WorldWideScience

Sample records for estimating dna ploidy

  1. [Are centrosomal abnormalities correlated to DNA ploidy in breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Rita; Fleury, Jocelyne; Prengel, Claudie; Roynard, Patricia; Daraï, Emile; Uzan, Serge; Rouzier, Roman; Bernaudin, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    ADN ploidy was shown to play a role in genomic instability of cancer cells and prognosis. The implication of the centrosome in the cell cycle was also described. Therefore, new prognostic factors could be suggested for a better-tailored therapy. The purpose of this study is to search for correlation between centrosomal abnormality and ADN ploidy in breast cancer. Cell prints were prepared from cell culture of mesothelial ascitis, fibroblast cell line MRC5 and breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D. Fresh cell prints were also obtained from cases with invasive carcinoma. The centrosome was labelled by an indirect immunofluorescence assay using anti-γ-tubulin antibody and F(ab')(2) FITC before quantification with fluorescence microscopy. ADN ploidy was scored with DNA index obtained by means of flux cytometry. The normal mesothelial cells (94% of cells with only one centrosome) and the diploid cell line MRC5 (68% of cells with two centrosomes) were used as controls. DNA ploidy was found to be correlated with centrosomal abnormality in MCF7 cell line (64% of cells had more than three centrosomes) but not in the 10 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma analysed in this study. The absence of correlation between DNA ploidy and centrosomal abnormality in breast cancer samples may be due to the small numbers of cases, the cell prints or tumorigenesis. Correlation analysis of a larger number of cases and types of breast lesions to numerical and morphological abnormalities of the centrosome are ongoing.

  2. Correlation of DNA Ploidy with Progression of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Mehrotra, S.; Kalra, N.; Singh, U.; Shukla, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of squamous cell carcinomas of cervix are preceded by visible changes in the cervix, most often detected by cervical smear. As cervical cancer is preceded by long precancerous stages, identification of the high-risk population through detection of DNA ploidy may be of importance in effective management of this disease. Here we attempted to correlate aneuploid DNA patterns and their influence on biological behavior of flow-cytometry analysis of DNA ploidy which was carried out in cytologically diagnosed cases of mild (79), moderate (36), and severe (12) dysplasia, as well as “atypical squamous cells of unknown significance (ASCUS)” (57) along with controls (69), in order to understand its importance in malignant progression of disease. Cytologically diagnosed dysplasias, which were employed for DNA ploidy studies, 39 mild, 28 moderate, and 11 severe dysplasia cases were found to be aneuploid. Out of the 69 control subjects, 6 cases showed aneuploidy pattern and the rest 63 subjects were diploid. An aneuploidy pattern was observed in 8 out of 57 cases of cytologically evaluated ASCUS. The results of the followup studies showed that aberrant DNA content reliably predicts the occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma in cervical smear. Flow cytometric analysis of DNA ploidy may provide a strategic diagnostic tool for early detection of carcinoma cervix. Therefore, it is a concept of an HPV screening with reflex cytology in combination with DNA flow cytometry to detect progressive lesions with the greatest possible sensitivity and specificity. PMID:20445775

  3. Prognostic value of DNA ploidy status in patients with oral leukoplakia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, J.F.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Broeckaert, M.A.M.; Beliën, J.A.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Bloemena, E.; van der Waal, I.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a potentially malignant disorder that will develop into oral cancer at an estimated rate of 1-2% per year. Aim of the present study is to assess the possible predictive value of DNA ploidy for malignant progression of oral leukoplakia. A cohort of 62 leukoplakia patients was

  4. Prognostic value of DNA ploidy status in patients with oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Jantine F; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; Broeckaert, Mark A M; Beliën, Jeroen A M; Leemans, C René; Bloemena, Elisabeth; van der Waal, Isaäc; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M

    2011-10-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a potentially malignant disorder that will develop into oral cancer at an estimated rate of 1-2% per year. Aim of the present study is to assess the possible predictive value of DNA ploidy for malignant progression of oral leukoplakia. A cohort of 62 leukoplakia patients was studied and their biopsy was examined with standard histopathology and DNA image cytometry. Cox regression analysis was performed to establish the relationship between progression-free survival and the DNA ploidy status. During the follow-up time (median of 69 months) 13 patients developed an oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). DNA aneuploidy was observed in 27 (44%) patients and was significantly associated with a shorter progression-free survival [Hazard ratio of 3.7, 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.1 and 13.0 and a p-value of 0.04]. Sensitivity and specificity scores were 54% and 60%, respectively. Aneuploidy was not correlated with dysplasia grading (chi-square analysis). DNA aneuploidy in oral leukoplakia is associated with an increased risk of progression to OSCC. However, for the individual leukoplakia patient, DNA ploidy status as single biomarker has limited value to predict progression to cancer. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Ploidy and genome composition of Musa germplasm at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... This study determined the ploidy levels and genome composition of the Musa ... Flow cytometric analysis of nuclear DNA content was used to estimate ploidy ...... Occurrence and inheritance of 2n pollen in Musa. Ann. Bot.

  6. Can the centrosome be a marker for DNA ploidy in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Rita A; Fleury, Jocelyne; Prengel, Claudie; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Uzan, Serge; Rouzier, Roman; Darai, Emile

    2012-04-01

    The role of DNA ploidy in genomic instability of cancer cells and prognosis has been described in a number of studies. The role of the centrosome in cell cycle has also been reported. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between the centrosome and DNA ploidy in breast cancer in a search for a cytologic predictive and prognostic marker. Cell prints were prepared from cell culture of mesothelial cells, fibroblast cell line MRC5 and breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D. Indirect immunofluorescence was used with anti-γ-tubulin and centrosomes were quantified using a fluorescence microscope. DNA ploidy was scored with the DNA index analyzed by flow cytometry. The normal mesothelial cells (94% of the cells with one detected centrosome) and MRC5 diploid cells (68% with two centrosomes) were used as quality controls. A correlation between the number of centrosomes and DNA ploidy was found in MCF7 cell lines (64% of the cells with a number of centrosomes ≥ 3). It was not observed in invasive breast cancer samples; however, the frequency of cells with centrosomes ≥ 3 was found to be slightly higher in DNA aneuploid samples than in DNA diploid samples (15% vs 13.3%). Quantification of centrosome appears to be correlated to DNA ploidy in breast cancer cell lines and slightly associated to DNA aneuploidy in invasive breast cancer. Studies analyzing a larger number of samples as well as morphological abnormalities of the centrosome are needed.

  7. Can the centrosome be a marker for DNA ploidy in breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita A Sakr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of DNA ploidy in genomic instability of cancer cells and prognosis has been described in a number of studies. The role of the centrosome in cell cycle has also been reported. Aim: In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between the centrosome and DNA ploidy in breast cancer in a search for a cytologic predictive and prognostic marker. Materials and Methods: Cell prints were prepared from cell culture of mesothelial cells, fibroblast cell line MRC5 and breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D. Indirect immunofluorescence was used with anti-γ-tubulin and centrosomes were quantified using a fluorescence microscope. DNA ploidy was scored with the DNA index analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: The normal mesothelial cells (94% of the cells with one detected centrosome and MRC5 diploid cells (68% with two centrosomes were used as quality controls. A correlation between the number of centrosomes and DNA ploidy was found in MCF7 cell lines (64% of the cells with a number of centrosomes ≥ 3. It was not observed in invasive breast cancer samples; however, the frequency of cells with centrosomes ≥ 3 was found to be slightly higher in DNA aneuploid samples than in DNA diploid samples (15% vs 13.3%. Conclusion: Quantification of centrosome appears to be correlated to DNA ploidy in breast cancer cell lines and slightly associated to DNA aneuploidy in invasive breast cancer. Studies analyzing a larger number of samples as well as morphological abnormalities of the centrosome are needed.

  8. Automatic Morphological Sieving: Comparison between Different Methods, Application to DNA Ploidy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Boudry

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to propose alternative automatic methods to time consuming interactive sorting of elements for DNA ploidy measurements. One archival brain tumour and two archival breast carcinoma were studied, corresponding to 7120 elements (3764 nuclei, 3356 debris and aggregates. Three automatic classification methods were tested to eliminate debris and aggregates from DNA ploidy measurements (mathematical morphology (MM, multiparametric analysis (MA and neural network (NN. Performances were evaluated by reference to interactive sorting. The results obtained for the three methods concerning the percentage of debris and aggregates automatically removed reach 63, 75 and 85% for MM, MA and NN methods, respectively, with false positive rates of 6, 21 and 25%. Information about DNA ploidy abnormalities were globally preserved after automatic elimination of debris and aggregates by MM and MA methods as opposed to NN method, showing that automatic classification methods can offer alternatives to tedious interactive elimination of debris and aggregates, for DNA ploidy measurements of archival tumours.

  9. [Bladder transitional cell carcinoma rating, systematization of grading and value of DNA ploidy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro Martín, I; Alvarez Pérez, M; Blanes Berenguel, A; Quiñonero Díaz, A; Díaz Cano, S; García González, I; Matilla Vicente, A

    1999-06-01

    TCCs are an heterogenous group of tumors with an uncertain biologic behaviour, especially intermediate grade (G2). Histologic grade and pathologic stage have revealed only partially useful on predicting the outcome. Search and statement of objective and cuantitative parameters able to define prognostic subgroups to TCCs. We studied consecutive 106 patients with TCC in order to: 1) Identify every variable with independent predictive value in classifying cases of TCC in a three (1,2,3) or two (high/low) grades systems. 2) Make a correlation between DNA ploidy obtained by image analysis and DNA ploidy and S-phase obtained by flow cytometry. Every variable used to define the histologic grade showed significative correlation with both gradation systems. In multivariate analysis, the presence of superficial cells and the mitotic counts revealed us the most valuable variables in predicting the histologic grade. DNA-ploidy (both obtained by static an flow cytometry) correlated well with grade, stage, growth pattern and necrosis, whereas S-phase did so with grade, mitotic index and DNA ploidy. Image cytometry showed similars results to those of flow cytometry and also was able to detect aneuploidy when an situ carcinoma or dysplasia were present in the adyacent mucosa.

  10. DNA ploidy measurement in oral leukoplakia: different results between flow and image cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, E.R.E.A.; Bloemena, E.; Belien, J.A.M.; Broeckaert, M.A.M.; Aartman, I.H.A.; van der Waal, I.

    2012-01-01

    The estimated prevalence of oral leukoplakia is worldwide approximately 2%, with an annual malignant transformation rate of approximately 1%. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible contribution of ploidy measurement to the prediction of the clinical course, in a well defined

  11. Comparison of histological grading and large-scale genomic status (DNA ploidy) as prognostic tools in oral dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudbø, J; Bryne, M; Johannessen, A C; Kildal, W; Danielsen, H E; Reith, A

    2001-07-01

    Approximately one in ten oral white patches (leukoplakia) are histologically classified as dysplasia, with a well-documented potential for developing into oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Histological grading in oral dysplasia has limited prognostic value, whereas large-scale genomic status (DNA ploidy, nuclear DNA content) is an early marker of malignant transformation in several tissues. Biopsies from 196 patients with oral leukoplakia histologically typed as dysplasia were investigated. Inter-observer agreement among four experienced pathologists performing a simplified grading was assessed by Cohen's kappa values. For 150 of the 196 cases, it was also possible to assess large-scale genomic status and compare its prognostic impact with that of histological grading. Disease-free survival was estimated by life-table methods, with a mean follow-up time of 103 months (range 4-165 months). The primary considered end-point was the subsequent occurrence of OSCC. For grading of the total of 196 cases, kappa values ranged from 0.17 to 0.33 when three grading groups (mild, moderate, and severe dysplasia) were considered, and from 0.21 to 0.32 when two groups (low grade and high grade) were considered (p=0.41). For the 150 cases in which large-scale genomic status was also assessed, kappa values for the histological grading ranged from 0.21 to 0.33 for three grading groups and from 0.27 to 0.34 for two grading groups (p=0.47). In survival analysis, histological grading was without significant prognostic value for any of the four observers (p 0.14-0.44), in contrast to DNA ploidy (p=0.001). It is concluded that DNA ploidy in oral dysplasia has a practical prognostic value, unlike histological grading of the same lesions. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Chromosome numbers and DNA ploidy levels of selected species of Hieracium s.str. (Asteraceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrtek, Jindřich; Mráz, P.; Zahradníček, J.; Mateo, G.; Szelag, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2007), s. 411-430 ISSN 1211-9520 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/05/0657 Grant - others:Slovak Research and Development Agency(SK) APVT-51-026404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Hieracium * chromosome number * DNA ploidy level Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.133, year: 2007

  13. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis of ovarian granulosa cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; C.J. Cornelisse; A. Schabert (A.)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The nuclear DNA content of 50 ovarian tumors initially diagnosed as granulosa cell tumors was measured by flow cytometry using paraffin-embedded archival material. The follow-up period of the patients ranged from 4 months to 19 years. Thirty-eight tumors were diploid or

  14. Correlation between DNA ploidy, metaphase high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization results and clinical outcome of synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papp Gergő

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although synovial sarcoma is the 3rd most commonly occurring mesenchymal tumor in young adults, usually with a highly aggressive clinical course; remarkable differences can be seen regarding the clinical outcome. According to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH data published in the literature, the simple and complex karyotypes show a correlation between the prognosis and clinical outcome. In addition, the connection between DNA ploidy and clinical course is controversial. The aim of this study was using a fine-tuning interpretation of our DNA ploidy results and to compare these with metaphase high-resolution CGH (HR-CGH results. Methods DNA ploidy was determined on Feulgen-stained smears in 56 synovial sarcoma cases by image cytometry; follow up was available in 46 cases (average: 78 months. In 9 cases HR-CGH analysis was also available. Results 10 cases were found DNA-aneuploid, 46 were DNA-diploid by image cytometry. With fine-tuning of the diploid cases according to the 5c exceeding events (single cell aneuploidy, 33 cases were so called "simple-diploid" (without 5c exceeding events and 13 cases were "complex-diploid"; containing 5c exceeding events (any number. Aneuploid tumors contained large numbers of genetic alterations with the sum gain of at least 2 chromosomes (A-, B- or C-group detected by HR-CGH. In the "simple-diploid" cases no or few genetic alterations could be detected, whereas the "complex-diploid" samples numerous aberrations (equal or more than 3 could be found. Conclusions Our results show a correlation between the DNA-ploidy, a fine-tuned DNA-ploidy and the HR-CGH results. Furthermore, we found significant correlation between the different ploidy groups and the clinical outcome (p

  15. Clinical outcome of patients with previously untreated soft tissue sarcomas in relation to tumor grade, DNA ploidy and karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaat, B E; Muntinghe, F L; Molenaar, W M; Hoekstra, H J; Bosveld, H E; Dam, A; Dijkhuizen, T; van den Berg, E

    1997-01-01

    The most important prognostic factor in soft tissue sarcomas (STS) is tumor grade. Since most grading methods are subject to the interpretation of the individual pathologist, there is a need for objective criteria such as DNA ploidy and karyotype, which are of prognostic value in several types of

  16. DNA ploidy and S phase fraction of breast and ovarian tumor cells treated with a natural anthracycline analog (aloin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmat, Amr Y; El-Gerzawy, Shadia M; Rafaat, Amira

    2005-01-01

    DNA ploidy and S phase fraction analysis by flow cytometry on breast and ovarian tumor cells continuously exposed to aloin, a natural anthraquinone, at two concentrations (20-60 microg/ml) was done. Untreated breast and ovarian tumor cells (control) showed an aneuploid pattern, with a mean DNA index of 2.10+/-0.10 and S phase fraction of 28.46+/-1.5 and 17.40+/-0.75%, respectively. Treatment of breast and ovarian tumor cells with aloin showed a persistent aneuploid pattern and a significantly dose-dependent increase in the percentage of S phase fraction and in the proportion of cells cycling at a higher ploidy level (>G2M). The polyploidization indicates that aloin does not inhibit initiation of DNA synthesis and that cells replicated a full complement of DNA but had difficulty in M phase.

  17. BRCA1 mutation site may be linked with nuclear DNA ploidy in BRCA1-mutated ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghmesheh, Morteza; Saxena, Akshat; Niknam, Farshid

    2015-06-01

    BRCA1 has a role in maintaining normal nuclear DNA content during cell division and its inactivation may result in DNA aneuploidy and cancer progression. BRCA1-linked breast cancers are more aneuploid and have a worse prognosis, but this has not been elucidated in ovarian cancers. This study explores the potential difference in ploidy status between BRCA1-mutated and sporadic ovarian carcinomas. It also explores the potential association between BRCA1 mutation site and DNA ploidy status. This study compared DNA ploidy status of tumor blocks from 23 BRCA1-mutated ovarian carcinomas with that of 23 sporadic ovarian carcinomas matched for histologic subtype, patient age, stage and grade. DNA content of the nuclei was measured by Feulgen-Schiff staining followed by image cytometry and compared. BRCA1-linked tumors with a stop codon closer to the N-terminal (between 1 and 500 aa; 6/6, 100%) had a significantly higher frequency of nondiploidy compared with those with stop codon above 500 aa (7/12, 58%) (P = 0.033). A diploid peak was detected in 28% of BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancers and in 33% of sporadic ovarian cancers. The present study concluded that ovarian tumors with mutations closer to the N-terminal of BRCA1 may have a higher risk of DNA aneuploidy. There is no significant difference between BRCA1-mutated and sporadic ovarian carcinomas with respect to the DNA content. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. DNA Ploidy and Liver Cell Dysplasia in Liver Biopsies from Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed S El-Sayed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy among pathologists when assessing the presence or absence of liver cell dysplasia in liver biopsies taken from cirrhotic patients. The objective of the present study was to determine the DNA ploidy pattern of hepatocytes of patients with liver cirrhosis and its relationship to liver cell dysplasia. A total of 48 male patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis based on clinical, laboratory and histopathological criteria were included in the study. A liver biopsy was taken from each patient; one part of the biopsy was subjected to histopathology, and the other to flow cytometry. The histopathological examination revealed liver cell dysplasia in 60% of patients with liver cirrhosis (62% of them had large cell dysplasia [LCD] and 38% had small cell dysplasia [SCD]. Abnormal DNA content (aneuploidy was found in 81.5% of positive liver cell dysplasia specimens and found only in 11.1% of negative liver cell dysplasia specimens, with a statistically significant difference (P0.05 in comparison with SCD. In conclusion, SCD (similar to LCD is also associated with aneuploidy and elevated DNA index, and may carry the same risk for progression to hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. DNA Ploidy as surrogate for biopsy gleason score for preoperative organ versus nonorgan-confined prostate cancer prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isharwal, Sumit; Miller, M Craig; Epstein, Jonathan I; Mangold, Leslie A; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Partin, Alan W; Veltri, Robert W

    2009-05-01

    Transformation of normal epithelium into cancer cells involves epigenetic and genetic changes and modifications in nuclear structure and tissue architecture. To evaluate nuclear morphometric alterations and clinicopathologic features for organ- vs nonorgan-confined prostate carcinoma (PCa) prediction. Of 557 prospectively enrolled patients, 370 had complete information and sufficient tumor area for all evaluated parameters (281 organ-confined and 89 nonorgan-confined PCa cases). Digital images of Feulgen DNA-stained nuclei were captured from biopsies using the AutoCyte imaging system, and the nuclear morphometric alterations were calculated. Logistic regression analysis with bootstrap resampling was used to determine the factors important for differentiation of the 2 groups and to generate models for organ- vs nonorgan-confined PCa prediction. Several nuclear morphometric features were significantly altered and could differentiate organ- and nonorgan-confined disease. DNA ploidy was the most important factor among the significant nuclear morphometric features and was the second most important factor for organ- vs nonorgan-confined PCa prediction when considered with total prostate-specific antigen (PSA), complexed PSA, free/total PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical stage. The combination of DNA ploidy with clinical stage, total PSA, and biopsy Gleason score showed an improvement of 1.5% in the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves compared with the combination of clinical stage, total PSA, and biopsy Gleason (73.97% vs 72.43%). The use of DNA ploidy in lieu of the biopsy Gleason score in each preoperative model evaluated resulted in equivalent or improved organ- vs nonorgan-confined PCa prediction. The results of our study have shown that DNA ploidy can serve as a surrogate biomarker that has the potential to replace biopsy Gleason scores for organ- vs nonorgan-confined PCa prediction.

  20. DNA Methylation in Genomes of Several Annual Herbaceous and Woody Perennial Plants of Varying Ploidy as Detected by MSAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai; Hu, Bao-Quan; Xue, Zhen-Yi; Chen, Li; Wang, Wei-Xing; Song, Wen-Qin; Chen, Cheng-Bin; Wang, Chun-Guo

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidization is known to accompany altered DNA methylation in higher plants, which plays an important role in gene expression regulation and maintaining genome stability. While the characteristics of DNA methylation in different polyploid plants are still to be elucidated; here, status of genomic DNA methylation in a series of diploid, triploid, and tetraploid annual herbaceous plants (watermelon and Salvia ) and woody perennials (pear, Poplar , and loquat) were explored by methylation-specific amplified polymorphism analysis. The results indicated that levels of DNA methylation in triploid watermelon and Salvia were lower than their diploid parents. In triploid Poplar and pear, higher levels of DNA methylation were detected, and no significant difference was observed between triploid and tetraploid in all tested materials. Further data analysis suggested that about half of the total detected sites underwent changes of DNA methylation patterns in triploid watermelons and Salvia , as well as an obvious trend towards demethylation. However, the changes of DNA methylation patterns in three triploid woody perennials were only 17.54-33.40%. This implied that the characteristics of DNA methylation are significantly different during the polyploidization of different plant species. Furthermore, the results suggested that the level of DNA methylation was nonlinearly related to the ploidy level, and triploid plants displayed more interesting DNA methylation status. The characteristics and possible functions of DNA methylation in different ploidy series are further discussed.

  1. Evaluation of ploidy status using DNA-image cytometry of exfoliated mucosal cells in oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Teja Chitturi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP is one of the potentially malignant disorders (PMDs with a malignancy rate of 0.2-2%. Aneuploidy is considered to be one of the important markers for malignant transformation and DNA-image cytometry (DIC has been successfully employed in oral mucosal PMDs and also in tumors of the cervix, lung and biliary tract. Aims: In this study, we intend to assess the ploidy status of exfoliated cells in OLP using DIC. Materials and Methods: Exfoliated cells from 48 patients with different subtypes of OLP (reticular, plaque type, erosive and atrophic and 10 controls were stained using Feulgen reaction and assessed for integrated optical density using image analysis software and the ploidy status was assessed. Results: All the patients in the control group and most of the patients (93.5% who had reticular or plaque type of OLP (29 out of 31 exhibited diploid nuclei in the smears, whereas 11 patients who had erosive or atrophic types of OLP showed aneuploid nuclei. Conclusions: The patients with erosive or atrophic types of OLP are at more risk and assessment of ploidy status by exfoliative cytology can be used as an adjuvant for diagnosis.

  2. DNA Ploidy Measured on Archived Pretreatment Biopsy Material May Correlate With Prostate-Specific Antigen Recurrence After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, Mira, E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Oncology, Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); MacAulay, Calum [Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Hayes, Malcolm [Department of Pathology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Korbelik, Jagoda [Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James [Radiation Oncology, Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Palcic, Branko [Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To explore whether DNA ploidy of prostate cancer cells determined from archived transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy specimens correlates with disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven failures and 47 controls were selected from 1006 consecutive low- and intermediate-risk patients treated with prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy (July 1998-October 2003). Median follow-up was 7.5 years. Ten-year actuarial disease-free survival was 94.1%. Controls were matched using age, initial prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, Gleason score, use of hormone therapy, and follow-up (all P nonsignificant). Seventy-eight specimens were successfully processed; 27 control and 20 failure specimens contained more than 100 tumor cells were used for the final analysis. The Feulgen-Thionin stained cytology samples from archived paraffin blocks were used to determine the DNA ploidy of each tumor by measuring integrated optical densities. Results: The samples were divided into diploid and aneuploid tumors. Aneuploid tumors were found in 16 of 20 of the failures (80%) and 8 of 27 controls (30%). Diploid DNA patients had a significantly lower rate of disease recurrence (P=.0086) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.256). On multivariable analysis, patients with aneuploid tumors had a higher prostate-specific antigen failure rate (HR 5.13). Additionally, those with “excellent” dosimetry (V100 >90%; D90 >144 Gy) had a significantly lower recurrence rate (HR 0.25). All patients with aneuploid tumors and dosimetry classified as “nonexcellent” (V100 <90%; D90 <144 Gy) (5 of 5) had disease recurrence, compared with 40% of patients with aneuploid tumors and “excellent” dosimetry (8 of 15). In contrast, dosimetry did not affect the outcome for diploid patients. Conclusions: Using core biopsy material from archived paraffin blocks, DNA ploidy correctly classified the majority of failures and nonfailures in this study. The results suggest that DNA ploidy can be used as a

  3. A novel and easy FxCycle™ violet based flow cytometric method for simultaneous assessment of DNA ploidy and six-color immunophenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembhare, Prashant; Badrinath, Yajamanam; Ghogale, Sitaram; Patkar, Nikhil; Dhole, Nilesh; Dalavi, Pooja; Kunder, Nikesh; Kumar, Ashok; Gujral, Sumeet; Subramanian, P G

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal DNA ploidy is a valuable prognostic factor in many neoplasms, especially in hematological neoplasms like B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and multiple myeloma (MM). Current methods of flow-cytometric (FC) DNA-ploidy evaluation are either technically difficult or limited to three- to four-color immunophenotyping and hence, challenging to evaluate DNA-ploidy in minute tumor population with background rich of its normal counterpart cells and other hematopoietic cells. We standardized a novel sensitive and easy method of simultaneous evaluation of six- to seven-color immunophenotyping and DNA-ploidy using a dye-FxCycle Violet (FCV). Linearity, resolution, and coefficient of variation (CV) for FCV were studied using chicken erythrocyte nuclei. Ploidy results of FCV were compared with Propidium iodide (PI) in 20 samples and intra-assay variation for FCV was studied. Using this six-color immunophenotyping & FCV-protocol DNA-ploidy was determined in bone-marrow samples from 124 B-ALL & 50 MM patients. Dilution experiment was also conducted to determine the sensitivity in detection of aneuploidy in minute tumor population. FCV revealed high linearity and resolution in 450/50 channel. On comparison with PI, CV of Go/G1-peak with FCV (mean-CV 4.1%) was slightly higher than PI (mean-CV 2.9%) but had complete agreement in ploidy results. Dilution experiment showed that aneuploidy could be accurately detected up to the limit of 0.01% tumor cells. Intra-assay variation was very low with CV of 0.005%. In B-ALL, hypodiploidy was noted in 4%, hyperdiploidy in 24%, near-hyperdiploidy in 13% and remaining 59% were diploid. In MM, hypodiploidy was in 2%, hyperdiploidy in 58%, near-hyperdiploidy in 8% and remaining 30% were diploid. FCV-based DNA-ploidy method is a sensitive and easy method for simultaneous evaluation of six-color immunophenotyping and DNA analysis. It is useful in DNA-ploidy evaluation of minute tumor population in cases like minimal residual

  4. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  5. Adaptation of image cytometry methodology for DNA ploidy analysis of cervical epithelium samples: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Eliza Motta Duarte

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Image cytometry of the cervical specimens revealed DNA aneuploidy, most probably resulting from chromosomal alterations and appearing as precancerous lesions in 65% of the cases. The adaptations implemented in this study, enabled the DNA-image cytometry to become more accessible, enhancing its extended use as an adjuvant strategy for the early screening of the cervical epithelium samples during routine analyses.

  6. Development of a flow cytometric method to determine DNA ploidy of oesophageal cancer cells obtained by forceps biopsy samples during oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickes, S; Hauptmann, S; Flath, B; Abbenseth, R; Zwiebel, F M; Possinger, K

    2003-02-01

    The DNA content of oesophageal tumour cells is a prognostic factor in untreated patients. To investigate whether DNA ploidy is useful to select patients for neoadjuvant therapy it is of interest to develop a method allowing reliable flow cytometric analysis of the DNA content of tumour cells obtained by forceps biopsy during endoscopy before start of therapy. Freshly frozen forceps biopsy samples from 30 patients with oesophageal cancer were disaggregated. DNA was stained with propidium iodide and ploidy was determined by flow cytometry. To enhance sensitivity epithelial cells were simultaneously labelled with anti-cytokeratin antibodies. Results were compared with image analysis. To evaluate the sampling error, parallel measurements were done in 10 patients by image analysis on forceps biopsies obtained during endoscopy before surgery and on the resected tumour. The sensitivity to detect aneuploidy was lower for standard flow cytometry than for image analysis (13 versus 33%). The overall sensitivities were identical using a double labelling technique with additional cytokeratin-staining of the epithelial cells, but divergent results were obtained in 2 cases, where detection of aneuploidy was either possible with image analysis or with double labelling flow cytometry only. DNA content of samples gained by forceps biopsies and surgically resected tumours was concordant in 8 of 10 cases. In 2 patients, aneuploidy was detected only in the surgically resected tumour but not in the pre-operatively obtained forceps biopsies. A flow cytometric method for routine determination of the DNA ploidy of cells obtained by forceps biopsies from patients with oesophageal cancer was developed and evaluated against image analysis. The technique allows the prediction of DNA content before tumour resection, and might be used for optimising therapy and the patient's quality of live. Copyright 2003 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  7. DNA ploidy and cell cycle protein expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas with and without lymph node metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargoun, Ibtisam M; Bingle, L; Speight, P M

    2017-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most frequently occurring malignant tumour in the oral cavity. OSCC arises because of multiple genetic alterations. Cell cycle aberrations and aneuploidy are reportedly among the main characteristics of cancer cells and are associated with aggressive growth and poor prognosis. The study sample included 47 non-metastasised and 39 metastasised primary OSCC, with matched positive cervical lymph nodes and 17 normal oral mucosa samples. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were prepared with a minimum of three cores from each case. TMA sections were cut and immunostained with MCM2, Ki-67, geminin and cyclin D1 antibodies. DNA image analysis was performed on the whole tissue section before TMAs were created. The results revealed that there were no differences in cell cycle protein expression in different areas of the tumours or between the metastatic and non-metastatic carcinomas. None of the cell cycle proteins showed significant differences between the lymph node metastasis and the primary OSCC, except for Ki-67. Geminin/Ki-67 ratio showed significant difference between metastatic and non-metastatic tumours. Aneuploidy was detected in all (100%) cases of OSCC. Similarly, all lymph node samples (39 cases) were aneuploid. The results suggest that although there was dysregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins, only Ki-67 and the MCM2/Ki-67 and geminin/Ki-67 ratios may have prognostic significance in oral cancer. DNA ploidy alone was not specific and may not be a good tool to evaluate prognosis or metastatic progression in oral cavity carcinomas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. DNA ploidy changes in rhino mouse skin induced by all-trans retinoic acid and retinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Alcaraz, M V; Díaz, F; Flotte, T J; Pérez de Vargas, I; Anderson, R R; Kollias, N

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the proliferative changes induced by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and retinol (ROL), we have carried out a study of the DNA content of basal and suprabasal keratinocytes after epicutaneous application on the rhino mouse. Skin sections were analyzed stereologically and cytophotometrically using the Feulgen technique. The diploid DNA value (2C) was obtained from hepatocyte nuclei of control animals. Whereas cells in phase G0-G1 will show a 2C content, cells during phase S and in phase G2-M will show DNA values ranging from 2C to 4C and 4C, respectively. Although epidermal thickness (ET) increased significantly in all treated animals, surface density only increased in animals treated with all-trans RA. Quantification of DNA content of basal keratinocytes showed reduction of 2C and 2C-4C populations with a commensurate increase in proportions of cells with 4C and > 4C in the animals treated with 0.025% all-trans RA and ROL. Suprabasal keratinocytes of mice treated with 0.025% all-trans showed a decrease of the 2C population and an increased proportion of cells with 4C. Whereas 0.025% all-trans RA induced an increase of both basal and suprabasal DNA indices, ROL enhanced only the basal DNA index significantly. Animals treated with 0.025% ROL showed a significant increase in the basal proliferative index (PI) while the suprabasal PI remained constant; treatment with 0.025% all-trans RA produced a significant increase of both basal and suprabasal PIs and parakeratotic hyperkeratosis probably due to incomplete differentiation.

  9. Sequential steps in DNA replication are inhibited to ensure reduction of ploidy in meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hui; Namdar, Mandana; Ganier, Olivier; Gregan, Juraj; Méchali, Marcel; Kearsey, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis involves two successive rounds of chromosome segregation without an intervening S phase. Exit from meiosis I is distinct from mitotic exit, in that replication origins are not licensed by Mcm2-7 chromatin binding, but spindle disassembly occurs during a transient interphase-like state before meiosis II. The absence of licensing is assumed to explain the block to DNA replication, but this has not been formally tested. Here we attempt to subvert this block by expressing the licensing control factors Cdc18 and Cdt1 during the interval between meiotic nuclear divisions. Surprisingly, this leads only to a partial round of DNA replication, even when these factors are overexpressed and effect clear Mcm2-7 chromatin binding. Combining Cdc18 and Cdt1 expression with modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, activation of Dbf4-dependent kinase, or deletion of the Spd1 inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase has little additional effect on the extent of DNA replication. Single-molecule analysis indicates this partial round of replication results from inefficient progression of replication forks, and thus both initiation and elongation replication steps may be inhibited in late meiosis. In addition, DNA replication or damage during the meiosis I–II interval fails to arrest meiotic progress, suggesting absence of checkpoint regulation of meiosis II entry. PMID:23303250

  10. Combination of DNA ploidy analysis and miR-21 or miR-24 in screening malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chongmei; Huang, Liuyan; Zhang, Xuechun; Yang, Juan

    2017-10-24

    The study aimed to assess the combination of DNA ploidy analysis (DPA) and the expression of microRNA-21 (miR-21) or microRNA-24 (miR-24) in the detection of malignant pleural effusion (MPE). In this prospective research, a total of 40 samples (20 benign and 20 malignant effusions), flexural effusion exfoliated cells and cell-free miR-21 and miR-24 were collected. DPA and exfoliative cytology examinations were conducted to diagnose flexural effusion exfoliated cells. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was carried out to measure the expressions of miR-21 and miR-24. Receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the curve were applied to evaluate the accuracy rate of different diagnostic approaches on MPE. In the MPE group, DPA demonstrated a higher rate of accuracy in MPE diagnosis than exfoliative cytology. The expressions of miR-21 and miR-24 were significantly higher in MPE than in benign pleural effusion (P < 0.05). Furthermore, area under the curve, sensitivity and specificity were 0.942, 95% and 90% for the combination of miR-21 and DPA and 0.973, 100% and 80% for the union of miR-24 and DPA, respectively, representing a significant improvement in both accuracy and sensitivity. Therefore, the combination of DPA and miR-21 or miR-24 appears to be a better biomarker for discriminating MPE from benign pleural effusion. The combination of DPA and miR-21 or miR-24 may function as a promising diagnostic tool of MPE. ChiCTR-TRC-14004719.

  11. A method for the determination of bacterial spore DNA content based on isotopic labelling, spore germination and diphenylamine assay; ploidy of spores of several Bacillus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, P.M.; Karamata, D. (Institut de Genetique et Biologie Microbiennes, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    A reliable method for measuring the spore DNA content, based on radioactive DNA labelling, spore germination in absence of DNA replication and diphenylamine assay, was developed. The accuracy of the method, within 10 - 15%, is adequate for determining the number of chromosomes per spore, provided that the genome size is known. B subtilis spores were shown to be invariably monogenomic, while those of larger bacilli Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, often, if not invariably, contain two genomes. Attempts to modify the spore DNA content of B subtilis by altering the richness of the sporulation medium, the sporulation conditions (liquid or solid medium), or by mutation, were apparently unsuccessful. An increase of spore size with medium richness, not accompanied by an increase in DNA content, was observed. The implication of the apparently species-specific spore ploidy and the influence of the sporulation conditions on spore size and shape are discussed.

  12. A method for the determination of bacterial spore DNA content based on isotopic labelling, spore germination and diphenylamine assay; ploidy of spores of several Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, P M; Karamata, D

    1992-01-01

    A reliable method for measuring the spore DNA content, based on radioactive DNA labelling, spore germination in absence of DNA replication and diphenylamine assay, was developed. The accuracy of the method, within 10-15%, is adequate for determining the number of chromosomes per spore, provided that the genome size is known. B subtilis spores were shown to be invariably monogenomic, while those of larger bacilli Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, often, if not invariably, contain two genomes. Attempts to modify the spore DNA content of B subtilis by altering the richness of the sporulation medium, the sporulation conditions (liquid or solid medium), or by mutation, were apparently unsuccessful. An increase of spore size with medium richness, not accompanied by an increase in DNA content, was observed. The implication of the apparently species-specific spore ploidy and the influence of the sporulation conditions on spore size and shape are discussed.

  13. Unbiased Estimation of Gene Diversity in Samples Containing Related Individuals: Exact Variance and Arbitrary Ploidy

    OpenAIRE

    DeGiorgio, Michael; Jankovic, Ivana; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2010-01-01

    Gene diversity, a commonly used measure of genetic variation, evaluates the proportion of heterozygous individuals expected at a locus in a population, under the assumption of Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. When using the standard estimator of gene diversity, the inclusion of related or inbred individuals in a sample produces a downward bias. Here, we extend a recently developed estimator shown to be unbiased in a diploid autosomal sample that includes known related or inbred individuals to the ...

  14. Organization and variation analysis of 5S rDNA in different ploidy-level hybrids of red crucian carp × topmouth culter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo He

    Full Text Available Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100 × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48 were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC and only class IV from their male parent (TC. Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC and class IV from their male parent (TC. Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC, and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-N. The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics.

  15. Organization and variation analysis of 5S rDNA in different ploidy-level hybrids of red crucian carp × topmouth culter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiguo; Qin, Qinbo; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp) in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC) and only class IV from their male parent (TC). Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC) and class IV from their male parent (TC). Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC), and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-N). The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA content is associated with ploidy status, maternal age, and oocyte maturation methods in mouse blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xin; Landis, Jessica N; Krisher, Rebecca L; Duncan, Francesca E; Silva, Elena; Lonczak, Agnieszka; Scott, Richard T; Zhan, Yiping; Chu, Tinchun; Scott, Richard T; Treff, Nathan R

    2017-10-24

    It was reported that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was significantly increased in aneuploid human embryos compared to euploid embryos and was also associated with maternal age. In this study, we further established the mouse model of mtDNA quantitation in reproductive samples based on whole-genome amplification (WGA) and next-generation sequencing (NGS). WGA followed by NGS-based mtDNA quantitation was first performed on 6 single- and 100-cell samples from a tumor-derived mouse cell line, which was exposed to ethidium bromide to reduce mtDNA content. The relative mtDNA content was normalized to nuclear DNA. This method was then applied to mouse reproductive samples, including 40 pairs of oocytes and polar bodies from 8 CD-1 female mice of advanced reproductive age and 171 blastocysts derived via in vitro maturation (IVM) or in vivo maturation (IVO) from young (6-9 weeks) and reproductively aged (13.5 months) female CF-1 mice. Exposure to ethidium bromide for 3 and 6 days decreased mtDNA levels in both the single- and 100-cell samples as expected. Results demonstrated that the first polar body contained an average of 0.9% of mtDNA relative to oocytes. Compared to the cells in blastocysts, oocytes contained about 180 times as much mtDNA per cell. mtDNA levels were compared among blastocysts from reproductively young and old female mice that had either been produced by IVM or IVO. Cells in blastocysts from younger mice contained significantly lower amounts of mtDNA compared to aged mice (P < 0.0001). Cells in blastocysts produced via IVO had higher mtDNA content than IVM-derived blastocysts (P = 0.0001). Cells in aneuploid blastocysts were found to have significantly higher (1.74-fold) levels of mtDNA compared to euploid blastocysts (P = 0.0006). A reliable method for assessing mtDNA content in mouse gametes and embryos was established. Relative mtDNA levels were elevated in aneuploid embryos relative to euploid embryos, were higher in blastocysts from

  17. Genetic alterations within the retinoblastoma locus in colorectal carcinomas. Relation to DNA ploidy pattern studied by flow cytometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meling, G. I.; Lothe, R. A.; Børresen, A. L.; Hauge, S.; Graue, C.; Clausen, O. P.; Rognum, T. O.

    1991-01-01

    Alterations within the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene, as detected by the VNTR probe p68RS2.0, and flow cytometric DNA pattern have been analysed in 255 colorectal carcinomas. A total of 35.3% of the tumours had alterations within the Rb gene. Amplification of one allele was demonstrated in 29.5% of the tumours, and loss of heterozygosity was found in 11.5%. No association was found between amplification within the Rb gene and clinicopathological characteristics of the patients. The high frequency of alterations demonstrated within the Rb gene, suggests that this gene is involved in colorectal carcinogenesis with amplification as by far the most abundant genetic alteration. This may imply that the Rb gene has an oncogene-like function in colorectal carcinomas, rather than acting as a tumour suppressor gene. Sixty-three per cent of the carcinomas were DNA aneuploid, and a significant association was demonstrated between amplification within the Rb gene and DNA aneuploidy (P less than 0.01). Two other chromosome loci were analysed, on chromosome 1p (probe pYNZ2) and on chromosome 2p (probe pYNH24), respectively. On chromosome 1p, heterozygous loss was found in 22.2% of the tumours, indicating an involvement of this chromosome in a subset of colorectal carcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:1911187

  18. DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction analysis in peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer: correlation with clinical pathological factors and response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carloni, Silvia; Gallerani, Giulia; Tesei, Anna; Scarpi, Emanuela; Verdecchia, Giorgio Maria; Virzì, Salvatore; Fabbri, Francesco; Arienti, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between ploidy or S-phase fraction (SPF) and the clinical pathological characteristics of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer. We also assessed their relation with the in vivo and in vitro response to several chemotherapeutic agents. Fifty-three patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer were enrolled. Frozen tumor tissue was dissociated by a detergent-trypsin method, and the resulting cell suspension was stained with RNase A and propidium iodide. Samples were then analyzed for ploidy and SPF by flow cytometry. Fresh tumor tissue was dissociated by enzymatic digestion, and cells were exposed to different concentrations of cisplatin, adriamycin, carboplatin, gemcitabine and taxol for 72 hours. In vitro drug sensitivity was then measured using the sulforhodamine B assay. No significant correlation was found between ploidy or SPF and patient characteristics, even though primary carcinomas were mainly hyperdiploid and more proliferative than recurrent tumors. SPF differed significantly among ploidy categories (P=0.01), and high SPF was associated with short-term survival (P=0.48). Patients with multiploid tumors were the most resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy, whereas those with hyperdiploid tumors were the most responsive. In vitro multiploid tumors were the least sensitive, while hypodiploid samples showed the highest sensitivity to the tested drugs. Sensitivity to adriamycin was significantly correlated with ploidy (P=0.03), whereas sensitivity to taxol was correlated with SPF (P=0.04). Our results indicate that ploidy and SPF could facilitate the choice of therapy for patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  19. The TP53 tumour suppressor gene in colorectal carcinomas. II. Relation to DNA ploidy pattern and clinicopathological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meling, G. I.; Lothe, R. A.; Børresen, A. L.; Graue, C.; Hauge, S.; Clausen, O. P.; Rognum, T. O.

    1993-01-01

    Heterozygous loss of the TP53 gene on chromosome arm 17p in colorectal carcinomas was strongly associated with DNA aneuploidy (P or = 1.1 and or = 1.3 had a significantly higher frequency of TP53 gene loss (85%) (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). There was a significant association between loss of the TP53 gene and histological grade (P < 0.01), and there tended to be an association between loss of the TP53 gene and degree of cellular atypia (P < 0.05), with TP53 gene loss being most frequent in moderately differentiated carcinomas, and in carcinomas with severe cellular atypia, respectively. The proportion of tumours with loss of the TP53 gene increased significantly towards the distal part of the large bowel (P < 0.0001). These results indicate that different genetic mechanisms may be involved in the carcinogenesis in colon and rectum carcinomas, and in the two subsets of DNA aneuploid carcinomas. Furthermore, the data may suggest a role for the TP53 gene in the aneuploidisation process, possibly as a 'target' for a whole chromosome loss. PMID:8427784

  20. ploidyNGS: visually exploring ploidy with Next Generation Sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto Corrêa Dos Santos, Renato; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2017-08-15

    ploidyNGS is a model-free, open source tool to visualize and explore ploidy levels in a newly sequenced genome, exploiting short read data. We tested ploidyNGS using both simulated and real NGS data of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ploidyNGS allows the identification of the ploidy level of a newly sequenced genome in a visual way. ploidyNGS is available under the GNU General Public License (GPL) at https://github.com/diriano/ploidyNGS. ploidyNGS is implemented in Python and R. diriano@gmail.com.

  1. DNA-index and stereological estimation of nuclear volume in primary and metastatic malignant melanomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Kristensen, I B; Grymer, F

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical nuclear volume and ploidy level in malignant melanomas, and to analyse the heterogeneity of these two parameters among primary and corresponding secondary tumours. Unbiased stereological estimates of nuclear volume can...... be obtained objectively by point-sampled intercepts. Using this approach, the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume, nuclear vv, was estimated in ordinary histological sections from 34 primary cutaneous malignant melanomas and their corresponding 62 metastatic lesions. For comparison, DNA-indices (DI) were...... determined by flow cytometry in adjacent sections from the same paraffin-embedded tumours. Only a poor correlation was found between nuclear vv and DI (Kendall's tau = +0.21). The variability of nuclear vv among metastatic lesions was increased as compared to primary melanomas, whereas averaged mean values...

  2. Estimation of Fish Biomass Using Environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Doi, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) from aquatic vertebrates has recently been used to estimate the presence of a species. We hypothesized that fish release DNA into the water at a rate commensurate with their biomass. Thus, the concentration of eDNA of a target species may be used to estimate the species biomass. We developed an eDNA method to estimate the biomass of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) using laboratory and field experiments. In the aquarium, the concentration of eDNA changed initially, but reached an equilibrium after 6 days. Temperature had no effect on eDNA concentrations in aquaria. The concentration of eDNA was positively correlated with carp biomass in both aquaria and experimental ponds. We used this method to estimate the biomass and distribution of carp in a natural freshwater lagoon. We demonstrated that the distribution of carp eDNA concentration was explained by water temperature. Our results suggest that biomass data estimated from eDNA concentration reflects the potential distribution of common carp in the natural environment. Measuring eDNA concentration offers a non-invasive, simple, and rapid method for estimating biomass. This method could inform management plans for the conservation of ecosystems. PMID:22563411

  3. Phylogenetic estimation of timescales using ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molak, Martyna; Lorenzen, Eline; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    analyses of ancient DNA. We also investigated the sample size and temporal span of the ancient DNA sequences needed to estimate phylogenetic timescales reliably. Our results show that the range of sample ages plays a crucial role in determining the quality of the results but that accurate and precise...

  4. Atypical ploidy cycles, Spo11, and the evolution of meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gareth

    2016-06-01

    The Spo11 protein induces DNA double strand breaks before the first division of meiosis, enabling the formation of the chiasmata that physically link homologous chromosomes as they align. Spo11 is an ancient and well conserved protein, related in sequence and structure to a DNA topoisomerase subunit found in Archaea as well as a subset of eukaryotes. However the origins of its meiotic function are unclear. This review examines some apparent exceptions to the rule that Spo11 activity is specific to, and required for meiosis. Spo11 appears to function in the context of unusual forms of ploidy reduction in some protists and fungi. One lineage of amoebae, the dictyostelids, is thought to undergo meiosis during its sexual cycle despite having lost Spo11 entirely. Further experimental characterisation of these and other non-canonical ploidy cycling mechanisms may cast light of the evolution of meiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The ploidy races of Atriplex confertifolia (chenopodiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart C. Sanderson

    2011-01-01

    Previous accounts of polyploidy in the North American salt desert shrub Atriplex confertifolia (shadscale) have dealt with the distribution of polyploidy and the morphological and secondary chemical differences between races. The present study amplifies these studies and reveals additional ploidy-flavonoid races, with ploidy levels known to extend from 2x to 12x, and...

  6. Ploidy reductions in murine fusion-derived hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Duncan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that fusion between hepatocytes lacking a crucial liver enzyme, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH, and wild-type blood cells resulted in hepatocyte reprogramming. FAH expression was restored in hybrid hepatocytes and, upon in vivo expansion, ameliorated the effects of FAH deficiency. Here, we show that fusion-derived polyploid hepatocytes can undergo ploidy reductions to generate daughter cells with one-half chromosomal content. Fusion hybrids are, by definition, at least tetraploid. We demonstrate reduction to diploid chromosome content by multiple methods. First, cytogenetic analysis of fusion-derived hepatocytes reveals a population of diploid cells. Secondly, we demonstrate marker segregation using ss-galactosidase and the Y-chromosome. Approximately 2-5% of fusion-derived FAH-positive nodules were negative for one or more markers, as expected during ploidy reduction. Next, using a reporter system in which ss-galactosidase is expressed exclusively in fusion-derived hepatocytes, we identify a subpopulation of diploid cells expressing ss-galactosidase and FAH. Finally, we track marker segregation specifically in fusion-derived hepatocytes with diploid DNA content. Hemizygous markers were lost by >or=50% of Fah-positive cells. Since fusion-derived hepatocytes are minimally tetraploid, the existence of diploid hepatocytes demonstrates that fusion-derived cells can undergo ploidy reduction. Moreover, the high degree of marker loss in diploid daughter cells suggests that chromosomes/markers are lost in a non-random fashion. Thus, we propose that ploidy reductions lead to the generation of genetically diverse daughter cells with about 50% reduction in nuclear content. The generation of such daughter cells increases liver diversity, which may increase the likelihood of oncogenesis.

  7. Clonal heterogeneity of small-cell anaplastic carcinoma of the lung demonstrated by flow-cytometric DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindeløv, L L; Hansen, H H; Christensen, I J

    1980-01-01

    of contamination of the aspirates with normal cells was determined by differential counts. The ratio of the peak channel numbers for the G1 phase of the tumor cells to that of the diploid standard (DNA index) was calculated and used for ploidy identification. Twenty-nine patients were evaluable with respect to DNA......Flow-cytometric DNA analysis yields information on ploidy and proliferative characteristics of a cell population. The analysis was implemented on small-cell anaplastic carcinoma of the lung using a rapid detergent technique for the preparation of fine-needle aspirates for DNA determination...... index determination. The coefficient of variation of the DNA index determinations was estimated as 0.039. In 23 (79%) patients, only one cell line could be detected. Evidence of the presence of 2 tumor cell clones with different ploidy was obtained in the remaining 6 (21%) patients. Of the 35 malignant...

  8. Anatomic Site Based Ploidy Analysis of Oral Premalignant Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. N.; Kornberg, L.; Veenker, E.; Cohen, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    The location of oral leukoplakia correlates strongly with the probability of finding dysplastic or malignant alterations at biopsy. It is well established that early detection can dramatically improve the 5-year survival rates for oral squamous cell carcinomas. Since aneuploidy is predictive of future conversion to malignancy, we hypothesized that dysplastic lesions from high-risk sites (floor of mouth, tongue and lips) would exhibit greater aneuploidy than low-risk sites (palate, gingiva and buccal mucosa). Epithelial sections from 60 archival samples diagnosed as mild dysplasia (36 females, 20 males) from various high/low risk locations were stained with Blue Feulgen Stain for DNA Ploidy Analysis (Clarient, Aliso Viejo, CA) and ploidy was analyzed using a ChromaVision ACIS II (Clarient, ALiso Viejo, CA) Image cytometry system. A DNA histogram was generated using an image analyzing software that evaluated the amount of Feulgen stain which is proportional to the amount of nuclear DNA. An ANOVA analysis followed by the Student’s‘t’ test revealed significant differences between means (P ≤ 0.05). Lesions originating from lateral/ventral tongue (85%), floor of mouth (50%) and soft palate (44%) exhibited a higher frequency of aneuploidy than lesions from gingiva (22%) and lower lip (25%). This pilot study demonstrates that dysplastic lesions from high-risk sites such as the floor of the mouth and lateral/ventral tongue have higher frequency of aneuploidy. PMID:20237983

  9. Genome size and ploidy of Thysanoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A L; Johnston, J S; Rotenberg, D; Whitfield, A E; Booth, W; Vargo, E L; Kennedy, G G

    2013-02-01

    Flow cytometry was used to study the genome sizes and ploidy levels for four thrips species: Franklinothrips orizabensis Johansen (Thysanoptera: Aeolothripidae), Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande, Frankliniella fusca Hinds, and Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). F. orizabensis males and females had 1C genome sizes of 426 Mb and 422 Mb, respectively. Male and female F. fusca had 1C genome sizes of 392 Mb and 409 Mb, whereas F. occidentalis males and females had smaller 1C genomes that were 345 Mb and 337 Mb, respectively. Male F. orizabensis, F. occidentalis and F. fusca were haploid and females diploid. Five isofemale lines of T. tabaci, initiated from parthenogenetic, thelytokous females and collected from different locations in North Carolina, were included in this study; no males were available. One isofemale line was diploid with a genome size of 1C = 310 Mb, and the other four had a mean genome size of 1C = 482 Mb, which is consistent with evidence from microsatellite data of diploidy and polyploidy, respectively, in these same five thelytokous lines. This is the first study to produce genome size estimates for thysanopteran species, and report polyploidy in T. tabaci populations. © 2012 Royal Entomological Society.

