafite, R.; Deloffre, J.; Lemoine, M.

    2012-12-01

    Intertidal area contributes widely to fine-grained sediment balance in estuarine environments. Their sedimentary dynamics is controlled by several forcing parameters including tidal range, river flow and swell, affected by human activities such as dredging, construction or vessels traffic leading to modify sediment transport pattern. Although the estuarine hydrodynamics is well documented, the link between forcing parameters and these sedimentary processes is weakly understood. One of the main reasons is the difficulty to integrate spatial (from the fluvial to the estuary mouth) and temporal (from swell in seconds to pluriannual river flow variability) patterns. This study achieved on intertidal mudflats distributed along the macrotidal Seine estuary (France) aims (i) to quantify the impact of forcing parameters on each intertidal area respect to its longitudinal position in the estuarine system and (ii) to assess the fine-grained sediment budget at estuarine scale. The Seine estuary is a macrotidal estuary developed over 160 km up the upstream limit of tidal wave penetration. With an average river flow of 450m3.s-1, 80% of the Suspended Particles Matter (SPM) annual flux is discharged during the flood period. In the downstream part, the Seine estuary Turbidity Maximum (TM) is the SPM stock located near the mouth. During their transfer toward the sea, the fine particles can be trapped in (i) the intertidal mudflats; preferential areas characterized by low hydrodynamics and generally sheltered of the tidal dominant flow, the main tidal current the Seine River and (ii) the TM. The Seine estuary is an anthropic estuary in order to secure navigation: one consequence of these developments is the tidal bore disappearance. Along the macrotidal Seine estuary hydrodynamics features and sedimentary fluxes were followed during at least 1 year using respectively Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, Optical BackScatter and altimeter. Results in the fluvial estuary enhance the role of

  6. Resting eggs in free living marine and estuarine copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Kiørboe, Thomas; Brun, Philipp Georg

    2017-01-01

    Marine free living copepods can survive harsh periods and cope with seasonal fluctuations in environmental conditions using resting eggs (embryonic dormancy). Laboratory experiments show that temperature is the common driver for resting egg production. Hence, we hypothesize (i) that seasonal...... temperature variation, rather than variation in food abundance is the main driver for the occurrence of the resting eggs strategy in marine and estuarine copepod species; and (ii) that the thermal boundaries of the distribution determine where resting eggs are produced and whether they are produced to cope...... with warm or cold periods. We compile literature information on the occurrence of resting egg production and relate this to spatio-temporal patterns in sea surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentration obtained from satellite observations. We find that the production of resting eggs has been reported...

  7. Physiological responses of estuarine animals to cadmium pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theede, H.

    1980-03-01

    Toxic effects of cadmium contamination may be observed at all levels of organismic organization. In estuarine areas the sensitivity of euryhaline species to acute Cd toxicity is strongly modified by various abiotic factors, whereas long-term threshold values are less dependent on environmental parameters. Experiments with larval stages of the mollusc Mytilus edulis reveal that Cd effects on life functions such as development and growth are differentially modified by temperature and salinity. High Cd concentrations can be accumulated by adult bivalves of coastal areas without signs of physiological damage. Mechanisms of heavy-metal detoxication in these molluscs seem to be quite different from those known to exist in vertebrates. Among decapod crustaceans, stenoecous species tend to exhibit higher rates of Cd uptake than euryoecous ones. Rates of Cd uptake and of accumulation depend on external and internal factors. In adult Nereis succinea individuals sublethal Cd effects have been recorded on growth and food conversion (in terms of energy content).

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE AGONISTTS ON METAMORPHOSIS AND REPRODUCTION IN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative developmental and reproductive studies were performed on several species of estuarine crustaceans in response to three juvenile hormone agonists (JHAs) (methoprene, fenoxycarb, and pyriproxyfen). Larval development of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was greater ...

  9. 2016 Draft Estuarine/Marine Copper Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  10. Spectral variations of UV-A and PAR solar radiation in estuarine waters of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Talaulikar, M.; Suresh, T.; Silveira, N.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Lotlikar, A.

    The spectral solar radiation measurements in the range 350-800 nm were carried out in the estuarine waters of Goa using hyperspectral radiometer. The results of the analysis of solar light in the spectral range of photosynthetically available...

  11. Comparative bioaccumulation of trace metals in Penaeus stylirostris in estuarine and coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Osuna, F.; Ruiz-Fernández, C.

    1995-01-01

    Trace metal concentrations (Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Cr and Zn) have been measured in estuarine and marine shrimp P. stylirostris collected in the Pacific coast of México. Estuarine individuals (juveniles) had higher concentrations of Fe and Mn than marine individuals (adults). Size-dependent relationships were observed and differed among the elements examined. A negative slope was found for Co, Fe, Mn and Ni in estuarine juvenile shrimps, while for Cu the opposite tendency occurred. In marine adults a positive slope was observed for Cd, Co, Cr and Cu. These findings may be due to two factors: (1) that P. stylirostris spends part of its life-cycle in estuarine/lagoon environments where it is more likely to be exposed to higher levels of bioavailable trace metals (natural and anthropogenic contributions) and/or (2) different metabolic requirements of young and older specimens, which is especially applicable to copper.

  12. Behaviour of fluoride and dissolved silicon in Gouthami Godavari estuarine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.; Sudhakar, U.; Varaprasad, S.J.D.

    The concentrations of fluoride and dissolved silicon in Gouthami-Godavari estuarine region (Andhra Pradesh, India) have been measured as a function of chlorinity during different seasons. Fluoride and dissolved silicon behave conservatively during...

  13. Currents in the Cochin estuarine system [southwest coast of India] during March

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, K.; Revichandran, C.; Thottam, T.J.; Maheswaran, P.A.; Asharaf, T.T.M.; Murukesh, N.

    Analysis of current meter data collected in the Cochin estuarine system (southwest coast of India) has been made, to understand variations of currents in the estuary for spring and neap tidal phases during March 2000. The currents were strongest...

  14. Estuarine, intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types in Klag Bay, Chichagof Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Six major estuarine intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types were identified within the inner basin of Klag Bay. These habitat types are mapped in Fig. 3. The...

  15. Seasonal patterns of phytoplankton biomass and productivity in a tropical estuarine complex (west coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devassy, V.P.; Goes, J.I.

    Phytoplankton cell numbers and chlorophyll a determinations were made during the premonsoon, monsoon and postmonsoon periods in the Mandovi-Zuari estuarine complex (west coast of India). Primary productivity estimates agreed well with chlorophyll a...

  16. CHARACTERIZING POPULATIONS OF THE ESTUARINE FISH FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS INDIGENOUS TO SITES WITH DIFFERING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of the non-migratory estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus were collected from New Bedford Harbor and distant clean sites to investigate whether indigenous populations have adapted genetically to the harbor's contamination. New Bedford Harbor, a major port in southe...

  17. Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Steven P. Ferraro, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR Background/Questions/Methods The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification, and the Her...

  18. Genetic architecture of evolved tolerance to PCBs in the estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Atlantic killifish (F. heteroclitus) resident to coastal estuarine habitats contaminated with halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) exhibit heritable resistance to the early life-stage toxicity associated with these compounds. Beyond our knowledge of the aryl hy...

  19. Estuarine Living Marine Resources: West Coast Regional Distribution and Abundance (NCEI Accession 0161540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is the West Coast regional component of NOAA’s Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Project, a national database of ecologically and economically...

  20. Estuarine Living Marine Resources: Southeast Regional Distribution and Abundance (NCEI Accession 0163992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is the original (1991) Southeast regional component of NOAA's Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Project, a national database of ecologically and...

  1. Estuarine Living Marine Resources: North Atlantic Regional Distribution and Abundance (NCEI Accession 0162402)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is the North Atlantic regional component of NOAA’s Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Project, a national database of ecologically and economically...

