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Sample records for estimate fluid flow

  1. Motion estimation under location uncertainty for turbulent fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengze; Mémin, Etienne; Dérian, Pierre; Xu, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel optical flow formulation for estimating two-dimensional velocity fields from an image sequence depicting the evolution of a passive scalar transported by a fluid flow. This motion estimator relies on a stochastic representation of the flow allowing to incorporate naturally a notion of uncertainty in the flow measurement. In this context, the Eulerian fluid flow velocity field is decomposed into two components: a large-scale motion field and a small-scale uncertainty component. We define the small-scale component as a random field. Subsequently, the data term of the optical flow formulation is based on a stochastic transport equation, derived from the formalism under location uncertainty proposed in Mémin (Geophys Astrophys Fluid Dyn 108(2):119-146, 2014) and Resseguier et al. (Geophys Astrophys Fluid Dyn 111(3):149-176, 2017a). In addition, a specific regularization term built from the assumption of constant kinetic energy involves the very same diffusion tensor as the one appearing in the data transport term. Opposite to the classical motion estimators, this enables us to devise an optical flow method dedicated to fluid flows in which the regularization parameter has now a clear physical interpretation and can be easily estimated. Experimental evaluations are presented on both synthetic and real world image sequences. Results and comparisons indicate very good performance of the proposed formulation for turbulent flow motion estimation.

  2. Estimation of fluid flow fields and their stagnation points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    Given a temporal sequence of images of fluids we will use local polynomials to regularise obser-vations of normal flows into smooth flow fields. This technique furthermore allows us to give a qualitative local description of the flow field and to estimate the position of stagnation points...

  3. A framework for estimating potential fluid flow from digital imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttman, Aaron; Bollt, Erik M; Basnayake, Ranil; Kramer, Sean; Tufillaro, Nicholas B

    2013-09-01

    Given image data of a fluid flow, the flow field, , governing the evolution of the system can be estimated using a variational approach to optical flow. Assuming that the flow field governing the advection is the symplectic gradient of a stream function or the gradient of a potential function-both falling under the category of a potential flow-it is natural to re-frame the optical flow problem to reconstruct the stream or potential function directly rather than the components of the flow individually. There are several advantages to this framework. Minimizing a functional based on the stream or potential function rather than based on the components of the flow will ensure that the computed flow is a potential flow. Next, this approach allows a more natural method for imposing scientific priors on the computed flow, via regularization of the optical flow functional. Also, this paradigm shift gives a framework--rather than an algorithm--and can be applied to nearly any existing variational optical flow technique. In this work, we develop the mathematical formulation of the potential optical flow framework and demonstrate the technique on synthetic flows that represent important dynamics for mass transport in fluid flows, as well as a flow generated by a satellite data-verified ocean model of temperature transport.

  4. Biosensor Arrays for Estimating Molecular Concentration in Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Abolfath-Beygi, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    This paper constructs dynamical models and estimation algorithms for the concentration of target molecules in a fluid flow using an array of novel biosensors. Each biosensor is constructed out of protein molecules embedded in a synthetic cell membrane. The concentration evolves according to an advection-diffusion partial differential equation which is coupled with chemical reaction equations on the biosensor surface. By using averaging theory methods and the divergence theorem, an approximate model is constructed that describes the asymptotic behaviour of the concentration as a system of ordinary differential equations. The estimate of target molecules is then obtained by solving a nonlinear least squares problem. It is shown that the estimator is strongly consistent and asymptotically normal. An explicit expression is obtained for the asymptotic variance of the estimation error. As an example, the results are illustrated for a novel biosensor built out of protein molecules.

  5. Estimation of Dense Image Flow Fields in Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Conradsen, Knut; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    1998-01-01

    The estimation of flow fields from time sequences of satellite imagery has a number of important applications. For visualisation of cloud or sea ice movements in sequences of crude temporal sampling a satisfactory non-blurred temporal interpolation can be performed only when the flow field...... of the local energy distribution, which is sampled using a set of 3-D spatio-temporal filters. The estimated local energy distribution also allows us to compute a confidence measure of the estimated local normal flow. The algorithm furthermore utilises Markovian random fields in order to integrate the local...... estimates of normal flows into a dense flow field using measures of spatial smoothness. To obtain smoothness we will constrain first order derivatives of the flow field. The performance of the algorithm is illustrated by the estimation of the flow fields corresponding to a sequence of Meteosat thermal...

  6. Estimation of Dense Image Flow Fields in Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Conradsen, Knut; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    of the local energy distribution, which is sampled using a set of 3-D spatio-temporal filters. The estimated local energy distribution also allows us to compute a certainty measure of the estimated local flow. The algorithm furhtermore utilizes Markovian random fields in order to incorporate smoothness across......The estimation of flow fields from time sequences of satellite imagery has a number of important applications. For visualization of cloud or sea ice movements in sequences of crude temporal sampling a satisfactory non blurred temporal interpolation can be performed only when the flow field...... the field. To obtain smothness we will constrain first as well as second order derivatives of the flow field. The performance of the algorithm is illustrated by the estimation of the flow fields corresponding to a sequence of Meteosat thermal images. The estimated flow fields are used in a temporal...

  7. Estimation of Dense Image Flow Fields in Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Rasmus; Conradsen, Knut; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    1998-01-01

    The estimation of flow fields from time sequences of satellite imagery has a number of important applications. For visualisation of cloud or sea ice movements in sequences of crude temporal sampling a satisfactory non-blurred temporal interpolation can be performed only when the flow field or an estimate there-of is known. Estimated flow fields in weather satellite imagery might also be used on an operational basis as inputs to short-term weather prediction. In this article we describe a meth...

  8. Theory and validation of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation using intensity flow data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Kian Loong Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motion tracking based on spatial-temporal radio-frequency signals from the pixel representation of magnetic resonance (MR imaging of a non-stationary fluid is able to provide two dimensional vector field maps. This supports the underlying fundamentals of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation and generates a new methodology for flow measurement that is based on registration of nuclear signals from moving hydrogen nuclei in fluid. However, there is a need to validate the computational aspect of the approach by using velocity flow field data that we will assume as the true reference information or ground truth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we create flow vectors based on an ideal analytical vortex, and generate artificial signal-motion image data to verify our computational approach. The analytical and computed flow fields are compared to provide an error estimate of our methodology. The comparison shows that the fluid motion estimation approach using simulated MR data is accurate and robust enough for flow field mapping. To verify our methodology, we have tested the computational configuration on magnetic resonance images of cardiac blood and proved that the theory of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation can be applicable practically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this work will allow us to progress further in the investigation of fluid motion prediction based on imaging modalities that do not require velocity encoding. This article describes a novel theory of motion estimation based on magnetic resonating blood, which may be directly applied to cardiac flow imaging.

  9. Permeability Estimation of Porous Rock by Means of Fluid Flow Simulation and Digital Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winardhi, C. W.; Maulana, F. I.; Latief, F. D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability plays an important role to determine the characteristics of how fluids flow through a porous medium which can be estimated using various methods. Darcy's law and the Kozeny-Carman equation are two of the most utilized methods in estimating permeability. In Darcy's law, permeability can be calculated by applying a pressure gradient between opposing sides of inlet-outlet of a certain direction. The permeability then depends on the fluid viscosity and the flowrate. The Kozeny-Carman equation is an empirical equation which depends on several parameters such as shape factor of the pore, tortuosity, specific surface area, and porosity to determine the permeability. For both methods, digital image obtained by means of Micro CT-Scan is used. In this research, the permeability estimation using the Darcy's law was conducted by simulating fluid flow through the digital image using Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). As for the Kozeny-Carman equation, digital image analysis was used to obtain the required parameters. Two Kozeny-Carman equations were used to calculate the permeability of the samples. The first equation (KC1) depends on pore shape factor, porosity, tortuosity, and specific surface area while the second equation (KC2) only depends on pore radius, porosity, and tortuosity. We investigate the methods by first testing on three simple pipe models which vary in the radii. By using the result from Darcy's law as a reference, we compare the results from the Kozeny-Carman equations. From the calculation, KC2 yield smaller difference to the reference. The three methods were then applied to the Fontainebleau sandstone to verify the previous result.

  10. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V......This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...

  11. Compaction and local fluid flow variations estimate through a new stylolite classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Daniel; Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Pressure solution is a mechanism commonly affecting sedimentary rocks, developing rough surfaces called bedding-parallel stylolites (BPS) when the stress originates from strata burial. In the Zechstein 2 carbonate units, an important lean gas reservoir in the southern Permian Zechstein basin in Germany, stylolites influence local fluid flow, mineral replacement reactions and hence the permeability of the reservoir. The geometrical growth of the roughening of layer dominated BPS has been modeled numerically in order to understand their structural evolution. Our simulations demonstrate that layer-dominated stylolites can grow in three distinct stages: an initial slow nucleation phase, a fast layer pinning phase and a final freezing phase if the layer is completely dissolved during growth. Dissolution of the pinning layer and thus destruction of the stylolite's compaction tracking capabilities is a function of the background noise in the rock and the dissolution rate of the layer itself. Low background noise needs a slower dissolving layer for pinning to be successful but produces flatter teeth than higher background noise. From comparison between roughness as resulting from the models and as observed in nature, we present a comprehensive classification of BPS that bound the final morphology of a stylolite to its impact on chemical compaction and on local permeability variation. BPS falls into four classes: (1) rectangular layer type, (2) seismogram pinning type, (3) suture/sharp peak type and (4) simple wave-like type. Our results show that the capability of a stylolite to consistently track the amount of chemical compaction is dependent on the linearity of their growth law. As a result, rectangular layer type stylolites are the most appropriate for chemical compaction estimates because they grow linearly and record most of the actual compaction, Seismogram pinning type stylolites also provide good tracking capabilities, with the largest teeth tracking most of the

  12. Flows of Reactive Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The modeling of reactive flows has progressed mainly with advances in aerospace, which gave birth to a new science called aerothermochemistry, as well as through developments in chemical and process engineering. The methods employed, the phenomena investigated, and the aims of modeling differ for each field; however, in all cases, the results obtained have considerably enriched the working knowledge of reactive flows. This work examines basic concepts and methods necessary to study reactive flows and transfer phenomena in areas such as fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and chemistry. Specific topics covered include: * Equations of state * Transfer phenomena and chemical kinetics * Balance equations of reactive flows * Dimensionless numbers and similarity * Chemical reactors * Coupled phenomena * Turbulent flow concepts * Boundary layers and fluid layers * Reactive and nonreactive waves * Interface phenomena * Multiphase flow concepts The book presents tools of interest to graduate students, researchers in math...

  13. Uncertainty analysis of an optical method for pressure estimation in fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomit, Guillaume; Acher, Gwenael; Chatellier, Ludovic; David, Laurent

    2018-02-01

    The analysis of the error propagation from the velocity field to the pressure field using the pressure estimation method proposed by Jeon et al (2015 11th Int. In Symp. Part. Image Velocim. PIV15) is achieved. The accuracy of the method is assessed based on numerical data. The flow around a rigid profile (NACA0015) with a free tip is considered. From the numerical simulation data, tomographic-PIV (TPIV)-like data are generated. Two types of error are used to distort the data: a Gaussian noise and a pixel-locking effect are modelled. Propagation of both types of error during the pressure estimation process and the effect of the TPIV resolution are evaluated. Results highlight the importance of the resolution to accurately estimate the pressure in presence of small structures but also to limit the propagation of error from the velocity to the pressure. The study of the sensitivity of the method for the two models of errors, Gaussian or pixel-locking, shows different trends. This reveals also the importance of the model of errors for the analysis of the uncertainties for PIV-based pressure.

  14. Mechanics of fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Basniev, Kaplan S; Chilingar, George V 0

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fluid flow is a fundamental engineering discipline explaining both natural phenomena and human-induced processes, and a thorough understanding of it is central to the operations of the oil and gas industry.  This book, written by some of the world's best-known and respected petroleum engineers, covers the concepts, theories, and applications of the mechanics of fluid flow for the veteran engineer working in the field and the student, alike.  It is a must-have for any engineer working in the oil and gas industry.

  15. Computation of fluid flow and pore-space properties estimation on micro-CT images of rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnoni, M.; Pokrajac, D.; Neilson, J. E.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate determination of the petrophysical properties of rocks, namely REV, mean pore and grain size and absolute permeability, is essential for a broad range of engineering applications. Here, the petrophysical properties of rocks are calculated using an integrated approach comprising image processing, statistical correlation and numerical simulations. The Stokes equations of creeping flow for incompressible fluids are solved using the Finite-Volume SIMPLE algorithm. Simulations are then carried out on three-dimensional digital images obtained from micro-CT scanning of two rock formations: one sandstone and one carbonate. Permeability is predicted from the computed flow field using Darcy's law. It is shown that REV, REA and mean pore and grain size are effectively estimated using the two-point spatial correlation function. Homogeneity and anisotropy are also evaluated using the same statistical tools. A comparison of different absolute permeability estimates is also presented, revealing a good agreement between the numerical value and the experimentally determined one for the carbonate sample, but a large discrepancy for the sandstone. Finally, a new convergence criterion for the SIMPLE algorithm, and more generally for the family of pressure-correction methods, is presented. This criterion is based on satisfaction of bulk momentum balance, which makes it particularly useful for pore-scale modelling of reservoir rocks.

  16. Estimation of the Lateral Ventricles Volumes from a 2D Image and Its Relationship with Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Chaarani; Cyrille, Capel; Jadwiga, Zmudka; Joel, Daouk; Fichten, Anthony; Catherine, Gondry-Jouet; Roger, Bouzerar; Olivier, Balédent

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This work suggests a fast estimation method of the lateral ventricles volume from a 2D image and then determines if this volume is correlated with the cerebrospinal fluid flow at the aqueductal and cerebral levels in neurodegenerative diseases. Materials and Methods. FForty-five elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (19), normal pressure hydrocephalus (13), and vascular dementia (13) were involved and underwent anatomical and phase contrast MRI scans. Lateral ventricles and stroke volumes were assessed on anatomical and phase contrast scans, respectively. A common reference plane was used to calculate the lateral ventricles' area on 2D images. Results. The largest volumes were observed in hydrocephalus patients. The linear regression between volumes and areas was computed, and a strong positive correlation was detected (R 2 = 0.9). A derived equation was determined to represent the volumes for any given area. On the other hand, no significant correlations were detected between ventricles and stroke volumes (R 2 ≤ 0.15). Conclusion. Lateral ventricles volumes are significantly proportional to the 2D reference section area and could be used for patients' follow-up even if 3D images are unavailable. The cerebrospinal fluid fluctuations in brain disorders may depend on many physiological parameters other than the ventricular morphology. PMID:24151585

  17. Estimation of the Lateral Ventricles Volumes from a 2D Image and Its Relationship with Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaarani Bader

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This work suggests a fast estimation method of the lateral ventricles volume from a 2D image and then determines if this volume is correlated with the cerebrospinal fluid flow at the aqueductal and cerebral levels in neurodegenerative diseases. Materials and Methods. FForty-five elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (19, normal pressure hydrocephalus (13, and vascular dementia (13 were involved and underwent anatomical and phase contrast MRI scans. Lateral ventricles and stroke volumes were assessed on anatomical and phase contrast scans, respectively. A common reference plane was used to calculate the lateral ventricles’ area on 2D images. Results. The largest volumes were observed in hydrocephalus patients. The linear regression between volumes and areas was computed, and a strong positive correlation was detected (R2=0.9. A derived equation was determined to represent the volumes for any given area. On the other hand, no significant correlations were detected between ventricles and stroke volumes (R2≤0.15. Conclusion. Lateral ventricles volumes are significantly proportional to the 2D reference section area and could be used for patients’ follow-up even if 3D images are unavailable. The cerebrospinal fluid fluctuations in brain disorders may depend on many physiological parameters other than the ventricular morphology.

  18. Fluid flow monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Mark D.; Sweeney, Chad E.; Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel

    1993-01-01

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  19. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  20. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Michael W.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2017-08-15

    Disclosed herein is a acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow that includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  1. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, C. A.; Passant, L. P.; Bolton, F. G.

    1968-01-01

    Three turbidometric methods and one method using ultraviolet spectrophotometry for estimating total cerebrospinal fluid protein have been examined. The necessity for preliminary dialysis renders the ultraviolet method unsuitable for routine use. The turbidometric method of Meulemans (1960) using a sulphosalicylic acid-sodium sulphate precipitating fluid is better than a method using sulphosalicylic acid alone which is affected by the albumin-globulin ratio, and has a greater sensitivity and better reproducibility than a method using trichloracetic acid as a precipitant. Turbidity may be measured with a spectrophotometer or an MRC grey wedge photometer with human or bovine albumin as a standard. This method deserves wider acceptance. PMID:5697354

  2. Fluid flow meter using thermal tracers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, Arno Willem Frederik; Blokland, Huibert; Velthuis, Johannes Fransiscus Maria; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2007-01-01

    Fluid flows through a conduit. To measure flow speed the fluid is heated at a heating location in the conduit with a time-dependent heating strength. A speed of sound in fluid flowing in the conduit is measured at a plurality of sensing locations downstream from said heating location. The flow speed

  3. Fluid flow meter using thermal tracers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, Arno Willem Frederik; Blokland, Huibert; Velthuis, Johannes Fransiscus Maria; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2011-01-01

    Fluid flows through a conduit. To measure flow speed the fluid is heated at a heating location in the conduit with a time-dependent heating strength. A speed of sound in fluid flowing in the conduit is measured at a plurality of sensing locations downstream from said heating location. The flow speed

  4. Viscous Flow with Large Fluid-Fluid Interface Displacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole; Saasen, Arild

    1998-01-01

    The arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) kinematic description has been implemented in a 3D transient finite element program to simulate multiple fluid flows with fluid-fluid interface or surface displacements. The description of fluid interfaces includes variable interfacial tension, and the formulation...... is useful in the simulation of low and intermediate Reynolds number viscous flow. The displacement of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical (concentric and eccentric) annulus and a (vertical and inclined)tube is simulated....

  5. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  6. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balankin, Alexander S., E-mail: abalankin@ipn.mx [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico); Mena, Baltasar [Laboratorio de Ingeniería y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Sisal, Yucatán, 97355 (Mexico); Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico)

    2017-02-12

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived. - Highlights: • Equations of Stokes flow of Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. • Pressure distribution in the Newtonian fractal fluid is derived. • Velocity distribution in Poiseuille flow of fractal fluid is found. • Velocity distribution in a steady Couette flow is established.

  7. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  8. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  9. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Brkić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ. In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re and the relative roughness (ε/D ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  10. Estimation of Centers and Stagnation points in optical flow fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    In a topological sense fluid flows are characterised by their stagnation points. Given a temporal sequence of images of fluids we will consider the application of local polynomials to the estimation of smooth fluid flow fields. The normal flow at intensity contours is estimated from the local...... distribution of spatio-temporal energy, which is sampled using a set of spatio-temporal quadrature filters. These observations of normal flows are then integrated into smooth flow fields by locally approximating first order polynomials in the spatial coordinates to the flow vectors. This technique furthermore...

  11. Flowing fluid electrical conductivity logging of a deep borehole during and following drilling: estimation of transmissivity, water salinity and hydraulic head of conductive zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Juhlin, Christopher; Dobson, Patrick F.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-03-01

    Flowing fluid electrical conductivity (FFEC) logging is a hydrogeologic testing method that is usually conducted in an existing borehole. However, for the 2,500-m deep COSC-1 borehole, drilled at Åre, central Sweden, it was done within the drilling period during a scheduled 1-day break, thus having a negligible impact on the drilling schedule, yet providing important information on depths of hydraulically conductive zones and their transmissivities and salinities. This paper presents a reanalysis of this set of data together with a new FFEC logging data set obtained soon after drilling was completed, also over a period of 1 day, but with a different pumping rate and water-level drawdown. Their joint analysis not only results in better estimates of transmissivity and salinity in the conducting fractures intercepted by the borehole, but also yields the hydraulic head values of these fractures, an important piece of information for the understanding of hydraulic structure of the subsurface. Two additional FFEC logging tests were done about 1 year later, and are used to confirm and refine this analysis. Results show that from 250 to 2,000 m depths, there are seven distinct hydraulically conductive zones with different hydraulic heads and low transmissivity values. For the final test, conducted with a much smaller water-level drawdown, inflow ceased from some of the conductive zones, confirming that their hydraulic heads are below the hydraulic head measured in the wellbore under non-pumped conditions. The challenges accompanying 1-day FFEC logging are summarized, along with lessons learned in addressing them.

  12. Bifurcated SEN with Fluid Flow Conditioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rivera-Perez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the performance of a novel design for a bifurcated submerged entry nozzle (SEN used for the continuous casting of steel slabs. The proposed design incorporates fluid flow conditioners attached on SEN external wall. The fluid flow conditioners impose a pseudosymmetric pattern in the upper zone of the mold by inhibiting the fluid exchange between the zones created by conditioners. The performance of the SEN with fluid flow conditioners is analyzed through numerical simulations using the CFD technique. Numerical results were validated by means of physical simulations conducted on a scaled cold water model. Numerical and physical simulations confirmed that the performance of the proposed SEN is superior to a traditional one. Fluid flow conditioners reduce the liquid free surface fluctuations and minimize the occurrence of vortexes at the free surface.

  13. Fluid Mechanics An Introduction to the Theory of Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Durst, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Advancements of fluid flow measuring techniques and of computational methods have led to new ways to treat laminar and turbulent flows. These methods are extensively used these days in research and engineering practise. This also requires new ways to teach the subject to students at higher educational institutions in an introductory manner. The book provides the knowledge to students in engineering and natural science needed to enter fluid mechanics applications in various fields. Analytical treatments are provided, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Introductions are also given into numerical and experimental methods applied to flows. The main benefit the reader will derive from the book is a sound introduction into all aspects of fluid mechanics covering all relevant subfields.

  14. Light-controlled flows in active fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervaux, Julien; Capellazzi Resta, Marina; Brunet, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Many photosynthetic microorganisms are able to detect light and move towards optimal intensities. This ability, known as phototaxis, plays a major role in ecology by affecting natural phytoplankton mass transfers, and has important applications in bioreactor and artificial micro-swimmers technologies. Here we show that this property can be exploited to generate macroscopic fluid flows using a localized light source directed towards shallow suspensions of phototactic microorganisms. Within the intensity range of positive phototaxis, algae accumulate beneath the excitation light, where collective effects lead to the emergence of radially symmetric convective flows. These flows can thus be used as hydrodynamic tweezers to manipulate small floating objects. At high cell density and layer depth, we uncover a new kind of instability, wherein the viscous torque exerted by self-generated fluid flows on the swimmers induces the formation of travelling waves. A model coupling fluid flow, cell concentration and orientation finely reproduces the experimental data.

  15. Robust Optical Flow Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez Pérez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available n this work, we describe an implementation of the variational method proposed by Brox etal. in 2004, which yields accurate optical flows with low running times. It has several benefitswith respect to the method of Horn and Schunck: it is more robust to the presence of outliers,produces piecewise-smooth flow fields and can cope with constant brightness changes. Thismethod relies on the brightness and gradient constancy assumptions, using the information ofthe image intensities and the image gradients to find correspondences. It also generalizes theuse of continuous L1 functionals, which help mitigate the effect of outliers and create a TotalVariation (TV regularization. Additionally, it introduces a simple temporal regularizationscheme that enforces a continuous temporal coherence of the flow fields.

  16. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  17. Simulation based engineering in fluid flow design

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, J S

    2017-01-01

    This volume offers a tool for High Performance Computing (HPC). A brief historical background on the subject is first given. Fluid Statics dealing with Pressure in fluids at rest, Buoyancy and Basics of Thermodynamics are next presented. The Finite Volume Method, the most convenient process for HPC, is explained in one-dimensional approach to diffusion with convection and pressure velocity coupling. Adiabatic, isentropic and supersonic flows in quasi-one dimensional flows in axisymmetric nozzles is considered before applying CFD solutions. Though the theory is restricted to one-dimensional cases, three-dimensional CFD examples are also given. Lastly, nozzle flows with normal shocks are presented using turbulence models. Worked examples and exercises are given in each chapter. Fluids transport thermal energy for its conversion to kinetic energy, thus playing a major role that is central to all heat engines. With the advent of rotating machinery in the 20th century, Fluid Engineering was developed in the form o...

  18. Water holdup estimation from pressure drop measurements in oil-water two-phase flows by means of the two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, L. P. M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Sotgia, G.; Babakhani Dehkordi, P.; Lucchini, A.

    2017-11-01

    The Two-Fluid Model (TFM) has been applied to determine water holdup from pressure drop measurements for core-annular flows in horizontal pipes. The fluids are Milpar 220 oil (ρo=890 kg/m3, μo=0.832 Pa·s at 20 °C) and tap water (μw=1.026×10-3 Pa·s at 20 °C). The investigated volume flow rates range from 2 to 6 m3/h, for water, and from 1 to 3.5 m3/h, for oil, respectively. The results are in very good agreement with available experimental data from the literature and a simple correlation between water holdup and water input fraction has been benchmarked to the overall data set. Eventually, the TFM endowed with the holdup correlation has been adopted to predict the pressure drop with quite satisfactory results: 98% of data fall within a percentage error of ±10%, 99% of the data fall within ±15%, and all the data are predicted within ±20%. On the other hand, the mean absolute relative error for the pressure drop reduction factor is 5.5%.

  19. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  20. Mathematical theory of compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    von Mises, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A pioneer in the fields of statistics and probability theory, Richard von Mises (1883-1953) made notable advances in boundary-layer-flow theory and airfoil design. This text on compressible flow, unfinished upon his sudden death, was subsequently completed in accordance with his plans, and von Mises' first three chapters were augmented with a survey of the theory of steady plane flow. Suitable as a text for advanced undergraduate and graduate students - as well as a reference for professionals - Mathematical Theory of Compressible Fluid Flow examines the fundamentals of high-speed flows, with

  1. Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, M. J.; Chang, H.-C.; Leighton, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the major results of the grant "Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows." These include: 1) the demonstration that atomization in liquid/liquid shear flow is driven by a viscous shear instability that triggers the formation of a long thin sheet; 2) discovery of a new mode of interfacial instability for oscillatory two-layer systems whereby a mode that originates within the less viscous liquid phase causes interfacial deformation as the oscillation proceeds; 3) the demonstration that rivulet formation from gravity front occurs because the local front shape specified by gravity and surface tension changes from a nose to a wedge geometry, thus triggering a large increase in viscous resistance; and 4) extension of the studies on nonlinear wave evolution on falling films and in stratified flow, particularly the evolution towards large-amplitude solitary waves that tend to generate drops.