  10. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the comet assay, single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used - in combination with a reference curve - to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose and they are inexpensive.

  11. Determination of chromosomal ploidy in Agave ssp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... (2008) analyzed the karyotypes of several agave cul- tivars. Doughty (1936) reported the chromosomal ploidies of three varieties. However, little is known about the chromosome numbers of wild and local breeding. *Corresponding author. E-mail: lianzi9381@yahoo.com.cn. Tel: (+86)13922727215.

  12. Changing Ploidy as a Strategy: The Irish Potato Famine Pathogen Shifts Ploidy in Relation to Its Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Shen, He; Zhou, Qian; Qian, Kun; van der Lee, Theo; Huang, Sanwen

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans was the causal agent of the Irish Great Famine and is a recurring threat to global food security. The pathogen can reproduce both sexually and asexually, with high potential to adapt to various environments and great risk to break disease resistance genes in potato. As are other oomycetes, P. infestans is regarded to be diploid during the vegetative phase of its life cycle, although some studies reported trisomy and polyploidy. Using microsatellite fingerprinting, genome-wide assessment of single nucleotide polymorphisms, nuclear DNA quantification, and microscopic counting of chromosome numbers, we assessed the ploidy level of a comprehensive selection of isolates. All progenies from sexual populations of P. infestans in nature were found to be diploid, in contrast nearly all dominant asexual lineages, including the most important pandemic clonal lineages US-1 and 13_A2 were triploid. Such triploids possess significantly more allelic variation than diploids. We observed that triploid genotype can change to a diploid genome constitution when exposed to artificial stress conditions. This study reveals that fluctuations in the ploidy level may be a key factor in the adaptation process of this notorious plant destroyer and imposes an extra challenge to control this disease.

  13. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  14. Evaluation of Prognostic Factors Following Flow-Cytometric DNA Analysis after Cytokeratin Labelling: I. Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Wimberger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In gynecologic oncology valid prognostic factors are necessary to estimate the course of disease and to define biologically similar subgroups for analysis of therapeutic efficacy. The presented study is a prospective study concerning prognostic significance of DNA ploidy and S‐phase fraction in breast cancer following enrichment of tumor cells by cytokeratin labelling. Epithelial cells were labeled by FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, 8, and CK 17 prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis in 327 fresh specimens of primary breast cancer. Univariate analysis in breast cancer detected the prognostic significance of DNA‐ploidy, S‐phase fraction and CV (coefficient of variation of G0G1‐peak of tumor cells for clinical outcome, especially for nodal‐negative patients. Multivariate analysis could not confirm prognostic evidence of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction. In conclusion, in breast cancer no clinical significance for determination of DNA‐parameters was found.

  15. PLOIDY STATUS OF Dioscorea alata L. AND ITS RELATIONSHIP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    intermediaries (Miège, 1952 ; Ramachandran,. 1968 ; Hamon et al., 1992). Indeed, yam being monoecious, this knowledge will allow to make the proper choice of the parents to cross for more chance of success. The individuals with the same level are easier to cross than those with different level of ploidy. Ploidy is usually ...

  16. The study of triploid progenies crossed between different ploidy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of triploid progenies crossed between different ploidy grapes. L Sun, G Zhang, A Yan, H Xu. Abstract. The cross between different ploidy grape was one of the effective ways to obtain new seedless cultivars, in this study, through testing the changes of the ovule weight and observing its anatomical structure, the ...

  17. Nuclear DNA content variation associated with muscle fiber hypertrophic growth in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Kinsey, Stephen T

    2012-05-01

    Muscle fiber hypertrophic growth can lead to an increase in the myonuclear domain (MND), leading to greater diffusion distances within the cytoplasmic volume that each nucleus services. We tested the hypothesis that hypertrophic growth in the white muscle of fishes was associated with increases in the mean DNA content of nuclei, which may be a strategy to offset increasing diffusion constraints. DAPI-stained chicken erythrocytes standards and image analysis were used to estimate nuclear DNA content in erythrocytes and muscle fibers from 17 fish species. Mean diploid (2C) values in fish erythrocytes ranged from 0.78 to 7.2 pg. Erythrocyte 2C values were used to determine ploidy level in muscle tissue of small and large size classes of each species. Within each species, mean muscle fiber diameter was greater in the large size class than the small size class, and MND was significantly greater in larger fibers for 11 of the 17 species. Nuclear DNA content per species in muscle ranged from 2 to 64C. Fiber-size dependent increases in ploidy were observed in nine species, which is consistent with our hypothesis and indicates that endoreduplication is occurring during fiber growth. However, two species exhibited significantly lower ploidy in the larger size class, and the mechanistic basis and potential advantage of this ploidy shift is unclear. These results suggest that increases in ploidy may be a common mechanism to compensate for increases in MND associated with fiber hypertrophy in fishes, although it is likely that other factors also affect ploidy changes that occur in muscle during animal growth.

  18. Environmental DNA (eDNA sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive burmese pythons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Hunter

    Full Text Available Environmental DNA (eDNA methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus, Northern African python (P. sebae, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor, and the green (Eunectes murinus and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus. Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive

  19. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive Burmese pythons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Smith, Brian J.; Hunter, Charles T.; Reed, Robert N.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), Northern African python (P. sebae), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and the green (Eunectes murinus) and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus). Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive constrictors

  20. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling improves occurrence and detection estimates of invasive burmese pythons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Dorazio, Robert M; Fike, Jennifer A; Smith, Brian J; Hunter, Charles T; Reed, Robert N; Hart, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods are used to detect DNA that is shed into the aquatic environment by cryptic or low density species. Applied in eDNA studies, occupancy models can be used to estimate occurrence and detection probabilities and thereby account for imperfect detection. However, occupancy terminology has been applied inconsistently in eDNA studies, and many have calculated occurrence probabilities while not considering the effects of imperfect detection. Low detection of invasive giant constrictors using visual surveys and traps has hampered the estimation of occupancy and detection estimates needed for population management in southern Florida, USA. Giant constrictor snakes pose a threat to native species and the ecological restoration of the Florida Everglades. To assist with detection, we developed species-specific eDNA assays using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus), Northern African python (P. sebae), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), and the green (Eunectes murinus) and yellow anaconda (E. notaeus). Burmese pythons, Northern African pythons, and boa constrictors are established and reproducing, while the green and yellow anaconda have the potential to become established. We validated the python and boa constrictor assays using laboratory trials and tested all species in 21 field locations distributed in eight southern Florida regions. Burmese python eDNA was detected in 37 of 63 field sampling events; however, the other species were not detected. Although eDNA was heterogeneously distributed in the environment, occupancy models were able to provide the first estimates of detection probabilities, which were greater than 91%. Burmese python eDNA was detected along the leading northern edge of the known population boundary. The development of informative detection tools and eDNA occupancy models can improve conservation efforts in southern Florida and support more extensive studies of invasive constrictors

  1. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Molak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred.

  2. Human papillomavirus type 16 in tumor tissue of low-stage squamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix in relation to ploidy grade and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenter, G. G.; Cornelisse, C. J.; Jiwa, N. M.; Aartsen, E. J.; Hermans, J.; Mooi, W.; Heintz, A. P.; Fleuren, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship among the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in tumor cells, DNA ploidy, and the prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix was studied. METHODS: HPV 16 was detected using the polymerase chain reaction on paraffin-embedded material from 69 patients

  3. Ploidy-dependent changes in the epigenome of symbiotic cells correlate with specific patterns of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Nagymihály, Marianna

    2017-04-13

    The formation of symbiotic nodule cells in Medicago truncatula is driven by successive endoreduplication cycles and transcriptional reprogramming in different temporal waves including the activation of more than 600 cysteine-rich NCR genes expressed only in nodules. We show here that the transcriptional waves correlate with growing ploidy levels and have investigated how the epigenome changes during endoreduplication cycles. Differential DNA methylation was found in only a small subset of symbiotic nodule-specific genes, including more than half of the NCR genes, whereas in most genes DNA methylation was unaffected by the ploidy levels and was independent of the genes\\' active or repressed state. On the other hand, expression of nodule-specific genes correlated with ploidy-dependent opening of the chromatin as well as, in a subset of tested genes, with reduced H3K27me3 levels combined with enhanced H3K9ac levels. Our results suggest that endoreduplication-dependent epigenetic changes contribute to transcriptional reprogramming in the differentiation of symbiotic cells.

  4. Ploidy and genome composition of Musa germplasm at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musa spp (bananas and plantains) constitute a hybrid-polyploid complex and are classified according to different genome compositions such as AA, BB, AB, AAA, AAB, ABB, AAAA, ABBB, AAAB and AABB. Knowledge of ploidy and exact genome compositions of the parental material is essential for. Musa breeding.

  5. Flow cytometry determination of ploidy level in winged bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flow cytometry determination of ploidy level in winged bean [ Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC] and its response to colchicine-induced mutagenesis. ... For mutation induction, 20 seeds from accessionsTPt26 and TPt154 were soaked in three different concentrations of colchicine (5,10, 15mg/l) for 24, 48, and 72 hours, ...

  6. Ancient evolutionary trade-offs between yeast ploidy states

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zörgö, Enikö; Chwialkowska, Karolina; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Garré, Elena; Sunnerhagen, Per; Liti, Gianni; Blomberg, Anders; Omholt, Stig W; Warringer, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    ...] and promoting tumor progression [9]. Despite the biological impact of ploidy differences, the underlying molecular, evolutionary and ecological constraints controlling these remain murky [10]. Mutational models are based on chromosome set additions increasing the number of mutable sites but masking recessive variation, thereby affecti...

  7. Ploidy variation of Musa hybrids from crosses | Oselebe | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plantain and banana (Musa spp) breeding involves crossing 3x (triploid) landraces to 2x (diploid) accessions as female and male parents, respectively, selecting 4x (tetraploid) and 2x primary hybrids from the 3x - 2x progenies, and crossing 4x - 2x hybrids to produce secondary 3x hybrids. In these crosses, complex ploidy ...

  8. Determination of chromosomal ploidy in Agave ssp. | Lingling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosome observation is necessary to elucidate the structure, function and organization of Agave plants' genes and genomes. However, few researches about chromosome observation of Agave ssp. were done, not only because their chromosome numbers are large, but also because their ploidies are complicated.

  9. Determination of ploidy level by flow cytometry and autopolyploid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A procedure for chromosome doubling of the white cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) type was established by using colchicine and oryzalin treatments to in vitro plantlets. Flow cytometry was successfully used for analyzing ploidy levels within three cocoyam types and regenerated plants. Treating in vitro white cocoyam ...

  10. Radiation induced reproductive death as a function of mammalian cell ploidy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbrick, D.A.

    1976-09-01

    Mammalian cells containing different multiples of the diploid chromosome set were created through drug induction and cell fusion. In all cell strains used the chromosome number was determined from metaphase spreads, as well as from DNA content and cell size. The survival of cells as a function of radiation dose was determined for cell lines with differing chromosome complements at 37/sup 0/C, 4/sup 0/C, in hypertonic media, while frozen, and with increasing levels of incorporated IUdR. Survival of frozen diploid and hypotetraploid Chinese hamster cells was determined following varying numbers of decays of incorporated /sup 3/HTdR and /sup 125/IUdR. The percent of reproductively viable cells following irradiation is a function of the cell ploidy, i.e., the number of haploid sets of chromosomes contained in the cell genome. At 37/sup 0/C and in hypertonic media, the Chinese hamster cells of progressively higher ploidies are increasingly sensitive to irradiation. As the number of chromosomes per unit cell volume increases the radiosensitivity increases. Both trends suggest interaction between chromosomes as an important cause of cell death.

  11. DNA ploidy of primary and recurrent irradiated laryngeal tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struikmans, H; Hordijk, GJ; Kal, HB

    Purpose: Radiosensitivity of diploid laryngeal cancers, as compared with that of aneuploid ones, appears to be increased. However, no conclusive data exist. If a causal relationship exists, then recurrent laryngeal cancer after irradiation should predominantly be characterized by aneuploidy.

  12. Parental ploidy strongly affects offspring fitness in heteroploid crosses among three cytotypes of autopolyploid Jacobaea carniolica (Asteraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Sonnleitner

    Full Text Available Reproductive interactions among cytotypes in their contact zones determine whether these cytotypes can co-exist and form stable contact zones or not. In autopolyploids, heteroploid cross-compatibilities might depend on parental ploidy, but tests of this hypothesis in autopolyploid systems with more than two ploidies are lacking. Here, we study Jacobaea carniolica, which comprises diploid, tetraploid, and hexaploid individuals regularly forming contact zones. Seeds obtained from in situ cross-pollinations within and among cytotypes were subjected to DNA flow cytometry and greenhouse germination experiments. Hybrid fitness and parental effects on hybrid fitness were tested with regression models comparing fitness parameters of early life stages. Irrespective of the direction of crosses, seed viability and seedling survival in diploid-polyploid crosses were substantially lower than in tetraploid-hexaploid crosses. In contrast, seedling growth traits indicated neither transgressive character expression nor any selection against hybrid offspring. Congruent with a model of genome dosage effects, these traits differed between reciprocal crosses, especially of diploids and tetraploids, where trait values resembled those of the maternal parent. The strong effect of parental ploidy on offspring fitness in heteroploid crosses may cause contact zones involving exclusively polyploid cytotypes to be less stable over longer terms than those involving diploids and polyploids.

  13. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization in different ploidy levels cross-breeding of lily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Jingmao; Zhang, Yiying; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Shunchao; Lu, Yingmin

    2015-01-01

    21 crossing were conducted between Asiatic Lily with different ploidy levels, the results showed that the interploidy hybridization between diploid and tetraploid lilies was not as successful as intraploidy hybridization. Regardless of male sterility, triploid lilies could be used as female parents in the hybridization which the progenies were aneuploidy. 3x×4x crosses could be cultured more successfully than 3x×2x crosses. 45S rDNA was mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lilium species and their progenies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH revealed six to sixteen 45S rDNA gene loci, and normally the sites were not in pairs. The asymmetry indexes of LA (Longiflorum hybrids × Asiatic hybrids) hybrids was higher than Asiatic hybrids, the evolution degree was LA hybrids > Asiatic hybrids. 45S rDNA distributed variably on chromosome 1-10 and 12 among Asiatic hybrids. Chromosome 1 had invariable sites of 45S rDNA in all Asiatic hybrids, which could be considered as the characteristic of Asiatic hybrids. LA hybrid 'Freya' had two sites of 45S rDNA on one homologous chromosome 5, and also it could be found in the progenies. The karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S rDNA as probe were applied to identify the different genotypes of 9 hybrids. Typical chromosomes with parental signal sites could be observed in all the genotypes of hybrids, it was confirmed that all the hybrids were true.

  14. Evaluation of the Environmental DNA Method for Estimating Distribution and Biomass of Submerged Aquatic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhashi, Saeko; Doi, Hideyuki; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Watanabe, Sonoko; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) method has increasingly been recognized as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic animal species; however, its application for monitoring aquatic plants is limited. To evaluate eDNA analysis for estimating the distribution of aquatic plants, we compared its estimated distributions with eDNA analysis, visual observation, and past distribution records for the submerged species Hydrilla verticillata. Moreover, we conducted aquarium experiments using H. verticillata and Egeria densa and analyzed the relationships between eDNA concentrations and plant biomass to investigate the potential for biomass estimation. The occurrences estimated by eDNA analysis closely corresponded to past distribution records, and eDNA detections were more frequent than visual observations, indicating that the method is potentially more sensitive. The results of the aquarium experiments showed a positive relationship between plant biomass and eDNA concentration; however, the relationship was not always significant. The eDNA concentration peaked within three days of the start of the experiment in most cases, suggesting that plants do not release constant amounts of DNA. These results showed that eDNA analysis can be used for distribution surveys, and has the potential to estimate the biomass of aquatic plants.

  15. Estimates of DNA strand breakage in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus leukocytes measured with the Comet and DNA diffusion assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Díaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of DNA damage by mean of Comet or single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE assay has been commonly used to assess genotoxic impact in aquatic animals being able to detect exposure to low concentrations of contaminants in a wide range of species. The aims of this work were 1 to evaluate the usefulness of the Comet to detect DNA strand breakage in dolphin leukocytes, 2 to use the DNA diffusion assay to determine the amount of DNA strand breakage associated with apoptosis or necrosis, and 3 to determine the proportion of DNA strand breakage that was unrelated to apoptosis and necrosis. Significant intra-individual variation was observed in all of the estimates of DNA damage. DNA strand breakage was overestimated because a considerable amount (~29% of the DNA damage was derived from apoptosis and necrosis. The remaining DNA damage in dolphin leukocytes was caused by factors unrelated to apoptosis and necrosis. These results indicate that the DNA diffusion assay is a complementary tool that can be used together with the Comet assay to assess DNA damage in bottlenose dolphins.

  16. Use of droplet digital PCR for estimation of fish abundance and biomass in environmental DNA surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Uchii, Kimiko; Takahara, Teruhiko; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    An environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis method has been recently developed to estimate the distribution of aquatic animals by quantifying the number of target DNA copies with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A new quantitative PCR technology, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), partitions PCR reactions into thousands of droplets and detects the amplification in each droplet, thereby allowing direct quantification of target DNA. We evaluated the quantification accuracy of qPCR and ddPCR to estimate species abundance and biomass by using eDNA in mesocosm experiments involving different numbers of common carp. We found that ddPCR quantified the concentration of carp eDNA along with carp abundance and biomass more accurately than qPCR, especially at low eDNA concentrations. In addition, errors in the analysis were smaller in ddPCR than in qPCR. Thus, ddPCR is better suited to measure eDNA concentration in water, and it provides more accurate results for the abundance and biomass of the target species than qPCR. We also found that the relationship between carp abundance and eDNA concentration was stronger than that between biomass and eDNA by using both ddPCR and qPCR; this suggests that abundance can be better estimated by the analysis of eDNA for species with fewer variations in body mass.

  17. Chromosome numbers and DNA content in some species of Mecardonia (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, María M.; Angulo, María B.; Greppi, Julián A.; Bugallo, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetic characterization and determination of DNA content by flow cytometry of five species of Mecardonia Ruiz et Pavon, 1798 (Gratiolae, Plantaginaceae) was performed. This is the first study of nuclear DNA content carried out in the genus. Mitotic analysis revealed a base chromosome number x = 11 for all entities and different ploidy levels, ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 22) to hexaploid (2n = 6x = 66). The results include the first report of the chromosome numbers for Mecardonia flagellaris (Chamisso & Schlechtendal, 1827) (2n = 22), Mecardonia grandiflora (Bentham) Pennell, 1946 (2n = 22), Mecardonia kamogawae Greppi & Hagiwara, 2011 (2n = 66), and Mecardonia sp. (2n = 44). The three ploidy levels here reported suggest that polyploidy is common in Mecardonia and appear to be an important factor in the evolution of this genus. The 2C- and 1Cx-values were also estimated in all the species. The 2C-values ranged from 1.91 to 5.29 pg. The 1Cx-values ranged from 0.88 to 1.03 pg. The general tendency indicated a decrease in the 1Cx-value with increasing ploidy level. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to taxonomy of the genus. PMID:28123693

  18. Study of quantitative genetics of gum arabic production complicated by variability in ploidy level of Acacia senegal (L.) Willd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diallo, Adja Madjiguene; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Hansen, Jon Kehlet

    2015-01-01

    that progenies consisted of both diploid and polyploid trees, and growth, gum yield, and gum quality varied substantially among ploidy level, populations, and progenies. Analysis of molecular variance and estimates of outcrossing rate supported that trees within open-pollinated families of diploids were half...... sibs, while the open-pollinated families of polyploids showed low variation within families. The difference in sibling relationship observed between ploidy levels complicated estimation of genetic parameters. However, based on the diploid trees, we conclude that heritability in gum arabic production......Gum arabic is an important international commodity produced by trees of Acacia senegal across Sahelian Africa, but documented results of breeding activities are limited. The objective of this study was to provide reliable estimates of quantitative genetic parameters in order to shed light...

  19. Estimating occupancy and abundance of stream amphibians using environmental DNA from filtered water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting aquatic species are advancing rapidly, but with little evaluation of field protocols or precision of resulting estimates. We compared sampling results from traditional field methods with eDNA methods for two amphibians in 13 streams in central Idaho, USA. We also evaluated three water collection protocols and the influence of sampling location, time of day, and distance from animals on eDNA concentration in the water. We found no difference in detection or amount of eDNA among water collection protocols. eDNA methods had slightly higher detection rates than traditional field methods, particularly when species occurred at low densities. eDNA concentration was positively related to field-measured density, biomass, and proportion of transects occupied. Precision of eDNA-based abundance estimates increased with the amount of eDNA in the water and the number of replicate subsamples collected. eDNA concentration did not vary significantly with sample location in the stream, time of day, or distance downstream from animals. Our results further advance the implementation of eDNA methods for monitoring aquatic vertebrates in stream habitats.

  20. An Advanced Model to Precisely Estimate the Cell-Free Fetal DNA Concentration in Maternal Plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongbin Kang

    Full Text Available With the speedy development of sequencing technologies, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT has been widely applied in clinical practice for testing for fetal aneuploidy. The cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA concentration in maternal plasma is the most critical parameter for this technology because it affects the accuracy of NIPT-based sequencing for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. Several approaches have been developed to calculate the cffDNA fraction of the total cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. However, most approaches depend on specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP allele information or are restricted to male fetuses.In this study, we present an innovative method to accurately deduce the concentration of the cffDNA fraction using only maternal plasma DNA. SNPs were classified into four maternal-fetal genotype combinations and three boundaries were added to capture effective SNP loci in which the mother was homozygous and the fetus was heterozygous. The median value of the concentration of the fetal DNA fraction was estimated using the effective SNPs. A depth-bias correction was performed using simulated data and corresponding regression equations for adjustments when the depth of the sequencing data was below 100-fold or the cffDNA fraction is less than 10%.Using our approach, the median of the relative bias was 0.4% in 18 maternal plasma samples with a median sequencing depth of 125-fold. There was a significant association (r = 0.935 between our estimations and the estimations inferred from the Y chromosome. Furthermore, this approach could precisely estimate a cffDNA fraction as low as 3%, using only maternal plasma DNA at the targeted region with a sequencing depth of 65-fold. We also used PCR instead of parallel sequencing to calculate the cffDNA fraction. There was a significant association (r = 98.2% between our estimations and those inferred from the Y chromosome.

  1. Using Time-Structured Data to Estimate Evolutionary Rates of Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Cadhla; Kitchen, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth; Suchard, Marc A.; Holmes, Edward C.; Rambaut, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses are often described as evolving through long-term codivergent associations with their hosts, a pattern that is expected to be associated with low rates of nucleotide substitution. However, the hypothesis of codivergence between dsDNA viruses and their hosts has rarely been rigorously tested, even though the vast majority of nucleotide substitution rate estimates for dsDNA viruses are based upon this assumption. It is therefore important to estimate the evolutionary rates of dsDNA viruses independent of the assumption of host-virus codivergence. Here, we explore the use of temporally structured sequence data within a Bayesian framework to estimate the evolutionary rates for seven human dsDNA viruses, including variola virus (VARV) (the causative agent of smallpox) and herpes simplex virus-1. Our analyses reveal that although the VARV genome is likely to evolve at a rate of approximately 1 × 10−5 substitutions/site/year and hence approaching that of many RNA viruses, the evolutionary rates of many other dsDNA viruses remain problematic to estimate. Synthetic data sets were constructed to inform our interpretation of the substitution rates estimated for these dsDNA viruses and the analysis of these demonstrated that given a sequence data set of appropriate length and sampling depth, it is possible to use time-structured analyses to estimate the substitution rates of many dsDNA viruses independently from the assumption of host-virus codivergence. Finally, the discovery that some dsDNA viruses may evolve at rates approaching those of RNA viruses has important implications for our understanding of the long-term evolutionary history and emergence potential of this major group of viruses. PMID:20363828

  2. Schmutzi: estimation of contamination and endogenous mitochondrial consensus calling for ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Gabriel; Slon, Viviane; Duggan, Ana T; Kelso, Janet

    2015-10-12

    Ancient DNA is typically highly degraded with appreciable cytosine deamination, and contamination with present-day DNA often complicates the identification of endogenous molecules. Together, these factors impede accurate assembly of the endogenous ancient mitochondrial genome. We present schmutzi, an iterative approach to jointly estimate present-day human contamination in ancient human DNA datasets and reconstruct the endogenous mitochondrial genome. By using sequence deamination patterns and fragment length distributions, schmutzi accurately reconstructs the endogenous mitochondrial genome sequence even when contamination exceeds 50 %. Given sufficient coverage, schmutzi also produces reliable estimates of contamination across a range of contamination rates. https://bioinf.eva.mpg.de/schmutzi/ license:GPLv3.

  3. Combination of Immunohistochemistry and Ploidy Analysis to Assist Histopathological Diagnosis of Molar Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Osterheld

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Differential diagnosis between hydropic abortion, partial mole and complete mole is still a challenge for pathologists but really important for patient management. Material and Method In this study, we have evaluated 111 products of conception from the first trimester. Histological analysis was made according to the main diagnostic histopathological features described in the literature and the cases were categorized in hydropic abortus (HA, partial mole (PM and complete mole (CM. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibody against p57 kip protein a putative paternally imprinted inhibitor gene and DNA ploidy was analysed in all cases by image cytometry. Results All 23 HAs presented a diploid DNA content and were p57 kip2 positive. From the 28 CMs, 12 cases (43% were diploid and 16 cases (57% were tetraploid but no expression of p57 kip2 was found with positive internal controls. From the 60 PMs, 58 cases were positive for p57 kip2 expression and 53 cases (88% were triploid, 6 cases (10% tetraploid and 1 case (2% diploid. Conclusion This study on 111 cases of early pregnancies confirms the usefulness of immunohistochemistry and cytometry but demonstrates the importance of the combination of both techniques to assist histology for the best reliable diagnosis.

  4. Ploidy Effects in Isogenic Populations of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven P.; Brinegar, A. Chris; Schrader, Larry E.; Jordan, Douglas B.; Ogren, William L.

    1983-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) was isolated from isogenic diploid-tetraploid and tetraploid-octoploid sets of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) leaves. Molecular weights of RuBPCase subunits were similar across ploidy levels of both isogenic sets with subunits of 52,000 and 14,000. Apparent Km(CO2) values and substrate specificity factors (VcKo/VoKc) of RuBPCase were similar across ploidy levels of both isogenic sets. These results indicate that ploidy had no effect on the kinetic properties of RuBPCase in alfalfa. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16662937

  5. Ploidy of Bovine Nuclear Transfer Blastocysts Blastomere Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, P J; VIUFF, D; THOMSEN, P D

    2000-01-01

    The higher rate of embryonic loss in nuclear transfer compared to in vitro produced embryos may be due to chromosome abnormalities that occur during preimplantation in vitro devel- opment. Because little is known about ploidy errors in nuclear transfer embryos, this was ex- amined using embryos...... cultured until day 7 at which time blastocyst nuclei were extracted and chromosome abnormalities were evaluated by fluorescent in situ hybridization using two probes that bind to the subcentromeric regions on chromosomes 6 and 7. In 16 nuclear transfer blastocysts generated from 5 donor embryos, 53.8 6 20...... fertil- ization but the distribution of chromosome abnormalities was different (p 5 0.0002). In conclusion, nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed using blastomere cells can produce over 50% blastocysts with a diploid chromosome complement. However, the contribution of chro- mosome abnormalities...

  6. An analytical framework for estimating aquatic species density from environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambert, Thierry; Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko

    2018-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis of water samples is on the brink of becoming a standard monitoring method for aquatic species. This method has improved detection rates over conventional survey methods and thus has demonstrated effectiveness for estimation of site occupancy and species distribution. The frontier of eDNA applications, however, is to infer species density. Building upon previous studies, we present and assess a modeling approach that aims at inferring animal density from eDNA. The modeling combines eDNA and animal count data from a subset of sites to estimate species density (and associated uncertainties) at other sites where only eDNA data are available. As a proof of concept, we first perform a cross-validation study using experimental data on carp in mesocosms. In these data, fish densities are known without error, which allows us to test the performance of the method with known data. We then evaluate the model using field data from a study on a stream salamander species to assess the potential of this method to work in natural settings, where density can never be known with absolute certainty. Two alternative distributions (Normal and Negative Binomial) to model variability in eDNA concentration data are assessed. Assessment based on the proof of concept data (carp) revealed that the Negative Binomial model provided much more accurate estimates than the model based on a Normal distribution, likely because eDNA data tend to be overdispersed. Greater imprecision was found when we applied the method to the field data, but the Negative Binomial model still provided useful density estimates. We call for further model development in this direction, as well as further research targeted at sampling design optimization. It will be important to assess these approaches on a broad range of study systems.

  7. Pollen size in Hordeum L.: correlation between size, ploidy level, and breeding system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; von Bothmer, Roland

    1994-01-01

    The size of pollen in the genus Hordeum (Poaceae) is correlated with ploidy level and breeding system. Generally, the pollen size increases with the ploidy level, and outbreeding species possess significant- ly larger pollen than inbreeders. In H. roshevitzii (2x), H. pusilplum (2x), H. murinum...... consequences of heteromorphic pollen are discussed, and a model for the evolution of breeding strategies in Hordeum is suggest- ed. Key...

  8. Agronomic Trait Variations and Ploidy Differentiation of Kiwiberries in Northwest China: Implication for Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Polyploid plants often have higher biomass and superior crop qualities. Breeders therefore search for crop germplasm with higher ploidy levels; however, whether higher ploidy levels are associated with better performance remains unclear. Actinidia arguta and related species, whose commercialized fruit are referred to as kiwiberries, harbor a series of ploidy races in nature, offering an opportunity to determine the link between ploidy levels and agronomic traits. In the present study, we determined the ploidy levels of A. arguta var. arguta, A. arguta var. giraldii, and A. melanandra in 16 natural populations using flow cytometry, and examined 31 trait variations in fruits, leaves and flowers by field observations, microscopic examination and laboratory analyses. Our results showed that octaploid and decaploid A. arguta var. giraldii had larger dimension of leaves than tetraploid A. arguta var. arguta and A. melanandra, but their fruits were significantly smaller. In addition, A. arguta var. giraldii (8x and 10x had higher contents of nutrients such as ascorbic acid and amino acids; however, some important agronomic traits, including the content of total sugar and total acid, were significantly lower in the octaploids and decaploids. Moreover, octaploids and decaploids did not result in greater ecological adaptability for the challenging environments and climates. In conclusion, the differentiation of ecological adaptability and traits among natural kiwiberries' cytotypes suggested that higher ploidy levels are not inevitably advantageous in plants. The findings of A. arguta and related taxa in geographical distribution and agronomic trait variations will facilitate their germplasm domestication.

  9. Different DNA Loidy Patterns for the Differentiation of Common Subtypes of Renal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorong Li

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The common subtypes of renal tumors are conventional or clear cell carcinoma, papillary carcinoma, chromophobe carcinoma and oncocytoma. Each subtype has its distinct histogenesis and clinical evolution. DNA ploidy is viewed as a marker of gross genomic aberrations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the DNA ploidy in the common subtypes of renal tumors to increase our understanding of renal tumor biology and to broaden clinical application of DNA ploidy. Methods: 38 renal tumor samples (13 clear cell RCCs, 12 papillary RCCs, 7 chromophobe RCCs, and 6 oncocytomas were studied. Five biopsies of different parts of each fresh tumor were subjected to a flow cytometric analysis of DNA ploidy. Results: All tumors except one papillary RCC generated interpretable DNA histograms. Flow cytometric analysis of oncocytomas showed the diploid pattern (29/30 frequencies while the chromophobe RCC never showed the diploid pattern (0/55 frequencies (p < 0.01. 3/7 chromopbobe RCCs possessed the hypodiploid stemline. The hypodiploid stemline appeared neither in conventional RCCs (0/63 frequencies nor in papillary RCCs (0/50 frequencies. The diploid pattern was dominant in conventional and papillary RCCs. 10/13 (76.9% of clear cell RCCs and 9/11 (81.8% of papillary RCCs possessed a homogeneous DNA ploidy pattern while only 1/7 (14.3% has a homogeneous DNA ploidy pattern. 6/7 chromophobe RCCs had multiple aneuploid stemlines. Conclusions: Flow cytometric analysis reveals that conventional and papillary RCCs are more homogeneous than chromophobe RCC. Each subtype of renal tumors possesses a specific DNA ploidy pattern. The analysis of DNA ploidy is useful for the differentiation of common subtypes of renal tumors in morphologically difficult cases.

  10. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  11. DNA Cytometry and Nuclear Morphometry in Ovarian Benign, Borderline and Malignant Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina A. Gamal el Din

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: We suggest that DNA ploidy and nuclear area combined, may be adjuncts to histopathology; in ovarian serous and mucinous benign, borderline and malignant neoplasms; identifying the aggressive borderline tumours.

  12. Bioinformatics Approaches for Fetal DNA Fraction Estimation in Noninvasive Prenatal Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianlu Laura Peng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA molecules in plasma of pregnant women has created a paradigm shift in noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT. Circulating cell-free DNA in maternal plasma has been increasingly recognized as an important proxy to detect fetal abnormalities in a noninvasive manner. A variety of approaches for NIPT using next-generation sequencing have been developed, which have been rapidly transforming clinical practices nowadays. In such approaches, the fetal DNA fraction is a pivotal parameter governing the overall performance and guaranteeing the proper clinical interpretation of testing results. In this review, we describe the current bioinformatics approaches developed for estimating the fetal DNA fraction and discuss their pros and cons.

  13. DNA-based population density estimation of black bear at northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) microsatellites from hair samples obtained by the non-invasive method of traps was used to estimate the population density of black bears (Ursus americanus eremicus) in a mountain located at the county of Lampazos, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The genotyping of bears was ...

  14. Age Estimation with DNA: From Forensic DNA Fingerprinting to Forensic (Epi)Genomics: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, Walther

    2018-01-23

    Forensic genetics developed from protein-based techniques a quarter of a century ago and became famous as "DNA fingerprinting," this being based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of high-molecular-weight DNA. The amplification of much smaller short tandem repeat (STR) sequences using the polymerase chain reaction soon replaced RFLP analysis and advanced to become the gold standard in genetic identification. Meanwhile, STR multiplexes have been developed and made commercially available which simultaneously amplify up to 30 STR loci from as little as 15 cells or fewer. The enormous information content that comes with the large variety of observed STR genotypes allows for genetic individualisation (with the exception of identical twins). Carefully selected core STR loci form the basis of intelligence-led DNA databases that provide investigative leads by linking unsolved crime scenes and criminals through their matched STR profiles. Nevertheless, the success of modern DNA fingerprinting depends on the availability of reference material from suspects. In order to provide new investigative leads in cases where such reference samples are absent, forensic scientists started to explore the prediction of phenotypic traits from the DNA of the evidentiary sample. This paradigm change now uses DNA and epigenetic markers to forecast characteristics that are useful to triage further investigative work. So far, the best investigated externally visible characteristics are eye, hair and skin colour, as well as geographic ancestry and age. Information on the chronological age of a stain donor (or any sample donor) is elemental for forensic investigations in a number of aspects and has, therefore, been explored by researchers in some detail. Among different methodological approaches tested to date, the methylation-sensitive analysis of carefully selected DNA markers (CpG sites) has brought the most promising results by providing prediction accuracies of ±3-4 years

  15. The microgeographical patterns of morphological and molecular variation of a mixed ploidy population in the species complex Actinidia chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Liu

    Full Text Available Polyploidy and hybridization are thought to have significant impacts on both the evolution and diversification of the genus Actinidia, but the structure and patterns of morphology and molecular diversity relating to ploidy variation of wild Actinidia plants remain much less understood. Here, we examine the distribution of morphological variation and ploidy levels along geographic and environmental variables of a large mixed-ploidy population of the A. chinensis species complex. We then characterize the extent of both genetic and epigenetic diversity and differentiation exhibited between individuals of different ploidy levels. Our results showed that while there are three ploidy levels in this population, hexaploids were constituted the majority (70.3%. Individuals with different ploidy levels were microgeographically structured in relation to elevation and extent of niche disturbance. The morphological characters examined revealed clear difference between diploids and hexaploids, however tetraploids exhibited intermediate forms. Both genetic and epigenetic diversity were high but the differentiation among cytotypes was weak, suggesting extensive gene flow and/or shared ancestral variation occurred in this population even across ploidy levels. Epigenetic variation was clearly correlated with changes in altitudes, a trend of continuous genetic variation and gradual increase of epigenomic heterogeneities of individuals was also observed. Our results show that complex interactions between the locally microgeographical environment, ploidy and gene flow impact A. chinensis genetic and epigenetic variation. We posit that an increase in ploidy does not broaden the species habitat range, but rather permits A. chinensis adaptation to specific niches.

  16. Algorithm for post-clustering curation of DNA amplicon data yields reliable biodiversity estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froslev, Tobias Guldberg; Kjoller, Rasmus; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2017-01-01

    DNA metabarcoding is promising for cost-effective biodiversity monitoring, but reliable diversity estimates are difficult to achieve and validate. Here we present and validate a method, called LULU, for removing erroneous molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from community data derived...... soil from 130 sites in Denmark spanning major environmental gradients. OTU tables are produced with several different OTU definition algorithms and subsequently curated with LULU, and validated against field survey data. LULU curation consistently improves α-diversity estimates and other biodiversity...... metrics, and does not require a sequence reference database; thus, it represents a promising method for reliable biodiversity estimation....

  17. Plant DNA barcodes can accurately estimate species richness in poorly known floras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Costion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Widespread uptake of DNA barcoding technology for vascular plants has been slow due to the relatively poor resolution of species discrimination (∼70% and low sequencing and amplification success of one of the two official barcoding loci, matK. Studies to date have mostly focused on finding a solution to these intrinsic limitations of the markers, rather than posing questions that can maximize the utility of DNA barcodes for plants with the current technology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we test the ability of plant DNA barcodes using the two official barcoding loci, rbcLa and matK, plus an alternative barcoding locus, trnH-psbA, to estimate the species diversity of trees in a tropical rainforest plot. Species discrimination accuracy was similar to findings from previous studies but species richness estimation accuracy proved higher, up to 89%. All combinations which included the trnH-psbA locus performed better at both species discrimination and richness estimation than matK, which showed little enhanced species discriminatory power when concatenated with rbcLa. The utility of the trnH-psbA locus is limited however, by the occurrence of intraspecific variation observed in some angiosperm families to occur as an inversion that obscures the monophyly of species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate for the first time, using a case study, the potential of plant DNA barcodes for the rapid estimation of species richness in taxonomically poorly known areas or cryptic populations revealing a powerful new tool for rapid biodiversity assessment. The combination of the rbcLa and trnH-psbA loci performed better for this purpose than any two-locus combination that included matK. We show that although DNA barcodes fail to discriminate all species of plants, new perspectives and methods on biodiversity value and quantification may overshadow some of these shortcomings by applying barcode data in new ways.

  18. Multiple data sources improve DNA-based mark-recapture population estimates of grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, John; Kendall, Katherine C; Stetz, Jeffrey B; Roon, David A; Waits, Lisette P; Paetkau, David

    2008-04-01

    A fundamental challenge to estimating population size with mark-recapture methods is heterogeneous capture probabilities and subsequent bias of population estimates. Confronting this problem usually requires substantial sampling effort that can be difficult to achieve for some species, such as carnivores. We developed a methodology that uses two data sources to deal with heterogeneity and applied this to DNA mark-recapture data from grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). We improved population estimates by incorporating additional DNA "captures" of grizzly bears obtained by collecting hair from unbaited bear rub trees concurrently with baited, grid-based, hair snag sampling. We consider a Lincoln-Petersen estimator with hair snag captures as the initial session and rub tree captures as the recapture session and develop an estimator in program MARK that treats hair snag and rub tree samples as successive sessions. Using empirical data from a large-scale project in the greater Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, area and simulation modeling we evaluate these methods and compare the results to hair-snag-only estimates. Empirical results indicate that, compared with hair-snag-only data, the joint hair-snag-rub-tree methods produce similar but more precise estimates if capture and recapture rates are reasonably high for both methods. Simulation results suggest that estimators are potentially affected by correlation of capture probabilities between sample types in the presence of heterogeneity. Overall, closed population Huggins-Pledger estimators showed the highest precision and were most robust to sparse data, heterogeneity, and capture probability correlation among sampling types. Results also indicate that these estimators can be used when a segment of the population has zero capture probability for one of the methods. We propose that this general methodology may be useful for other species in which mark-recapture data are available from multiple sources.

  19. PDA: a pipeline to explore and estimate polymorphism in large DNA databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Sònia; Barbadilla, Antonio

    2004-07-01

    Polymorphism studies are one of the main research areas of this genomic era. To date, however, no available web server or software package has been designed to automate the process of exploring and estimating nucleotide polymorphism in large DNA databases. Here, we introduce a novel software, PDA, Pipeline Diversity Analysis, that automatically can (i) search for polymorphic sequences in large databases, and (ii) estimate their genetic diversity. PDA is a collection of modules, mainly written in Perl, which works sequentially as follows: unaligned sequence retrieved from a DNA database are automatically classified by organism and gene, and aligned using the ClustalW algorithm. Sequence sets are regrouped depending on their similarity scores. Main diversity parameters, including polymorphism, synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions, linkage disequilibrium and codon bias are estimated both for the full length of the sequences and for specific functional regions. Program output includes a database with all sequences and estimations, and HTML pages with summary statistics, the performed alignments and a histogram maker tool. PDA is an essential tool to explore polymorphism in large DNA databases for sequences from different genes, populations or species. It has already been successfully applied to create a secondary database. PDA is available on the web at http://pda.uab.es/.

  20. Forensic individual age estimation with DNA: From initial approaches to methylation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Aradas, A; Phillips, C; Lareu, M V

    2017-07-01

    Individual age estimation is a key factor in forensic science analysis that can provide very useful information applicable to criminal, legal, and anthropological investigations. Forensic age inference was initially based on morphological inspection or radiography and only later began to adopt molecular approaches. However, a lack of accuracy or technical problems hampered the introduction of these DNA-based methodologies in casework analysis. A turning point occurred when the epigenetic signature of DNA methylation was observed to gradually change during an individual´s lifespan. In the last four years, the number of publications reporting DNA methylation age-correlated changes has gradually risen and the forensic community now has a range of age methylation tests applicable to forensic casework. Most forensic age predictor models have been developed based on blood DNA samples, but additional tissues are now also being explored. This review assesses the most widely adopted genes harboring methylation sites, detection technologies, statistical age-predictive analyses, and potential causes of variation in age estimates. Despite the need for further work to improve predictive accuracy and establishing a broader range of tissues for which tests can analyze the most appropriate methylation sites, several forensic age predictors have now been reported that provide consistency in their prediction accuracies (predictive error of ±4 years); this makes them compelling tools with the potential to contribute key information to help guide criminal investigations. Copyright © 2017 Central Police University.

  1. Detecting and estimating contamination of human DNA samples in sequencing and array-based genotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Goo; Flickinger, Matthew; Hetrick, Kurt N; Romm, Jane M; Doheny, Kimberly F; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Kang, Hyun Min

    2012-11-02

    DNA sample contamination is a serious problem in DNA sequencing studies and may result in systematic genotype misclassification and false positive associations. Although methods exist to detect and filter out cross-species contamination, few methods to detect within-species sample contamination are available. In this paper, we describe methods to identify within-species DNA sample contamination based on (1) a combination of sequencing reads and array-based genotype data, (2) sequence reads alone, and (3) array-based genotype data alone. Analysis of sequencing reads allows contamination detection after sequence data is generated but prior to variant calling; analysis of array-based genotype data allows contamination detection prior to generation of costly sequence data. Through a combination of analysis of in silico and experimentally contaminated samples, we show that our methods can reliably detect and estimate levels of contamination as low as 1%. We evaluate the impact of DNA contamination on genotype accuracy and propose effective strategies to screen for and prevent DNA contamination in sequencing studies. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of inbreeding on DNA profile frequency estimates using PCR-based loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, B

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of inbreeding were determined using Wright's FST for loci used for PCR-based forensic analyses. The populations analyzed were African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, and Orientals. In most cases the FST values at each locus were less than 0.01. The FST values over all loci for African Americans, Caucasians, and Orientals ranged from 0.0015 to 0.0048. No substantial differences were observed for DNA profile frequency estimates when calculated under the assumption of independence or with the incorporation of FST.

  3. Nuclear DNA content estimates in green algal lineages: chlorophyta and streptophyta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapraun, Donald F

    2007-04-01

    Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies present a compelling case that an ancient divergence separates eukaryotic green algae into two major monophyletic lineages, Chlorophyta and Streptophyta, and a residuum of green algae, which have been referred to prasinophytes or micromonadophytes. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for less than 1% of the described green algal members of Chlorophyta, which includes multicellular green marine algae and freshwater flagellates (e.g. Chlamydomonas and Volvox). The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and adds substantially to our database of C-values, especially for the streptophyte charophycean lineage which is the sister group of the land plants. A recent list of 2C nuclear DNA contents for isolates and species of green algae is expanded by 72 to 157. The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and red blood cell (chicken erythrocytes) standard were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. In Chlorophyta, including Chlorophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Ulvophyceae, 2C DNA estimates range from 0.01 to 5.8 pg. Nuclear DNA content variation trends are noted and discussed for specific problematic taxon pairs, including Ulotrichales-Ulvales, and Cladophorales-Siphonocladales. For Streptophyta, 2C nuclear DNA contents range from 0.2 to 6.4 pg, excluding the highly polyploid Charales and Desmidiales, which have genome sizes of up to 14.8 and 46.8 pg, respectively. Nuclear DNA content data for Streptophyta superimposed on a contemporary molecular phylogeny indicate that early diverging lineages, including some members of Chlorokybales, Coleochaetales and Klebsormidiales, have genomes as small as 0.1-0.5 pg. It is proposed that the streptophyte ancestral nuclear genome common to both the charophyte and the embryophyte lineages can be characterized as 1C = 0.2 pg and 1n = 6. These data will help pre-screen candidate species for the on

  4. A computational method for estimating the PCR duplication rate in DNA and RNA-seq experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vikas

    2017-03-14

    PCR amplification is an important step in the preparation of DNA sequencing libraries prior to high-throughput sequencing. PCR amplification introduces redundant reads in the sequence data and estimating the PCR duplication rate is important to assess the frequency of such reads. Existing computational methods do not distinguish PCR duplicates from "natural" read duplicates that represent independent DNA fragments and therefore, over-estimate the PCR duplication rate for DNA-seq and RNA-seq experiments. In this paper, we present a computational method to estimate the average PCR duplication rate of high-throughput sequence datasets that accounts for natural read duplicates by leveraging heterozygous variants in an individual genome. Analysis of simulated data and exome sequence data from the 1000 Genomes project demonstrated that our method can accurately estimate the PCR duplication rate on paired-end as well as single-end read datasets which contain a high proportion of natural read duplicates. Further, analysis of exome datasets prepared using the Nextera library preparation method indicated that 45-50% of read duplicates correspond to natural read duplicates likely due to fragmentation bias. Finally, analysis of RNA-seq datasets from individuals in the 1000 Genomes project demonstrated that 70-95% of read duplicates observed in such datasets correspond to natural duplicates sampled from genes with high expression and identified outlier samples with a 2-fold greater PCR duplication rate than other samples. The method described here is a useful tool for estimating the PCR duplication rate of high-throughput sequence datasets and for assessing the fraction of read duplicates that correspond to natural read duplicates. An implementation of the method is available at https://github.com/vibansal/PCRduplicates .

  5. Computationally feasible estimation of haplotype frequencies from pooled DNA with and without Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Anthony Y C; Zhang, Han; Yang, Yaning

    2009-02-01

    Pooling large number of DNA samples is a common practice in association study, especially for initial screening. However, the use of expectation-maximization (EM)-type algorithms in estimating haplotype distributions for even moderate pool sizes is hampered by the computational complexity involved. A novel constrained EM algorithm called PoooL has been proposed recently to bypass the difficulty via the use of asymptotic normality of the pooled allele frequencies. The resulting estimates are, however, not maximum likelihood estimates and hence not optimal. Furthermore, the assumption of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) made may not be realistic in practice. Rather than carrying out constrained maximization as in PoooL, we revert to the usual EM algorithm but make it computationally feasible by using normal approximations. The resulting algorithm is much simpler to implement than PoooL because there is no need to invoke sophisticated iterative scaling methods as in PoooL. We also develop an estimating equation analogue of the EM algorithm for the case of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (HWD) by conditioning on the haplotypes of both chromosomes of the same individual. Incorporated into the method is a way of estimating the inbreeding coefficient by relating it to overdispersion. Simulation study assuming HWE shows that our simplified implementation of the EM algorithm leads to estimates with substantially smaller SDs than PoooL estimates. Further simulations show that ignoring HWD will induce biases in the estimates. Our extended method with estimation of inbreeding coefficient incorporated is able to reduce the bias leading to estimates with substantially smaller mean square errors. We also present results to suggest that our method can cope with a certain degree of locus-specific inbreeding as well as additional overdispersion not caused by inbreeding. http://staff.ustc.edu.cn/ approximately ynyang/aem-aes

  6. Estimating DNA coverage and abundance in metagenomes using a gamma approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Sean D; Dalevi, Daniel; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Shotgun sequencing generates large numbers of short DNA reads from either an isolated organism or, in the case of metagenomics projects, from the aggregate genome of a microbial community. These reads are then assembled based on overlapping sequences into larger, contiguous sequences (contigs). The feasibility of assembly and the coverage achieved (reads per nucleotide or distinct sequence of nucleotides) depend on several factors: the number of reads sequenced, the read length and the relative abundances of their source genomes in the microbial community. A low coverage suggests that most of the genomic DNA in the sample has not been sequenced, but it is often difficult to estimate either the extent of the uncaptured diversity or the amount of additional sequencing that would be most efficacious. In this work, we regard a metagenome as a population of DNA fragments (bins), each of which may be covered by one or more reads. We employ a gamma distribution to model this bin population due to its flexibility and ease of use. When a gamma approximation can be found that adequately fits the data, we may estimate the number of bins that were not sequenced and that could potentially be revealed by additional sequencing. We evaluated the performance of this model using simulated metagenomes and demonstrate its applicability on three recent metagenomic datasets.

  7. Joint Estimation of Contamination, Error and Demography for Nuclear DNA from Ancient Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Racimo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available When sequencing an ancient DNA sample from a hominin fossil, DNA from present-day humans involved in excavation and extraction will be sequenced along with the endogenous material. This type of contamination is problematic for downstream analyses as it will introduce a bias towards the population of the contaminating individual(s. Quantifying the extent of contamination is a crucial step as it allows researchers to account for possible biases that may arise in downstream genetic analyses. Here, we present an MCMC algorithm to co-estimate the contamination rate, sequencing error rate and demographic parameters-including drift times and admixture rates-for an ancient nuclear genome obtained from human remains, when the putative contaminating DNA comes from present-day humans. We assume we have a large panel representing the putative contaminant population (e.g. European, East Asian or African. The method is implemented in a C++ program called 'Demographic Inference with Contamination and Error' (DICE. We applied it to simulations and genome data from ancient Neanderthals and modern humans. With reasonable levels of genome sequence coverage (>3X, we find we can recover accurate estimates of all these parameters, even when the contamination rate is as high as 50%.

  8. Joint Estimation of Contamination, Error and Demography for Nuclear DNA from Ancient Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racimo, Fernando; Renaud, Gabriel; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-04-01

    When sequencing an ancient DNA sample from a hominin fossil, DNA from present-day humans involved in excavation and extraction will be sequenced along with the endogenous material. This type of contamination is problematic for downstream analyses as it will introduce a bias towards the population of the contaminating individual(s). Quantifying the extent of contamination is a crucial step as it allows researchers to account for possible biases that may arise in downstream genetic analyses. Here, we present an MCMC algorithm to co-estimate the contamination rate, sequencing error rate and demographic parameters-including drift times and admixture rates-for an ancient nuclear genome obtained from human remains, when the putative contaminating DNA comes from present-day humans. We assume we have a large panel representing the putative contaminant population (e.g. European, East Asian or African). The method is implemented in a C++ program called 'Demographic Inference with Contamination and Error' (DICE). We applied it to simulations and genome data from ancient Neanderthals and modern humans. With reasonable levels of genome sequence coverage (>3X), we find we can recover accurate estimates of all these parameters, even when the contamination rate is as high as 50%.