  2. Estuarine Living Marine Resources: Mid-Atlantic Regional Distribution and Abundance (NCEI Accession 0162403)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is the Mid-Atlantic regional component of NOAA’s Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Project, a national database of ecologically and economically...

  3. Estuarine Living Marine Resources: Gulf of Mexico Regional Distribution and Abundance (NCEI Accession 0163993)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is the original (1992) Gulf of Mexico regional component of NOAA's Estuarine Living Marine Resources (ELMR) Project, a national database of ecologically and...

  4. The role of watershed characteristics in estuarine condition: an empirical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Latimer; Melissa Hughes; Michael Charpentier; Christine Tilburg

    2016-01-01

    Estuarine condition is a function of the nature of the estuary, ocean, and atmospheric systems, and the upstream watershed. To fully understand and predict how an estuary will respond to drivers and pressures,...

  5. Physico-chemical characteristics of the Mahanadi estuarine ecosystem, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Upadhyay, S.

    Seasonal pattern of temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate and silicate profiles of the Mahanadi estuary have been studied. On the basis of physical characteristics, Mahanadi estuarine system can be classified as a partially...

  6. Assessment of Godavari estuarine mangrove ecosystem through trace metal studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, A.K.; Tripathy, S.C.; Patra, S.; Sarma, V.V.

    Trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Ni. Pb, Cd & Cr) analyses in particulate matter and sediments were carried out at sixteen different stations in the Godavari mangrove ecosystem covering the three regions viz., Kakinada (KKD) bay, Goutami...

  7. Application of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope and C/N Ratios as Source Indicators of Organic Matter Provenance in Estuarine Systems: Evidence from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, S. F.; McManus, J.

    1994-03-01

    The source of particulate organic matter (POM) in lacustrine and estuarine sediments from the Tay River catchment has been evaluated using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope and elemental C/N ratios. The δ 13C, δ 15N and C/N compositions of POM from the two environments (respectively -25·4 to -28·0%, 0·2 to 4·0%, 12·17 to 19·5 and -23·2 to -26·6%, 2·6 to 10·6%, 9·03 to 15·71) were statistically distinct, enabling, by use of a simple two component mixing equation, assessment of the ability of each tracer to estimate the terrigenous flux to the estuarine organic matter pool. Estuarial mixing of terrigenous, indigenous estuarine and marine derived organics, recorded by δ 13C data, was only partly confirmed by equivalent δ 15N and C/N compositions which reflected greater control by organic matter diagenesis and biological processing. Limited data indicate sewage derived contributions are insignificant. Of the three tracers employed, only δ 13C ratios are reliable as provenance indicators. Both δ 15N and C/N ratios are limited because the original POM source signature may be lost or overprinted by biochemical alteration prior to and/or soon after deposition. The simultaneous application of these tracers provides substantially more information regarding the source, quality and turnover of sedimentary POM in these contrasting systems than could be achieved using one technique alone.

  8. Priority data on marine and estuarine resources within northeastern National Parks: Inventory and acquisition needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tracy E.; Neckles, Hilary A.; Kopp, Blaine S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to guide development of a strategy for the inventory and mapping of submerged natural resources associated within 10 coastal parks of the National Park Service (NPS) Northeast Region (NER; see Table 1). Priority data needs were identified by the NER Ocean Stewardship Task Force. The majority of the NER priority data needs involve the biotic, chemical, and geological characterization of the seabed. Taken collectively, this demands a consistent and unified approach to habitat classification. The Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) is endorsed by the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC-STD-018) for classifying ecological units in coastal and marine environments, and is recommended as a framework for acquiring and organizing NER data. We prepared an inventory of existing data on priority marine and estuarine natural resources within the ten NER coastal parks. This report describes the data and information sources relevant to each park and identifies gaps in available data. Overwhelmingly and uniformly across all parks, the most pressing needs are consistent, high-resolution bathymetry and seafloor characterization data. Approaches for acquiring these data using an integrated, multi-resolution sampling framework are recommended.

  9. Fingerprinting of bed sediment in the Tay Estuary, Scotland: an environmental magnetism approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Pierre A.; Duck, Rob W.; Rowan, John S.; Walden, John

    Sediment fingerprinting is commonly used for sediment provenance studies in lakes, rivers and reservoirs and on hillslopes and floodplains. This investigation explores the mixing of terrestrial and marine-derived sediment in the Tay Estuary, Scotland, using mineral magnetic attributes for fingerprinting. Samples representative of the estuary sediments and of four sources (end-members) were subjected to a suite of magnetic susceptibility and remanence measurements. Sediment samples from the beds of the Rivers Tay and Earn represented fluvial inputs while samples from the Angus and Fife coasts represented marine input. Multivariate discriminant and factor analysis showed that the sources could be separated on the basis of six magnetic parameters in a simple multivariate unmixing model to identify source contributions to estuarine bed sediments. Multi-domain magnetite signatures, characteristic of unweathered bedrock, dominate the magnetic measurements. Overall contributions of 3% from the River Earn, 17% from the River Tay, 29% from the Angus coast and 51% from the Fife coast source end-members, demonstrated the present-day regime of marine sediment derivation in the Tay Estuary. However, this conceals considerable spatial variability both along-estuary and in terms of sub-environments, with small-scale variations in sediment provenance reflecting local morphology, particularly areas of channel convergence.

  10. Effect of sediments on the survival of Escherichia coli in marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerba, C P; McLeod, J S

    1976-01-01

    Escherichia coli, a fecal coliform, was found to survive for longer periods of time in unsterile natural seawater when sediment material was present than in seawater alone, and at least on one occasion growth was observed to occur. This enteric bacterium was found to increase rapidly in number in autoclaved natural seawater and autoclaved sediment taken from areas receiving domestic wastes, even when the seawater had salinities as high as 34 g/kg. However, in autoclaved seawater, growth was always more gradual and never reached numbers as high as those observed when sediment was present. It was found that nutrients were easily eluted from the sediment after autoclaving or upon addition to artificial seawater, but little elution occured during mixing of the sediments with unsterile natural seawater. The longer survival of E. coli in the sediment is attributed to the greater content of organic matter present in the sediment than the sweater. These laboratory results, in part, could explain why on a volume basis larger numbers of coliforms and fecal coliforms and fecal coliforms were found in estuarine sediments than the overlaying water at field sites. PMID:788634

  11. Sediment bioassay with sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus), a submersed aquatic macrophyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, W.J. [NBS, Raleigh, NC (United States); Siesko, M.M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ailstock, M.S. [Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Sago pondweed explants produced in tissue culture were grown for 6 weeks in sediments from Baltimore Harbor, MD. Although sediments contained up to 9,800 ppm Al, 7.5 ppm Cd, 3,090 ppm Cr, 397 ppm Pb, 530 Cu, 1,320 Sn, 2,040 ppm Zn, and 82,900 ppm oil and grease (all expressed as dry wt.) stepwise linear regression of log transformed contaminant data showed no linkage of reduced plant growth to the contaminants measured. Plant growth was negatively correlated with particle size and particle size was negatively correlated with most contaminant concentrations. In a second study, 17 estuarine sediments, representing a range of low to very high toxicity in Microtox and Hyalella azteca bioassays, were selected for study. Selected sediments contained up to 10 ppm Cd, 135 ppm Cr, 21 ppm Cu, 105 ppm Pb, 15 ppm Ni, and 190 ppm Zn (all expressed as dry wt.). Sago pondweed explants were planted into these sediments and grown for 4 weeks. Biomass production differed significantly among sediments tested. Phytotoxicity of sediments did not correlate well with the toxicity results of the Microtox and Hyalella azteca bioassays nor the metal content of sediments.

  12. Uncertainty in tsunami sediment transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Goto, Kazuhisa; Sugawara, Daisuke; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; La Selle, SeanPaul M.