  2. Multi-Componential Fluid Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The present book provides guidance to understanding complicated coupled processes based on the experimental data available and implementation of developed algorithms in numerical codes. Results of selected test cases in the fields of closed-form solutions (e.g., deformation processes), single pro...... processes (such as groundwater flow) as well as coupled processes are presented. It is part of the OpenGeoSys initiative - an open source project to share knowledge and experience in environmental analysis and scientific computation with the community....

  3. Messinian Salinity Crisis and basin fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Claudia; Cartwight, Joe

    2014-05-01

    Syn- and post-depositional movement of fluids through sediments is one of the least understood aspects in the evolution of a basin. The conventional hydrostratigraphic view on marine sedimentary basins assumes that compactional and meteoric groundwater fluid circulation drives fluid movement and defines its timing. However, in the past few years, several examples of instantaneous and catastrophic release of fluids have been observed even through low-permeability sediments. A particularly complex case-study involves the presence of giant salt bodies in the depocentres of marine basins. Evaporites dramatically change the hydrostratigraphy and fluid-dynamics of the basin, and influence the P/T regimes, e.g. through changes in the geothermal gradient and in the compaction of underlying sediments. Our paper reviews the impact of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) and evaporites on fluid flow in the Mediterranean sub-basins. The analysis of geological and geophysical sub-surface data provides examples from this basin, and the comparison with analogues in other well-known evaporitic provinces. During the MSC, massive sea-level changes occurred in a relatively limited time interval, and affected the balance of fluid dynamics, e.g. with sudden release or unusual trapping of fluids. Fluid expulsion events are here analysed and classified in relation to the long and short-term effects of the MSC. Our main aim is to build a framework for the correct identification of the fluid flow-related events, and their genetic mechanisms. On basin margins, where evaporites are thin or absent, the sea-level changes associated with the MSC force a rapid basinward shift of the mixing zone of meteoric/gravity flow and saline/compactional flow, 100s-km away from its pre-MSC position. This phenomenon changes the geometry of converging flows, creates hydraulic traps for fluids, and triggers specific diagenetic reactions in pre-MSC deep marine sediments. In basin-centre settings, unloading and

  4. Measurements of fluid flow in weld pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the fluid flow in weld pools contributes significantly toward controlling the heat distribution in the base material and the mass distribution of molten base and additive materials. Currently, most investigations focus primarily on numerical models, due to the experimental difficulties

  5. Hodograph method in MHD orthogonal fluid flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Nguyen

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Equations for steady plane MHD orthogonal flows of a viscous incompressible fluid of finite electrical conductivity are recast in the hodograph plane by using the Legendre transform function of the streamfunction. Three examples are studied to illustrate the developed theory. Solutions and geometries for these examples are determined.

  6. Fluid flow for chemical and process engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, F

    1995-01-01

    This major new edition of a popular undergraduate text covers topics of interest to chemical engineers taking courses on fluid flow. These topics include non-Newtonian flow, gas-liquid two-phase flow, pumping and mixing. It expands on the explanations of principles given in the first edition and is more self-contained. Two strong features of the first edition were the extensive derivation of equations and worked examples to illustrate calculation procedures. These have been retained. A new extended introductory chapter has been provided to give the student a thorough basis to understand the methods covered in subsequent chapters.

  7. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  8. Simple Flows of Pseudoplastic Fluids Based on Dehaven Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walicka A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper three simple flows of visco-plastic fluids of DeHaven type or fluids similar to them are considered. These flows are: Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, Poiseuille flow through a circular pipe and rotating Couette flow between two coaxial cylinders. After presentation DeHaven model it was presented some models of fluids similar to this model. Next it was given the solutions of equations of motion for three flows mentioned above.

  9. Simple Flows of Pseudoplastic Fluids Based on Dehaven Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper three simple flows of visco-plastic fluids of DeHaven type or fluids similar to them are considered. These flows are: Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, Poiseuille flow through a circular pipe and rotating Couette flow between two coaxial cylinders. After presentation DeHaven model it was presented some models of fluids similar to this model. Next it was given the solutions of equations of motion for three flows mentioned above.

  10. Corner Flow of Power Law Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, P.; Hassager, Ole

    1989-01-01

    A local analysis of the flow of power law fluids near corners is performed. The equation for the stream function is shown to allow separated solutions in plane polar coordinates. The radial behavior is shown to be algebraic and results are given for the exponent for different values of corner angle...... and power law exponent. In addition, the critical angle for the onset of an eddy structure is found as function of the power law exponent....

  11. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  12. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  13. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  14. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  15. Piezoelectric energy harvesting in internal fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-10-14

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph's clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  16. Thermodynamics of Fluids Under Flow Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Jou, David; Criado-Sancho, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This is the second edition of the book “Thermodynamics of Fluids under Flow,” which was published in 2000 and has now been corrected, expanded and updated. This is a companion book to our other title Extended irreversible thermodynamics (D. Jou, J. Casas-Vázquez and G. Lebon, Springer, 4th edition 2010), and of the textbook Understanding non-equilibrium thermodynamics (G. Lebon, D. Jou and J. Casas-Vázquez, Springer, 2008. The present book is more specialized than its counterpart, as it focuses its attention on the non-equilibrium thermodynamics of flowing fluids, incorporating non-trivial thermodynamic contributions of the flow, going beyond local equilibrium theories, i.e., including the effects of internal variables and of external forcing due to the flow. Whereas the book's first edition was much more focused on polymer solutions, with brief glimpses into ideal and real gases, the present edition covers a much wider variety of systems, such as: diluted and concentrated polymer solutions, polymer ble...

  17. Topological fluid mechanics of Axisymmetric Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1998-01-01

    Topological fluid mechanics in the sense of the present paper is the study and classification of flow patterns close to a critical point. Here we discuss the topology of steady viscous incompressible axisymmetric flows in the vicinity of the axis. Following previous studies the velocity field v...... is expanded in a Taylor series at a point on the axis, and the expansion coefficients are considered as bifurcation parameters. After a normal form transformation we easily obtain the most common bifurcations of the flow patterns. The use of non-linear normal forms provide a gross simplification, which...... and interact follow the topological classification and that the complete set of patterns found is contained in a codimension-4 unfolding of the most simple singular configuration....

  18. Communications: Mechanical Deformation of Dendrites by Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, J.; Hellawell, A.

    1996-01-01

    It is generally accepted that liquid agitation during alloy solidification assists in crystal multiplication, as in dendrite fragmentation and the detachment of side arms in the mushy region of a casting. Even without deliberate stirring by electromagnetic or mechanical means, there is often vigorous interdendritic fluid flow promoted by natural thermosolutal convection. In this analysis, we shall estimate the stress at the root of a secondary dendrite arm of aluminum arising from the action of a flow of molten metal past the dendrite arm.

  19. Optimum solar collector fluid flow rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    1996-01-01

    Experiments showed that by means of a standard electronically controlled pump, type UPE 2000 from Grundfos it is possible to control the flow rate in a solar collector loop in such a way that the flow rate is strongly influenced by the temperature of the solar collector fluid passing the pump...... the energy consumption of a normal ciculation pump in the solar heating system.Calculations showed that the highest thermal performances for small SDHW systems based on mantle tanks with constant volume flow rates in the solar collector loops are achieved if the flow rate is situated in the interval from 0.......2 to 0.3 l/min. per m^2 solar collector for combi tank systems and in the interval from 0.3 to 0.4 l/min. per m^2 solar collector for preheating systems. Further, calculations showed that by means of an advanced control strategy for the flow rate - for instance if the flow rate is directly proportional...

  20. Testing the Markov hypothesis in fluid flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W; Saggini, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic Markov processes are used very frequently to model, for example, processes in turbulence and subsurface flow and transport. Based on the weak Chapman-Kolmogorov equation and the strong Markov condition, we present methods to test the Markov hypothesis that is at the heart of these models. We demonstrate the capabilities of our methodology by testing the Markov hypothesis for fluid and inertial particles in turbulence, and fluid particles in the heterogeneous subsurface. In the context of subsurface macrodispersion, we find that depending on the heterogeneity level, Markov models work well above a certain scale of interest for media with different log-conductivity correlation structures. Moreover, we find surprising similarities in the velocity dynamics of the different media considered.

  1. Fluid Flow Simulations of a Vane Separator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aage I. Jøsang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the fluid flow in a vane separator is simulated by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Detailed measurements of air flow inside a single passage in a vane separator have earlier been presented (Josang and Melaaen 2000. The simulations cover various turbulence models (k-epsilon and RSM turbulence models, near wall treatments, numerical schemes and structured grid as well as un-structured grid simulations. Earlier simulations show that a proper matching between the grid and the near wall treatment is important. However, most important is the effect of the two different numerical schemes together with the turbulence models. The selected numerical schemes are two different first order schemes (the power law scheme and the first order upwind scheme and the higher order QUICK scheme. Normally, the highest order scheme is asssumed to produce the most accurate result, but in the present work the combination of the best turbulence model (RSM and QUICK gave the worst result. Most of the other combinations gave good predicted flow fields, although some deviations exist for the prediction of the recirculation zones.

  2. Rotating electroosmotic flow of an Eyring fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cheng; Ng, Chiu-On

    2017-04-01

    A perturbation analysis is presented in this paper for the electroosmotic (EO) flow of an Eyring fluid through a wide rectangular microchannel that rotates about an axis perpendicular to its own. Mildly shear-thinning rheology is assumed such that at the leading order the problem reduces to that of Newtonian EO flow in a rotating channel, while the shear thinning effect shows up in a higher-order problem. Using the relaxation time as the small ordering parameter, analytical solutions are deduced for the leading- as well as first-order problems in terms of the dimensionless Debye and rotation parameters. The velocity profiles of the Ekman-electric double layer (EDL) layer, which is the boundary layer that arises when the Ekman layer and the EDL are comparably thin, are also deduced for an Eyring fluid. It is shown that the present perturbation model can yield results that are close to the exact solutions even when the ordering parameter is as large as order unity. By this order of the relaxation time parameter, the enhancing effect on the rotating EO flow due to shear-thinning Eyring rheology can be significant.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics using in vivo ultrasound blood flow measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Marie Sand; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model environment for construction of patient-specific computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models for the abdominal aorta (AA). Realistic pulsatile velocity waveforms are employed by using in vivo ultrasound blood flow measurements. Ultrasound is suitable for acquisition....... The estimated and smoothed velocity profiles were quantitatively compared. The energy contained in the velocity profile after smoothing is 65% larger relative to the noise contaminated estimated profiles. In conclusion, a model environment that produces realistic patient-specific CFD simulation models without...

  4. Modeling Fluid Flow in Faulted Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faille I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers. In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretisation, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator.

  5. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Flow Diode and Method for Controlling Fluid Flow Origin of the Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger W (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flow diode configured to permit fluid flow in a first direction while preventing fluid flow in a second direction opposite the first direction is disclosed. The flow diode prevents fluid flow without use of mechanical closures or moving parts. The flow diode utilizes a bypass flowline whereby all fluid flow in the second direction moves into the bypass flowline having a plurality of tortuous portions providing high fluidic resistance. The portions decrease in diameter such that debris in the fluid is trapped. As fluid only travels in one direction through the portions, the debris remains trapped in the portions.

  7. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  8. Flow acoustics in solid-fluid structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Mads, Mikhail Vladimirovich Deryabin

    2008-01-01

    The governing two-dimensional equations of a heterogeneous material composed of a fluid (allowed to flow in the absence of acoustic excitations) and a crystalline piezoelectric cubic solid stacked one-dimensionally (along the z direction) are derived and special emphasis is given to the discussion...... of acoustic group velocity for the structure as a function of the wavenumber component perpendicular to the stacking direction (being the x axis). Variations in physical parameters with y are neglected assuming infinite material homogeneity along the y direction and the flow velocity is assumed to be directed...... in the general solution but examples are provided for the case where these are subject to rigid-wall conditions (Neumann boundary conditions in the acoustic pressure). In the second part of the paper, emphasis is given to the general case of larger frequencies and wavenumber-frequency bandstructure formation...

  9. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the optical system for the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment that flew on two Spacelab missions. Silicone oil served as the atmosphere around a rotating metal sphere and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  10. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  11. Deformation and Fluid Flow in the Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Eric; Koehn, Daniel; Passchier, Cees; Davis, Jennifer; Salvona, Aron; Chung, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We studied deformation bands in sandstone and breccia veins in overlying basalts of the Etendeka Plateau, NW Namibia, regarding their development and history of fluid flow within. The studied deformation bands can be divided into disaggregation bands and cataclastic bands. The former appear to develop in unsorted sandstone, whereas the latter form in well sorted sandstone. We estimated the porosity of the bands and host rock in thin sections using a simple image analysis software (ImageJ). Results show, that no or only a minor decrease in porosity occur in disaggregation bands, while the porosity in cataclastic bands is decreased by up to 82 % with respect to the host rock. These observations are in agreement with results of existing studies (e.g. Fossen et al., 2007). Hence the cataclastic bands form a seal to fluid flow in the host rock, yet it is observed in outcrops that deformation bands can develop into open fractures which in turn increase the permeability of the rock. Breccia veins in the overlying basalts show intense fracturing where the basalt is locally fractured into elongated chips. Mineral precipitation in these breccia veins indicates a hydrothermal origin of the fluids since the precipitates consist of extremely fine-grained quartz aggregates. Secondary mineralization with large crystals indicates that a long-lived fluid circulation through tubular networks was active at a later stage, which eventually sealed the veins completely. We propose that the Etendeka basalts on top of the sandstone formation produced a localized deformation along deformation bands and heated up fluid below the lavas. At a later stage fluid pressures were either high enough to break through the basalt or fracturing due to ongoing extension produced fluid pathways. References Fossen, H., Schultz, R., Shipton, Z. and Mair, K. (2007). Deformation bands in sandstone: a review. J. Geol. Soc., 164, 755-769.

  12. Helical flows of fractionalized Burgers' fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jamil

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flows of Burgers’ fluid with fractional derivatives model, through a circular cylinder, is studied by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. The motion is produced by the cylinder that at the initial moment begins to rotate around its axis with an angular velocity Ωt, and to slide along the same axis with linear velocity Ut. The solutions that have been obtained, presented in series form in terms of the generalized Ga,b,c(•, t functions, satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Moreover, the corresponding solutions for fractionalized Oldroyd-B, Maxwell and second grade fluids appear as special cases of the present results. Furthermore, the solutions for ordinary Burgers’, Oldroyd-B, Maxwell, second grade and Newtonian performing the same motion, are also obtained as special cases of general solutions by substituting fractional parameters α = β = 1. Finally, the influence of the pertinent parameters on the fluid motion, as well as a comparison among models, is shown by graphical illustrations.

  13. A tractable molecular theory of flow in strongly inhomogeneous fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsanis, I.; Vanderlick, T. K.; Tirrell, M.; Davis, H. T.

    1988-09-01

    A recently introduced model is used to study several flows in fluids with large density variations over distances comparable to their molecular dimensions (strongly inhomogeneous fluids). According to our model, the local average density model (LADM), local viscosity coefficients can be assigned at each point in a strongly inhomogeneous fluid and the stress tensor retains its Newtonian form provided that the properly defined local viscosities are used. The model has been previously shown to agree with the results of molecular dynamics simulations on diffusion and flow properties in plane Couette flow. Application of this model requires determination of the molecular density profiles in the flow region. Using a successful closure for the pair distribution function, we solve the Yvon-Born-Green (YBG) equation of fluid structure in order to determine the density profiles of a fluid confined between planar micropore walls only a few molecular diameters apart. The fluid confinement produces a strongly inhomogeneous structure. Subsequently we apply LADM to set up the fluid mechanical equations for Couette flow, Poiseuille flow, and squeezing flow between parallel plates. With the use of the YBG theoretical density profiles we solve the flow equations and predict velocity profiles, stress distributions, and effective viscosities. The dependence of these quantities on the fluid inhomogeneity is described. The effective viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous fluids is found to be quite sensitive to the nature of the flow. Our squeezing flow analysis provides a first explanation of recent experimental findings on the effective viscosity of simple fluids confined in very narrow spaces.

  14. Visualization of vortical flows in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, K. N.; Emel'yanov, V. N.; Teterina, I. V.; Yakovchuk, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The concepts and methods of the visual representation of fluid dynamics computations of vortical flows are studied. Approaches to the visualization of vortical flows based on the use of various definitions of a vortex and various tests for its identification are discussed. Examples of the visual representation of solutions to some fluid dynamics problems related to the computation of vortical flows in jets, channels, and cavities and of the computation of separated flows occurring in flows around bodies of various shapes are discussed.

  15. The friction control of magnetic fluid in the Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labkovich, O.N., E-mail: olji@tut.by; Reks, A.G.; Chernobai, V.A.

    2017-06-01

    In the work characteristic areas of magnetic fluid flow are experimentally determined in the gap between the cylinders: the area of strong dipole-dipole interaction between magnetite particles 0flow 8flow Ta>41,2. For areas with high flow losses in viscous friction is shown the possibility of reducing the introduction of magnetic fluid of carbon nanotubes and creating a rotating magnetic field. - Highlights: • Typical areas of magnetic fluid flow are determined in the gap. • Influence of dipole-dipole interaction of magnetite particles on the viscous friction. • Features of Taylor vortex flow.

  16. The Squeeze Flow of Yield Stress Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabideau, Brooks D.; Lanos, Christophe; Coussot, Philippe

    2008-07-01

    A systematic study of squeeze flow (SF) is presented using different concentrations of carbopol with varying yield stresses. A constant volume of sample is placed between two parallel plates and a series of 3 constant force steps applied; each lasting 8 minutes, allowing the sample to achieve a limiting height before the next force is applied. The yield stress of each fluid can be calculated from the limiting height as predicted by SF theory. In this study, the reliability of SF for the determination of the yield stress is analyzed through comparison with precise rheometrical tests. The rheometrical data is combined with SF theory to obtain the predicted dynamic height evolution. The predicted height evolution represents the results of the SF experiments quite nicely. Ultimately, the yield stress values determined from the SF experiments and those of the precise rheometrical tests are in good agreement.

  17. Electrokinetic potential study from fluid flow in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Syahruddin, Muhammad Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    Tulisan ini di publikasikan pada prosiding MICCE 2010 di Clarion Hotel Makassar Indonesia Electrokinetic potential can be generated by fluid flow in porous media. Electrokinetic potential value changes the several of physical properties in fluid of subsurface. For example salinity, hydraulic conductivity, pH, and temperature. This research is focused on electrokinetic potential study generated by fresh water flow in porous media. Therefore, elektrokinetic potential can be use to fluid flow...

  18. Fluid flow dynamics under location uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mémin, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    We present a derivation of a stochastic model of Navier Stokes equations that relies on a decomposition of the velocity fields into a differentiable drift component and a time uncorrelated uncertainty random term. This type of decomposition is reminiscent in spirit to the classical Reynolds decomposition. However, the random velocity fluctuations considered here are not differentiable with respect to time, and they must be handled through stochastic calculus. The dynamics associated with the differentiable drift component is derived from a stochastic version of the Reynolds transport theorem. It includes in its general form an uncertainty dependent "subgrid" bulk formula that cannot be immediately related to the usual Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption constructed from thermal molecular agitation analogy. This formulation, emerging from uncertainties on the fluid parcels location, explains with another viewpoint some subgrid eddy diffusion models currently used in computational fluid dynamics or in geophysical sciences and paves the way for new large-scales flow modelling. We finally describe an applications of our formalism to the derivation of stochastic versions of the Shallow water equations or to the definition of reduced order dynamical systems.

  19. Simulation of dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-wu Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow has a significant impact on the microstructure evolution of alloys during solidification. Based on the previous work relating simulation of the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with hcp (hexagonal close-packed structure, an extension was made to the formerly established CA (cellular automaton model with the purpose of studying the effect of fluid flow on the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys. The modified projection method was used to solve the transport equations of flow field. By coupling the flow field with the solute field, simulation results of equiaxed and columnar dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow were achieved. The simulated results were quantitatively compared with those without fluid flow. Moreover, a comparison was also made between the present work and previous works conducted by others. It can be concluded that a deep understanding of the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow can be obtained by applying the present numerical model.

  20. Topographic instability of flow in a rotating fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Patarashvili

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Here are presented the results of experimental and theoretical studies on a stability of zonal geostrophic flows in the rotating layer of the shallow water. In the experiments, a special apparatus by Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory Georgian Academy of Science was used. This apparatus represents a paraboloid of rotation, which can be set in a regulable rotation around the vertical axis. Maximal diameter of the paraboloid is 1.2 m, radius of curvature in the pole is 0.698 m. In the paraboloid, water spreads on walls as a layer uniform on height under the period of rotation 1.677 s. Against a background of the rotating fluid, the zonal flows are formed by the source-sink system. It consists of two concentric circular perforations on the paraboloid bottom (width is 0.3 cm, radiuses are 8.4 and 57.3 cm, respectively; water can be pumped through them with various velocities and in all directions. It has been established that under constant vertical depth of the rotating fluid the zonal flows are stable. There are given the measurements of the radial profiles for the water level and velocity in the stationary regime. It has been found that zonal flows may lose stability under the presence of the radial gradient of full depth formed by a change of angular velocity of paraboloid rotation. An instability origin results in the loss of flow axial symmetry and in the appearance of self-excited oscillations in the zonal flow. At the given angular velocity of rotation, instability is observed only in the definite range of intensities of the source-sink system. The theoretical estimations are performed in the framework of the equations of the shallow water theory, including the terms describing the bottom friction. It has been shown that the instability of zonal flows found experimentally has a topographical nature and is related with non-monotone dependence of the potential vorticity on radius.

  1. Poiseuille Flow of Fluid Whose Viscosity is Temperature Dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss a fluid flowing between two parallel plates. We assume a Poiseuille flow. Furthermore, we assume that the viscosity μ, depends on temperature T. We show that the velocity equation has two solutions. Graph features prominently in the presentation.

  2. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid-Flow Simulations over an Aircraft Surface Using a Fluid-Flow Mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David L. (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated aircraft surface is generated using inviscid and viscous simulations. A fluid-flow mesh of fluid cells is obtained. At least one inviscid fluid property for the fluid cells is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. A set of intersecting fluid cells that intersects the aircraft surface are identified. One surface mesh polygon of the surface mesh is identified for each intersecting fluid cell. A boundary-layer prediction point for each identified surface mesh polygon is determined. At least one boundary-layer fluid property for each boundary-layer prediction point is determined using the at least one inviscid fluid property of the corresponding intersecting fluid cell and a boundary-layer simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. At least one updated fluid property for at least one fluid cell is determined using the at least one boundary-layer fluid property and the inviscid fluid simulation.

  3. Boundary control of fluid flow through porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasan, Agus; Foss, Bjarne; Sagatun, Svein Ivar

    2010-01-01

    The flow of fluids through porous media can be described by the Boussinesq’s equation with mixed boundary conditions; a Neumann’s boundary condition and a nonlinear boundary condition. The nonlinear boundary condition provides a means to control the fluid flow through porous media. In this paper...

  4. Simulations of flow induced ordering in viscoelastic fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos de Oliveira, I.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we report on simulations of colloidal ordering phenomena in shearthinning viscoelastic fluids under shear flow. Depending on the characteristics of the fluid, the colloids are observed to align in the direction of the flow. These string-like structures remain stable as long as the

  5. Numerical simulation of fluid flow in a rotational bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganimedov, V. L.; Papaeva, E. O.; Maslov, N. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2017-10-01

    Application of scaffold technology for the problem of bone tissue regeneration has great prospects in modern medicine. The influence of fluid shear stress on stem cells cultivation and its differentiation into osteoblasts is the subject of intensive research. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow in bioreactor allowed us to determine the structure of flow and estimate the level of mechanical stress on cells. The series of computations for different rotation frequencies (0.083, 0.124, 0.167, 0.2 and 0.233 Hz) was performed for the laminar flow regime approximation. It was shown that the Taylor vortices in the gap between the cylinders qualitatively change the distribution of static pressure and shear stress in the region of vortices connection. It was shown that an increase in the rotation frequency leads to an increase of the unevenness in distribution of the above mentioned functions. The obtained shear stress and static pressure dependence on the rotational frequency make it possible to choose the operating mode of the reactor depending on the provided requirements. It was shown that in the range of rotation frequencies chosen in this work (0.083 < f < 0.233 Hz), the shear stress does not exceed the known literature data (0.002 - 0.1 Pa).

  6. Flow of viscoplastic fluids in a rotating concentric annulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Bittleston, Simon H.

    1992-01-01

    A difficulty in any flow calculation with viscoplastic fluids such as Bingham fluids is the determination of possible plug zones in which no deformation occurs. This paper investigates the flow in a concentric annulus when there is both an axial and tangential flow, the tangent flow arising from...... pressure gradient is small compared to the yield stress of the fluid then the full solution predicts the existence of plugs attached to the outer wall of the annulus. The slot approximation fails to predict this feature. For larger pressure gradients the two solutions are in good agreement. The analytical...

  7. MHD Flow of the Micropolar Fluid between Eccentrically Rotating Disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Neetu

    2014-01-01

    This analytical investigation examines the magnetohydrodynamic flow problem of an incompressible micropolar fluid between the two eccentrically placed disks. Employing suitable transformations, the flow governing partial differential equations is reduced to ordinary differential equations. An exact solution representing the different flow characteristic of micropolar fluid has been derived by solving the ordinary differential equations. Analysis of the flow characteristics of the micropolar fluid has been done graphically by varying the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. This analysis has been carried out for the weak and strong interactions.

  8. Fluid-Structure Interaction of Channel Driven Cavity Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    study the fluid- structure interaction and provide benchmark data for validation of numerical fluid-structure interaction models. The channel driven...driven cavity flow in order to study the fluid-structure interaction and provide benchmark data for validation of numerical fluid-structure interaction...Finally, I would like to thank Mom and Dad for ensuring I received the best education possible while I lived at home. xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY

  9. Flow properties of water-based drilling fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this master thesis was to investigate the flow properties of water based drilling fluids, utilizing measurements in both the micro and macro scale. The research was performed on two realistic drilling fluids by the use of a viscometer, a rheometer and a realistic flow loop, where the latter represents the macro scale. The research outcome could possibly improve the understanding of flow behavior in wellbores, and remove uncertainties associated with annular friction. The two...