  9. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952 of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612 were intronic and 9% (n = 464 were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS. Significant (P ® MassARRAY. No significant differences (P > 0.1 were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total. Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post-natal growth and development and subsequent lactogenesis and fertility. We have identified a large number of variants segregating at significantly different frequencies between cattle groups divergent for calving

  10. Ploidy level of the banana (Musa spp.) accessions at the germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deborah Karamura

    2016-08-03

    Aug 3, 2016 ... Banana Germplasm Collection serves as a source of useful genes for banana breeding. However, insufficient ... banana accessions in the ex situ germplasm collection centre for the East and Central Africa, located in. Mbarara, Uganda. ... tissue culture as they are affected by ploidy (Suman et al., 2012).

  11. The risk of persistent trophoblastic disease after hydatidiform mole classified by morphology and ploidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Isa; Hansen, Estrid S; Sunde, Lone

    2007-01-01

    influence the development of morphologic features in hydatidiform moles. We recommend that gestations suspected of hydatidiform mole are subjected to histopathologic examination. If hydatidiform change and trophoblastic hyperplasia are identified, the ploidy should be used to identify patients with a high...... risk of persistent trophoblastic disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb...

  12. The ploidy conveyor of mature hepatocytes as a source of genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew W; Taylor, Matthew H; Hickey, Raymond D; Hanlon Newell, Amy E; Lenzi, Michelle L; Olson, Susan B; Finegold, Milton J; Grompe, Markus

    2010-10-07

    Mononucleated and binucleated polyploid hepatocytes (4n, 8n, 16n and higher) are found in all mammalian species, but the functional significance of this conserved phenomenon remains unknown. Polyploidization occurs through failed cytokinesis, begins at weaning in rodents and increases with age. Previously, we demonstrated that the opposite event, ploidy reversal, also occurs in polyploid hepatocytes generated by artificial cell fusion. This raised the possibility that somatic 'reductive mitoses' can also happen in normal hepatocytes. Here we show that multipolar mitotic spindles form frequently in mouse polyploid hepatocytes and can result in one-step ploidy reversal to generate offspring with halved chromosome content. Proliferating hepatocytes produce a highly diverse population of daughter cells with multiple numerical chromosome imbalances as well as uniparental origins. Our findings support a dynamic model of hepatocyte polyploidization, ploidy reversal and aneuploidy, a phenomenon that we term the 'ploidy conveyor'. We propose that this mechanism evolved to generate genetic diversity and permits adaptation of hepatocytes to xenobiotic or nutritional injury.

  13. Change in ploidy status from hyperdiploid to near-tetraploid in multiple myeloma associated with bortezomib/lenalidomide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlistova, Lenka; Zemanova, Zuzana; Sarova, Iveta; Lhotska, Halka; Berkova, Adela; Spicka, Ivan; Michalova, Kyra

    2014-01-01

    Ploidy is an important prognostic factor in the risk stratification of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Patients with MM can be divided into two groups according to the modal number of chromosomes: nonhyperdiploid (NH-MM) and hyperdiploid (H-MM), which has a more favorable outcome. The two ploidy groups represent two different oncogenetic pathways determined at the premalignant stage. The ploidy subtype also persists during the course of the disease, even during progression after the therapy, with only very rare cases of ploidy conversion. The clinical significance of ploidy conversion and its relation to drug resistance have been previously discussed. Here, we describe a female MM patient with a rare change in her ploidy status from H-MM to NH-MM, detected by cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic examinations of consecutive bone marrow aspirates. We hypothesize that ploidy conversion (from H-MM to NH-MM) is associated with disease progression and acquired resistance to bortezomib/lenalidomide therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Solidago altissima differs with respect to ploidy frequency and clinal variation across the prairie-forest biome border in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etterson, Julie R; Toczydlowski, Rachel H; Winkler, Katharine J; Kirschbaum, Jessica A; McAulay, Tim S

    2016-01-01

    Although our awareness of ploidy diversity has expanded with the application of flow cytometry, we still know little about the extent to which cytotypes within mixed-ploidy populations are genetically differentiated across environmental gradients. To address this issue, we reared 14 populations of Solidago altissima spanning the prairie-forest ecotone in Minnesota in a common garden with a watering treatment. We assessed ploidy frequencies and measured survival, flowering phenology, and plant architectural traits for 4 years. All populations harbored multiple cytotypes; prairie populations were dominated by tetraploids, forest populations by hexaploids. Diploids and polyploids differed significantly for 84% of the traits. Beyond average differences, the slope of trait values covaried with latitude and longitude, but this relationship was stronger for diploids than the other two polyploid cytotypes as indicated by numerous ploidy × latitude and ploidy × longitude interactions. For example, the timing of flowering of the cytotypes overlapped in populations sampled from the northeastern hemiboreal forest but differed significantly between cytotypes sampled from populations in the southwestern prairie. The watering treatments had weak effects, and there were no ploidy differences for phenotypic plasticity. Our data show that diploids have diverged genetically to a greater extent than polyploids along the environmental clines sampled in this study. Moreover, different environments favor phenotypic convergence over divergence among cytotypes for some traits. Differences in ploidy frequency and phenotypic divergence among cytotypes across gradients of temperature and precipitation are important considerations for restoration in an age of climate change. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Hierarchical models for estimating density from DNA mark-recapture studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Beth; Royle, J Andrew; Wegan, Michael T

    2009-04-01

    Genetic sampling is increasingly used as a tool by wildlife biologists and managers to estimate abundance and density of species. Typically, DNA is used to identify individuals captured in an array of traps (e.g., baited hair snares) from which individual encounter histories are derived. Standard methods for estimating the size of a closed population can be applied to such data. However, due to the movement of individuals on and off the trapping array during sampling, the area over which individuals are exposed to trapping is unknown, and so obtaining unbiased estimates of density has proved difficult. We propose a hierarchical spatial capture-recapture model which contains explicit models for the spatial point process governing the distribution of individuals and their exposure to (via movement) and detection by traps. Detection probability is modeled as a function of each individual's distance to the trap. We applied this model to a black bear (Ursus americanus) study conducted in 2006 using a hair-snare trap array in the Adirondack region of New York, USA. We estimated the density of bears to be 0.159 bears/km2, which is lower than the estimated density (0.410 bears/km2) based on standard closed population techniques. A Bayesian analysis of the model is fully implemented in the software program WinBUGS.

  16. Genome-wide estimation of firing efficiencies of origins of DNA replication from time-course copy number variation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jianhua

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA replication is a fundamental biological process during S phase of cell division. It is initiated from several hundreds of origins along whole chromosome with different firing efficiencies (or frequency of usage. Direct measurement of origin firing efficiency by techniques such as DNA combing are time-consuming and lack the ability to measure all origins. Recent genome-wide study of DNA replication approximated origin firing efficiency by indirectly measuring other quantities related to replication. However, these approximation methods do not reflect properties of origin firing and may lead to inappropriate estimations. Results In this paper, we develop a probabilistic model - Spanned Firing Time Model (SFTM to characterize DNA replication process. The proposed model reflects current understandings about DNA replication. Origins in an individual cell may initiate replication randomly within a time window, but the population average exhibits a temporal program with some origins replicated early and the others late. By estimating DNA origin firing time and fork moving velocity from genome-wide time-course S-phase copy number variation data, we could estimate firing efficiency of all origins. The estimated firing efficiency is correlated well with the previous studies in fission and budding yeasts. Conclusions The new probabilistic model enables sensitive identification of origins as well as genome-wide estimation of origin firing efficiency. We have successfully estimated firing efficiencies of all origins in S.cerevisiae, S.pombe and human chromosomes 21 and 22.

  17. Ploidy influences cellular responses to gross chromosomal rearrangements in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine Sophie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs such as aneuploidy are key factors in genome evolution as well as being common features of human cancer. Their role in tumour initiation and progression has not yet been completely elucidated and the effects of additional chromosomes in cancer cells are still unknown. Most previous studies in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for cancer cells have been carried out in the haploid context. To obtain new insights on the role of ploidy, the cellular effects of GCRs were compared between the haploid and diploid contexts. Results A total number of 21 haploid and diploid S. cerevisiae strains carrying various types of GCRs (aneuploidies, nonreciprocal translocations, segmental duplications and deletions were studied with a view to determining the effects of ploidy on the cellular responses. Differences in colony and cell morphology as well as in the growth rates were observed between mutant and parental strains. These results suggest that cells are impaired physiologically in both contexts. We also investigated the variation in genomic expression in all the mutants. We observed that gene expression was significantly altered. The data obtained here clearly show that genes involved in energy metabolism, especially in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, are up-regulated in all these mutants. However, the genes involved in the composition of the ribosome or in RNA processing are down-regulated in diploids but up-regulated in haploids. Over-expression of genes involved in the regulation of the proteasome was found to occur only in haploid mutants. Conclusion The present comparisons between the cellular responses of strains carrying GCRs in different ploidy contexts bring to light two main findings. First, GCRs induce a general stress response in all studied mutants, regardless of their ploidy. Secondly, the ploidy context plays a crucial role in maintaining the stoichiometric balance

  18. Effects of sampling conditions on DNA-based estimates of American black bear abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufenberg, Jared S.; Van Manen, Frank T.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based capture-mark-recapture techniques are commonly used to estimate American black bear (Ursus americanus) population abundance (N). Although the technique is well established, many questions remain regarding study design. In particular, relationships among N, capture probability of heterogeneity mixtures A and B (pA and pB, respectively, or p, collectively), the proportion of each mixture (π), number of capture occasions (k), and probability of obtaining reliable estimates of N are not fully understood. We investigated these relationships using 1) an empirical dataset of DNA samples for which true N was unknown and 2) simulated datasets with known properties that represented a broader array of sampling conditions. For the empirical data analysis, we used the full closed population with heterogeneity data type in Program MARK to estimate N for a black bear population in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee. We systematically reduced the number of those samples used in the analysis to evaluate the effect that changes in capture probabilities may have on parameter estimates. Model-averaged N for females and males were 161 (95% CI = 114–272) and 100 (95% CI = 74–167), respectively (pooled N = 261, 95% CI = 192–419), and the average weekly p was 0.09 for females and 0.12 for males. When we reduced the number of samples of the empirical data, support for heterogeneity models decreased. For the simulation analysis, we generated capture data with individual heterogeneity covering a range of sampling conditions commonly encountered in DNA-based capture-mark-recapture studies and examined the relationships between those conditions and accuracy (i.e., probability of obtaining an estimated N that is within 20% of true N), coverage (i.e., probability that 95% confidence interval includes true N), and precision (i.e., probability of obtaining a coefficient of variation ≤20%) of estimates using logistic regression. The capture probability

  19. Estimating haplotype frequencies by combining data from large DNA pools with database information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarra, Dario; Kulathinal, Sangita; Pirinen, Matti; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2011-01-01

    We assume that allele frequency data have been extracted from several large DNA pools, each containing genetic material of up to hundreds of sampled individuals. Our goal is to estimate the haplotype frequencies among the sampled individuals by combining the pooled allele frequency data with prior knowledge about the set of possible haplotypes. Such prior information can be obtained, for example, from a database such as HapMap. We present a Bayesian haplotyping method for pooled DNA based on a continuous approximation of the multinomial distribution. The proposed method is applicable when the sizes of the DNA pools and/or the number of considered loci exceed the limits of several earlier methods. In the example analyses, the proposed model clearly outperforms a deterministic greedy algorithm on real data from the HapMap database. With a small number of loci, the performance of the proposed method is similar to that of an EM-algorithm, which uses a multinormal approximation for the pooled allele frequencies, but which does not utilize prior information about the haplotypes. The method has been implemented using Matlab and the code is available upon request from the authors.

  20. The predictive value of the maximum likelihood estimator of the number of contributors to a DNA mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haned, H; Pène, L; Sauvage, F; Pontier, D

    2011-08-01

    We propose to quantify the accuracy of a likelihood-based estimator that was recently proposed for the determination of the number of contributors to a DNA mixture, when genetic data alone is considered [H. Haned, L. Pène, J.R. Lobry, A.B. Dufour, D. Pontier, Estimating the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures: does maximum likelihood perform better than maximum allele count? J. Forensic Sci., in press]. Using Bayes' theorem, we derive a formula for the calculation of the predictive value (PV) of the likelihood-based estimator. The PV gives the probability that a DNA stain contains the DNAs of i people given that the maximum likelihood estimator gave an estimate of i contributors for this stain. We illustrate the PV calculations for two different types of DNA evidence: traces and body fluids. The PV varied according to the number of contributors involved in the DNA stain. Setting the maximum number of possible contributors to five, the lowest predictive values were scored for five-person mixtures with a minimum value of 0.26 for traces, but values were always above 0.94 for stains comprising one, two or three contributors, for both traces and body fluids. Values remained relatively high for four-person mixtures with a minimum value of 0.69. These findings confirm that likelihood-maximization is a powerful approach for the determination of the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimation of a Killer Whale (Orcinus orca Population's Diet Using Sequencing Analysis of DNA from Feces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Ford

    Full Text Available Estimating diet composition is important for understanding interactions between predators and prey and thus illuminating ecosystem function. The diet of many species, however, is difficult to observe directly. Genetic analysis of fecal material collected in the field is therefore a useful tool for gaining insight into wild animal diets. In this study, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing to quantitatively estimate the diet composition of an endangered population of wild killer whales (Orcinus orca in their summer range in the Salish Sea. We combined 175 fecal samples collected between May and September from five years between 2006 and 2011 into 13 sample groups. Two known DNA composition control groups were also created. Each group was sequenced at a ~330bp segment of the 16s gene in the mitochondrial genome using an Illumina MiSeq sequencing system. After several quality controls steps, 4,987,107 individual sequences were aligned to a custom sequence database containing 19 potential fish prey species and the most likely species of each fecal-derived sequence was determined. Based on these alignments, salmonids made up >98.6% of the total sequences and thus of the inferred diet. Of the six salmonid species, Chinook salmon made up 79.5% of the sequences, followed by coho salmon (15%. Over all years, a clear pattern emerged with Chinook salmon dominating the estimated diet early in the summer, and coho salmon contributing an average of >40% of the diet in late summer. Sockeye salmon appeared to be occasionally important, at >18% in some sample groups. Non-salmonids were rarely observed. Our results are consistent with earlier results based on surface prey remains, and confirm the importance of Chinook salmon in this population's summer diet.

  2. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  3. Hydrodynamic characterization and molecular weight estimation of ultrasonically sheared DNA; Caracterizacion hidrodinamica y estimacion de pesos moleculares de DNA degradado por ultrasonidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casal, J. I.; Garces, F.; Garcia-Sacristan, A.

    1981-07-01

    The sedimentation coefficients and intrinsic viscosities of ultrasonically sheared calf thymus DNA have been determined. The molecular weight estimation according to this parameters have been compared with the ones obtained from the electrophoretic migration rates based on the calibration proposed using the known molecular weight restriction fragments of X-ENA. (Author) 35 refs.

  4. Reef-associated crustacean fauna: biodiversity estimates using semi-quantitative sampling and DNA barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, L.; Knowlton, N.; Paulay, G.; Meyer, C.

    2009-12-01

    The cryptofauna associated with coral reefs accounts for a major part of the biodiversity in these ecosystems but has been largely overlooked in biodiversity estimates because the organisms are hard to collect and identify. We combine a semi-quantitative sampling design and a DNA barcoding approach to provide metrics for the diversity of reef-associated crustacean. Twenty-two similar-sized dead heads of Pocillopora were sampled at 10 m depth from five central Pacific Ocean localities (four atolls in the Northern Line Islands and in Moorea, French Polynesia). All crustaceans were removed, and partial cytochrome oxidase subunit I was sequenced from 403 individuals, yielding 135 distinct taxa using a species-level criterion of 5% similarity. Most crustacean species were rare; 44% of the OTUs were represented by a single individual, and an additional 33% were represented by several specimens found only in one of the five localities. The Northern Line Islands and Moorea shared only 11 OTUs. Total numbers estimated by species richness statistics (Chao1 and ACE) suggest at least 90 species of crustaceans in Moorea and 150 in the Northern Line Islands for this habitat type. However, rarefaction curves for each region failed to approach an asymptote, and Chao1 and ACE estimators did not stabilize after sampling eight heads in Moorea, so even these diversity figures are underestimates. Nevertheless, even this modest sampling effort from a very limited habitat resulted in surprisingly high species numbers.

  5. Effects of 16S rDNA sampling on estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic trees can reveal the origins of endosymbiotic lineages of bacteria and detect patterns of co-evolution with their hosts. Although taxon sampling can greatly affect phylogenetic and co-evolutionary inference, most hypotheses of endosymbiont relationships are based on few available bacterial sequences. Here we examined how different sampling strategies of Gammaproteobacteria sequences affect estimates of the number of endosymbiont lineages in parasitic sucking lice (Insecta: Phthirapatera: Anoplura. We estimated the number of louse endosymbiont lineages using both newly obtained and previously sequenced 16S rDNA bacterial sequences and more than 42,000 16S rDNA sequences from other Gammaproteobacteria. We also performed parametric and nonparametric bootstrapping experiments to examine the effects of phylogenetic error and uncertainty on these estimates. Sampling of 16S rDNA sequences affects the estimates of endosymbiont diversity in sucking lice until we reach a threshold of genetic diversity, the size of which depends on the sampling strategy. Sampling by maximizing the diversity of 16S rDNA sequences is more efficient than randomly sampling available 16S rDNA sequences. Although simulation results validate estimates of multiple endosymbiont lineages in sucking lice, the bootstrap results suggest that the precise number of endosymbiont origins is still uncertain.

  6. Method of DNA Analysis Using the Estimation of the Algorithmic Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad GAVRILĂ

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The computational approach has a major impact in current biomolecular research. The computation of the algorithmic complexity (Kolmogorov is a recently introduced method of global analysis for DNA sequences. The complexity is not directly computable, but one can estimate it using the compressibility of the given sequence. Intuitively, the more compressible a sequence is, the less complex it is; a random sequence is virtually incompressible.We have developed a set of programs which work together with GenCompress (Chen, Kwong, Li – 2001.We have used them for analyzing a variety of sequences: complete viral genome, chloroplastic genome, eukaryotic genes and fragments of genes, etc.We have found that exons are virtually incompressible, as opposed to introns, which posess various compressibility ratios. This confirms the existence of long-range correlations within introns, but not in exons. The method can also be used for detecting low complexity sequences, as well as homogeneous domain-like regions. This new procedure has also enabled the construction of phylogenetic trees.As a conclusion, the study of the complexity of DNA sequences is a powerful tool in genome analysis.

  7. Estimation of correlations between copy-number variants in non-coding DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Allelic DNA aberrations across our genome have been associated with normal human genetic heterogeneity as well as with a number of diseases and disorders. When copy-number variations (CNVs) occur in gene-coding regions, known relationships between genes may help us understand correlations between CNVs. However, a large number of these aberrations occur in non-coding, extragenic regions and their correlations may be characterized only quantitatively, e.g., probabilistically, but not functionally. Using a signal processing approach to CNV detection, we identified distributed CNVs in short, non-coding regions across chromosomes and investigated their potential correlations. We estimated predominantly local correlations between CNVs within the same chromosome, and a small number of apparently random long-distance correlations.

  8. Effect of Different Human Papillomavirus Serological and DNA Criteria on Vaccine Efficacy Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gonzalez, Paula; Wacholder, Sholom; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sherman, Mark E.; Sidawy, Mary; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Schiller, John T.; Schiffman, Mark; Wacholder, Sholom; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sidawy, Mary; Self, Steve; Benavides, Adriana; Calzada, Luis Diego; Karron, Ruth; Nayar, Ritu; Roach, Nancy; Cain, Joanna; Davey, Diane; DeMets, David; Fuster, Francisco; Gershon, Ann; Holly, Elizabeth; Raventós, Henriette; Rida, Wasima; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Suthers, Kristen; Lara, Silvia; Thomas, Sarah; Alfaro, Mario; Barrantes, Manuel; Concepción Bratti, M.; Cárdenas, Fernando; Cortés, Bernal; Espinoza, Albert; Estrada, Yenory; González, Paula; Guillén, Diego; Herrero, Roland; Jiménez, Silvia E.; Morales, Jorge; Villegas, Luis; Morera, Lidia Ana; Pérez, Elmer; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Rivas, Libia; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; García-Piñeres, Alfanso; Silva, Sandra; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Macklin, Nora; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T.; Sherman, Mark; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Pinto, Ligia; Kemp, Troy; Eklund, Claire; Hutchinson, Martha; Sidawy, Mary; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Two trials of clinically approved human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease (FUTURE I/II) and the Papilloma Trial Against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA), reported a 22% difference in vaccine efficacy (VE) against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse in HPV-naïve subcohorts; however, serological testing methods and the HPV DNA criteria used to define HPV-unexposed women differed between the studies. We applied previously described methods to simulate these HPV-naïve subcohorts within the Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Trial and assessed how these criteria affect the estimation of VE. We applied 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) thresholds for HPV16 and HPV18 seropositivity (8 and 7 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for PATRICIA; 54 and 65 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for FUTURE I/II (to approximate the competitive Luminex immunoassay)) and 2 criteria for HPV DNA positivity (12 oncogenic HPV types, plus HPV66 and 68/73 for PATRICIA; or plus HPV6 and 11 for FUTURE I/II). VE was computed in the 2 naïve subcohorts. Using the FUTURE I/II and PATRICIA criteria, VE estimates against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse, regardless of HPV type, were 69.0% (95% confidence interval: 40.3%, 84.9%) and 80.8% (95% confidence interval: 52.6%, 93.5%), respectively (P = 0.1). Although the application of FUTURE I/II criteria to our cohort resulted in the inclusion of more sexually experienced women, methodological differences did not fully explain the VE differences. PMID:25139208

  9. Distribution and ecological consequences of ploidy variation in Artemisia sieberi in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Adel; Rabie, Mina; Azarnivand, Hossein; Hodgson, John G.; Arzani, Hossein; Jamzad, Ziba; Asri, Younes; Hamzehee, Behnam; Ghasemi, Farzaneh; Hesamzadeh Hejazi, S. M.; Abbas-Azimi, R.

    2013-11-01

    Because of their high proportion in the plant kingdom polyploid taxa are considered to have had evolutionary advantages over their diploid ancestors. These advantages may have included new characteristics that enable polyploids to occupy a broader range of habitats. In this context, we assess the ecological range of Artemisia sieberi, a canopy dominant within an important vegetation type in Iran. We assess the extent to which ploidy covaries with geographical and ecological distribution and look for ecologically-significant differences in the functional characteristics of diploids and polyploids. Populations of A. sieberi were sampled widely in Iran and soil characteristics, climate and anatomical and phytochemical plant attributes were measured. Also, in parallel, an independent genetic assessment of populations was carried out using genetic fingerprinting. Two ploidy levels were identified: 75% of the 34 populations of A. sieberi populations sampled were tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36) with the remainder diploid (2n = 2x = 18). Plants of differing ploidy also differed anatomically, genetically and chemically. Tetraploid populations had larger cells and lower stomatal densities and a different essential oil composition. They also appear ecologically distinct, occupying more fertile, mesic habitats than diploids. Genetic fingerprinting revealed the existence of two genetically differentiated subgroups independent of ploidy but with some geographic and ecological pattern. We conclude that diploids and tetraploids have a different ecological distribution and that the absence of mixed diploid-tetraploid populations is a reflection of differing fitness in different habitats. We suspect that a key ecological difference between diploids and tetraploids is the increased stomatal size of tetraploids, possibly resulting from the increased genome and hence cell size following polyploidisation. Polyploid-formation may be constrained in arid habitats by problems of water

  10. Geographic Variation in Festuca rubra L. Ploidy Levels and Systemic Fungal Endophyte Frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Dirihan

    Full Text Available Polyploidy and symbiotic Epichloë fungal endophytes are common and heritable characteristics that can facilitate environmental range expansion in grasses. Here we examined geographic patterns of polyploidy and the frequency of fungal endophyte colonized plants in 29 Festuca rubra L. populations from eight geographic sites across latitudes from Spain to northernmost Finland and Greenland. Ploidy seemed to be positively and negatively correlated with latitude and productivity, respectively. However, the correlations were nonlinear; 84% of the plants were hexaploids (2n = 6x = 42, and the positive correlation between ploidy level and latitude is the result of only four populations skewing the data. In the southernmost end of the gradient 86% of the plants were tetraploids (2n = 4x = 28, whereas in the northernmost end of the gradient one population had only octoploid plants (2n = 8x = 56. Endophytes were detected in 22 out of the 29 populations. Endophyte frequencies varied among geographic sites, and populations and habitats within geographic sites irrespective of ploidy, latitude or productivity. The highest overall endophyte frequencies were found in the southernmost end of the gradient, Spain, where 69% of plants harbored endophytes. In northern Finland, endophytes were detected in 30% of grasses but endophyte frequencies varied among populations from 0% to 75%, being higher in meadows compared to riverbanks. The endophytes were detected in 36%, 30% and 27% of the plants in Faroe Islands, Iceland and Switzerland, respectively. Practically all examined plants collected from southern Finland and Greenland were endophyte-free, whereas in other geographic sites endophyte frequencies were highly variable among populations. Common to all populations with high endophyte frequencies is heavy vertebrate grazing. We propose that the detected endophyte frequencies and ploidy levels mirror past distribution history of F. rubra after the last glaciation

  11. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bucharová

    Full Text Available Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  12. Gene flow among populations of two rare co-occurring fern species differing in ploidy level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharová, Anna; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Differences in ploidy levels among different fern species have a vast influence on their mating system, their colonization ability and on the gene flow among populations. Differences in the colonization abilities of species with different ploidy levels are well known: tetraploids, in contrast to diploids, are able to undergo intra-gametophytic selfing. Because fertilization is a post-dispersal process in ferns, selfing results in better colonization abilities in tetraploids because of single spore colonization. Considerably less is known about the gene flow among populations of different ploidy levels. The present study examines two rare fern species that differ in ploidy. While it has already been confirmed that tetraploid species are better at colonizing, the present study focuses on the gene flow among existing populations. We analyzed the genetic structure of a set of populations in a 10×10 km study region using isoenzymes. Genetic variation in tetraploid species is distributed mainly among populations; the genetic distance between populations is correlated with the geographical distance, and larger populations host more genetic diversity than smaller populations. In the diploid species, most variability is partitioned within populations; the genetic distance is not related to geographic distance, and the genetic diversity of populations is not related to the population size. This suggests that in tetraploid species, which undergo selfing, gene flow is limited. In contrast, in the diploid species, which experience outcrossing, gene flow is extensive and the whole system behaves as one large population. Our results suggest that in ferns, the ability to colonize new habitats and the gene flow among existing populations are affected by the mating system.

  13. Apparent ploidy effects on silencing are post-transcriptional at HML and telomeres in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M McLaughlan

    Full Text Available The repression of genes in regions of heterochromatin is known as transcriptional silencing. It occurs in a wide range of organisms and can have importance in adaptation to the environment, developmental changes and disease. The model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for many years to study transcriptional silencing, but until recently no study has been made in relation to ploidy. The aim of this work was to compare transcriptional silencing in haploids and diploids at both telomeres and the hidden mating-type (HM loci. Transcriptional silencing was assayed, by growth on 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA media or by flow cytometry, on strains where a telomere or HM locus was marked. RNA levels were measured by quantitative RT-PCR to confirm that effects were transcriptional. 5-FOA assays and flow cytometry were consistent with transcriptional silencing at telomeres and at HML being reduced as ploidy increases which agreed with conclusions in previous publications. However, QRT-PCR revealed that transcriptional silencing was unaffected by ploidy and thus protein levels were increasing independently of RNA levels. At telomere XI left (XI-L, changes in protein level were strongly influenced by mating-type, whereas at HML mating-type had much less influence. The post-transcriptional effects seen in this study, illustrate the often ignored need to measure RNA levels when assaying transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  14. A general ploidy model for the evolution of helping in viscous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Angela Yi-Chen; Gardner, Andy

    2012-07-07

    There is growing interest in understanding how kin selection drives the evolution of social behaviours in viscous populations. A key result, that has inspired much work on this topic, is the exact cancellation of the genetic relatedness and kin competition effects of dispersal in the simplest models of population viscosity, such that a reduction in the rate of dispersal neither promotes nor inhibits the evolution of helping behaviour. This theoretical result has been demonstrated for populations characterised by haploid, diploid and haplodiploid modes of inheritance. Here we develop a model of general ploidy that recovers these three scenarios as special cases and allows examination of scenarios that have not been considered previously. Specifically, we: clarify the importance of the implicit assumption of monandry in previous models; show that the cancellation result obtains in some models of ploidy but not in others; and reveal that the cancellation result obtains for different reasons in different models of ploidy. The cancellation result therefore hinges upon a population's genetic system as well as its demography.

  15. Diversity and endemism in deglaciated areas: ploidy, relative genome size and niche differentiation in the Galium pusillum complex (Rubiaceae) in Northern and Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolář, Filip; Lučanová, Magdalena; Vít, Petr; Urfus, Tomáš; Chrtek, Jindřich; Fér, Tomáš; Ehrendorfer, Friedrich; Suda, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants endemic to areas covered by ice sheets during the last glaciation represent paradigmatic examples of rapid speciation in changing environments, yet very few systems outside the harsh arctic zone have been comprehensively investigated so far. The Galium pusillum aggregate (Rubiaceae) is a challenging species complex that exhibits a marked differentiation in boreal parts of Northern Europe. As a first step towards understanding its evolutionary history in deglaciated regions, this study assesses cytological variation and ecological preferences of the northern endemics and compares the results with corresponding data for species occurring in neighbouring unglaciated parts of Central and Western Europe. Methods DNA flow cytometry was used together with confirmatory chromosome counts to determine ploidy levels and relative genome sizes in 1158 individuals from 181 populations. A formalized analysis of habitat preferences was applied to explore niche differentiation among species and ploidy levels. Key Results The G. pusillum complex evolved at diploid and tetraploid levels in Northern Europe, in contrast to the high-polyploid evolution of most other northern endemics. A high level of eco-geographic segregation was observed between different species (particularly along gradients of soil pH and competition) which is unusual for plants in deglaciated areas and most probably contributes to maintaining species integrity. Relative monoploid DNA contents of the species from previously glaciated regions were significantly lower than those of their counterparts from mostly unglaciated Central Europe, suggesting independent evolutionary histories. Conclusions The aggregate of G. pusillum in Northern Europe represents an exceptional case with a geographically vicariant and ecologically distinct diploid/tetraploid species endemic to formerly glaciated areas. The high level of interspecific differentiation substantially widens our perception of the

  16. Training a model for estimating leukocyte composition using whole-blood DNA methylation and cell counts as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Jonathan A; Breitling, Lutz P; Lehne, Benjamin; Kooner, Jaspal S; Chambers, John C; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    Whole-blood DNA methylation depends on the underlying leukocyte composition and confounding hereby is a major concern in epigenome-wide association studies. Cell counts are often missing or may not be feasible. Computational approaches estimate leukocyte composition from DNA methylation based on reference datasets of purified leukocytes. We explored the possibility to train such a model on whole-blood DNA methylation and cell counts without the need for purification. Using whole-blood DNA methylation and corresponding five-part cell counts from 2445 participants from the London Life Sciences Prospective Population Study, a model was trained on a subset of 175 subjects and evaluated on the remaining. Correlations between cell counts and estimated cell proportions were high (neutrophils 0.85, eosinophils 0.88, basophils 0.02, lymphocytes 0.84, monocytes 0.55) and estimated proportions explained more variance in whole-blood DNA methylation levels than counts. Our model provided precise estimates for the common cell types.

  17. New method for estimating clustering of DNA lesions induced by physical/chemical mutagens using fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Ken; Shikazono, Naoya; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We have developed a new method for estimating the localization of DNA damage such as apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (APs) on DNA using fluorescence anisotropy. This method is aimed at characterizing clustered DNA damage produced by DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. A fluorescent probe with an aminooxy group (AlexaFluor488) was used to label APs. We prepared a pUC19 plasmid with APs by heating under acidic conditions as a model for damaged DNA, and subsequently labeled the APs. We found that the observed fluorescence anisotropy (r obs ) decreases as averaged AP density (λ AP : number of APs per base pair) increases due to homo-FRET, and that the APs were randomly distributed. We applied this method to three DNA-damaging agents, 60 Co γ-rays, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and neocarzinostatin (NCS). We found that r obs -λ AP relationships differed significantly between MMS and NCS. At low AP density (λ AP  < 0.001), the APs induced by MMS seemed to not be closely distributed, whereas those induced by NCS were remarkably clustered. In contrast, the AP clustering induced by 60 Co γ-rays was similar to, but potentially more likely to occur than, random distribution. This simple method can be used to estimate mutagenicity of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Hereditary deafness in Kirov oblast: estimation of the incidence rate and DNA diagnosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Osetrova, A A; Sharonova, E I

    2012-04-01

    Genetic analysis of hereditary deafness (HD) has been performed in the city of Kirov and ten rural districts of Kirov oblast (administrative region). The analysis employed the methods used in audiology, medical genetic counseling, and DNA diagnosis. Deafness has been established to be hereditary in 143 children from 100 unrelated families. The incidence rates of isolated and syndromic HDs in the period studied (1995-2001) have been estimated at 1.25 and 0.36 per 1000 newborns, respectively, the total incidence rate of all HD forms being 1.61 per 1000 newborns (1 case per 621 newborns). DNA analysis for the detection of seven frequent mutations in the genes GJB2 (the 35delG, 167delT, 235delC, and M34T mutations), GJB6 (the del(GJB6-D13S1854) and del(GJB6-D13S1830) mutations), and TMC1 (the R34X mutation) has been performed in families with isolated neurosensory deafness. Molecular genetic analysis has detected mutations in 51 children (48.6%); in 54 children (51.4%), no mutations have been found. The following genotypes have been identified in children with HD: 35delG/35delG in 32 probands (30.5%), 35delG/+ in 16 probands (15.2%), 35delG/235delC in 1 proband (0.95%), M34T/+ in 1 proband (0.95%), and M34T/35delG in 1 proband (0.95%). The 167delT mutation has not been found. The frequency of the 35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene has been estimated to be 39.05%. In the group with a family history of HD, mutations have been found in 66.7% of patients; in the group without a family history of HD, in 37.5% of patients. No mutation has been found in the GJB6 or TMC1 gene. Molecular genetic analysis has been performed in a family with clinically diagnosed Treacher Collins-Franceschetti syndrome. Sequencing has been used to find the 748-69C>T polymorphism in intron 6 (in the homozygous state) and the 3635C>G mutation in exon 23 leading to the substitution of glycine for alanine at position 1176 of the amino acid sequence (Ala1176Gly, in the heterozygous state), which have not

  19. Prognostic value of DNA image cytometry in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, A; Urdiales, G; Martínez-Nistal, A; Riera, J; Hardisson, D

    1996-06-01

    To investigate the diagnostic sensitivity and prognosis predicting of DNA image cytometry in colorectal carcinoma. We studied the ploidy status and other DNA cytometric parameters in 68 patients with colorectal carcinoma. In addition, clinical-histologic and follow-up information was collected for at least five years. DNA histograms were available in all cases, showing a diploid DNA distribution pattern in 6 (8.8%), tetraploid in 21 (30.9%), hyperdiploid in 20 (29.4%) and hypertetraploid in 21 (30.9%). The differences in the correlation study between cytometric parameters and pathologic features were not statistically significant. Ploidy status and DNA malignancy grade were individually related to five-year survival (P < .005 and P < .05). The data show that DNA image cytometry can provide valuable prognostic information on colorectal carcinomas and may prove useful in guiding adjuvant therapy in these patients.

  20. Effects of ploidy level and haplotype on variation of photosynthetic traits: Novel evidence from two Fragaria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Gao

    Full Text Available To reveal the effects of ploidy level and haplotype on photosynthetic traits, we chose 175 genotypes of wild strawberries belonging to two haplotypes at two types of ploidy levels (diploidy and tetraploidy and measured photosynthetic traits. Our results revealed that ploidy significantly affected the characteristics of light-response curves, CO2-response curves, and leaf gas exchange parameters, except intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci. Tetraploid species had a lower light saturation point (LSP and CO2 saturation point (CSP, higher light compensation point (LCP, dark respiration (Rd, and CO2 compensation point (CCP than diploid species. Furthermore, tetraploid species have lower photosynthetic capacity than diploid species, including net photosynthetic rate (Pn, stomatal conductivity (Gs, and transpiration rate (Tr. In addition, haplotype had a significant effect on LSP, CSP, Tr, and Ci as well as a significant interactive effect between ploidy and haplotype on the maximal photosynethic rate of the light-response curve and Rd. Most of the variance existed within haplotypes among individuals. These results suggest that polyploidization was the main driver for the evolution of photosynthesis with increasing ploidy level (i.e. from diploidy to tetraploidy in Fragaria species, while the origin of a chromosome could also affect the photosynthetic traits and the polyploidization effect on photosynthetic traits.

  1. Estimating the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures: does maximum likelihood perform better than maximum allele count?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haned, Hinda; Pène, Laurent; Lobry, Jean R; Dufour, Anne B; Pontier, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Determining the number of contributors to a forensic DNA mixture using maximum allele count is a common practice in many forensic laboratories. In this paper, we compare this method to a maximum likelihood estimator, previously proposed by Egeland et al., that we extend to the cases of multiallelic loci and population subdivision. We compared both methods' efficiency for identifying mixtures of two to five individuals in the case of uncertainty about the population allele frequencies and partial profiles. The proportion of correctly resolved mixtures was >90% for both estimators for two- and three-person mixtures, while likelihood maximization yielded success rates 2- to 15-fold higher for four- and five-person mixtures. Comparable results were obtained in the cases of uncertain allele frequencies and partial profiles. Our results support the use of the maximum likelihood estimator to report the number of contributors when dealing with complex DNA mixtures. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. PACE: Probabilistic Assessment for Contributor Estimation- A machine learning-based assessment of the number of contributors in DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Michael A; Adelman, Jonathan D

    2017-03-01

    The deconvolution of DNA mixtures remains one of the most critical challenges in the field of forensic DNA analysis. In addition, of all the data features required to perform such deconvolution, the number of contributors in the sample is widely considered the most important, and, if incorrectly chosen, the most likely to negatively influence the mixture interpretation of a DNA profile. Unfortunately, most current approaches to mixture deconvolution require the assumption that the number of contributors is known by the analyst, an assumption that can prove to be especially faulty when faced with increasingly complex mixtures of 3 or more contributors. In this study, we propose a probabilistic approach for estimating the number of contributors in a DNA mixture that leverages the strengths of machine learning. To assess this approach, we compare classification performances of six machine learning algorithms and evaluate the model from the top-performing algorithm against the current state of the art in the field of contributor number classification. Overall results show over 98% accuracy in identifying the number of contributors in a DNA mixture of up to 4 contributors. Comparative results showed 3-person mixtures had a classification accuracy improvement of over 6% compared to the current best-in-field methodology, and that 4-person mixtures had a classification accuracy improvement of over 20%. The Probabilistic Assessment for Contributor Estimation (PACE) also accomplishes classification of mixtures of up to 4 contributors in less than 1s using a standard laptop or desktop computer. Considering the high classification accuracy rates, as well as the significant time commitment required by the current state of the art model versus seconds required by a machine learning-derived model, the approach described herein provides a promising means of estimating the number of contributors and, subsequently, will lead to improved DNA mixture interpretation. Copyright © 2016

  3. Detecting and Estimating Contamination of Human DNA Samples in Sequencing and Array-Based Genotype Data

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Goo; Flickinger, Matthew; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Romm, Jane M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Kang, Hyun Min

    2012-01-01

    DNA sample contamination is a serious problem in DNA sequencing studies and may result in systematic genotype misclassification and false positive associations. Although methods exist to detect and filter out cross-species contamination, few methods to detect within-species sample contamination are available. In this paper, we describe methods to identify within-species DNA sample contamination based on (1) a combination of sequencing reads and array-based genotype data, (2) sequence reads al...

  4. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K.L.; Betancourt, J.L.; Riddle, B.R.; Van Devender, T. R.; Cole, K.L.; Geoffrey, Spaulding W.

    2000-01-01

    1 A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26-10 14C kyr BP or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ???4.0 14C kyr BP. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr BP. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr BP in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (???37??N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr BP. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture. ?? 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  5. Estimating the Growth Rate of a Bacterial Species in a Complex Mixture by Hybridization of Genomic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard

    1998-09-01

    > Abstract Advances in molecular techniques have enabled new approaches to identifying bacteria. However, once identified, there is no quantitative information on the in situ growth rate of the species, mainly because the technology has not been available. The quantitative incorporation of [methyl-3H]thymidine into dividing bacteria is coupled with a molecular (hybridization) method, to determine the growth rate of bacterial species in situ. The basis of this molecular method is a reverse gene probe-natural populations are labeled in situ with [methyl-3H]thymidine. The probe (3H-Tdr-DNA) is captured, using a hybridization procedure, on a positively charged nylon membrane on which is attached non-labeled target DNA. Two bacterial species, Bacillus cereus and Zoogloea ramigera, were used to demonstrate the principle in laboratory cultures and in a municipal activate sludge treatment process. The DNA of the dividing bacteria in activated sludge was radioactively labeled with [methyl-3H]thymidine, and the DNA of Z. ramigera was recovered using a DNA hybridization method. The recovered radioactively-labeled DNA was used to estimate the growth rate (0.03 x 10(9) cells . ml-1 . h-1) of Z. ramigera in situ. Simultaneously applying these two powerful molecular-based methods could potentially be used to study bacterial population dynamics in situ.

  6. In search of coding and non-coding regions of DNA sequences based on balanced estimation of diffusion entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Wenqing; Yang, Huijie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of coding regions in DNA sequences remains challenging. Various methods have been proposed, but these are limited by species-dependence and the need for adequate training sets. The elements in DNA coding regions are known to be distributed in a quasi-random way, while those in non-coding regions have typical similar structures. For short sequences, these statistical characteristics cannot be extracted correctly and cannot even be detected. This paper introduces a new way to solve the problem: balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE).

  7. Telomerecat: A ploidy-agnostic method for estimating telomere length from whole genome sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farmery, James H. R.; Smith, Mike L.; Lynch, Andy G.; Huissoon, Aarnoud; Furnell, Abigail; Mead, Adam; Levine, Adam P.; Manzur, Adnan; Thrasher, Adrian; Greenhalgh, Alan; Parker, Alasdair; Sanchis-Juan, Alba; Richter, Alex; Gardham, Alice; Lawrie, Allan; Sohal, Aman; Creaser-Myers, Amanda; Frary, Amy; Greinacher, Andreas; Themistocleous, Andreas; Peacock, Andrew J.; Marshall, Andrew; Mumford, Andrew; Rice, Andrew; Webster, Andrew; Brady, Angie; Koziell, Ania; Manson, Ania; Chandra, Anita; Hensiek, Anke; Veld, Anna Huis In't; Maw, Anna; Kelly, Anne M.; Moore, Anthony; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Attwood, Antony; Herwadkar, Archana; Ghofrani, Ardi; Houweling, Arjan C.; Girerd, Barbara; Furie, Bruce; Treacy, Carmen M.; Millar, Carolyn M.; Sewell, Carrock; Roughley, Catherine; Titterton, Catherine; Williamson, Catherine; Hadinnapola, Charaka; Deshpande, Charu; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Bacchelli, Chiara; Patch, Chris; Geet, Chris Van; Babbs, Christian; Bryson, Christine; Penkett, Christopher J.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Watt, Christopher; Bethune, Claire; Booth, Claire; Lentaigne, Claire; McJannet, Coleen; Church, Colin; French, Courtney; Samarghitean, Crina; Halmagyi, Csaba; Gale, Daniel; Greene, Daniel; Hart, Daniel; Allsup, David; Bennett, David; Edgar, David; Kiely, David G.; Gosal, David; Perry, David J.; Keeling, David; Montani, David; Shipley, Debbie; Whitehorn, Deborah; Fletcher, Debra; Krishnakumar, Deepa; Grozeva, Detelina; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Thompson, Dorothy; Josifova, Dragana; Maher, Eamonn; Wong, Edwin K. S.; Murphy, Elaine; Dewhurst, Eleanor; Louka, Eleni; Rosser, Elisabeth; Chalmers, Elizabeth; Colby, Elizabeth; Drewe, Elizabeth; McDermott, Elizabeth; Thomas, Ellen; Staples, Emily; Clement, Emma; Matthews, Emma; Wakeling, Emma; Oksenhendler, Eric; Turro, Ernest; Reid, Evan; Wassmer, Evangeline; Raymond, F. Lucy; Hu, Fengyuan; Kennedy, Fiona; Soubrier, Florent; Flinter, Frances; Kovacs, Gabor; Polwarth, Gary; Ambegaonkar, Gautum; Arno, Gavin; Hudson, Gavin; Woods, Geoff; Coghlan, Gerry; Hayman, Grant; Arumugakani, Gururaj; Schotte, Gwen; Cook, H. Terry; Alachkar, Hana; Lango Allen, Hana; Lango-Allen, Hana; Stark, Hannah; Stauss, Hans; Schulze, Harald; Boggard, Harm J.; Baxendale, Helen; Dolling, Helen; Firth, Helen; Gall, Henning; Watson, Henry; Longhurst, Hilary; Markus, Hugh S.; Watkins, Hugh; Simeoni, Ilenia; Emmerson, Ingrid; Roberts, Irene; Quinti, Isabella; Wanjiku, Ivy; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Thaventhiran, James; Whitworth, James; Hurst, Jane; Collins, Janine; Suntharalingam, Jay; Payne, Jeanette; Thachil, Jecko; Martin, Jennifer M.; Martin, Jennifer; Carmichael, Jenny; Maimaris, Jesmeen; Paterson, Joan; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Gebhart, Johanna; Davis, John; Pasi, John; Bradley, John R.; Wharton, John; Stephens, Jonathan; Rankin, Julia; Anderson, Julie; Vogt, Julie; von Ziegenweldt, Julie; Rehnstrom, Karola; Megy, Karyn; Talks, Kate; Peerlinck, Kathelijne; Yates, Katherine; Freson, Kathleen; Stirrups, Kathleen; Gomez, Keith; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Carss, Keren; Rue-Albrecht, Kevin; Gilmour, Kimberley; Masati, Larahmie; Scelsi, Laura; Southgate, Laura; Ranganathan, Lavanya; Ginsberg, Lionel; Devlin, Lisa; Willcocks, Lisa; Ormondroyd, Liz; Lorenzo, Lorena; Harper, Lorraine; Allen, Louise; Daugherty, Louise; Chitre, Manali; Kurian, Manju; Humbert, Marc; Tischkowitz, Marc; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Erwood, Marie; Scully, Marie; Veltman, Marijke; Caulfield, Mark; Layton, Mark; McCarthy, Mark; Ponsford, Mark; Toshner, Mark; Bleda, Marta; Wilkins, Martin; Mathias, Mary; Reilly, Mary; Afzal, Maryam; Brown, Matthew; Rondina, Matthew; Stubbs, Matthew; Haimel, Matthias; Lees, Melissa; Laffan, Michael A.; Browning, Michael; Gattens, Michael; Richards, Michael; Michaelides, Michel; Lambert, Michele P.; Makris, Mike; de Vries, Minka; Mahdi-Rogers, Mohamed; Saleem, Moin; Thomas, Moira; Holder, Muriel; Eyries, Mélanie; Clements-Brod, Naomi; Canham, Natalie; Dormand, Natalie; Zuydam, Natalie Van; Kingston, Nathalie; Ghali, Neeti; Cooper, Nichola; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Yeatman, Nigel; Roy, Noémi; Shamardina, Olga; Alavijeh, Omid S.; Gresele, Paolo; Nurden, Paquita; Chinnery, Patrick; Deegan, Patrick; Yong, Patrick; Man, Patrick Yu Wai; Corris, Paul A.; Calleja, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Bolton-Maggs, Paula; Rayner-Matthews, Paula; Ghataorhe, Pavandeep K.; Gordins, Pavel; Stein, Penelope; Collins, Peter; Dixon, Peter; Kelleher, Peter; Ancliff, Phil; Yu, Ping; Tait, R. Campbell; Linger, Rachel; Doffinger, Rainer; Machado, Rajiv; Kazmi, Rashid; Sargur, Ravishankar; Favier, Remi; Tan, Rhea; Liesner, Ri; Antrobus, Richard; Sandford, Richard; Scott, Richard; Trembath, Richard; Horvath, Rita; Hadden, Rob; MackenzieRoss, Rob V.; Henderson, Robert; MacLaren, Robert; James, Roger; Ghurye, Rohit; DaCosta, Rosa; Hague, Rosie; Mapeta, Rutendo; Armstrong, Ruth; Noorani, Sadia; Murng, Sai; Santra, Saikat; Tuna, Salih; Johnson, Sally; Chong, Sam; Lear, Sara; Walker, Sara; Goddard, Sarah; Mangles, Sarah; Westbury, Sarah; Mehta, Sarju; Hackett, Scott; Nejentsev, Sergey; Moledina, Shahin; Bibi, Shahnaz; Meehan, Sharon; Othman, Shokri; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Holden, Simon; McGowan, Simon; Staines, Simon; Savic, Sinisa; Burns, Siobhan; Grigoriadou, Sofia; Papadia, Sofia; Ashford, Sofie; Schulman, Sol; Ali, Sonia; Park, Soo-Mi; Davies, Sophie; Stock, Sophie; Ali, Souad; Deevi, Sri V. V.; Gräf, Stefan; Ghio, Stefano; Wort, Stephen J.; Jolles, Stephen; Austin, Steve; Welch, Steve; Meacham, Stuart; Rankin, Stuart; Walker, Suellen; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Holder, Susan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Richardson, Sylvia; Kuijpers, Taco; Bariana, Tadbir K.; Bakchoul, Tamam; Everington, Tamara; Renton, Tara; Young, Tim; Aitman, Timothy; Warner, Timothy Q.; Vale, Tom; Hammerton, Tracey; Pollock, Val; Matser, Vera; Cookson, Victoria; Clowes, Virginia; Qasim, Waseem; Wei, Wei; Erber, Wendy N.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Astle, William; Egner, William; Turek, Wojciech; Henskens, Yvonne; Tan, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    Telomere length is a risk factor in disease and the dynamics of telomere length are crucial to our understanding of cell replication and vitality. The proliferation of whole genome sequencing represents an unprecedented opportunity to glean new insights into telomere biology on a previously

  8. Ploidy mosaicism and allele-specific gene expression differences in the allopolyploid Squalius alburnoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matos Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squalius alburnoides is an Iberian cyprinid fish resulting from an interspecific hybridisation between Squalius pyrenaicus females (P genome and males of an unknown Anaecypris hispanica-like species (A genome. S. alburnoides is an allopolyploid hybridogenetic complex, which makes it a likely candidate for ploidy mosaicism occurrence, and is also an interesting model to address questions about gene expression regulation and genomic interactions. Indeed, it was previously suggested that in S. alburnoides triploids (PAA composition silencing of one of the three alleles (mainly of the P allele occurs. However, not a whole haplome is inactivated but a more or less random inactivation of alleles varying between individuals and even between organs of the same fish was seen. In this work we intended to correlate expression differences between individuals and/or between organs to the occurrence of mosaicism, evaluating if mosaics could explain previous observations and its impact on the assessment of gene expression patterns. Results To achieve our goal, we developed flow cytometry and cell sorting protocols for this system generating more homogenous cellular and transcriptional samples. With this set-up we detected 10% ploidy mosaicism within the S. alburnoides complex, and determined the allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of mosaic and non-mosaic individuals coming from different rivers over a wide geographic range. Conclusions Ploidy mosaicism occurs sporadically within the S. alburnoides complex, but in a frequency significantly higher than reported for other organisms. Moreover, we could exclude the influence of this phenomenon on the detection of variable allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of triploid individuals. Finally, we determined that the expression patterns

  9. Hyoscyamine biosynthesis in Datura stramonium hairy root in vitro systems with different ploidy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A; Berkov, S; Weber, J; Bley, Th

    2009-05-01

    Hyoscyamine biosynthesis in Datura stramonium hairy roots with different ploidy levels was investigated. For the first time, we report that hairy roots undergo endoreduplication and therefore consist mainly of cells with doupled sets of chromosomes of primary plant tissues, used for Agrobacterium transformation. The alkaloid profiles of hairy roots obtained from diploid and tetraploid plants were similar in terms of the major compounds, but they differed significantly with respect to the minor compounds (here defined as those that accounted for stramonium hairy root cultures are also presented.

  10. Determination of ploidy level and isolation of genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase in Japanese Foxtail (Alopecurus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongle Xu

    Full Text Available Ploidy level is important in biodiversity studies and in developing strategies for isolating important plant genes. Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but our understanding of these polyploid weeds is limited. Japanese foxtail, a noxious agricultural grass weed, has evolved herbicide resistance. However, most studies on this weed have ignored the fact that there are multiple copies of target genes. This may complicate the study of resistance mechanisms. Japanese foxtail was found to be a tetraploid by flow cytometer and chromosome counting, two commonly used methods in the determination of ploidy levels. We found that there are two copies of the gene encoding plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase in Japanese foxtail and all the homologous genes are expressed. Additionally, no difference in ploidy levels or ACCase gene copy numbers was observed between an ACCase-inhibiting herbicide-resistant and a herbicide-sensitive population in this study.