    2016-01-01

    Erosion and deposition from tsunamis record information about tsunami hydrodynamics and size that can be interpreted to improve tsunami hazard assessment. We explore sources and methods for quantifying uncertainty in tsunami sediment transport modeling. Uncertainty varies with tsunami, study site, available input data, sediment grain size, and model. Although uncertainty has the potential to be large, published case studies indicate that both forward and inverse tsunami sediment transport models perform well enough to be useful for deciphering tsunami characteristics, including size, from deposits. New techniques for quantifying uncertainty, such as Ensemble Kalman Filtering inversion, and more rigorous reporting of uncertainties will advance the science of tsunami sediment transport modeling. Uncertainty may be decreased with additional laboratory studies that increase our understanding of the semi-empirical parameters and physics of tsunami sediment transport, standardized benchmark tests to assess model performance, and development of hybrid modeling approaches to exploit the strengths of forward and inverse models.

  13. Stratified active archaeal communities in the sediments of Jiulong River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian eLi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Here the composition of total and active archaeal communities in a sediment core of Jiulong River estuary at Fujian Province, Southern China was reported. Profiles of CH4 and SO42- concentrations from the sediment core indicated the existence of a sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ in which sulfate reduction-coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane occurs. Accordingly, three sediment layers (16-18.5 cm, 71-73.5 cm, 161-163.5 cm from the 1.2 m sediment core were sectioned and named top, middle and bottom, respectively. Total DNA and RNA of each layer were extracted and used for clone libraries and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes, the reverse transcription (RT-PCR products of 16S rRNA and methyl CoM reductase alpha subunit (mcrA genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that archaeal communities of the three layers were dominated by the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG whose ecological functions were still unknown. The MCG could be further divided into seven subgroups, named MCG-A, B, C, D, E, F and G. MCG-A and MCG-G were the most active groups in the estuarine sediments. Known anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANMEs were only found as minor components in these estuarine archaeal communities. This study, together with the studies of deep subsurface sediments, would be a very good start point to target and compare the specific active archaeal groups and their roles in the dark, deep subsurface sediment environments.

  14. Novel Application of Cyclolipopeptide Amphisin: Feasibility Study as Additive to Remediate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH Contaminated Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Groboillot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To decontaminate dredged harbor sediments by bioremediation or electromigration processes, adding biosurfactants could enhance the bioavailability or mobility of contaminants in an aqueous phase. Pure amphisin from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSS73 displays increased effectiveness in releasing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs strongly adsorbed to sediments when compared to a synthetic anionic surfactant. Amphisin production by the bacteria in the natural environment was also considered. DSS73’s growth is weakened by three model PAHs above saturation, but amphisin is still produced. Estuarine water feeding the dredged material disposal site of a Norman harbor (France allows both P. fluorescens DSS73 growth and amphisin production.

  15. A review of estuarine fish research in South America: what has been achieved and what is the future for sustainability and conservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, S J M; Barletta, M

    2016-07-01

    Estuarine fish research in South America began in the early 20th Century, but it is only within the last 40 years that detailed studies have been undertaken. This review firstly summarizes research results from South American estuaries by geographic area, starting with the temperate south-east, then the temperate-sub-tropical transition zone in Brazil, then the semi-arid and tropical estuaries of north and north-east Brazil including the Amazon complex, then the north and Caribbean coasts and finally down the Pacific coast of the continent. They include almost all types of estuarine systems, from large open systems (e.g. the temperate Rio de La Plata and tropical Amazon) to extensive coastal lakes (e.g. the temperate Patos Lagoon and tropical Cienega Grande de Santa Marta). They encompass a broad range of climatic and vegetation types, from saltmarsh systems in the south-east and fjords in the south-west to both arid and humid tropical systems, dominated by mangroves in the north. Their tidal regimes range from microtidal (e.g. Mar Chiquita, Argentina) through mesotidal (e.g. Goiana, Brazil) to macrotidal in the Amazon complex where they can exceed 7 m. The review uses where possible the recent standardization of estuarine fish categories and guilds, but the ways that fishes use tropical South American systems may necessitate further refinements of the categories and guilds, particularly in relation to freshwater fishes, notably the Siluriformes, which dominate many north and north-east South American systems. The extent to which South American studies contribute to discussions and paradigms of connectivity and estuarine dependence is summarized, but work on these topics has only just begun. The anthropogenic issue of pollution, particularly in relation to heavy metals and fishes and fisheries in estuaries is more advanced, but the possible effects of climate change have barely been addressed. Studies around conservation and management are briefly reviewed and

  16. Evaluation of zoobenthic assemblages and recovery following petroleum spill in a coastal area of Rio de la Plata estuarine system, South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocon, C.S. [Instituto de Limnologia ' Dr. Raul A. Ringuelet' , UNLP-CONICET CC 712, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)], E-mail: carolina@ilpla.edu.ar; Capitulo, A. Rodrigues; Paggi, A.C. [Instituto de Limnologia ' Dr. Raul A. Ringuelet' , UNLP-CONICET CC 712, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    The objective of this work was to analyse zoobenthic assemblages in the coastal sector of the Rio de La Plata, Argentina, after a petroleum spill. Sampling stations were located in representative sites of various landscapes. Structure, composition, physico-chemical parameters and seasonal changes were recorded in order to assess taxocenosis evolution during the period 1999-2003. Recovery signs were estimated by means of biotic indices and the presence of sensitive species. Tolerant species were dominant in heavily polluted sites, with low diversity and water quality values, according to the biotic indices used. In certain zones, sediment quality remains impoverished, with a visible oil film on the surface. However, during the last sampling, some points showed an increase in biotic indices, pointing to a slight improvement in environmental conditions. - Oil spill impact was evaluated by zoobenthos response in an estuarine system.

  17. Protozoan grazing increases mineralization of naphthalene in marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Suk-Fong; Taghon, Gary L

    2006-05-01

    Bacterial decomposition of organic matter is frequently enhanced when protozoa are present. Various mechanisms have been proposed to account for this phenomenon, including effects associated with grazing by protozoa (such as increased recycling of limiting nutrients, removal of senescent cells, or reduction of competition among bacteria) and indirect effects of grazers (such as excretion of bacterial growth factors). Few studies have examined the role of protozoa in bacterial degradation of xenobiotic compounds in sediment containing a natural community of microbes. The effect of protozoa on mineralization of naphthalene was investigated in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted using field-contaminated estuarine sediment, with the indigenous microbial populations. Mineralization of naphthalene was up to four times greater in treatments with actively grazing protozoa than in treatments containing the grazing inhibitor cytochalasin B. Control experiments confirmed that the grazing inhibitor was not toxic to ciliates but did prevent them from grazing. The grazing inhibitor did not affect growth rates of a mixed culture of sediment bacteria or a pure polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading strain. Once grazing had been inhibited, supplementing treatments with inorganic N and P, glucose, or additional protozoa failed to stimulate naphthalene mineralization. Naphthalene-degrading bacteria were four to nine times less abundant when protozoan grazing was suppressed. We suggest that protozoa enhance naphthalene mineralization by selectively grazing on those sediment bacteria that ordinarily would outcompete naphthalene-degrading bacteria.

  18. Laboratory theory and methods for sediment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Harold P.

    1969-01-01

    The diverse character of fluvial sediments makes the choice of laboratory analysis somewhat arbitrary and the pressing of sediment samples difficult. This report presents some theories and methods used by the Water Resources Division for analysis of fluvial sediments to determine the concentration of suspended-sediment samples and the particle-size distribution of both suspended-sediment and bed-material samples. Other analyses related to these determinations may include particle shape, mineral content, and specific gravity, the organic matter and dissolved solids of samples, and the specific weight of soils. The merits and techniques of both the evaporation and filtration methods for concentration analysis are discussed. Methods used for particle-size analysis of suspended-sediment samples may include the sieve pipet, the VA tube-pipet, or the BW tube-VA tube depending on the equipment available, the concentration and approximate size of sediment in the sample, and the settling medium used. The choice of method for most bed-material samples is usually limited to procedures suitable for sand or to some type of visual analysis for large sizes. Several tested forms are presented to help insure a well-ordered system in the laboratory to handle the samples, to help determine the kind of analysis required for each, to conduct the required processes, and to assist in the required computations. Use of the manual should further 'standardize' methods of fluvial sediment analysis among the many laboratories and thereby help to achieve uniformity and precision of the data.