  10. Hydrodynamic cavitation in Stokes flow of anisotropic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Tillmann; Agha, Hakam; Schoen, Martin; Mazza, Marco G.; Sengupta, Anupam

    2017-01-01

    Cavitation, the nucleation of vapour in liquids, is ubiquitous in fluid dynamics, and is often implicated in a myriad of industrial and biomedical applications. Although extensively studied in isotropic liquids, corresponding investigations in anisotropic liquids are largely lacking. Here, by combining liquid crystal microfluidic experiments, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical arguments, we report flow-induced cavitation in an anisotropic fluid. The cavitation domain nucleates due to sudden pressure drop upon flow past a cylindrical obstacle within a microchannel. For an anisotropic fluid, the inception and growth of the cavitation domain ensued in the Stokes regime, while no cavitation was observed in isotropic liquids flowing under similar hydrodynamic parameters. Using simulations we identify a critical value of the Reynolds number for cavitation inception that scales inversely with the order parameter of the fluid. Strikingly, the critical Reynolds number for anisotropic fluids can be 50% lower than that of isotropic fluids. PMID:28555615

  11. Evidence for a fluid flow triggered spatio-temporal migration of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal disposition of estimated station corrections of P- and S-waves suggests that the fluid flow in the causative fault zone of the 2001 Bhuj mainshock increased during 2001–2010, while it reduced during 2011–2013, due to the healing process associated with the perturbed Kachchh fault zone. We also estimated the ...

  12. Particle-fluid interactions for flow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, N. S.

    1973-01-01

    Study has been made of the motion of single particle and of group of particles, emphasizing solid particles in gaseous fluid. Velocities of fluid and particle are compared for several conditions of physical interest. Mean velocity and velocity fluctuations are calculated for single particle, and some consideration is given to multiparticle systems.

  13. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization...... operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures...

  14. Flow and structure of fluids in functionalized nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, José Rafael; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate through non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the structure and flow of fluids in functionalized nanopores. The nanopores are modeled as cylindrical structures with solvophilic and solvophobic sites. Two fluids are modeled. The first is a standard Lennard Jones fluid. The second one is modeled with an isotropic two-length scale potential, which exhibits in bulk water-like anomalies. Our results indicate distinct dependence of the overall mass flux for each species of fluid with the number of solvophilic sites for different nanotubes' radii. Also, the density and fluid structure are dependent on the nanotube radius and the solvophilic properties of the nanotube. This indicates that the presence of a second length scale in the fluid-fluid interaction will lead to distinct behavior. Also, our results show that chemically functionalized nanotubes with different radii will have distinct nanofluidic features. Our results are explained on the basis of the characteristic scale fluid properties and the effects of nanoconfinement.

  15. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  16. Destabilization of confined granular packings due to fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monloubou, Martin; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow through granular materials can cause fluidization when fluid drag exceeds the frictional stress within the packing. Fluid driven failure of granular packings is observed in both natural and engineered settings, e.g. soil liquefaction and flowback of proppants during hydraulic fracturing operations. We study experimentally the destabilization and flow of an unconsolidated granular packing subjected to a point source fluid withdrawal using a model system consisting of a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing a water-grain mixture. The fluid is withdrawn from the cell at a constant rate, and the emerging flow patterns are imaged in time-lapse mode. Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), we show that the granular flow gets localized in a narrow channel down the center of the cell, and adopts a Gaussian velocity profile similar to those observed in dry grain flows in silos. We investigate the effects of the experimental parameters (flow rate, grain size, grain shape, fluid viscosity) on the packing destabilization, and identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed complex flow behaviour.

  17. Simulation of uncompressible fluid flow through a porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESIQIE-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met. (Edif. ' Z' y Edif. ' 6' P.B.), Mexico City (Mexico)], E-mail: adaramil@yahoo.com.mx; Gonzalez, J.L. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-ESIQIE-IPN), Unidad Profesional Zacatenco, Laboratorio de Analisis Met. (Edif. ' Z' y Edif. ' 6' P.B.), Mexico City (Mexico); Carrillo, F. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (SEPI-CICATA-IPN), Unidad Altamira Tamaulipas, Mexico (Mexico); Lopez, S. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (I.M.P.-D.F.), Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-02-28

    Recently, a great interest has been focused for investigations about transport phenomena in disordered systems. One of the most treated topics is fluid flow through anisotropic materials due to the importance in many industrial processes like fluid flow in filters, membranes, walls, oil reservoirs, etc. In this work is described the formulation of a 2D mathematical model to simulate the fluid flow behavior through a porous media (PM) based on the solution of the continuity equation as a function of the Darcy's law for a percolation system; which was reproduced using computational techniques reproduced using a random distribution of the porous media properties (porosity, permeability and saturation). The model displays the filling of a partially saturated porous media with a new injected fluid showing the non-defined advance front and dispersion of fluids phenomena.

  18. Experimental investigation of transverse flow estimation using transverse oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners can only display the blood velocity component parallel to the ultrasound beam. Introducing a laterally oscillating field gives signals from which the transverse velocity component can be estimated using 2:1 parallel receive beamformers. To yield the performance...... with a mean relative bias of 6.3% and a mean relative standard deviation of 5.4% over the entire vessel length. With the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS the simulations are reproduced in an experimental flow phantom using a linear array transducer and vessel characteristics as in the simulations....... The flow is generated with the Compuflow 1000 programmable flow pump giving a parabolic velocity profile of the blood mimicking fluid in the flow phantom. The profiles are estimated for 310 trials each containing of 32 data vectors. The relative mean bias over entire blood vessel is found to be 10...

  19. Superconfinement tailors fluid flow at microscales.

    KAUST Repository

    Setu, Siti Aminah

    2015-06-15

    Understanding fluid dynamics under extreme confinement, where device and intrinsic fluid length scales become comparable, is essential to successfully develop the coming generations of fluidic devices. Here we report measurements of advancing fluid fronts in such a regime, which we dub superconfinement. We find that the strong coupling between contact-line friction and geometric confinement gives rise to a new stability regime where the maximum speed for a stable moving front exhibits a distinctive response to changes in the bounding geometry. Unstable fronts develop into drop-emitting jets controlled by thermal fluctuations. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics in superconfined systems is dominated by interfacial forces. Henceforth, we present a theory that quantifies our experiments in terms of the relevant interfacial length scale, which in our system is the intrinsic contact-line slip length. Our findings show that length-scale overlap can be used as a new fluid-control mechanism in strongly confined systems.

  20. Ultrasonic Doppler Velocity Profiler for Fluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method, first developed in medical engineering, is now widely used in clinical settings. The fluid mechanical basis of UVP was established in investigations by the author and his colleagues with work demonstrating that UVP is a powerful new tool in experimental fluid mechanics. There are diverse examples, ranging from problems in fundamental fluid dynamics to applied problems in mechanical, chemical, nuclear, and environmental engineering. In all these problems, the methodological principle in fluid mechanics was converted from point measurements to spatio-temporal measurements along a line. This book is the first monograph on UVP that offers comprehensive information about the method, its principles, its practice, and applied examples, and which serves both current and new users. Current users can confirm that their application configurations are correct, which will help them to improve the configurations so as to make them more efficient and effective. New users will be...

  1. Flow of viscoplastic fluids in eccentric annular geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1992-01-01

    A classification of flowfields for the flow of a Bingham fluid in general eccentric annular geometries is presented. Simple arguments show that a singularity can exist in the stress gradient on boundaries between zones with yielded and un-yielded fluid respectively. A Finite Element code is used...... to verify this property of the Bingham fluid. An analytical solution for the flowfield in case of small eccentricities is derived....

  2. Laminar Flow Processes of Fluid Energy Carries in Pipe Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Еsman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes methodology for analysis and calculation of laminar fluid flows in pipes and channels.  Various regimes of fluid motion in pipelines of heat-power units and equipment are considered in the paper.The presented dependencies can be used for practical calculations while transporting energy carriers for various application.

  3. Vortex Breakdown under Laminar Flow of Pseudoplastic Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyirov, A. I.; Abaydullin, B. R.

    2017-09-01

    The numerical investigation was carried out to study vortex breakdown for pseudoplastic fluid flow in circular pipe with twisted tape inserts. 0.67%, 1.5% and 3% aqueous solutions of Na-CMC are chosen as a pseudoplastic fluid. The numerical results are compared with available data in literature.

  4. Stability and dynamics of fluid flow past deformable solid media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Objective of our work: To uncover qualitatively new instabilities in flow past deformable solid media. (Will not consider tube collapse due to external pressure changes.) Page 5. Introduction. 5. Fluid Governing equations. Incompressible; both Newtonian and Viscoelastic fluids. $%' & (. )0&01)243. 5&26(. &08720. Newtonian ...

  5. Poiseuille flow to measure the viscosity of particle model fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer, J.A.; Lowe, C.P.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Iedema, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    The most important property of a fluid is its viscosity, it determines the flow properties. If one simulates a fluid using a particle model, calculating the viscosity accurately is difficult because it is a collective property. In this article we describe a new method that has a better signal to

  6. Near critical swirling flow of a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Nguyen; Rusak, Zvi; Tichy, John; Wang, Shixiao

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between flow inertia and elasticity in high Re, axisymmetric, and near-critical swirling flows of a viscoelastic fluid in a finite-length straight circular pipe is studied. The viscous stresses are described by the Giesekus constitutive model. The application of this model to columnar streamwise vortices is first investigated. Then, a nonlinear small-disturbance analysis is developed from the governing equations of motion. It explores the complicated interactions between flow inertia, swirl, and fluid viscosity and elasticity. An effective Re that links between steady states of swirling flows of a viscoelastic fluid and those of a Newtonian fluid is revealed. The effects of the fluid viscosity, relaxation time, retardation time and mobility parameter on the flow development and on the critical swirl for the appearance of vortex breakdown are explored. Decreasing the ratio of the viscoelastic characteristic times from one increases the critical swirl for breakdown. Increasing the Weissenberg number from zero or increasing the fluid mobility parameter from zero cause a similar effect. Results may explain changes in the appearance of breakdown zones as a function of swirl level that were observed in Stokes et al. (2001) experiments, where Boger fluids were used.

  7. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  8. Investigation of the fluid flow dynamic parameters for Newtonian and non-Newtonian materials: an approach to understanding the fluid flow-like structures within fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H.; Shiomi, Y.; Ma, K.-F.

    2017-11-01

    To understand the fault zone fluid flow-like structure, namely the ductile deformation structure, often observed in the geological field (e.g., Ramsay and Huber The techniques of modern structure geology, vol. 1: strain analysis, Academia Press, London, 1983; Hobbs and Ord Structure geology: the mechanics of deforming metamorphic rocks, Vol. I: principles, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2015), we applied a theoretical approach to estimate the rate of deformation, the shear stress and the time to form a streak-line pattern in the boundary layer of viscous fluids. We model the dynamics of streak lines in laminar boundary layers for Newtonian and pseudoplastic fluids and compare the results to those obtained via laboratory experiments. The structure of deformed streak lines obtained using our model is consistent with experimental observations, indicating that our model is appropriate for understanding the shear rate, flow time and shear stress based on the profile of deformed streak lines in the boundary layer in Newtonian and pseudoplastic viscous materials. This study improves our understanding of the transportation processes in fluids and of the transformation processes in fluid-like materials. Further application of this model could facilitate understanding the shear stress and time history of the fluid flow-like structure of fault zones observed in the field.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Fluid flows in a librating cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Sauret, Alban; Bars, Michael Le; Dizès, Stéphane Le; 10.1063/1.3680874

    2012-01-01

    The flow in a cylinder driven by time harmonic oscillations of the rotation rate, called longitudinal librations, is investigated. Using a theoretical approach and axisymmetric numerical simulations, we study two distinct phenomena appearing in this librating flow. First, we investigate the occurrence of a centrifugal instability near the oscillating boundary, leading to the so-called Taylor-G\\"ortler vortices. A viscous stability criterion is derived and compared to numerical results obtained for various libration frequencies and Ekman numbers. The strongly nonlinear regime well above the instability threshold is also documented. We show that a new mechanism of spontaneous generation of inertial waves in the bulk could exist when the sidewall boundary layer becomes turbulent. Then, we analyse the librating flow below the instability threshold and characterize the mean zonal flow correction induced by the nonlinear interaction of the boundary layer flow with itself. In the frequency regime where inertial mode...

  10. Stokes flow of micropolar fluid past a viscous fluid spheroid with non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Stokes axisymmetric flow of an incompressible micropolar fluid past a viscous fluid spheroid whose shape deviates slightly from that of a sphere is studied analytically. The boundary conditions used are the vanishing of the normal velocities, the continuity of the tangential velocities, continuity of shear stresses and ...

  11. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam

    2012-01-01

    that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted...... operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures......In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization...

  12. Multiphase Flow of Immiscible Fluids on Unstructured Moving Meshes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam

    2013-01-01

    that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted...... operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures......In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization...

  13. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  14. ESTIMATING REGIONAL ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCE FLOWS

    OpenAIRE

    Booker, James F.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of direct and indirect material and energy usage for New York State are derived from existing input-output and natural resource and energy databases. The work provides both a generally applicable methodology and an empirical example for estimating energy and material flow impacts at the regional level.

  15. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  16. Direct observation of cerebrospinal fluid bulk flow in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Humberto; Tithof, Jeffrey; Thomas, John; Kelley, Douglas; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves a vital role in normal brain function. Its adequate flow and exchange with interstitial fluid through perivascular spaces (PVS) has been shown to be important in the clearance of toxic metabolites like amyloid- β, and its disturbance can cause severe neurological diseases. It has long been suspected that bulk flow may transport CSF, but limitations in imaging techniques have prevented direct observation of such flows in the PVS. In this talk, we describe a novel approach using high speed two photon laser scanning microscopy which has allowed for the first ever direct observation of CSF flow in the PVS of a mouse brain. By performing particle tracking velocimetry, we quantify the CSF bulk flow speeds and PVS geometry. This technique enables future studies of CSF flow disturbances on a new scale and will pave the way for evaluating the role of these fluxes in neurodegenerative disease. R01NS100366 (to M.N.).

  17. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhovcak Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  18. Fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation has the objective to provide a basis for understanding the hydrodynamic characteristics of the continuous flow electrophoresis chamber and their effects on the separation process. Particular emphasis is placed on the role buoyancy plays in establishing the basic flow and affecting its stability. The flow and temperature field is discussed, taking into account mathematical models for the structure of the temperature field, models for the structure of the axial velocity field, a two-dimensional constant thermal conductivity model, the axial velocity field, a two-dimensional constant transport properties model, and one-dimensional velocity fields. Questions of hydrodynamic stability are considered, giving attention to the stability of a fully developed flow with an axial temperature gradient.

  19. Heat transfer and fluid flow in minichannels and microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Kandlikar, Satish; Li, Dongqing; Colin, Stephane; King, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Heat exchangers with minichannel and microchannel flow passages are becoming increasingly popular due to their ability to remove large heat fluxes under single-phase and two-phase applications. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Minichannels and Microchannels methodically covers gas, liquid, and electrokinetic flows, as well as flow boiling and condensation, in minichannel and microchannel applications. Examining biomedical applications as well, the book is an ideal reference for anyone involved in the design processes of microchannel flow passages in a heat exchanger. Each chapter is accompan

  20. Simultaneous Rotational and Axial Flow of Nonlinear Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Nariman; Yektapour, Mehdi; Shafahi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    An axial flow is introduced to the rotational flow of pseudoplastic fluids in the gap between concentric cylinders. The outer cylinder is fixed while the inner one has simultaneous and independent rotational and translational motions. The fluid follows the Carreau-Bird model and mixed boundary conditions are imposed. The four-dimensional low-order equations resulted from Galerkin projection of the conservation of mass and momentum equations, includes highly non-linear terms in the velocity components. Without axial flow, stability of the base radial flow is lost to the vortex structure at a lower critical Taylor number, with increase of the fluid pseudoplasticity. The vortices imply onset of a supercritical bifurcation which occurs in the rotational flow of linear fluids as well. In contrast to the Newtonian case, pseudoplastic Taylor vortices lose their stability at a second critical Taylor number is reached a second critical number that corresponds to the onset of a Hopf bifurcation. The axial flow, caused by the translational motion of the inner cylinder advance each critical point on the bifurcation diagram. The flow field and viscosity maps are provided for major stability regions.

  1. Fluid flow through intravenous cannulae in a clinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Duncan; Adekanye, Olukorede; Wilkes, Antony R; Hall, Judith E

    2009-04-01

    Predicting flow through an IV cannula is useful to clinicians if changes in flow are required and to guide selection of cannula. We sought the usefulness of manufacturers' quoted flows in predicting actual flow and to characterize that flow. We built a vein model and inserted cannulae between 14 and 20-gauge. In the first experiment, we compared the manufacturer's quoted flows using deionized water, Hartmann's solution and Gelofusine. In the second experiment, we varied the pressure feeding the cannula and measured the resulting flow. Flow through a cannula is not a simple ratio of the manufacturers' quoted flow rate, even controlling for fluid type and feeding pressure. Flow is neither fully laminar, nor fully turbulent in the range of rates we have measured and in the International Organization for Standardization test. The Reynolds number is often below 2000. Flow through cannulae is not laminar at the upper range of clinically used flows, therefore Poiseuille's law is not useful in predicting flow and the effect of changing radius is less than commonly believed. The quoted maximum flows are also not useful. There are many conditions for laminar flow apart from Reynolds number. Further work would determine useful predictors of flow.

  2. Ventricle wall movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow in hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Richard D; Basati, Sukhraaj; Sweetman, Brian; Guo, Xiaodong; Linninger, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of fluid flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) are poorly understood. Normally, CSF flows out of the brain through the ventricles. However, ventricular enlargement during NPH may be caused by CSF backflow into the brain through the ventricles. A previous study showed this reversal of flow; in the present study, the authors provide additional clinical data obtained in patients with NPH and supplement these data with computer simulations to better understand the CSF flow and ventricular wall displacement and emphasize its clinical implications. Three NPH patients and 1 patient with aqueductal stenosis underwent cine phase-contrast MR imaging (cine MR imaging) for measurement of CSF flow and ventricle wall movement during the cardiac cycle. These data were compared to data previously obtained in 8 healthy volunteers. The CSF flow measurements were obtained at the outlet of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Calculation of the ventricular wall movement was determined from the complete set of cine MR images obtained axially at the middle of the lateral ventricle. The data were obtained before and after CSF removal with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with an adjustable valve. To supplement the clinical data, a computational model was used to predict the transmural pressure and flow. In healthy volunteers, net CSF aqueductal flow was 1.2 ml/minute in the craniocaudal direction. In patients with NPH, the net CSF flow was in the opposite direction--the caudocranial direction--before shunt placement. After shunting, the magnitude of the abnormal fluid flow decreased or reversed, with the flow resembling the normal flow patterns observed in healthy volunteers. The authors' MR imaging-based measurements of the CSF flow direction and lateral ventricle volume size change and the results of computer modeling of fluid dynamics lead them to conclude that the directional pattern and magnitude of CSF flow in patients with NPH may be an indication of the disease state. This has

  3. Evaluation of dentinal fluid flow behaviours: a fluid-structure interaction simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Chih; Chuang, Shu-Fen; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Chang, Chih-Han

    2014-11-01

    This study uses the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method to investigate the fluid flow in dental pulp. First, the FSI method is used for the biomechanical simulation of dental intrapulpal responses during force loading (50, 100 and 150 N) on a tooth. The results are validated by comparison with experimental outcomes. Second, the FSI method is used to investigate an intact tooth subjected to a mechanical stimulus during loading at various loading rates. Force loading (0-100 N) is applied gradually to an intact tooth surface with loading rates of 125, 62.5, 25 and 12.5 N/s, respectively, and the fluid flow changes in the pulp are evaluated. FSI analysis is found to be suitable for examining intrapulpal biomechanics. An external force applied to a tooth with a low loading rate leads to a low fluid flow velocity in the pulp chamber, thus avoiding tooth pain.

  4. Fluid dynamics following flow shut-off in bottle filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thete, Sumeet; Appathurai, Santosh; Gao, Haijing; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    Bottle filling is ubiquitous in industry. Examples include filling of bottles with shampoos and cleaners, engine oil and pharmaceuticals. In these examples, fluid flows out of a nozzle to fill bottles in an assembly line. Once the required volume of fluid has flowed out of the nozzle, the flow is shut off. However, an evolving fluid thread or string may remain suspended from the nozzle following flow shut-off and persist. This stringing phenomenon can be detrimental to a bottle filling operation because it can adversely affect line speed and filling accuracy by causing uncertainty in fill volume, product loss and undesirable marring of the bottles' exterior surfaces. The dynamics of stringing are studied numerically primarily by using the 1D, slender-jet approximation of the flow equations. A novel feature entails development and use of a new boundary condition downstream of the nozzle exit to expedite the computations. While the emphasis is on stringing of Newtonian fluids and use of 1D approximations, results will also be presented for situations where (a) the fluids are non-Newtonian and (b) the full set of equations are solved without invoking the 1D approximation. Phase diagrams will be presented that identify conditions for which stringing can be problematic.

  5. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  6. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an…

  7. Topological Fluid Mechanics with Applications to Free Surfaces and Axisymmetric Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow.......Topological fluid mechanics is the study of qualitative features of fluid patterns. We discuss applications to the flow beneath a stagnant surface film, and to patterns in axisymmetric flow....

  8. Topological fluid dynamics of interfacial flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1994-01-01

    setting, including nonconstant curvature of the interface and gradients of surface tension, using tools of modern nonlinear dynamics. Bifurcations of the flow pattern occur at degenerate configurations. Using the theory of unfolding, this paper gives a complete description of the bifurcations that depend...

  9. Determining fluid and gas flow distribution within separation apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remizov, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    This study considered fluid and gas flow distribution in existing industrial separator units. The author found that overall hydraulic resistance was not identical in these units, resulting from variables in the gas-fluid mixtures' movement between the distribution points and the separator units. Separator loads were found to be imbalanced due to the imperfect design of these units. Load equalization could be obtained by way of achieving simultaneous pulsation suppression in distribution lines. Pulsation suppression itself is achieved through the use of a separation phase in collection pipelines followed by individual flow separation. Gas and fluid are thus introduced into the distribution pipeline and separator separately. Separator design dimensions and parameters are given along with suggestions for their application. Long-term industrial experience with flow separators has shown that these units not only require minimal operating expenditure, but also are highly reliable and effective.

  10. Multiphase flow of immiscible fluids on unstructured moving meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Erleben, Kenny; Bargteil, Adam; Fursund, Jens; Christensen, Brian Bunch; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Bridson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for animating multiphase flow of immiscible fluids using unstructured moving meshes. Our underlying discretization is an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, the deformable simplicial complex (DSC), that moves with the flow in a Lagrangian manner. Mesh optimization operations improve element quality and avoid element inversion. In the context of multiphase flow, we guarantee that every element is occupied by a single fluid and, consequently, the interface between fluids is represented by a set of faces in the simplicial complex. This approach ensures that the underlying discretization matches the physics and avoids the additional book-keeping required in grid-based methods where multiple fluids may occupy the same cell. Our Lagrangian approach naturally leads us to adopt a finite element approach to simulation, in contrast to the finite volume approaches adopted by a majority of fluid simulation techniques that use tetrahedral meshes. We characterize fluid simulation as an optimization problem allowing for full coupling of the pressure and velocity fields and the incorporation of a second-order surface energy. We introduce a preconditioner based on the diagonal Schur complement and solve our optimization on the GPU. We provide the results of parameter studies as well as a performance analysis of our method, together with suggestions for performance optimization.

  11. Granular materials flow like complex fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Binquan; Cao, Yixin; Li, Jindong; Xia, Chengjie; Li, Zhifeng; Dong, Haipeng; Zhang, Ang; Zhang, Jie; Kob, Walter; Wang, Yujie

    2017-11-01

    Granular materials such as sand, powders and foams are ubiquitous in daily life and in industrial and geotechnical applications. These disordered systems form stable structures when unperturbed, but in the presence of external influences such as tapping or shear they `relax', becoming fluid in nature. It is often assumed that the relaxation dynamics of granular systems is similar to that of thermal glass-forming systems. However, so far it has not been possible to determine experimentally the dynamic properties of three-dimensional granular systems at the particle level. This lack of experimental data, combined with the fact that the motion of granular particles involves friction (whereas the motion of particles in thermal glass-forming systems does not), means that an accurate description of the relaxation dynamics of granular materials is lacking. Here we use X-ray tomography to determine the microscale relaxation dynamics of hard granular ellipsoids subject to an oscillatory shear. We find that the distribution of the displacements of the ellipsoids is well described by a Gumbel law (which is similar to a Gaussian distribution for small displacements but has a heavier tail for larger displacements), with a shape parameter that is independent of the amplitude of the shear strain and of the time. Despite this universality, the mean squared displacement of an individual ellipsoid follows a power law as a function of time, with an exponent that does depend on the strain amplitude and time. We argue that these results are related to microscale relaxation mechanisms that involve friction and memory effects (whereby the motion of an ellipsoid at a given point in time depends on its previous motion). Our observations demonstrate that, at the particle level, the dynamic behaviour of granular systems is qualitatively different from that of thermal glass-forming systems, and is instead more similar to that of complex fluids. We conclude that granular materials can relax

  12. Fluid flow modeling in complex areas*, **

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poullet Pascal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We show first results of 3D simulation of sea currents in a realistic context. We use the full Navier–Stokes equations for incompressible viscous fluid. The problem is solved using a second order incremental projection method associated with the finite volume of the staggered (MAC scheme for the spatial discretization. After validation on classical cases, it is used in a numerical simulation of the Pointe à Pitre harbour area. The use of the fictious domain method permits us to take into account the complexity of bathymetric data and allows us to work with regular meshes and thus preserves the efficiency essential for a 3D code. Dans cette étude, nous présentons les premiers résultats de simulation d’un écoulement d’un fluide incompressible visqueux dans un contexte environnemental réel. L’approche utilisée utilise une méthode de domaines fictifs pour une prise en compte d’un domaine physique tridimensionnel très irrégulier. Le schéma numérique combine un schéma de projection incrémentale et des volumes finis utilisant des volumes de contrôle adaptés à un maillage décalé. Les tests de validation sont menés pour les cas tests de la cavité double entraînée ainsi que l’écoulement dans un canal avec un obstacle placé de manière asymmétrique.

  13. Taylor-Couette flow with radial fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Dutcher, Cari S.

    2017-08-01

    Taylor-Couette cells have been shown to improve a number of industrial processes due to the wide variety of hydrodynamic flow states accessible. Traditional designs, however, limit the ability to introduce new fluids into the annulus during device operation due to geometric confinement and complexity. In this paper, a co- and counter-rotating Taylor-Couette cell with radial fluid injection has been constructed. The incorporation of 16 ports in the inner cylinder enables radial fluid injection during rotation of both cylinders. The design is also capable of continuous axial flow, enabling large injection volumes. The new inner cylinder design does not modify the critical Re for flow instabilities and can precisely inject a desired mass at a desired flow rate. A range of injection rates and masses were explored to quantify the effect of radial injection on the stability of the turbulent Taylor vortex structure. Only the highest injection rate and total mass studied (5.9 g/s, 100 g) modified the turbulent Taylor vortex structure after injection for a sustained period. The post-injection vortices remained larger than the pre-injection vortices, whereas at lower injection rates or masses, the vortex structure quickly returned to the pre-injection structure. This new system allows for in situ study of hydrodynamic effects on fluid-fluid (gas and liquid) mixing and multiphase complexation, growth, and structure. We demonstrated this new design's potential for studying the flocculation of bentonite using cationic polyacrylamide for enhancing water treatment operations.