  11. A Flow Cytometry Protocol to Estimate DNA Content in the Yellowtail Tetra Astyanax altiparanae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Pedro L P; Senhorini, José A; Pereira-Santos, Matheus; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Shimoda, Eduardo; Silva, Luciano A; Dos Santos, Silvio A; Yasui, George S

    2017-01-01

    The production of triploid yellowtail tetra Astyanax altiparanae is a key factor to obtain permanently sterile individuals by chromosome set manipulation. Flow cytometric analysis is the main tool for confirmation of the resultant triploids individuals, but very few protocols are specific for A. altiparanae species. The current study has developed a protocol to estimate DNA content in this species. Furthermore, a protocol for long-term storage of dorsal fins used for flow cytometry analysis was established. The combination of five solutions with three detergents (Nonidet P-40 Substitute, Tween 20, and Triton X-100) at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% concentration was evaluated. Using the best solution from this first experiment, the addition of trypsin (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5%) and sucrose (74 mM) and the effects of increased concentrations of the detergents at 0.6 and 1.2% concentration were also evaluated. After adjustment of the protocol for flow cytometry, preservation of somatic tissue or isolated nuclei was also evaluated by freezing (at -20°C) and fixation in saturated NaCl solution, acetic methanol (1:3), ethanol, and formalin at 10% for 30 or 60 days of storage at 25°C. Flow cytometry analysis in yellowtail tetra species was optimized using the following conditions: lysis solution: 9.53 mM MgCl2.7H20; 47.67 mM KCl; 15 mM Tris; 74 mM sucrose, 0.6% Triton X-100, pH 8.0; staining solution: Dulbecco's PBS with DAPI 1 μg mL(-1); preservation procedure: somatic cells (dorsal fin samples) frozen at -20°C. Using this protocol, samples may be stored up to 60 days with good accuracy for flow cytometry analysis.

  12. Better estimation of protein-DNA interaction parameters improve prediction of functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Flanagan Ruadhan A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterizing transcription factor binding motifs is a common bioinformatics task. For transcription factors with variable binding sites, we need to get many suboptimal binding sites in our training dataset to get accurate estimates of free energy penalties for deviating from the consensus DNA sequence. One procedure to do that involves a modified SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment method designed to produce many such sequences. Results We analyzed low stringency SELEX data for E. coli Catabolic Activator Protein (CAP, and we show here that appropriate quantitative analysis improves our ability to predict in vitro affinity. To obtain large number of sequences required for this analysis we used a SELEX SAGE protocol developed by Roulet et al. The sequences obtained from here were subjected to bioinformatic analysis. The resulting bioinformatic model characterizes the sequence specificity of the protein more accurately than those sequence specificities predicted from previous analysis just by using a few known binding sites available in the literature. The consequences of this increase in accuracy for prediction of in vivo binding sites (and especially functional ones in the E. coli genome are also discussed. We measured the dissociation constants of several putative CAP binding sites by EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay and compared the affinities to the bioinformatics scores provided by methods like the weight matrix method and QPMEME (Quadratic Programming Method of Energy Matrix Estimation trained on known binding sites as well as on the new sites from SELEX SAGE data. We also checked predicted genome sites for conservation in the related species S. typhimurium. We found that bioinformatics scores based on SELEX SAGE data does better in terms of prediction of physical binding energies as well as in detecting functional sites. Conclusion We think that training binding site detection

  13. Estimation of serum concentration of parvovirus B19 DNA by PCR in patients with chronic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornsleth, A.; Carlsen, K. M.; Christensen, Laurids Siig

    1994-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in serum samples from 10 out of 42 patients with chronic anaemia, the majority of whom suffered from aplastic anaemia, haemolytic anaemia, pure red cell anaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Nested PCR methods with sensitivities of 0.005-0.05 fg DNA were developed. ...

  14. Accurate Estimation of the Standard Binding Free Energy of Netropsin with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is the target of chemical compounds (drugs, pollutants, photosensitizers, etc., which bind through non-covalent interactions. Depending on their structure and their chemical properties, DNA binders can associate to the minor or to the major groove of double-stranded DNA. They can also intercalate between two adjacent base pairs, or even replace one or two base pairs within the DNA double helix. The subsequent biological effects are strongly dependent on the architecture of the binding motif. Discriminating between the different binding patterns is of paramount importance to predict and rationalize the effect of a given compound on DNA. The structural characterization of DNA complexes remains, however, cumbersome at the experimental level. In this contribution, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the standard binding free energy of DNA with netropsin, a well-characterized antiviral and antimicrobial drug, which associates to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. To overcome the sampling limitations of classical molecular dynamics simulations, which cannot capture the large change in configurational entropy that accompanies binding, we resort to a series of potentials of mean force calculations involving a set of geometrical restraints acting on collective variables.

  15. Genetic Variance in Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation in Wheat Materials Differing in Ploidy and Genome at Seedling Stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ci, D; Jiang, D; Wollenweber, B

    2010-01-01

    translocation (ratio of SCA to total Cd accumulation in plants) of the wheat varieties differing in ploidies generally decreased from octoploid to diploid, except for material containing the CCUU genome. It was found that Cd tolerance of these 24 wheat varieties varied with different ploidy and genomes...... and cluster analysis, Triticum boeoticum Boiss was found to be the most Cd-tolerant variety exhibiting low Cd translocation rates, whereas T. aestivum cv. Huixianhong and Jinghui 1 were identified as the most Cd-sensitive varieties showing also higher Cd translocation rates....

  16. Microarray-based estimation of SNP allele-frequency in pooled DNA using the Langmuir kinetic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Bang-Ce

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for genome-wide association requires technologies for generating millions of genotypes with relative ease but also at a reasonable cost and with high accuracy. In this work, we have developed a theoretical approach to estimate allele frequency in pooled DNA samples, based on the physical principles of DNA immobilization and hybridization on solid surface using the Langmuir kinetic model and quantitative analysis of the allelic signals. Results This method can successfully distinguish allele frequencies differing by 0.01 in the actual pool of clinical samples, and detect alleles with a frequency as low as 2%. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and actual frequencies having an r2 = 0.9992. These results demonstrated that this method could allow the accurate estimation of absolute allele frequencies in pooled samples of DNA in a feasible and inexpensive way. Conclusion We conclude that this novel strategy for quantitative analysis of the ratio of SNP allelic sequences in DNA pools is an inexpensive and feasible alternative for detecting polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans.

  17. Identification of cardiomyocyte nuclei and assessment of ploidy for the analysis of cell turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Alkass, Kanar; Druid, Henrik [Department of Forensic Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Bernard, Samuel [CNRS UMR5208, Institut Camille Jordan, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France); Frisen, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.frisen@ki.se [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-01-15

    Assays to quantify myocardial renewal rely on the accurate identification of cardiomyocyte nuclei. We previously {sup 14}C birth dated human cardiomyocytes based on the nuclear localization of cTroponins T and I. A recent report by Kajstura et al. suggested that cTroponin I is only localized to the nucleus in a senescent subpopulation of cardiomyocytes, implying that {sup 14}C birth dating of cTroponin T and I positive cell populations underestimates cardiomyocyte renewal in humans. We show here that the isolation of cell nuclei from the heart by flow cytometry with antibodies against cardiac Troponins T and I, as well as pericentriolar material 1 (PCM-1), allows for isolation of close to all cardiomyocyte nuclei, based on ploidy and marker expression. We also present a reassessment of cardiomyocyte ploidy, which has important implications for the analysis of cell turnover, and iododeoxyuridine (IdU) incorporation data. These data provide the foundation for reliable analysis of cardiomyocyte turnover in humans.

  18. Ploidy Variation in Hybrids from Interploid 3x X 2x Crosses in Musa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osuji, JO.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids were obtained after in vitro germination of embryos from interploid crosses between triploid 'French' plantain cultivars (Musa spp. AAB group 'Ntanga 2' and 'Bobby Tannap' with diploid banana (Ivlusa acuminata subsp. burmannicoidesj 'Calcutta 4'. Cross-pollinated bunches were harvested at full maturity and ripened with acetylene in a room for 4 days. Seeds were extracted from peeled ripe fruits by squashing. Embryos from the seeds were excised aseptically after 2 days and germinated in vitro. Seedlings were subsequently planted in early evaluation trials after acclimatising in the greenhouse. Chromosome counts were carried out on root tips of mature and maiden suckers to determine ploidy levels using a modified squashing technique. Counts showed that two of the hybrids were aneuploids (trisomies with somatic chromosome number of 2n = 2x + 1 = 23, one hybrid was diploid while the other two were tetraploids. Tetraploids are the most promising hybrids for the genetic improvement of plantains. Diploids are valuable material for further improvement of the plantain genome at this ploidy level. Trisomies provide means for further characterisation of the Musa genome and physical gene mapping in plantain and banana.

  19. Estimates of DNA damage by the comet assay in the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus johnstonei (Anura, Eleutherodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Carolina Valencia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use the Comet assay to assess genetic damage in the direct-developing frog Eleutherodactylus johnstonei. A DNA diffusion assay was used to evaluate the effectiveness of alkaline, enzymatic and alkaline/enzymatic treatments for lysing E. johnstonei blood cells and to determine the amount of DNA strand breakage associated with apoptosis and necrosis. Cell sensitivity to the mutagens bleomycin (BLM and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO was also assessed using the Comet assay, as was the assay reproducibility. Alkaline treatment did not lyse the cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes of E. johnstonei blood cells, whereas enzymatic digestion with proteinase K (40 !g/mL yielded naked nuclei. The contribution of apoptosis and necrosis (assessed by the DNA diffusion assay to DNA damage was estimated to range from 0% to 8%. BLM and 4NQO induced DNA damage in E. johnstonei blood cells at different concentrations and exposure times. Dose-effect curves with both mutagens were highly reproducible and showed consistently low coefficients of variation (CV < 10%. The results are discussed with regard to the potential use of the modified Comet assay for assessing the exposure of E. johnstonei to herbicides in ecotoxicological studies.

  20. Studi Tingkat Ploidi pada Lili (Lilium sp. Hasil Kultur Antera Melalui Penghitungan Jumlah Kloroplas dan Kromosom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Pramanik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lili (Lilium sp. termasuk famili Liliaceae, merupakan tanaman hias yang memiliki nilai ekonomi tinggi karena permintaan konsumen terus meningkat. Permintaan varietas tanaman yang seragam menuntut pengembangan hibrida F1. Perakitan tanaman hibrida dapat dihasilkan melalui pembentukan tanaman haploid. Salah satu metode untuk memproduksi tanaman haploid adalah dengan kultur antera.  Pengecekan tanaman hasil kultur antera dapat dilakukan dengan penghitungan  jumlah kloroplas dan jumlah kromosom, namun untuk lili hasil belum diperoleh informasi mengenai korelasi antara jumlah kloroplas pada sel penjaga stomata dengan jumlah kromosom, sehingga tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengatahui korelasi antara jumlah kloroplas dengan jumlah kromosom serta mengetahui tingkat ploidi pada regeneran lili hasil kultur antera. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di Laboratorium Kultur Jaringan Balai Penelitian Tanaman Hias (BALITHI Cianjur dari Januari-Juni 2016.  Terdapat 5 nomor lili yang diuji tingkat ploidinya.  Setiap nomor terdiri dari 4 ulangan, setiap ulangan ada 4 botol dan  masing-masing botol terdiri dari 3 planlet. Metode analisis yang digunakan yaitu statistik sederhana rata-rata dan standar eror dan dikorelasikan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan planlet haploid terbanyak ditemukan pada nomor 2015.1.1 kelompok Longiflorum dengan jumlah 26,67% sedangkan planlet haploid yang jumlahnya paling sedikit ditemukan pada nomor 2015.S2.3 kelompok Oriental dengan jumlah 11,11%. Metode kultur antera dapat menghasilkan planlet haploid namun pada Lilium sp. persentase keberhasilannya masih rendah. Tidak diperoleh korelasi antara jumlah kloroplas dan kromosom. Penelitian lebih lanjut terkait tingkat ploidi tanaman lili dan pengujian jumlah kromosom dengan menggunakan flowcytometer perlu dilakukan.  Lily (Lilium sp., Liliaceae family, is an ornamental plant that has a high economic value as consumer demand continues to rise. The uniformity of crop varieties requires the

  1. Ploidy-specific symbiotic interactions: divergence of mycorrhizal fungi between cytotypes of the Gymnadenia conopsea group (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Těšitelová, Tamara; Jersáková, Jana; Roy, Mélanie; Kubátová, Barbora; Těšitel, Jakub; Urfus, Tomáš; Trávníček, Pavel; Suda, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Polyploidy is widely recognized as a major mechanism of sympatric speciation in plants, yet little is known about its effects on interactions with other organisms. Mycorrhizal fungi are among the most common plant symbionts and play an important role in plant nutrient supply. It remains to be understood whether mycorrhizal associations of ploidy-variable plants can be ploidy-specific. We examined mycorrhizal associations in three cytotypes (2x, 3x, 4x) of the Gymnadenia conopsea group (Orchidaceae), involving G. conopsea s.s. and G. densiflora, at different spatial scales and during different ontogenetic stages. We analysed: adults from mixed- and single-ploidy populations at a regional scale; closely spaced adults within a mixed-ploidy site; and mycorrhizal seedlings. All Gymnadenia cytotypes associated mainly with saprotrophic Tulasnellaceae (Basidiomycota). Nonetheless, both adults and seedlings of diploids and their autotetraploid derivatives significantly differed in the identity of their mycorrhizal symbionts. Interploidy segregation of mycorrhizal symbionts was most pronounced within a site with closely spaced adults. This study provides the first evidence that polyploidization of a plant species can be associated with a shift in mycorrhizal symbionts. This divergence may contribute to niche partitioning and facilitate establishment and co-existence of different cytotypes. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. DNA barcoding of odonates from the Upper Plata basin: Database creation and genetic diversity estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Koroiva

    Full Text Available We present a DNA barcoding study of Neotropical odonates from the Upper Plata basin, Brazil. A total of 38 species were collected in a transition region of "Cerrado" and Atlantic Forest, both regarded as biological hotspots, and 130 cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI barcodes were generated for the collected specimens. The distinct gap between intraspecific (0-2% and interspecific variation (15% and above in COI, and resulting separation of Barcode Index Numbers (BIN, allowed for successful identification of specimens in 94% of cases. The 6% fail rate was due to a shared BIN between two separate nominal species. DNA barcoding, based on COI, thus seems to be a reliable and efficient tool for identifying Neotropical odonate specimens down to the species level. These results underscore the utility of DNA barcoding to aid specimen identification in diverse biological hotspots, areas that require urgent action regarding taxonomic surveys and biodiversity conservation.

  3. Nuclear DNA amounts in 112 species of tropical hardwoods -- new estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, D; Bhargava, A; Chatterjee, A

    2004-09-01

    The 4C DNA values of 112 species, belonging to 37 families have a range from 0.83 pg (Bixa orellana) to 15.54 pg (Thryallis angustifolia), showing a 18.72-fold variation. The genome size varies from 0.21 pg (Bixa orellana) to 3.32 (Thespesia populnea), with a 15.8-fold difference. The Bombacaceae has the minimum range (1.08-fold) of variation, while the maximum (5.0-fold) is shown by the Fabaceae. The Boraginaceae, Lauraceae, Malpighiaceae, and Malvaceae generally have higher 4C DNA values of > 10 pg, while the Bixaceae, Caricaceae, Oxalidaceae, and Santalaceae have lower values of < 2.0 pg. These data add further to our knowledge on variation in DNA amount in tropical hardwoods.

  4. CENH3-GFP: a visual marker for gametophytic and somatic ploidy determination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Storme, Nico; Keçeli, Burcu Nur; Zamariola, Linda; Angenon, Geert; Geelen, Danny

    2016-01-05

    The in vivo determination of the cell-specific chromosome number provides a valuable tool in several aspects of plant research. However, current techniques to determine the endosystemic ploidy level do not allow non-destructive, cell-specific chromosome quantification. Particularly in the gametophytic cell lineages, which are physically encapsulated in the reproductive organ structures, direct in vivo ploidy determination has been proven very challenging. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model, we here assess the applicability of recombinant CENH3-GFP reporters for the labeling of the cell's chromocenters and for the monitoring of the gametophytic and somatic chromosome number in vivo. By modulating expression of a CENH3-GFP reporter cassette using different promoters, we isolated two reporter lines that allow for a clear and highly specific labeling of centromeric chromosome regions in somatic and gametophytic cells respectively. Using polyploid plant series and reproductive mutants, we demonstrate that the pWOX2-CENH3-GFP recombinant fusion protein allows for the determination of the gametophytic chromosome number in both male and female gametophytic cells, and additionally labels centromeric regions in early embryo development. Somatic centromere labeling through p35S-CENH3-GFP shows a maximum of ten centromeric dots in young dividing tissues, reflecting the diploid chromosome number (2x = 10), and reveals a progressive decrease in GFP foci frequency throughout plant development. Moreover, using chemical and genetic induction of endomitosis, we demonstrate that CENH3-mediated chromosome labeling provides an easy and valuable tool for the detection and characterization of endomitotic polyploidization events. This study demonstrates that the introgression of the pWOX2-CENH3-GFP reporter construct in Arabidopsis thaliana provides an easy and reliable methodology for determining the chromosome number in developing male and female gametes, and during early embryo

  5. Development and application of DNA techniques for validating and improving pinniped diet estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollit, Dominic J; Schulze, Angela D; Trites, Andrew W; Olesiuk, Peter F; Crockford, Susan J; Gelatt, Thomas S; Ream, Rolf R; Miller, Kristina M

    2009-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction techniques were developed and applied to identify DNA from >40 species of prey contained in fecal (scat) soft-part matrix collected at terrestrial sites used by Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in British Columbia and the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska. Sixty percent more fish and cephalopod prey were identified by morphological analyses of hard parts compared with DNA analysis of soft parts (hard parts identified higher relative proportions of Ammodytes sp., Cottidae, and certain Gadidae). DNA identified 213 prey occurrences, of which 75 (35%) were undetected by hard parts (mainly Salmonidae, Pleuronectidae, Elasmobranchii, and Cephalopoda), and thereby increased species occurrences by 22% overall and species richness in 44% of cases (when comparing 110 scats that amplified prey DNA). Prey composition was identical within only 20% of scats. Overall, diet composition derived from both identification techniques combined did not differ significantly from hard-part identification alone, suggesting that past scat-based diet studies have not missed major dietary components. However, significant differences in relative diet contributions across scats (as identified using the two techniques separately) reflect passage rate differences between hard and soft digesta material and highlight certain hypothesized limitations in conventional morphological-based methods (e.g., differences in resistance to digestion, hard part regurgitation, partial and secondary prey consumption), as well as potential technical issues (e.g., resolution of primer efficiency and sensitivity and scat subsampling protocols). DNA analysis of salmon occurrence (from scat soft-part matrix and 238 archived salmon hard parts) provided species-level taxonomic resolution that could not be obtained by morphological identification and showed that Steller sea lions were primarily consuming pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon. Notably, DNA from

  6. Local climate and cultivation, but not ploidy, predict functional trait variation in Bouteloua gracilis (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Bradley J.; Wood, Troy E.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to improve the diversity of seed 18 resources for important restoration species has become a high priority for land managers in many parts of the world. Relationships between functional trait values and the environment from which seed sources are collected can provide important insights into patterns of local adaptation and guidelines for seed transfer. However, little is known about which functional traits exhibit genetic differentiation across populations of restoration species and thus may contribute to local adaptation. Here, we report the results of a common garden experiment aimed at assessing genetic (including ploidy level) and environmental regulation of several functional traits among populations of Bouteloua gracilis, a dominant C4 grass and the most highly utilized restoration species across much of the Colorado Plateau. We found that leaf size and specific leaf area (SLA) varied significantly among populations, and were strongly correlated with the source population environment from which seeds were collected. However, variation in ploidy level had no significant effect on functional traits. Leaves of plants grown from commercial seed releases were significantly larger and had lower SLA than those from natural populations, a result that is concordant with the overall relation between climate and these two functional traits. We suggest that the patterns of functional trait variation shown here may extend to other grass species in the western USA, and may serve as useful proxies for more extensive genecology research. Furthermore, we argue that care should be taken to develop commercial seed lines with functional trait values that match those of natural populations occupying climates similar to target restoration sites.

  7. Estimating Herbal Product Authentication and Adulteration in India Using a Vouchered, DNA-Based Biological Reference Material Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmughanandhan, Dhivya; Ragupathy, Subramanyam; Newmaster, Steven G; Mohanasundaram, Saravanan; Sathishkumar, Ramalingam

    2016-12-01

    India is considered the 'medicinal garden' of the world, with 8000 medicinal plants of which 960 are commercial species that are traded nationally and globally. Although scientific studies estimate herbal product adulteration as 42-66 % in North America, India does not have any published marketplace studies and subsequent estimates of adulteration in an industry facing considerable supply demands. The goal of this project is to provide an initial assessment of herbal product authentication and adulteration in the marketplace in India by (1) developing a biological reference material (BRM) herbal DNA library for Indian herbal species using DNA barcode regions (ITS2 and rbcL) in order to facilitate accurate species resolution when testing the herbal products; and (2) assessing herbal product identification using our BRM library; and (3) comparing the use of our BRM library to identify herbal products with that of GenBank. A BRM herbal DNA library consisting of 187 herbal species was prepared to authenticate the herbal products within India. Ninty-three herbal products representing ten different companies were procured from local stores located at Coimbatore, India. These samples were subjected to blind testing for authenticity using the DNA barcode regions rbcL and ITS2. The results indicate that 40 % of the products tested are authentic, and 60 % of the products may be adulterated (i.e. contained species of plants not listed on the product labels). The adulterated samples included contamination (50 %), substitution (10 %) and fillers (6 %). Our BRM library provided a 100 % Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) match for all species, whereas the GenBank match was 64 %. Our findings suggest that most Indian herbal medicinal products are essentially mixed with one or a few other herbs that could lessen the therapeutic activity of the main ingredients. We do not recommend the use of GenBank to identify herbal products because the use of this non-curated and

  8. Estimation of census and effective population sizes: the increasing usefulness of DNA-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Luikart; Nils Ryman; David A. Tallmon; Michael K. Schwartz; Fred W. Allendorf

    2010-01-01

    Population census size (NC) and effective population sizes (Ne) are two crucial parameters that influence population viability, wildlife management decisions, and conservation planning. Genetic estimators of both NC and Ne are increasingly widely used because molecular markers are increasingly available, statistical methods are improving rapidly, and genetic estimators...

  9. DNA Markers and FCSS Analyses Shed Light on the Genetic Diversity and Reproductive Strategy of Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Gigliola Ambrosi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. (2n = 2x = 22 is becoming a popular non-food oleaginous crop in several developed countries due to its proposed value in the biopharmaceutical industry. Despite the potentials of its oil-rich seeds as a renewable source of biodiesel and an interest in large-scale cultivation, relatively little is known with respect to plant reproduction strategies and population dynamics. Here, genomic DNA markers and FCSS analyses were performed to gain insights into ploidy variation and heterozygosity levels of multiple accessions, and genomic relationships among commercial varieties of Jatropha grown in different geographical areas. The determination of ploidy and the differentiation of either pseudogamous or autonomous apomixis from sexuality were based on the seed DNA contents of embryo and endosperm. The presence of only a high 2C embryo peak and a smaller 3C endosperm peak (ratio 2:3 is consistent with an obligate sexual reproductive system. Because of the lack of either 4C or 5C endosperm DNA estimates, the occurrence of gametophytic apomixis seems unlikely in this species but adventitious embryony cannot be ruled out. The investigation of genetic variation within and between cultivated populations was carried out using dominant RAPD and Inter-SSR markers, and codominant SSR markers. Nei’s genetic diversity, corresponding to the expected heterozygosity, was equal to He = 0.3491 and the fixation index as low as Fst = 0.2042. The main finding is that seeds commercialized worldwide include a few closely related genotypes, which are not representative of the original Mexican gene pool, revealing high degrees of homozygosity for single varieties and very low genetic diversity between varieties.

  10. Levels of Intra-specific AFLP Diversity in Tuber-Bearing Potato Species with Different Breeding Systems and Ploidy Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn J. Bryan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based marker analysis of plant genebank material has become a useful tool in the evaluation of levels of genetic diversity and for the informed use and maintenance of germplasm. In this study, we quantify levels of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP in representative accessions of wild and cultivated potato species of differing geographic origin, ploidy, and breeding system. We generated 449 polymorphic AFLP fragments in 619 plants, representing multiple plants (16–23 from 17 accessions of 14 potato taxa as well as single plants sampled from available accessions (from 3 to 56 of the same 14 taxa. Intra-accession diversities were compared to those of a synthetic ‘taxon-wide’ population comprising a single individual from a variable number of available accessions of each sampled taxon. Results confirm the expected considerably lower levels of polymorphism within accessions of self-compatible as compared to self-incompatible taxa. We observed broadly similar levels of ‘taxon-wide’ polymorphism among self-compatible and self-incompatible species, with self-compatible taxa showing only slightly lower rates of polymorphism. The most diverse accessions were the two cultivated potato accessions examined, the least diverse being the Mexican allohexaploids Solanum demissum and S. iopetalum. Generally allopolyploid self-compatible accessions exhibited lower levels of diversity. Some purported self-incompatible accessions showed relatively low levels of marker diversity, similar to the more diverse self-compatible material surveyed. Our data indicate that for self-compatible species a single plant is highly representative of a genebank accession. The situation for self-incompatible taxa is less clear, and sampling strategies used will depend on the type of investigation. These results have important implications for those seeking novel trait variation (e.g., disease resistance in gene banks as well as for the selection of individuals

  11. Lymphocytes DNA Content, P53, C-Myc And Bcl-2 As Predictive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cell cycle parameters as well as apoptotic and tumor markers directly control cell growth. DNA ploidy and S phase fraction, apoptosis fraction in addition to apoptotic inducer (p53, c-myc) and antiapoptotic marker (Bcl-2) were investigated in childhood with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) leukemia as a predictive ...

  12. Two epithelioid malignant schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis : Cytology, histology and DNA-flow-cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, W M; Ladde, B E; Koops, H Schraffordt; Dam-Meiring, A

    Cytological, histological and DNA-ploidy findings of 2 epithelioid malignant schwannomas arising in a patient with von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis are described. In both primary tumors, i.e. in the thigh and in the thoracic wall, origin from a neurofibromatous nerve could be established.

  13. Algorithm for post-clustering curation of DNA amplicon data yields reliable biodiversity estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Kjøller, Rasmus; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2017-01-01

    soil from 130 sites in Denmark spanning major environmental gradients. OTU tables are produced with several different OTU definition algorithms and subsequently curated with LULU, and validated against field survey data. LULU curation consistently improves α-diversity estimates and other biodiversity...

  14. Ploidy Distribution of the Harmful Bloom Forming Macroalgae Ulva spp. in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA, Using Flow Cytometry Methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine E Potter

    Full Text Available Macroalgal blooms occur worldwide and have the potential to cause severe ecological and economic damage. Narragansett Bay, RI is a eutrophic system that experiences summer macroalgal blooms composed mostly of Ulva compressa and Ulva rigida, which have biphasic life cycles with separate haploid and diploid phases. In this study, we used flow cytometry to assess ploidy levels of U. compressa and U. rigida populations from five sites in Narragansett Bay, RI, USA, to assess the relative contribution of both phases to bloom formation. Both haploid gametophytes and diploid sporophytes were present for both species. Sites ranged from a relative overabundance of gametophytes to a relative overabundance of sporophytes, compared to the null model prediction of √2 gametophytes: 1 sporophyte. We found significant differences in cell area between ploidy levels for each species, with sporophyte cells significantly larger than gametophyte cells in U. compressa and U. rigida. We found no differences in relative growth rate between ploidy levels for each species. Our results indicate the presence of both phases of each of the two dominant bloom forming species throughout the bloom season, and represent one of the first studies of in situ Ulva life cycle dynamics.

  15. Ploidy Distribution of the Harmful Bloom Forming Macroalgae Ulva spp. in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA, Using Flow Cytometry Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Elaine E; Thornber, Carol S; Swanson, John-David; McFarland, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur worldwide and have the potential to cause severe ecological and economic damage. Narragansett Bay, RI is a eutrophic system that experiences summer macroalgal blooms composed mostly of Ulva compressa and Ulva rigida, which have biphasic life cycles with separate haploid and diploid phases. In this study, we used flow cytometry to assess ploidy levels of U. compressa and U. rigida populations from five sites in Narragansett Bay, RI, USA, to assess the relative contribution of both phases to bloom formation. Both haploid gametophytes and diploid sporophytes were present for both species. Sites ranged from a relative overabundance of gametophytes to a relative overabundance of sporophytes, compared to the null model prediction of √2 gametophytes: 1 sporophyte. We found significant differences in cell area between ploidy levels for each species, with sporophyte cells significantly larger than gametophyte cells in U. compressa and U. rigida. We found no differences in relative growth rate between ploidy levels for each species. Our results indicate the presence of both phases of each of the two dominant bloom forming species throughout the bloom season, and represent one of the first studies of in situ Ulva life cycle dynamics.

  16. Anatomy and morphology character of five Indonesian banana cultivars (Musa spp. of different ploidy level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISSIREP SUMARDI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sumardi I, Wulandari M (2011 Anatomy and morphology character of five Indonesian banana cultivars (Musa spp. of different ploidy level. Biodiversitas 12: 167-175. In Indonesia there are many cultivars of banana, and some of them produce edible fruits. Beside their morphology, the character which necessary as a tool for classification is anatomical character. The aim of this research were to describe the anatomical character and morphology of fives Indonesian banana cultivars based on their level of ploidy. The cultivars were collected from Banana Germplasm Plantation, Yogyakarta District, Indonesia. The samples of roots, rhizome, and leaf were collected from five banana cultivars i.e.: Musa acuminata cv Penjalin, M.balbisiana cv Kluthuk warangan, M.acuminata cv Ambon warangan, M.paradisiaca cv Raja nangka , and M. paradisiaca cv Kluthuk susu. For anatomy observation samples were prepared using paraffin method, stained with 1% safranin in 70% ethanol. To observe the structure of stomata and epidermis surface, slide were prepared using modification of whole mount method. Slides were observed using Olympus BHB microscope completed with Olympus camera BM-10A. Stem and leaf morphology character of diploid level (AA and BB genome is different with triploid level (AAA, AAB, and ABB genome. Anatomy and morphology character of root and rhizome of banana in diploid level (AA and BB genome and triploid level (AAA, AAB, and ABB genome is quite similar. Distribution of stomata is found in leaf and pseudostem. Stomata is found in adaxial and abaxial epidermis layer. The size of guard cells in triploid cultivars was longer than that diploid cultivars. The root composse of epidermis layer, cortex and cylinder vascular of five cultivar’s root show anomalous structure. Rhizome consist of peripheric and centre zone. Anatomically, this was no differences in the rizome structur among five banana cultivars. The row of vascular bundles act as demarcation area

  17. Oxidative DNA damage estimated by 8-hydroxydeoxy guanosine excretion in humans: influence of smoking gender and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Vistisen, Kirsten Kjeldgaard; Ewertz, Marianne

    1992-01-01

    Toksikologi, reaktive iltforbindelser, oksidativ DNA-skade, epidemiologi, cancer, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, rygning......Toksikologi, reaktive iltforbindelser, oksidativ DNA-skade, epidemiologi, cancer, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, rygning...

  18. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and phosphorus application on nuclear ploidy in Allium porrum plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusconi, Anna; Lingua, Guido; Trotta, Antonio; Berta, Graziella

    2005-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization can strongly affect the plant cell nucleus, causing displacement from the periphery to the center of the cell, hypertrophy and polyploidization. The hypertrophy response has been shown in a variety of AM plants whilst polyploidization has been reported only in Lycopersicon esculentum, a multiploid species with a small genome. In order to determine whether polyploidization is a general plant response to AM colonization, analyses were performed on Allium porrum, a plant with a large genome, which is much less subject to polyploidization than L. esculentum. The ploidy status of leaves, complete root systems and four zones of the adventitious roots was investigated in relation to phosphorus content, AM colonization and root differentiation in A. porrum plants grown under two different regimes of phosphate nutrition in order to distinguish direct effects of the fungus from those of improved nutrition. Results showed the presence of two nuclear populations (2C and 4C) in all treatments and samples. Linear regression analyses suggested a general negative correlation between phosphorus content and the proportion of 2C nuclei. The percentage of 2C nuclei (and consequently that of 4C nuclei), was also influenced by AM colonization, differentiation and ageing of the root cells, which resulted in earlier occurrence, in time and space, of polyploid nuclei.

  19. DNA level, tumor thickness, and stereological estimates of nuclear volume in stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. A comparative study with analysis of prognostic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Kristensen, I B; Grymer, F

    1991-01-01

    The mutual relation and prognostic value of three quantitative variables were investigated in a retrospective series of 56 stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. Unbiased stereological estimates of nuclear volume, nuclear nu v were obtained along with measurements of melanoma thickness. The DNA......, nuclear nu v was the only independent, prognostically significant variable. Physical, three-dimensional nuclear volume is not solely a reflection of nuclear DNA content, and may represent a valuable, quantitative prognostic indicator in cutaneous malignant melanomas....

  20. Detection and evaluation of DNA methylation markers found at SCGN and KLF14 loci to estimate human age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghanim, Hussain; Antunes, Joana; Silva, Deborah Soares Bispo Santos; Alho, Clarice Sampaio; Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; McCord, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    Recent developments in the analysis of epigenetic DNA methylation patterns have demonstrated that certain genetic loci show a linear correlation with chronological age. It is the goal of this study to identify a new set of epigenetic methylation markers for the forensic estimation of human age. A total number of 27 CpG sites at three genetic loci, SCGN, DLX5 and KLF14, were examined to evaluate the correlation of their methylation status with age. These sites were evaluated using 72 blood samples and 91 saliva samples collected from volunteers with ages ranging from 5 to 73 years. DNA was bisulfite modified followed by PCR amplification and pyrosequencing to determine the level of DNA methylation at each CpG site. In this study, certain CpG sites in SCGN and KLF14 loci showed methylation levels that were correlated with chronological age, however, the tested CpG sites in DLX5 did not show a correlation with age. Using a 52-saliva sample training set, two age-predictor models were developed by means of a multivariate linear regression analysis for age prediction. The two models performed similarly with a single-locus model explaining 85% of the age variance at a mean absolute deviation of 5.8 years and a dual-locus model explaining 84% of the age variance with a mean absolute deviation of 6.2 years. In the validation set, the mean absolute deviation was measured to be 8.0 years and 7.1 years for the single- and dual-locus model, respectively. Another age predictor model was also developed using a 40-blood sample training set that accounted for 71% of the age variance. This model gave a mean absolute deviation of 6.6 years for the training set and 10.3years for the validation set. The results indicate that specific CpGs in SCGN and KLF14 can be used as potential epigenetic markers to estimate age using saliva and blood specimens. These epigenetic markers could provide important information in cases where the determination of a suspect's age is critical in developing

  1. Genome size of Pachypsylla venusta (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and the ploidy of its bacteriocyte, the symbiotic host cell that harbors intracellular mutualistic bacteria with the smallest cellular genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabachi, A; Koshikawa, S; Miura, T; Miyagishima, S

    2010-02-01

    Psyllids harbor the primary symbiont, Carsonella ruddii (gamma-Proteobacteria), within the cytoplasm of specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Carsonella has the smallest known cellular genome (160 kb), lacking numerous genes that appear to be essential for bacterial life. This raises the question regarding the genetic mechanisms of the host which supports the survival of Carsonella. Our preceding analyses have indicated that some of the genes that are encoded in the psyllid genome and which are highly expressed in the bacteriocyte are of bacterial origin. This implies that psyllids acquired genes from bacteria by lateral gene transfer (LGT) and are using these genes to maintain the primary symbiont, Carsonella. To reveal the complete picture of LGT from symbiotic bacteria to the genome of psyllids, whole genome analysis of psyllids is essential. In order to assess the feasibility of whole genome analysis of the host psyllid, the genome size of the hackberry petiole gall psyllid, Pachypsylla venusta, was estimated. Feulgen image analysis densitometry and flow cytometry demonstrated that the haploid genome size of P. venusta is 0.74 pg (724 Mb), verifying the feasibility of whole genome analysis. Feulgen image analysis densitometry further revealed that bacteriocytes of P. venusta are invariably 16-ploid. This higher ploidy may be essential to facilitate the symbiotic relationship with bacteria, as it appears to be a feature common to insect bacteriocytes. These results provide a foundation for genomics-based research into host-symbiont interactions.

  2. Nuclear DNA content of the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum Sw. with the analysis of flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upatham Meesawat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear DNA content for the adult plants grown in a greenhouse and in vitro young plantlets of the pigeon orchid (Dendrobium crumenatum Sw. was analyzed using flow cytometry. The resulting 2C DNA values ranged from 2.30±0.14 pgto 2.43±0.06 pg. However, nuclear DNA ploidy levels of long-term in vitro plantlets were found to be triploid and tetraploid.These ploidy levels were confirmed by chromosome counting. Tetraploid individuals (2n = 4x = 76 had approximately two times DNA content than diploid (2n = 2x = 38 individuals. This variation may be due to prolonged cultivation and thepresence of exogenous plant growth regulators.

  3. Estimating Size and Trend of the North Interlake Woodland Caribou Population Using Fecal-DNA and Capture-Recapture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Peter N; Arnason, Arni Neil; Manseau, Micheline; Cross, Dale; Whaley, Kent; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    A critical step in recovery efforts for endangered and threatened species is the monitoring of population demographic parameters. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the use of fecal-DNA based capture-recapture methods to estimate population sizes and population rate of change for the North Interlake woodland caribou herd (Rangifer tarandus caribou), Manitoba, Canada. This herd is part of the boreal population of woodland caribou, listed as threatened under the federal Species at Risk Act (2003) and the provincial Manitoba Endangered Species Act (2006). Between 2004 and 2009 (9 surveys), we collected 1,080 fecal samples and identified 180 unique genotypes (102 females and 78 males). We used a robust design survey plan with 2 surveys in most years and analysed the data with Program MARK to estimate encounter rates (p), apparent survival rates (ϕ), rates of population change (λ), and population sizes (N). We estimated these demographic parameters for males and females and for 2 genetic clusters within the North Interlake. The population size estimates were larger for the Lower than the Upper North Interlake area and the proportion of males was lower in the Lower (33%) than the Upper North Interlake (49%). Population rate of change for the entire North Interlake area (2005-2009) using the robust design Pradel model was significantly <1.0 (λ = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.99) and varied between sex and area with the highest being for males in Lower North Interlake (λ = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.83-1.13) and the lowest being for females in Upper North Interlake (λ = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.69-0.97). The additivity of λ between sex and area is supported on the log scale and translates into males having a λ that is 0.09 greater than females and independent of sex, Lower North Interlake having a λ that is 0.06 greater than Upper North Interlake. Population estimates paralleled these declining trends, which correspond to trends observed in other fragmented populations of woodland caribou

  4. Hybridization between two cryptic filamentous brown seaweeds along the shore: analysing pre- and postzygotic barriers in populations of individuals with varying ploidy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecinos, Alejandro E; Guillemin, Marie-Laure; Couceiro, Lucia; Peters, Akira F; Stoeckel, Solenn; Valero, Myriam

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to study the importance of hybridization between two cryptic species of the genus Ectocarpus, a group of filamentous algae with haploid-diploid life cycles that include the principal genetic model organism for the brown algae. In haploid-diploid species, the genetic structure of the two phases of the life cycle can be analysed separately in natural populations. Such life cycles provide a unique opportunity to estimate the frequency of hybrid genotypes in diploid sporophytes and meiotic recombinant genotypes in haploid gametophytes allowing the effects of reproductive barriers preventing fertilization or preventing meiosis to be untangle. The level of hybridization between E. siliculosus and E. crouaniorum was quantified along the European coast. Clonal cultures (568 diploid, 336 haploid) isolated from field samples were genotyped using cytoplasmic and nuclear markers to estimate the frequency of hybrid genotypes in diploids and recombinant haploids. We identified admixed individuals using microsatellite loci, classical assignment methods and a newly developed Bayesian method (XPloidAssignment), which allows the analysis of populations that exhibit variations in ploidy level. Over all populations, the level of hybridization was estimated at 8.7%. Hybrids were exclusively observed in sympatric populations. More than 98% of hybrids were diploids (40% of which showed signs of aneuploidy) with a high frequency of rare alleles. The near absence of haploid recombinant hybrids demonstrates that the reproductive barriers are mostly postzygotic and suggests that abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis following hybridization of species with different genome sizes could be a major cause of interspecific incompatibility in this system. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. DNA level, tumor thickness, and stereological estimates of nuclear volume in stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. A comparative study with analysis of prognostic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Kristensen, I B; Grymer, F

    1991-01-01

    The mutual relation and prognostic value of three quantitative variables were investigated in a retrospective series of 56 stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. Unbiased stereological estimates of nuclear volume, nuclear nu v were obtained along with measurements of melanoma thickness. The DNA i...

  6. DNA level and stereologic estimates of nuclear volume in squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix. A comparative study with analysis of prognostic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P; Jakobsen, A

    1992-01-01

    with highly distinguishing capacity between prognostically poor and favorable cases was constructed (2P = 1.9 x 10(-7)). It is concluded that realistic estimates of nuclear volume are independent of nuclear DNA content and are of prognostic value for objective malignancy grading in patients with squamous cell...

  7. X-ray induced DNA double-strand breakage and rejoining in a radiosensitive human renal carcinoma cell line estimated by CHEF electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, K. (Univ. Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna Univ. (Austria) Inst. of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, BJ (China)); Wandl, E. (Univ. Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna Univ. (Austria)); Kaercher, K.H. (Univ. Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna Univ. (Austria))

    1993-12-01

    Cell intrinsic radiosensitivity is of great importance in radiation therapy, but its molecular basis is still uncertain. Since DNA double strand breakage is considered to be the most important lesion related to cell death induced by ionizing radiation, the relationship between DNA double-strand breakage, repair and cell survival was investigated in three cell lines: Chinese hamster cell (CHO-K1), human fibroblast and human renal carcinoma (Tu 25). The D[sub 0] values after X-irradiation were 1.73, 1.23, and 0.89 Gy, respectively, showing that Tu 25 was the most sensitive among them. DNA double-strand breaks were measured by CHEF electrophoresis, the initial yield of double-strand break per dose in the three cell lines was almost the same, and no correlation to cell survival was found. However, the rejoining capacity for DNA double-strand break differed. After a dose of 20 Gy, the repair rate was markedly lower in Tu 25, with a half repair time of 40 min, as compared with the other two cell lines with half repair times of 15 min. The results strongly supported the correlation between the repair capacity for DNA double-strand break and cell survival. It was concluded that DNA repair capacity is one of the determinants of cell radiosensitivity. Estimation of DNA double-strand break rejoining by CHEF was suggested as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. (orig.)

  8. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers to estimate the proportion of Pisolithus tinctorius and Eucalyptus RNAs in ectomycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, E C; Tagu, D; Martin, F

    1997-03-01

    Ectomycorrhiza is a complex association of several types of plant and fungal cells. Differentiation of symbiotic structures is correlated with large changes in mRNA synthesis, leading to novel protein patterns. Quantification of up- and down-regulated specific transcripts is complicated by the intermingling of root and hyphal components. Determination of steady-state levels of symbiosis-regulated mRNA requires a normalization to the housekeeping RNA content of each partner. In this study, the usefulness of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-5.8S ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as molecular markers of the root colonization by fungal mycelium was assayed. The rDNA ITSs of Pisolithus tinctorius and Eucalyptus globulus were cloned by PCR amplification, and their sequences were determined. They contained the 5.8S rDNAs, and these two probes did not cross-hybridize. Steady-state levels of the ITS-5.8S rRNAs in the vegetative mycelium, in the noninfected root, and in ectomycorrhizas of E. globulus-P. tinctorius 441 were estimated at different stages of development. Colonization of roots by the mycelium provoked a large decrease in the proportion of root rRNAs. At the end of mycorrhiza formation, about 80% of the ectomycorrhizal RNA belonged to the mycobiont. The ITS-5.8S can be used as a specific probe for the estimation of fungal or plant rRNA in the symbiotic tissues and to determine whether an mRNA is down- or up-regulated in ectomycorrhiza.

  9. Degradation of biomolecules in artificially and naturally aged teeth: implications for age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization and DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobberstein, Reimer C; Huppertz, Jan; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2008-08-06

    Postmortem teeth are the most stable structures, and can be used to gain different information (age estimation, genetic data). Over long postmortem intervals (PMI), degradation processes may alter the molecular integrity and thus affect the reliability of applied molecular methods. Whereas some knowledge on the degradation of biomolecules in bone during the PMI exists, data for teeth are lacking. In particular, the impact of degradation processes in dentine on age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization (AAR) cannot be estimated yet. Hence, the molecular stability of both collagen and DNA was analyzed systematically, and their impact on the reliability of age estimation based on AAR and genetic analyses was checked. Two hundred and ten human and 59 porcine teeth were heated (90 degrees C in water) to simulate collagen and DNA diagenesis; 14 naturally aged teeth (PMI: 3 days to 1700 years) were analyzed comparatively. Peptide patterns of cyanogen bromide (CNBr)-cleaved collagen were employed as a new approach to check the collagen integrity. In the same samples, collagen yields, amino acid compositions, AAR in different protein fractions, and DNA integrity were analyzed. In heated human and porcine teeth the collagen content declined during the heating experiment. The amino acid composition in human samples was collagen-like until 12 days of heating. In naturally aged teeth, the collagen yielded from 9.5 to 15%, and no discrepancy of amino acid composition to that of modern collagen was observed. Electrophoresis of CNBr-peptides showed an altered pattern in experimentally degraded samples from day 10 on; naturally aged collagen displayed the typical collagen pattern. AAR increased in all protein fractions with increasing duration of the heating experiment; naturally aged samples displayed a slow accumulation of AAR. DNA degraded progressively, and after 32 h of heat exposure no more DNA was detectable, whereas the amplification of nuclear and mitochondrial

  10. Ploidy status and copy number aberrations in primary glioblastomas defined by integrated analysis of allelic ratios, signal ratios and loss of heterozygosity using 500K SNP Mapping Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowell John K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic hybridization platforms, including BAC-CGH and genotyping arrays, have been used to estimate chromosome copy number (CN in tumor samples by detecting the relative strength of genomic signal. The methods rely on the assumption that the predominant chromosomal background of the samples is diploid, an assumption that is frequently incorrect for tumor samples. In addition to generally greater resolution, an advantage of genotyping arrays over CGH arrays is the ability to detect signals from individual alleles, allowing estimation of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH and allelic ratios to enhance the interpretation of copy number alterations. Copy number events associated with LOH potentially have the same genetic consequences as deletions. Results We have utilized allelic ratios to detect patterns that are indicative of higher ploidy levels. An integrated analysis using allelic ratios, total signal and LOH indicates that many or most of the chromosomes from 24 glioblastoma tumors are in fact aneuploid. Some putative whole-chromosome losses actually represent trisomy, and many apparent sub-chromosomal losses are in fact relative losses against a triploid or tetraploid background. Conclusion These results suggest a re-interpretation of previous findings based only on total signal ratios. One interesting observation is that many single or multiple-copy deletions occur at common putative tumor suppressor sites subsequent to chromosomal duplication; these losses do not necessarily result in LOH, but nonetheless occur in conspicuous patterns. The 500 K Mapping array was also capable of detecting many sub-mega base losses and gains that were overlooked by CGH-BAC arrays, and was superior to CGH-BAC arrays in resolving regions of complex CN variation.

  11. The use of Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose for estimation of affinities of hexahistidine-tagged Fab to single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarov, A A; Marchbank, M T; Deutscher, S L

    1997-04-05

    The complex formed between 32P-labeled (dT)15 and a hexahistidine (6-His)-tagged anti-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) Fab, DNA-1, was trapped by addition of nickel-chelating nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose that led to efficient separation of bound ligand from free. High stability of the immobilized complex (half-life of 4 h) and low nonspecific binding of (32P](dT)15 allowed for a rapid estimation of the dissociation constant (Kd) and was found to be approximately 130 nM. Oligonucleotide bound DNA-1 preimmobilized on Ni-NTA agarose with the same Kd as the Fab/(dT)15 complex formed in solution, indicating that the interaction of the 6-His tag with the resin did not interfere with binding. Addition of unlabeled (dT)15 led to a fast exchange with bound [32P](dT)15. Mutant versions of DNA-1 were also examined and results obtained were in agreement with data from equilibrium gel filtration and fluorescence titration [A. A. Komissarov, M. J. Calcutt, M. T. Marchbank, E. N. Peletskaya, and S. L. Deutscher (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 12241-12246]. These results demonstrate that the Ni-NTA assay is an efficient and accurate method to examine 6-His-tagged protein-nucleic acid complexes. Furthermore, a competition modification of this assay may be used for detection of anti-ssDNA antibodies in serum.

  12. PLOJDY ANALYSIS AND DNA CONTENT OF MUTANT BANANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAK CHAI

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutagens cause random changes in the nuclear DNA or cytoplasmic organelles, resulting in gene, chromosomal or genomic mutations and hence, create variability. In this study, flow cytometry (FCM was used to determine ploidy levels and DNA content in gamma-irradiated variants of mutated Pisang Berangan (cv. Intan, AAA - a local banana genotype. Induced variants such as shor t plant stature (stunted growth, late flowering plants (late maturity and abnormalities in bunch characters were selected to stud y possible changes at the DNA level. The study showed that DNA content of mutated plants differed from non-irradiated control and that irradiation had the most effect at high doses (40 and 60 Gy. The increase of DNA content in 20 Gy and 30 Gy treated plants was not more than that of the control plants. The values of genomic DNA content of gamma-irra diation variants decreased as the dose of irradiation increased from 20 to 60 Gy, indicating that the high dose of gamma-irradiation had a significant effect on the genome of the plants. The analysis further showed that phenotypic variation due to mutagenesis was reflected in the DNA content of the plants. The results also showed that ploidy levels were not affected by gamma-irradiation even at high doses.

  13. Variation in ploidy level and phenology can result in large and unexpected differences in demography and climatic sensitivity between closely related ferns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de G.A.; Zuidema, P.A.; Groot, H.; During, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Current environmental changes may affect the dynamics and viability of plant populations. This environmental sensitivity may differ between species of different ploidy level because polyploidization can influence life history traits. We compared the demography and climatic

  14. Tetraploids do not form cushions: association of ploidy level, growth form and ecology in the High Arctic Saxifraga oppositifolia L. s. lat. (Saxifragaceae in Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Bronken Eidesen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Saxifraga oppositifolia L. is a common circumpolar plant species that displays considerable morphological and genetic variation throughout its range. It is mainly diploid, but tetraploids are reported from several regions. The growth form varies from prostate to cushion-shaped, and the plant thrives in wet snow beds as well as on dry ridges. This variation has triggered the curiosity of many researchers, but as yet, no one has explained the observed morphological variation using ecological and/or genetic factors. However, the ploidy level has rarely been taken into account. This is the first study that demonstrates a significant correlation between ploidy level, ecology and growth form in S. oppositifolia. We successfully analysed 193 individuals of S. oppositifolia from 15 locations in Svalbard to investigate possible relationships among growth forms (prostrate, intermediate and cushion, ecological factors (vegetation and soil characteristics and ploidy level. Results from flow cytometry reported 106 diploids, eight triploids and 79 tetraploids. Tetraploids almost exclusively showed prostrate growth, while the diploids displayed all three growth forms, evidence that growth form is at least partly genetically determined. Our analyses of environmental and vegetation data in relation to ploidy level indicated overlapping niches, but the tetraploids showed a narrower niche, and one shifted towards more benign habitats characterized by higher pH, higher soil temperatures and higher cover of vascular plants. The latter may suggest that tetraploids are slightly better competitors, but less hardy. Thus, autopolyploidy in S. oppositifolia has expanded the ecological amplitude of this species complex.

  15. A look at ploidy level of Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench and V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. (Apocynaceae) from the perspective of a study of their invasion success

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to document precisely the patterns of chromosome counts and/or ploidy level variation of Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench and V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. (Apocynaceae) following their introduction and dispersion in the U.S. and Canada. V. nigrum is native to southwestern Europe whe...

  16. Application of DNA barcoding in biodiversity studies of shallow-water octocorals: molecular proxies agree with morphological estimates of species richness in Palau

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, C. S.; Brown, A. S.; Brayton, C.; Hunt, C. B.; van Ofwegen, L. P.