  19. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  20. Superfund: Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated sediments are a significant environmental problem and contribute to the over 3,200 fish consumption advisories nationwide. The Superfund program cleans up sediment sites that present an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment.

  1. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  2. Ocean Sediment Thickness Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean sediment thickness contours in 200 meter intervals for water depths ranging from 0 - 18,000 meters. These contours were derived from a global sediment...

  3. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment in...

  4. Mercury methylation by a microbial community from sediments of the Adour Estuary (Bay of Biscay, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, R. [Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Avenue de l' Universite, IBEAS BP1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France)], E-mail: robert.duran@univ-pau.fr; Ranchou-Peyruse, M.; Menuet, V. [Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Avenue de l' Universite, IBEAS BP1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Monperrus, M.; Bareille, G. [Equipe Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Goni, M.S.; Salvado, J.C. [Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Avenue de l' Universite, IBEAS BP1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Amouroux, D. [Equipe Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Guyoneaud, R. [Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Avenue de l' Universite, IBEAS BP1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France); Donard, O.F.X. [Equipe Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Materiaux, UMR CNRS 5254, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, 64013 Pau Cedex (France)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    In order to study the influence of microorganisms on the mercury biogeochemistry, the metal content and the structure of microbial communities were determined in sediments from stations along the Adour Estuary. The comparison of the bacterial communities and their distribution in function of the environmental parameters by Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) revealed the influence of metals on the bacterial communities structure. Sediments where the bacterial communities are mostly influenced by methylmercury were incubated in slurries with or without mercury, under oxic and anoxic conditions. Methylmercury production was detected in the anoxic biotic slurries with a net methylation yield of 0.3% after 24 h. CCA based on T-RFLP profiles revealed the impact of mercury addition on the bacterial communities structure. In addition, 17 bacterial strains, mainly sulphate-reducing bacteria involved in mercury methylation, were isolated and identified. - Role of oxic/anoxic cycles and microbial activities on the methylmercury formation in Adour (France) estuarine sediments.

  5. LOWER PASSAIC RIVER SEDIMENT POLLUTION STUDY USING GIS, NEW JERSEY, USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FENG,H.; ONWUEME,V.; JASLANEK,W.J.; STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.W.

    2005-04-01

    The Passaic River is located in the New Jersey-New York metropolitan area. This river has been heavily polluted by dioxins, PAHs, PCBs and heavy metals due to agricultural, industrial activities, and urbanization. Contaminated sediments in the Passaic River have received considerable attention because contaminants (metals, PCBs. PAHs, dioxins) in the sediments have potential to release into the aquatic system and air through diffusion and/or volatilization, causing human health hazards. Identification of high concentration areas of these Contaminants in the river-estuarine system is critical to the Passaic River environmental restoration and watershed protection. In this study, we analyzed portion of 10 years (1991-2000) data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as a tool to study the distributions of contaminants in the sediments. The results from this study provide important information for developing environmental management strategies for the lower Passaic River system.

  6. Characterization of Baker Fjord region through its heavy metal content on sediments (Central Chilean Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Ahumada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of heavy metals content (Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sr and Zn in sediments of the Baker Fjord and surrounding channels in the central region of the Chilean fjords (47°45'S, 48°15'S is analyzed. The aim of the study was characterized the patterns of abundance and distribution of these metals in surface sediments. The area corresponds to a poorly studied zone with low human activity. Distribution patterns would be influenced by rainfall conditions (local erosion, fluvial (continental sediments carried by rivers, glacier (glacier flour and estuarine circulation. Cluster analysis allows differentiation among the sampled sites and group with similar characteristics. Finally, the concentrations found were contrasted with average values of metamorphic rocks and show with some certainty that the values found for calendar for this area and the greatest concentrations are the result of natural enrichment.

  7. Marine benthic habitat mapping of Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, with an evaluation of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusel, Luke D.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Etherington, Lisa L.; Powell, Ross D.; Mayer, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Seafloor geology and potential benthic habitats were mapped in Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, using multibeam sonar, ground-truth information, and geological interpretations. Muir Inlet is a recently deglaciated fjord that is under the influence of glacial and paraglacial marine processes. High glacially derived sediment and meltwater fluxes, slope instabilities, and variable bathymetry result in a highly dynamic estuarine environment and benthic ecosystem. We characterize the fjord seafloor and potential benthic habitats using the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) recently developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NatureServe. Substrates within Muir Inlet are dominated by mud, derived from the high glacial debris flux. Water-column characteristics are derived from a combination of conductivity temperature depth (CTD) measurements and circulation-model results. We also present modern glaciomarine sediment accumulation data from quantitative differential bathymetry. These data show Muir Inlet is divided into two contrasting environments: a dynamic upper fjord and a relatively static lower fjord. The accompanying maps represent the first publicly available high-resolution bathymetric surveys of Muir Inlet. The results of these analyses serve as a test of the CMECS and as a baseline for continued mapping and correlations among seafloor substrate, benthic habitats, and glaciomarine processes.

  8. ESR (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Sed Rate; Sedimentation Rate; Westergren Sedimentation Rate Formal name: Erythrocyte Sedimentation ...

  9. Electrodialytic remediation of sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland

    often hinders this usage. Hence, for both types of sediments, expensive deposition at hazardous waste landfills is required. Electrodialysis is presently being developed as an alternative method for treatment of such contaminated sediments. Heavy metals are removed by treating the sediments...

  10. Metal accumulation kinetics by the estuarine macroalga, Fucus ceranoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Ranjit; Turner, Andrew; Brown, Murray T.; Millward, Geoff E.

    2013-08-01

    The kinetics of Cu, Cd and Pb accumulation by the macroalga, Fucus ceranoides, was studied under simulated estuarine conditions. Accumulation of Cu and Pb proceeded via a pseudo-first-order reaction that was reversible, suggesting desorption or efflux of accumulated metal, with forward rate constants on the order of 0.1 h-1. For both metals, reaction reversibility increased and the equilibrium constant decreased with increasing salinity (from 1 to 33.5) and system response times were <10 h throughout. Accumulation of Cd proceeded via a first-order reaction that was irreversible, suggesting little desorption or efflux of metal, with rate constants that decreased with increasing salinity (from 0.023 to 0.015 h-1) and reaction half-lives ranging from approximately 30-50 h. Inorganic equilibrium speciation calculations suggest that interactions of Cu, Cd and Pb principally involve the respective free ions, but that additional ions (e.g. CdCl+) and biotic processes may also be significant.

  11. Microbe-assisted phytoremediation of hydrocarbons in estuarine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vanessa; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Silva, Artur M S; Silva, Helena; Cunha, Ângela

    2015-01-01

    Estuaries are sinks for various anthropogenic contaminants, such as petroleum hydrocarbons, giving rise to significant environmental concern. The demand for organisms and processes capable of degrading pollutants in a clean, effective, and less expensive process is of great importance. Phytoremedition approaches involving plant/bacteria interactions have been explored as an alternative, and halophyte vegetation has potential for use in phytoremedition of hydrocarbon contamination. Studies with plant species potentially suitable for microbe-assisted phytoremediation are widely represented in scientific literature. However, the in-depth understanding of the biological processes associated with the re-introduction of indigenous bacteria and plants and their performance in the degradation of hydrocarbons is still the limiting step for the application of these bioremediation solutions in a field context. The intent of the present review is to summarize the sources and effects of hydrocarbon contamination in estuarine environments, the strategies currently available for bioremediation (potential and limitations), and the perspectives of the use of halophyte plants in microbe-assisted phytoremediation approaches.