  14. Parameter estimation in channel network flow simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Longxi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of water flow in channel networks require estimated values of roughness for all the individual channel segments that make up a network. When the number of individual channel segments is large, the parameter calibration workload is substantial and a high level of uncertainty in estimated roughness cannot be avoided. In this study, all the individual channel segments are graded according to the factors determining the value of roughness. It is assumed that channel segments with the same grade have the same value of roughness. Based on observed hydrological data, an optimal model for roughness estimation is built. The procedure of solving the optimal problem using the optimal model is described. In a test of its efficacy, this estimation method was applied successfully in the simulation of tidal water flow in a large complicated channel network in the lower reach of the Yangtze River in China.

  15. Unsteady magnetohydrodynamics micropolar fluid in boundary layer flow past a sphere influenced by magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratomo, Rizky Verdyanto; Widodo, Basuki; Adzkiya, Dieky

    2017-12-01

    Research about fluid flow was very interesting because have a lot of advantages and it can be applied in many aspects of life. The study on fluid flow which is now widely studied is on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). Magnetohydrodynamic is a conductive and electrical in a magnetic field. This paper considers the effect of unsteady magnetic fields on the flow of magneto-hydrodynamic fluid on the boundary layer that flows past a sphere in micropolar fluid influenced by magnetic field. Our approach is as follows. First, we construct a mathematical model and then the system of equations obtained will be solved numerically using the Keller-Box scheme. Then the system is simulated to assess its effect on the fluid flow velocity profile and the profile of microrotation particles. The result of this research indicates, that when the magnetic parameters increase, then velocity profile increases. If material parameters increase, then velocity profile decreases and magnetic parameters increase for n = 0. For n = 0.5, if magnetic parameters increase, then microrotation profile decreases.

  16. Using artificial intelligence to control fluid flow computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsey, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation is an essential tool for the prediction of fluid flow. Many powerful simulation programs exist today. However, using these programs to reliably analyze fluid flow and other physical situations requires considerable human effort and expertise to set up a simulation, determine whether the output makes sense, and repeatedly run the simulation with different inputs until a satisfactory result is achieved. Automating this process is not only of considerable practical importance but will also significantly advance basic artificial intelligence (AI) research in reasoning about the physical world.

  17. Dynamics of a fluid flow on Mars: lava or mud?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We have identified an enigmatic flow in S.W. Cerberus Fossae, Mars. The flow originates from an almost circular pit within a remnant of a yardang at 0.58 degrees N, 155.28 degrees E, within the lower unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. The flow is ~42 km long and 0.5 to 2.0 km wide. The surface textures of the resulting deposit show that the material flowed in such a way that the various deformation patterns on its surface were generally preserved as it moved, only being distorted or disrupted when the flow encountered major topographic obstacles or was forced to make rapid changes of direction. This observation of a stiff, generally undeformed surface layer overlying a relatively mobile base suggests that, while it was moving, the fluid material flowed in a laminar, and possibly non-Newtonian, fashion. The least-complicated non-Newtonian fluids are Bingham plastics. On this basis we use measurements of flow width, length, thickness and substrate slope obtained from images, a DEM constructed from stereo pairs of Context Camera (CTX) images, and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) altimetry points to deduce the rheological properties of the fluid, treating it as both a Newtonian and a Bingham material for comparison. The Newtonian option requires the fluid to have a viscosity close to 100 Pa s and to have flowed everywhere in a turbulent fashion. The Bingham option requires laminar flow, a plastic viscosity close to 1 Pa s, and a yield strength of ~185 Pa. We compare these parameters values with those of various environmental fluids on Earth in an attempt to narrow the range of possible materials forming the martian flow. A mafic to ultramafic lava would fit the Newtonian option but the required turbulence does not seem consistent with the surface textures. The Bingham option satisfies the morphological constraint of laminar motion if the material is a mud flow consisting of ~40% water and ~60% silt-sized silicate solids. Elsewhere on Mars, deposits with similar

  18. Squeeze Flow of Yield Stress Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelot, David; Yarin, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The squeeze flow of yield stress materials are investigated using a non-invasive optical technique. In the experiments, cylindrically-shaped samples of Carbopol solutions and Bentonite dispersions are rapidly compressed between two transparent plates using a constant force and the instantaneous cross-sectional area is recorded as a function of time using a high speed CCD camera. Furthermore, visualization of the boundary reveals that the no-slip condition holds. In addition, shear experiments are conducted using parallel-plate and vane viscometers. The material exhibits first a fast stage of squeezing in which the normal stresses dominate and viscosity plays the main role. Then, the second (slow) stage sets in where the material exhibits a slow deformation dominated by yield stress. At the end, the deformation process is arrested by yield stress. The material response is attributed to the Bingham-like or Herschel-Bulkley-like rheological behavior. Squeeze flow is developed into a convenient and simple tool for studying yield stress materials. This work is supported by the United States Gypsum Corp.

  19. Mathematical Model for Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Processes in Plate Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvete B. Dimitrieska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the analytical solution of the system of equations which solve fluid flow and heat transfer processes, the elliptical and parabolic differential equations based on initial and boundary conditions is usually unfamiliar in a closed form. Numerical solution of equation system is necessarily obtained by discretization of equations. When system of equations relate to estimation of two dimensional stationary problems, the applicable method for estimation in basic two – dimensional form is recommended.

  20. Estimating the topographic predictability of debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nele Kristin; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Korup, Oliver; Romstad, Bård; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    The Norwegian traffic network is impacted by about 2000 landslides, avalanches, and debris flows each year that incur high economic losses. Despite the urgent need to mitigate future losses, efforts to locate potential debris flow source areas have been rare at the regional scale. We tackle this research gap by exploring a minimal set of possible topographic predictors of debris flow initiation that we input to a Weights-of-Evidence (WofE) model for mapping the regional susceptibility to debris flows in western Norway. We use an inventory of 429 debris flows that were recorded between 1979 and 2008, and use the terrain variables of slope, total curvature, and contributing area (flow accumulation) to compute the posterior probabilities of local debris flow occurrence. The novelty of our approach is that we quantify the uncertainties in the WofE approach arising from different predictor classification schemes and data input, while estimating model accuracy and predictive performance from independent test data. Our results show that a percentile-based classification scheme excels over a manual classification of the predictor variables because differing abundances in manually defined bins reduce the reliability of the conditional independence tests, a key, and often neglected, prerequisite for the WofE method. The conditional dependence between total curvature and flow accumulation precludes their joint use in the model. Slope gradient has the highest true positive rate (88%), although the fraction of area classified as susceptible is very large (37%). The predictive performance, i.e. the reduction of false positives, is improved when combined with either total curvature or flow accumulation. Bootstrapping shows that the combination of slope and flow accumulation provides more reliable predictions than the combination of slope and total curvature, and helps refining the use of slope-area plots for identifying morphometric fingerprints of debris flow source areas, an

  1. Flow of MHD Carreau Fluid in a Curved Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Noreen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis has been made for the curvature effects on the MHD peristaltic flow of an incompressible Carreau fluid in a channel. The flow problem is first reduced in the wave frame of reference and then solved after employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Expressions of stream function, pressure gradient, magnetic force function, induced magnetic field and current density are derived and then examined for various parameters of interest.

  2. Stability of axisymmetric swirl flows of viscous incompressible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktershev, S. P.; Kuibin, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    A new method of solution to the problem of stability of the swirl flow of viscous incompressible fluid is developed. The method based on expansion of the required function into power series of radial coordinate allows an avoidance of difficulties related to numerical integration of the system of differential equations with a singular point. Stability of the Poiseuille flow in a rotating pipe is considered as an example.

  3. Fluid-dynamic optimal design of helical vascular graft for stenotic disturbed flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Ha

    Full Text Available Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn* of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft.

  4. Fluid-dynamic optimal design of helical vascular graft for stenotic disturbed flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Choi, Woo-Rak; Baek, Jehyun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Although a helical configuration of a prosthetic vascular graft appears to be clinically beneficial in suppressing thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia, an optimization of a helical design has yet to be achieved because of the lack of a detailed understanding on hemodynamic features in helical grafts and their fluid dynamic influences. In the present study, the swirling flow in a helical graft was hypothesized to have beneficial influences on a disturbed flow structure such as stenotic flow. The characteristics of swirling flows generated by helical tubes with various helical pitches and curvatures were investigated to prove the hypothesis. The fluid dynamic influences of these helical tubes on stenotic flow were quantitatively analysed by using a particle image velocimetry technique. Results showed that the swirling intensity and helicity of the swirling flow have a linear relation with a modified Germano number (Gn*) of the helical pipe. In addition, the swirling flow generated a beneficial flow structure at the stenosis by reducing the size of the recirculation flow under steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Therefore, the beneficial effects of a helical graft on the flow field can be estimated by using the magnitude of Gn*. Finally, an optimized helical design with a maximum Gn* was suggested for the future design of a vascular graft.

  5. Fluid and particulate suspension flows at fracture junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tak S.; Koplik, Joel

    2015-03-01

    Suspended particles can be a serious problem in geological contexts such as fluid recovery from reservoirs because they alter the rheology of the flowing liquids and may obstruct transport by narrowing flow channels due to deposition or gravitational sedimentation. In particular, the irregular geometry of the fracture walls can trap particles, induce jamming and cause unwanted channeling effects. We have investigated particle suspension flows in tight geological fractures using lattice Boltzmann method in the past. In this work we extend these studies to flows at a junction where two fractures intersect, an essential step towards a complete understanding of flows in fracture networks. The fracture walls are modeled as realistic self-affine fractal surfaces, and we focus on the case of tight fractures, where the wall roughness, the aperture and the particle size are all comparable. The simulations provide complete detail on the particle configurations and the fluid flow field, from which the stresses in the fluid and the forces acting on the bounding walls can be computed. With these information, phenomena such as particle mixing and dispersion, mechanical responses of the solid walls, possible jamming and release at junctions, and other situations of interest can be investigated. Work supported by NERSC and DOE.

  6. A Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program to Model Flow Distribution in Fluid Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok; Bailey, John W.; Schallhorn, Paul; Steadman, Todd

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex network. The program is capable of modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics and external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal. The program's preprocessor allows the user to interactively develop a fluid network simulation consisting of nodes and branches. Mass, energy and specie conservation equations are solved at the nodes; the momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. The program contains subroutines for computing "real fluid" thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for 33 fluids. The fluids are: helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen, parahydrogen, water, kerosene (RP-1), isobutane, butane, deuterium, ethane, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, krypton, propane, xenon, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134A, R-152A, nitrogen trifluoride and ammonia. The program also provides the options of using any incompressible fluid with constant density and viscosity or ideal gas. Seventeen different resistance/source options are provided for modeling momentum sources or sinks in the branches. These options include: pipe flow, flow through a restriction, non-circular duct, pipe flow with entrance and/or exit losses, thin sharp orifice, thick orifice, square edge reduction, square edge expansion, rotating annular duct, rotating radial duct, labyrinth seal, parallel plates, common fittings and valves, pump characteristics, pump power, valve with a given loss coefficient, and a Joule-Thompson device. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. This paper also illustrates the application and verification of the code by comparison with Hardy Cross method for steady state flow and analytical solution for unsteady flow.

  7. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies of metamorphic fluid flow in an evolving tectonic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesolowski, D.; Cole, D.R.; Drummond, M.S.; Stakes, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian borehole represents a unique opportunity to couple O-H-C-S isotope and fluid inclusion studies with textures, mineralogies, and chemical compositions in order to assess the role of fluids in metamorphism, deformation, element migration, and heat transfer throughout the evolution of a complex orogen. Studies which focus on hydrothermal veins, felsic/mafic intrusives and juxtaposed but chemically and isotopically distinct lithologies such as volcanics/-clastics and silicates/carbonates will be particularly informative. That large-scale metamorphic fluid flow has occurred in the Southern Appalachians is evidenced by devolatilization of enormous masses of rock during prograde metamorphism and extensive revolatilization, along major shear zones exhibiting retrograde assemblages. The authors own textural, chemical and oxygen isotope studies of granitoids and their host rocks in Northern Alabama document substantial isotopic, major and trace element (e.g. U, Th, Pb, Rb, and Sr) redistribution over thousands of cubic kilometers via exchange with infiltrating metamorphic fluids. Even chemically and mineralogically unaltered granites in the area have been isotopically enriched, perhaps reflecting differing chemical and isotopic exchange capacities of the fluid/rock system. These observations suggest that the chemical and isotopic effects of metamorphic fluid flow must be quantified in order to determine the origins of sedimentary and igneous rocks based on their geochemical signatures and age dates and to evaluate the role of fluids in the tectonic evolution of the proposed study area.

  8. A quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow in posttraumatic syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Nihei, Ryuuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Suyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Haruki (National Rehabilitation Center for the Disabled Hospital, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow within the spinal canal and syrinx in posttraumatic syringomyelia were studied by cardiac-gated phase images of magnetic resonance imaging in 12 normal volunteers and 8 patients with syringomyelia. The cardiac-gated phase method was simple and useful for detection of CSF flow. Phase modulation was in direct proportion to flow velocity. Phase modulation was not affected by the T1 or T2 relaxation time. In normal volunteers, CSF flows caudally during systole and cranially during diastole. The maximum caudal CSF flow velocity at C2 level was from 0.45 cm/sec to 1.71 cm/sec, average; 1.27 cm/sec. All of symptomatic posttraumatic syringomyelia patients had the flow in the syrinx. (author).

  9. A Review of Critical Conditions for the Onset of Nonlinear Fluid Flow in Rock Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting appropriate governing equations for fluid flow in fractured rock masses is of special importance for estimating the permeability of rock fracture networks. When the flow velocity is small, the flow is in the linear regime and obeys the cubic law, whereas when the flow velocity is large, the flow is in the nonlinear regime and should be simulated by solving the complex Navier-Stokes equations. The critical conditions such as critical Reynolds number and critical hydraulic gradient are commonly defined in the previous works to quantify the onset of nonlinear fluid flow. This study reviews the simplifications of governing equations from the Navier-Stokes equations, Stokes equation, and Reynold equation to the cubic law and reviews the evolutions of critical Reynolds number and critical hydraulic gradient for fluid flow in rock fractures and fracture networks, considering the influences of shear displacement, normal stress and/or confining pressure, fracture surface roughness, aperture, and number of intersections. This review provides a reference for the engineers and hydrogeologists especially the beginners to thoroughly understand the nonlinear flow regimes/mechanisms within complex fractured rock masses.

  10. a modified power law for determinig flow characteristics of fluid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1986-09-01

    Sep 1, 1986 ... CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUID. BY. G. SODAH AYERNOR. Department of Food Science and Technology. University of Nigeria Nsukka. ABSTRACT. A modified power law derived with “angle of deviation flow was used to determine the, rheological properties of corn syrup (CS), honey (H), emulsion salad ...

  11. Micromachined structures for thermal measurements of fluid and flow parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    In this paper thermal sensor-actuator structures are proposed that can be used to measure various fluid parameters such as thermal conductivity, flow velocity, heat capacity, kinematic viscosity and pressure. All structures are designed in such a way that they can be realized in the same fabrication

  12. Control of fluid flows using multivariate spline reduced order models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, H.J.; de Visser, C.C.; Kotsonis, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study on control of fluid flows using multivariate spline reduced order models. A new approach is presented for model reduction of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using multivariate splines defined on triangulations. State space descriptions are derived that can be

  13. Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variation in body acceleration amplitude though affects the velocity profile in the capillary tubes, it has no effect on the leakback in the tubes. Leakback is mainly determined by the balance of the viscous drag and the driving force of the applied pressure gradient. Key words: Leakback, Pulsatile Flow, Fluid Suspension, ...

  14. The Challenge of Fluid Flow -6---------------------------------~~---------R ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and F=F (x, t) is a body force (per unit volume of fluid). .... motion that, after 1960, were to be proved incorrect. ..... been used earlier in turbulent channel flow by Clark Millikan). GENERAL I ARTICLE both scaling arguments are valid, i.e. they are matchable. This led to the prediction that, over that range of intermediate scales.

  15. Development of a vital-sign/fluid-balance flow sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, L A; Adkins, A T

    1993-01-01

    An improved flow sheet for recording vital signs and fluid balance on a medical oncology unit was developed and tested using quality-assurance techniques. The new form, which replaced three separate forms, measurably improved documentation on all quality-assurance monitors tested. Additional benefits include cost-savings and decreased time expenditures by nursing staff.

  16. EFFECTS OF HEAT-FLOW AND HYDROTHERMAL FLUIDS FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volcanic intrusions and hydrothermal activity have modified the diagenetic minerals. In the Ulster Basin, UK, most of the authigenic mineralization in the Permo-Triassic sandstones pre-dated tertiary volcanic intrusions. The hydrothermal fluids and heat-flow from the volcanic intrusions did not affect quartz and feldspar ...

  17. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow in the Tape Casting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The flow behavior of the fluid in the tape casting process is analyzed. A simple geometry is assumed for running the numerical calculations in ANSYS Fluent and the main parameters are expressed in non-dimensional form. The effect of different values for substrate velocity and pressure force...

  18. Tracing fluid flow in geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.E.; Adams, M.C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A family of fluorescent compounds, the polycyclic aromatic sulfonates, were evaluated for application in intermediate- and high-temperature geothermal reservoirs. Whereas the naphthalene sulfonates were found to be very thermally stable and reasonably detectable, the amino-substituted naphthalene sulfonates were found to be somewhat less thermally stable, but much more detectable. A tracer test was conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir using one of the substituted naphthalene sulfonates, amino G, and fluorescein. Four of 9 production wells showed tracer breakthrough during the first 200 days of the test. Reconstructed tracer return curves are presented that correct for the thermal decay of tracer assuming an average reservoir temperature of 227{degrees}C. In order to examine the feasibility of using numerical simulation to model tracer flow, we developed simple, two-dimensional models of the geothermal reservoir using the numerical simulation programs TETRAD and TOUGH2. By fitting model outputs to measured return curves, we show that numerical reservoir simulations can be calibrated with the tracer data. Both models predict the same order of elution, approximate tracer concentrations, and return curve shapes. Using these results, we propose a method for using numerical models to design a tracer test.

  19. Flow of fractional Maxwell fluid between coaxial cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetecau, C. [GC University, Abdus Salam School of Mathematical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Technical University of Iasi, Department of Mathematics, Iasi (Romania); Fetecau, Corina [Technical University of Iasi, Department of Theoretical Mechanics, Iasi (Romania); Jamil, M. [GC University, Abdus Salam School of Mathematical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); NED University of Engineering and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Karachi (Pakistan); Mahmood, A. [GC University, Abdus Salam School of Mathematical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2011-08-15

    This paper deals with the study of unsteady flow of a Maxwell fluid with fractional derivative model, between two infinite coaxial circular cylinders, using Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. The motion of the fluid is produced by the inner cylinder that, at time t=0{sup +}, is subject to a time-dependent longitudinal shear stress. Velocity field and the adequate shear stress are presented under series form in terms of the generalized G and R functions. The solutions that have been obtained satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. The corresponding solutions for ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluids are obtained as limiting cases of general solutions. Finally, the influence of the pertinent parameters on the fluid motion as well as a comparison between the three models is underlined by graphical illustrations. (orig.)

  20. Process viscometry in flows of non-Newtonian fluids using an anchor agitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hae Jin; Jang, Hye Kyeong; Kim, Young Ju; Hwang, Wook Ryol

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present a viscosity measurement technique for inelastic non-Newtonian fluids directly in flows of anchor agitators that are commonly used in highly viscous fluid mixing particularly with yield stress. A two-blade anchor impeller is chosen as a model flow system and Carbopol 940 solutions and Xanthan gum solutions with various concentrations are investigated as test materials. Following the Metzner-Otto correlation, the effective shear rate constant and the energy dissipation rate constant have been estimated experimentally by establishing (i) the relationship between the power number and the Reynolds number using a reference Newtonian fluid and (ii) the proportionality between the effective shear rate and the impeller speed with a reference non-Newtonian fluid. The effective viscosity that reproduces the same amount of the energy dissipation rate, corresponding to that of Newtonian fluid, has been obtained by measuring torques for various impeller speeds and the accuracy in the viscosity prediction as a function of the shear rate has been compared with the rheological measurement. We report that the process viscometry with the anchor impeller yields viscosity estimation within the relative error of 20% with highly shear-thinning fluids.

  1. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    KAUST Repository

    Uddin, J.

    2012-07-19

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Z tip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Z tip = Z min ) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  2. Aeroelastic stability of cylindrical shells interacting with internal annular fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, S. A.; Lekomtsev, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the dynamic behavior of cylindrical shells, containing an internal annular layer of ideal fluid and subject to the external supersonic gas flow. The aerodynamic pressure is calculated based on the quasi-static aerodynamic theory. The behavior of the compressible fluid is described in terms of the perturbation velocity potential. A mathematical formulation of the problem is developed based on the classical theory of shells and virtual displacement principle. A solution of the problem involves computation of complex eigenvalues of the coupled system of equations. The paper presents the results of numerical experiments, which were performed to estimate the influence of the fluid flow velocity on the value of the static pressure in the unperturbed gas flow for shells, interacting with fluid layers of different thicknesses. The numerical simulation shows that a reduction of the fluid layer thickness and increase of the fluid velocity produce a stabilizing effect by virtue of increasing the threshold of aerodynamic stability. However, an essential reduction of the layer thickness can lead, depending on the preset combinations of boundary conditions, to a considerable growth of the stability threshold or to the onset of instability.

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Fluid Flow in Cone and Cavitation Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada KOZUBKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem of cavitation is the undesirable phenomena occuring in the fluid flow in many hydraulic application (pumps, turbines, valves, etc.. Therefore this is in the focus of interest using experimental and mathematical methods. Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience [1], [2], [4], following problem described as the water flow at the outlet from turbine blade wheel was solved. Primarily the problem is simplified into modelling of water flow in cone. Profiles of axial, radial and tangential velocity are defined on inlet zone. The value of pressure is defined on the outlet. Boundary conditions were defined by main investigator of the grant project – Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan’s Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The value of air volume was insignificant. Cavitation was solved by Singhal model of cavitation.

  4. Neutron radigoraphy of fluid flow for geothermal energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Jacobson, David [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the “particles” and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  5. OPTICAL FLOW FOR GLACIER MOTION ESTIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vogel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative measurements of glacier flow over time are an important ingredient for glaciological research, for example to determine the mass balances and the evolution of glaciers. Measuring glacier flow in multi-temporal images involves the estimation of a dense set of corresponding points, which in turn define the flow vectors. Furthermore glaciers exhibit rather difficult radiometry, since their surface usually contains homogeneous areas as well as weak texture and contrast. To date glacier flow is usually observed by manually measuring a sparse set of correspondences, which is labor-intensive and often yields rather irregular point distributions, with the associated problems of interpolating over large areas. In the present work we propose to densely compute motion vectors at every pixel, by using recent robust methods for optic flow computation. Determining the optic flow, i.e. the dense deformation field between two images of a dynamic scene, has been a classic, long-standing research problem in computer vision and image processing. Sophisticated methods exist to optimally balance data fidelity with smoothness of the motion field. Depending on the strength of the local image gradients these methods yield a smooth trade-off between matching and interpolation, thereby avoiding the somewhat arbitrary decision which discrete anchor points to measure, while at the same time mitigating the problem of gross matching errors. We evaluate our method by comparing with manually measured point wise ground truth.

  6. Directional Transverse Oscillation Vector Flow Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. In Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) a normal focused field is emitted and the received signals are beamformed in the lateral direction transverse to the ultrasound...... beam to increase the amount of data for vector velocity estimation. The approach is self-calibrating as the lateral oscillation period is estimated from the directional signal through a Fourier transform to yield quantitative velocity results over a large range of depths. The approach was extensively...... simulated using Field IIpro and implemented on the experimental SARUS scanner in connection with a BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer. Velocity estimates for DTO are found for beam-to-flow angles of 60, 75, and 90, and vessel depths from 24 to 156 mm. Using 16 emissions the Standard Deviation (SD...

  7. Optical diagnostics in supersonic plasma flows: Purging fluid effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchillon, C.W.; Norton, O.P.; Cook, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic topping cycles are being planned for electrical power production in conjunction with conventional fossil fueled power plants. In order to develop proper designs and to provide for better control and safety, it is desirable to make measurements in the plasma flows which are used in the MHD process. Noninvasive optically based instruments are well suited to this purpose. In order to use these optically based instruments, optically transparent viewports are required to allow observations of the plasma flow conditions. A purge/impulse fluid flow system has been devised to provide continuous optical access to the flow by DIAL. The presence of the purge flows in the supersonic section of the MHD system may have an effect on the flow characteristics and consequently, the effectiveness of the electrical energy generation or on the long-term reliability of the power train. A numerical evaluation of the resulting flow field in a supersonic duct with purge flow viewports has been made and results are presented which illustrate the predicted effects of the purge flow under steady state conditions. The only significant effect on the plasma flow was in the temperature distribution near the wall downstream and in the plane of the viewpoints.

  8. Optical diagnostics in supersonic plasma flows: Purging fluid effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchillon, C.W.; Norton, O.P.; Cook, R.L.

    1993-03-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic topping cycles are being planned for electrical power production in conjunction with conventional fossil fueled power plants. In order to develop proper designs and to provide for better control and safety, it is desirable to make measurements in the plasma flows which are used in the MHD process. Noninvasive optically based instruments are well suited to this purpose. In order to use these optically based instruments, optically transparent viewports are required to allow observations of the plasma flow conditions. A purge/impulse fluid flow system has been devised to provide continuous optical access to the flow by DIAL. The presence of the purge flows in the supersonic section of the MHD system may have an effect on the flow characteristics and consequently, the effectiveness of the electrical energy generation or on the long-term reliability of the power train. A numerical evaluation of the resulting flow field in a supersonic duct with purge flow viewports has been made and results are presented which illustrate the predicted effects of the purge flow under steady state conditions. The only significant effect on the plasma flow was in the temperature distribution near the wall downstream and in the plane of the viewpoints.