    2014-06-01

    The application of DNA barcoding to anthozoan cnidarians has been hindered by their slow rates of mitochondrial gene evolution and the failure to identify alternative molecular markers that distinguish species reliably. Among octocorals, however, multilocus barcodes can distinguish up to 70 % of morphospecies, thereby facilitating the identification of species that are ecologically important but still very poorly known taxonomically. We tested the ability of these imperfect DNA barcodes to estimate species richness in a biodiversity survey of the shallow-water octocoral fauna of Palau using multilocus ( COI, mtMutS, 28S rDNA) sequences obtained from 305 specimens representing 38 genera of octocorals. Numbers and identities of species were estimated independently (1) by a taxonomic expert using morphological criteria and (2) by assigning sequences to molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) using predefined genetic distance thresholds. Estimated numbers of MOTUs ranged from 73 to 128 depending on the barcode and distance threshold applied, bracketing the estimated number of 118 morphospecies. Concordance between morphospecies identifications and MOTUs ranged from 71 to 75 % and differed little among barcodes. For the speciose and ecologically dominant genus Sinularia, however, we were able to identify 95 % of specimens correctly simply by comparing mtMutS sequences and in situ photographs of colonies to an existing vouchered database. Because we lack a clear understanding of species boundaries in most of these taxa, numbers of morphospecies and MOTUs are both estimates of the true species diversity, and we cannot currently determine which is more accurate. Our results suggest, however, that the two methods provide comparable estimates of species richness for shallow-water Indo-Pacific octocorals. Use of molecular barcodes in biodiversity surveys will facilitate comparisons of species richness and composition among localities and over time, data that do not

  17. An "escape clock" for estimating the turnover of SIV DNA in resting CD4⁺ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Reece

    Full Text Available Persistence of HIV DNA presents a major barrier to the complete control of HIV infection under current therapies. Most studies suggest that cells with latently integrated HIV decay very slowly under therapy. However, it is much more difficult to study the turnover and persistence of HIV DNA during active infection. We have developed an "escape clock" approach for measuring the turnover of HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells. This approach studies the replacement of wild-type (WT SIV DNA present in early infection by CTL escape mutant (EM strains during later infection. Using a strain-specific real time PCR assay, we quantified the relative amounts of WT and EM strains in plasma SIV RNA and cellular SIV DNA. Thus we can track the formation and turnover of SIV DNA in sorted resting CD4+ T cells. We studied serial plasma and PBMC samples from 20 SIV-infected Mane-A*10 positive pigtail macaques that have a signature Gag CTL escape mutation. In animals with low viral load, WT virus laid down early in infection is extremely stable, and the decay of this WT species is very slow, consistent with findings in subjects on anti-retroviral medications. However, during active, high level infection, most SIV DNA in resting cells was turning over rapidly, suggesting a large pool of short-lived DNA produced by recent infection events. Our results suggest that, in order to reduce the formation of a stable population of SIV DNA, it will be important either to intervene very early or intervene during active replication.

  18. Estimating genetic diversity among selected cotton genotypes and the identificationof DNA markers associated with resistance to cotton leaf curl disease

    OpenAIRE

    ABBAS, AMMAD; Iqbal, Muhammad Atif; RAHMAN, MEHBOOB-UR; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    To the extent of our knowledge, applications of DNA markers in marker-assisted breeding of cotton are handicapped due to low genetic diversity in cotton germplasm. Cotton leaf curl disease, a disease of viral origin, has substantially depressed cotton production in Pakistan, and this disease is also an emerging threat to the neighboring cotton-growing countries like China and India. The present study was designed to identify DNA markers, predominately simple sequence repeats (SSRs), associate...

  19. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerkamp, Kim M., E-mail: K.M.Boerkamp@uu.nl; Rutteman, Gerard R. [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kik, Marja J. L. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kirpensteijn, Jolle [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-03

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  20. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schulze

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  1. Impulse cytophotometric DNA analysis in pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyai, A; Hori, A; Bockermann, V; Rama, B; Blech, M; Markakis, E

    1988-01-01

    Flow cytometric DNA analysis was carried out on 32 microsurgically removed pituitary adenomas. Additionally, the histograms of tumor cell nuclei of 7 patients were compared with those of the cultured cells from the same tumor samples. The tumors were classified into 3 groups according to the proliferation index (PI) of the flow cytometric results: 1) tumors with DNA patterns of slow proliferation (PI under 10), to which the majority of the examined pituitary adenomas belonged; 2) pituitary adenomas with diploid karyograms and PI values from 10 to 15; 3) diploid or aneuploid karyograms with PI values above 15. The third group were characterized histologically by increased chromatin content, nuclear polymorphism, mitoses, and extrapituitary infiltration of the tumor cells, and were, therefore, no longer benign. However, there was no direct relationship between the intensity of hormone secretory activity of the tumors and DNA ploidy. Cultured adenoma cells examined by flow cytometry remained stable in all cases but one.

  2. Shifts in microbial populations in Rusitec fermenters as affected by the type of diet and impact of the method for estimating microbial growth (15N v. microbial DNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I; Ranilla, M J; Saro, C; Carro, M D

    2017-11-01

    Rusitec fermenters are in vitro systems widely used to study ruminal fermentation, but little is known about the microbial populations establishing in them. This study was designed to assess the time evolution of microbial populations in fermenters fed medium- (MC; 50% alfalfa hay : concentrate) and high-concentrate diets (HC; 15 : 85 barley straw : concentrate). Samples from solid (SOL) and liquid (LIQ) content of fermenters were taken immediately before feeding on days 3, 8 and 14 of incubation for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis analyses. In SOL, total bacterial DNA concentration and relative abundance of Ruminococcus flavefaciens remained unchanged over the incubation period, but protozoal DNA concentration and abundance of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus and fungi decreased and abundance of methanogenic archaea increased. In LIQ, total bacterial DNA concentration increased with time, whereas concentration of protozoal DNA and abundance of methanogens and fungi decreased. Diet×time interactions were observed for bacterial and protozoal DNA and relative abundance of F. succinogenes and R. albus in SOL, as well as for protozoal DNA in LIQ. Bacterial diversity in SOL increased with time, but no changes were observed in LIQ. The incubated diet influenced all microbial populations, with the exception of total bacteria and fungi abundance in LIQ. Bacterial diversity was higher in MC-fed than in HC-fed fermenters in SOL, but no differences were detected in LIQ. Values of pH, daily production of volatile fatty acids and CH4 and isobutyrate proportions remained stable over the incubation period, but other fermentation parameters varied with time. The relationships among microbial populations and fermentation parameters were in well agreement with those previously reported in in vivo studies. Using 15N as a microbial marker or quantifying total microbial DNA for estimating microbial protein synthesis

  3. Diversity of planktonic fish larvae along a latitudinal gradient in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean estimated through DNA barcodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ardura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mid-trophic pelagic fish are essential components of marine ecosystems because they represent the link between plankton and higher predators. Moreover, they are the basis of the most important fisheries resources; for example, in African waters. In this study, we have sampled pelagic fish larvae in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean along a latitudinal gradient between 37°N and 2°S. We have employed Bongo nets for plankton sampling and sorted visually fish and fish larvae. Using the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI as a DNA barcode, we have identified 44 OTUs down to species level that correspond to 14 families, with Myctophidae being the most abundant. A few species were cosmopolitan and others latitude-specific, as was expected. The latitudinal pattern of diversity did not exhibit a temperate-tropical cline; instead, it was likely correlated with environmental conditions with a decline in low-oxygen zones. Importantly, gaps and inconsistencies in reference DNA databases impeded accurate identification to the species level of 49% of the individuals. Fish sampled from tropical latitudes and some orders, such as Perciformes, Myctophiformes and Stomiiformes, were largely unidentified due to incomplete references. Some larvae were identified based on morphology and COI analysis for comparing time and costs employed from each methodology. These results suggest the need of reinforcing DNA barcoding reference datasets of Atlantic bathypelagic tropical fish that, as main prey of top predators, are crucial for ecosystem-based management of fisheries resources.

  4. DNA barcoding, microarrays and next generation sequencing: recent tools for genetic diversity estimation and authentication of medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwat, Maryam; Yamdagni, Manu Mayank

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding, microarray technology and next generation sequencing have emerged as promising tools for the elucidation of plant genetic diversity and its conservation. They are proving to be immensely helpful in authenticating the useful medicinal plants for herbal drug preparations. These newer versions of molecular markers utilize short genetic markers in the genome to characterize the organism to a particular species. This has the potential not only to classify the known and yet unknown species but also has a promising future to link the medicinally important plants according to their properties. The newer trends being followed in DNA chips and barcoding pave the way for a future with many different possibilities. Several of these possibilities might be: characterization of unknown species in a considerably less time than usual, identification of newer medicinal properties possessed by the species and also updating the data of the already existing but unnoticed properties. This can assist us to cure many different diseases and will also generate novel opportunities in medicinal drug delivery and targeting.

  5. Prevalence and pathogen load estimates for the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis are impacted by ITS DNA copy number variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar, Eria A; Woodhams, Douglas C; LaBumbard, Brandon; Kielgast, Jos; Harris, Reid N

    2017-03-21

    The ribosomal gene complex is a multi-copy region that is widely used for phylogenetic analyses of organisms from all 3 domains of life. In fungi, the copy number of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is used to detect abundance of pathogens causing diseases such as chytridiomycosis in amphibians and white nose syndrome in bats. Chytridiomycosis is caused by the fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and B. salamandrivorans (Bsal), and is responsible for declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. Over a decade ago, a qPCR assay was developed to determine Bd prevalence and pathogen load. Here, we demonstrate the effect that ITS copy number variation in Bd strains can have on the estimation of prevalence and pathogen load. We used data sets from different amphibian species to simulate how ITS copy number affects prevalence and pathogen load. In addition, we tested 2 methods (gBlocks® synthetic standards and digital PCR) to determine ITS copy number in Bd strains. Our results show that assumptions about the ITS copy number can lead to under- or overestimation of Bd prevalence and pathogen load. The use of synthetic standards replicated previously published estimates of ITS copy number, whereas dPCR resulted in estimates that were consistently lower than previously published estimates. Standardizing methods will assist with comparison across studies and produce reliable estimates of prevalence and pathogen load in the wild, while using the same Bd strain for exposure experiments and zoospore standards in qPCR remains the best method for estimating parameters used in epidemiological studies.

  6. Prognostic Significance of DNA Cytometry in Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix FIGO Stage IB and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jürgen Grote

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prognostic value of DNA‐image cytometry in cervical carcinoma of the uterus and its relation to other established prognostic factors. Study design: The study included 116 cases of cervical carcinoma FIGO stages IB and II which were treated with radical abdominal hysterectomy. The median follow‐up was 55 months (range 1–162 months. DNA image cytometry was performed on cytologic specimens prepared by enzymatic cell separation from formalin‐fixed, paraffin‐embedded tissues. DNA stemline ploidy, DNA stemline aneuploidy, 5c exceeding rate, 9c exceeding rate, 2c deviation index, and DNA malignancy grade were computed. DNA‐variables as well as various clinical and histological variables were related to survival rates. Results: In multivariate statistical analysis DNA stemline ploidy using 2.2c as a cut‐off value and FIGO stage showed to be statistically significant available presurgery predictors of survival, whereas the postsurgical parameters lymphonodal status, tumor size and parametrial involvement were significantly correlated with survival. The synopsis of all parameters in a multivariate Cox model indicated that – with declining relevance – the number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, DNA stemline ploidy using a cut‐off level at a modal value of 2.2c, largest pelvic lymph node, 5c exceeding rate, and ratio of carcinoma area to cervix area, were of predictive value for survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that prognostic information deducted from classical staging parameters is successfully complemented by DNA image cytometry which can be applied pretherapeutically.

  7. Morphological differentiation of seven parthenogenetic Artemia (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) populations from China, with special emphasis on ploidy degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asem, Alireza; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2016-04-01

    Parthenogenetic Artemia from seven Chinese locations with different elevations and various ploidies are characterized by phenotypic and morphometric analyses. Our findings show that the studied populations exhibit dissimilar patterns of ovisac. Four phenotypic patterns of furca are qualified and one of them is shared among di-, tetra- and pentaploid Artemia. Results of discriminant analysis based on morphometric data reveal that tetra- and pentaploid populations are grouped together, but the Aqqikkol Lake population is clearly differentiated. Previous hypothesis/conclusion that polyploid Artemia are larger than diploids is only partly supported by the present results, which show that pentaploid and tetraploid populations are larger than the mostly diploid populations in terms of the total length, but the body size of the Aibi Lake triploids has not significant difference with the sympatric diploids and the mostly diploid Aqqikkol population that inhabit in very high altitude has the largest body size among all parthenogenetic populations. The founding confirms that body size of Artemia is following with Bergmann's rule. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Test of simultaneous synthetic DNA tracer injections for the estimation of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären, northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Leung, S.; Lyon, S. W.; Sharma, A. N.; Walter, M. T.; Williamson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Storglaciären glacier, located in the sub-arctic Tarfala catchment, in northern Sweden is one of the world's longest continuously monitored glaciers which provides a unique research platform for the long-term assessment of glacier and ice sheet processes. For example, small mountain glacier hydrological knowledge of the subglacial water distribution at the ice-bed interface has been applied to ice sheets to predict basal sliding processes. Basal sliding promoted by hydraulic jacking is an important glacial-velocity control that is dependent on the subglacial flow pathways' morphology. Thus, understanding subglacial water distribution and drainage system structure and morphology is crucial for modeling ice masses' flow. In order to estimate subglacial drainage system structure and morphology dye tracing experiments are widely employed. Tracer experiments provide quantitative parameters for any input location including tracer transit velocity, dispersivity, recovery and storage. However, spatial data coverage is limited by the finite number of tracers available for simultaneous tracing. In the presented study we test the use of synthetic DNA tracers for the assessment of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären. The synthetic DNA tracer is composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated (Sharma et al., 2012, Environmental Science & Technology). Because the DNA sequences can be randomly combined the synthetic DNA tracer provides an enormous number of unique tracers (approximately 1.61 x 1060). Thus, these synthetic tracers have the advantage that multiple (>10) experiments can be conducted simultaneously, allowing a greater information gain within a shorter measurement period. Quantities of a certain DNA strand can be detected using biotechnology tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). During the 2013

  9. Evaluation of five DNA extraction methods for purification of DNA from atherosclerotic tissue and estimation of prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in tissue from a Danish population undergoing vascular repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend

    2003-01-01

    To date PCR detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA in atherosclerotic lesions from Danish patients has been unsuccessful. To establish whether non-detection was caused by a suboptimal DNA extraction method, we tested five different DNA extraction methods for purification of DNA from atherosclerotic...

  10. Karyotype analysis, DNA content and molecular screening in Lippia alba (Verbenaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M.O. Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analyses, of pollen viability, nuclear DNA content and RAPD markers were employed to study three chemotypes of Lippia alba (Mill. (Verbenaceae in order to understand the genetic variation among them. Different ploidy levels and mixoploid individuals were observed. This work comprises the first report of different chromosome numbers (cytotypes in L. alba. The chromosome numbers of La2-carvone and La3-linalool chemotypes suggested that they are polyploids. Flow cytometric analysis showed an increase of nuclear DNA content that was not directly proportional to ploidy level variation. A cluster analysis based on RAPD markers revealed that La3-linalool shares genetic markers with La1-citral and La2-carvone. The analysis showed that the majority of genetic variation of La3-linalool could be a consequence of ixoploidy. ur data indicates that sexual reproduction aong those three chemotypes is unlikely and suggests the beginning of reproductive isolation. The results demonstrated that chromosome analysis, nuclear DNA content estimation and RAPD markers constitute excellent tools for detecting genetic variation among L. alba chemotypes.Análises citogenéticas, de viabilidade do pólen, do conteúdo de DNA nuclear e marcadores RAPD foram empregadas no estudo de três quimiotipos de Lippia alba (Mill. (Verbenaceae visando contribuir para o entendimento da variação genética entre os mesmos. Diferentes níveis de ploidia e indivíduos mixoploides foram observados. Este trabalho compreende o primeiro relato de diferentes números cromossômicos (citótipos em L. alba. Os números cromossômicos dos quimiotipos La2-carvona e La3-linalol sugere que eles seja poliploides. A análise da citometria de fluxo mostrou um aumento do conteúdo de DNA nuclear que não foi diretamente proporcional à variação no nível de ploidia. A análise de agrupamento baseada nos marcadores RAPD demonstrou que La3-linalol compartilha marcadores genéticos com La1

  11. Neighbour Origin and Ploidy Level Drive Impact of an Alien Invasive Plant Species in a Competitive Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the potential mechanisms driving the spread and naturalization of alien plant species has increased over the past decades, but specific knowledge on the factors contributing to their increased impact in the introduced range is still urgently needed. The native European plant Centaurea stoebe occurs as two cytotypes with different life histories (monocarpic diploids, allo-polycarpic tetraploids. However, only tetraploids have been found in its introduced range in North America, where C. stoebe has become a most prominent plant invader. Here, we focus on the ploidy level of C. stoebe and origin of neighbouring community in explaining the high impact during the invasion of new sites in the introduced range. We conducted a mesocosm experiment under open-field conditions with the diploid (EU2x and tetraploid (EU4x cytotype of Centaurea stoebe from its native European (EU range, and with the invasive tetraploid (NA4x cytotype from the introduced North American (NA range in competition with EU (old or NA (new neighbouring plant communities. In the presence of competition, the biomass of EU neighbouring community was reduced to a comparable level by all three geo-cytotypes of C. stoebe. In contrast, the biomass of the NA neighbouring community was reduced beyond when competing with tetraploid, but not with diploid C. stoebe. The fact that the biomass of all three geo-cytotypes of C. stoebe was correlated with the biomass of the EU neighbouring community, but not with that of the NA neighbouring community suggests that different mechanisms underlie the competitive interactions between C. stoebe and its old vs. new neighbouring communities, such as competition for the same limiting resources at home vs competition through novel allelo-chemicals or differential resource uptake strategies in the introduced range. We therefore caution to simply use the ecosystem impact assessed at home to predict impact in the introduced range.

  12. Agronomic, leaf anatomy, morphology, endophyte presence and ploidy characterization of accessions of Festuca group rubra collected in northern Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, J. A.; Gutierrez-Villarias, M. I.; Fernandez-Casado, M. A.; Costal-Andrade, L.; Gonzalez-Arraez, E.; Bughrara, S. S.; Afif, E.

    2008-07-01

    Fifteen accessions of Facet's group rubra collected in northern Spain were characterized and grouped into four Festuca taxa on the basis of leaf anatomy, morphology and ploidy; seven were identified as F. heteromalla; two as F. trichophylla ssp. asperifolia; two as F. nigrescens ssp. microphylla and four as F. rubra ssp. pruinosa. All the accessions and one commercial cultivar Wilma (F. nigrescens ssp. nigrescens), used as control, were established at the Mabegondo Agronomical Research Centre, A Coruna (Galicia) in a completely randomised block design with three replicates of 10 plants per accession. The plants were agronomically characterized for seven traits during 2004 and 2005. Cluster analysis was useful in identifying four clusters that described 66.5% of the phenotypic variation. Cluster 1 consisted of nine accessions with early heading, intermediate values of green colour and tolerance to crown rust in autumn and the highest seasonal growth. Cluster 2 contained two accessions with intermediate values of heading, green colour, good tolerance to crown rust in autumn and intermediate seasonal growth. Cluster 3 contained two accessions and the cultivar Wilma, which showed early heading, dark green colour, good tolerance to crown rust in autumn and spring and intermediate seasonal growth. Cluster 4 consisted of two late heading accessions with dark green colour, and the best tolerance to crown rust in autumn and intermediate seasonal growth. Thirteen of the 15 accessions (86.6%) were infected by fungal endophytes, with the degree of infection ranging from 2 to 73%. Additional key words: endophyte, fine fescues, genetic resources, hierarchical clustering, leaf sections, multivariate analysis, turf grass. (Author) 33 refs.

  13. Neighbour Origin and Ploidy Level Drive Impact of an Alien Invasive Plant Species in a Competitive Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Müller-Schärer, Heinz; Schaffner, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the potential mechanisms driving the spread and naturalization of alien plant species has increased over the past decades, but specific knowledge on the factors contributing to their increased impact in the introduced range is still urgently needed. The native European plant Centaurea stoebe occurs as two cytotypes with different life histories (monocarpic diploids, allo-polycarpic tetraploids). However, only tetraploids have been found in its introduced range in North America, where C. stoebe has become a most prominent plant invader. Here, we focus on the ploidy level of C. stoebe and origin of neighbouring community in explaining the high impact during the invasion of new sites in the introduced range. We conducted a mesocosm experiment under open-field conditions with the diploid (EU2x) and tetraploid (EU4x) cytotype of Centaurea stoebe from its native European (EU) range, and with the invasive tetraploid (NA4x) cytotype from the introduced North American (NA) range in competition with EU (old) or NA (new) neighbouring plant communities. In the presence of competition, the biomass of EU neighbouring community was reduced to a comparable level by all three geo-cytotypes of C. stoebe. In contrast, the biomass of the NA neighbouring community was reduced beyond when competing with tetraploid, but not with diploid C. stoebe. The fact that the biomass of all three geo-cytotypes of C. stoebe was correlated with the biomass of the EU neighbouring community, but not with that of the NA neighbouring community suggests that different mechanisms underlie the competitive interactions between C. stoebe and its old vs. new neighbouring communities, such as competition for the same limiting resources at home vs competition through novel allelo-chemicals or differential resource uptake strategies in the introduced range. We therefore caution to simply use the ecosystem impact assessed at home to predict impact in the introduced range.

  14. Changing numbers of spawning cutthroat trout in tributary streams of Yellowstone Lake and estimates of grizzly bears visiting streams from DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldson, M.A.; Gunther, K.A.; Reinhart, Daniel P.; Podruzny, S.R.; Cegelski, C.; Waits, L.; Wyman, T.C.; Smith, J.

    2005-01-01

    Spawning Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) provide a source of highly digestible energy for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) that visit tributary streams to Yellowstone Lake during the spring and early summer. During 1985–87, research documented grizzly bears fishing on 61% of the 124 tributary streams to the lake. Using track measurements, it was estimated that a minimum of 44 grizzly bears fished those streams annually. During 1994, non-native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were discovered in Yellowstone Lake. Lake trout are efficient predators and have the potential to reduce the native cutthroat population and negatively impact terrestrial predators that use cutthroat trout as a food resource. In 1997, we began sampling a subset of streams (n = 25) from areas of Yellowstone Lake surveyed during the previous study to determine if changes in spawner numbers or bear use had occurred. Comparisons of peak numbers and duration suggested a considerable decline between study periods in streams in the West Thumb area of the lake. The apparent decline may be due to predation by lake trout. Indices of bear use also declined on West Thumb area streams. We used DNA from hair collected near spawning streams to estimate the minimum number of bears visiting the vicinity of spawning streams. Seventy-four individual bears were identified from 429 hair samples. The annual number of individuals detected ranged from 15 in 1997 to 33 in 2000. Seventy percent of genotypes identified were represented by more than 1 sample, but only 31% of bears were documented more than 1 year of the study. Sixty-two (84%) bears were only documented in 1 segment of the lake, whereas 12 (16%) were found in 2–3 lake segments. Twenty-seven bears were identified from hair collected at multiple streams. One bear was identified on 6 streams in 2 segments of the lake and during 3 years of the study. We used encounter histories derived from DNA and the Jolly-Seber procedure in Program MARK

  15. Low Temperature Tolerance of Apple Cultivars of Different Ploidy at Different Times of the Winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozherelieva Zoya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial freezing was used to evaluate diploid and triploid apple cultivars from the All Russian Research Institute of Fruit Crop Breeding at Orel throughout three winters. The studied apple varieties were developed by breeder E. N. Sedov and cytological analysis was carried out by cytologist G. A. Sedysheva. In early winter, all cultivars exhibited high tolerance to cold. In mid-winter buds and wood were severely damaged, while bark was more resistant for most cultivars. Basic components of hardiness were estimated: component I - frost resistance at -25 °C in the beginning of winter; component II - maximum value of frost resistance at -40 °C developed by plants during hardening; component III - ability to retain the hardened condition at -25 °C after a period of three-day thaw at +2 °C; and component IV - the ability to restore frost resistance at -30 °C after repeated hardening and three-day thaw at +2 °C. During late-winter thaws, buds suffered from frosts, while the bark and wood retained frost hardiness. Late in winter all cultivars demonstrated high resistance to repeated frosts. Triploid cultivars exhibited the highest level of cold hardiness of vegetative buds, bark and wood of annual shoots throughout the winter; these cultivars included ‘Zhilinskoye’, ‘Vavilovskoye’, ‘Osipovskoye’, ‘Patriot’, ‘Sinap Orlovski’, ‘Spasskoye’, ‘Turgenevskoye’, and diploids ‘Bolotovskoye’, ‘Sokovinka’, and ‘’Ranneye Aloye’.

  16. Genome size, chromosome number, and rDNA organisation in Algerian populations of Artemisia herba-alba (Asteraceae, a basic plant for animal feeding facing overgrazing erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Bougoutaia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia herba-alba is a largely-distributed and often landscape-dominating taxon in arid areas of the Mediterranean and Irano-Turanian regions. In Algeria, in 2010 its communities covered 10% of the steppe territory, but its populations have been subjected to overgrazing. A karyological study based on 22 populations together with a cytogenetic characterisation of this species has been performed for the first time in Algerian materials, through genome size and chromosome number determination. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH was also used to assess the rDNA loci number and distribution in the two ploidy levels detected. The studied accessions are diploid (2n = 2x = 18 chromosomes, 6 populations or tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36 chromosomes, 15 populations. One population, occupying a more or less central geographic position among the studied area, presented both cytotypes. Genome size reflects well the two ploidy levels, with no evidence of downsizing with polyploidy. The karyotypes are rather symmetric (2A Stebbins’ class. FISH analyses detected four signals (2 loci in diploid and eight signals (4 loci in tetraploid cytotypes for both ribosomal DNA genes, which present an L-type (linked organisation, i.e. with loci from both rDNA genes colocalised. The presence of two ploidy levels suggest a genomic dynamism and even a possible differentiation underlying the morphological uniformity and despite the dramatic decrease experienced by this plant in Algeria in terms of surface coverage.

  17. DNA flow cytometric analysis in variable types of hydropic placentas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Atabaki pasdar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Differential diagnosis between complete hydatidiform mole, partial hydatidiform mole and hydropic abortion, known as hydropic placentas is still a challenge for pathologists but it is very important for patient management. Objective: We analyzed the nuclear DNA content of various types of hydropic placentas by flowcytometry. Materials and Methods: DNA ploidy analysis was performed in 20 non-molar (hydropic and non-hydropic spontaneous abortions and 20 molar (complete and partial moles, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples by flow cytometry. The criteria for selection were based on the histopathologic diagnosis. Results: Of 10 cases histologically diagnosed as complete hydatiform mole, 9 cases yielded diploid histograms, and 1 case was tetraploid. Of 10 partial hydatidiform moles, 8 were triploid and 2 were diploid. All of 20 cases diagnosed as spontaneous abortions (hydropic and non-hydropic yielded diploid histograms. Conclusion: These findings signify the importance of the combined use of conventional histology and ploidy analysis in the differential diagnosis of complete hydatidiform mole, partial hydatidiform mole and hydropic abortion.

  18. The effect of vaccination, ploidy and smolt production regime on pathological melanin depositions in muscle tissue of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, H A S; Austbø, L; Nødtvedt, A; Fraser, T W K; Rimstad, E; Fjelldal, P G; Hansen, T; Koppang, E O

    2014-04-01

    The presence of melanin in muscle fillets of farmed salmon represents a considerable quality problem for the salmon industry with major economic concerns. In this study, we have examined the presence of abnormal pigmentation in vaccinated versus unvaccinated Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., and evaluated possible differences between diploid and triploid fish. Furthermore, the impact of the smolt production regime at ambient (4.5 °C) versus elevated temperature (16 °C) was investigated. Pigmented muscle spots were analysed for the expression of genes involved in melanization (tyrosinase gene family) and immune-related response in addition to morphological investigations. The proportion of fish with intramuscular melanin deposits was not significantly different between vaccinated and unvaccinated fish, regardless of ploidy. However, an interaction between vaccination and smolt regime was shown, where smoltification at elevated temperature after vaccination increased the number of affected individuals compared with vaccination followed by simulated natural smoltification. Furthermore, there were overall more fish with melanin spots amongst the triploids compared with their diploid counterparts. Transcription of the tyrosinase gene family confirmed an onsite melanogenesis in all pigment spots. The histological examination and the expression of the immune-related genes revealed a chronic polyphasic myopathy that was not affected by vaccination, ploidy or smolt production regime. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Estimation of age-related DNA degradation from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue according to the extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mototsugu; Hashida, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Matsubara, Takehiro; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Suzawa, Ken; Maki, Yuho; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Toyooka, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2017-09-01

    Techniques for the extraction and use of nucleic acids from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, preserved over long time periods in libraries, have been developed. However, DNA extracted from FFPE tissues is generally damaged, and long-term storage may affect DNA quality. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the effect of long-term storage on FFPE tissues and evaluate the techniques used to extract DNA from them. In the present study, the yield, purity, and integrity of DNA in FFPE tissue samples was evaluated. Two DNA extraction techniques were used: A silica-binding DNA collection method using QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit (QIA) and a total tissue DNA collection method using a WaxFree DNA extraction kit (WAX). A total of 25 FFPE tissues from lung adenocarcinomas were studied, which had been surgically resected and fixed at Okayama University Hospital prior to examination and subsequent storage at room temperature for 0.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 years. Extracted DNA was quantified using ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescent dye, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The quality of the DNA was defined by the absorbance ratio of 260 to 280 nm (A260/280) and Q-score, which is the quantitative value of qPCR product size ratio. The results demonstrated that the yield of total DNA extracted using WAX was significantly greater than when QIA was used (Pextracted using WAX included more contaminants and was significantly more fragmented compared with DNA extracted using QIA (Pextraction (QIA P=0.02, WAX P=0.03; 0.5 years vs. 3 years, QIA Pextraction methods are viable depending on whether high yield or high quality of extracted DNA is required. However, due to the increased degradation with age, storage time limits the available DNA in FFPE tissues regardless of the extraction method.

  20. Chromosome number distribution and cellular DNA content in colorectal adenomas from polyposis and nonpolyposis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S E; Madsen, A L; Bak, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Ploidy analyses of colorectal adenomas were performed by combined flow cytometric DNA analysis of unfixed isolated nuclei and direct chromosome preparation after Colcemid incubation for 9-20 hours. Ten of 18 adenomas from nonpolyposis patients and 4 of 13 adenomas from patients with familial...... and a correspondingly increased nuclear DNA content. In another two adenomas, the DNA analyses showed small hyperploid populations constituting 6% and 2% of the cells. The most striking difference between the DNA analyses and chromosome number distributions was that 13% of all metaphases were hyperploid with chromosome...... numbers outside the perimodal range but, except in one adenoma, without indication in the DNA histogram of corresponding hyperploid cell populations. We propose that these aberrant metaphases indicate an early acquired genetic instability of the neoplastic epithelium, which may be instrumental...

  1. Comparison of cytogenetic abnormalities and deoxyribonucleic acid ploidy of benign, borderline malignant, and different grades of malignant soft tissue tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Eva; Oven, M W Van; de Jong, Bauke; Dam, Anke; Wiersema, J; Dijkhuizen, T; Hoekstra, H J; Molenaar, W M

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both DNA flow cytometry and cytogenetic analysis have been used to study soft tissue tumors. With flow cytometry, the DNA content of a relatively large number of cells can be examined, but cytogenetic analysis gives more detailed information about genomic changes. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In

  2. When ultrasound anomalies are present: An estimation of the frequency of chromosome abnormalities not detected by cell-free DNA aneuploidy screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Rebecca M; Mason-Suares, Heather; Little, Sarah E; Bromley, Bryann; Reiff, Emily S; Dobson, Lori J; Wilkins-Haug, Louise

    2018-02-13

    This study characterizes cytogenetic abnormalities with ultrasound findings to refine counseling following negative cell-free DNA (cfDNA). A retrospective cohort of pregnancies with chromosome abnormalities and ultrasound findings was examined to determine the residual risk following negative cfDNA. Cytogenetic data was categorized as cfDNA detectable for aneuploidies of chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, or Y or non-cfDNA detectable for other chromosome abnormalities. Ultrasound reports were categorized as structural anomaly, nuchal translucency (NT) ≥3.0 mm, or other "soft markers". Results were compared using chi squared and Fishers exact tests. Of the 498 fetuses with cytogenetic abnormalities and ultrasound findings, 16.3% (81/498) had non-cfDNA detectable results. In the first, second, and third trimesters, 12.4% (32/259), 19.5% (42/215), and 29.2% (7/24) had non-cfDNA detectable results respectively. The first trimester non-cfDNA detectable results reduced to 7.7% (19/246) if triploidy was detectable by cfDNA testing. For isolated first trimester NT of 3.0-3.49 mm, 15.8% (6/38) had non-cfDNA detectable results, while for NT ≥3.5 mm, it was 12.3% (20/162). For cystic hygroma, 4.3% (4/94) had non-cfDNA detectable results. Counseling for residual risk following cfDNA in the presence of an ultrasound finding is impacted by gestational age, ultrasound finding, and cfDNA detection of triploidy. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  4. Probing DNA-DNA electrostatic friction in tight superhelical DNA plies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherstvy, A G

    2009-04-23

    We estimate theoretically the strength of DNA-DNA electrostatic friction forces emerging upon a slow drag of one DNA over another one in a close juxtaposition. For ideally helical DNA duplexes, this friction occurs due to correlations in electrostatic potential near the DNA surface. The latter originate from the intrinsic helicity of DNA phosphates and adsorbed cations on a scale of 3.4 nm. They produce positive-negative charge interlocking along the DNA-DNA contact. For realistic nonideally helical DNAs, where electrostatic potential barriers become decorrelated due to accumulation of mismatches in DNA structure, DNA-DNA frictional forces are strongly impeded. We discuss possibilities of probing the DNA-DNA intermolecular interactions in strongly confined DNA superhelical plies, as obtained in single-molecule experiments.

  5. The correlation between cell-free DNA and tumour burden was estimated by PET/CT in patients with advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, A D; Holdgaard, Paw; Spindler, K-L G

    2014-01-01

    burden defined by positron emission tomography (PET) parameters.Methods:Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled into a prospective biomarker trial. Before treatment, plasma was extracted and the level of cfDNA was determined by qPCR. An (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F......Background:Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) circulating in the blood holds a possible prognostic value in malignant diseases. Under malignant conditions, the level of cfDNA increases but the biological mechanism remains to be fully understood. We aimed to examine the correlation between cfDNA and total tumour...... analysis. MTV>the median was associated with a significantly shorter OS (P=0.02). There was no significant difference in OS according to TLG (P=0.08).Conclusion:Cell-free DNA may not be a simple measure of tumour burden, but seems to reflect more complex mechanisms of tumour biology, making it attractive...

  6. Benchmark dose risk assessment for formaldehyde using airflow modeling and a single-compartment, DNA-protein cross-link dosimetry model to estimate human equivalent doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Paul M; Lilly, Patrick D; Conolly, Rory B; Janszen, Derek B; Kimbell, Julie S

    2003-06-01

    Formaldehyde induced squamous-cell carcinomas in the nasal passages of F344 rats in two inhalation bioassays at exposure levels of 6 ppm and above. Increases in rates of cell proliferation were measured by T. M. Monticello and colleagues at exposure levels of 0.7 ppm and above in the same tissues from which tumors arose. A risk assessment for formaldehyde was conducted at the CIIT Centers for Health Research, in collaboration with investigators from Toxicological Excellence in Risk Assessment (TERA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in 1999. Two methods for dose-response assessment were used: a full biologically based modeling approach and a statistically oriented analysis by benchmark dose (BMD) method. This article presents the later approach, the purpose of which is to combine BMD and pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate human cancer risks from formaldehyde exposure. BMD analysis was used to identify points of departure (exposure levels) for low-dose extrapolation in rats for both tumor and the cell proliferation endpoints. The benchmark concentrations for induced cell proliferation were lower than for tumors. These concentrations were extrapolated to humans using two mechanistic models. One model used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) alone to determine rates of delivery of inhaled formaldehyde to the nasal lining. The second model combined the CFD method with a pharmacokinetic model to predict tissue dose with formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein cross-links (DPX) as a dose metric. Both extrapolation methods gave similar results, and the predicted cancer risk in humans at low exposure levels was found to be similar to that from a risk assessment conducted by the U.S. EPA in 1991. Use of the mechanistically based extrapolation models lends greater certainty to these risk estimates than previous approaches and also identifies the uncertainty in the measured dose-response relationship for cell proliferation at low exposure levels, the dose

  7. Estimating the DNA strand breakage using a fuzzy inference system and agarose gel electrophoresis, a case study with toothed carp Aphanius sophiae exposed to cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorbagher, Hadi; Moghaddam, Maryam Nasrollahpour; Eagderi, Soheil; Farahmand, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    The DNA breakage has been widely used in ecotoxicological studies to investigate effects of pesticides in fishes. The present study used a fuzzy inference system to quantify the breakage of DNA double strand in Aphanius sophiae exposed to the cypermethrin. The specimens were adapted to different temperatures and salinity for 14 days and then exposed to cypermethrin. DNA of each specimens were extracted, electrophoresed and photographed. A fuzzy system with three input variables and 27 rules were defined. The pixel value curve of DNA on each gel lane was obtained using ImageJ. The DNA breakage was quantified using the pixel value curve and fuzzy system. The defuzzified values were analyzed using a three-way analysis of variance. Cypermethrin had significant effects on DNA breakage. Fuzzy inference systems can be used as a tool to quantify the breakage of double strand DNA. DNA double strand of the gill of A. sophiae is sensitive enough to be used to detect cypermethrin in surface waters in concentrations much lower than those reported in previous studies.

  8. Intragenomic variation in the ITS rDNA region obscures phylogenetic relationships and inflates estimates of operational taxonomic units in genus Laetiporus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Mark T. Banik

    2011-01-01

    Regions of rDNA are commonly used to infer phylogenetic relationships among fungal species and as DNA barcodes for identification. These regions occur in large tandem arrays, and concerted evolution is believed to reduce intragenomic variation among copies within these arrays, although some variation still might exist. Phylogenetic studies typically use consensus...

  9. Evaluation of Prognostic Factors Following Flow-Cytometric DNA Analysis after Cytokeratin Labelling: II. Cervical and Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Wimberger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In gynecologic oncology valid prognostic factors are necessary to define biologically similar subgroups for analysis of therapeutic efficacy. This study is the first published prospective study concerning prognostic significance of DNA ploidy and S‐phase fraction in cervical and endometrial cancer following enrichment of tumor cells by cytokeratin labelling. Epithelial cells were labeled by FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, 8, and CK 17 prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis in 91 specimens of cervical cancer and 73 samples of endometrial cancer. In cervical cancer neither DNA‐ploidy nor S‐phase fraction were relevant prognostic parameters. But CV of the G0G1‐peak showed prognostic relevance in cervical cancer cells, even in multivariate analysis. This interesting observation, however, seems to have no therapeutic consequence due to the small discrimination capacity of CV. In endometrial carcinoma, gross DNA‐aneuploidy (DNA‐index > 1.3 and a high percentage of proliferating cells (>75th percentile were univariate and multivariate highly significant prognostic factors for recurrence‐free survival. Especially DNA‐aneuploidy (DI>1.3 is one of the most important independent molecular biological prognostic factors. While diagnostic curettage we could identify risk patients even preoperatively by determination of the prognostic factors like histologic tumor type, grading, cervical involvement and DNA‐ploidy. Thereby these patients could be treated primarily in an oncologic center. In conclusion, our investigations showed that the determination of DNA‐ploidy should be done in endometrial carcinoma. In cervical cancer no clinical significance for determination of DNA‐parameters was found.

  10. Prognostic relevance of DNA flow cytometry in breast cancer revisited: The 25-year experience of the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, António E.; Pereira, Teresa; Silva, Giovani L.; André, Saudade

    2017-01-01

    The potential prognostic significance of DNA flow cytometric measurements (DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction) in breast cancer remains in dispute. Inconclusive data, primarily due to the lack of consistent standardization and quality control programs, have limited its translation into clinical practice. The aim of the present review, based on the 25-year experience of the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon, is to assess the clinical relevance and application of DNA flow cytometry for the prognosis of breast cancer. Overall, data from Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon indicate that DNA flow cytometry provides significant prognostic information that is biologically relevant and clinically useful for the management of patients with breast cancer. Furthermore, this data has demonstrated the independent value of DNA aneuploidy as a prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in various subgroups of patients with early or locally advanced breast cancer at short- and long-term follow-up. Notably, aneuploidy identifies subsets of patients with grade (G)1 or G2 tumours who exhibit a poor clinical outcome. These patients may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, particularly those with luminal A and luminal B/human epidermal growth factor-2-negative endocrine-responsive breast cancer. In conclusion, data from Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Lisbon reinforces the clinical importance and utility of DNA flow cytometric analysis, particularly DNA ploidy, in the prognostic assessment and therapeutic planning for patients with breast cancer. PMID:28454358

  11. Abnormal meiosis in an intersectional allotriploid of Populus L. and segregation of ploidy levels in 2x × 3x progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Huo, Beibei; Liu, Wanting; Li, Daili; Liao, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Triploid plants are usually highly aborted owing to unbalanced meiotic chromosome segregation, but limited viable gametes can participate in the transition to different ploidy levels. In this study, numerous meiotic abnormalities were found with high frequency in an intersectional allotriploid poplar (Populus alba × P. berolinensis 'Yinzhong'), including univalents, precocious chromosome migration, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, and precocious cytokinesis, indicating high genetic imbalance in this allotriploid. Some micronuclei trigger mini-spindle formation in metaphase II and participate in cytokinesis to form polyads with microcytes. Unbalanced chromosome segregation and chromosome elimination resulted in the formation of microspores with aneuploid chromosome sets. Fusion of sister nuclei occurs in microsporocytes with precocious cytokinesis, which could form second meiotic division restitution (SDR)-type gametes. However, SDR-type gametes likely contain incomplete chromosome sets due to unbalanced segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division in triploids. Misorientation of spindles during the second meiotic division, such as fused and tripolar spindles with low frequency, could result in the formation of first meiotic division restitution (FDR)-type unreduced gametes, which most likely contain three complete chromosome sets. Although 'Yinzhong' yields 88.7% stainable pollen grains with wide diameter variation from 23.9 to 61.3 μm, the pollen viability is poor (2.78% ± 0.38). A cross of 'Yinzhong' pollen with a diploid female clone produced progeny with extensive segregation of ploidy levels, including 29 diploids, 18 triploids, 4 tetraploids, and 48 aneuploids, suggesting the formation of viable aneuploidy and unreduced pollen in 'Yinzhong'. Individuals with different chromosome compositions are potential to analyze chromosomal function and to integrate the chromosomal dosage variation into breeding programs

  12. Abnormal meiosis in an intersectional allotriploid of Populus L. and segregation of ploidy levels in 2x × 3x progeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available Triploid plants are usually highly aborted owing to unbalanced meiotic chromosome segregation, but limited viable gametes can participate in the transition to different ploidy levels. In this study, numerous meiotic abnormalities were found with high frequency in an intersectional allotriploid poplar (Populus alba × P. berolinensis 'Yinzhong', including univalents, precocious chromosome migration, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, and precocious cytokinesis, indicating high genetic imbalance in this allotriploid. Some micronuclei trigger mini-spindle formation in metaphase II and participate in cytokinesis to form polyads with microcytes. Unbalanced chromosome segregation and chromosome elimination resulted in the formation of microspores with aneuploid chromosome sets. Fusion of sister nuclei occurs in microsporocytes with precocious cytokinesis, which could form second meiotic division restitution (SDR-type gametes. However, SDR-type gametes likely contain incomplete chromosome sets due to unbalanced segregation of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division in triploids. Misorientation of spindles during the second meiotic division, such as fused and tripolar spindles with low frequency, could result in the formation of first meiotic division restitution (FDR-type unreduced gametes, which most likely contain three complete chromosome sets. Although 'Yinzhong' yields 88.7% stainable pollen grains with wide diameter variation from 23.9 to 61.3 μm, the pollen viability is poor (2.78% ± 0.38. A cross of 'Yinzhong' pollen with a diploid female clone produced progeny with extensive segregation of ploidy levels, including 29 diploids, 18 triploids, 4 tetraploids, and 48 aneuploids, suggesting the formation of viable aneuploidy and unreduced pollen in 'Yinzhong'. Individuals with different chromosome compositions are potential to analyze chromosomal function and to integrate the chromosomal dosage variation into

  13. Spermatocytic seminoma as compared to classical seminoma: an immunohistochemical and DNA flow cytometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraggerud, S M; Berner, A; Bryne, M; Pettersen, E O; Fossa, S D

    1999-03-01

    Based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) and DNA ploidy, different paths of carcinogenesis have been suggested for spermatocytic seminoma (SS) and classical seminoma (CS). The present study extends current knowledge on the above parameters. Seventeen SSs and twenty-two CSs were assessed by IHC for placental-like alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), c-kit, cytokeratin and adhesion carbohydrate molecyles. All SSs and 11 CSs were also analysed for DNA ploidy. All CSs, but none of the SSs, were positive for PLAP. C-kit positivity was found in 7 of 17 SSs and in all CSs. The other IHC parameters were similarly distributed among the evaluated SSs and CSs. Fourteen SSs were diploid or polyploid, and three were aneuploid. All CSs were aneuploid. The new observation of c-kit positivity in about 40% of SSs suggests that at least some of the SSs originate from primordial cells. The predominantly diploid or polyploid DNA pattern indicates that SSs follow a pathogenetic pathway which is most probably different from that of CSs.

  14. Cell type specific DNA methylation in cord blood: A 450K-reference data set and cell count-based validation of estimated cell type composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervin, K. (Kristina); Page, C.M. (Christian Magnus); H.C.D. Aass (Hans Christian Dalsbotten); M.A.E. Jansen (Michelle A.E.); Fjeldstad, H.E. (Heidi Elisabeth); B.K. Andreassen (Bettina Kulle); L. Duijts (Liesbeth); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); M.C. van Zelm (Menno); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); Nordeng, H. (Hedvig); Knudsen, G.P. (Gunn Peggy); P. Magnus (Per); W. Nystad (Wenche); Staff, A.C. (Anne Cathrine); J.F. Felix (Janine); R. Lyle (Robert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEpigenome-wide association studies of prenatal exposure to different environmental factors are becoming increasingly common. These studies are usually performed in umbilical cord blood. Since blood comprises multiple cell types with specific DNA methylation patterns, confounding caused

  15. Organization and Variation Analysis of 5S rDNA in Different Ploidy-level Hybrids of Red Crucian Carp × Topmouth Culter

    OpenAIRE

    He, Weiguo; Qin, Qinbo; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets...

  16. Cytokinetic investigations in human breast cancer by flow cytometrically recorded DNA/protein distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, H; Görlich, M; Frege, J; Granetzny, A; Streller, B; Nitschke, U; Weiher, U

    1996-01-01

    This prospective study characterizes T1-T2 breast carcinomas (N = 114) and fibroadenomas (N = 16) by cell kinetic parameters derived from flow cytometrically recorded DNA/protein histograms. Ploidy level, cell cycle distribution and the number of cell subpopulations (SP) characterized by correlating DNA and protein values were assessed. The subpopulations were derived from the three-dimensional plot. The estrogen receptor (ER) status was determined biochemically (N = 61). Within the G1/0 cell peak 1-6 SP were evident in principle. Depending on the number of SP, two subsets were established: subset 1 with or = 3 SP. They differed significantly in proliferative activity expressed in the percentage of cells in the G2M phase. Subset 2 showed the higher activity. Analysis of subset distributions revealed that subset 1 prevails in favourable prognostic cases as ER positive cases (P < 0.03), lobular carcinomas (P < 0.01) and LN- cases (P < 0.03), whereas subset 2 prevails in the unfavourable counterparts. Analysis of variance showed that the main effect on proliferative activity indicated by G2M% is due to subpopulation composition rather than histologic type, nodal status or ER status (P < 0.01, P < 0.002, P < 0.05), not even due to ploidy level (P < 0.0001). The rationale for subset stratification may be cytogenetic variability connected with protein content heterogeneity accounting for kinetic SP.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of the Gomphales based on nuc-25S-rDNA, mit-12S-rDNA, and mit-atp6-DNA combined sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admir J. Giachini; Kentaro Hosaka; Eduardo Nouhra; Joseph Spatafora; James M. Trappe

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Geastrales, Gomphales, Hysterangiales, and Phallales were estimated via combined sequences: nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (nuc-25S-rDNA), mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal DNA (mit-12S-rDNA), and mitochondrial atp6 DNA (mit-atp6-DNA). Eighty-one taxa comprising 19 genera and 58 species...

  18. Variation in ploidy level and phenology can result in large and unexpected differences in demography and climatic sensitivity between closely related ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, G Arjen; Zuidema, Pieter A; de Groot, Harry; During, Heinjo J

    2012-08-01

    Current environmental changes may affect the dynamics and viability of plant populations. This environmental sensitivity may differ between species of different ploidy level because polyploidization can influence life history traits. We compared the demography and climatic sensitivity of two closely related ferns: the tetraploid Polystichum aculeatum and one of its diploid parents, Polystichum setiferum. Matrix models were used to assess the effects of life history variation on population dynamics under varying winter conditions. We analyzed the contributions of all key aspects of the fern life cycle to population growth. Our study is the first to also include the gametophyte generation. Projected population growth rate (λ) was much higher for the tetraploid P. aculeatum (1.516) than for P. setiferum (1.071) under normal winter conditions. During a year with harsh winter conditions, population growth of P. aculeatum was strongly reduced. This finding contradicts our expectation that the winter-hardy fronds of this species would allow high survival of harsh winters. Differences in λ between species and between years with different winter conditions were mostly caused by variation in gametophyte-related recruitment rates, a finding that shows the importance of including gametophytes in fern demographic studies. Our results indicate that populations of closely related ferns can show large differences in population performance, mainly related to recruitment rates and frond phenology, and that these differences may depend greatly on climatic conditions. Our findings provide a first indication that (allo)polyploidization in ferns can have a significant effect on population dynamics.

  19. DNA level and stereologic estimates of nuclear volume in squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix. A comparative study with analysis of prognostic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P; Jakobsen, A

    1992-01-01

    Grading of malignancy in squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix is based on qualitative, morphologic examination and suffers from poor reproducibility. Using modern stereology, unbiased estimates of the three-dimensional, volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (nuclear vv), were obtained in ...

  20. Correlation between ploidy status using flow cytometry and nucleolar organizer regions in benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Mahmoud, Sarah Ahmed; El-Rouby, Dalia Hussein; El-Ghani, Safa Fathy Abd; Badawy, Omnia Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Differentiation between the aggressive benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts is controversial and difficult. While flow cytometry (FCM) allowed DNA analysis in neoplasia, argyrophilic organizer regions (AgNORs) number and/or size in a nucleus are correlated with the ribosomal gene activity and therefore with cellular proliferation. The aim of this research was to study the diagnostic accuracy of FCM and AgNORs staining in differentiating between benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors and to correlate between these two interventions. Sixteen benign cases [8 cases of ameloblastoma (AB) and 8 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT)] and 13 malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors [8 cases of ameloblastic carcinoma (ABC) and 5 cases of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma(CCOC)] were included in the current study. For FCM analysis, a single cell suspension from Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors was prepared according to a modified method described by Hedley (1989) and AgNORs staining were performed in accordance to the Ploton protocol (1986). Analysis of AgNORs was performed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The work revealed that all the examined tumors were diploid, except for 40% of CCOC cases. The S-phase fraction (SPF) value, AgNORs count and AgNORs area/cell showed statistically significant difference on comparing benign and malignant groups. A weak positive correlation was observed between SPF and AgNORs count. The SPF value was considered to be more sensitive and specific in differentiation between aggressive benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors in comparison to AgNORs counting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Supercoiling DNA Locates Mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmore, Andrew; Brahmachari, Sumitabha; Takagi, Yasuharu; Marko, John F.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2017-10-01

    We present a method of detecting sequence defects by supercoiling DNA with magnetic tweezers. The method is sensitive to a single mismatched base pair in a DNA sequence of several thousand base pairs. We systematically compare DNA molecules with 0 to 16 adjacent mismatches at 1 M monovalent salt and 3.6 pN force and show that under these conditions, a single plectoneme forms and is stably pinned at the defect. We use these measurements to estimate the energy and degree of end-loop kinking at defects. From this, we calculate the relative probability of plectoneme pinning at the mismatch under physiologically relevant conditions. Based on this estimate, we propose that DNA supercoiling could contribute to mismatch and damage sensing in vivo.