  12. Geochemistry of trace metals in a fresh water sediment: Field results and diagenetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, R.W. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, PO Box 80021, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: r.canavan@geo.uu.nl; Cappellen, P. van [Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, PO Box 80021, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwolsman, J.J.G. [Kiwa Water Research, PO Box 1072, 3430 BB Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Berg, G.A. van den [Kiwa Water Research, PO Box 1072, 3430 BB Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Slomp, C.P. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, PO Box 80021, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-08-01

    Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in pore water and sediment of a coastal fresh water lake (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands). Elevated sediment trace metal concentrations reflect anthropogenic inputs from the Rhine and Meuse Rivers. Pore water and sediment analyses, together with thermodynamic calculations, indicate a shift in trace metal speciation from oxide-bound to sulfide-bound over the upper 20 cm of the sediment. Concentrations of reducible Fe and Mn decline with increasing depth, but do not reach zero values at 20 cm depth. The reducible phases are relatively more important for the binding of Co, Ni, and Zn than for Pb and Cd. Pore waters exhibit supersaturation with respect to Zn, Pb, Co, and Cd monosulfides, while significant fractions of Ni and Co are bound to pyrite. A multi-component, diagenetic model developed for organic matter degradation was expanded to include Zn and Ni dynamics. Pore water transport of trace metals is primarily diffusive, with a lesser contribution of bioirrigation. Reactions affecting trace metal mobility near the sediment-water interface, especially sulfide oxidation and sorption to newly formed oxides, strongly influence the modeled estimates of the diffusive effluxes to the overlying water. Model results imply less efficient sediment retention of Ni than Zn. Sensitivity analyses show that increased bioturbation and sulfate availability, which are expected upon restoration of estuarine conditions in the lake, should increase the sulfide bound fractions of Zn and Ni in the sediments.

  13. Developmental toxicity of Louisiana crude oil-spiked sediment to zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Sandy; Jackson, Crystal R; Krzykwa, Julie; Hemmer, Becky L; Awkerman, Jill A; Barron, Mace G

    2014-10-01

    Embryonic exposures to the components of petroleum, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), cause a characteristic suite of developmental defects and cardiotoxicity in a variety of fish species. We exposed zebrafish embryos to reference sediment mixed with laboratory weathered South Louisiana crude oil and to sediment collected from an oiled site in Barataria Bay, Louisiana in December 2010. Laboratory oiled sediment exposures caused a reproducible set of developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos including yolk sac and pericardial edema, craniofacial and spinal defects, and tissue degeneration. Dose-response studies with spiked sediment showed that total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (tPAH) concentrations of 27mg tPAH/kg (dry weight normalized to 1 percent organic carbon [1 percent OC]) caused a significant increase in defects, and concentrations above 78mg tPAH/kg 1 percent OC caused nearly complete embryo mortality. No toxicity was observed in Barataria sediment with 2mg tPAH/kg 1 percent OC. Laboratory aging of spiked sediment at 4°C resulted in a nearly 10-fold decrease in sensitivity over a 40-day period. This study demonstrates oiled sediment as an exposure pathway to fish with dose-dependent effects on embryogenesis that are consistent with PAH mechanisms of developmental toxicity. The results have implications for effects on estuarine fish from oiled coastal areas during the Deepwater Horizon spill. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The Impact of Sediment Characteristics on PCB-dechlorinating Cultures: Implications for Bioaugmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; LaPara, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    PCB-dechlorinating cultures with complimentary activities, previously derived from estuarine Baltimore Harbor (B), marine Palos Verdes (P) and riverine Hudson River (H) sediments, were mixed and then inoculated into sterile sediments from the same sources. In the treatments containing sterile B sediment, the different inocula had limited impact on the bacterial community development and on dechlorination patterns, all of which were similar. In treatments containing sterile P or H sediment, however, different inocula resulted in significantly different PCB dechlorination patterns and bacterial communities. The B sediment appeared to support not only the most extensive and rapid dechlorination of the three sediments, but also supported a more diverse bacterial community. This was thought to be a result of nutritional richness, as it was high in organic carbon and micronutrients such as zinc and cobalt. Although mixing three PCB-dechlorinating cultures was able to produce a culture capable of enhanced PCB-dechlorinating activity as compared to single cultures, some activities were lost upon culture transfer. This indicates that care must be taken to establish robust PCB-dechlorinating cultures capable of extensive dechlorination prior to pursuing bioaugmentation. In addition, our results indicate that the concentration and availability of macro- and micro-nutrients could have a significant impact on the microbial community structure, and thus a thorough characterization of the sediment at contaminated sites is essential for implementing bioaugmentation for PCB bioremediation. PMID:18176633

  15. Comparison of pollution indices for the assessment of heavy metal in Brisbane River sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2016-12-01

    Estuarine environment is complex and receives different contaminants from numerous sources that are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. The distribution, source, contamination and ecological risk status of heavy metals in sediment of Brisbane River, Australia were investigated. Sediment samples were analysed for major and minor elements using LA-ICP-MS. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis identified three main sources of metals in the samples: marine sand intrusion, mixed lithogenic and sand intrusion as well as transport related. To overcome inherent deficiencies in using a single index, a range of sediment quality indices, including contamination factor, enrichment factor, index of geo-accumulation, modified degree of contamination, pollution index and modified pollution index were utilised to ascertain the sediment quality. Generally, the sediment is deemed to be "slightly" to "heavily" polluted. A further comparison with the Australian Sediment Quality Guidelines indicated that Ag, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn had the potential to rarely cause biological effects while Hg could frequently cause biological effects. Application of potential ecological risk index (RI) revealed that the sediment poses moderate to considerable ecological risk. However, RI could not account for the complex sediment behaviour because it uses a simple contamination factor. Consequently, a modified ecological risk index (MRI) employing enrichment factor is proposed. This provides a more reliable understanding of whole sediment behaviour and classified the ecological risk of the sediment as moderate to very high. The results demonstrate the need for further investigation into heavy metal speciation and bioavailability in the sediment to ascertain the degree of toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contrasting sediment records of marine submersion events related to wave exposure, Southwest France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, J.; Chaumillon, E.; Schneider, J.-L.; Jorissen, F.; Sauriau, P.-G.; Richard, P.; Bonnin, J.; Schmidt, S.

    2017-05-01

    Sediment records of two contrasting backshore coastal marshes, extremely vulnerable to recent and historical marine flooding events, located on the SW coast of France, have been investigated using a multiproxy approach. The studied marshes are 30 km apart and have been flooded by similar storm events (7 marine floods in the last 250 years). One is located in a wave-exposed coast but isolated from the sea by a sediment barrier, whereas the other is located in a sheltered estuarine environment and isolated from the sea by a dike. One core was collected in each marsh and information on grain-size, foraminifera, shell contents and stable carbon isotopes was obtained along with an age model using 210Pb, 137Cs and 14C. Core data combined with historical maps give evidence of a typical estuarine backfilling, part of the Holocene regressive parasequence, including an intertidal mudflat at the base and a backshore environment at the top. Despite the absence of grain size anomalies, marine flood-related sedimentation in the backshore area of both marshes is identified by a mixture of marine and terrestrial features, including marine fauna, vegetation debris and variation in the δ13C signature of the organic fraction. Very low sedimentation rates between flood events and/or bioturbation prevents the identification of individual episodic marine floods in the sediment succession. Comparison of the two sedimentary successions shows that the foraminifera deposited by marine submersions are of two different types. Foraminifera are monospecific and originate from the upper tidal mudflat in the sheltered marsh; whereas in the backshore marsh located in a wave-exposed environment, they show higher diversity and originate from both shallow and deeper water marine environments. This study shows that wave exposure can control the faunal content of marine flood sediment records in coastal marshes.