  9. Fluid flow analysis in horizontal continuous casting tundish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Dong Heon; Lee, Hwang Ku; Han, Jeong Whan; You, Byung Don

    2002-11-01

    Water model studies were carried out to analyze fluid flow characteristics in a horizontal continuous casting tundish. The effects of LSN (ladle submerged nozzle) and dams on the flow pattems in a tundish were investigated and casting speeds were also changed as experimental parameters. Dye injection experiments were made to observe qualitative flow patterns and mixing characteristics in a continuous flowing tundish. And quantitative analyses of RTD (residence time distribution) curves using tracer pulse injection were also made to calculate the dead volume fraction in the water model tundish under consideration. From the results it was found that flow modification devices with an open stream have little effect on the flow patterns in the tundish, whether the dam is installed or not. This was confirmed by the flow visualization method showing upward flow near falling stream driven by the buoyancy force caused by air entrapment during liquid falling. However when LSN was installed between a ladle and a tundish there was a great change in flow pattern and a bypassing flow that existed in bare tundish was decreased with the use of dams. Especially, dead volume fraction was decreased with the increase of dam height.

  10. Noninvasive Characterization Of A Flowing Multiphase Fluid Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2005-05-10

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  11. Numerical modelling of structural controls on fluid flow and mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a set of numerical models focussing on structural controls on hydrothermal mineralization. We first give an overview of natural phenomena of structurally-controlled ore formation and the background theory and mechanisms for such controls. We then provide the results of a group of simple 2D numerical models validated through comparison with Cu-vein structure observed near the Shilu Copper deposit (Yangchun, Guangdong Province, China and finally a case study of 3D numerical modelling applied to the Hodgkinson Province in North Queensland (Australia. Two modelling approaches, discrete deformation modelling and continuum coupled deformation and fluid flow modelling, are involved. The 2D model-derived patterns are remarkably consistent with the Cu-vein structure from the Shilu Copper deposit, and show that both modelling approaches can realistically simulate the mechanical behaviours of shear and dilatant fractures. The continuum coupled deformation and fluid flow model indicates that pattern of the Cu-veins near the Shilu deposit is the result of shear strain localization, development of dilation and fluid focussing into the dilatant fracture segments. The 3D case-study models (with deformation and fluid flow coupling on the Hodgkinson Province generated a number of potential gold mineralization targets.

  12. Experimental Study of Fluid Flow in an Aneurysm for Varying Shape Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Paulo; Choi, Cyrus; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2014-11-01

    An aneurysm is an abnormal bulging of a blood vessel wall. A ruptured aneurysm can be severely debilitating or fatal. There is a lack of understanding of fluid flow parameters leading to aneurysm growth and rupture. Clinical studies have shown that certain aneurysm shape indices are strongly correlated to rupture. The overall goal of this study is to comprehensively characterize fluid dynamics parameters inside an aneurysm sac, for varying shape indices. As part of this work, two different idealized aneurysm glass models are used, and an in-house flow loop system has been developed to simulate constant and physiological pressure gradients. Index of refraction matching techniques have been used for accurate estimation of fluid flow parameters. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements are conducted for Reynolds number values from 10-200 to understand impact of inflow conditions on flow structures and parameters inside aneurysm sac. Particle Image Velocimetry measurements are performed on several horizontal and vertical planes inside aneurysm sac and show the presence of secondary fluid structures inside the sac, not observed in mid-plane measurements from earlier studies. The results show dependence of flow parameters/structures on aneurysm shape and inflow conditions. This work is supported through the California State University Northridge Research Fellowship Program 2013-14.

  13. Entropy Generation in Laminar Fluid Flow through a Circular Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rached Ben-Mansour

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A numerical solution to the entropy generation in a circular pipe is made. Radial and axial variations are considered. Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates are used to solve the velocity and temperature fields. Uniform wall heat flux is considered as the thermal boundary condition. The distribution of the entropy generation rate is investigated throughout the volume of the fluid as it flows through the pipe. Engine oil is selected as the working fluid. In addition, water and Freon are used in a parametric study. The total entropy generation rate is calculated by integration over the various cross-sections as well as over the entire volume.

  14. Flow of power-law fluids in simplex atomizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States); Jog, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)], E-mail: Milind.Jog@uc.edu; Xue, J.; Ibrahim, A.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper presents a computational analysis of flow of time-independent, purely-viscous, power-law fluids in simplex atomizers using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. Flow of shear-thinning (0.4 < n < 1), Newtonian (n = 1) and shear thickening fluids (1 < n < 1.2) has been considered. The effect of power-law index and atomizer geometry on the flow and atomizer performance has been investigated. Three geometry parameters have been considered, viz., the atomizer constant which is the ratio of inlet area to the product of swirl chamber diameter and the exit diameter, the ratio of swirl chamber diameter to exit orifice diameter, and the length-to-diameter ratio of the exit orifice. The dimensionless film thickness at exit, spray cone angle, and the discharge coefficient for different values power-law index as well as those with varying atomizer geometry are reported. The pressure drop across the atomizer has been kept constant in all simulations. A change in the power-law index significantly alters the flow field in the in the swirl chamber of the atomizer. The velocity magnitudes and liquid film thickness at the orifice exit change with the power-law index. With fixed atomizer geometry, the pseudoplastic fluids tend to produce thinner liquid sheet, larger spray cone angle, and have lower discharge coefficient compared to dilatant fluids. Changes in the atomizer geometry have a significant impact on the flow for all values of power-law index. The spray cone angle decreases and the discharge coefficient and the film thickness increase with increasing atomizer constant. With increasing D{sub s}/d{sub o}, the dimensionless film thickness at exit increases whereas the dimensional film thickness decreases monotonically. The discharge coefficient increases and the spray cone angle decreases with increasingD{sub s}/d{sub o}. The discharge coefficient, the spray cone angle, and the film thickness decrease with increasing l{sub o}/d{sub o}. A significant finding is that the

  15. High Definition Graphics Application In Fluid Flow Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Merritt, Fergus; Buning, Pieter; Watson, Val

    1987-06-01

    The Fluid Dynamics Division of the NASA Ames Research Center is using high definition (high spatial and color resolution) computer graphics to help visualize flow fields from computer simulations of air flow about vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. Computational solutions of the flow field are obtained from Cray supercomputers. These solutions are then transferred to Silicon Graphics Workstations for creation and interactive viewing of dynamic 3D displays of the flow fields. The scientist's viewing position in the 3D space can be interactively changed while the fluid flow is either frozen in time or moving in time. Specific animated sequences can be created for viewing on the workstation or for recording on video tape or 16mm movies with the aid of specialized software that permits easy editing and automatic "tweening" of the sequences. This paper will describe the software developed for creating the 3D flow field displays and for creating the animation sequences. It will also specify the hardware required to generate these displays, to record them on video tape, and to record them on 16mm film. A video tape will be shown to illustrate the capabilities of the hardware and software with examples.

  16. Divergence instability of pipes conveying fluid with uncertain flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Mehdi; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza; Goli, Sareh

    2018-02-01

    This article deals with investigation of probabilistic stability of pipes conveying fluid with stochastic flow velocity in time domain. As a matter of fact, this study has focused on the randomness effects of flow velocity on stability of pipes conveying fluid while most of research efforts have only focused on the influences of deterministic parameters on the system stability. The Euler-Bernoulli beam and plug flow theory are employed to model pipe structure and internal flow, respectively. In addition, flow velocity is considered as a stationary random process with Gaussian distribution. Afterwards, the stochastic averaging method and Routh's stability criterion are used so as to investigate the stability conditions of system. Consequently, the effects of boundary conditions, viscoelastic damping, mass ratio, and elastic foundation on the stability regions are discussed. Results delineate that the critical mean flow velocity decreases by increasing power spectral density (PSD) of the random velocity. Moreover, by increasing PSD from zero, the type effects of boundary condition and presence of elastic foundation are diminished, while the influences of viscoelastic damping and mass ratio could increase. Finally, to have a more applicable study, regression analysis is utilized to develop design equations and facilitate further analyses for design purposes.

  17. Shear-thinning of molecular fluids in Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Bharath V.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the Boltzmann equation, and continuum thermomechanics to investigate and characterize the shear-thinning behavior of molecular fluids undergoing Couette flow, interacting via a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. In particular, we study the shear-stress under steady-state conditions and its dependency on fluid density and applied shear-strain rate. Motivated by kinetic theory, we propose a rheological equation of state that fits observed system responses exceptionally well and captures the extreme shear-thinning effect. We notice that beyond a particular strain-rate threshold, the fluid exhibits shear-thinning, the degree of which is dependent on the density and temperature of the system. In addition, we obtain a shear-rate dependent model for the viscosity which matches the well established Cross viscosity model. We demonstrate how this model arises naturally from the Boltzmann equation and possesses an inherent scaling parameter that unifies the rheological properties of the LJ fluid. We compare our model with those in the literature. Finally, we formulate a dissipation function modeling the LJ fluid as a quasilinear fluid.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...... estimation and spectral estimates is presented. The variation of the blood flow angle and the effect on the velocity estimate is investigated. The right common carotid arteries of three healthy volunteers were scanned. Real-time spectral and vector flow data were obtained simultaneously from one range gate...

  19. Comparative study of Nusselt number for a single phase fluid flow using plate heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugam Rajasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the plate heat exchangers are used for various applications in the industries for heat exchange process such as heating, cooling and condensation. The performance of plate heat exchanger depends on many factors such as flow arrangements, plate design, chevron angle, enlargement factor, type of fluid used, etc. The various Nusselt number correlations are developed by considering that the water as a working fluid. The main objective of the present work is to design the experimental set-up for a single phase fluid flow using plate heat exchanger and studied the heat transfer performance. The experiments are carried out for various Reynolds number between 500 and 2200, the heat transfer coefficients are estimated. Based on the experimental results the new correlation is developed for Nusselt number and compared with an existing correlation.

  20. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  1. Investigation of particle lateral migration in sample-sheath flow of viscoelastic fluid and Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dan; Zhang, Jun; Yan, Sheng; Peng, Gangrou; Zhao, Qianbin; Alici, Gursel; Du, Hejun; Li, Weihua

    2016-08-01

    In this work, particle lateral migration in sample-sheath flow of viscoelastic fluid and Newtonian fluid was experimentally investigated. The 4.8-μm micro-particles were dispersed in a polyethylene oxide (PEO) viscoelastic solution, and then the solution was injected into a straight rectangular channel with a deionised (DI) water Newtonian sheath flow. Micro-particles suspended in PEO solution migrated laterally to a DI water stream, but migration in the opposite direction from a DI water stream to a PEO solution stream or from one DI water stream to another DI water stream could not be achieved. The lateral migration of particles depends on the viscoelastic properties of the sample fluids. Furthermore, the effects of channel length, flow rate, and PEO concentration were studied. By using viscoelastic sample flow and Newtonian sheath flow, a selective particle lateral migration can be achieved in a simple straight channel, without any external force fields. This particle lateral migration technique could be potentially used in solution exchange fields such as automated cell staining and washing in microfluidic platforms, and holds numerous biomedical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Coupling two-phase fluid flow with two-phase darcy flow in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, J.

    2014-06-03

    This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow. 2014 Jie Chen et al.

  3. Coupling Two-Phase Fluid Flow with Two-Phase Darcy Flow in Anisotropic Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow.

  4. Blood viscosity monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass based on pressure-flow characteristics of a Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahara, Shigeyuki; Zu Soh; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro; Tsuji, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a blood viscosity estimation method based on pressure-flow characteristics of oxygenators used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a previous study that showed the estimated viscosity to correlate well with the measured viscosity. However, the determination of the parameters included in the method required the use of blood, thereby leading to high cost of calibration. Therefore, in this study we propose a new method to monitor blood viscosity, which approximates the pressure-flow characteristics of blood considered as a non-Newtonian fluid with characteristics of a Newtonian fluid by using the parameters derived from glycerin solution to enable ease of acquisition. Because parameters used in the estimation method are based on fluid types, bovine blood parameters were used to calculate estimated viscosity (ηe), and glycerin parameters were used to estimate deemed viscosity (ηdeem). Three samples of whole bovine blood with different hematocrit levels (21.8%, 31.0%, and 39.8%) were prepared and perfused into the oxygenator. As the temperature changed from 37 °C to 27 °C, the oxygenator mean inlet pressure and outlet pressure were recorded for flows of 2 L/min and 4 L/min, and the viscosity was estimated. The value of deemed viscosity calculated with the glycerin parameters was lower than estimated viscosity calculated with bovine blood parameters by 20-33% at 21.8% hematocrit, 12-27% at 31.0% hematocrit, and 10-15% at 39.8% hematocrit. Furthermore, deemed viscosity was lower than estimated viscosity by 10-30% at 2 L/min and 30-40% at 4 L/min. Nevertheless, estimated and deemed viscosities varied with a similar slope. Therefore, this shows that deemed viscosity achieved using glycerin parameters may be capable of successfully monitoring relative viscosity changes of blood in a perfusing oxygenator.

  5. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  6. Calculation of periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    Analytic theory of disturbances generated by an oscillating compact source in a viscous continuously stratified fluid was constructed. Exact solution of the internal waves generation problem was constructed taking into account diffusivity effects. This analysis is based on set of fundamental equations of incompressible flows. The linearized problem of periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid, generated by an oscillating part of the inclined plane was solved by methods of singular perturbation theory. A rectangular or disc placed on a sloping plane and oscillating linearly in an arbitrary direction was selected as a source of disturbances. The solutions include regularly perturbed on dissipative component functions describing internal waves and a family of singularly perturbed functions. One of the functions from the singular components family has an analogue in a homogeneous fluid that is a periodic or Stokes' flow. Its thickness is defined by a universal micro scale depending on kinematics viscosity coefficient and a buoyancy frequency with a factor depending on the wave slope. Other singular perturbed functions are specific for stratified flows. Their thickness are defined the diffusion coefficient, kinematic viscosity and additional factor depending on geometry of the problem. Fields of fluid density, velocity, vorticity, pressure, energy density and flux as well as forces acting on the source are calculated for different types of the sources. It is shown that most effective source of waves is the bi-piston. Complete 3D problem is transformed in various limiting cases that are into 2D problem for source in stratified or homogeneous fluid and the Stokes problem for an oscillating infinite plane. The case of the "critical" angle that is equality of the emitting surface and the wave cone slope angles needs in separate investigations. In this case, the number of singular component is saved. Patterns of velocity and density fields were constructed and

  7. Mixed convective flow of immiscible viscous fluids confined between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    A note on free convection along a vertical wavy surface in a porous medium, ASME J. Heat. Transfer, Vol. 116, pp. 505-508. Selvarajan, S., Tulapurkara, E.G. and Ram, V.V., 1998. A numerical study of flow through wavy-walled channels, J. Numer. Meth. Fluids, Vol. 26, pp. 519-531. Umavathi, J.C., Abdul Mateen, Chamkha, ...

  8. Assessment of fluid distribution and flow properties in two phase fluid flow using X-ray CT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Wu, Bohao; Li, Xingbo; Wang, Sijia; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xinhuan; Zhang, Yi

    2017-11-01

    To study on microscale distribution of CO2 and brine during two-phase flow is crucial for understanding the trapping mechanisms of CO2 storage. In this study, CO2-brine flow experiments in porous media were conducted using X-ray computed tomography. The porous media were packed with glass beads. The pore structure (porosity/tortuosity) and flow properties at different flow rates and flow fractions were investigated. The results showed that porosity of the packed beads differed at different position as a result of heterogeneity. The CO2 saturation is higher at low injection flow rates and high CO2 fractions. CO2 distribution at the pore scale was also visualized. ∅ Porosity of porous media CT brine_sat grey value of sample saturated with brine CT dry grey value of sample saturated with air CT brine grey value of pure brine CT air grey value of pure air CT flow grey values of sample with two fluids occupying the pore space {CT}_{CO_2_ sat} grey value of sample saturated with CO2 {f}_{CO_2}({S}_{CO_2}) CO2 fraction {q}_{CO_2} the volume flow rate for CO2 q brine the volume flow rate for brine L Thickness of the porous media, mm L e a bundle of capillaries of equal length, mm τ Tortuosity, calculated from L e / L.

  9. The effect of magnetohydrodynamic nano fluid flow through porous cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Basuki; Arif, Didik Khusnul; Aryany, Deviana; Asiyah, Nur; Widjajati, Farida Agustini; Kamiran

    2017-08-01

    This paper concerns about the analysis of the effect of magnetohydrodynamic nano fluid flow through horizontal porous cylinder on steady and incompressible condition. Fluid flow is assumed opposite gravity and induced by magnet field. Porous cylinder is assumed had the same depth of porous and was not absorptive. The First thing to do in this research is to build the model of fluid flow to obtain dimentional governing equations. The dimentional governing equations are consist of continuity equation, momentum equation, and energy equation. Furthermore, the dimensional governing equations are converted to non-dimensional governing equation by using non-dimensional parameters and variables. Then, the non-dimensional governing equations are transformed into similarity equations using stream function and solved using Keller-Box method. The result of numerical solution further is obtained by taking variation of magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, porosity parameter, and volume fraction. The numerical results show that velocity profiles increase and temperature profiles decrease when both of the magnetic and the porosity parameter increase. However, the velocity profiles decrease and the temperature profiles increase when both of the magnetic and the porosity parameter increase.

  10. Partitioned fluid-solid coupling for cardiovascular blood flow: left-ventricular fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittian, Sebastian; Janoske, Uwe; Oertel, Herbert; Böhlke, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We present a 3D code-coupling approach which has been specialized towards cardiovascular blood flow. For the first time, the prescribed geometry movement of the cardiovascular flow model KaHMo (Karlsruhe Heart Model) has been replaced by a myocardial composite model. Deformation is driven by fluid forces and myocardial response, i.e., both its contractile and constitutive behavior. Whereas the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) of the Navier-Stokes equations is discretized by finite volumes (FVM), the solid mechanical finite elasticity equations are discretized by a finite element (FEM) approach. Taking advantage of specialized numerical solution strategies for non-matching fluid and solid domain meshes, an iterative data-exchange guarantees the interface equilibrium of the underlying governing equations. The focus of this work is on left-ventricular fluid-structure interaction based on patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging datasets. Multi-physical phenomena are described by temporal visualization and characteristic FSI numbers. The results gained show flow patterns that are in good agreement with previous observations. A deeper understanding of cavity deformation, blood flow, and their vital interaction can help to improve surgical treatment and clinical therapy planning.

  11. Experimental and modeling hydraulic studies of foam drilling fluid flowing through vertical smooth pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Saxena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foam has emerged as an efficient drilling fluid for the drilling of low pressure, fractured and matured reservoirs because of its the ability to reduce formation damage, fluid loss, differential sticking etc. However the compressible nature along with its complicated rheology has made its implementation a multifaceted task. Knowledge of the hydrodynamic behavior of drilling fluid within the borehole is the key behind successful implementation of drilling job. However, little effort has been made to develop the hydrodynamic models for the foam flowing with cuttings through pipes of variable diameter. In the present study, hydrodynamics of the foam fluid was investigated through the vertical smooth pipes of different pipe diameters, with variable foam properties in a flow loop system. Effect of cutting loading on pressure drop was also studied. Thus, the present investigation estimates the differential pressure loss across the pipe. The flow loop permits foam flow through 25.4 mm, 38.1 mm and 50.8 mm diameter pipes. The smaller diameter pipes are used to replicate the annular spaces between the drill string and wellbore. The developed model determines the pressure loss along the pipe and the results are compared with a number of existing models. The developed model is able to predict the experimental results more accurately.

  12. On Laminar Flow of Non-Newtonian Fluids in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Fayed, Hassan E.

    2015-10-20

    Flow of generalized Newtonian fluids in porous media can be modeled as a bundle of capillary tubes or a pore-scale network. In general, both approaches rely on the solution of Hagen–Poiseuille equation using power law to estimate the variations in the fluid viscosity due to the applied shear rate. Despite the effectiveness and simplicity, power law tends to provide unrealistic values for the effective viscosity especially in the limits of zero and infinite shear rates. Here, instead of using power law, Carreau model (bubbles, drops, and particles in non-Newtonian fluids. Taylor & Francis Group, New York, 2007) is used to determine the effective viscosity as a function of the shear strain rate. Carreau model can predict accurately the variation in the viscosity at all shear rates and provide more accurate solution for the flow physics in a single pore. Using the results for a single pore, normalized Fanning friction coefficient has been calculated and plotted as a function of the newly defined Reynolds number based on pressure gradient. For laminar flow, the variation in the friction coefficient with Reynolds number has been plotted and scaled. It is observed that generalized Newtonian fluid flows show Newtonian nature up to a certain Reynolds number. At high Reynolds number, deviation from the Newtonian behavior is observed. The main contribution of this paper is to present a closed-form solution for the flow in a single pore using Carreau model, which allows for fast evaluation of the relationship between flux and pressure gradient in an arbitrary pore diameter. In this way, we believe that our development will open the perspectives for using Carreau models in pore-network simulations at low computational costs to obtain more accurate prediction for generalized Newtonian fluid flows in porous media.

  13. Turbulent characteristics of shear-thinning fluids in recirculating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, A.S. [Inst. Superior de Engenharia do Porto (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2000-03-01

    A miniaturised fibre optic laser-Doppler anemometer was used to carry out a detailed hydrodynamic investigation of the flow downstream of a sudden expansion with 0.1-0.2% by weight shear-thinning aqueous solutions of xanthan gum. Upstream of the sudden expansion the pipe flow was fully-developed and the xanthan gum solutions exhibited drag reduction with corresponding lower radial and tangential normal Reynolds stresses, but higher axial Reynolds stress near the wall and a flatter axial mean velocity profile in comparison with Newtonian flow. The recirculation bubble length was reduced by more than 20% relative to the high Reynolds number Newtonian flow, and this was attributed to the occurrence further upstream of high turbulence for the non-Newtonian solutions, because of advection of turbulence and earlier high turbulence production in the shear layer. Comparisons with the measurements of Escudier and Smith (1999) with similar fluids emphasized the dominating role of inlet turbulence. The present was less anisotropic, and had lower maximum axial Reynolds stresses (by 16%) but higher radial turbulence (20%) than theirs. They reported considerably longer recirculating bubble lengths than we do for similar non-Newtonian fluids and Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  14. Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Microbots in Complex Fluid Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Campo-Deaño

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of microbots in biomedicine is a powerful tool that has been an object of study in the last few years. In the special case of using these microdevices in the human circulatory system to remove clots or to deliver drugs, the complex nature of blood flow must be taken into account for their proper design. The dynamic performance, defined in this context as the quantification of the disturbance of the flow around an object (which is essentially dependent on the microbot morphology and the rheological characteristics of the fluid should be improved in order to diminish the damage inside the patient body and to increase the efficiency when they swim through the main veins or arteries. In this article, different experimental techniques (micro-Particle Image Velocimetry, flow visualization, pressure drop measurements, etc. are analyzed to assess their dynamic performance when they swim through the human body immersed in complex fluid flows. This article provides a useful guide for the characterization of the dynamic performance of microbots and also highlights the necessity to consider the viscoelastic character of blood in their design.

  15. Fluid mechanics relevant to flow through pretreatment of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault-Léger, Véronique; Lynd, Lee R

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigates fluid mechanical properties of cellulosic feedstocks relevant to flow through (FT) pretreatment for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass. The results inform identifying conditions for which FT pretreatment can be implemented in a practical context. Measurements of pressure drop across packed beds, viscous compaction and water absorption are reported for milled and not milled sugarcane bagasse, switchgrass and poplar, and important factors impacting viscous flow are deduced. Using biomass knife-milled to pass through a 2mm sieve, the observed pressure drop was highest for bagasse, intermediate for switchgrass and lowest for poplar. The highest pressure drop was associated with the presence of more fine particles, greater viscous compaction and the degree of water absorption. Using bagasse without particle size reduction, the instability of the reactor during pretreatment above 140kg/m(3) sets an upper bound on the allowable concentration for continuous stable flow. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Predicting Fluid Flow in Stressed Fractures: A Quantitative Evaluation of Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihmann, S. A.; Healy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable estimation of fracture stability in the subsurface is crucial to the success of exploration and production in the petroleum industry, and also for wider applications to earthquake mechanics, hydrogeology and waste disposal. Previous work suggests that fracture stability is related to fluid flow in crystalline basement rocks through shear or tensile instabilities of fractures. Our preliminary scoping analysis compares the fracture stability of 60 partly open (apertures 1.5-3 cm) and electrically conductive (low acoustic amplitudes relative to matrix) fractures from a 16 m section of a producing zone in a basement well in Bayoot field, Yemen, to a non-producing zone in the same well (also 16 m). We determine the Critically Stressed Fractures (CSF; Barton et al., 1995) and dilatation tendency (Td; Ferrill et al., 1999). We find that: 1. CSF (Fig. 1) is a poor predictor of high fluid flow in the inflow zone; 88% of the fractures are predicted to be NOT critically stressed and yet they all occur within a zone of high fluid flow rate 2. Td (Fig. 2) is also a poor predictor of high fluid flow in the inflow zone; 67% of the fractures have a LOW Td(mud or a lower density and electrically conductive fill such as clay in the producing zone and therefore appear (partly) open. In situ stress, fluid pressure, rock properties (friction, strength) and fracture orientation data used as inputs for the CSF and Td calculations are all subject to uncertainty. Our results suggest that scope exists to systematically quantify and explore the impacts of these uncertainties for better predictions of geomechanical stability and fluid conductivity in the subsurface.