  2. The thermodynamics of protein aggregation reactions may underpin the enhanced metabolic efficiency associated with heterosis, some balancing selection, and the evolution of ploidy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, B R

    2017-07-01

    Identifying the physical basis of heterosis (or "hybrid vigor") has remained elusive despite over a hundred years of research on the subject. The three main theories of heterosis are dominance theory, overdominance theory, and epistasis theory. Kacser and Burns (1981) identified the molecular basis of dominance, which has greatly enhanced our understanding of its importance to heterosis. This paper aims to explain how overdominance, and some features of epistasis, can similarly emerge from the molecular dynamics of proteins. Possessing multiple alleles at a gene locus results in the synthesis of different allozymes at reduced concentrations. This in turn reduces the rate at which each allozyme forms soluble oligomers, which are toxic and must be degraded, because allozymes co-aggregate at low efficiencies. The model developed in this paper can explain how heterozygosity impacts the metabolic efficiency of an organism. It can also explain why the viabilities of some inbred lines seem to decline rapidly at high inbreeding coefficients (F > 0.5), which may provide a physical basis for truncation selection for heterozygosity. Finally, the model has implications for the ploidy level of organisms. It can explain why polyploids are frequently found in environments where severe physical stresses promote the formation of soluble oligomers. The model can also explain why complex organisms, which need to synthesize aggregation-prone proteins that contain intrinsically unstructured regions (IURs) and multiple domains because they facilitate complex protein interaction networks (PINs), tend to be diploid while haploidy tends to be restricted to relatively simple organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimating Baseline Population Parameters of Urban and Wildland Black Bear Populations Using a DNA-Based Capture -Mark-Recapture Approach in Mono County, California

    OpenAIRE

    Fusaro, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to European settlement, black bear (Ursus americanus) were far less abundant in the state of California. Estimates from statewide harvest data indicate the California black bear population has tripled in the last 3 decades. Bears inhabit areas they formally never occurred (e.g., urban environments) and populations that were at historically low densities are now at high densities. Though harvest data are useful and widely used as an index for black bear population size and population dem...

  4. Unravelling the riddle of Radix: DNA barcoding for species identification of freshwater snail intermediate hosts of zoonotic digeneans and estimating their inter-population evolutionary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Scott P; Lim, Rivka M; Dukes, Juliet P; Kett, Stephen M; Cook, Richard T; Walker, Anthony J; Kirk, Ruth S

    2015-10-01

    Radix spp. are intermediate host snails for digenean parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Within this genus, species differentiation using shell and internal organ morphology can result in erroneous species identification, causing problems when trying to understand the population biology of Radix. In the present study, DNA barcoding, using cox1 and ITS2 sequences, identified populations of Radix auricularia and Radix balthica from specimens originally morphologically identified as Radix peregra from the UK. Assessment of cox1 and ITS2 as species identification markers showed that, although both markers differentiated species, cox1 possessed greater molecular diversity and higher phylogenetic resolution. Cox1 also proved useful for gaining insights into the evolutionary relationships of Radix species populations. Phylogenetic analysis and haplotype networks of cox1 indicated that R. auricularia appeared to have invaded the UK several times; some haplotypes forming a distinct UK specific clade, whilst others are more akin to those found on mainland Europe. This was in contrast to relationships between R. balthica populations, which had low molecular diversity and no distinct UK specific haplotypes, suggesting recent and multiple invasions from mainland Europe. Molecular techniques therefore appear to be crucial for distinguishing Radix spp., particularly using cox1. This barcoding marker also enables the population biology of Radix spp. to be explored, and is invaluable for monitoring the epidemiology of fluke diseases especially in the light of emerging diseases and food security. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence and pathogen load estimates for the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis are impacted by ITS DNA copy number variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebollar, Eria A.; Woodhams, Douglas C.; LaBumbard, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    in amphibians and white nose syndrome in bats. Chytridiomycosis is caused by the fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and B. salamandrivorans (Bsal), and is responsible for declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. Over a decade ago, a qPCR assay was developed to determine Bd prevalence...... and pathogen load. Here, we demonstrate the effect that ITS copy number variation in Bd strains can have on the estimation of prevalence and pathogen load. We used data sets from different amphibian species to simulate how ITS copy number affects prevalence and pathogen load. In addition, we tested 2 methods...

  6. Frequent occurrence of mitochondrial DNA mutations in Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soong Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Barrett's esophagus (BE is one of the most common premalignant lesions and can progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. The numerous molecular events may play a role in the neoplastic transformation of Barrett's mucosa such as the change of DNA ploidy, p53 mutation and alteration of adhesion molecules. However, the molecular mechanism of the progression of BE to EA remains unclear and most studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations in BE have performed on BE with the presence of dysplasia. METHODS/FINDINGS: Thus, the current study is to investigate new molecular events (Barrett's esophageal tissue-specific-mtDNA alterations/instabilities in mitochondrial genome and causative factors for their alterations using the corresponding adjacent normal mucosal tissue (NT and tissue (BT from 34 patients having Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia. Eighteen patients (53% exhibited mtDNA mutations which were not found in adjacent NT. mtDNA copy number was about 3 times higher in BT than in adjacent NT. The activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme complexes in tissues from Barrett's metaplasia without the presence of dysplasia was impaired. Reactive oxygen species (ROS level in BT was significantly higher than those in corresponding samples. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High ROS level in BT may contribute to the development of mtDNA mutations, which may play a crucial role in disease progression and tumorigenesis in BE.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  8. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  9. Inheritance and Variation of Genomic DNA Methylation in Diploid and Triploid Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qun; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2016-02-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that could be responsive to environmental changes indicating a potential role in natural selection and adaption. In order to evaluate an evolutionary role of DNA methylation, it is essential to first gain a better insight into inheritability. To address this question, this study investigated DNA methylation variation from parents to offspring in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas using fluorescent-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) analysis. Most of parental methylated loci were stably transmitted to offspring segregating following Medelian expectation. However, methylated loci deviated more often than non-methylated loci and offspring showed a few de novo methylated loci indicating DNA methylation changes from parents to offspring. Interestingly, some male-specific methylated loci were found in this study which might help to explore sex determination in oyster. Despite environmental stimuli, genomic stresses such as polyploidization also can induce methylation changes. This study also compared global DNA methylation level and individual methylated loci between diploid and triploid oysters. Results showed no difference in global methylation state but a few ploidy-specific loci were detected. DNA methylation variation during polyploidization was less than autonomous methylation variation from parents to offspring.

  10. DNA as a Phosphate Storage Polymer and the Alternative Advantages of Polyploidy for Growth or Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerulla, Karolin; Chimileski, Scott; Näther, Daniela; Gophna, Uri; Papke, R. Thane; Soppa, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Haloferax volcanii uses extracellular DNA as a source for carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. However, it can also grow to a limited extend in the absence of added phosphorous, indicating that it contains an intracellular phosphate storage molecule. As Hfx. volcanii is polyploid, it was investigated whether DNA might be used as storage polymer, in addition to its role as genetic material. It could be verified that during phosphate starvation cells multiply by distributing as well as by degrading their chromosomes. In contrast, the number of ribosomes stayed constant, revealing that ribosomes are distributed to descendant cells, but not degraded. These results suggest that the phosphate of phosphate-containing biomolecules (other than DNA and RNA) originates from that stored in DNA, not in rRNA. Adding phosphate to chromosome depleted cells rapidly restores polyploidy. Quantification of desiccation survival of cells with different ploidy levels showed that under phosphate starvation Hfx. volcanii diminishes genetic advantages of polyploidy in favor of cell multiplication. The consequences of the usage of genomic DNA as phosphate storage polymer are discussed as well as the hypothesis that DNA might have initially evolved in evolution as a storage polymer, and the various genetic benefits evolved later. PMID:24733558

  11. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  12. A maximum-likelihood estimation of pairwise relatedness for autopolyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K; Guo, S T; Shattuck, M R; Chen, S T; Qi, X G; Zhang, P; Li, B G

    2015-02-01

    Relatedness between individuals is central to ecological genetics. Multiple methods are available to quantify relatedness from molecular data, including method-of-moment and maximum-likelihood estimators. We describe a maximum-likelihood estimator for autopolyploids, and quantify its statistical performance under a range of biologically relevant conditions. The statistical performances of five additional polyploid estimators of relatedness were also quantified under identical conditions. When comparing truncated estimators, the maximum-likelihood estimator exhibited lower root mean square error under some conditions and was more biased for non-relatives, especially when the number of alleles per loci was low. However, even under these conditions, this bias was reduced to be statistically insignificant with more robust genetic sampling. We also considered ambiguity in polyploid heterozygote genotyping and developed a weighting methodology for candidate genotypes. The statistical performances of three polyploid estimators under both ideal and actual conditions (including inbreeding and double reduction) were compared. The software package POLYRELATEDNESS is available to perform this estimation and supports a maximum ploidy of eight.

  13. Changing ploidy as a strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ying; Shen, He; Zhou, Qian; Qian, Kun; Lee, van der Theo; Huang, Sanwen

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans was the causal agent of the Irish Great Famine and is a recurring threat to global food security. The pathogen can reproduce both sexually and asexually, with high potential to adapt to various environments and great risk to break disease resistance genes in

  14. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  15. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  16. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research interests include: eukaryotic gene expres- sion and infectious diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL I ... T -cells: Lymphocytes that differentiate primarily in the thymus and are central to the control and ... enhance DNA delivery into skeletal muscle.

  17. Adaptive response to DNA-damaging agents in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations from "Evolution Canyon", Mt. Carmel, Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A Lidzbarsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural populations of most organisms, especially unicellular microorganisms, are constantly exposed to harsh environmental factors which affect their growth. UV radiation is one of the most important physical parameters which influences yeast growth in nature. Here we used 46 natural strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from several natural populations at the "Evolution Canyon" microsite (Nahal Oren, Mt. Carmel, Israel. The opposing slopes of this canyon share the same geology, soil, and macroclimate, but they differ in microclimatic conditions. The interslope differences in solar radiation (200%-800% more on the "African" slope caused the development of two distinct biomes. The south-facing slope is sunnier and has xeric, savannoid "African" environment while the north-facing slope is represented by temperate, "European" forested environment. Here we studied the phenotypic response of the S. cerevisiae strains to UVA and UVC radiations and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS in order to evaluate the interslope effect on the strains' ability to withstand DNA-damaging agents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed our strains to the different DNA-damaging agents and measured survival by counting colony forming units. The strains from the "African" slope were more resilient to both UVA and MMS than the strains from the "European" slope. In contrast, we found that there was almost no difference between strains (with similar ploidy from the opposite slopes, in their sensitivity to UVC radiation. These results suggest that the "African" strains are more adapted to higher solar radiation than the "European" strains. We also found that the tetraploids strains were more tolerant to all DNA-damaging agents than their neighboring diploid strains, which suggest that high ploidy level might be a mechanism of adaptation to high solar radiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results and the results of parallel studies with several other

  18. Calcium effect on the content of DNA and NYS-stained nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic proteins in cortex cells of pea (Pisum sativum L. roots treated with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Stecka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using cytophotometric procedures, following Feulgen-NYS staining, the measurements of DNA and nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic protein contents in cortex cells of pea roots growing for 144 h in calcium and/or heavy metals (Cd2+, Cr3+, Pb2+ presence were made. All tested metals treatment reduced the number of nuclei in 4C DNA class and induced appearance of nuclei with DNA amount below 2C, that was expressed in diminished DNA content. The level of NYS proteins in cells underwent also reduction. In lead presence protein content diminished in nucleus. On the other hand, increased amount of nuclear, nucleolar and cytoplasmic proteins was observed in material treated with cadmium while only of nucleolar protein content in chromium presence. In root cells treated with tested metals protein content in nucleus was related with ploidy level, disturbances in this relation appeared in nucleolus and mostly in cytoplasm. Calcium added to chromium and mostly to lead solutions diminished the toxic effect of these metals that was demonstrated by an increase in DNA content, although calcium alone reduced DNA amount in nucleus due to lower number of 4C nuclei accompanied by appearance of 1C and 1-2C DNA classes. Calcium in different ways affected protein content changed by metal treatment. Present in cadmium solution it caused a further reduction in protein content in nucleus, nucleolus and cytoplasm but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic protein when added to lead, and nucleolar proteins - in chromium solution. Moreover, calcium ions presence in metal solutions did not restore the relationship between ploidy level and nucleolar and cytoplasmic NYS stained proteins and it did not disturbe the relation existing in nucleus.

  19. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  20. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  1. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  2. DNA Chip

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. In the human ge- nome, the ratio between coding and non-coding DNA is very low (less than 3% of the human .... construction of a Tm-specific chip, i.e. all the oligos/cDNA on the chip will hybridize at the same temperature. The techniques available are still not able to create a chip ...

  3. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  4. Difference in light-induced increase in ploidy level and cell size between adaxial and abaxial epidermal pavement cells of Phaseolus vulgaris primary leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Isao; Sanbe, Akiko; Yokomura, E-iti

    2008-01-01

    Changes in nuclear DNA content and cell size of adaxial and abaxial epidermal pavement cells were investigated using bright light-induced leaf expansion of Phaseolus vulgaris plants. In primary leaves of bean plants grown under high (sunlight) or moderate (ML; photon flux density, 163 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) light, most adaxial epidermal pavement cells had a nucleus with the 4C amount of DNA, whereas most abaxial pavement cells had a 2C nucleus. In contrast, plants grown under low intensity white light (LL; 15 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) for 13 d, when cell proliferation of epidermal pavement cells had already finished, had a 2C nuclear DNA content in most adaxial pavement cells. When these LL-grown plants were transferred to ML, the increase in irradiance raised the frequency of 4C nuclei in adaxial but not in abaxial pavement cells within 4 d. On the other hand, the size of abaxial pavement cells increased by 53% within 4 d of transfer to ML and remained unchanged thereafter, whereas adaxial pavement cells continuously enlarged for 12 d. This suggests that the increase in adaxial cell size after 4 d is supported by the nuclear DNA doubling. The different responses between adaxial and abaxial epidermal cells were not induced by the different light intensity at both surfaces. It was shown that adaxial epidermal cells have a different property than abaxial ones.

  5. The role of irradiation dose and DNA content of somatic hybrid calli in producing asymmetric plants between an interspecific tomato hybrid and eggplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylov, V M; Sink, K C

    1996-05-01

    Highly asymmetric somatic hybrid plants were obtained by PEG/DMSO fusion of gamma-irradiated mesophyll protoplasts of the kanamycin-resistant (KmR(+)) interspecific hybrid Lycopersicon esculentum x L. pennellii (EP) with mesophyll protoplasts of Solanum melongena (eggplant, E). Elimination of the EP chromosomes was obtained by irradiating the donor genome with different doses of gamma rays (100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 Gy). The selection of somatic hybrid calli was based on kanamycin resistance; EP and E protoplasts did not divide due to the irradiation treatment and sensitivity to kanamycin, respectively. KmR(+) calli were recovered following all irradiation doses of donor EP protoplasts. The hybrid nature of the recovered calli was confirmed by PCR amplification of the NptII gene, RAPD patterns and Southern hybridizations using potato ribosomal DNA and pTHG2 probes. Ploidy levels of calli confirmed as hybrid were further analyzed by flow cytometry. Such analyses revealed that the vast majority of hybrid calli that did not regenerate shoots were 5-9n polyploids. The three asymmetric somatic hybrid plants obtained were regenerated only from callus with a ploidy level close to 4n, and such calli occurred only when the donor EP had been exposed to 100 Gy. The amount of DNA in somatic hybrid calli, from 100-Gy exposure, was found by dot blot hybridization with the species-specific probe, pTHG2, to be equivalent with 3.1-25.8% of the tomato genome. Thus, DNA contained in 3.8-13.2 average-size tomato chromosomes was present in these hybrid calli. The asymmetric somatic hybrid plants had the eggplant morphology and were regenerated from one hybrid callus that contained an amount of tomato DNA equivalent to 6.29 average-size tomato chromosomes.

  6. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  7. Combined effect of mitochondrial DNA 5178 C/A polymorphism and alcohol consumption on estimated glomerular filtration rate in male Japanese health check-up examinees: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokaze Akatsuki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major public health issue. Although several studies have been performed on the association between alcohol consumption and CKD or renal function, it remains controversial. Numerous genetic polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with CKD and kidney function. Mitochondrial DNA cytosine/adenine (Mt5178 C/A polymorphism is associated with longevity in Japanese. This polymorphism modifies the effects of alcohol consumption on blood pressure, risk of hypertension, serum triglyceride levels, risk of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia and serum uric acid levels. The objective of this study was to investigate whether Mt5178 C/A polymorphism modifies the effects of alcohol consumption on renal function in male Japanese health check-up examinees. Methods A total of 394 male subjects aged 29–76 years were selected from among individuals visiting the hospital for regular medical check-ups. After Mt5178 C/A genotyping, a cross-sectional study assessing the combined effects of Mt5178 C/A polymorphism and habitual drinking on the risk of mildly decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (2 was conducted. Results For Mt5178A genotypic men, habitual drinking may increase eGFR (P for trend = 0.003 or reduce the risk of mildly decreased eGFR (P for trend = 0.003. Daily drinkers had a significantly higher eGFR than non-drinkers (P = 0.005. The crude odds ratio for decreased eGFR was significantly lower in daily drinkers than in non-drinkers (odds ratio = 0.092, 95% confidence interval: 0.012-0.727, P = 0.024. On the other hand, for Mt5178C genotypic men, habitual drinking does not appear to affect eGFR. Conclusion The present results suggest a joint effect of Mt5178 C/A polymorphism and alcohol consumption on eGFR and the risk of mildly decreased eGFR in male Japanese subjects.

  8. DNA Methylation in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Lotta-Katrin; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Kenis, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric condition that displays a complex phenotype. A multitude of genetic susceptibility loci have now been identified, but these fail to explain the high heritability estimates of schizophrenia. In addition, epidemiologically relevant environmental risk factors for schizophrenia may lead to permanent changes in brain function. In conjunction with genetic liability, these environmental risk factors-likely through epigenetic mechanisms-may give rise to schizophrenia, a clinical syndrome characterized by florid psychotic symptoms and moderate to severe cognitive impairment. These pathophysiological features point to the involvement of epigenetic processes. Recently, a wave of studies examining aberrant DNA modifications in schizophrenia was published. This chapter aims to comprehensively review the current findings, from both candidate gene studies and genome-wide approaches, on DNA methylation changes in schizophrenia.

  9. Flow Cytometric DNA Analysis Using Cytokeratin Labeling for Identification of Tumor Cells in Carcinomas of the Breast and the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kimmig

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric assessment of DNA‐ploidy and S‐phase fraction in malignant tumors is compromised by the heterogeneity of cell subpopulations derived from the malignant and surrounding connective tissue, e.g., tumor, stromal and inflammatory cells. To evaluate the effect on quality of DNA cell cycle analysis and determination of DNA ploidy, cytokeratin labeling of epithelial cells was used for tumor cell enrichment in breast, ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer prior to DNA analysis. In a prospective study, tumor cell subpopulations of 620 malignant tumors were labeled by a FITC‐conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK 5, 6, CK18 and CK 5, 6, 8 and CK 17, respectively prior to flow cytometric cell cycle analysis. Compared to total cell analysis, detection rate of DNA‐aneuploid tumors following cytokeratin labeling was increased from 62% to 76.5% in breast cancer, from 68% to 77% in ovarian cancer, from 60% to 80% in cervical cancer and from 30% to 53% in endometrial cancer. Predominantly in DNA‐diploid tumors, a significantly improved detection of S‐phase fraction of the tumor cells was shown due to the elimination of contaminating nonproliferating “normal cells”. S‐phase fraction following tumor cell enrichment was increased by 10% (mean following cytokeratin staining in ovarian and endometrial cancer, by 30% in breast cancer and even by 70% in cervical cancer compared to total cell analysis. Thus, diagnostic accuracy of DNA‐analysis was enhanced by cytokeratin labeling of tumor cells for all tumor entities investigated.

  10. Overexpression of a protein fragment of RNA helicase A causes inhibition of endogenous BRCA1 function and defects in ploidy and cytokinesis in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Brian P; Starita, Lea M; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2003-02-20

    The breast- and ovarian-specific tumor suppressor, BRCA1, has been implicated to function in many nuclear processes, including DNA damage repair, recombination, transcription, ubiquitination, cell cycle checkpoint enforcement, and centrosome regulation. Utilizing a previously described interaction between BRCA1 and RNA helicase A (RHA), we have developed a dominant-negative approach to block BRCA1 function in human breast epithelial cells. Overexpression of a truncated RHA peptide that can bind to the BRCA1 carboxy-terminus prevents normal BRCA1 function, such as BRCA1 association with nuclear foci following DNA damage. Overexpression of this dominant-negative protein induces pleomorphic nuclei, aberrant mitoses with extra centrosomes, and tetraploidy. This model system allows us to observe changes to mammary epithelial cells that occur acutely following loss of BRCA1 function. Furthermore, inhibition of BRCA1 via overexpressing the RHA fragment coincides with a reduction in PARP-1 protein expression, suggesting a possible mechanism for BRCA1 in the maintenance of genomic integrity.

  11. Impact of the DNA extraction method on 2-LTR DNA circle recovery from HIV-1 infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badralmaa, Yunden; Natarajan, Ven

    2013-10-01

    Detection of episomal 2-LTR DNA circles is used as a marker for the ongoing virus replication in patients infected with HIV-1, and efficient extraction of episomal DNA is critical for accurate estimation of the 2-LTR circles. The impact of different methods of DNA extraction on the recovery of 2-LTR circles was compared using mitochondrial DNA extracted as an internal control. The bacterial plasmid DNA isolation method extracted less than 10% of cellular DNA, 40% of mitochondrial DNA and 12-20% of the input 2-LTR DNA. The total DNA isolation method recovered about 70% of mitochondrial DNA and 45% of the input 2-LTR DNA. The total nucleic acid isolation method recovered 90% of mitochondrial DNA and 60% of the input 2-LTR DNA. Similar results were obtained when the DNA was extracted from HIV-1 infected cells. Plasmid DNA isolation could not distinguish between 12 and 25 copies of 2-LTR DNA per million cells, whereas the total nucleic acid isolation showed a consistent and statistically significant difference between 12 and 25 copies. In conclusion, the total nucleic acid isolation method is more efficient than the plasmid DNA isolation method in recovering mitochondrial DNA and 2-LTR DNA circles from HIV-1 infected cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Parameter Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Heitzig, Martina; Cameron, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter the importance of parameter estimation in model development is illustrated through various applications related to reaction systems. In particular, rate constants in a reaction system are obtained through parameter estimation methods. These approaches often require the application...... of optimisation techniques coupled with dynamic solution of the underlying model. Linear and nonlinear approaches to parameter estimation are investigated. There is also the application of maximum likelihood principles in the estimation of parameters, as well as the use of orthogonal collocation to generate a set...... of algebraic equations as the basis for parameter estimation.These approaches are illustrated using estimations of kinetic constants from reaction system models....

  13. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (pindividual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (pgenetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of lymphoblastoid cells for the estimation of environmental insults to DNA. Comprehensive report of the overall activities of the contract during the past three years. Progress report, August 1, 1978-June 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on a study to detect chronic low-level exposure of individuals to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by analysis of DNA in cells with low turnover rates. The technique used was to measure the level of excision repair activity in lymphoblastoid and lymphoma cell lines. (ACR)

  15. Genetic dissimilarity between primary colorectal carcinomas and their lymph node metastases: ploidy, p53, bcl-2, and c-myc expression--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalata, Khaled Refaat; Elshal, Mohamed Farouk; Foda, Abd AlRahman Mohammad; Shoma, Ashraf

    2015-08-01

    The current paradigm of metastasis proposes that rare cells within primary tumors acquire metastatic capability via sequential mutations, suggesting that metastases are genetically dissimilar from their primary tumors. This study investigated the changes in the level of expression of a well-defined panel of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis markers between the primary colorectal cancer (CRC) and the corresponding synchronous lymph node (LN) metastasis from the same patients. DNA flow cytometry and immunostaining of p53, bcl-2, and c-myc were carried out on 36 cases of CRC radical resection specimens with their corresponding LN metastases. There was very low probability that the histological patterns of primary tumors and LN metastases are independent (p < 0.001). Metastatic tumors were significantly more diffusely positive for p53 than the primary tumors (p < 0.001). Conversely, primary tumors were significantly more diffusely positive for c-myc than metastatic tumors (p = 0.011). No significant difference was found between the LNs and the primary tumors in bcl-2 positivity (p = 0.538) and DNA aneuploidy (p = 0.35), with a tendency towards negative bcl-2 and less aneuploidy in LN metastases than primary tumors. In conclusion, LN metastatic colorectal carcinomas have a tendency of being less differentiated, with a higher incidence of diffuse p53 staining, lower incidence of bcl-2 staining, and less aneuploidy in comparison to their primary counterparts suggesting a more aggressive biological behavior, which could indicate the necessity for more aggressive adjuvant therapy.

  16. DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  17. Context dependent DNA evolutionary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ledet

    in this paper, and a time discretization of the process is presented in order to make the calculations more feasible. Apart from the time discretization we introduce a set of simple estimating equations, together with an EM type algorithm, for finding the parameter estimates. A detailed derivation......This paper is about stochastic models for the evolution of DNA. For a set of aligned DNA sequences, connected in a phylogenetic tree, the models should be able to explain - in probabilistic terms - the differences seen in the sequences. From the estimates of the parameters in the model one can...... studying models on spaces with 4n (or 64n) number of states with n well above one hundred, say. For such models it is no longer possible to calculate the transition probability analytically, and often Markov chain Monte Carlo is used in connection with likelihood analysis. This is also the approach taken...

  18. Scaffolded DNA Origami of a DNA Tetrahedron Molecular Container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Yongang; Sharma, Jaswinder; Liu, Minghui

    2009-01-01

    We describe a strategy of scaffolded DNA origami to design and construct 3D molecular cages of tetrahedron geometry with inside volume closed by triangular faces. Each edge of the triangular face is ∼54 nm in dimension. The estimated total external volume and the internal cavity of the triangular...... pyramid are about 1.8 × 10-23 and 1.5 × 10-23 m3, respectively. Correct formation of the tetrahedron DNA cage was verified by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering techniques....

  19. Extraction of ultrashort DNA molecules from herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutaker, Rafal M; Reiter, Ella; Furtwängler, Anja; Schuenemann, Verena J; Burbano, Hernán A

    2017-02-01

    DNA extracted from herbarium specimens is highly fragmented; therefore, it is crucial to use extraction protocols that retrieve short DNA molecules. Improvements in extraction and DNA library preparation protocols for animal remains have allowed efficient retrieval of molecules shorter than 50 bp. Here, we applied these improvements to DNA extraction protocols for herbarium specimens and evaluated extraction performance by shotgun sequencing, which allows an accurate estimation of the distribution of DNA fragment lengths. Extraction with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) buffer decreased median fragment length by 35% when compared with cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB); modifying the binding conditions of DNA to silica allowed for an additional decrease of 10%. We did not observe a further decrease in length for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) versus double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) library preparation methods. Our protocol enables the retrieval of ultrashort molecules from herbarium specimens, which will help to unlock the genetic information stored in herbaria.

  20. DNA fragmentation and nuclear phenotype in tendons exposed to low-intensity infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paoli, Flavia; Ramos Cerqueira, Larissa; Martins Ramos, Mayara; Campos, Vera M.; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Geller, Mauro; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2015-03-01

    Clinical protocols are recommended in device guidelines outlined for treating many diseases on empirical basis. However, effects of low-intensity infrared lasers at fluences used in clinical protocols on DNA are controversial. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in tissues and free radicals generation could be described as a consequence of laser used. DNA lesions induced by free radicals cause changes in DNA structure, chromatin organization, ploidy degrees and cell death. In this work, we investigated whether low-intensity infrared laser therapy could alter the fibroblasts nuclei characteristics and induce DNA fragmentation. Tendons of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser (830 nm), at different fluences (1, 5 and 10 J/cm2), in continuous wave (power output of 10mW, power density of 79.6 mW/cm2). Different frequencies were analyzed for the higher fluence (10 J/cm2), at pulsed emission mode (2.5, 250 and 2500 Hz), with the laser source at surface of skin. Geometric, densitometric and textural parameters obtained for Feulgen-stained nuclei by image analysis were used to define nuclear phenotypes. Significant differences were observed on the nuclear phenotype of tendons after exposure to laser, as well as, high cell death percentages was observed for all fluences and frequencies analyzed here, exception 1 J/cm2 fluence. Our results indicate that low-intensity infrared laser can alter geometric, densitometric and textural parameters in tendon fibroblasts nuclei. Laser can also induce DNA fragmentation, chromatin lost and consequently cell death, using fluences, frequencies and emission modes took out from clinical protocols.

  1. The flexibility of low molecular weight double-stranded DNA as a function of length. I. Light scattering measurements and the estimation of persistence lengths from light scattering, sedimentation and viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, J E; Eisenberg, H

    1976-09-01

    In the preceding paper are described the isolation and physical characterization of seven narrowly disperse fractions of calf thymus DNA in the molecular weight range 0.3 to 1.3 X 10(6) daltons. Herein, we have determined by light scattering the molecular weights and root mean square radii of these fractions in a solvent comprising 0.2 M NaCl, 2 mM EDTA, 2mM Na-PO4,pH7. Measurements were made in a modified Wippler-Scheibling photometer to a 20 degree lower limit of scattering angle on solutions rendered virtually dust-free by procedures described. The optical anisotropies of the DNA fractions were measured permitting the experimental molecular weights and root mean square radii to be corrected to their true values. From these values, with appropriate polydispersity corrections, we calculate a Kratky-Porod persistence length, a, of 54.0 +/- 5.6 nm which is invariant over the molecular range examined. From the sedimentation coefficients (preceding paper) and the theory of Yamakawa and Fujii, we calculate a to be 66 nm, a value found to apply equally well to several DNA samples of various origins whose sedimentation rates are known in themolecular weight range from about 4 X 10(4) to 10(8) daltons. Similarly, from the intrinsic viscosities and the theory of Yamakawa and Fujii, we calculate a to be 59 nm, which again adequately applies to a number of DNA samples whose viscosities have been measured by other workers in the molecular wieght range 3 X 10(5) to 10(8) daltons. The Flory-Mandelkern paramerter, beta, was found to vary with molecular weight in the manner predicted by the theory of Yamakawa and Fujii. The average value of a from the three sets of measurements is 60 +/- 6nm, which we believe applies to double-stranded DNA molecules, independent of chain length, over the whole range of molecular weights from which reliable data exist.

  2. Minority cytotypes in European populations of the Gymnadenia conopsea complex (Orchidaceae) greatly increase intraspecific and intrapopulation diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trávnícek, Pavel; Jersáková, Jana; Kubátová, Barbora; Krejcíková, Jana; Bateman, Richard M; Lucanová, Magdalena; Krajníková, Eva; Tesitelová, Tamara; Stípková, Zuzana; Amardeilh, Jean-Pierre; Brzosko, Emilia; Jermakowicz, Edyta; Cabanne, Olivier; Durka, Walter; Efimov, Peter; Hedrén, Mikael; Hermosilla, Carlos E; Kreutz, Karel; Kull, Tiiu; Tali, Kadri; Marchand, Olivier; Rey, Manel; Schiestl, Florian P; Curn, Vladislav; Suda, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Patterns of ploidy variation among and within populations can provide valuable insights into the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the dynamics of plant systems showing ploidy diversity. Whereas data on majority ploidies are, by definition, often sufficiently extensive, much less is known about the incidence and evolutionary role of minority cytotypes. Ploidy and proportions of endoreplicated genome were determined using DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) flow cytometry in 6150 Gymnadenia plants (fragrant orchids) collected from 141 populations in 17 European countries. All widely recognized European species, and several taxa of less certain taxonomic status were sampled within Gymnadenia conopsea sensu lato. Most Gymnadenia populations were taxonomically and/or ploidy heterogeneous. Two majority (2x and 4x) and three minority (3x, 5x and 6x) cytotypes were identified. Evolution largely proceeded at the diploid level, whereas tetraploids were much more geographically and taxonomically restricted. Although minority ploidies constituted <2 % of the individuals sampled, they were found in 35 % of populations across the entire area investigated. The amount of nuclear DNA, together with the level of progressively partial endoreplication, separated all Gymnadenia species currently widely recognized in Europe. Despite their low frequency, minority cytotypes substantially increase intraspecific and intrapopulation ploidy diversity estimates for fragrant orchids. The cytogenetic structure of Gymnadenia populations is remarkably dynamic and shaped by multiple evolutionary mechanisms, including both the ongoing production of unreduced gametes and heteroploid hybridization. Overall, it is likely that the level of ploidy heterogeneity experienced by most plant species/populations is currently underestimated; intensive sampling is necessary to obtain a holistic picture.

  3. Fractional Brownian Motion:. Theory and Application to DNA Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Muniandy, S. V.

    2001-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the theory of fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and its generalization to multifractional Brownian motion (MBM). FBM and MBM are applied to a biological system namely the DNA sequence. By considering a DNA sequence as a fractal random walk, it is possible to model the noncoding sequence of human retinoblastoma DNA as a discrete version of FBM. The average scaling exponent or Hurst exponent of the DNA walk is estimated to be H = 0.60 ± 0.05 using the monofractal R/S analysis. This implies that the mean square fluctuation of DNA walk belongs to anomalous superdiffusion type. We also show that the DNA landscape is not monofractal, instead one has multifractal DNA landscape. The empirical estimates of the Hurst exponent falls approximately within the range H ~ 0.62 - 0.72. We propose two multifractal models, namely the MBM and multiscale FBM to describe the existence of different Hurst exponents in DNA walk.

  4. Flow Cytometric DNA Analysis and Histopathologic Re-Evaluation of Paraffin Embedded Samples from Hydatidiform Moles and Hydropic Abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Izadi-Mood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Distinction of hydatidiform moles (HMs from non-molar abortions and sub-classification of HMs are important for clinical practice; yet, diagnosis based solely on morphology is affected by interobserver variability. The objective of this study was to determine the role of DNA flow cytometry in distinguishing molar from non-molar pregnancies. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Pathology, Women’s Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between 2006 and 2010. DNA ploidy analysis and histopathologic re-evaluation were performed on paraffin-embedded tissue from 36 (17 complete and 19 partial molar and 24 hydropic abortus (HA cases which were previously diagnosed based on histomorphologic study. Results: Of the 17 cases initially diagnosed as complete HM (CHM, 9 were diploid, 2 were triploid, 5 were tetraploid and 1 was aneuploid. Of the 19 initial partial HMs (PHMs, 2, 8, 1 and 8 cases were diploid, triploid, tetraploid and aneuploid, respectively. In the initial HA category (n=24, 14 diploid, 1 triploid, 5 tetraploid, and 4 aneuploid cases existed. Following flow cytometry and histopathologic reevaluation, 1 case with previous diagnosis of HA was reclassified as PHM, 2 initial PHMs were reclassified as CHM and 2 initial CHMs were categorized as PHM. Conclusion: The results show that correct diagnosis of PMH is the main challenge in histological diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD. DNA flow cytometric analysis could be an informative supplement to the histological interpretation of molar and hydropic placentas.

  5. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  6. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in Dairy Cattle by Means of Selective Milk DNA Pooling Using Dinucleotide Microsatellite Markers: Analysis of Milk Protein Percentage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lipkin, Ehud; Mosig, Mathias O; Darvasi, Ariel; Ezra, Ephraim; Shalom, A; Friedmann, Adam; Soller, Morris

    1998-01-01

    "Selective DNA pooling" accomplishes quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping through densitometric estimates of marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA samples of phenotypically extreme individuals. With poly(TG...

  7. REVIEW: The detection of aquatic animal species using environmental DNA – a review of eDNA as a survey tool in ecology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rees, Helen C; Maddison, Ben C; Middleditch, David J; Patmore, James R.M; Gough, Kevin C; Crispo, Erika

    2014-01-01

    ... time‐consuming and costly. Environmental DNA analysis is increasingly being used in the detection of rare or invasive species and has also been applied to e DNA persistence studies and estimations of species...

  8. Attitude Estimation or Quaternion Estimation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2003-01-01

    The attitude of spacecraft is represented by a 3x3 orthogonal matrix with unity determinant, which belongs to the three-dimensional special orthogonal group SO(3). The fact that all three-parameter representations of SO(3) are singular or discontinuous for certain attitudes has led to the use of higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterizations, especially the four-component quaternion. In attitude estimation, we are faced with the alternatives of using an attitude representation that is either singular or redundant. Estimation procedures fall into three broad classes. The first estimates a three-dimensional representation of attitude deviations from a reference attitude parameterized by a higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterization. The deviations from the reference are assumed to be small enough to avoid any singularity or discontinuity of the three-dimensional parameterization. The second class, which estimates a higher-dimensional representation subject to enough constraints to leave only three degrees of freedom, is difficult to formulate and apply consistently. The third class estimates a representation of SO(3) with more than three dimensions, treating the parameters as independent. We refer to the most common member of this class as quaternion estimation, to contrast it with attitude estimation. We analyze the first and third of these approaches in the context of an extended Kalman filter with simplified kinematics and measurement models.

  9. DNA origami based Au–Ag-core–shell nanoparticle dimers with single-molecule SERS sensitivity† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about materials and methods, designs of DNA origami templates, height profiles, additional SERS spectra, assignment of DNA bands, SEM images, additional AFM images, FDTD simulations, additional reference spectra for Cy3 and detailed description of EF estimation, simulated absorption and scattering spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08674d Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, J.; Heck, C.; Ellerik, L.; Merk, V.

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled. PMID:26892770

  10. Adaptive Response to DNA-Damaging Agents in Natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae Populations from “Evolution Canyon”, Mt. Carmel, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidzbarsky, Gabriel A.; Shkolnik, Tamar; Nevo, Eviatar

    2009-01-01

    Background Natural populations of most organisms, especially unicellular microorganisms, are constantly exposed to harsh environmental factors which affect their growth. UV radiation is one of the most important physical parameters which influences yeast growth in nature. Here we used 46 natural strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from several natural populations at the “Evolution Canyon” microsite (Nahal Oren, Mt. Carmel, Israel). The opposing slopes of this canyon share the same geology, soil, and macroclimate, but they differ in microclimatic conditions. The interslope differences in solar radiation (200%–800% more on the “African” slope) caused the development of two distinct biomes. The south-facing slope is sunnier and has xeric, savannoid “African” environment while the north-facing slope is represented by temperate, “European” forested environment. Here we studied the phenotypic response of the S. cerevisiae strains to UVA and UVC radiations and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in order to evaluate the interslope effect on the strains' ability to withstand DNA-damaging agents. Methodology/Principal Findings We exposed our strains to the different DNA-damaging agents and measured survival by counting colony forming units. The strains from the “African” slope were more resilient to both UVA and MMS than the strains from the “European” slope. In contrast, we found that there was almost no difference between strains (with similar ploidy) from the opposite slopes, in their sensitivity to UVC radiation. These results suggest that the “African” strains are more adapted to higher solar radiation than the “European” strains. We also found that the tetraploids strains were more tolerant to all DNA-damaging agents than their neighboring diploid strains, which suggest that high ploidy level might be a mechanism of adaptation to high solar radiation. Conclusions/Significance Our results and the results of parallel studies with

  11. An Evolutionary Model of DNA Substring Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Meelis; Tretyakov, Konstantin; Vilo, Jaak

    DNA sequence analysis methods, such as motif discovery, gene detection or phylogeny reconstruction, can often provide important input for biological studies. Many of such methods require a background model, representing the expected distribution of short substrings in a given DNA region. Most current techniques for modeling this distribution disregard the evolutionary processes underlying DNA formation. We propose a novel approach for modeling DNA k-mer distribution that is capable of taking the notions of evolution and natural selection into account. We derive a computionally tractable approximation for estimating k-mer probabilities at genetic equilibrium, given a description of evolutionary processes in terms of fitness and mutation probabilities. We assess the goodness of this approximation via numerical experiments. Besides providing a generative model for DNA sequences, our method has further applications in motif discovery.

  12. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  13. Cytogenetic features of rRNA genes across land plants: analysis of the Plant rDNA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sònia; Kovařík, Ales; Leitch, Andrew R; Garnatje, Teresa

    2017-03-01

    The online resource http://www.plantrdnadatabase.com/ stores information on the number, chromosomal locations and structure of the 5S and 18S-5.8S-26S (35S) ribosomal DNAs (rDNA) in plants. This resource was exploited to study relationships between rDNA locus number, distribution, the occurrence of linked (L-type) and separated (S-type) 5S and 35S rDNA units, chromosome number, genome size and ploidy level. The analyses presented summarise current knowledge on rDNA locus numbers and distribution in plants. We analysed 2949 karyotypes, from 1791 species and 86 plant families, and performed ancestral character state reconstructions. The ancestral karyotype (2n = 16) has two terminal 35S sites and two interstitial 5S sites, while the median (2n = 24) presents four terminal 35S sites and three interstitial 5S sites. Whilst 86.57% of karyotypes show S-type organisation (ancestral condition), the L-type arrangement has arisen independently several times during plant evolution. A non-terminal position of 35S rDNA was found in about 25% of single-locus karyotypes, suggesting that terminal locations are not essential for functionality and expression. Single-locus karyotypes are very common, even in polyploids. In this regard, polyploidy is followed by subsequent locus loss. This results in a decrease in locus number per monoploid genome, forming part of the diploidisation process returning polyploids to a diploid-like state over time. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Forensic Validation of the Goldeneye™ DNA ID 25A Kit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yao-dong; Cao, Li-ping

    2015-08-01

    To test and estimate the forensic application of Goldeneye™ DNA ID 25A Kit. The kit was validated by a series of tests for accuracy, sensitivity, consistency, peak height balance, stability, and mixed samples through measured blood samples and other samples in routine casework. The peak height balance of the different loci was ≥ 42%. The genotyping results of the positive control DNA was accurate. The complete STR genotyping result could be obtained from 0.125 ng positive control DNA. Goldeneye™ DNA ID 25A Kit is suitable for criminal cases and DNA database in forensic practice.

  15. 45S rDNA external transcribed spacer organization reveals new phylogenetic relationships in Avena genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joana; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    The genus Avena comprises four distinct genomes organized in diploid (AA or CC), tetraploid (AABB or AACC) and hexaploid species (AACCDD), constituting an interesting model for phylogenetic analysis. The aim of this work was to characterize 45S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) variability in distinct species representative of Avena genome diversity-A. strigosa (AA), A. ventricosa (CvCv), A. eriantha (CpCp), A. barbata (AABB), A. murphyi (AACC), A. sativa (AACCDD) and A. sterilis (AACCDD) through the assessment of the 5' external transcribed spacer (5'-ETS), a promising IGS region for phylogenetic studies poorly studied in Avena genus. In this work, IGS length polymorphisms were detected mainly due to distinct 5'-ETS sequence types resulting from major differences in the number and organization of repeated motifs. Although species with A genome revealed a 5'-ETS organization (A-organization) similar to the one previously described in A. sativa, a distinct organization was unraveled in C genome diploid species (C-organization). Interestingly, such new organization presents a higher similarity with other Poaceae species than A-genome sequences, supporting the hypothesis of C-genome being the ancestral Avena genome. Additionally, polyploid species with both genomes mainly retain the A-genome 5'-ETS organization, confirming the preferential elimination of C-genome sequences in Avena polyploid species. Moreover, 5'-ETS sequences phylogenetic analysis consistently clustered the species studied according to ploidy and genomic constitution supporting the use of ribosomal genes to highlight Avena species evolutive pathways.

  16. Delayed degradation of parental macronuclear DNA in programmed nuclear death of Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Naomi; Mikami, Kazuyuki; Endoh, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    In the ciliated protozoan Paramecium caudatum, a parental macronucleus that is fragmented into some 40-50 pieces during conjugation does not degenerate immediately, but persists until the eighth cell cycle after conjugation. Here we demonstrate that the initiation of the parental macronuclear degeneration occurs at about the fifth cell cycle. The size of parental macronuclear fragments continued to increase between the first and fourth cell cycle, but gradually decreased thereafter. By contrast, a new macronucleus grew and reached a maximum size by the fourth cell cycle, suggesting that the new macronucleus matured by that stage. Southern blot analysis revealed that parental macronuclear DNA was degraded at about the fifth cell cycle. The degradation was supported by acridine orange staining, indicating degeneration of the macronuclear fragments. Prior to the degradation, the fragments once attached to the new macronucleus were subsequently liberated from it. These observations lead us to conclude that once a new macronucleus has been fully formed by the fourth cell cycle, the parental macronuclear fragments are destined to degenerate, probably through direction by new macronucleus. Considering the long persistence of the parental macronucleus during the early cell cycles after conjugation, the macronuclear fragments might function in the maturation of the imperfect new macronucleus. Two possible functions, a gene dosage compensation and adjustment of ploidy level, are discussed. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. SUMO-1 possesses DNA binding activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieruszeski Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugation of small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs is a frequent post-translational modification of proteins. SUMOs can also temporally associate with protein-targets via SUMO binding motifs (SBMs. Protein sumoylation has been identified as an important regulatory mechanism especially in the regulation of transcription and the maintenance of genome stability. The precise molecular mechanisms by which SUMO conjugation and association act are, however, not understood. Findings Using NMR spectroscopy and protein-DNA cross-linking experiments, we demonstrate here that SUMO-1 can specifically interact with dsDNA in a sequence-independent fashion. We also show that SUMO-1 binding to DNA can compete with other protein-DNA interactions at the example of the regulatory domain of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase and, based on these competition studies, estimate the DNA binding constant of SUMO1 in the range 1 mM. Conclusion This finding provides an important insight into how SUMO-1 might exert its activity. SUMO-1 might play a general role in destabilizing DNA bound protein complexes thereby operating in a bottle-opener way of fashion, explaining its pivotal role in regulating the activity of many central transcription and DNA repair complexes.

  18. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  19. FLOW CYTOMETRY DETERMINATION OF PLOIDY LEVEL IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    of winged bean (grown in the green house) from 21 ..... Plate 1a-d: Effect of colchicine on the pods of P. tetragonolobus (a = control; b = 5mg/l for 24hrs; c = 10mg/l for ..... Pigeon Pea. International Journal of Agriculture. & Biology, 15(5): 885–890. Udensi, O., Edu, E. A., Ikpeme, E. V., Ebigwai, J. K and. Ekpe, D. E., 2012a.

  20. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  1. DNA computing models

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, Zoya; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this excellent text, the reader is given a comprehensive introduction to the field of DNA computing. The book emphasizes computational methods to tackle central problems of DNA computing, such as controlling living cells, building patterns, and generating nanomachines.

  2. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  3. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  4. DNA damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); A. Zotter (Angelika); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractStructural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network ofDNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance

  5. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nal factors such as UV radiation, high energy radiation such as X-. Keywords. DNA repair, DNA damage, base excision repair, nucleotide exci- sion repair, methlyl-directed mis- match repair, Nobel Prize. rays and gamma rays, mutagenic chemicals and viruses. Different types of DNA ... be especially important in plants.

  6. Temporal organization of replication in DNA fibers of mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The extent of coordinate control over the multiple initiation events in DNA replication has been investigated in three mammalian cell lines by DNA fiber autoradiography. Quantitative estimates have been obtained of the degree of synchrony among initiations occurring on stretches of DNA. Synchrony decreases markedly with increasing distance between initiation sites in MDBK (bovine) and L929 (mouse) cells, but only slightly in muntjac cells. Possible control mechanisms for the initiation process are discussed. PMID:457781

  7. Phylogeny of the Genus Chrysanthemum L.: Evidence from Single-Copy Nuclear Gene and Chloroplast DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Li; Wan, Qian; Guo, Yan-Ping; Yang, Ji; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemum L. (Asteraceae-Anthemideae) is a genus with rapid speciation. It comprises about 40 species, most of which are distributed in East Asia. Many of these are narrowly distributed and habitat-specific. Considerable variations in morphology and ploidy are found in this genus. Some species have been the subjects of many studies, but the relationships between Chrysanthemum and its allies and the phylogeny of this genus remain poorly understood. In the present study, 32 species/varieties from Chrysanthemum and 11 from the allied genera were analyzed using DNA sequences of the single-copy nuclear CDS gene and seven cpDNA loci (psbA-trnH, trnC-ycf6, ycf6-psbM, trnY-rpoB, rpS4-trnT, trnL-F, and rpL16). The cpDNA and nuclear CDS gene trees both suggest that 1) Chrysanthemum is not a monophyletic taxon, and the affinity between Chrysanthemum and Ajania is so close that these two genera should be incorporated taxonomically; 2) Phaeostigma is more closely related to the Chrysanthemum+Ajania than other generic allies. According to pollen morphology and to the present cpDNA and CDS data, Ajania purpurea is a member of Phaeostigma. Species differentiation in Chrysanthemum appears to be correlated with geographic and environmental conditions. The Chinese Chrysanthemum species can be divided into two groups, the C. zawadskii group and the C. indicum group. The former is distributed in northern China and the latter in southern China. Many polyploid species, such as C. argyrophyllum, may have originated from allopolyploidization involving divergent progenitors. Considering all the evidence from present and previous studies, we conclude that geographic and ecological factors as well as hybridization and polyploidy play important roles in the divergence and speciation of the genus Chrysanthemum. PMID:23133665

  8. Phylogeny of the genus Chrysanthemum L.: evidence from single-copy nuclear gene and chloroplast DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Li; Wan, Qian; Guo, Yan-Ping; Yang, Ji; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemum L. (Asteraceae-Anthemideae) is a genus with rapid speciation. It comprises about 40 species, most of which are distributed in East Asia. Many of these are narrowly distributed and habitat-specific. Considerable variations in morphology and ploidy are found in this genus. Some species have been the subjects of many studies, but the relationships between Chrysanthemum and its allies and the phylogeny of this genus remain poorly understood. In the present study, 32 species/varieties from Chrysanthemum and 11 from the allied genera were analyzed using DNA sequences of the single-copy nuclear CDS gene and seven cpDNA loci (psbA-trnH, trnC-ycf6, ycf6-psbM, trnY-rpoB, rpS4-trnT, trnL-F, and rpL16). The cpDNA and nuclear CDS gene trees both suggest that 1) Chrysanthemum is not a monophyletic taxon, and the affinity between Chrysanthemum and Ajania is so close that these two genera should be incorporated taxonomically; 2) Phaeostigma is more closely related to the Chrysanthemum+Ajania than other generic allies. According to pollen morphology and to the present cpDNA and CDS data, Ajania purpurea is a member of Phaeostigma. Species differentiation in Chrysanthemum appears to be correlated with geographic and environmental conditions. The Chinese Chrysanthemum species can be divided into two groups, the C. zawadskii group and the C. indicum group. The former is distributed in northern China and the latter in southern China. Many polyploid species, such as C. argyrophyllum, may have originated from allopolyploidization involving divergent progenitors. Considering all the evidence from present and previous studies, we conclude that geographic and ecological factors as well as hybridization and polyploidy play important roles in the divergence and speciation of the genus Chrysanthemum.

  9. Phenotypic and nuclear DNA variation in Tunisian cultivars of date ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to assess the morphological diversity of the five most important and widely consumed Tunisian date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars and the possible relationship between phenotypic variation and genome size and ploidy, since polyploidy can occur in this species. Five Tunisian palm date ...

  10. Implementation of Accurate and Fast DNA Cytometry by Confocal Microscopy in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennert S. Ploeger

    2005-01-01

    . Conclusions: The described methodology allows to obtain a largely unbiased sample of nuclei in thick tissue sections using 3D DNA cytometry by confocal laser scanning microscopy within an acceptable time frame for pilot clinical applications, and with a CV small enough to resolve smaller near diploid stemlines. This provides a suitable method for 3D DNA ploidy assessment of selected rare cells based on morphologic characteristics and of clinical samples that are too small to prepare adequate cell suspensions.

  11. Amplification of DNA mixtures - Missing data approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the interpretation of results of STR typing of DNA mixtures based on a multivariate normal distribution of peak areas. From previous analyses of controlled experiments with mixed DNA samples, we exploit the linear relationship between peak heights and peak areas...... DNA samples, it is only possible to observe the cumulative peak heights and areas. Complying with this latent structure, we use the EM-algorithm to impute the missing variables based on a compound symmetry model. That is the measurements are subject to intra- and inter-loci correlations not depending...... on the actual alleles of the DNA profiles. Due to factorization of the likelihood, properties of the normal distribution and use of auxiliary variables, an ordinary implementation of the EM-algorithm solves the missing data problem. We estimate the parameters in the model based on a training data set. In order...

  12. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369] PMID:27099236

  13. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369].

  14. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  15. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two...

  16. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  17. DNA Methylation Biomarkers: Cancer and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeska, Thomas; Craig, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease. PMID:25229548

  18. DNA Methylation Biomarkers: Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mikeska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease.