  17. Bacterial community dynamic associated with autochthonous bioaugmentation for enhanced Cu phytoremediation of salt-marsh sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C Marisa R; Oliveira, Tânia; Reis, Izabela; Gomes, Carlos R; Mucha, Ana P

    2017-12-01

    Autochthonous bioaugmentation for metal phytoremediation is still little explored, particularly its application to estuarine salt marshes, but results obtained so far are promising. Nevertheless, understanding the behaviour of the microbial communities in the process of bioaugmentation and their role in improving metal phytoremediation is very important to fully validate the application of this biological technology. This study aimed to characterize the bacterial community dynamic associated with the application of autochthonous bioaugmentation in an experimentation which showed that Phragmites australis rhizosphere microorganisms could increase this salt marsh plant potential to phytoremediate Cu contaminated sediments. Bacterial communities present in the autochthonous microbial consortium resistant to Cu added to the medium and in the sediment at the beginning and at the end of the experiment were characterized by ARISA. Complementarily, the consortium and the sediment used for its production were characterized by next generation sequencing using the pyrosequencing platform 454. The microbial consortium resistant to Cu obtained from non-vegetated sediment was dominated by the genus Lactococcus (46%), Raoultella (25%), Bacillus (12%) and Acinetobacter (11%), whereas the one obtained form rhizosediment was dominated by the genus Gluconacetobacter (77%), Bacillus (17%) and Dyella (3%). Results clearly showed that, after two months of experiment, Cu caused a shift in the bacterial community structure of sediments, an effect that was observed either with or without addition of the metal resistant microbial consortium. Therefore, bioaugmentation application improved the process of phytoremediation (metal translocation by the plant was increased) without inducing long term changes in the bacterial community structure of the sediments. So, phytoremediation combined with autochthonous bioaugmentation can be a suitable technology for the recovery of estuarine areas

  18. Effects of cyclic changes in pH and salinity on metals release from sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Seok; Kinney, Kerry A; Reible, Danny D

    2011-08-01

    The effects of dynamic changes in pH and salinity on metal speciation and release are investigated with sediments posed in a simulated estuarine environment. The release of Zn, Cd, Mn, and Fe was studied using sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC, USA) spiked with freshly precipitated amorphous cadmium sulfide to increase Cd content. The sediment was exposed to salt water (high pH, ionic strength) and freshwater (neutral pH, minimal ionic strength) continuously and alternately (to mimic tidal changes) in small microcosms over 100 d. At the conclusion of the experiments, the vertical profiles of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) as well as porewater metals and anion concentrations were characterized. Acid volatile sulfide oxidation at the sediment surface led to a commensurate increase in dissolved metal species and metal release that was strongly dependent on the changes in the overlying water characteristics. Total Cd release was substantially higher during exposure to salt water, although, as a result of complexation, predicted dissolved Cd(2+) concentration in the overlying water was higher during exposure to freshwater. Total Zn release was little changed during exposure to salt water and freshwater, although the predicted dissolved Zn(2+) concentration was much higher during freshwater exposures. No significant iron was released because of the rapid oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) in aerobic surficial sediments and overlying water. The present study suggests that cyclic changes in pH and salinity in the overlying water can dramatically influence metal release from estuarine sediments. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  19. Organic matter characterization in a tropical estuarine-mangrove ecosystem of India: Preliminary assessment by using stable isotopes and lignin phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Krishna Prasad, M.; Ramanathan, A. L.

    2009-10-01

    In order to characterize the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) in the Pichavaram estuarine-mangrove ecosystem (east coast of India), stable isotope (δ 13C and δ 15N) ratios and molecular lignin analyses were conducted in plant litter, benthic algae, sediment, particulate matter and in a variety of benthic invertebrate species. The δ 13C signature of plant litter ranges from -29.75‰ to -27.64‰ suggesting that mangrove trees follow the C 3 photosynthetic pathway. Sedimentary δ 13C signature (-28.92‰ to -25.34‰) demonstrates the greater influence of plant litter organic matter on sedimentary organic matter. Suspended particulate organic pool was influenced by terrestrial source and also seems to be influenced by the marine phytoplankton. Enriched signature of δ 15N in surface sediments (4.66-8.01‰; avg. 6.69‰) suggesting the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen from agricultural fields and human settlements. Spatial chemical variability in availability of nitrogen and plant associated microbial interactions demonstrate variability in δ 15N signature in mangrove plant litter. Two (lower and higher) trophic levels of invertebrates were identified with and observed >4‰ gradient in δ 13C signal between these two trophic groups. The observed δ 13C values suggest that the lower level invertebrates feed on phytoplankton and higher level organisms have a mixed source of diet, phytoplankton, sediment and particulate organic matter. Lignin phenol analyses explain that the benthic surface layer was almost free of lignin. The ratio between syringyl phenols to vanillyl phenols (S/V) is 1.14-1.32 (avg. 1.23) and cinnamyl phenols to vanillyl phenols (C/V) is 0.17-0.31 (avg. 0.24), demonstrate non-woody angiosperm tissues was the major sources of lignin to this ecosystem, while aldehyde to acid ratios (Ad/Al) describe diagenetic nature of sediment and is moderately to less degraded. A two-end-member mixing model indicate that the terrigenous OM was dominant

  20. 40 CFR 435.13 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-92 method: “Standard Guide for Conducting 10-day Static Sediment Toxicity Tests with Marine and... Marine and Estuarine Amphipods,” 1992, after preparing the sediment according to the method specified in... Marine and Estuarine Amphipods,” 1992, after preparing the sediment according to the method specified in...

  1. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Florence L.; Woodrow, Donald L.; McGann, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Heavy or high-specific gravity minerals make up a small but diagnostic component of sediment that is well suited for determining the provenance and distribution of sediment transported through estuarine and coastal systems worldwide. By this means, we see that surficial sand-sized sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System comes primarily from the Sierra Nevada and associated terranes by way of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and is transported with little dilution through the San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate. Heavy minerals document a slight change from the strictly Sierran-Sacramento mineralogy at the confluence of the two rivers to a composition that includes minor amounts of chert and other Franciscan Complex components west of Carquinez Strait. Between Carquinez Strait and the San Francisco Bar, Sierran sediment is intermingled with Franciscan-modified Sierran sediment. The latter continues out the Gate and turns southward towards beaches of the San Francisco Peninsula. The Sierran sediment also fans out from the San Francisco Bar to merge with a Sierran province on the shelf in the Gulf of the Farallones. Beach-sand sized sediment from the Russian River is transported southward to Point Reyes where it spreads out to define a Franciscan sediment province on the shelf, but does not continue southward to contribute to the sediment in the Golden Gate area.

  2. Affinities of some common estuarine macroinvertebrates to salinity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the fourteen species studied, three were found mostly at high salinities, two were confined to sandy substratum, and four showed a clear preference for muddy sediment. The crab Paratylodiplax algoense was identified as a euryhaline marine species and the larvae of chironomid midges, previously believed to be ...

  3. Relationship of Estuarine Plant Contaminants to Existing Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    shipyards. 3) Mouriscas - located near the old tidal-mill of Quinta das Mouriscas, a few Km west of the Aguas de Moura channel. The fine sediments...vironments, 2nd. Ed. Springer-Verlag, Berlim. 486 pp. GONZALEZ, S. & Bergqvist, E. (1986). Evidencias de Contaminacion con Me tales Pesados en un

  4. Effects of Bottom-up and Top-down Controls and Climate Change on Estuarine Macrophyte Communities and the Ecosystem Services they Provide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophytes provide important estuarine benthic habitats and support a significant portion of estuarine productivity. The composition and characteristics of these benthic communities are regulated bottom-up by resource availability and from the top-down by herbivory and predation...