  17. Visualization periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakov, R.; Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    To visualize the flow pattern of viscous continuously stratified fluid both experimental and computational methods were developed. Computational procedures were based on exact solutions of set of the fundamental equations. Solutions of the problems of flows producing by periodically oscillating disk (linear and torsion oscillations) were visualized with a high resolutions to distinguish small-scale the singular components on the background of strong internal waves. Numerical algorithm of visualization allows to represent both the scalar and vector fields, such as velocity, density, pressure, vorticity, stream function. The size of the source, buoyancy and oscillation frequency, kinematic viscosity of the medium effects were traced in 2D an 3D posing problems. Precision schlieren instrument was used to visualize the flow pattern produced by linear and torsion oscillations of strip and disk in a continuously stratified fluid. Uniform stratification was created by the continuous displacement method. The buoyancy period ranged from 7.5 to 14 s. In the experiments disks with diameters from 9 to 30 cm and a thickness of 1 mm to 10 mm were used. Different schlieren methods that are conventional vertical slit - Foucault knife, vertical slit - filament (Maksoutov's method) and horizontal slit - horizontal grating (natural "rainbow" schlieren method) help to produce supplementing flow patterns. Both internal wave beams and fine flow components were visualized in vicinity and far from the source. Intensity of high gradient envelopes increased proportionally the amplitude of the source. In domains of envelopes convergence isolated small scale vortices and extended mushroom like jets were formed. Experiments have shown that in the case of torsion oscillations pattern of currents is more complicated than in case of forced linear oscillations. Comparison with known theoretical model shows that nonlinear interactions between the regular and singular flow components must be taken

  18. Microscopic and continuum descriptions of Janus motor fluid flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Active media, whose constituents are able to move autonomously, display novel features that differ from those of equilibrium systems. In addition to naturally occurring active systems such as populations of swimming bacteria, active systems of synthetic self-propelled nanomotors have been developed. These synthetic systems are interesting because of their potential applications in a variety of fields. Janus particles, synthetic motors of spherical geometry with one hemisphere that catalyses the conversion of fuel to product and one non-catalytic hemisphere, can propel themselves in solution by self-diffusiophoresis. In this mechanism, the concentration gradient generated by the asymmetric catalytic activity leads to a force on the motor that induces fluid flows in the surrounding medium. These fluid flows are studied in detail through microscopic simulations of Janus motor motion and continuum theory. It is shown that continuum theory is able to capture many, but not all, features of the dynamics of the Janus motor and the velocity fields of the fluid. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling at the physics–chemistry–biology interface’. PMID:27698037

  19. Microscopic and continuum descriptions of Janus motor fluid flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang Yik; Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Active media, whose constituents are able to move autonomously, display novel features that differ from those of equilibrium systems. In addition to naturally occurring active systems such as populations of swimming bacteria, active systems of synthetic self-propelled nanomotors have been developed. These synthetic systems are interesting because of their potential applications in a variety of fields. Janus particles, synthetic motors of spherical geometry with one hemisphere that catalyses the conversion of fuel to product and one non-catalytic hemisphere, can propel themselves in solution by self-diffusiophoresis. In this mechanism, the concentration gradient generated by the asymmetric catalytic activity leads to a force on the motor that induces fluid flows in the surrounding medium. These fluid flows are studied in detail through microscopic simulations of Janus motor motion and continuum theory. It is shown that continuum theory is able to capture many, but not all, features of the dynamics of the Janus motor and the velocity fields of the fluid. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  20. Estimation of Porous Medium Tortuosity Directly from Flow Path Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakalapati, Suryanarayana; Celik, Ismail

    2013-11-01

    A thorough understanding of transport processes inside porous materials is vital for improving the efficiency of energy devices such as fuel cells and batteries. Continuum simulations of porous media make use of parameters such as porosity and tortuosity to account for the influence of the actual pore geometry and orientation on the transport processes. In most studies the tortuosity is treated as an adjustable parameter which is calibrated to match the predictions with the experiments. In this study a direct method is utilized to estimate the tortuosity of a porous medium. The actual geometry of a fuel cell electrode is obtained from an experimental study where the porous structure is reconstructed from slice images. The detailed geometry of porous medium is used to simulate fully resolved fluid flow through the pores. Stream lines are then generated which show the actual paths taken by the fluid flowing through the porous medium. The lengths of these path lines are then used to calculate the tortuosity of the porous medium by employing the actual definition of the tortuosity. It is shown that the tortuosities obtained in this way are smaller than the typical values reported in literature.

  1. Dynamical systems characterization of inertial effects of fluid flow in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggiero, Michael; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine inertial effects in a 180-degree model of curved arteries under pulsatile inflow conditions. Two-component, two-dimensional particle image velocimetery (2C-2D PIV) data were acquired upstream of and at several cross-sectional locations in the curved artery model. A blood-analog fluid comprised of 71% saturated sodium iodide solution, 28% glycerol and 1% distilled water (by volume) was subjected to multi-harmonic pulsatile inflow functions. First, signal time-lag was quantified by cross-correlating the input (voltage-time) supplied to a programmable pump and the output PIV (flow rate-time) measurements. The experiment was then treated as a linear, time-invariant system, and frequency response was estimated for phase shifts across a certain spectrum. Input-output signal dissimilarities were attributable to intrinsic inertial effects of flow. By coupling pressure-time and upstream flow rate-time measurements, the experiment was modeled using system identification methods. Results elucidate the role of inertial effects in fluid flow velocity measurements and the effect of these delays on secondary flow structure detection in a curved artery model. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  2. Study on flow parameters of fractal porous media in the high-velocity fluid flow regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Mei; Xu, Hui; Yang, Chao; Qu, Tailai; Kong, lingxiao; Wu, Shucheng; Zeng, Baoquan; Xu, Haixia

    2017-12-01

    High-velocity fluid flow, which will result in the region of the wellbore or fracture, is generally in the turbulent flow regime and has drawn tremendous attention in petroleum engineering field. Turbulent factor is the key parameter, which is widely used to describe high-velocity flow in porous media. In this work, a theoretical model for turbulent factor in fractal porous media in the high-velocity fluid flow regime is developed. Moreover, a novel analytical expression for the permeability in porous media based on Wu's resistance model is also derived. Then, the analytical Kozeny-Carman constant with no empirical constant is obtained. The predictions of permeability-porosity relation by the current mathematical models have been validated by comparing with available experimental data. Furthermore, the effects of structural parameters of porous media on the curve of velocity and pressure drop are discussed in detail.

  3. A Numerical Study of Mesh Adaptivity in Multiphase Flows with Non-Newtonian Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, James; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Alberini, Federico; Simmons, Mark; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    We present an investigation into the computational efficiency benefits of dynamic mesh adaptivity in the numerical simulation of transient multiphase fluid flow problems involving Non-Newtonian fluids. Such fluids appear in a range of industrial applications, from printing inks to toothpastes and introduce new challenges for mesh adaptivity due to the additional ``memory'' of viscoelastic fluids. Nevertheless, the multiscale nature of these flows implies huge potential benefits for a successful implementation. The study is performed using the open source package Fluidity, which couples an unstructured mesh control volume finite element solver for the multiphase Navier-Stokes equations to a dynamic anisotropic mesh adaptivity algorithm, based on estimated solution interpolation error criteria, and conservative mesh-to-mesh interpolation routine. The code is applied to problems involving rheologies ranging from simple Newtonian to shear-thinning to viscoelastic materials and verified against experimental data for various industrial and microfluidic flows. This work was undertaken as part of the EPSRC MEMPHIS programme grant EP/K003976/1.

  4. Characterization of fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.D.

    1981-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a four month study of the characteristics of multiphase flow in naturally fractured porous media. An assessment and evaluation of the literature was carried out and a comprehensive list of references compiled on the subject. Mathematical models presented in the various references cited were evaluated along with the stated assumptions or those inherent in the equations. Particular attention was focused upon identifying unique approaches which would lead to the formulation of a general mathematical model of multiphase/multi-component flow in fractured porous media. A model is presented which may be used to more accurately predict the movement of multi-phase fluids through such type formations. Equations of motion are derived for a multiphase/multicomponent fluid which is flowing through a double porosity, double permeability medium consisting of isotropic primary rock matrix blocks and an anisotropic fracture matrix system. The fractures are assumed to have a general statistical distribution in space and orientation. A general distribution function, called the fracture matrix function is introduced to represent the statistical nature of the fractures.

  5. Magnetized Fluid Flow in an Earth-like Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. M.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    We present experimental studies of the turbulent flow of a conducting fluid in a spherical shear flow in the presence of a magnetic field. Our experimental apparatus uses sodium as the working fluid, and both the inner and outer spheres can be rotated independently. An axial magnetic field of varying strength can be applied to the experiment, and magnetic field measurements are used to extract information about the global flow within the device. In addition, we measure the torque required to drive the inner and outer spheres at their respective rotation rates. The geometry of the experiment makes these studies applicable to geophysical and astrophysical bodies. With the inner sphere rotating faster than the outer sphere, we observe enhanced angular momentum transport from the inner to the outer sphere as the applied magnetic field is increased. In a previous experiment of the same geometry, enhanced angular momentum transport was observed with a stationary outer sphere.[1] In this case the source of enhanced transport was identified as the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Results for the case of rotating outer sphere also indicate the possible presence of the MRI with independently rotating spheres, which is relevant to recent theoretical work indicating a possible connection between geomagnetic jerks and the MRI in Earth’s core.[2] [1] Sisan, et. al., PRL, 2004. [2] Petitdemange, et. al., GRL, 2008.

  6. Flow of viscous fluid along an exponentially stretching curved surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Okechi

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the boundary layer analysis of flow induced by rapidly stretching curved surface with exponential velocity. The governing boundary value problem is reduced into self-similar form using a new similarity transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically using shooting and Runge-Kutta methods. The numerical results depicts that the fluid velocity as well as the skin friction coefficient increases with the surface curvature, similar trend is also observed for the pressure. The dimensionless wall shear stress defined for this problem is greater than that of a linearly stretching curved surface, but becomes comparably less for a surface stretching with a power-law velocity. In addition, the result for the plane surface is a special case of this study when the radius of curvature of the surface is sufficiently large. The numerical investigations presented in terms of the graphs are interpreted with the help of underlying physics of the fluid flow and the consequences arising from the curved geometry. Keywords: Boundary layer flow, Curved surface, Exponential stretching, Curvature

  7. Fluid flow and permeabilities in basement fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinsworth, Allan; Koehn, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Fault zones are important sites for crustal fluid flow, specifically where they cross-cut low permeability host rocks such as granites and gneisses. Fluids migrating through fault zones can cause rheology changes, mineral precipitation and pore space closure, and may alter the physical and chemical properties of the host rock and deformation products. It is therefore essential to consider the evolution of permeability in fault zones at a range of pressure-temperature conditions to understand fluid migration throughout a fault's history, and how fluid-rock interaction modifies permeability and rheological characteristics. Field localities in the Rwenzori Mountains, western Uganda and the Outer Hebrides, north-west Scotland, have been selected for field work and sample collection. Here Archaean-age TTG gneisses have been faulted within the upper 15km of the crust and have experienced fluid ingress. The Rwenzori Mountains are an anomalously uplifted horst-block located in a transfer zone in the western rift of the East African Rift System. The north-western ridge is characterised by a tectonically simple western flank, where the partially mineralised Bwamba Fault has detached from the Congo craton. Mineralisation is associated with hydrothermal fluids heated by a thermal body beneath the Semliki rift, and has resulted in substantial iron oxide precipitation within porous cataclasites. Non-mineralised faults further north contain foliated gouges and show evidence of leaking fluids. These faults serve as an analogue for faults associated with the Lake Albert oil and gas prospects. The Outer Hebrides Fault Zone (OHFZ) was largely active during the Caledonian Orogeny (ca. 430-400 Ma) at a deeper crustal level than the Ugandan rift faults. Initial dry conditions were followed by fluid ingress during deformation that controlled its rheological behaviour. The transition also altered the existing permeability. The OHFZ is a natural laboratory in which to study brittle fault

  8. Fluid flow device, comprising a valve unit, as well as method of manufacturing the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lötters, Joost Conrad; Groen, Maarten; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; Meutstege, E.

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a fluid flow device (1), comprising a system chip (11) having a substrate (12), a flow channel (21) defined within said substrate, and a sensor unit (41) connected to said flow channel for determining a property of a fluid in said flow channel. Furthermore, a valve unit (30)

  9. Simulation of fluid, heat transport to estimate desert stream infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, J.T.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In semiarid regions, the contribution of infiltration from intermittent streamflow to ground water recharge may be quantified by comparing simulations of fluid and heat transport beneath stream channels to observed ground temperatures. In addition to quantifying natural recharge, streamflow infiltration estimates provide a means to characterize the physical properties of stream channel sediments and to identify suitable locations for artificial recharge sites. Rates of winter streamflow infiltration along stream channels are estimated based on the cooling effect of infiltrated water on streambed sediments, combined with the simulation of two-dimensional fluid and heat transport using the computer program VS2DH. The cooling effect of ground water is determined by measuring ground temperatures at regular intervals beneath stream channels and nearby channel banks in order to calculate temperature-depth profiles. Additional data inputs included the physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of unsaturated alluvium, and monthly ground temperatures measurements over an annual cycle. Observed temperatures and simulation results can provide estimates of the minimum threshold for deep infiltration, the variability of infiltration along stream channels, and also the frequency of infiltration events.

  10. Manipulation and confinement of single particles using fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyeri, Melikhan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-06-12

    High precision control of micro- and nanoscale objects in aqueous media is an essential technology for nanoscience and engineering. Existing methods for particle trapping primarily depend on optical, magnetic, electrokinetic, and acoustic fields. In this work, we report a new hydrodynamic flow based approach that allows for fine-scale manipulation and positioning of single micro- and nanoscale particles using automated fluid flow. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate trapping and two-dimensional (2D) manipulation of 500 nm and 2.2 μm diameter particles with a positioning precision as small as 180 nm during confinement. By adjusting a single flow parameter, we further show that the shape of the effective trap potential can be efficiently controlled. Finally, we demonstrate two distinct features of the flow-based trapping method, including isolation of a single particle from a crowded particle solution and active control over the surrounding medium of a trapped object. The 2D flow-based trapping method described here further expands the micro/nanomanipulation toolbox for small particles and holds strong promise for applications in biology, chemistry, and materials research.

  11. Mechanics of fluid flow over compliant wrinkled polymeric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raayai, Shabnam; McKinley, Gareth; Boyce, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Skin friction coefficients (based on frontal area) of sharks and dolphins are lower than birds, fish and swimming beetles. By either exploiting flow-induced changes in their flexible skin or microscale textures, dolphins and sharks can change the structure of the fluid flow around them and thus reduce viscous drag forces on their bodies. Inspired by this ability, investigators have tried using compliant walls and riblet-like textures as drag reduction methods in aircraft and marine industries and have been able to achieve reductions up to 19%. Here we investigate flow-structure interaction and wrinkling of soft polymer surfaces that can emulate shark riblets and dolphin's flexible skin. Wrinkling arises spontaneously as the result of mismatched deformation of a thin stiff coating bound to a thick soft elastic substrate. Wrinkles can be fabricated by controlling the ratio of the stiffness of the coating and substrate, the applied displacement and the thickness of the coating. In this work we will examine the evolution in the kinematic structures associated with steady viscous flow over the polymer wrinkled surfaces and in particular compare the skin friction with corresponding results for flow over non-textured and rigid surfaces.

  12. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fourier-Bessel theory on flow acoustics in inviscid shear pipeline fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-11-01

    Flow acoustics in pipeline is of considerable interest in both industrial application and scientific research. While well-known analytical solutions exist for stationary and uniform mean flow, only numerical solutions exist for shear mean flow. Based on potential theory, a general mathematical formulation of flow acoustics in inviscid fluid with shear mean flow is deduced, resulting in a set of two second-order differential equations. According to Fourier-Bessel theory which is orthogonal and complete in Lebesgue Space, a solution is proposed to transform the differential equations to linear homogeneous algebraic equations. Consequently, the axial wave number is numerically calculated due to the existence condition of non-trivial solution to homogeneous linear algebraic equations, leading to the vanishment of the corresponding determinant. Based on the proposed method, wave propagation in laminar and turbulent flow is numerically analyzed.

  14. Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Rossel, Scott M. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2004-06-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

  15. Predicting Fluid Flow in Gas-Stirred Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb Roy, T.; Majumdar, A. K.

    1981-11-01

    Performance of many metallurgical operations where gas bubbles are injected into liquid baths, e.g., ladle degassing and desulfurization, is related to the level of bath circulation and agitation. This paper describes a method of calculating velocity fields and turbulence levels in these systems. The roles played by such factors as bubble size and volume of the two-phase gas/liquid region in determining the velocity field are examined. The applicability of fluid-flow calculations in preventing refractory failures is discussed.

  16. Heat transfer and fluid flow in nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fenech, Henri

    1982-01-01

    Heat Transfer and Fluid in Flow Nuclear Systems discusses topics that bridge the gap between the fundamental principles and the designed practices. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover analysis of the predicting thermal-hydraulics performance of large nuclear reactors and associated heat-exchangers or steam generators of various nuclear systems. Chapter 1 tackles the general considerations on thermal design and performance requirements of nuclear reactor cores. The second chapter deals with pressurized subcooled light water systems, and the third chapter covers boiling water reacto

  17. Fast Virtual Fractional Flow Reserve Based Upon Steady-State Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Morris, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional flow reserve (FFR-guided percutaneous intervention is superior to standard assessment but remains underused. The authors have developed a novel “pseudotransient” analysis protocol for computing virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR based upon angiographic images and steady-state computational fluid dynamics. This protocol generates vFFR results in 189 s (cf >24 h for transient analysis using a desktop PC, with <1% error relative to that of full-transient computational fluid dynamics analysis. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that physiological lesion significance was influenced less by coronary or lesion anatomy (33% and more by microvascular physiology (59%. If coronary microvascular resistance can be estimated, vFFR can be accurately computed in less time than it takes to make invasive measurements.

  18. Numerical modelling of thermal and fluid flow phenomena in the mould channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sowa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a mathematical and a numerical model of the solidification of a cylindrical slender shaped casting, which take into account the process of filling the mould cavity with molten metal, has been proposed. Pressure and velocity fields were obtained by solving the momentum equations and the continuity equation, while the thermal fields were obtained by solving the heat conduction equation containing the convection term. Next, the numerical analysis of the solidification process of metals alloy in a cylindrical mould channel has been made. In the model one takes into account interdependence the heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena. Coupling of the thermal and fluid flow phenomena has been taken into consideration by the changes of the fluidity function and thermophysical parameters of alloy with respect to the temperature. The influence of the pressure and the temperature of metal pouring on the solid phase growth kinetics were estimated. The problem has been solved by the finite element method.

  19. CFD evaluation of added damping due to fluid flow over a hydroelectric turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, J. P.; Giroux, A. M.; Etienne, S.; Gosselin, F. P.

    2016-11-01

    To estimate structural fatigue, vibrational response to realistic spectrum of excitations and associated equivalent damping are of paramount importance. In this paper, an approach to quantify flow-induced damping of a relatively heavy fluid on a vibrating hydraulic turbine blade using numerical simulations is presented. First, mode shapes and frequencies of the immersed structure are obtained by modal analysis using the finite element method. Then, forced oscillatory modal motion is prescribed on the structural boundary of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow simulations. Damping is finally computed as the normalized work done by the resulting fluid load on the structure. Validation is achieved by comparing the numerical results with available experimental data for a steel hydrofoil oscillating in flowing water. For this case, the linear increase in the damping ratio with the flow velocity is reproduced within 10% of the experimental values. Application of the method to an actual hydroelectric propeller turbine blade yields a fluid damping value of around 15% of critical damping for its first vibration mode.

  20. Fluid flow regulator device, comprising a valve member and a valve seat defining a fluid flow surface area, as well as method of using the same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Maarten; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a fluid flow regulator device, comprising a valve member and a valve seat arranged to be movable with respect to each other such that a fluid flow surface area defined by the valve member and the valve seat can be changed. Furthermore, sensor means are provided for measuring

  1. Generating Inviscid and Viscous Fluid Flow Simulations over a Surface Using a Quasi-simultaneous Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdza, Peter (Inventor); Martins-Rivas, Herve (Inventor); Suzuki, Yoshifumi (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid-flow simulation over a computer-generated surface is generated using a quasi-simultaneous technique. The simulation includes a fluid-flow mesh of inviscid and boundary-layer fluid cells. An initial fluid property for an inviscid fluid cell is determined using an inviscid fluid simulation that does not simulate fluid viscous effects. An initial boundary-layer fluid property a boundary-layer fluid cell is determined using the initial fluid property and a viscous fluid simulation that simulates fluid viscous effects. An updated boundary-layer fluid property is determined for the boundary-layer fluid cell using the initial fluid property, initial boundary-layer fluid property, and an interaction law. The interaction law approximates the inviscid fluid simulation using a matrix of aerodynamic influence coefficients computed using a two-dimensional surface panel technique and a fluid-property vector. An updated fluid property is determined for the inviscid fluid cell using the updated boundary-layer fluid property.

  2. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O'Sullivan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from −60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s−1 in increments of 0.5 m s−1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  3. Energetic Variational Approach to Multi-Component Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshtein, Arkadz; Liu, Chun; Brannick, James

    2017-11-01

    In this talk I will introduce the systematic energetic variational approach for dissipative systems applied to multi-component fluid flows. These variational approaches are motivated by the seminal works of Rayleigh and Onsager. The advantage of this approach is that we have to postulate only energy law and some kinematic relations based on fundamental physical principles. The method gives a clear, quick and consistent way to derive the PDE system. I will compare different approaches to three-component flows using diffusive interface method and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The diffusive interface method is an approach for modeling interactions among complex substances. The main idea behind this method is to introduce phase field labeling functions in order to model the contact line by smooth change from one type of material to another. The work of Arkadz Kirshtein and Chun Liu is partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-141200 and DMS-1216938.

  4. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Naturally Ventilated Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elashmawy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, heat transfer and fluid flow in naturally ventilated greenhouses are studied numerically for tow configuration according to the number and positions of the opening. The equations governing the phenomenon are developed using the stream function-vorticity formalism and solved using the finite volume method. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence airflow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr=0.71. Results are reported in terms of stream function, isotherms and average Nusselt number. It is found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and the number of openings. Also, that using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross-airflow inside the greenhouse.

  5. Hysteresis in a swirling two-fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, I. V.; Sharifullin, B. R.; Shtern, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    This experimental study describes a hysteresis—a vivid manifestation of strongly nonlinear flow physics. A sealed vertical cylindrical container of radius 45 mm and height 90 mm is filled with water and sunflower oil. The rotating lid drives swirl and the meridional circulation of both fluids. As the rotation strength Re increases, the oil-water interface rises near the axis, touches the lid at Re = Re1, and moves toward the container sidewall. Then as Re decreases, the interface returns to the axis and separates from the lid at Re = Re2 flow states are observed that is typical of hysteresis. The hysteresis only occurs if a volume fraction of oil is small. The hysteresis disappears as the oil fraction exceeds a threshold, which is around 0.4.

  6. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  7. Decorrelation-based blood flow velocity estimation: effect of spread of flow velocity, linear flow velocity gradients, and parabolic flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupotti, F.A.; Steen, A.F.W. van der; Mastik, F.; Korte, C.L. de

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a new method to measure transverse blood flow, based on the decorrelation of the radio frequency (RF) signals has been developed. In this paper, we investigated the influence of nonuniform flow on the velocity estimation. The decorrelation characteristics of transverse blood flow

  8. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  9. Two-phase fluid flow in geometric packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Aureliano Sancho S; Oliveira, Rafael S; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2015-12-13

    We investigate how a plug of obstacles inside a two-dimensional channel affects the drainage of high viscous fluid (oil) when the channel is invaded by a less viscous fluid (water). The plug consists of an Apollonian packing with, at most, 17 circles of different sizes, which is intended to model an inhomogeneous porous region. The work aims to quantify the amount of retained oil in the region where the flow is influenced by the packing. The investigation, carried out with the help of the computational fluid dynamics package ANSYS-FLUENT, is based on the integration of the complete set of equations of motion. The study considers the effect of both the injection speed and the number and size of obstacles, which directly affects the porosity of the system. The results indicate a complex dependence in the fraction of retained oil on the velocity and geometric parameters. The regions where the oil remains trapped is very sensitive to the number of circles and their size, which influence in different ways the porosity of the system. Nevertheless, at low values of Reynolds and capillary numbers Re<4 and n(c)≃10(-5), the overall expected result that the volume fraction of oil retained decreases with increasing porosity is recovered. A direct relationship between the injection speed and the fraction of oil is also obtained. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Network Flow Simulation of Fluid Transients in Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Hamill, Brian; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Majumdar, Alok

    2011-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicle propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shutdown. The pressure rise due to sudden opening and closing of valves of propulsion feed lines can cause serious damage during activation and shutdown of propulsion systems. During activation (valve opening) and shutdown (valve closing), pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. In the current work, a network flow simulation software (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) based on Finite Volume Method has been used to predict the pressure surges in the feed line due to both valve closing and valve opening using two separate geometrical configurations. The valve opening pressure surge results are compared with experimental data available in the literature and the numerical results compared very well within reasonable accuracy (simulation results are compared with the results of Method of Characteristics. Most rocket engines experience a longitudinal acceleration, known as "pogo" during the later stage of engine burn. In the shutdown example problem, an accumulator has been used in the feed system to demonstrate the "pogo" mitigation effects in the feed system of propellant. The simulation results using GFSSP compared very well with the results of Method of Characteristics.

  11. Geothermal heat exchanger with coaxial flow of fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Dragan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a heat exchanger with coaxial flow. Two coaxial pipes of the secondary part were placed directly into a geothermal boring in such a way that geothermal water flows around the outer pipe. Starting from the energy balance of the exchanger formed in this way and the assumption of a study-state operating regime, a mathematical model was formulated. On the basis of the model, the secondary circle output temperature was determined as a function of the exchanger geometry, the coefficient of heat passing through the heat exchange areas, the average mass isobaric specific heats of fluid and mass flows. The input temperature of the exchanger secondary circle and the temperature of the geothermal water at the exit of the boring were taken as known values. Also, an analysis of changes in certain factors influencing the secondary water temperature was carried out. The parameters (flow temperature of the deep boring B-4 in Sijarinska Spa, Serbia were used. The theoretical results obtained indicate the great potential of this boring and the possible application of such an exchanger.

  12. Fluid flow and degassing in high temperature magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, H. E.; Sammonds, P.; Kilburn, C.; Meredith, P.; Smith, R.

    2012-04-01

    Dacitic volcanoes such as Mount St Helens are commonly associated with plinian eruptions. They can also erupt magma as lava domes that, in addition to simple effusion, frequently pass through episodes of major collapse and can also explode in vulcanian eruptions under suitable increases in gas pressure. Both dome collapse and vulcanian events can propagate pyroclastic flows and so extend the hazardous range of a dome far beyond the radius of the dome itself. As magma rises in the conduit it becomes supersaturated with dissolved volatiles and, during decompression, exsolution occurs creating gas bubbles within the melt. The ability of gases to escape the rising magma depends strongly on its permeability. It is common in highly viscous magma for gas pressure to build up until, under a sufficient amount of depressurisation, the tensile strength of the magma is exceeded and fragmentation occurs. However effusion of lava domes requires magma to reach the surface in a relatively volatile free state and the processes that control this gas escape in high temperature magma are still poorly understood. To investigate the controls on degassing processes, we have measured how permeability varies progressively with increasing temperature on samples from the 2004-2008 lava dome at Mount St Helens. Permeability was measured on cylindrical samples 25 mm in diameter in a high temperature triaxial deformation apparatus at temperatures up to 900oC, confining pressures of 10 MPa and pore fluid pressures of 5 MPa. Samples of intact dacite from the interior of Spine 4 were used to test temperature effects on fluid flow. Our preliminary results show that fluid flow in the dacite lava at the core of the lava dome is reduced by over two orders of magnitude when the temperature is increased from 30oC to 400oC, with no apparent discontinuity when the pore fluid water flashes to steam at 264oC. During ascent in the conduit the magma is cooled from around 850oC and depressurisation causes

  13. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  14. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re sub max, Re sub w, and A sub R, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation, and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphics).