  19. DNA structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase. © 2015 FEBS.

  20. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  1. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  2. Quantification of damage in DNA recovered from highly degraded samples – a case study on DNA in faeces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveson J Paige

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poorly preserved biological tissues have become an important source of DNA for a wide range of zoological studies. Measuring the quality of DNA obtained from these samples is often desired; however, there are no widely used techniques available for quantifying damage in highly degraded DNA samples. We present a general method that can be used to determine the frequency of polymerase blocking DNA damage in specific gene-regions in such samples. The approach uses quantitative PCR to measure the amount of DNA present at several fragment sizes within a sample. According to a model of random degradation the amount of available template will decline exponentially with increasing fragment size in damaged samples, and the frequency of DNA damage (λ can be estimated by determining the rate of decline. Results The method is illustrated through the analysis of DNA extracted from sea lion faecal samples. Faeces contain a complex mixture of DNA from several sources and different components are expected to be differentially degraded. We estimated the frequency of DNA damage in both predator and prey DNA within individual faecal samples. The distribution of fragment lengths for each target fit well with the assumption of a random degradation process and, in keeping with our expectations, the estimated frequency of damage was always less in predator DNA than in prey DNA within the same sample (mean λpredator = 0.0106 per nucleotide; mean λprey = 0.0176 per nucleotide. This study is the first to explicitly define the amount of template damage in any DNA extracted from faeces and the first to quantify the amount of predator and prey DNA present within individual faecal samples. Conclusion We present an approach for characterizing mixed, highly degraded PCR templates such as those often encountered in ecological studies using non-invasive samples as a source of DNA, wildlife forensics investigations and ancient DNA research. This method will

  3. DNA origami: the art of folding DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccà, Barbara; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2012-01-02

    The advent of DNA origami technology greatly simplified the design and construction of nanometer-sized DNA objects. The self-assembly of a DNA-origami structure is a straightforward process in which a long single-stranded scaffold (often from the phage M13mp18) is folded into basically any desired shape with the help of a multitude of short helper strands. This approach enables the ready generation of objects with an addressable surface area of a few thousand nm(2) and with a single "pixel" resolution of about 6 nm. The process is rapid, puts low demands on experimental conditions, and delivers target products in high yields. These features make DNA origami the method of choice in structural DNA nanotechnology when two- and three-dimensional objects are desired. This Minireview summarizes recent advances in the design of DNA origami nanostructures, which open the door to numerous exciting applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Small RNA-mediated regulation of DNA dosage in the ciliateOxytricha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Jaspreet S; Clay, Derek M; Moreira, Sandrine; Wang, Xing; Landweber, Laura F

    2018-01-01

    Dicer-dependent small noncoding RNAs play important roles in gene regulation in a wide variety of organisms. Endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are part of an ancient pathway of transposon control in plants and animals. The ciliate, Oxytricha trifallax, has approximately 16,000 gene-sized chromosomes in its somatic nucleus. Long noncoding RNAs establish high ploidy levels at the onset of sexual development, but the factors that regulate chromosome copy numbers during cell division and growth have been a mystery. We report a novel function of a class of Dicer (Dcl-1)- and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP)-dependent endogenous small RNAs in regulating chromosome copy number and gene dosage in O. trifallax Asexually growing populations express an abundant class of 21-nt sRNAs that map to both coding and noncoding regions of most chromosomes. These sRNAs are bound to chromatin and their levels surprisingly do not correlate with mRNA levels. Instead, the levels of these small RNAs correlate with genomic DNA copy number. Reduced sRNA levels in dcl-1 or rdrp mutants lead to concomitant reduction in chromosome copy number. Furthermore, these cells show no signs of transposon activation, but instead display irregular nuclear architecture and signs of replication stress. In conclusion, Oxytricha Dcl-1 and RdRP-dependent small RNAs that derive from the somatic nucleus contribute to the maintenance of gene dosage, possibly via a role in DNA replication, offering a novel role for these small RNAs in eukaryotes. © 2018 Khurana et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. DNA methylation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyushin, B F

    2006-01-01

    DNA in plants is highly methylated, containing 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and N6-methyladenine (m6A); m5C is located mainly in symmetrical CG and CNG sequences but it may occur also in other non-symmetrical contexts. m6A but not m5C was found in plant mitochondrial DNA. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific. It is controlled by phytohormones and changes on seed germination, flowering and under the influence of various pathogens (viral, bacterial, fungal). DNA methylation controls plant growth and development, with particular involvement in regulation of gene expression and DNA replication. DNA replication is accompanied by the appearance of under-methylated, newly formed DNA strands including Okazaki fragments; asymmetry of strand DNA methylation disappears until the end of the cell cycle. A model for regulation of DNA replication by methylation is suggested. Cytosine DNA methylation in plants is more rich and diverse compared with animals. It is carried out by the families of specific enzymes that belong to at least three classes of DNA methyltransferases. Open reading frames (ORF) for adenine DNA methyltransferases are found in plant and animal genomes, and a first eukaryotic (plant) adenine DNA methyltransferase (wadmtase) is described; the enzyme seems to be involved in regulation of the mitochondria replication. Like in animals, DNA methylation in plants is closely associated with histone modifications and it affects binding of specific proteins to DNA and formation of respective transcription complexes in chromatin. The same gene (DRM2) in Arabidopsis thaliana is methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues; thus, at least two different, and probably interdependent, systems of DNA modification are present in plants. Plants seem to have a restriction-modification (R-M) system. RNA-directed DNA methylation has been observed in plants; it involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues in a region of siRNA-DNA

  6. Environmental DNA (eDNA) Detection Probability Is Influenced by Seasonal Activity of Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lesley S; Godwin, James C; Renshaw, Mark A; Larson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) holds great promise for conservation applications like the monitoring of invasive or imperiled species, yet this emerging technique requires ongoing testing in order to determine the contexts over which it is effective. For example, little research to date has evaluated how seasonality of organism behavior or activity may influence detection probability of eDNA. We applied eDNA to survey for two highly imperiled species endemic to the upper Black Warrior River basin in Alabama, US: the Black Warrior Waterdog (Necturus alabamensis) and the Flattened Musk Turtle (Sternotherus depressus). Importantly, these species have contrasting patterns of seasonal activity, with N. alabamensis more active in the cool season (October-April) and S. depressus more active in the warm season (May-September). We surveyed sites historically occupied by these species across cool and warm seasons over two years with replicated eDNA water samples, which were analyzed in the laboratory using species-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. We then used occupancy estimation with detection probability modeling to evaluate both the effects of landscape attributes on organism presence and season of sampling on detection probability of eDNA. Importantly, we found that season strongly affected eDNA detection probability for both species, with N. alabamensis having higher eDNA detection probabilities during the cool season and S. depressus have higher eDNA detection probabilities during the warm season. These results illustrate the influence of organismal behavior or activity on eDNA detection in the environment and identify an important role for basic natural history in designing eDNA monitoring programs.

  7. Environmental DNA (eDNA): A tool for quantifying the abundant but elusive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Morris, Charles C.; Shively, Dawn; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna; Spoljaric, Ashley M.; Dickey, Joshua; Roseman, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is revolutionizing biodiversity monitoring, occupancy estimates, and real-time detections of invasive species. In the Great Lakes, the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), an invasive benthic fish from the Black Sea, has spread to encompass all five lakes and many tributaries, outcompeting or consuming native species; however, estimates of round goby abundance are confounded by behavior and habitat preference, which impact reliable methods for estimating their population. By integrating eDNA into round goby monitoring, improved estimates of biomass may be obtainable. We conducted mesocosm experiments to estimate rates of goby DNA shedding and decay. Further, we compared eDNA with several methods of traditional field sampling to compare its use as an alternative/complementary monitoring method. Environmental DNA decay was comparable to other fish species, and first-order decay was lower at 12°C (k = 0.043) than at 19°C (k = 0.058). Round goby eDNA was routinely detected in known invaded sites of Lake Michigan and its tributaries (range log10 4.8–6.2 CN/L), but not upstream of an artificial fish barrier. Traditional techniques (mark-recapture, seining, trapping) in Lakes Michigan and Huron resulted in fewer, more variable detections than eDNA, but trapping and eDNA were correlated (Pearson R = 0.87). Additional field testing will help correlate round goby abundance with eDNA, providing insight on its role as a prey fish and its impact on food webs.

  8. Environmental DNA (eDNA: A tool for quantifying the abundant but elusive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith B Nevers

    Full Text Available Environmental DNA (eDNA is revolutionizing biodiversity monitoring, occupancy estimates, and real-time detections of invasive species. In the Great Lakes, the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus, an invasive benthic fish from the Black Sea, has spread to encompass all five lakes and many tributaries, outcompeting or consuming native species; however, estimates of round goby abundance are confounded by behavior and habitat preference, which impact reliable methods for estimating their population. By integrating eDNA into round goby monitoring, improved estimates of biomass may be obtainable. We conducted mesocosm experiments to estimate rates of goby DNA shedding and decay. Further, we compared eDNA with several methods of traditional field sampling to compare its use as an alternative/complementary monitoring method. Environmental DNA decay was comparable to other fish species, and first-order decay was lower at 12°C (k = 0.043 than at 19°C (k = 0.058. Round goby eDNA was routinely detected in known invaded sites of Lake Michigan and its tributaries (range log10 4.8-6.2 CN/L, but not upstream of an artificial fish barrier. Traditional techniques (mark-recapture, seining, trapping in Lakes Michigan and Huron resulted in fewer, more variable detections than eDNA, but trapping and eDNA were correlated (Pearson R = 0.87. Additional field testing will help correlate round goby abundance with eDNA, providing insight on its role as a prey fish and its impact on food webs.

  9. Environmental DNA (eDNA): A tool for quantifying the abundant but elusive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevers, Meredith B; Byappanahalli, Murulee N; Morris, Charles C; Shively, Dawn; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Spoljaric, Ashley M; Dickey, Joshua; Roseman, Edward F

    2018-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is revolutionizing biodiversity monitoring, occupancy estimates, and real-time detections of invasive species. In the Great Lakes, the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), an invasive benthic fish from the Black Sea, has spread to encompass all five lakes and many tributaries, outcompeting or consuming native species; however, estimates of round goby abundance are confounded by behavior and habitat preference, which impact reliable methods for estimating their population. By integrating eDNA into round goby monitoring, improved estimates of biomass may be obtainable. We conducted mesocosm experiments to estimate rates of goby DNA shedding and decay. Further, we compared eDNA with several methods of traditional field sampling to compare its use as an alternative/complementary monitoring method. Environmental DNA decay was comparable to other fish species, and first-order decay was lower at 12°C (k = 0.043) than at 19°C (k = 0.058). Round goby eDNA was routinely detected in known invaded sites of Lake Michigan and its tributaries (range log10 4.8-6.2 CN/L), but not upstream of an artificial fish barrier. Traditional techniques (mark-recapture, seining, trapping) in Lakes Michigan and Huron resulted in fewer, more variable detections than eDNA, but trapping and eDNA were correlated (Pearson R = 0.87). Additional field testing will help correlate round goby abundance with eDNA, providing insight on its role as a prey fish and its impact on food webs.

  10. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  11. DNA barcoding fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Lee A; Driskell, Amy C; Baldwin, Carole C; Ormos, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the techniques for DNA barcoding of fishes from field collection to DNA sequence analysis. Recommendations for modifications of field protocols and best tissue sampling practices are made. A variety of DNA extraction protocols is provided, including high-throughput robot-assisted methods. A pair of well-tested forward and reverse primers for PCR amplification and sequencing are presented. These primers have been successfully used for DNA barcode on a wide array of marine fish taxa and also work well in most freshwater and cartilaginous fishes. Recipes and cycling protocols for both PCR amplification and sequencing and cleanup methods for the reaction products are provided. A method for the consistent production of high-quality DNA barcodes from DNA sequence data is given and stringent guidelines for judging the quality of raw sequence data are laid out.

  12. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  13. Peripheral blood mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA (mtDNA/nDNA) ratio as a marker of mitochondrial toxicities of stavudine containing antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Malawian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampira, Elizabeth; Dzobo, Kevin; Kumwenda, Johnstone; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Parker, M Iqbal; Dandara, Collet

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is a major concern related to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Common manifestations are peripheral neuropathy and lipodystrophy. Depletion of mitochondria has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) levels in peripheral blood can be used as biomarker of stavudine-associated mitochondrial toxicities. We enrolled 203 HIV-infected Malawian adult patients on stavudine-containing ART and 64 healthy controls of Bantu origin in a cross-sectional study. Total DNA was extracted from whole blood.The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was used to estimate nuclear DNA (nDNA) levels and the ATP synthase-8 mitochondrial DNA gene to estimate mtDNA levels, from which mtDNA/nDNA ratios were determined. MtDNA subhaplogroups were established by sequencing. Among patients, peripheral neuropathy was present in 21% (43/203), lipodystrophy in 18% (20/112), elevated lactate level (>2.5 mmol/L) in 17% (19/113). Healthy controls had a higher median mtDNA/nDNA ratio when compared to HIV/AIDS patients (6.64 vs. 5.08; p=0.05), patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy (6.64 vs. 3.40, p=0.039), and patients with high lactate levels (6.64 vs. 0.68, p=0.024), respectively. Significant differences in median mtDNA/nDNA ratios were observed between patients with high and normal lactate levels (5.88 vs. 0.68, p=0.018). The median mtDNA/nDNA ratio of patients in subhaplogroup L0a2 was much lower (0.62 vs. 8.50, p=0.01) than that of those in subhaplogroup L2a. Our data indicate that peripheral blood mtDNA/nDNA ratio is a marker of mitochondrial toxicities of stavudine and is associated with elevated lactate levels and mtDNA subhaplogroups. This could open the prospect to select a substantial group of patients who will not have problematic side effects from stavudine, an affordable and effective antiretroviral drug that is being phased out in Africa due to its toxicity.

  14. Freezing shortens the lifetime of DNA molecules under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Ju; Cui, Yujia; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Wei, Wesley H; Chang, Rong-Shing; Shu, Wun-Yi; Hsu, Ian C

    2017-12-01

    DNA samples are commonly frozen for storage. However, freezing can compromise the integrity of DNA molecules. Considering the wide applications of DNA molecules in nanotechnology, changes to DNA integrity at the molecular level may cause undesirable outcomes. However, the effects of freezing on DNA integrity have not been fully explored. To investigate the impact of freezing on DNA integrity, samples of frozen and non-frozen bacteriophage lambda DNA were studied using optical tweezers. Tension (5-35 pN) was applied to DNA molecules to mimic mechanical interactions between DNA and other biomolecules. The integrity of the DNA molecules was evaluated by measuring the time taken for single DNA molecules to break under tension. Mean lifetimes were determined by maximum likelihood estimates and variances were obtained through bootstrapping simulations. Under 5 pN of force, the mean lifetime of frozen samples is 44.3 min with 95% confidence interval (CI) between 36.7 min and 53.6 min while the mean lifetime of non-frozen samples is 133.2 min (95% CI: 97.8-190.1 min). Under 15 pN of force, the mean lifetimes are 10.8 min (95% CI: 7.6-12.6 min) and 78.5 min (95% CI: 58.1-108.9 min). The lifetimes of frozen DNA molecules are significantly reduced, implying that freezing compromises DNA integrity. Moreover, we found that the reduced DNA structural integrity cannot be restored using regular ligation process. These results indicate that freezing can alter the structural integrity of the DNA molecules.

  15. Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and polyploidization: a flow cytometric and comet assay study in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eleazar; Azevedo, Raquel; Fernandes, Pedro; Santos, Conceição

    2011-07-18

    Chromium(VI) is recognized as the most toxic valency of Cr, but its genotoxicity and cytostaticity in plants is still poorly studied. In order to analyze Cr(VI) cyto- and gentotoxicity, Pisum sativum L. plants were grown in soil and watered with solutions with different concentrations of Cr up to 2000 mg/L. After 28 days of exposure, leaves showed no significant variations in either cell cycle dynamics or ploidy level. As for DNA damage, flow cytometric (FCM) histograms showed significant differences in full peak coefficient of variation (FPCV) values, suggesting clastogenicity. This is paralleled by the Comet assay results, showing an increase in DNA damage for 1000 and 2000 mg/L. In roots, exposure to 2000 mg/L resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G(2)/M checkpoint. It was also verified that under the same conditions 40% of the individuals analyzed suffered polyploidization having both 2C and 4C levels. DNA damage analysis by the Comet assay and FCM revealed dose-dependent increases in DNA damage and FPCV. Through this, we have unequivocally demonstrated for the first time in plants that Cr exposure can result in DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and polyploidization. Moreover, we critically compare the validity of the Comet assay and FCM in evaluating cytogenetic toxicity tests in plants and demonstrate that the data provided by both techniques complement each other and present high correlation levels. In conclusion, the data presented provides new insight on Cr effects in plants in general and supports the use of the parameters tested in this study as reliable endpoints for this metal toxicity in plants. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA- REVOLUTIONARY EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhehi Narayan Nayak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Mitochondrion, the sausage-shaped organelle residing in the cytoplasm of all eukaryotic cells, apart from being the power house, represents endosymbiotic evolution of a free living organism to intracellular structure. Anthropologically, mitochondrial DNA is the fossilised source to trace the human ancestry particularly of maternal lineage. This article attempts to highlight the various biological functions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA with a note on its forensic application.

  17. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  18. DNA origami nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Engst, Christian R; Ablay, Marc; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2012-01-11

    We demonstrate the assembly of functional hybrid nanopores for single molecule sensing by inserting DNA origami structures into solid-state nanopores. In our experiments, single artificial nanopores based on DNA origami are repeatedly inserted in and ejected from solid-state nanopores with diameters around 15 nm. We show that these hybrid nanopores can be employed for the detection of λ-DNA molecules. Our approach paves the way for future development of adaptable single-molecule nanopore sensors based on the combination of solid-state nanopores and DNA self-assembly. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. The prognostic value of a histologic grading system, DNA profile, and MIB-1 expression in early stages of cervical squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graflund, Marianne; Sorbe, B; Bryne, M; Karlsson, M

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic importance of a new grading system focusing on the invasive tumor front, DNA profile, and the proliferation marker MIB-1. A complete geographic series of 172 women treated with radical hysterectomy (Wertheim-Meigs) for FIGO stage I-II cervical carcinomas was the target population. The analyses were performed on 141 (82%) squamous cell carcinomas of the complete series. During the period of observation (mean 222 months), 17 recurrences (12.1%) were encountered. Prognostic factors for disease-free survival were lymph node status (P < 0.000001), radical surgical margins (P = 0.00004), and tumor size (P = 0.002). The complete score of the invasive front grading system (IFG), and the individual scores of two variables-pattern of invasion and host response-were all significantly (P = 0.002, P = 0.007, P = 0.0001) associated with pelvic lymph node metastases. Host response was the single most important factor in the IFG system, and it was superior to the complete score in predicting lymph node metastases. The total IFG score was also a significant (P = 0.003) prognostic factor for disease-free survival. DNA ploidy, S-phase fraction, and MIB-1 expression were nonsignificant factors in predicting pelvic lymph node metastases and disease-free survival of the patient. The IFG in the original or modified versions could predict low- and high-risk groups of tumors and therefore be of value in treatment planning for these patients.

  20. Use of the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique for bacteria detection in Aedes aegypti (Diptera:Culicidae) (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacteria associated with insects can have a substantial impact on the biology and life cycle of their host. The checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique is a semi-quantitative technique that has been previously employed in odontology to detect and quantify a variety of bacterial species in dental samples. Here we tested the applicability of the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique to detect the presence of Aedes aegypti-associated bacterial species in larvae, pupae and adults of A. aegypti. Findings Using the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique we could detect and estimate the number of four bacterial species in total DNA samples extracted from A. aegypti single whole individuals and midguts. A. aegypti associated bacterial species were also detected in the midgut of four other insect species, Lutzomyia longipalpis, Drosophila melanogaster, Bradysia hygida and Apis mellifera. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique can be employed to study the microbiota composition of mosquitoes. The method has the sensitivity to detect bacteria in single individuals, as well as in a single organ, and therefore can be employed to evaluate the differences in bacterial counts amongst individuals in a given mosquito population. We suggest that the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique is a straightforward technique that can be widely used for the characterization of the microbiota in mosquito populations. PMID:22185193

  1. Image cytometric evaluation of nuclear texture features and DNA content of the reticular form of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Matjaz; Flezar, Margareta Strojan; Kogoj-Rode, Mirela; Us-Krasovec, Marija

    2006-10-01

    To analyze image cytometric chromatin changes reflected in nuclear texture features and DNA ploidy of oral lichen planus in relation to the normal buccal mucosa and buccal mucosa expressing malignancy-associated changes in cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients with the reticular form of oral lichen planus, with a follow-up period of 25 years, 50 healthy controls and 50 lung cancer patients were included in the study. Scrapings of buccal mucosa were suspended in transport medium. Monolayer filter preparations were Feulgen-thionin stained. Image cytometric analysis was performed by Cyto-Savant. All oral lichen planus specimens in our study were diploid. In univariate analysis, differences between the normal buccal mucosa and oral lichen planus were found in several nuclear texture features, which gave an 80% correct classification rate in multivariate analysis. In the second part of the study, the classifier that recognizes malignancy-associated changes on the buccal mucosa of patients with lung cancer correctly recognized > 80% of oral lichen planus samples as normal buccal mucosa. Our results indicate that chromatin changes in oral lichen planus exist compared to normal cells; however, the chromatin structure of the reticular form of oral lichen planus does not express malignancy-associated changes and is more similar to normal squamous cells.

  2. The salvage/turnover/repair (STOR) model for uniparental inheritance in Chlamydomonas: DNA as a source of sustenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, B B; VanWinkle-Swift, K

    1994-01-01

    The non-Mendelian inheritance of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas has engaged researchers for decades and has prompted numerous debates regarding molecular mechanisms and evolutionary significance. The hallmarks of chloroplast inheritance in Chlamydomonas are reviewed here, including observations on vegetative haploid cells, somatic hybrids, meiotic zygospores, and vegetative zygotes resulting from sexual reproduction. Models invoked to explain the typical uniparental maternal inheritance of chloroplast genes, and which center upon the presumed existence of sex-specific protectors and destroyers of chloroplast genomes, are briefly discussed. In an effort to bring together the diverse observations on chloroplast gene inheritance in somatic as well as sexual cells, a model is proposed that focuses on organelle DNA turnover as a source of sustenance for the cell during periods of starvation. The salvage/turnover/repair (STOR) model for chloroplast inheritance in Chlamydomonas proposes that as a consequence of the high ploidy of the chloroplast genome, many copies are dispensable; their degradation would provide nucleotides for recombination, repair, RNA synthesis and cell metabolism. The STOR model offers an alternative view of uniparental inheritance as a phenomenon of direct selective benefit to the organism rather than simply being of selfish benefit to the chloroplast genome. These concepts may also have application to other lower eukaryotes that have sexual reproduction coupled with an extended dormancy.

  3. Study of interaction of a fluorescent probe with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Fangying, E-mail: fywu@ncu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry and Center of Analysis and Testing, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Xiang Yanling [Department of Chemistry and Center of Analysis and Testing, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wu Yumei [Packaging Engineering Institute of Jinan University, Zhuhai 519070 (China); Xie Feiyan [Department of Chemistry and Center of Analysis and Testing, Nanchang University, Nanchang, 330031 (China)

    2009-11-15

    The zinc complex of 2-[2-(3, 5-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl-4-hydroxy-phenyl) ethylene]-5-methylpyrazine (1) could bind with the calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA). The binding behaviors between them were studied by fluorescence and absorption spectral assay. The absorption titration of 1-Zn with ct-DNA showed no bathochromic shift and hypochromic effect. No anisotropy increase was observed when ct-DNA was added to 1-Zn solution. They both proved the lack of intercalation interaction between 1-Zn and ct-DNA. The ionic strength experiment, Scatchard plot, study of interaction between 1-Zn and denatured ct-DNA all revealed that the interaction mode between 1-Zn and ct-DNA was electrostatic interaction. Binding constant was estimated to be 7.96x10{sup 4} L moL{sup -1}.

  4. DNA barcoding of Cryptosporidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlapeta, Jan

    2017-11-08

    Cryptosporidium spp. (Apicomplexa) causing cryptosporidiosis are of medical and veterinary significance. The genus Cryptosporidium has benefited from the application of what is considered a DNA-barcoding approach, even before the term 'DNA barcoding' was formally coined. Here, the objective to define the DNA barcode diversity of Cryptosporidium infecting mammals is reviewed and considered to be accomplished. Within the Cryptosporidium literature, the distinction between DNA barcoding and DNA taxonomy is indistinct. DNA barcoding and DNA taxonomy are examined using the latest additions to the growing spectrum of named Cryptosporidium species and within-species and between-species identity is revisited. Ease and availability of whole-genome DNA sequencing of the relatively small Cryptosporidium genome offer an initial perspective on the intra-host diversity. The opportunity emerges to apply a metagenomic approach to purified field/clinical Cryptosporidum isolates. The outstanding question remains a reliable definition of Cryptosporidium phenotype. The complementary experimental infections and metagenome approach will need to be applied simultaneously to address Cryptosporidium phenotype with carefully chosen clinical evaluations enabling identification of virulence factors.

  5. Actinomycin and DNA transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Sobell, H M

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding how actinomycin binds to DNA have suggested its mechanism of action. Actinomycin binds to a premelted DNA conformation present within the transcriptional complex. This immobilizes the complex, interfering with the elongation of growing RNA chains. The model has a number of implications for understanding RNA synthesis.

  6. Actinomycin and DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, H M

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding how actinomycin binds to DNA have suggested its mechanism of action. Actinomycin binds to a premelted DNA conformation present within the transcriptional complex. This immobilizes the complex, interfering with the elongation of growing RNA chains. The model has a number of implications for understanding RNA synthesis. Images PMID:2410919

  7. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  8. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly...

  9. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  10. Actinomycin and DNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobell, H.M.

    1985-08-01

    Recent advances in understanding how actinomycin binds to DNA have suggested its mechanism of action. Actinomycin binds to a premelted DNA conformation present within the transcriptional complex. This immobilizes the complex, interfering with the elongation of growing RNA chains. The model has a number of implications for understanding RNA synthesis.

  11. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  12. DNA Duplex Length and Salt Concentration Dependence of Enthalpy−Entropy Compensation Parameters for DNA Melting

    KAUST Repository

    Starikov, E. B.

    2009-08-20

    Systematical differential calorimetry experiments on DNA oligomers with different lengths and placed in water solutions with various added salt concentrations may, in principle, unravel important information about the structure and dynamics of the DNA and their water-counterion surrounding. With this in mind, to reinterpret the most recent results of calorimetric experiments on DNA oligomers of such a kind, the recent enthalpy-entropy compensation theory has been used. It is demonstrated that the application of the latter could enable direct estimation of thermodynamic parameters of the microphase transitions connected to the changes in DNA dynamical regimes versus the length of the biopolymers and the ionic strengths of their water solutions, and this calls for much more systematical experimental and theoretical studies in this field. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshifumi Minamoto

    Full Text Available Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean.

  14. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Fukuda, Miho; Katsuhara, Koki R; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Hidaka, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kohji; Masuda, Reiji

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica) as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean.

  15. Premeltons in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review.

  16. The effect of ancient DNA damage on inferences of demographic histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Erik; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, Marcus Thomas Pius

    2008-01-01

    The field of ancient DNA (aDNA) is casting new light on many evolutionary questions. However, problems associated with the postmortem instability of DNA may complicate the interpretation of aDNA data. For example, in population genetic studies, the inclusion of damaged DNA may inflate estimates o...... for a change in effective population size in this data set vanishes once the effects of putative damage are removed. Our results suggest that population genetic analyses of aDNA sequences, which do not accurately account for damage, should be interpreted with great caution....

  17. Increased urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, in urban bus drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, S; Poulsen, H E; Vistisen, K

    1999-01-01

    pollution. Similarly, DNA repair may be influenced by occupational and other exposures as well as modify the effect of DNA damaging agents. As part of a large investigation of the genotoxic burden to diesel exposed workers in transport sectors we studied oxidative DNA damage in 57 non-smoking bus drivers......'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a repair product of the highly mutagenic oxidation of guanine in DNA or the cellular pool of GTP. CYP1A2 activity was estimated from the urinary excretion of metabolites of dietary caffeine. The DNA repair was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mononuclear cells isolated...

  18. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...

  19. Advances in DNA photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Emily M.; Aga, Roberto S.; Fehrman Cory, Emily M.; Ouchen, Fahima; Lesko, Alyssa; Telek, Brian; Lombardi, Jack; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Grote, James G.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we present our current research in exploring a DNA biopolymer for photonics applications. A new processing technique has been adopted that employs a modified soxhlet-dialysis (SD) rinsing technique to completely remove excess ionic contaminants from the DNA biopolymer, resulting in a material with greater mechanical stability and enhanced performance reproducibility. This newly processed material has been shown to be an excellent material for cladding layers in poled polymer electro-optic (EO) waveguide modulator applications. Thin film poling results are reported for materials using the DNA biopolymer as a cladding layer, as are results for beam steering devices also using the DNA biopolymer. Finally, progress on fabrication of a Mach Zehnder EO modulator with DNA biopolymer claddings using nanoimprint lithography techniques is reported.

  20. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  1. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including......In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  2. Fidelity of DNA polymerases in DNA amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keohavong, P.; Thilly, W.G. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by T4, modified T7, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, and Thermus aquaticus (Tag) DNA polymerases. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type by DGGE as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes and the heteroduplex fraction was used to calculate the average error rate (mutations per base duplication). The error rate induced in the 104-base-pair low-temperature melting domain of exon 3 of the human hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene was {approx} 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for modified T7, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Klenow fragment, and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Taq polymerases after a 10{sup 6}-fold amplification. The error rate for T4 DNA polymerase was not more than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} error per base duplication. The predominant mutations were sequenced and found to be transitions of G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T for T4 and modified T7 DNA polymerases, and A{center dot}T to G{center dot}C for Taq polymerase. Klenow fragment induced both possible transitions and deletions of 2 and 4 base pairs.

  3. Oxidative DNA damage after transplantation of the liver and small intestine in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, S; Larsen, P N; Rasmussen, A

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative damage is thought to play an important role in ischemia/reperfusion injury, including the outcome of transplantation of the liver and intestine. We have investigated oxidative DNA damage after combined transplantation of the liver and small intestine in 5 pigs. DNA damage was estimated...... to DNA results from reperfusion of transplanted small intestine and liver in pigs, as estimated from the readily excreted repair product 8-oxodG....

  4. Comparative analysis of protocols for DNA extraction from soybean caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J; Valmorbida, I; da Costa, I F D; Guedes, J V C

    2016-04-07

    Genomic DNA extraction is crucial for molecular research, including diagnostic and genome characterization of different organisms. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze protocols of DNA extraction based on cell lysis by sarcosyl, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, and to determine the most efficient method applicable to soybean caterpillars. DNA was extracted from specimens of Chrysodeixis includens and Spodoptera eridania using the aforementioned three methods. DNA quantification was performed using spectrophotometry and high molecular weight DNA ladders. The purity of the extracted DNA was determined by calculating the A260/A280 ratio. Cost and time for each DNA extraction method were estimated and analyzed statistically. The amount of DNA extracted by these three methods was sufficient for PCR amplification. The sarcosyl method yielded DNA of higher purity, because it generated a clearer pellet without viscosity, and yielded high quality amplification products of the COI gene I. The sarcosyl method showed lower cost per extraction and did not differ from the other methods with respect to preparation times. Cell lysis by sarcosyl represents the best method for DNA extraction in terms of yield, quality, and cost effectiveness.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA variants in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Knoll

    Full Text Available Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0. For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2. SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002 located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039. These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048. Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between mothers and

  6. DNA mini-barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; McKenna, Charly

    2012-01-01

    Conventional DNA barcoding uses an approximately 650 bp DNA barcode of the mitochondrial gene COI for species identification in animal groups. Similar size fragments from chloroplast genes have been proposed as barcode markers for plants. While PCR amplification and sequencing of a 650 bp fragment is consistent in freshly collected and well-preserved specimens, it is difficult to obtain a full-length barcode in older museum specimens and samples which have been preserved in formalin or similar DNA-unfriendly preservatives. A comparable issue may prevent effective DNA-based authentication and testing in processed biological materials, such as food products, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In these cases, shorter DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-have been robustly recovered and shown to be effective in identifying majority of specimens to a species level. Furthermore, short DNA regions can be utilized via high-throughput sequencing platforms providing an inexpensive and comprehensive means of large-scale species identification. These properties of mini-barcodes, coupled with the availability of standardized and universal primers make mini-barcodes a feasible option for DNA barcode analysis in museum samples and applied diagnostic and environmental biodiversity analysis.

  7. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  8. HIV DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are distinguished from other viruses by two characteristic steps in the viral replication cycle. The first is reverse transcription, which results in the production of a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome, and the second is integration, which results in covalent attachment of the DNA copy to host cell DNA. The initial catalytic steps of the integration reaction are performed by the virus-encoded integrase (IN) protein. The chemistry of the IN-mediated DNA breaking and joining steps is well worked out, and structures of IN-DNA complexes have now clarified how the overall complex assembles. Methods developed during these studies were adapted for identification of IN inhibitors, which received FDA approval for use in patients in 2007. At the chromosomal level, HIV integration is strongly favored in active transcription units, which may promote efficient viral gene expression after integration. HIV IN binds to the cellular factor LEDGF/p75, which promotes efficient infection and tethers IN to favored target sites. The HIV integration machinery must also interact with many additional host factors during infection, including nuclear trafficking and pore proteins during nuclear entry, histones during initial target capture, and DNA repair proteins during completion of the DNA joining steps. Models for some of the molecular mechanisms involved have been proposed, but important details remain to be clarified. PMID:22762018

  9. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  10. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. DNA Bending elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David Alexander

    DNA bending elasticity on length scales of tens of basepairs is of critical importance in numerous biological contexts. Even the simplest models of DNA bending admit of few simple analytic results, thus there is a need for numerical methods to calculate experimental observables, such as distance distributions, forces, FRET efficiencies, and timescales of particular large-scale motions. We have implemented and helped develop a coarse-grained representation of DNA and various other covalently-linked groups that allows simple calculation of such observables for varied experimental systems. The simple freely-jointed chain (FJC) model and extremely coarse resolution proved useful in understanding DNA threading through nanopores, identifying steric occlusion by other parts of the chain as a prime culprit for slower capture as distance to the pore decreased. Enhanced sampling techniques of a finer resolution discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model permitted calculation of cyclization rates for small chains and identified the ramifications of a thermodynamically-sound treatment of thermal melts. Adding treatment of double-stranded DNA's helical nature and single-stranded DNA provided a model system that helped demonstrate the importance of statistical fluctuations in even highly-stressed DNA mini-loops, and allowed us to verify that even these constructs show no evidence of excitation-induced softening. Additional incorporation of salt-sensitivity to the model allowed us to calculate forces and FRET efficiencies for such mini-loops and their uncircularized precursors, thereby furthering the understanding of the nature of IHF binding and bending of its recognition sequence. Adding large volume-excluding spheres linked to the ends of the dsDNA permits calculation of distance distributions and thus small-angle X-ray scattering, whereby we demonstrated the validity of the WLC in describing bending fluctuations in DNA chains as short as 42 bp. We also make important connections

  12. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  13. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Meehan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  14. Interaction of sulforaphane with DNA and RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Abassi Joozdani

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN-DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2, while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN-phosphate (PO2 interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN-DNA=3.01 (± 0.035×10(4 M(-1 and K(SFN-RNA= 6.63 (±0.042×10(3 M(-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1, DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure.

  15. Interaction of Sulforaphane with DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi Joozdani, Farzaneh; Yari, Faramarz; Abassi Joozdani, Parvaneh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN–DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV–Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2), while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN–phosphate (PO2) interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN–DNA)=3.01 (± 0.035)×104 M-1 and K(SFN–RNA)= 6.63 (±0.042)×103 M-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1), DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure. PMID:26030290

  16. Archaeal DNA polymerases in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Yanchao

    2015-08-01

    DNA polymerase (pol) is a ubiquitous enzyme that synthesizes DNA strands in all living cells. In vitro, DNA pol is used for DNA manipulation, including cloning, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, sequencing, and several other applications. Family B archaeal DNA pols have been widely used for molecular biological methods. Biochemical and structural studies reveal that each archaeal DNA pol has different characteristics with respect to fidelity, processivity and thermostability. Due to their high fidelity and strong thermostability, family B archaeal DNA pols have the extensive application on high-fidelity PCR, DNA sequencing, and site-directed mutagenesis while family Y archaeal DNA pols have the potential for error-prone PCR and random mutagenesis because of their low fidelity and strong thermostability. This information combined with mutational analysis has been used to construct novel DNA pols with altered properties that enhance their use as biotechnological reagents. In this review, we focus on the development and use of family B archaeal DNA pols.

  17. Close encounters with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  18. Kink solitons in DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Zdravković, S; Daniel, M

    2012-01-01

    We here examine the nonlinear dynamics of artificial homogeneous DNA chain relying on the plain-base rotator model. It is shown that such dynamics can exhibit kink and antikink solitons of sine-Gordon type. In that respect we propose possible experimental assays based on single molecule micromanipulation techniques. The aim of these experiments is to excite the rotational waves and to determine their speeds along excited DNA. We propose that these experiments should be conducted either for the case of double stranded (DS) or single stranded (SS) DNA. A key question is to compare the corresponding velocities of the rotational waves indicating which one is bigger. The ratio of these velocities appears to be related with the sign of the model parameter representing ratio of the hydrogen-bonding and the covalent-bonding interaction within the considered DNA chain.

  19. DNA Microarray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content DNA Microarray Technology Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  20. Retroviral DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  1. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  2. HPV DNA test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Cancer of cervix - HPV DNA test References Hacker NF. Cervical dysplasia and cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  3. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  4. Ratchet Nanofiltration of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joel D. P.; Joswiak, Mark N.; Olson, Daniel W.; Park, Sung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    The DNA nanofilter is a microfabricated electrophoretic separation device consisting of a periodic array of thin slits (circa 60 nm) separated by deeper wells (circa 320 nm). We demonstrate that this device can act as a tuneable, clog-free filter when operating in a low frequency, asymmetric field inversion mode. This filtration occurs by using the asymmetric field inversion to achieve bi-directional migration of short (less than 1000 bp) DNA. Moreover, similar ratchet-type operation can improve separations when compared to a constant field separation in the same device. These modes of operation enhance the utility of the DNA nanofilter as a component of integrated lab-on-a-chip devices. The experimental data confirm theoretical predictions for the bidirectional transport of DNA in entropy-based separations. PMID:23896739

  5. DNA-Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2010-01-01

    DNA-nanostrukturer giver nye muligheder for studier af individuelle molekyler. Ved at udnytte DNAs unikke selvsamlende egenskaber kan man designe systemer, hvorpå der kan studeres kemiske reaktioner, fluoroforer og biiomolekyler på enkeltmolekyle-niveau....

  6. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  7. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  8. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  9. Ensemble estimators for multivariate entropy estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharan, Kumar; Wei, Dennis; Hero, Alfred O

    2013-07-01

    The problem of estimation of density functionals like entropy and mutual information has received much attention in the statistics and information theory communities. A large class of estimators of functionals of the probability density suffer from the curse of dimensionality, wherein the mean squared error (MSE) decays increasingly slowly as a function of the sample size T as the dimension d of the samples increases. In particular, the rate is often glacially slow of order O(T(-)(γ)(/)(d) ), where γ > 0 is a rate parameter. Examples of such estimators include kernel density estimators, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) density estimators, k-NN entropy estimators, intrinsic dimension estimators and other examples. In this paper, we propose a weighted affine combination of an ensemble of such estimators, where optimal weights can be chosen such that the weighted estimator converges at a much faster dimension invariant rate of O(T(-1)). Furthermore, we show that these optimal weights can be determined by solving a convex optimization problem which can be performed offline and does not require training data. We illustrate the superior performance of our weighted estimator for two important applications: (i) estimating the Panter-Dite distortion-rate factor and (ii) estimating the Shannon entropy for testing the probability distribution of a random sample.

  10. Development and assessment of Diversity Arrays Technology for high-throughput DNA analyses in Musa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risterucci, Ange-Marie; Hippolyte, Isabelle; Perrier, Xavier; Xia, Ling; Caig, Vanessa; Evers, Margaret; Huttner, Eric; Kilian, Andrzej; Glaszmann, Jean-Christophe

    2009-10-01

    Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) is a DNA hybridisation-based molecular marker technique that can detect simultaneously variation at numerous genomic loci without sequence information. This efficiency makes it a potential tool for a quick and powerful assessment of the structure of germplasm collections. This article demonstrates the usefulness of DArT markers for genetic diversity analyses of Musa spp. genotypes. We developed four complexity reduction methods to generate DArT genomic representations and we tested their performance using 48 reference Musa genotypes. For these four complexity reduction methods, DArT markers displayed high polymorphism information content. We selected the two methods which generated the most polymorphic genomic representations (PstI/BstNI 16.8%, PstI/TaqI 16.1%) to analyze a panel of 168 Musa genotypes from two of the most important field collections of Musa in the world: Cirad (Neufchateau, Guadeloupe), and IITA (Ibadan, Nigeria). Since most edible cultivars are derived from two wild species, Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome), the study is restricted mostly to accessions of these two species and those derived from them. The genomic origin of the markers can help resolving the pedigree of valuable genotypes of unknown origin. A total of 836 markers were identified and used for genotyping. Ten percent of them were specific to the A genome and enabled targeting this genome portion in relatedness analysis among diverse ploidy constitutions. DArT markers revealed genetic relationships among Musa genotype consistent with those provided by the other markers technologies, but at a significantly higher resolution and speed and reduced cost.

  11. 45S rDNA external transcribed spacer organization reveals new phylogenetic relationships in Avena genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joana; Viegas, Wanda

    2017-01-01

    The genus Avena comprises four distinct genomes organized in diploid (AA or CC), tetraploid (AABB or AACC) and hexaploid species (AACCDD), constituting an interesting model for phylogenetic analysis. The aim of this work was to characterize 45S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) variability in distinct species representative of Avena genome diversity–A. strigosa (AA), A. ventricosa (CvCv), A. eriantha (CpCp), A. barbata (AABB), A. murphyi (AACC), A. sativa (AACCDD) and A. sterilis (AACCDD) through the assessment of the 5’ external transcribed spacer (5’-ETS), a promising IGS region for phylogenetic studies poorly studied in Avena genus. In this work, IGS length polymorphisms were detected mainly due to distinct 5’-ETS sequence types resulting from major differences in the number and organization of repeated motifs. Although species with A genome revealed a 5’-ETS organization (A-organization) similar to the one previously described in A. sativa, a distinct organization was unraveled in C genome diploid species (C-organization). Interestingly, such new organization presents a higher similarity with other Poaceae species than A-genome sequences, supporting the hypothesis of C-genome being the ancestral Avena genome. Additionally, polyploid species with both genomes mainly retain the A-genome 5’-ETS organization, confirming the preferential elimination of C-genome sequences in Avena polyploid species. Moreover, 5’-ETS sequences phylogenetic analysis consistently clustered the species studied according to ploidy and genomic constitution supporting the use of ribosomal genes to highlight Avena species evolutive pathways. PMID:28448637

  12. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  13. Das DNA-Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  14. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Variations in brain DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus eAvila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain.

  16. Intravesicle Isothermal DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Lindsey A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral DNA replication was previously reconstituted in vitro from component parts 1234. Significant advances in building minimal cell-like structures also have been made recently 567. Combining the two approaches would further attempts to build a minimal cell-like structure capable of undergoing evolution by combining membrane encapsulation and genome replication. Towards this end, we attempted to use purified genomic replication protein components from thermophilic bacterial sources to copy strands of DNA isothermally within lipid vesicles. Findings Bacterial replication components (such as helicases and DNA polymerases are compatible with methods for the generation of lipid vesicles. Encapsulation inside phospholipid vesicles does not inhibit the activity of bacterial DNA genome replication machinery. Further the described system is efficient at isothermally amplifying short segments of DNA within phospholipid vesicles. Conclusions Herein we show that bacterial isothermal DNA replication machinery is functional inside of phospholipid vesicles, suggesting that replicating cellular mimics can be built from purified bacterial components.

  17. DNA Polymerase Gamma in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Copeland

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are associated with aging, and they can cause tissue degeneration and neuromuscular pathologies known as mitochondrial diseases. Because DNA polymerase γ (pol γ is the enzyme responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA, the burden of faithful duplication of mitochondrial DNA, both in preventing spontaneous errors and in DNA repair synthesis, falls on pol γ. Investigating the biological functions of pol γ and its inhibitors aids our understanding of the sources of mtDNA mutations. In animal cells, pol γ is composed of two subunits, a larger catalytic subunit of 125–140 kDa and second subunit of 35–55 kDa. The catalytic subunit contains DNA polymerase activity, 3’-5’ exonuclease activity, and a 5’-dRP lyase activity. The accessory subunit is required for highly processive DNA synthesis and increases the affinity of pol gamma to the DNA.

  18. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage.

  19. The persistence of human DNA in soil following surface decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Alexandra L; DeBruyn, Jennifer M; Mundorff, Amy Z; Cobaugh, Kelly L; Cabana, Graciela S

    2017-09-01

    Though recent decades have seen a marked increase in research concerning the impact of human decomposition on the grave soil environment, the fate of human DNA in grave soil has been relatively understudied. With the purpose of supplementing the growing body of literature in forensic soil taphonomy, this study assessed the relative persistence of human DNA in soil over the course of decomposition. Endpoint PCR was used to assess the presence or absence of human nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, while qPCR was used to evaluate the quantity of human DNA recovered from the soil beneath four cadavers at the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility (ARF). Human nuclear DNA from the soil was largely unrecoverable, while human mitochondrial DNA was detectable in the soil throughout all decomposition stages. Mitochondrial DNA copy abundances were not significantly different between decomposition stages and were not significantly correlated to soil edaphic parameters tested. There was, however, a significant positive correlation between mitochondrial DNA copy abundances and the human associated bacteria, Bacteroides, as estimated by 16S rRNA gene abundances. These results show that human mitochondrial DNA can persist in grave soil and be consistently detected throughout decomposition. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chrysotile effects on human lung cell carcinoma in culture: 3-D reconstruction and DNA quantification by image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado-Santelli Glaucia M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chrysotile is considered less harmful to human health than other types of asbestos fibers. Its clearance from the lung is faster and, in comparison to amphibole forms of asbestos, chrysotile asbestos fail to accumulate in the lung tissue due to a mechanism involving fibers fragmentation in short pieces. Short exposure to chrysotile has not been associated with any histopathological alteration of lung tissue. Methods The present work focuses on the association of small chrysotile fibers with interphasic and mitotic human lung cancer cells in culture, using for analyses confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions. The main goal was to perform the analysis of abnormalities in mitosis of fibers-containing cells as well as to quantify nuclear DNA content of treated cells during their recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Results HK2 cells treated with chrysotile for 48 h and recovered in additional periods of 24, 48 and 72 h in normal medium showed increased frequency of multinucleated and apoptotic cells. DNA ploidy of the cells submitted to the same chrysotile treatment schedules showed enhanced aneuploidy values. The results were consistent with the high frequency of multipolar spindles observed and with the presence of fibers in the intercellular bridge during cytokinesis. Conclusion The present data show that 48 h chrysotile exposure can cause centrosome amplification, apoptosis and aneuploid cell formation even when long periods of recovery were provided. Internalized fibers seem to interact with the chromatin during mitosis, and they could also interfere in cytokinesis, leading to cytokinesis failure which forms aneuploid or multinucleated cells with centrosome amplification.

  1. Nuclear morphometry in male breast carcinoma: association with cell proliferative activity, oncogene expression, DNA content and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiusa, L; Margaria, E; Pich, A

    2000-11-20

    To investigate the prognostic value of nuclear morphometry in male breast carcinoma (MBC), histological samples from 50 patients (mean age 62.2 years) were retrospectively analyzed by computerized nuclear morphometry. All patients received surgery; 35 had multiple combinations of adjuvant therapies. Mean follow-up was 67 months (range 1-230). In each case, 100 tumor cells were measured, and the mean nuclear area (MNA), standard deviation of the nuclear area (SDNA), mean nuclear perimeter (MNP), standard deviation of the nuclear perimeter (SDNP) and shape factor (SHF) were calculated. Morphometric features were compared with tumor histological grade, size, nodal status, DNA ploidy evaluated by flow-cytometry and cell proliferative activity assessed by the quantity of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region-associated proteins (AgNORs), monoclonal antibody (MAb) PC10 against proliferating cell nuclear antigen and MAb MIB-1. Comparison was also made with the immunohistochemical detection of p53, bcl-2, c-erbB-2 and c-myc proteins. Significant association was found between nuclear morphometric parameters and tumor grade, DNA content and cell proliferation indices. SDNA was greater in p53-positive and bcl-2-negative cases; SDNP was greater in p53-positive cases; SHF was lower in p53- and c-myc-positive cases. Overall survival was shorter in carcinomas with high MNA, SDNA, MNP and SDNP and low SHF. In multivariate analysis, performed by testing nuclear morphometric parameters, histological grade, tumor size, nodal status and p53 immunostaining in the Cox model, p53 over-expression and histological grade retained independent prognostic significance. When p53 was excluded, only SDNP appeared as an independent prognostic variable. Our results indicate that nuclear morphometric parameters can identify an aggressive tumor phenotype and provide additional prognostic information for patients with MBC. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Nanomechanics of Fluorescent DNA Dyes on DNA Investigated by Magnetic Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Sischka, Andy; Walhorn, Volker; Tönsing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2016-10-18

    Fluorescent DNA dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications for detecting and imaging DNA in cells and gels. Their binding alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and affects the biological processes that are associated with it. Although interaction modes like intercalation and minor groove binding already have been identified, associated mechanic effects like local elongation, unwinding, and softening of the DNA often remain in question. We used magnetic tweezers to quantitatively investigate the impact of three DNA-binding dyes (YOYO-1, DAPI, and DRAQ5) in a concentration-dependent manner. By extending and overwinding individual, torsionally constrained, nick-free dsDNA molecules, we measured the contour lengths and molecular forces that allow estimation of thermodynamic and nanomechanical binding parameters. Whereas for YOYO-1 and DAPI the binding mechanisms could be assigned to bis-intercalation and minor groove binding, respectively, DRAQ5 exhibited both binding modes in a concentration-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between hypermethylation of DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell DNA and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Rachel E; Clark, Paul J; Fawcett, Jonathan; Fritschi, Lin; Nagler, Belinda N; Risch, Harvey A; Walters, Rhiannon J; Crawford, William J; Webb, Penelope M; Whiteman, David C; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Methylation of DNA may influence risk or be a marker of early disease. The aim of this study was to measure the association between methylation of three DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell (WBC) DNA and pancreatic cancer. DNA from WBCs of pancreatic cancer cases (n=559) and healthy unrelated controls (n=603) were tested for methylation of the LINE-1, Alu and Sat2 DNA repetitive elements using MethyLight quantitative PCR assays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) between both continuous measures of percent of methylated sample compared to a reference (PMR) or quintiles of PMR and pancreatic cancer, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, BMI, alcohol and higher education, were estimated. The PMR for each of the three markers was higher in cases than in controls, although only LINE-1 was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (OR per log unit=1.37, 95%CI=1.16-1.63). The marker methylation score for all three markers combined was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (p-trend=0.0006). There were no associations between measures of PMR and either presence of metastases, or timing of blood collection in relation to diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy or death (all p>0.1). We observed an association between methylation of LINE-1 in WBC DNA and risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to confirm this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Supramolecular Complexes of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, G.; Scherman, D.

    Deoxyribose nucleic acid or DNA is a linear polymer in the form of a double strand, synthesised by sequential polymerisation of a large number of units chosen from among the nucleic bases called purines (adenosine A and guanosine G) and pyrimidines (cytosine C and thymidine T). DNA contains all the genetic information required for life. It exists in the form of a limited number (a few dozen) of very big molecules, called chromosomes. This genetic information is first of all transcribed. In this process, a restricted fragment of the DNA called a gene is copied in the form of ribonucleic acid, or RNA. This RNA is itself a polymer, but with a single strand in which the sequence of nucleic acids is schematically analogous to the sequence on one of the two strands of the transcribed DNA. Finally, this RNA is translated into a protein, yet another linear polymer. The proteins make up the main part of the active constituents ensuring the survival of the cell. Any loss of information, either by mutation or by deletion of the DNA, will cause an imbalance in the cell's metabolism that may in turn lead to incurable pathologies. Several strategies have been developed to reduce the consequences of such genetic deficiencies or, more generally, to act, by amplifying or suppressing them, on the mechanisms leading from the reading of the genetic information to the production of proteins: Strategies aiming to introduce synthetic DNA or RNA, which selectively block the expression of certain genes, are now being studied by an increasing number of research scientists and pharmacologists. They use antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides or interfering oligoribonucleotides and they already have clinical applications. This kind of therapy is often called gene pharmacology. Other, more ambitious strategies aim to repair in situ mutated or incomplete DNA within the chromosomes themselves, by introducing short sequences of DNA or RNA which recognise and take the place of mutations. This is the

  5. [From fingerprints to DNA tags].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajantila, Antti

    2010-01-01

    Decisions concerning individuals are made based on the DNA fingerprinting technique, e.g. in the courts of law. Currently applied DNA markers and the technique associated with their analysis have changed significantly from those of the original DNA fingerprint. The digital nature of today's DNA tag determination has enabled the application of powerful DNA registers in crime investigations. Application of DNA tags has expanded from paternity, crime and cadaver identification to the prediction of external features such as hair or eye color in criminal investigation. In the early 1990's pioneering work on PCR-based DNA identification was carried out in Finland.

  6. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Schupp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients’ burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker’s potential to predict clinical outcomes.