  5. North Inlet • Winyah Bay (NIW) National Estuarine Research Reserve Meteorological Data, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 2000 • 2004.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — National Estuarine Research Reserve System The National Estuarine Research Reserve System was established by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (as amended) and...

  6. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Long-term back-barrier shoreline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  7. Catchment controls and human disturbances on the geomorphology of small Mediterranean estuarine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrany, Joan; Grimalt, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Geographic signatures are physical and human-induced characteristics or processes that identify comparable or unique features of estuaries along latitudinal gradients. In Mediterranean areas, the microtidal regime and the strong seasonal and inter-annual contrasts cause an alternation between relatively high runoff and arid conditions. Furthermore, the long history of human settlement also increases the complexity in the study of these estuarine systems. This study investigates these signatures of the estuaries located within the Mallorcan eastern coast, which are geomorphologically homogeneous because of a similar bedrock geology and Holocene history. A multi-method approach focused on the integration of geomorphometry, hydraulics, historical sources and statistics was used. We explore the role played by catchment morphometric parameters, severe flash flood events and human disturbances in controlling the geomorphology of 10 beach-barrier enclosed, fluvial incised lagoons. Most of the lagoons discharge into 'calas', ranging in size from 1345 to 17,537 m2 and their related catchments are representative of the Mediterranean hydrological systems. Multiple regression models illustrate that the size, slope and drainage network development of the catchments explain the variance in length (r2 = 0.67), volume (r2 = 0.49), area (r2 = 0.64), circularity (r2 = 0.72) and average width (r2 = 0.81) of the lagoons. Depending on these catchment morphometric variables, the shape of the lagoons is also determined by the occurrence of catastrophic flash floods, which cause scouring and dredging, whereas the ordinary flood events and sea storms promote refilling and sedimentation. A historical analysis since 1850 documented 18 flood events, 5 of which were catastrophic with destructive effects along the catchments and large morphological changes in coastal lagoons. High intensity rainfall (up to 200 mm in 2 h), the geomorphometry of the catchments and the massive construction of

  8. Radionuclides in sediments and biota of the south shore the estuary and the initial stretch of the river Tejo (is. Tajo); Radionucleidos en sedimentos y biota de la orilla sur del estuario y del tramo inicial del rio Tajo (es. Tajo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corisco, J. A. G.; Portugal, L. M.; Almeida, S.M.

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary data show a trend for which the concentrations of natural radionuclides in sediments surface near the village of Samouco, on the South Bank of the estuarine Bay of yew, is less than that is miden waters above, on a stretch of the River near the village of Valada. (Author)

  9. Sediment transport patterns in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System from cross-validation of bedform asymmetry and modeled residual flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; Dartnell, Peter; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of ~ 45,000 bedforms from 13 multibeam bathymetry surveys was used as a proxy for identifying net bedload sediment transport directions and pathways throughout the San Francisco Bay estuary and adjacent outer coast. The spatially-averaged shape asymmetry of the bedforms reveals distinct pathways of ebb and flood transport. Additionally, the region-wide, ebb-oriented asymmetry of 5% suggests net seaward-directed transport within the estuarine-coastal system, with significant seaward asymmetry at the mouth of San Francisco Bay (11%), through the northern reaches of the Bay (7–8%), and among the largest bedforms (21% for λ > 50 m). This general indication for the net transport of sand to the open coast strongly suggests that anthropogenic removal of sediment from the estuary, particularly along clearly defined seaward transport pathways, will limit the supply of sand to chronically eroding, open-coast beaches. The bedform asymmetry measurements significantly agree (up to ~ 76%) with modeled annual residual transport directions derived from a hydrodynamically-calibrated numerical model, and the orientation of adjacent, flow-sculpted seafloor features such as mega-flute structures, providing a comprehensive validation of the technique. The methods described in this paper to determine well-defined, cross-validated sediment transport pathways can be applied to estuarine-coastal systems globally where bedforms are present. The results can inform and improve regional sediment management practices to more efficiently utilize often limited sediment resources and mitigate current and future sediment supply-related impacts.

  10. Copper and zinc in estuarine water: Chemical speciation in relation to bioavailability to the marine planktonic diatom Ditylum Brightwellii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijstenbil, J.W.; Poortvliet, T.C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Availability of toxic trace metals in relation to phytoplankton growth was studied in water of the polluted Westerschelde (southwestern Netherlands). The prominent estuarine diatom Ditylum brightwellii was grown in bioassays with estuarine water (14%o salinity). Selective removal of Cu and Zn, and

  11. Trace elements and heavy metals in the Grand Bay National Estuarine Reserve in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve has the highest biotic diversity of habitats and offer a reserve of food resources and commercially significant species. Rapid human civilization has led to accumulation of heavy metals and trace elements in estuaries. The Grand Bay National Estuarin...

  12. Resolving drivers of variability in estuarine metabolism from sustained observations of water quality in the SE US

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examine trends in water quality in long-term monitoring (10-15 y) data collected at 5 estuarine systems of NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserve System: Grand Bay, MS; Weeks Bay, AL; Apalachicola Bay, FL; Rookery Bay, FL, and Guana Tolomatos and Matanzas Rivers, FL. These...

  13. Biogeochemical Cycling of Nutrients and Trace Metals in the Sediment of Haringvliet Lake: Response to Salinization

    OpenAIRE

    Canavan, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines sediment redox processes associated with organic matter degradation and their impact on the cycling of nutrients (N, P) and trace metals (Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Zn). Our study site, Haringvliet Lake, is located in the Rhine-Meuse River Delta in the southwest of The Netherlands. This waterbody was formerly a tidal and brackish estuary but was separated from the North Sea in 1970 by a dam, as part of the Delta Works program. Currently, a partial restoration of estuarine conditions...

  14. Stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koś Karolina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir. Based on the geotechnical characteristics of the tested sediments it was stated they do not fulfill all the criteria set for soils in earth embankments. Therefore, an attempt to improve their parameters was made by using two additives – cement and lime. An unconfined compressive strength, shear strength, bearing ratio and pH reaction were determined on samples after different time of curing. Based on the carried out tests it was stated that the obtained values of unconfined compressive strength of sediments stabilized with cement were relatively low and they did not fulfill the requirements set by the Polish standard, which concerns materials in road engineering. In case of lime stabilization it was stated that the tested sediments with 6% addition of the additive can be used for the bottom layers of the improved road base.

  15. Quantifying site-specific physical heterogeneity within an estuarine seascape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Cristina G.; Mather, Martha E.; Smith, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying physical heterogeneity is essential for meaningful ecological research and effective resource management. Spatial patterns of multiple, co-occurring physical features are rarely quantified across a seascape because of methodological challenges. Here, we identified approaches that measured total site-specific heterogeneity, an often overlooked aspect of estuarine ecosystems. Specifically, we examined 23 metrics that quantified four types of common physical features: (1) river and creek confluences, (2) bathymetric variation including underwater drop-offs, (3) land features such as islands/sandbars, and (4) major underwater channel networks. Our research at 40 sites throughout Plum Island Estuary (PIE) provided solutions to two problems. The first problem was that individual metrics that measured heterogeneity of a single physical feature showed different regional patterns. We solved this first problem by combining multiple metrics for a single feature using a within-physical feature cluster analysis. With this approach, we identified sites with four different types of confluences and three different types of underwater drop-offs. The second problem was that when multiple physical features co-occurred, new patterns of total site-specific heterogeneity were created across the seascape. This pattern of total heterogeneity has potential ecological relevance to structure-oriented predators. To address this second problem, we identified sites with similar types of total physical heterogeneity using an across-physical feature cluster analysis. Then, we calculated an additive heterogeneity index, which integrated all physical features at a site. Finally, we tested if site-specific additive heterogeneity index values differed for across-physical feature clusters. In PIE, the sites with the highest additive heterogeneity index values were clustered together and corresponded to sites where a fish predator, adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis), aggregated in a