  15. Biomagnetic fluid flow in an aneurysm using ferrohydrodynamics principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzirtzilakis, E. E.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the fundamental problem of biomagnetic fluid flow in an aneurysmal geometry under the influence of a steady localized magnetic field is numerically investigated. The mathematical model used to formulate the problem is consistent with the principles of ferrohydrodynamics. Blood is considered to be an electrically non-conducting, homogeneous, non-isothermal Newtonian magnetic fluid. For the numerical solution of the problem, which is described by a coupled, non-linear system of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs), with appropriate boundary conditions, the stream function-vorticity formulation is adopted. The solution is obtained by applying an efficient pseudotransient numerical methodology using finite differences. This methodology is based on the application of a semi-implicit numerical technique, transformations, stretching of the grid, and construction of the boundary conditions for the vorticity. The results regarding the velocity and temperature field, skin friction, and rate of heat transfer indicate that the presence of a magnetic field considerably influences the flow field, particularly in the region of the aneurysm.

  16. A review of interaction mechanisms in fluid-solid flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.; Rajagopal, K.R. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Massoudi, M. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Multiphase flows have become the subject of considerable attention because of their importance in many industrial applications, such as fluidized beds, pneumatic transport of solids, coal combustion, etc. Fundamental research into the nature of pneumatic transport has made significant progress in identifying key parameters controlling the characteristics of these processes. The emphasis of this study is on a mixture composed of spherical particles of uniform size and a linearly viscous fluid. Section 1 introduces our approach and the importance of this study. In Section 2, the dynamics of a single particle as studied in classical hydrodynamics and fluid dynamics is presented. This has been a subject of study for more than 200 years. In Section 3, we review the literature for the constitutive relations as given in multiphase studies, i.e., generalization of single particle and as given in literature concerning the continuum theories of mixtures or multicomponent systems. In Section 4, a comparison between these representations and the earlier approach, i.e., forces acting on a single particle will be made. The importance of flow regimes, particle concentration, particle size and shape, rotation of the particle, effect of solid walls, etc. are discussed. 141 refs.

  17. Two-Fluid Model for 1D Gas-Liquid Slug Flows: Realizable Mean Slug Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gourma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A two-fluid model is used to predict hydrodynamic characteristics of gas water two phase slug flows in horizontal pipes. Mathematical models are averaged based forms of balance laws with algebraic source terms. Predictions of transient solutions of such systems rely on accurate evaluations of speeds and scales of discontinuities generated by the flow conditions. Slug flows are characterized through slug frequencies, slug lengths and slug translational velocities. These are the fundamental quantities that one has to estimate in order to assess the validity of the model and the numerical method in use. A two fluid 1D model for slug flows along with an AUSMDV* numerical scheme is able to predict correct translational speeds, lengths scales and frequencies of slugs. An adaptive mesh refinement AMR procedure based on Kelvin-Helmholtz stability condition as an indicator for refinement is used to speed up simulations. The marginal Kelvin-Helmholtz stability condition is also introduced to estimate slug body length.

  18. Heat transfer to MHD oscillatory dusty fluid flow in a channel filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluid flow under the influence of magnetic field and heat transfer occurs in magneto-hydrodynamics accelerators, pumps and generators. This type of fluid has uses in nuclear reactors, plasma studies, geothermal energy extraction, and the boundary layer control in the field of aerodynamics. The flow of fluids through porous ...

  19. Four-dimensional flow MRI for evaluation of post-stenotic turbulent flow in a phantom: comparison with flowmeter and computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jihoon; Kim, Young-Hak [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiology and Heart Institute, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Guk Bae; Kim, Namkug [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, MunYoung [Siemens Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Stalder, Aurelien F.; Greiser, Andreas [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    To validate 4D flow MRI in a flow phantom using a flowmeter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as reference. Validation of 4D flow MRI was performed using flow phantoms with 75 % and 90 % stenosis. The effect of spatial resolution on flow rate, peak velocity and flow patterns was investigated in coronal and axial scans. The accuracy of flow rate with 4D flow MRI was evaluated using a flowmeter as reference, and the peak velocity and flow patterns obtained were compared with CFD analysis results. 4D flow MRI accurately measured the flow rate in proximal and distal regions of the stenosis (percent error ≤3.6 % in axial scanning with 1.6-mm resolution). The peak velocity of 4D flow MRI was underestimated by more than 22.8 %, especially from the second half of the stenosis. With 1-mm isotropic resolution, the maximum thickness of the recirculating flow region was estimated within a 1-mm difference, but the turbulent velocity fluctuations mostly disappeared in the post-stenotic region. 4D flow MRI accurately measures the flow rates in the proximal and distal regions of a stenosis in axial scan but has limitations in its estimation of peak velocity and turbulent characteristics. (orig.)

  20. Large-eddy simulation of supercritical fluid flow and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hongfa

    The present study focuses on the modeling and simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion of real fluids at supercritical conditions. The objectives of the study are: (1) to establish a unified theoretical framework that can be used to study the turbulent combustion of real fluids; (2) to implement the theoretical framework and conduct numerical studies with the aim of improving the understanding of the flow and combustion dynamics at conditions representative of contemporary liquid-propellant rocket engine operation; (3) to identify the key design parameters and the flow variables which dictate the dynamics characteristics of swirl- and shear- coaxial injectors. The theoretical and numerical framework is validated by simulating the Sandia Flame D. The calculated axial and radial profiles of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of major species are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental measurements. The conditionally averaged mass fraction profiles agree very well with the experimental results at different axial locations. The validated model is first employed to examine the flow dynamics of liquid oxygen in a pressure swirl injector at supercritical conditions. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the effects of external excitations on the dynamic response of the injector. The high-frequency fluctuations do not significantly affect the flow field as they are dissipated shortly after being introduced into the flow. However, the lower-frequency fluctuations are amplified by the flow. As a result, the film thickness and the spreading angle at the nozzle exit fluctuate strongly for low-frequency external excitations. The combustion of gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen in a high-pressure combustion chamber for a shear coaxial injector is simulated to assess the accuracy and the credibility of the computer program when applied to a sub-scale model of a combustor. The predicted heat flux profile is compared with the experimental and numerical studies. The

  1. On boundary layer flow of a sisko fluid over a stretching sheet | Khan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the steady boundary layer flow of a non-Newtonian fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet is investigated. The Sisko fluid model, which is combination of power-law and Newtonian fluids in which the fluid may exhibit shear thinning/thickening behaviors, is considered. The boundary layer equations are derived ...

  2. An investigation of dentinal fluid flow in dental pulp during food mastication: simulation of fluid-structure interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Chih; Chuang, Shu-Fen; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Chang, Chih-Han

    2014-06-01

    This study uses fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation to investigate the relationship between the dentinal fluid flow in the dental pulp of a tooth and the elastic modulus of masticated food particles and to investigate the effects of chewing rate on fluid flow in the dental pulp. Three-dimensional simulation models of a premolar tooth (enamel, dentine, pulp, periodontal ligament, cortical bone, and cancellous bone) and food particle were created. Food particles with elastic modulus of 2,000 and 10,000 MPa were used, respectively. The external displacement loading (5 μm) was gradually directed to the food particle surface for 1 and 0.1 s, respectively, to simulate the chewing of food particles. The displacement and stress on tooth structure and fluid flow in the dental pulp were selected as evaluation indices. The results show that masticating food with a high elastic modulus results in high stress and deformation in the tooth structure, causing faster dentinal fluid flow in the pulp in comparison with that obtained with soft food. In addition, fast chewing of hard food particles can induce faster fluid flow in the pulp, which may result in dental pain. FSI analysis is shown to be a useful tool for investigating dental biomechanics during food mastication. FSI simulation can be used to predict intrapulpal fluid flow in dental pulp; this information may provide the clinician with important concept in dental biomechanics during food mastication.

  3. Advanced tomographic flow diagnostics for opaque multiphase fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Jackson, N.B.; Shollenberger, K.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the work performed for the ``Advanced Tomographic Flow Diagnostics for Opaque Multiphase Fluids`` LDRD (Laboratory-Directed Research and Development) project and is presented as the fulfillment of the LDRD reporting requirement. Dispersed multiphase flows, particularly gas-liquid flows, are industrially important to the chemical and applied-energy industries, where bubble-column reactors are employed for chemical synthesis and waste treatment. Due to the large range of length scales (10{sup {minus}6}-10{sup 1}m) inherent in real systems, direct numerical simulation is not possible at present, so computational simulations are forced to use models of subgrid-scale processes, the accuracy of which strongly impacts simulation fidelity. The development and validation of such subgrid-scale models requires data sets at representative conditions. The ideal measurement techniques would provide spatially and temporally resolved full-field measurements of the distributions of all phases, their velocity fields, and additional associated quantities such as pressure and temperature. No technique or set of techniques is known that satisfies this requirement. In this study, efforts are focused on characterizing the spatial distribution of the phases in two-phase gas-liquid flow and in three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow. Due to its industrial importance, the bubble-column geometry is selected for diagnostics development and assessment. Two bubble-column testbeds are utilized: one at laboratory scale and one close to industrial scale. Several techniques for measuring the phase distributions at conditions of industrial interest are examined: level-rise measurements, differential-pressure measurements, bulk electrical impedance measurements, electrical bubble probes, x-ray tomography, gamma-densitometry tomography, and electrical impedance tomography.

  4. Space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for two-fluid flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, W.E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Multifluid and multiphase flows involve combinations of fluids and interfaces which separate these. These flows are of importance in many natural and industrial processes including fluidized beds and bubble columns. Often the interface is not static but moves with the fluid flow velocity. Also,

  5. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Shigehisa, E-mail: aokis@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Ikeda, Satoshi [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Takezawa, Toshiaki [Transgenic Animal Research Center, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Kishi, Tomoya [Department of Internal Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Makino, Junichi [Makino Clinic, Saga (Japan); Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, Mitsuru [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Sugihara, Hajime [Department of Physical Therapy, International University of Health and Welfare, Fukuoka (Japan); Toda, Shuji [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed

  6. Fluid inclusions and biomarkers in the Upper Mississippi Valley zinc-lead district; implications for the fluid-flow and thermal history of the Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, E. Lanier; Goldhaber, Martin B.

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Mississippi Valley zinc-lead district is hosted by Ordovician carbonate rocks at the northern margin of the Illinois Basin. Fluid inclusion temperature measurements on Early Permian sphalerite ore from the district are predominantly between 90?C and I50?C. These temperatures are greater than can be explained by their reconstructed burial depth, which was a maximum of approximately 1 km at the time of mineralization. In contrast to the temperatures of mineral formation derived from fluid inclusions, biomarker maturities in the Upper Mississippi Valley district give an estimate of total thermal exposure integrated over time. Temperatures from fluid inclusions trapped during ore genesis with biomarker maturities were combined to construct an estimate of the district's overall thermal history and, by inference, the late Paleozoic thermal and hydrologic history of the Illinois Basin. Circulation of groundwater through regional aquifers, given sufficient flow rates, can redistribute heat from deep in a sedimentary basin to its shallower margins. Evidence for regional-scale circulation of fluids is provided by paleomagnetic studies, regionally correlated zoned dolomite, fluid inclusions, and thermal maturity of organic matter. Evidence for igneous acti vity contemporaneous with mineralization in the vicinity of the Upper Mississippi Valley district is absent. Regional fluid and heat circulation is the most likely explanation for the elevated fluid inclusion temperatures (relative to maximum estimated burial depth) in the Upper Mississippi Valley district. One plausible driving mechanism and flow path for the ore-forming fluids is groundwater recharge in the late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita mountain belt and northward flow through the Reelfoot rift and the proto- Illinois Basin to the Upper Mississippi Valley district. Warm fluid flowing laterally through Cambrian and Ordovician aquifers would then move vertically upward through the fractures that control

  7. Waste-aware fluid volume assignment for flow-based microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Alexander Rüdiger; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analysers integrating the necessary functions onchip. We are interested in Flow-Based Microfluidic Biochips (FBMB), where a continuous flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves. Using microvalves and channels, more ...... is able to minimize the fluid consumption through optimal fluid assignment and reuse of fluid waste. Due to the algorithm's low complexity, fluid requirements can also be calculated during runtime for error recovery or statically unknown cases....

  8. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  9. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Munir

    Full Text Available The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞. The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM. Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem.

  10. Viscous boundary layers in rotating fluids driven by periodic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Cogley, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper analyzes the boundary layers formed in a rotating fluid by an oscillating flow over an infinite half plate, with particular attention paid to the effects of unsteadiness, the critical latitude effect and the structure of the solution to the boundary layer equations at resonance. The Navier-Stokes boundary layer equations are obtained through an asymptotic expansion with the incorporation of the Rossby and Ekman numbers and are analyzed as the sum of a nonlinear steady solution and a linearized unsteady solution. The solution is predominantly composed of two inertial wave vector components, one circularly polarized to the left and the other circularly polarized to the right. The problem considered here has relevance in oceanography and meteorology, with special reference to the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Analytical methods for heat transfer and fluid flow problems

    CERN Document Server

    Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    This book describes useful analytical methods by applying them to real-world problems rather than solving the usual over-simplified classroom problems. The book demonstrates the applicability of analytical methods even for complex problems and guides the reader to a more intuitive understanding of approaches and solutions. Although the solution of Partial Differential Equations by numerical methods is the standard practice in industries, analytical methods are still important for the critical assessment of results derived from advanced computer simulations and the improvement of the underlying numerical techniques. Literature devoted to analytical methods, however, often focuses on theoretical and mathematical aspects and is therefore useless to most engineers. Analytical Methods for Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Problems addresses engineers and engineering students. The second edition has been updated, the chapters on non-linear problems and on axial heat conduction problems were extended. And worked out exam...

  12. Studies of Tracer Dispersion and Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rage, T.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis explores the connection between the topology of a porous medium and its macroscopic transport properties and is based on computerized simulation. In porous media, both diffusion and convection contribute to the dispersion of a tracer and their combined effect is emphasized. The governing equations are solved numerically, using finite differences and Monte Carlo technique. The influence of finite Reynolds number on the outcome of echo-experiments is discussed. Comparing experiments and simulations it is found that nonlinear inertial forces lead to a visible deformation of a returned tracer at surprisingly small Reynolds numbers. In a study of tracer dispersion and fluid flow in periodic arrays of discs it is demonstrated that the mechanisms of mechanical dispersion in periodic media and in natural (non-periodic) porous media are essentially different. Measurements of the percolation probability distribution of a sandstone sample is presented. Local porosity theory predicts that this simple geometric function of a porous medium is of dominant importance for its macroscopic transport properties. It is demonstrated that many aspects of transport through fractures can be studied by using simple but realistic models and readily available computer resources. An example may be the transport of hydrocarbon fluids from the source rock to a reservoir. 165 refs., 44 figs., 1 table

  13. Fluid Structural Analysis of Urine Flow in a Stented Ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Blanco, J Carlos; Martínez-Reina, F Javier; Cruz, Domingo; Pagador, J Blas; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Soria, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Many urologists are currently studying new designs of ureteral stents to improve the quality of their operations and the subsequent recovery of the patient. In order to help during this design process, many computational models have been developed to simulate the behaviour of different biological tissues and provide a realistic computational environment to evaluate the stents. However, due to the high complexity of the involved tissues, they usually introduce simplifications to make these models less computationally demanding. In this study, the interaction between urine flow and a double-J stented ureter with a simplified geometry has been analysed. The Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) of urine and the ureteral wall was studied using three models for the solid domain: Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, and Ogden. The ureter was assumed to be quasi-incompressible and isotropic. Data obtained in previous studies from ex vivo and in vivo mechanical characterization of different ureters were used to fit the mentioned models. The results show that the interaction between the stented ureter and urine is negligible. Therefore, we can conclude that this type of models does not need to include the FSI and could be solved quite accurately assuming that the ureter is a rigid body and, thus, using the more simple Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach.

  14. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  15. Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its chemical-mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge about how fluids flow within and out of descending slabs. Relicts of fluid-flow systems in exhumed rocks of fossil subduction zones allow for identification of the general relationships between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events; all of which are required for quantitative models for fluid-induced subduction zone processes. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished in an eclogite-facies mélange block from the Pouébo Eclogite Mélange, New Caledonia. These veins record synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins), and infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) with the associated formation of a reaction selvage. The dehydration and fluid migration documented by the type I veins likely occurred on a timescale of 105-106 years, based on average subduction rates and metamorphic conditions required for mineral dehydration and fluid flow. The timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock of the type II veins is quantified using a continuous bulk-rock Li-diffusion profile perpendicular to a vein and its metasomatic selvage. Differences in Li concentration between the internal and external fluid reservoirs resulted in a distinct diffusion profile (decreasing Li concentration and increasing δ7 Li) as the reaction front propagated into the host rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that the timescales of fluid-rock interaction associated with type II vein formation are on the order of 1 to 4 months (0.150-0.08+0.14 years). The short-lived, pulse-like character of this process is consistent with the notion that fluid flow caused by oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the

  16. Serial and Parallel Implementations of Hybrid Fluid Model of Information Flows in Networks with Complex Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavin Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the issue of modeling information flows in networks with complex topologies and it describes a comparison of the sequential (written in the MATLAB language and parallel (based on GPGPU technology software implementations of the hybrid fluid model (HFM of Internet traffic. Obtained performance estimates of both software implementations indicate a higher performance of parallel software implementation HFM. The directions of further research, the results of which will be the basis for the later development of parallel software implementation HFM are proposed.

  17. Simulation of fluid flow and solididification in the funnel type crystalizer of thin slab continuous cast

    OpenAIRE

    Zare, M. H.; A. H. Meysami; Sh. Mahmoudi; M. Hajisafari; M. MazarAtabaki

    2014-01-01

    The present work models the fluid flow and heat transfer with solidification of a steel in the funnel type mold region of a thin slab steel continuous caster.ªª In current modeling a turbulent fluid flow has been supposed and used K-ɛ model in order to anticipate the heat transfer distribution in mold region. To consider the solidification effects on fluid flow and solid crust, the Darci model was applied, also for outlet heat flow measurement a simple method was used. The fluid flowresults i...

  18. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-06-01

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  19. Fluid flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid in an internally finned tube with different fin lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabski, Jakub Krzysztof; Kołodziej, Jan Adam

    2016-06-01

    In the paper an analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid in an internally finned tube with different fin length is conducted. Nonlinear momentum equation of a power-law fluid flow and nonlinear energy equation are solved using the Picard iteration method. Then on each iteration step the solution of inhomogeneous equation consists of two parts: the general solution and the particular solution. Firstly the particular solution is obtained by interpolation of the inhomogeneous term by means of the radial basis functions and monomials. Then the general solution is obtained using the method of fundamental solutions and by fulfilling boundary conditions.

  20. Comparative study of the two-fluid momentum equations for multi-dimensional bubbly flows: Modification of Reynolds stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Park, Ik Kyu; Yoon, Han Young [Thermal-Hydraulic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Byoung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Two-fluid equations are widely used to obtain averaged behaviors of two-phase flows. This study addresses a problem that may arise when the two-fluid equations are used for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. If steady drag is the only accounted force for the interfacial momentum transfer, the disperse-phase velocity would be the same as the continuous-phase velocity when the flow is fully developed without gravity. However, existing momentum equations may show unphysical results in estimating the relative velocity of the disperse phase against the continuous-phase. First, we examine two types of existing momentum equations. One is the standard two-fluid momentum equation in which the disperse-phase is treated as a continuum. The other is the averaged momentum equation derived from a solid/ fluid particle motion. We show that the existing equations are not proper for multi-dimensional bubbly flows. To resolve the problem mentioned above, we modify the form of the Reynolds stress terms in the averaged momentum equation based on the solid/fluid particle motion. The proposed equation shows physically correct results for both multi-dimensional laminar and turbulent flows.

  1. Effect of asynchrony on numerical simulations of fluid flow phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Mahoney, Bryan; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Designing scalable CFD codes on massively parallel computers is a challenge. This is mainly due to the large number of communications between processing elements (PEs) and their synchronization, leading to idling of PEs. Indeed, communication will likely be the bottleneck in the scalability of codes on Exascale machines. Our recent work on asynchronous computing for PDEs based on finite-differences has shown that it is possible to relax synchronization between PEs at a mathematical level. Computations then proceed regardless of the status of communication, reducing the idle time of PEs and improving the scalability. However, accuracy of the schemes is greatly affected. We have proposed asynchrony-tolerant (AT) schemes to address this issue. In this work, we study the effect of asynchrony on the solution of fluid flow problems using standard and AT schemes. We show that asynchrony creates additional scales with low energy content. The specific wavenumbers affected can be shown to be due to two distinct effects: the randomness in the arrival of messages and the corresponding switching between schemes. Understanding these errors allow us to effectively control them, rendering the method's feasibility in solving turbulent flows at realistic conditions on future computing systems.

  2. Fluid Flow Simulation and Energetic Analysis of Anomalocarididae Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2014-11-01

    While an abundance of animal locomotion simulations have been performed modeling the motions of living arthropods and aquatic animals, little quantitative simulation and reconstruction of gait parameters has been done to model the locomotion of extinct animals, many of which bear little physical resemblance to their modern descendants. To that end, this project seeks to analyze potential swimming patterns used by the anomalocaridid family, (specifically Anomalocaris canadensis, a Cambrian Era aquatic predator), and determine the most probable modes of movement. This will serve to either verify or cast into question the current assumed movement patterns and properties of these animals and create a bridge between similar flexible-bodied swimmers and their robotic counterparts. This will be accomplished by particle-based fluid flow simulations of the flow around the fins of the animal, as well as an energy analysis of a variety of sample gaits. The energy analysis will then be compared to the extant information regarding speed/energy use curves in an attempt to determine which modes of swimming were most energy efficient for a given range of speeds. These results will provide a better understanding of how these long-extinct animals moved, possibly allowing an improved understanding of their behavioral patterns, and may also lead to a novel potential platform for bio-inspired underwater autonomous vehicles (UAVs).

  3. Parametric study of fluid flow and heat transfer over louvered fins of air heat pump evaporator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomasz Muszyński; Sławomir Marcin Kozieł

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical investigations of the fluid flow and heat transfer have been carried out for the laminar flow of the louvered fin-plate heat exchanger, designed to work as an air-source heat pump evaporator...

  4. Three-dimensional computational modeling of subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid flow in the subarachnoid space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Soellinger, Michaela; Boesiger, Peter; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2009-02-01

    This study aims at investigating three-dimensional subject-specific cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the inferior cranial space, the superior spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), and the fourth cerebral ventricle using a combination of a finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments. An anatomically accurate 3D model of the entire SAS of a healthy volunteer was reconstructed from high resolution T2 weighted MRI data. Subject-specific pulsatile velocity boundary conditions were imposed at planes in the pontine cistern, cerebellomedullary cistern, and in the spinal subarachnoid space. Velocimetric MRI was used to measure the velocity field at these boundaries. A constant pressure boundary condition was imposed at the interface between the aqueduct of Sylvius and the fourth ventricle. The morphology of the SAS with its complex trabecula structures was taken into account through a novel porous media model with anisotropic permeability. The governing equations were solved using finite-volume CFD. We observed a total pressure variation from -42 Pa to 40 Pa within one cardiac cycle in the investigated domain. Maximum CSF velocities of about 15 cms occurred in the inferior section of the aqueduct, 14 cms in the left foramen of Luschka, and 9 cms in the foramen of Magendie. Flow velocities in the right foramen of Luschka were found to be significantly lower than in the left, indicating three-dimensional brain asymmetries. The flow in the cerebellomedullary cistern was found to be relatively diffusive with a peak Reynolds number (Re)=72, while the flow in the pontine cistern was primarily convective with a peak Re=386. The net volumetric flow rate in the spinal canal was found to be negligible despite CSF oscillation with substantial amplitude with a maximum volumetric flow rate of 109 mlmin. The observed transient flow patterns indicate a compliant behavior of the cranial subarachnoid space. Still, the estimated

  5. Noise, anti-noise and fluid flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J E Ffowcs

    2002-05-15

    This paper celebrates Thomas Young's discovery that wave interference was responsible for much that is known about light and colour. A substantial programme of work has been aimed at controlling the noise of aerodynamic flows. Much of that field can be explained in terms of interference and it is argued in this paper that the theoretical techniques for analysing noise can also be seen to rest on interference effects. Interference can change the character of wave fields to produce, out of well-ordered fields, wave systems quite different from the interfering wave elements. Lighthill's acoustic analogy is described as an example of this effect, an example in which the exact model of turbulence-generated noise is seen to consist of elementary interfering sound waves; waves that are sometimes heard in advance of their sources. The paper goes on to describe an emerging field of technology where sound is suppressed by superimposing on it a destructively interfering secondary sound; one designed and manufactured specifically for interference. That sound is known as anti-sound, or anti-noise when the sound is chaotic enough. Examples are then referred to where the noisy effect to be controlled is actually a disturbance of a linearly unstable system; a disturbance that is destroyed by destructive interference with a deliberately constructed antidote. The practical benefits of this kind of instability control are much greater and can even change the whole character of flows. It is argued that completely unnatural unstable conditions can be held with active controllers generating destructively interfering elements. Examples are given in which gravitational instability of stratified fluids can be prevented. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of shear flows can also be avoided by simple controls. Those are speculative examples of what might be possible in future developments of an interference effect, which has made anti-noise a useful technology.

  6. A Review on the development of lattice Boltzmann computation of macro fluid flows and heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arumuga Perumal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM is introduced in the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD field as a tool for research and development, but its ultimate importance lies in various industrial and academic applications. Owing to its excellent numerical stability and constitutive versatility it plays an essential role as a simulation tool for understanding micro and macro fluid flows. The LBM received a tremendous impetus with their spectacular use in incompressible and compressible fluid flow and heat transfer problems. The applications of LBM to incompressible flows with simple and complex geometries are much less spectacular. From a computational point of view, the present LBM is hyperbolic and can be solved locally, explicitly, and efficiently on parallel computers. The present paper reviews the philosophy and the formal concepts behind the lattice Boltzmann approach and gives progress in the area of incompressible fluid flows, compressible fluid flows and free surface flows.

  7. Observations on the decay of a thermocline in a rock bed with no net fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, D.E.; Clark, J.A.; Holstege, M.J.

    1985-02-01

    The transient thermal response of a rock bed with no net fluid flow is examined following all-day charging under clear sky conditions. The experimental system consists of 1.86 m/sup 2/ (20 ft/sup 2/) of flat-plate solar collectors using air as the working fluid, a flow control system, and a 0.357 m/sup 3/ (12.6 ft/sup 3/) rock bed for thermal energy storage. A thermocline is established in the bed during charging due to the timevarying nature of the collector outlet temperature. Experimental measurements of the temperature distribution in the bed for a 13-hour stagnation period allow a preliminary estimate of the loss of available energy in the storage medium. The net loss in thermodynamic availability is 30 percent. Since the temperatures in the upper regions of the bed are lower than those in the central regions at the end of charging under clear sky conditions, the possibility of natural convection motion of the fluid in the bed exists. An ''apparent'' local thermal diffusivity is calculated and from comparison with stagnant bed values indicates that natural convection motion may occur in the upper regions of the bed.