  7. Single DNA molecule patterning for high-throughput epigenetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Benítez, Jaime J; Craighead, Harold G

    2011-11-01

    We present a method for profiling the 5-methyl cytosine distribution on single DNA molecules. Our method combines soft-lithography and molecular elongation to form ordered arrays estimated to contain more than 250 000 individual DNA molecules immobilized on a solid substrate. The methylation state of the DNA is detected and mapped by binding of fluorescently labeled methyl-CpG binding domain peptides to the elongated dsDNA molecules and imaging of their distribution. The stretched molecules are fixed in their extended configuration by adsorption onto the substrate so analysis can be performed with high spatial resolution and signal averaging. We further prove this technique allows imaging of DNA molecules with different methylation states.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Joanna E; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V; Bamshad, Michael; Noonan, Carolyn; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Watson, Nathaniel F

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins. Academic clinical research center. 15 sleep duration discordant monozygotic twin pairs (30 twins, 80% female; mean age 42.1 years [SD 15.0]). Sleep duration was phenotyped with wrist actigraphy. Each twin pair included a "normal" (7-9 h/24) and "short" (sleeping twin. Fasting peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was assessed for mtDNA copy number via the n-fold difference between qPCR measured mtDNA and nuclear DNA creating an mtDNA measure without absolute units. We used generalized estimating equation linear regression models accounting for the correlated data structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.06, 0.95; P sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.51. Reduced sleep duration and sleep efficiency were associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number in sleep duration discordant monozygotic twins offering a potential mechanism whereby short sleep impairs health and longevity through mitochondrial stress. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Price and cost estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  10. Cyclization of short DNA fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2017-09-01

    From the per unit length free energy for DNA under tension, we have calculated an effective contour length dependent persistence length for short DNA. This effective persistence length results from the enhanced fluctuations in short DNA. It decreases for shorter DNA, making shorter DNA more flexible. The results of the J-factor calculated using this effective persistence length are in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Tommerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free......, we demonstrate how to estimate the length of molecules by continuous real-time image stitching and how to increase the effective resolution of a pressure controller by pulse width modulation. The sequence of image-processing steps addresses the challenges of genomic-length DNA visualization; however...

  12. Inferring chronological age from DNA methylation patterns of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Cristina; Cilli, Elisabetta; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Pirazzini, Chiara; Sazzini, Marco; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Franceschi, Claudio; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-04-01

    Current methods to determine chronological age from modern and ancient remains rely on both morphological and molecular approaches. However, low accuracy and the lack of standardized protocols make the development of alternative methods for the estimation of individual's age even more urgent for several research fields, such as biological anthropology, biodemography, forensics, evolutionary genetics, and ancient DNA studies. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify genomic regions whose DNA methylation level correlates with age in modern teeth. We used MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to analyze DNA methylation levels of specific CpGs located in the ELOVL2, FHL2, and PENK genes. We considered methylation data from cementum, dentin and pulp of 21 modern teeth (from 17 to 77 years old) to construct a mathematical model able to exploit DNA methylation values to predict age of the individuals. The median difference between the real age and that estimated using DNA methylation values is 1.20 years (SD = 1.9) if DNA is recovered from both cementum and pulp of the same modern teeth, 2.25 years (SD = 2.5) if DNA is recovered from dental pulp, 2.45 years (SD = 3.3) if DNA is extracted from cementum and 7.07 years (SD = 7.0) when DNA is recovered from dentin only. We propose for the first time the evaluation of DNA methylation at ELOVL2, FHL2, and PENK genes as a powerful tool to predict age in modern teeth for anthropological applications. Future studies are needed to apply this method also to historical and relatively ancient human teeth. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Local chromatin microenvironment determines DNMT activity : from DNA methyltransferase to DNA demethylase or DNA dehydroxymethylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Venkiteswaran, Muralidhar; Chen, Hui; Xu, Guo-Liang; Plosch, Torsten; Rots, Marianne G.

    2015-01-01

    Insights on active DNA demethylation disproved the original assumption that DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification. Interestingly, mammalian DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B (DNMT-3A and -3B) have also been reported to induce active DNA demethylation, in addition to their well-known

  14. Evaluating a multigene environmental DNA approach for biodiversity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Alexei J; Newcomb, Richard D; Buckley, Thomas R; Xie, Dong; Dopheide, Andrew; Potter, Benjamin Cm; Heled, Joseph; Ross, Howard A; Tooman, Leah; Grosser, Stefanie; Park, Duckchul; Demetras, Nicholas J; Stevens, Mark I; Russell, James C; Anderson, Sandra H; Carter, Anna; Nelson, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for rapid biodiversity assessment tools that have a broad taxonomic coverage. Here we evaluate a suite of environmental DNA (eDNA) markers coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) that span the tree of life, comparing them with traditional biodiversity monitoring tools within ten 20×20 meter plots along a 700 meter elevational gradient. From six eDNA datasets (one from each of 16S, 18S, ITS, trnL and two from COI) we identified sequences from 109 NCBI taxonomy-defined phyla or equivalent, ranging from 31 to 60 for a given eDNA marker. Estimates of alpha and gamma diversity were sensitive to the number of sequence reads, whereas beta diversity estimates were less sensitive. The average within-plot beta diversity was lower than between plots for all markers. The soil beta diversity of COI and 18S markers showed the strongest response to the elevational variation of the eDNA markers (COI: r=0.49, pbiodiversity measures. Using a soil-based eDNA approach, we demonstrate that standard phylogenetic markers are capable of recovering sequences from a broad diversity of eukaryotes, in addition to prokaryotes by 16S. The COI and 18S eDNA markers are the best proxies for aboveground biodiversity based on the high correlation between the pairwise beta diversities of these markers and those obtained using traditional methods.

  15. Estimating tail probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.B.; Tolley, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper investigates procedures for univariate nonparametric estimation of tail probabilities. Extrapolated values for tail probabilities beyond the data are also obtained based on the shape of the density in the tail. Several estimators which use exponential weighting are described. These are compared in a Monte Carlo study to nonweighted estimators, to the empirical cdf, to an integrated kernel, to a Fourier series estimate, to a penalized likelihood estimate and a maximum likelihood estimate. Selected weighted estimators are shown to compare favorably to many of these standard estimators for the sampling distributions investigated.

  16. Characterization of denaturation and renaturation of DNA for DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofang; Lim, Hyun Jeong; Son, Ahjeong

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to systematically characterize the denaturation and the renaturation of double stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is suitable for DNA hybridization. A series of physical and chemical denaturation methods were implemented on well-defined 86-bp dsDNA fragment. The degree of each denaturation was measured and the most suitable denaturation method was determined. DNA renaturation tendency was also investigated for the suggested denaturation method. Heating, beads mill, and sonication bath did not show any denaturation for 30 minutes. However probe sonication fully denatured DNA in 5 minutes. 1 mol/L sodium hydroxide (alkaline treatment) and 60% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment fully denatured DNA in 2-5 minutes. Among all the physical methods applied, the direct probe sonication was the most effective way to denature the DNA fragments. Among chemical methods, 60% DMSO was the most adequate denaturation method since it does not cause full renaturation during DNA hybridization.

  17. [Bacteriophage DNA reptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabashvili, I S; Grosberg, A Iu

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of reptation process of dsDNA leaving the phage head is analysed theoretically. It is assumed that the process is caused by DNA free energy decrease when it is leaving the head (DNA has to be in a globular state) for its surroundings where it is transformed into a coil state. For the analysis we have used the results of previous paper on equilibrium theory of DNA intraphage globule. Three possible cases for the ejection process friction are considered: friction in the tail-part channel, that of DNA segments with each other in the whole globule volume (it is essential for the collective way of the globule decondensation with simultaneous movement of all the loops--the first type way), the globule friction with internal capsid surface (it is most essential for the decondensation by the way of the globule rotation as a whole "spool"--the second type way). The first way would correspond to the greatest ejection time. The known experimental data on distinguishing ejection kinetics for phages with short and long tail-parts allow us to formulate arguments in favor of realization of the second way in nature.

  18. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  19. Pathways of DNA Demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the genome relies on the epigenome to instruct, define and restrict the activities of growth and development. Among the cohort of epigenetic instructions, DNA methylation is perhaps the best understood. In most mammals, cycles of the addition and removal of DNA methylation constitute phases of reprogramming when the developing embryo must negotiate lineage defining and developmental commitment events. In these instances, the DNA methylation instruction is often removed, thereby allowing a change in permission for future development and a return to a more plastic and pluripotent state. Because of this, the germ line, upon demethylation, can give rise to gametes that are fully functional across generations and poised for totipotency. This return to a less differentiated state can also be achieved experimentally. The loss of DNA methylation constitutes one of the significant barriers to induced pluripotency and is a prerequisite for the generation of iPS cells. Taking fully differentiated cells, such as skin cells, and turning back the developmental clock heralded a technological breakthrough discovery in 2006 (Takahashi and Yamanaka 2006) with unprecedented promise in regenerative medicine. In this chapter, the mechanistic possibilities for DNA demethylation will be described in the context of natural and experimentally induced epigenetic reprogramming. The balance of the maintenance of this heritable mark together with its timely removal is essential for lifelong health and may be a key in our understanding of ageing.

  20. DNA as a language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifonov, E.N. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Structural Biology

    1993-12-31

    The classical triplet code is not the, only code carried by the sequences. They contain, for example, the gene-splicing code, transcription codes and many other codes. By analyzing a large volume of the nucleotide sequences available, i.e., by performing various computer experiments with the sequences, one can decipher them and extract from them valuable biological information. At the DNA level there are at least two more codes -- the DNA shape code and the chromatin code. The overall DNA shape is sequence-dependent and can be described by a set of angles characteristic for various dinucleotide elements -- codons of the DNA shape code. The chromatin code provides instructions for histone obtainers where along the DNA to form the nucleosomes. This code is expressed as positional periodicity of, primarily, AA and TT dinucleotides. A new RNA code has been described -- the translation framing code. The frame seems to be maintained by a synchronizing pattern GCUGCUGCU... hidden in mRNA. Most enigmatic of all is, perhaps, the gene-splicing code. An interesting recent development indicates that the gene-splicing pattern in the sequences and the nucleosomal pattern have some common features. This has to do with superposition of the patterns that is characteristic for the sequence language in general which carries simultaneously many codes in one and the same text.

  1. Assessing environmental DNA detection in controlled lentic systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Moyer

    Full Text Available Little consideration has been given to environmental DNA (eDNA sampling strategies for rare species. The certainty of species detection relies on understanding false positive and false negative error rates. We used artificial ponds together with logistic regression models to assess the detection of African jewelfish eDNA at varying fish densities (0, 0.32, 1.75, and 5.25 fish/m3. Our objectives were to determine the most effective water stratum for eDNA detection, estimate true and false positive eDNA detection rates, and assess the number of water samples necessary to minimize the risk of false negatives. There were 28 eDNA detections in 324, 1-L, water samples collected from four experimental ponds. The best-approximating model indicated that the per-L-sample probability of eDNA detection was 4.86 times more likely for every 2.53 fish/m3 (1 SD increase in fish density and 1.67 times less likely for every 1.02 C (1 SD increase in water temperature. The best section of the water column to detect eDNA was the surface and to a lesser extent the bottom. Although no false positives were detected, the estimated likely number of false positives in samples from ponds that contained fish averaged 3.62. At high densities of African jewelfish, 3-5 L of water provided a >95% probability for the presence/absence of its eDNA. Conversely, at moderate and low densities, the number of water samples necessary to achieve a >95% probability of eDNA detection approximated 42-73 and >100 L, respectively. Potential biases associated with incomplete detection of eDNA could be alleviated via formal estimation of eDNA detection probabilities under an occupancy modeling framework; alternatively, the filtration of hundreds of liters of water may be required to achieve a high (e.g., 95% level of certainty that African jewelfish eDNA will be detected at low densities (i.e., <0.32 fish/m3 or 1.75 g/m3.

  2. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  3. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Salim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  4. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  5. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  6. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  7. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S.K.

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  8. Mosaicism for mitochondrial DNA polymorphic variants in placenta has implications for the feasibility of prenatal diagnosis in mtDNA diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchington, David R; Scott-Brown, Martin; Barlow, David H; Poulton, Joanna

    2006-07-01

    Women who have had a child with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disease need to know the risk of recurrence, but this risk is difficult to estimate because mutant and wild-type (normal) mtDNA coexist in the same person (heteroplasmy). The possibility that a single sample may not reflect the whole organism both impedes prenatal diagnosis of most mtDNA diseases, and suggests radical alternative strategies such as nuclear transfer. We used naturally occurring mtDNA variants to investigate mtDNA segregation in placenta. Using large samples of control placenta, we demonstrated that the level of polymorphic heteroplasmic mtDNA variants is very similar in mother, cord blood and placenta. However, where placental samples were very small (sample (CVS) may be unrepresentative of the whole placenta. Duplicates may be necessary where CVS are small. However, the close correlation of mutant load in maternal, fetal blood and placental mtDNA suggests that the average load in placenta does reflect the load of mutant mtDNA in the baby. Provided that segregation of neutral and pathogenic mtDNA mutants is similar in utero, our results are generally encouraging for developing prenatal diagnosis for mtDNA diseases. Identifying mtDNA segregation in human placenta suggests studies of relevance to placental evolution and to developmental biology.

  9. Computational structural analysis: multiple proteins bound to DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Tomovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With increasing numbers of crystal structures of proteinratioDNA and proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes publically available, it is now possible to extract sufficient structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters to make general observations and predictions about their interactions. In particular, the properties of macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA have not previously been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have performed computational structural analyses on macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA using a variety of different computational tools: PISA; PROMOTIF; X3DNA; ReadOut; DDNA and DCOMPLEX. Additionally, we have developed and employed an algorithm for approximate collision detection and overlapping volume estimation of two macromolecules. An implementation of this algorithm is available at http://promoterplot.fmi.ch/Collision1/. The results obtained are compared with structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters from proteinratioprotein and single proteinratioDNA complexes. Many of interface properties of multiple proteinratioDNA complexes were found to be very similar to those observed in binary proteinratioDNA and proteinratioprotein complexes. However, the conformational change of the DNA upon protein binding is significantly higher when multiple proteins bind to it than is observed when single proteins bind. The water mediated contacts are less important (found in less quantity between the interfaces of components in ternary (proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes than in those of binary complexes (proteinratioprotein and proteinratioDNA.The thermodynamic stability of ternary complexes is also higher than in the binary interactions. Greater specificity and affinity of multiple proteins binding to DNA in comparison with binary protein-DNA interactions were observed. However, protein-protein binding affinities are stronger in

  10. On nonparametric hazard estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Brian P

    The Nelson-Aalen estimator provides the basis for the ubiquitous Kaplan-Meier estimator, and therefore is an essential tool for nonparametric survival analysis. This article reviews martingale theory and its role in demonstrating that the Nelson-Aalen estimator is uniformly consistent for estimating the cumulative hazard function for right-censored continuous time-to-failure data.

  11. On nonparametric hazard estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nelson-Aalen estimator provides the basis for the ubiquitous Kaplan-Meier estimator, and therefore is an essential tool for nonparametric survival analysis. This article reviews martingale theory and its role in demonstrating that the Nelson-Aalen estimator is uniformly consistent for estimating the cumulative hazard function for right-censored continuous time-to-failure data.

  12. Triangulating the provenance of African elephants using mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Hondo, Tomoko; Roca, Alfred L

    2013-02-01

    African elephant mitochondrial (mt) DNA follows a distinctive evolutionary trajectory. As females do not migrate between elephant herds, mtDNA exhibits low geographic dispersal. We therefore examined the effectiveness of mtDNA for assigning the provenance of African elephants (or their ivory). For 653 savanna and forest elephants from 22 localities in 13 countries, 4258 bp of mtDNA was sequenced. We detected eight mtDNA subclades, of which seven had regionally restricted distributions. Among 108 unique haplotypes identified, 72% were found at only one locality and 84% were country specific, while 44% of individuals carried a haplotype detected only at their sampling locality. We combined 316 bp of our control region sequences with those generated by previous trans-national surveys of African elephants. Among 101 unique control region haplotypes detected in African elephants across 81 locations in 22 countries, 62% were present in only a single country. Applying our mtDNA results to a previous microsatellite-based assignment study would improve estimates of the provenance of elephants in 115 of 122 mis-assigned cases. Nuclear partitioning followed species boundaries and not mtDNA subclade boundaries. For taxa such as elephants in which nuclear and mtDNA markers differ in phylogeography, combining the two markers can triangulate the origins of confiscated wildlife products.

  13. Current developments in forensic interpretation of mixed DNA samples (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    HU, NA; CONG, BIN; LI, SHUJIN; MA, CHUNLING; FU, LIHONG; ZHANG, XIAOJING

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent improvements have provided contemporary forensic investigations with a variety of tools to improve the analysis of mixed DNA samples in criminal investigations, producing notable improvements in the analysis of complex trace samples in cases of sexual assult and homicide. Mixed DNA contains DNA from two or more contributors, compounding DNA analysis by combining DNA from one or more major contributors with small amounts of DNA from potentially numerous minor contributors. These samples are characterized by a high probability of drop-out or drop-in combined with elevated stutter, significantly increasing analysis complexity. At some loci, minor contributor alleles may be completely obscured due to amplification bias or over-amplification, creating the illusion of additional contributors. Thus, estimating the number of contributors and separating contributor genotypes at a given locus is significantly more difficult in mixed DNA samples, requiring the application of specialized protocols that have only recently been widely commercialized and standardized. Over the last decade, the accuracy and repeatability of mixed DNA analyses available to conventional forensic laboratories has greatly advanced in terms of laboratory technology, mathematical models and biostatistical software, generating more accurate, rapid and readily available data for legal proceedings and criminal cases. PMID:24748965

  14. Estimating Uncertainty in Annual Forest Inventory Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Veronica C. Lessard

    1999-01-01

    The precision of annual forest inventory estimates may be negatively affected by uncertainty from a variety of sources including: (1) sampling error; (2) procedures for updating plots not measured in the current year; and (3) measurement errors. The impact of these sources of uncertainty on final inventory estimates is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation...

  15. Molecular rigidity and enthalpy-entropy compensation in DNA melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Starr, Francis W; Douglas, Jack F

    2017-10-23

    Enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) is observed in diverse molecular binding processes of importance to living systems and manufacturing applications, but this widely occurring phenomenon is not sufficiently understood from a molecular physics standpoint. To gain insight into this fundamental problem, we focus on the melting of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) since measurements exhibiting EEC are extensive for nucleic acid complexes and existing coarse-grained models of DNA allow us to explore the influence of changes in molecular parameters on the energetic parameters by using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous experimental and computational studies have indicated a correlation between EEC and changes in molecular rigidity in certain binding-unbinding processes, and, correspondingly, we estimate measures of DNA molecular rigidity under a wide range of conditions, along with resultant changes in the enthalpy and entropy of binding. In particular, we consider variations in dsDNA rigidity that arise from changes of intrinsic molecular rigidity such as varying the associative interaction strength between the DNA bases, the length of the DNA chains, and the bending stiffness of the individual DNA chains. We also consider extrinsic changes of molecular rigidity arising from the addition of polymer additives and geometrical confinement of DNA between parallel plates. All our computations confirm EEC and indicate that this phenomenon is indeed highly correlated with changes in molecular rigidity. However, two distinct patterns relating to how DNA rigidity influences the entropy of association emerge from our analysis. Increasing the intrinsic DNA rigidity increases the entropy of binding, but increases in molecular rigidity from external constraints decreases the entropy of binding. EEC arises in numerous synthetic and biological binding processes and we suggest that changes in molecular rigidity might provide a common origin of this ubiquitous phenomenon in the mutual

  16. Evaluation of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, Makoto; Matuo, Youichrou; Izumi, Yoshinobu [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan); Sunagawa, Takeyoshi [Fukui University of Technology, Fukui (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-strand break is important to elucidate the biological effect of ionizing radiations. The conventional methods for DNA-strand break evaluation have been achieved by Agarose gel electrophoresis and others using an electrical property of DNAs. Such kinds of DNA-strand break evaluation systems can estimate DNA-strand break, according to a molecular weight of DNAs. However, the conventional method needs pre-treatment of the sample and a relatively long period for analysis. They do not have enough sensitivity to detect the strand break products in the low-dose region. The sample is water, methanol and plasmid DNA solution. The plasmid DNA pUC118 was multiplied by using Escherichia coli JM109 competent cells. The resonance frequency and Q-value were measured by means of microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy. When a sample is located at a center of the electric field, resonance curve of the frequency that existed as a standing wave is disturbed. As a result, the perturbation effect to perform a resonance with different frequency is adopted. The resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in a concentration of methanol as the model of the biological material, and the Q-value decreased. The absorption peak in microwave power spectrum of the double-strand break plasmid DNA shifted from the non-damaged plasmid DNA. Moreover, the sharpness of absorption peak changed resulting in change in Q-value. We confirmed that a resonance frequency shifted to higher frequency with an increase in concentration of the plasmid DNA. We developed a new technique for an evaluation of DNA damage. In this paper, we report the evaluation method of DNA damage using microwave dielectric absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Estimating constituent loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, T.A.; DeLong, L.L.; Gilroy, E.J.; Hirsch, R.M.; Wells, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper compares the bias and variance of three procedures that can be used with log linear regression models: the traditional rating curve estimator, a modified rating curve method, and a minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE). Analytical derivations of the bias and efficiency of all three estimators are presented. It is shown that for many conditions the traditional and the modified estimator can provide satisfactory estimates. However, other conditions exist where they have substantial bias and a large mean square error. These conditions commonly occur when sample sizes are small, or when loads are estimated during high-flow conditions. The MVUE, however, is unbiased and always performs nearly as well or better than the rating curve estimator or the modified estimator provided that the hypothesis of the log linear model is correct. Since an efficient unbiased estimator is available, there seems to be no reason to employ biased estimators. -from Authors

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of ancient DNA using BEAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Simon Y W

    2012-01-01

    Under exceptional circumstances, it is possible to obtain DNA sequences from samples that are up to hundreds of thousands of years old. These data provide an opportunity to look directly at past genetic diversity, to trace the evolutionary process through time, and to infer demographic and phylogeographic trends. Ancient DNA (aDNA) data sets have some degree of intrinsic temporal structure because the sequences have been obtained from samples of different ages. When analyzing these data sets, it is usually necessary to take the sampling times into account. A number of phylogenetic methods have been designed with this purpose in mind. Here I describe the steps involved in Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of aDNA data. I outline a procedure that can be used to co-estimate the genealogical relationships, mutation rate, evolutionary timescale, and demographic history of the study species in a single analytical framework. A number of modifications to the methodology can be made in order to deal with complicating factors such as postmortem damage, sequences from undated samples, and data sets with low information content.

  19. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients.

  20. DNA ligase I selectively affects DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon suggesting differential functions in DNA replication and repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossi, R; Ferrari, E; Hübscher, U

    1998-01-01

    The joining of single-stranded breaks in double-stranded DNA is an essential step in many important processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. Several data implicate a role for DNA ligase I in DNA replication, probably coordinated by the action of other enzymes and proteins. Since both DNA polymerases delta and epsilon show multiple functions in different DNA transactions, we investigated the effect of DNA ligase I on various DNA synthesis events catalyzed by th...

  1. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  2. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  3. Molecular Programming with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, Erik

    2009-05-01

    Information can be stored in molecules and processed by molecular reactions. Molecular information processing is at the heart of all biological systems; might it soon also be at the heart of non-biological synthetic chemical systems? Perhaps yes. One technological approach comes from DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing, where DNA is used as a non-biological informational polymer that can be rationally designed to create a rich class of molecular systems -- for example, DNA molecules that self-assemble precisely, that fold into complex nanoscale objects, that act as mechanical actuators and molecular motors, and that make decisions based on digital and analog logic. I will argue that to fully exploit their design potential, we will need to invent programming languages for specifying the behavior of information-based molecular systems, to create theoretical tools for understanding and analyzing the behavior of molecular programs, to develop compilers that automate the design of molecules with the desired behaviors, and to expand experimental techniques so that the implementation and debugging of complex molecular systems becomes as commonplace and practical as computer programming.

  4. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  5. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of DNA extraction methods for high-throughput DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebelhut, Lauren M; Abboud, Sarah S; Gómez Daglio, Liza E; Swift, Holly F; Dawson, Michael N

    2017-07-01

    The inclusion of next-generation sequencing technologies in population genetic and phylogenetic studies has elevated the need to balance time and cost of DNA extraction without compromising DNA quality. We tested eight extraction methods - ranging from low- to high-throughput techniques - and eight phyla: Annelida, Arthropoda, Cnidaria, Chordata, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Ochrophyta and Porifera. We assessed DNA yield, purity, efficacy and cost of each method. Extraction efficacy was quantified using the proportion of successful polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of two molecular markers for metazoans (mitochondrial COI and nuclear histone 3) and one for Ochrophyta (mitochondrial nad6) at four time points - 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 years following extraction. DNA yield and purity were quantified using NanoDrop absorbance ratios. Cost was estimated in terms of time and material expense. Results show differences in DNA yield, purity and PCR success between extraction methods and that performance also varied by taxon. The traditional time-intensive, low-throughput CTAB phenol-chloroform extraction performed well across taxa, but other methods also performed well and provide the opportunity to reduce time spent at the bench and increase throughput. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fungal DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in both natural and human-made environments. They play important roles in the health of plants, animals, and humans, and in broad ecosystem functions. Thus, having an efficient species-level identification system could significantly enhance our ability to treat fungal diseases and to monitor the spatial and temporal patterns of fungal distributions and migrations. DNA barcoding is a potent approach for rapid identification of fungal specimens, generating novel species hypothesis, and guiding biodiversity and ecological studies. In this mini-review, I briefly summarize (i) the history of DNA sequence-based fungal identification; (ii) the emergence of the ITS region as the consensus primary fungal barcode; (iii) the use of the ITS barcodes to address a variety of issues on fungal diversity from local to global scales, including generating a large number of species hypothesis; and (iv) the problems with the ITS barcode region and the approaches to overcome these problems. Similar to DNA barcoding research on plants and animals, significant progress has been achieved over the last few years in terms of both the questions being addressed and the foundations being laid for future research endeavors. However, significant challenges remain. I suggest three broad areas of research to enhance the usefulness of fungal DNA barcoding to meet the current and future challenges: (i) develop a common set of primers and technologies that allow the amplification and sequencing of all fungi at both the primary and secondary barcode loci; (ii) compile a centralized reference database that includes all recognized fungal species as well as species hypothesis, and allows regular updates from the research community; and (iii) establish a consensus set of new species recognition criteria based on barcode DNA sequences that can be applied across the fungal kingdom.

  8. The dynamic interplay between DNA topoisomerases and DNA topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-11-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell, DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes, including DNA replication and repair, not only alter the topology of the genome but also introduce additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that has established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, scientists have begun to explore the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology-dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  9. Electrochemical DNA Sensors for Detection of DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Oliveira Brett

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical devices have received particular attention due to their rapiddetection and great sensitivity for the evaluation of DNA-hazard compounds interactionmechanisms. Several types of bioanalytical method use nucleic acids probes to detect DNAdamage. This article reviews current directions and strategies in the development andapplications of electrochemical DNA sensors for the detection of DNA damage.

  10. Lipophilic DNA-conjugates: DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    DNA detection systems based on encoded solid particles have been reported but require often tedious and not generally applicable surface chemistry. In the present study a system comprised of a lipid-modified DNA probe sequence and unmodified DNA target sequences is used to non-covalently assemble...

  11. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  12. Altruistic functions for selfish DNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Carninci, Piero

    2009-01-01

    .... In a major development, recent works have strongly contradicted this "selfish DNA" or "junk DNA" dogma by demonstrating that TEs use a host of novel promoters to generate RNA on a massive scale...

  13. The Dynamics of DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvillo, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a paper-and-pencil activity that helps students understand DNA sequencing and expands student understanding of DNA structure, replication, and gel electrophoresis. Appropriate for advanced biology students who are familiar with the Sanger method. (DDR)

  14. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas; Kashuba, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance "aerobic" glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells.

  15. A phylogenetic study of the tribe Antirrhineae: Genome duplications and long-distance dispersals from the Old World to the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutcen, Ezgi; Vamosi, Jana C

    2016-06-01

    Antirrhineae is a large tribe within Plantaginaceae. Mostly concentrated in the Mediterranean Basin, the tribe members are present both in the Old World and the New World. Current Antirrhineae phylogenies have different views on taxonomic relationships, and they lack homogeneity in terms of geographic distribution and ploidy levels. This study aims to investigate the changes in the chromosome numbers along with dispersal routes as definitive characters identifying clades. With the use of multiple DNA regions and taxon sampling enriched with de novo sequences, we provide an extensive phylogeny for Antirrhineae. The reconstructed phylogeny was then used to investigate changes in ploidy levels and dispersal patterns in the tribe using ChromEvol and RASP, respectively. Antirrhineae is a monophyletic group with six highly supported clades. ChromEvol analysis suggests the ancestral haploid chromosome number for the tribe is six, and that the tribe has experienced several duplications and gain events. The Mediterranean Basin was estimated to be the origin for the tribe with four long-distance dispersals from the Old World to the New World, three of which were associated with genome duplications. On an updated Antirrhineae phylogeny, we showed that the three out of four dispersals from the Old World to the New World were coupled with changes in ploidy levels. The observed patterns suggest that increases in ploidy levels may facilitate dispersing into new environments. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  16. Single-stranded DNA library preparation from highly degraded DNA using T4 DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Gerber, Tobias; Glocke, Isabelle; Korlevic, Petra; Lippik, Laurin; Nagel, Sarah; Riehl, Lara Maria; Schmidt, Anna; Meyer, Matthias

    2017-06-02

    DNA library preparation for high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA usually involves ligation of adapters to double-stranded DNA fragments. However, for highly degraded DNA, especially ancient DNA, library preparation has been found to be more efficient if each of the two DNA strands are converted into library molecules separately. We present a new method for single-stranded library preparation, ssDNA2.0, which is based on single-stranded DNA ligation with T4 DNA ligase utilizing a splinter oligonucleotide with a stretch of random bases hybridized to a 3΄ biotinylated donor oligonucleotide. A thorough evaluation of this ligation scheme shows that single-stranded DNA can be ligated to adapter oligonucleotides in higher concentration than with CircLigase (an RNA ligase that was previously chosen for end-to-end ligation in single-stranded library preparation) and that biases in ligation can be minimized when choosing splinters with 7 or 8 random nucleotides. We show that ssDNA2.0 tolerates higher quantities of input DNA than CircLigase-based library preparation, is less costly and better compatible with automation. We also provide an in-depth comparison of library preparation methods on degraded DNA from various sources. Most strikingly, we find that single-stranded library preparation increases library yields from tissues stored in formalin for many years by several orders of magnitude. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. DNA damage and mutation. Types of DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Chakarov, Stoyan; Petkova, Rumena; Russev,George Ch; Zhelev, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines the basic types of DNA damage caused by exogenous and endogenous factors, analyses the possible consequences of each type of damage and discusses the need for different types of DNA repair. The mechanisms by which a minor damaging event to DNA may eventually result in the introduction of heritable mutation/s are reviewed. The major features of the role of DNA damage in ageing and carcinogenesis are outlined and the role of iatrogenic DNA damage in human health and dis...

  18. DNA damage and mutation. Types of DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakarov, Stoyan; Petkova, Rumena; Russev, George Ch; Zhelev, Nikolai

    2014-02-01

    This review outlines the basic types of DNA damage caused by exogenous and endogenous factors, analyses the possible consequences of each type of damage and discusses the need for different types of DNA repair. The mechanisms by which a minor damaging event to DNA may eventually result in the introduction of heritable mutation/s are reviewed. The major features of the role of DNA damage in ageing and carcinogenesis are outlined and the role of iatrogenic DNA damage in human health and disease (with curative intent as well as a long-term adverse effect of genotoxic therapies) are discussed in detail.

  19. Ancient and modern environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland woo...

  20. Monitoring Biodiversity using Environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis

    of mammalian DNA in leech guts is shown to persist for at least 4 months post feeding. Subsequently, it is shown that DNA from wild leeches, collected in tropical rainforest in Vietnam, contains DNA from wild mammals living in the area, representing poorly known, cryptic and threatened species. Finally...

  1. Environmental influences on DNA curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Higgins, C.F.; Bolshoy, A.

    1999-01-01

    DNA curvature plays an important role in many biological processes. To study environmentalinfluences on DNA curvature we compared the anomalous migration on polyacrylamide gels ofligation ladders of 11 specifically-designed oligonucleotides. At low temperatures (25 degreesC and below) most of the...... for DNAcurvature and for environmentally-sensitive DNA conformations in the regulation of geneexpression....

  2. DNA-based hybrid catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination

  3. DNA repair mechanisms and gametogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Baarends (Willy); R. van der Laan (Roald); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn mammals, there is a complex and intriguing relationship between DNA repair and gametogenesis. DNA repair mechanisms are involved not only in the repair of different types of DNA damage in developing germline cells, but also take part in the meiotic

  4. Werner Helicase Wings DNA Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Structure, Kitano et al. describe the structure of the DNA-bound winged-helix domain from the Werner helicase. This structure of a RecQ/DNA complex offers insights into the DNA unwinding mechanisms of RecQ family helicases.

  5. Werner helicase wings DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2010-02-10

    In this issue of Structure, Kitano et al. describe the structure of the DNA-bound winged-helix domain from the Werner helicase. This structure of a RecQ/DNA complex offers insights into the DNA-unwinding mechanisms of RecQ family helicases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  7. [A persistent model of the reptation movement of a DNA molecule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsov, V B; Kamliuk, A N; Shirko, A V

    2010-01-01

    By using a persistent model of the movement of a DNA molecule, the penetration of the DNA molecule into a cell has been described. The method enables one to estimate the time and the rate of the passage of the DNA molecule into the cell nucleus. The effect of the curvature of the molecule on its longitudinal movement was studied. The results obtained can be applied to characterize long chain molecules.

  8. Correcting for Sample Contamination in Genotype Calling of DNA Sequence Data

    OpenAIRE

    Flickinger, Matthew; Jun, Goo; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Kang, Hyun Min

    2015-01-01

    DNA sample contamination is a frequent problem in DNA sequencing studies and can result in genotyping errors and reduced power for association testing. We recently described methods to identify within-species DNA sample contamination based on sequencing read data, showed that our methods can reliably detect and estimate contamination levels as low as 1%, and suggested strategies to identify and remove contaminated samples from sequencing studies. Here we propose methods to model contamination...

  9. An analysis of the use of genomic DNA as a universal reference in two channel DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Vivek

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray is an invaluable tool for gene expression explorations. In the two-dye microarray, fluorescence intensities of two samples, each labeled with a different dye, are compared after hybridization. To compare a large number of samples, the 'reference design' is widely used, in which all RNA samples are hybridized to a common reference. Genomic DNA is an attractive candidate for use as a universal reference, especially for bacterial systems with a low percentage of non-coding sequences. However, genomic DNA, comprising of both the sense and anti-sense strands, is unlike the single stranded cDNA usually used in microarray hybridizations. The presence of the antisense strand in the 'reference' leads to reactions between complementary labeled strands in solution and may cause the assay result to deviate from true values. Results We have developed a mathematical model to predict the validity of using genomic DNA as a reference in the microarray assay. The model predicts that the assay can accurately estimate relative concentrations for a wide range of initial cDNA concentrations. Experimental results of DNA microarray assay using genomic DNA as a reference correlated well to those obtained by a direct hybridization between two cDNA samples. The model predicts that the initial concentrations of labeled genomic DNA strands and immobilized strands, and the hybridization time do not significantly affect the assay performance. At low values of the rate constant for hybridization between immobilized and mobile strands, the assay performance varies with the hybridization time and initial cDNA concentrations. For the case where a microarray with immobilized single strands is used, results from hybridizations using genomic DNA as a reference will correspond to true ratios under all conditions. Conclusion Simulation using the mathematical model, and the experimental study presented here show the potential utility of microarray

  10. Efficient sleeping beauty DNA transposition from DNA minicircles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nynne; Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Schrøder, Lisbeth Dahl; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-02-26

    DNA transposon-based vectors have emerged as new potential delivery tools in therapeutic gene transfer. Such vectors are now showing promise in hematopoietic stem cells and primary human T cells, and clinical trials with transposon-engineered cells are on the way. However, the use of plasmid DNA as a carrier of the vector raises safety concerns due to the undesirable administration of bacterial sequences. To optimize vectors based on the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon for clinical use, we examine here SB transposition from DNA minicircles (MCs) devoid of the bacterial plasmid backbone. Potent DNA transposition, directed by the hyperactive SB100X transposase, is demonstrated from MC donors, and the stable transfection rate is significantly enhanced by expressing the SB100X transposase from MCs. The stable transfection rate is inversely related to the size of circular donor, suggesting that a MC-based SB transposition system benefits primarily from an increased cellular uptake and/or enhanced expression which can be observed with DNA MCs. DNA transposon and transposase MCs are easily produced, are favorable in size, do not carry irrelevant DNA, and are robust substrates for DNA transposition. In accordance, DNA MCs should become a standard source of DNA transposons not only in therapeutic settings but also in the daily use of the SB system.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e74; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.1; published online 26 February 2013.

  11. Efficient Sleeping Beauty DNA Transposition From DNA Minicircles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nynne Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA transposon-based vectors have emerged as new potential delivery tools in therapeutic gene transfer. Such vectors are now showing promise in hematopoietic stem cells and primary human T cells, and clinical trials with transposon-engineered cells are on the way. However, the use of plasmid DNA as a carrier of the vector raises safety concerns due to the undesirable administration of bacterial sequences. To optimize vectors based on the Sleeping Beauty (SB DNA transposon for clinical use, we examine here SB transposition from DNA minicircles (MCs devoid of the bacterial plasmid backbone. Potent DNA transposition, directed by the hyperactive SB100X transposase, is demonstrated from MC donors, and the stable transfection rate is significantly enhanced by expressing the SB100X transposase from MCs. The stable transfection rate is inversely related to the size of circular donor, suggesting that a MC-based SB transposition system benefits primarily from an increased cellular uptake and/or enhanced expression which can be observed with DNA MCs. DNA transposon and transposase MCs are easily produced, are favorable in size, do not carry irrelevant DNA, and are robust substrates for DNA transposition. In accordance, DNA MCs should become a standard source of DNA transposons not only in therapeutic settings but also in the daily use of the SB system.

  12. The interaction of membrane DNA-binding protein with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielyan, A. G.; Arakhelyan, H. H.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    A 31-kDa protein specifically binding to double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) was isolated from plasmatic membranes of rat liver cells by means of affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Some of the properties of this protein were determined. Judging by the UV and circular dichroism spectroscopic data, the protein forms a complex with DNA, stabilizing its native structure, mainly in the regions rich in AT pairs. The 31-kDa protein-pAO3 plasmid DNA binding constant was determined by nitrocellulose filter analysis of protein labelled DNA complexes. The results obtained correspond to cooperative binding with DNA molecules of extended interacting ligands, having AT specificity. A possible role of the 31-kDa protein in DNA transmembrane transition processes is discussed.

  13. DNA Sequential Logic Gate Using Two-Ring DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Linjing; Liang, Chao; Dong, Yafei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Sequential DNA detection is a fundamental issue for elucidating the interactive relationships among complex gene systems. Here, a sequential logic DNA gate was achieved by utilizing the two-ring DNA structure, with the ability to recognize "before" and "after" triggering sequences of DNA signals. By taking advantage of a "loop-open" mechanism, separations of two-ring DNAs were controlled. Three triggering pathways with different sequential DNA treatments were distinguished by comparing fluorescent outputs. Programmed nanoparticle arrangement guided by "interlocked" two-ring DNA was also constructed to demonstrate the achievement of designed nanostrucutres. Such sequential logic DNA operation may guide future molecular sensors to monitor more complex gene network in biological systems.

  14. DNA-DNA hybridization determined in micro-wells using covalent attachment of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Angen, Øystein; Mutters, R.

    2000-01-01

    The present study was aimed at reducing the time and labour used to perform DNA-DNA hybridizations for classification of bacteria at the species level. A micro-well-format DNA hybridization method was developed and validated. DNA extractions were performed by a small-scale method and DNA...... was sheared mechanically into fragments of between 400 and 700 bases. The hybridization conditions were calibrated according to DNA similarities obtained by the spectrophotometric method using strains within the family Pasteurellaceae, Optimal conditions were obtained with 300 ng DNA added per well and bound...... by covalent attachment to NucleoLink. Hybridization was performed with 500 ng DNA, 5% (w/w) of which was labelled with photo-activatable biotin (competitive hybridization) for 2.5 h at 65 degrees C in 2 x SSC followed by stringent washing with 2 x SSC at the same temperature. The criteria for acceptance...

  15. Fleet DNA (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

  16. Dine marker har DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckholdt, Annette; Winding, Anne; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Ordet "biodiversitet" og at det er noget, vi skal have mere af, nævnes hyppigt. Men hvad er biodiversitet, og hvordan måles det? Agrologisk har bedt et par eksperter fra Aarhus Universitet forklare, hvordan et DNA-aftryk af jord og vand kan erstatte optællinger i felten og sige noget om biodivers......Ordet "biodiversitet" og at det er noget, vi skal have mere af, nævnes hyppigt. Men hvad er biodiversitet, og hvordan måles det? Agrologisk har bedt et par eksperter fra Aarhus Universitet forklare, hvordan et DNA-aftryk af jord og vand kan erstatte optællinger i felten og sige noget om...

  17. Bubble dynamics in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanke, Andreas [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Metzler, Ralf [NORDITA-Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2003-09-12

    The formation of local denaturation zones (bubbles) in double-stranded DNA is an important example of conformational changes of biological macromolecules. We study the dynamics of bubble formation in terms of a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density to find a bubble of size n base pairs at time t, on the basis of the free energy in the Poland-Scheraga model. Characteristic bubble closing and opening times can be determined from the corresponding first passage time problem, and are sensitive to the specific parameters entering the model. A multistate unzipping model with constant rates recently applied to DNA breathing dynamics (Altan-Bonnet et al 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 138101) emerges as a limiting case. (letter to the editor)

  18. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... patterns that increase activation of the innate immune system. Importantly, viral-vectored vaccines that act through the induction of one or more of these factors also may benefit from cytokine coadministration and increased antigen presentation. In order to increase immunogenicity to the level achieved...

  19. Kinetic theory for DNA melting with vibrational entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensale, Sebastian; Peng, Zhangli; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2017-10-01

    By treating DNA as a vibrating nonlinear lattice, an activated kinetic theory for DNA melting is developed to capture the breakage of the hydrogen bonds and subsequent softening of torsional and bending vibration modes. With a coarse-grained lattice model, we identify a key bending mode with GHz frequency that replaces the hydrogen vibration modes as the dominant out-of-phase phonon vibration at the transition state. By associating its bending modulus to a universal in-phase bending vibration modulus at equilibrium, we can hence estimate the entropic change in the out-of-phase vibration from near-equilibrium all-atom simulations. This and estimates of torsional and bending entropy changes lead to the first predictive and sequence-dependent theory with good quantitative agreement with experimental data for the activation energy of melting of short DNA molecules without intermediate hairpin structures.

  20. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes...... relative to that of the perfectly matched sequence with a corresponding free energy penalty of about 15 kJ mol(-1) bp(-1). The average cost of a single mismatch is therefore estimated to be on the order of or larger than the gain of two matched base pairs, resulting in an apparent binding constant of only...

  1. Making environmental DNA count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?' © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Quantitative measurement of ultraviolet-induced damage in cellular DNA by an enzyme immunodot assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakizaka, A.; Nishizawa, Y.; Aiba, N.; Okuhara, E.; Takahashi, S.

    1989-02-01

    A simple enzyme immunoassay procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of 254-nm uv-induced DNA damage in cells. With the use of specific antibodies to uv-irradiated DNA and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody to rabbit IgG, the extent of damaged DNA in uv-irradiated rat spleen mononuclear cells was quantitatively measurable. Through the use of this method, the amount of damaged DNA present in 2 X 10(5) cells irradiated at a dose of 75 J/m2 was estimated to be 7 ng equivalents of the standard uv-irradiated DNA. In addition, when the cells, irradiated at 750 J/m2, were incubated for 1 h, the antigenic activity of DNA decreased by 40%, suggesting that a repair of the damaged sites in DNA had proceeded to some extent in the cells.

  3. Optimal fault signal estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Niemann, H.H.; Saberi, A.; Sannuti, P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider here both fault identification and fault signal estimation. Regarding fault identification, we seek either exact or almost fault identification. On the other hand, regarding fault signal estimation, we seek either $H_2$ optimal, $H_2$ suboptimal or Hinfinity suboptimal estimation. By

  4. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  5. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  6. Environmental DNA metabarcoding: Transforming how we survey animal and plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Kristy; Bik, Holly M; Mächler, Elvira; Seymour, Mathew; Lacoursière-Roussel, Anaïs; Altermatt, Florian; Creer, Simon; Bista, Iliana; Lodge, David M; de Vere, Natasha; Pfrender, Michael E; Bernatchez, Louis

    2017-11-01

    The genomic revolution has fundamentally changed how we survey biodiversity on earth. High-throughput sequencing ("HTS") platforms now enable the rapid sequencing of DNA from diverse kinds of environmental samples (termed "environmental DNA" or "eDNA"). Coupling HTS with our ability to associate sequences from eDNA with a taxonomic name is called "eDNA metabarcoding" and offers a powerful molecular tool capable of noninvasively surveying species richness from many ecosystems. Here, we review the use of eDNA metabarcoding for surveying animal and plant richness, and the challenges in using eDNA approaches to estimate relative abundance. We highlight eDNA applications in freshwater, marine and terrestrial environments, and in this broad context, we distill what is known about the ability of different eDNA sample types to approximate richness in space and across time. We provide guiding questions for study design and discuss the eDNA metabarcoding workflow with a focus on primers and library preparation methods. We additionally discuss important criteria for consideration of bioinformatic filtering of data sets, with recommendations for increasing transparency. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss emerging applications of eDNA metabarcoding in ecology, conservation, invasion biology, biomonitoring, and how eDNA metabarcoding can empower citizen science and biodiversity education. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  8. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  9. Sanger dideoxy sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah E; Lorsch, Jon

    2013-01-01

    While the ease and reduced cost of automated DNA sequencing has largely obviated the need for manual dideoxy sequencing for routine purposes, specific applications require manual DNA sequencing. For instance, in studies of enzymes or proteins that bind or modify DNA, a DNA ladder is often used to map the site at which an enzyme is bound or a modification occurs. In these cases, the Sanger method for dideoxy sequencing provides a rapid and facile method for producing a labeled DNA ladder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of nuclear DNA markers for evolutionary studies in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    National Institute of Malaria Research (ICMR), 22 Sham Nath Marg, Delhi 110 054, India. Introduction. Estimation of genetic ... clear DNA markers in the human malaria parasite Plasmod- ium falciparum that would help in ... cause unequal extents of genetic diversity have been detected in different genes along the length of ...

  12. DNA methylation and genetic diversity analysis of genus Cycas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10 Cycas species as well as one subspecies localized in Thailand were studied using the methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) technique. 11 MSAP primer combinations were used and 720 MSAP bands were generated. The percentages of DNA methylation estimated from MSAP fingerprints were in ...

  13. Microsatellite DNA typing for assessment of genetic variability in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Sodhi M., Mukesh M., Prakash B., Ahlawat S. P. S. and Sobti R. C. 2006 Microsatellite DNA typing for assessment of genetic variability in. Tharparkar breed of Indian zebu (Bos indicus) cattle, a major breed of .... at each microsatellite locus were estimated using the FSTAT version 2.9.3.2 computer program (Goudet 2002).

  14. How to limit false positives in environmental DNA and metabarcoding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) and metabarcoding are boosting our ability to acquire data on species distribution in a variety of ecosystems. Nevertheless, as most of sampling approaches, eDNA is not perfect. It can fail to detect species that are actually present, and even false positives are possible: a species may be apparently detected in areas where it is actually absent. Controlling false positives remains a main challenge for eDNA analyses: in this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Lahoz-Monfort et al. () test the performance of multiple statistical modelling approaches to estimate the rate of detection and false positives from eDNA data. Here, we discuss the importance of controlling for false detection from early steps of eDNA analyses (laboratory, bioinformatics), to improve the quality of results and allow an efficient use of the site occupancy-detection modelling (SODM) framework for limiting false presences in eDNA analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein displays distinct kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA binding and exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yufeng; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2017-08-04

    The human mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein (mtSSB) is a homotetrameric protein, involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance. Although mtSSB is structurally similar to SSB from Escherichia coli (EcoSSB), it lacks the C-terminal disordered domain, and little is known about the biophysics of mtSSB-ssDNA interactions. Here, we characterized the kinetics and thermodynamics of mtSSB binding to ssDNA by equilibrium titrations and stopped-flow kinetic measurements. We show that the mtSSB tetramer can bind to ssDNA in two distinct binding modes: (SSB) 30 and (SSB) 60 , defined by DNA binding site sizes of 30 and 60 nucleotides, respectively. We found that the binding mode is modulated by magnesium ion and NaCl concentration, but unlike EcoSSB, the mtSSB does not show negative intersubunit cooperativity. Global fitting of both the equilibrium and kinetic data afforded estimates for the rate and equilibrium constants governing the formation of (SSB) 60 and (SSB) 30 complexes and for the transitions between the two binding modes. We found that the mtSSB tetramer binds to ssDNA with a rate constant near the diffusion limit (2 × 10 9 m -1 s -1 ) and that longer DNA (≥60 nucleotides) rapidly wraps around all four monomers, as revealed by FRET assays. We also show that the mtSSB tetramer can directly transfer from one ssDNA molecule to another via an intermediate with two DNA molecules bound to the mtSSB. In conclusion, our results indicate that human mtSSB shares many physicochemical properties with EcoSSB and that the differences may be explained by the lack of an acidic, disordered C-terminal tail in human mtSSB protein. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. DNA evidence: wrong answers or wrong questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, B; Vignaux, G A

    1995-01-01

    Much of the controversy over DNA evidence is due to the way in which forensic scientific evidence has classically been presented. The orthodox approach is to consider whether two samples match according to a predetermined criterion. If they do, the fact of match is reported along with an estimate of the frequency of the characteristics. This method fails to address the questions raised in court cases, diverts argument into irrelevancies and stultifies research. Presentation of evidence in the form of likelihood ratios, on the other hand, forces the witness to answer the questions the court is interested in and makes apparent lines of research required to increase our understanding.

  17. Ancient DNA extraction from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Logan

    2012-01-01

    A variety of protocols for DNA extraction from archaeological and paleobotanical plant specimens have been proposed. This is not surprising given the range of taxa and tissue types that may be preserved and the variety of conditions in which that preservation may take place. Commercially available DNA extraction kits can be used to recover ancient plant DNA, but modifications to standard approaches are often necessary to improve yield. In this chapter, I describe two protocols for extracting DNA from small amounts of ancient plant tissue. The CTAB protocol, which I recommend for use with single seeds, utilizes an incubation period in extraction buffer and subsequent chloroform extraction followed by DNA purification and suspension. The PTB protocol, which I recommend for use with gourd rind and similar tissues, utilizes an overnight incubation of pulverized tissue in extraction buffer, removal of the tissue by centrifugation, and DNA extraction from the buffer using commercial plant DNA extraction kits.

  18. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paijmans, Johanna L. A.; Gilbert, Tom; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences......The analysis of ancient DNA is playing an increasingly important role in conservation genetic, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, as it allows incorporating extinct species into DNA sequence trees and adds time depth to population genetics studies. For many years, these types of DNA...... (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well...

  19. DNA Methylation and Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpu, Yannick; Cordelier, Pierre; Cho, William C.; Torrisani, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in the physiological control of genome expression. DNA methylation patterns are largely modified in cancer cells and can therefore be used to distinguish cancer cells from normal tissues. This review describes the main technologies available for the detection and the discovery of aberrantly methylated DNA patterns. It also presents the different sources of biological samples suitable for DNA methylation studies. We discuss the interest and perspectives on the use of DNA methylation measurements for cancer diagnosis through examples of methylated genes commonly documented in the literature. The discussion leads to our consideration for why DNA methylation is not commonly used in clinical practice through an examination of the main requirements that constitute a reliable biomarker. Finally, we describe the main DNA methylation inhibitors currently used in clinical trials and those that exhibit promising results. PMID:23873296

  20. Forensic trace DNA: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    DNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so too has the desire to generate this information from smaller amounts of DNA. Trace DNA samples may be defined as any sample which falls below recommended thresholds at any stage of the analysis, from sample detection through to profile interpretation, and can not be defined by a precise picogram amount. Here we review aspects associated with the collection, DNA extraction, amplification, profiling and interpretation of trace DNA samples. Contamination and transfer issues are also briefly discussed within the context of trace DNA analysis. Whilst several methodological changes have facilitated profiling from trace samples in recent years it is also clear that many opportunities exist for further improvements. PMID:21122102