  16. Contrasting tropical estuarine ecosystem functioning and stability: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Maria Ching

    2015-03-01

    A comparative study of the Sine-saloum (Senegal) and Gambia (The Gambia) estuaries was performed based on trophic model outputs that describe the system structure and functioning. These trophic models were constructed such as to differentiate main energetic flows in the systems and express how climate change may have impacted ecosystem resilience to change. Estuarine fish assemblages are highly resilient despite exposure to vast hydrodynamic variations and stress. Coupled with strong anthropogenic-driven stresses such as fisheries and climate change, ecosystems may undergo severe regime shifts that may weaken their resilience and stability. Taxonomically related and morphologically similar species do not necessarily play similar ecological roles in these two ecosystems. Biomass and production in the Sine-saloum are concentrated at trophic levels (TLs) 2 and 3, while for the Gambia, both are concentrated at TL3. Higher TL biomasses in Gambia compared to Sine-Saloum may be explained by the latter ecosystem being characterized by inverse hypersalinity. Higher TL of production in Sine-Saloum is due to higher exploitations compared to Gambia where fishing activities are still less developed. High production and consumption rates of some groups in both ecosystems indicate high system productivity. Elevated productivity may be due to higher abundance of juvenile fishes in most groups that utilize the latter as refuge and/or nursery zones. Both ecosystems are phytoplankton-driven. Differences in group trophic and ecological roles are mainly due to adaptive responses of these species to seasonal and long-term climate and anthropogenic stressors. System indicators suggest different levels of ecosystem resilience and stability as a function of biodiversity. Relevance of other observations on ecosystem functioning and indicators in relation to perturbation is discussed.

  17. Characterisation of estuarine intertidal macroalgae by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Carla; Utkin, Andrei B.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2015-12-01

    The article reports the application of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for the assessment of macroalgae communities of estuarine intertidal areas. The method was applied for the characterisation of fifteen intertidal macroalgae species of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, and adjacent coastal area. Three bands characterised the LIF spectra of red macroalgae with emission maxima in the ranges 577-583 nm, 621-642 nm and 705-731 nm. Green and brown macroalgae showed one emission maximum in the red region (687-690 nm) and/or one in the far-red region (726-732 nm). Characteristics of LIF emission spectra were determined by differences in the main fluorescing pigments: phycoerythrin, phycocyanin and chlorophyll a (Chl a). In the green and brown macroalgae groups, the relative significance of the two emission maxima seems to be related to the thickness of the photosynthetic layer. In thick macroalgae, like Codium tomentosum or Fucus vesiculosus, the contribution of the far-red emission fluorescence peak was more significant, most probably due to re-absorption of the emitted red Chl a fluorescence within the dense photosynthetic layer. Similarly, an increase in the number of layers of the thin-blade green macroalgae Ulva rigida caused a shift to longer wavelengths of the red emission maximum and the development of a fluorescence peak at the far-red region. Water loss from Ulva's algal tissue also led to a decrease in the red/far-red Chl fluorescence ratio (F685/F735), indicating an increase in the density of chloroplasts in the shrinking macroalgal tissue during low tide exposure.

  18. Pyrethroids in Southern California coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Wenjian; Tiefenthaler, Liesl; Greenstein, Darrin J; Maruya, Keith A; Bay, Steven M; Ritter, Kerry; Schiff, Kenneth

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about pyrethroid fate and effects in estuarine and marine environments. In the present study, the extent and magnitude of pyrethroids in coastal embayments of the Southern California Bight (SCB), USA, were assessed. Using a stratified probabilistic design, 155 sediment samples were collected from four embayment habitats (estuaries, marinas, open bays, and ports) and analyzed for eight common-use pyrethroids. Total pyrethroid concentrations ranged from less than 0.5 to 230 µg/kg dry weight (area-weighted mean concentration=5.1 ± 3.1 µg/kg) and were detected in 35% of the total SCB embayment area. Estuaries and marinas had the greatest areal extent of detectable concentrations (up to 65%) and the greatest area-weighted mean concentrations (22.1 ± 26.5 µg/kg). Sites with the greatest pyrethroid concentrations were located near sources of runoff from urban watersheds. Bifenthrin and cyfluthrin were detected in 32 and 15% of all samples, respectively, whereas the other six pyrethroids were detected in ≤ 5% of samples. Permethrin and bifenthrin had the highest concentrations at 132 and 65 µg/kg. Toxic units estimated for the marine amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius ranged from 0 to 5.8, exceeding unity in 9 and 32% of the total and estuary habitat areas, respectively, and were not correlated with mortality, suggesting that other factors (e.g., co-occurring contaminants, reduced bioavailability) may affect the predictive capability using a single test species. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  19. Deep nirS amplicon sequencing of San Francisco Bay sediments enables prediction of geography and environmental conditions from denitrifying community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica A; Francis, Christopher A

    2017-12-01

    Denitrification is a dominant nitrogen loss process in the sediments of San Francisco Bay. In this study, we sought to understand the ecology of denitrifying bacteria by using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to survey the diversity of a denitrification functional gene, nirS (encoding cytchrome-cd 1 nitrite reductase), along the salinity gradient of San Francisco Bay over the course of a year. We compared our dataset to a library of nirS sequences obtained previously from the same samples by standard PCR cloning and Sanger sequencing, and showed that both methods similarly demonstrated geography, salinity and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen, to be strong determinants of community composition. Furthermore, the depth afforded by NGS enabled novel techniques for measuring the association between environment and community composition. We used Random Forests modelling to demonstrate that the site and salinity of a sample could be predicted from its nirS sequences, and to identify indicator taxa associated with those environmental characteristics. This work contributes significantly to our understanding of the distribution and dynamics of denitrifying communities in San Francisco Bay, and provides valuable tools for the further study of this key N-cycling guild in all estuarine systems. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Estuarine influence on biogeochemical properties of the Alabama shelf during the fall season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwonkowski, B.; Greer, A. T.; Briseño-Avena, C.; Krause, J. W.; Soto, I. M.; Hernandez, F. J.; Deary, A. L.; Wiggert, J. D.; Joung, D.; Fitzpatrick, P. J.; O'Brien, S. J.; Dykstra, S. L.; Lau, Y.; Cambazoglu, M. K.; Lockridge, G.; Howden, S. D.; Shiller, A. M.; Graham, W. M.

    2017-05-01

    Estuarine-shelf exchange can drive strong gradients in physical and biogeochemical properties in the coastal zone and exert a significant influence on biological processes and patterns. Physical, biogeochemical, and plankton data from an across-shelf transect extending south of Mobile Bay, Alabama, in conjunction with regional time series data, were used to determine the relative importance of estuarine-shelf interactions on the physical-biological structuring of the shelf environment during fall conditions (i.e., well-mixed, low discharge). This period was also characterized by a relatively unique weather event associated with the remnants of Hurricane Patricia, which drove a meteorological flushing of estuarine water onto the shelf. Survey data indicated generally low N:P ratios across the shelf, with slightly elevated dissolved inorganic nitrogen in the Region of Freshwater Influence (ROFI) that extended approximately 30 km offshore. The ROFI had higher values of chlorophyll-a, diatom-specific production, marine snow, and primary productivity, with notable contributions from the larger size cells (>5 μm). Furthermore, stratification provided a niche opportunity for Trichodesmium sp. aggregates, a typically oligotrophic cyanobacteria, at the offshore edge of the ROFI. The lens of estuarine water may have limited the vertical extent to which this population was mixed, providing enhanced light availability relative to the well-mixed offshore conditions. Following the biogeochemical trend, the highest zooplankton abundances were also located within the estuarine outflow. While limited in spatial extent, the distinct geochemical and biological characteristics within the ROFI demonstrate the ecological impacts that estuarine-sourced waters can have during periods of generally low productivity in the Mississippi Bight.