  8. A molecular dynamics study of non-Newtonian flows of simple fluids in confined and unconfined geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartkamp, Remco

    2013-01-01

    Various fluid flow phenomena originate in the dynamics of the atoms that constitute the fluid. Studying fluids as a collection of atoms is key to a better understanding of, for example, non-Newtonian fluid flow behavior. Molecular dynamics (MD) is a very suitable tool for the study of fluids on the

  9. Estimation of hepatic blood flow by hydrogen gas clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouma, D. J.; Coelho, J. C.; Schlegel, J.; Fisher, J. D.; Li, Y. F.; Moody, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    The hydrogen gas clearance technique was evaluated to estimate regional hepatic blood flow. Initially, the H2 gas method was compared to the indocyanine green clearance in mini pigs. The blood flow measured by the H2 gas method (0.49 +/- 0.03 ml/min/gm) was only 39% of the calculated blood flow by

  10. Optimization of liquid and gas flow rates for aerated drilling fluids considering hole cleaning for vertical and low inclination wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbayoglu, M.E. [Middle East Univ., Metn (Lebanon)

    2009-07-01

    One of the most widely used technologies in depleted and/or low pressured formations is underbalanced drilling. Drilling fluids are usually gasified in order to achieve underbalanced conditions. The most commonly used drilling fluids during underbalanced drilling are pure gas, gas-liquid mixtures, and foams. This paper presented a study that focused on gas-liquid mixtures. The purpose of this paper was to express two-phase flow in vertical wellbores, and determine required flow rates for liquid and gas phase by considering formation pressure and hole cleaning properties. It was assumed that the liquid phase is the major contributor for cuttings transport, and that the gas phase only influences the bottom hole pressure. The paper introduced a mechanistic model for estimating the hydraulic behaviour of gas-liquid mixture drilling fluids under different flow patterns. Based on the bottom hole pressure and effective hole cleaning point of view, an algorithm was proposed for estimating the optimum required flow rates for liquid and gas phases based on the introduced mechanistic model. The model also predicts the required backpressure that must be applied. It was concluded that since the liquid flow rate is only dependent on proper hole cleaning, gas flow rate can be adjusted to achieve a bottomhole pressure equal to formation pressure. Also, backpressure should not be kept constant at the same value for static and dynamic conditions. Otherwise, bottomhole pressure cannot be kept constant. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 appendix.

  11. Coded ultrasound for blood flow estimation using subband processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, F.; Udesen, J.; Jensen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of coded excitation for blood flow estimation in medical ultrasound. Traditional autocorrelation estimators use narrow-band excitation signals to provide sufficient signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and velocity estimation performance. In this paper, broadband coded...... the excitation signal is broadband and has good spatial resolution after pulse compression. This means that time can be saved by using the same data for B-mode imaging and blood flow estimation. Two different coding schemes are used in this paper, Barker codes and Golay codes. The performance of the codes...... for velocity estimation is compared with a conventional approach transmitting a narrow-band pulse. The study was carried out using an experimental ultrasound scanner and a commercial linear array 7 MHz transducer. A circulating flow rig was scanned with a beam-to-flow angle of 60 degrees. The flow in the rig...

  12. Coded Ultrasound for Blood Flow Estimation Using Subband Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachamnn

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of coded excitation for blood flow estimation in medical ultrasound. Traditional autocorrelation estimators use narrow-band excitation signals to provide sufficient signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and velocity estimation performance. In this paper, broadband coded...... the excitation signal is broadband and has good spatial resolution after pulse compression. This means that time can be saved by using the same data for B-mode imaging and blood flow estimation. Two different coding schemes are used in this paper, Barker codes and Golay codes. The performance of the codes...... for velocity estimation is compared with a conventional approach transmitting a narrow-band pulse. The study was carried out using an experimental ultrasound scanner and a commercial linear array 7 MHz transducer. A circulating flow rig was scanned with a beam-to-flow angle of 60°. The flow in the rig...

  13. Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Flow of two immiscible fluids in a periodically constricted tube: Transitions to stratified, segmented, churn, spray or segregated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamopoulos, John; Fraggedakis, Dimitris; Dimakopoulos, Yiannis

    2015-11-01

    We study the flow of two immiscible, Newtonian fluids in a periodically constricted tube driven by a constant pressure gradient. Our Volume-of-Fluid algorithm is used to solve the governing equations. First the code is validated by comparing its predictions to previously reported results for stratified and pulsing flow. Then it is used to capture accurately all the significant topological changes that take place. Initially, the fluids have a core-annular arrangement, which is found to either remain the same or change to a different arrangement depending on the fluid properties, the pressure driving the flow or the flow geometry. The flow-patterns that appear are the core-annular, segmented, churn, spray and segregated flow. The predicted scalings near pinching of the core fluid concur with similarity predictions and earlier numerical results (Cohen et al. (1999)). Flow-pattern maps are constructed in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. Our results provide deeper insights in the mechanism of the pattern transitions and are in agreement with previous studies on core-annular flow (Kouris & Tsamopoulos (2001 & 2002)), segmented flow (Lac & Sherwood (2009)) and churn flow (Bai et al. (1992)). GSRT of Greece through the program ``Excellence'' (Grant No. 1918, entitled ``FilCoMicrA'').

  15. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  16. Displacement of one Newtonian fluid by another: density effects in axial annular flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) finite elementtechnique is used to simulate 3D displacement oftwo immiscible Newtonian fluids in vertical annular wells. For equally viscous fluids the effect of distinct fluid densities is investigated in the region of low to intermediate Reynolds numbers. Comp......, the efficiency of the displacement is analysed for various flow situations....

  17. Entropy generation in a pipe due to non-Newtonian fluid flow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, a rather simple approach can be introduced to consider the mixture as a single homogeneous continuum. In this case, the mixture of fluid and solid particles behaves like a non-Newtonian fluid (Johnson et al 1991). Considerable research studies were carried out to investigate non-Newtonian fluid flows in pipes.

  18. Mathematical modeling for laminar flow of power law fluid in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Renato A.; Mesquita, Maximilian S. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Dept. de Engenharias e Computacao

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, the macroscopic equations for laminar power-law fluid flow is obtained for a porous medium starting from traditional equations (Navier-Stokes). Then, the volume averaging is applied in traditional transport equations with the power-law fluid model. This procedure leads to macroscopic transport equations set for non-Newtonian fluid. (author)

  19. Mathematical simulation of a twisted pseudoplastic fluid flow in a cylindrical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvienko, O. V.; Bazuev, V. P.; Yuzhanova, N. K.

    2011-05-01

    The results of investigations of a pseudoplastic fluid twisted flow in a cylindrical channel are presented. With increase in the shear stresses caused by the flow twisting, the effective viscosity decreases. As a result, in the axial part of the channel a zone of lower pressure is formed which, at smaller flow twisting, leads to the formation of the zone of backward flows.

  20. Tutorial on Feedback Control of Flows, Part I: Stabilization of Fluid Flows in Channels and Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole M. Aamo

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The field of flow control has picked up pace over the past decade or so, on the promise of real-time distributed control on turbulent scales being realizable in the near future. This promise is due to the micromachining technology that emerged in the 1980s and developed at an amazing speed through the 1990s. In lab experiments, so called micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS that incorporate the entire detection-decision-actuation process on a single chip, have been batch processed in large numbers and assembled into flexible skins for gluing onto body-fluid interfaces for drag reduction purposes. Control of fluid flows span a wide variety of specialities. In Part I of this tutorial, we focus on the problem of reducing drag in channel and pipe flows by stabilizing the parabolic equilibrium profile using boundary feedback control. The control strategics used for this problem include classical control, based on the Nyquist criteria, and various optimal control techniques (H2, H-Infinity, as well as applications of Lyapunov stability theory.

  1. An In-vivo investigation of transverse flow estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound scanners are restricted to display the blood velocity component in the ultrasound beam direction. By introducing a laterally oscillating field, signals are created from which the transverse velocity component can be estimated. This paper presents velocity and volume flow...... estimates obtained from flow phantom and in-vivo measurements at 90° relative to the ultrasound beam axis. The flow phantom experiment setup consists of a SMI140 flow phantom connected to a CompuFlow1000 programmable flow pump, which generates a flow similarly to that in the femoral artery. A B-K medical...... 8804 linear array transducer with 128 elements and a center frequency of 7 MHz is emitting 8 cycle ultrasound pulses with a pulse repetition frequency of 7 kHz in a direction perpendicular to the flow direction in the phantom. The transducer is connected to the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS...

  2. Transition in the Flow of Power-Law Fluids through Isotropic Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zami-Pierre, F; de Loubens, R; Quintard, M; Davit, Y

    2016-08-12

    We use computational fluid dynamics to explore the creeping flow of power-law fluids through isotropic porous media. We find that the flow pattern is primarily controlled by the geometry of the porous structure rather than by the nonlinear effects in the rheology of the fluid. We further highlight a macroscale transition between a Newtonian and a non-Newtonian regime, which is the signature of a coupling between the viscosity of the fluid and the structure of the porous medium. These complex features of the flow can be condensed into an effective length scale, which defines both the non-Newtonian transition and the Newtonian permeability.

  3. Fluid Flow Analysis of Jacket Cooling System for Marine Diesel Engine 93 Kw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguk Zuhdi Muhammad Fathallah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The main function of cooling system is to control the temperature in the engine. To know the flow in the jacket cooling system for marine diesel engine 93 KW and the couple simulation between 1D modeling and 3D modeling, the methodology used. The analysis process was performed by using 3 diffrent softwares. The methodology to analysis fluid flow is CFD (computational fluid dynamic with steps were problem identification, literature study, design the jacket cooling system based on the cummin diesel engine 93 KW, 1D modeling of cooling system, 3D modeling fluid flow in jacket cooling system, and conclusion. The input of 3D jacket cooling simulation are mass flow, fluid temperature, wall temperature, and heat transfer. The result from this bachelor thesis is fluid flow in jacket cooling system and another parameter output such as temperature flow and velocity if fluid in the jacket cooling system. The result of the flow in jacket cooling is much turbulance in various are of jacket cooling its mean the jacket cooling have a good enfficiency of heat transfer, and the fluid temperature show the increasing temperature from inlet to outlet because of heat transfer happen in the jacket cooling between wall of jacket cooling and fluid. The engine speed will affect the cooling system, if the engine speed is increasing, the speed of flow will increase because the cylinder block need more coolant and the temperature of cylinder block will increase

  4. Couette flow of a hydro-magnetic electrically conducting fluid with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical solution of the problem of Couette flow of a hydromagnetic electrically conducting fluid has been obtained where the temperature of the fluid is assumed to vary exponentially. Results obtained for the flow velocity, temperature, skin friction and rate of heat transfer indicate that the temperature is higher when the ...

  5. Advanced Fluid Reduced Order Models for Compressible Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezaur, Irina Kalashnikova [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Fike, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maddix, Danielle [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mussoni, Erin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Balajewicz, Maciej [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes fiscal year (FY) 2017 progress towards developing and implementing within the SPARC in-house finite volume flow solver advanced fluid reduced order models (ROMs) for compressible captive-carriage flow problems of interest to Sandia National Laboratories for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons components. The proposed projection-based model order reduction (MOR) approach, known as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Least- Squares Petrov-Galerkin (LSPG) method, can substantially reduce the CPU-time requirement for these simulations, thereby enabling advanced analyses such as uncertainty quantification and de- sign optimization. Following a description of the project objectives and FY17 targets, we overview briefly the POD/LSPG approach to model reduction implemented within SPARC . We then study the viability of these ROMs for long-time predictive simulations in the context of a two-dimensional viscous laminar cavity problem, and describe some FY17 enhancements to the proposed model reduction methodology that led to ROMs with improved predictive capabilities. Also described in this report are some FY17 efforts pursued in parallel to the primary objective of determining whether the ROMs in SPARC are viable for the targeted application. These include the implemen- tation and verification of some higher-order finite volume discretization methods within SPARC (towards using the code to study the viability of ROMs on three-dimensional cavity problems) and a novel structure-preserving constrained POD/LSPG formulation that can improve the accuracy of projection-based reduced order models. We conclude the report by summarizing the key takeaways from our FY17 findings, and providing some perspectives for future work.

  6. Mechanotransduction Signaling in Podocytes from Fluid Flow Shear Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tarak; Dai, Hongying; Heruth, Daniel P; Alon, Uri S; Garola, Robert E; Zhou, Jianping; Duncan, R Scott; El-Meanawy, Ashraf; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Johnson, Mark L; Savin, Virginia J; Sharma, Mukut

    2017-09-06

    Recently we and others have found that hyperfiltration-associated increase in biomechanical forces, namely tensile stress and fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) can directly and distinctly alter podocyte structure and function. The ultrafiltrate flow over the major processes and cell body generates FFSS to podocyte. Our previous work suggests that COX2-PGE2-EP2 axis plays an important role in mechanoperception of FFSS in podocyte (Srivastava et al. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 307: F1323-F1333, 2014). To address mechanotransduction of the perceived mechanical stimulus through EP2 receptor, cultured podocytes were exposed to FFSS (2 dynes/cm2) for 2hrs. Total RNA from cells at the end of treatment, 2h post-FFSS and 24h post-FFSS was used for whole exon array analysis. The differentially regulated genes (pmechanotransduction as well as exogenous PGE2 activate the Akt-GSK3β-β-catenin (Ser552) and ERK/MAPK but not the cAMP-PKA signal transduction cascades. These pathways are reportedly associated with FFSS-induced and EP2-mediated signaling in other epithelial cells as well. Current regimen for treating hyperfiltration-mediated injury largely depends on targeting the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System. Present study identifies specific transduction mechanisms and provides novel information on the direct effect of FFSS on podocytes. These results suggest that targeting EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways holds therapeutic significance for delaying progression chronic kidney disease secondary to hyperfiltration. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  7. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian Munawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0≤τ<∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs.

  8. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pietraß, Tanja [USDOE Office of Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-05-22

    From beneath the surface of the earth, we currently obtain about 80-percent of the energy our nation consumes each year. In the future we have the potential to generate billions of watts of electrical power from clean, green, geothermal energy sources. Our planet’s subsurface can also serve as a reservoir for storing energy produced from intermittent sources such as wind and solar, and it could provide safe, long-term storage of excess carbon dioxide, energy waste products and other hazardous materials. However, it is impossible to underestimate the complexities of the subsurface world. These complexities challenge our ability to acquire the scientific knowledge needed for the efficient and safe exploitation of its resources. To more effectively harness subsurface resources while mitigating the impacts of developing and using these resources, the U.S. Department of Energy established SubTER – the Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut team. This DOE multi-office team engaged scientists and engineers from the national laboratories to assess and make recommendations for improving energy-related subsurface engineering. The SubTER team produced a plan with the overall objective of “adaptive control of subsurface fractures and fluid flow.”This plan revolved around four core technological pillars—Intelligent Wellbore Systems that sustain the integrity of the wellbore environment; Subsurface Stress and Induced Seismicity programs that guide and optimize sustainable energy strategies while reducing the risks associated with subsurface injections; Permeability Manipulation studies that improve methods of enhancing, impeding and eliminating fluid flow; and New Subsurface Signals that transform our ability to see into and characterize subsurface systems. The SubTER team developed an extensive R&D plan for advancing technologies within these four core pillars and also identified several areas where new technologies would require additional basic research

  9. Heat transfer and fluid flow in biological processes advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Sid

    2015-01-01

    Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Biological Processes covers emerging areas in fluid flow and heat transfer relevant to biosystems and medical technology. This book uses an interdisciplinary approach to provide a comprehensive prospective on biofluid mechanics and heat transfer advances and includes reviews of the most recent methods in modeling of flows in biological media, such as CFD. Written by internationally recognized researchers in the field, each chapter provides a strong introductory section that is useful to both readers currently in the field and readers interested in learning more about these areas. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Biological Processes is an indispensable reference for professors, graduate students, professionals, and clinical researchers in the fields of biology, biomedical engineering, chemistry and medicine working on applications of fluid flow, heat transfer, and transport phenomena in biomedical technology. Provides a wide range of biological and clinical applications of fluid...

  10. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer for a viscoelastic fluid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A theoretical study is made in the region near the stagnation point when a lighter incompressible viscoelastic fluids impinges orthogonally on the surface of another quiescent heavier incompressible viscous fluid. Similarity solutions of the momentum balance equations for both fluids are equalized at the interface. It isnoted ...

  11. Normalizing parameters for the critical flow rate of simple fluids through nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that two-phase critical nozzle flow of simple fluids almost obeys the principle of corresponding states. Quantum fluid departures from the principle are resolved as a function of temperature for para-hydrogen and helium. The critical flow rates are normalized, using a normalizing parameter for which the critical flow rates of all simple fluids reduce to a single isothermal curve. The expression obtained for the normalizing parameter is shown to provide good agreement with the experiment for the critical flow rates of nitrogen, oxygen, and para-hydrogen.

  12. Flow of a power-law fluid with memory past an infinite plate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the flow of a power law fluid with a non-constant relaxation λtb past an infinite plate. When λ is zero the fluid is pseudoplastic and when the power law exponent is 1, the fluid is a Maxwell fluid. It is shown that the problem has a solution when 0 < n ≤ 1. Moreover, we show that momentum penetration ...

  13. Force acting on a particle in unsteady flow of a pseudoplastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, O. B.; Ignatenko, Ya. S.

    2016-11-01

    The accelerated flow of a pseudoplastic fluid around a quiescent sphere at Reynolds numbers Re = 0-200 and dimensionless acceleration Ga = 10-104 is studied by numerical simulation. It is shown that the analytical expression of the added mass force for an ideal fluid is appropriate for a pseudoplastic fluid. An expression for calculating the hereditary Basset force for a pseudoplastic fluid is proposed.

  14. Coded ultrasound for blood flow estimation using subband processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael bachmann

    2007-01-01

    This paper further investigates the use of coded excitation for blood flow estimation in medical ultrasound. Traditional autocorrelation estimators use narrow-band excitation signals to provide sufficient signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and velocity estimation performance. In this paper, broadband...... the excitation signal is broadband and has good spatial resolution after pulse compression. Two different codin-schemes are used in this paper, Barker codes and Golay codes. The performance of the codes for velocity estimation is compared to a conventional approach transmitting a narrow-band pulse. The study...... was carried out using an experimental ultrasound scanner and a commercial linear array 7 MHz transducer. A circulating flow rig was scanned with a beam-to-flow angle of 60 degrees. The flow in the rig was laminar and had a parabolic flow-profile with a peak velocity of 0.09 m/s. The mean relative standard...

  15. Study of pore fluid effect on the mobility of granular debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gordon G. D.; Sun, Q. C.

    2017-06-01

    Granular debris flows in nature are composed of a wide range of solids and viscous pore fluids, moving at high velocities down sloping channels. The pore fluids in a granular debris flow affect the interactions between the solid and fluid phases and thus govern the debris-flow mobility. Study of the pore fluid effect (i.e., excess pore water pressures correlated to solid structures, and the viscous shearing and dragging) is essential for understanding the high flow mobility of granular debris flows. This study critically reviews two dimensionless numbers with clear physical meanings, then demonstrates a new application of field monitoring data for identifying natural debris flows on large scales (i.e., surge and continuous debris-flows, respectively). This study illustrates that, the pore fluid viscous shearing stress dominates solid inertial stress due to solids collision. It is also found that different to continuous debris-flows, the high pore fluid pressures generated in surge debris-flow body dissipate quite slowly and mostly influence particle contact behaviour significantly. A new scientific criterion for identification of continuous and surge debris flow in nature can be given by this study.

  16. Fluid flows and forces in development: functions, features and biophysical principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Jonathan B; Goetz, Jacky G; Hill, Kent L; Vermot, Julien

    2012-04-01

    Throughout morphogenesis, cells experience intracellular tensile and contractile forces on microscopic scales. Cells also experience extracellular forces, such as static forces mediated by the extracellular matrix and forces resulting from microscopic fluid flow. Although the biological ramifications of static forces have received much attention, little is known about the roles of fluid flows and forces during embryogenesis. Here, we focus on the microfluidic forces generated by cilia-driven fluid flow and heart-driven hemodynamics, as well as on the signaling pathways involved in flow sensing. We discuss recent studies that describe the functions and the biomechanical features of these fluid flows. These insights suggest that biological flow determines many aspects of cell behavior and identity through a specific set of physical stimuli and signaling pathways.

  17. Local characterisation of fluid flow in sandstone with localised deformation features through fast neutron imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fluid flow through rocks is of key interest in hydrocarbon production and CO2 sequestration, amongst other applications. Such fluid injection or extraction from subsurface reservoirs can be significantly modified (increased or decreased by deformation and in particular by localised deformation features (fractures, shear bands and compaction bands. How such deformation alters fluid flow is however not well characterised experimentally. Measurement of fluid-flow distributions throughout a specimen requires techniques that can, first, see inside a test specimen and, second, see the fluid distinctly from the solid part. Therefore, neutron absorption imaging is well adapted to fluid flow monitoring in rocks as water is largely opaque to neutrons (i.e., it is highly absorbing and rocks are generally less absorbing. In this paper we present initial results of neutron radiography monitoring of fluid-flow through samples of a sandstone containing localised deformation features (shear-bands. A comparison of flow through an intact specimen and flow through samples containing localised deformation features is presented that provides insight into the effect of localised deformation on the flow properties.

  18. Experimental investigation of synthetic aperture flow angle estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    -correlation as a function of velocity and angle. This paper presents an experimental investigation of this velocity angle estimation method based on a set of synthetic aperture flow data measured using our RASMUS experimental ultrasound system. The measurements are performed for flow angles of 60, 75, and 90 deg...... for the experiments, and the emitted pulse is a 20 micro sec. chirp, linearly sweeping frequencies from approximately 3.5 to 10.5 MHz. The flow angle could be estimated with an average bias up to 5.0 deg., and a average standard deviation between 0.2 deg. and 5.2 deg. Using the angle estimates, the velocity...

  19. Exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Alam Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer. The governing partial differential equations (PDEs for an incompressible MHD flow of couple stress fluid are reduced to ordinary differential equations by employing wave parameter. The methodology is implemented for linearizing the flow equations without extra transformation and restrictive assumptions. Comparison is made with the result obtained previously.

  20. A Tightly Coupled Particle-Fluid Model for DNA-Laden Flows in Complex Microscale Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Colella, P; Graves, D T; Martin, D F; Schwartz, P O

    2004-11-18

    We present a stable and convergent method for the computation of flows of DNA-laden fluids in microchannels with complex geometry. The numerical strategy combines a ball-rod model representation for polymers tightly coupled with a projection method for incompressible viscous flow. We use Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods to discretize the fluid equations in the presence of complex domain boundaries. A sample calculation is presented showing flow through a packed array microchannel in 2D.

  1. Film Flow Dominated Simultaneous Flow of Two Viscous Incompressible Fluids Through a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav eAursjø

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental study of two-phase flow in a quasi-two-dimensional porous medium. The two phases, a water-glycerol solution and a commercial food grade rapeseed/canola oil, having an oil to water-glycerol viscosity ratio of 1.3, are injected simultaneously into a Hele-Shaw cell with a mono-layer of randomly distributed glass beads. The two liquids are injected into the model from alternating point inlets. Initially, the porous model is filled with the water-glycerol solution. We observe that after an initial transient state, an overall static cluster configuration is obtained. While the oil is found to create a connected system spanning cluster, a large part of the water-glycerol clusters left behind the initial invasion front is observed to remain immobile throughout the rest of the experiment. This could suggest that the water-glycerol flow-dynamics is largely dominated by film flow. The flow pathways are thus given through the dynamics of the initial invasion. This behavior is quite different from that observed in systems with large viscosity differences between the two fluids, and where compressibility plays an important part of the process.

  2. Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Ault, Jesse T.; Warren, Patrick B.; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-10-01

    The flow of solutions containing solutes and colloidal particles in porous media is widely found in systems including underground aquifers, hydraulic fractures, estuarine or coastal habitats, water filtration systems, etc. In such systems, solute gradients occur when there is a local change in the solute concentration. While the effects of solute gradients have been found to be important for many applications, we observe an unexpected colloidal behavior in porous media driven by the combination of solute gradients and the fluid flow. When two flows with different solute concentrations are in contact near a junction, a sharp solute gradient is formed at the interface, which may allow strong diffusiophoresis of the particles directed against the flow. Consequently, the particles accumulate near the pore entrance, rapidly approaching the packing limit. These colloidal dynamics have important implications for the clogging of a porous medium, where particles that are orders of magnitude smaller than the pore width can accumulate and block the pores within a short period of time. We also show that this effect can be exploited as a useful tool for preconcentrating biomolecules for rapid bioassays.

  3. Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwoo Shin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The flow of solutions containing solutes and colloidal particles in porous media is widely found in systems including underground aquifers, hydraulic fractures, estuarine or coastal habitats, water filtration systems, etc. In such systems, solute gradients occur when there is a local change in the solute concentration. While the effects of solute gradients have been found to be important for many applications, we observe an unexpected colloidal behavior in porous media driven by the combination of solute gradients and the fluid flow. When two flows with different solute concentrations are in contact near a junction, a sharp solute gradient is formed at the interface, which may allow strong diffusiophoresis of the particles directed against the flow. Consequently, the particles accumulate near the pore entrance, rapidly approaching the packing limit. These colloidal dynamics have important implications for the clogging of a porous medium, where particles that are orders of magnitude smaller than the pore width can accumulate and block the pores within a short period of time. We also show that this effect can be exploited as a useful tool for preconcentrating biomolecules for rapid bioassays.

  4. Dense Descriptors for Optical Flow Estimation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Baghaie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the displacements of intensity patterns between sequential frames is a very well-studied problem, which is usually referred to as optical flow estimation. The first assumption among many of the methods in the field is the brightness constancy during movements of pixels between frames. This assumption is proven to be not true in general, and therefore, the use of photometric invariant constraints has been studied in the past. One other solution can be sought by use of structural descriptors rather than pixels for estimating the optical flow. Unlike sparse feature detection/description techniques and since the problem of optical flow estimation tries to find a dense flow field, a dense structural representation of individual pixels and their neighbors is computed and then used for matching and optical flow estimation. Here, a comparative study is carried out by extending the framework of SIFT-flow to include more dense descriptors, and comprehensive comparisons are given. Overall, the work can be considered as a baseline for stimulating more interest in the use of dense descriptors for optical flow estimation.

  5. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics.

  6. Heat-conduction error of temperature sensors in a fluid flow with nonuniform and unsteady temperature distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khine, Soe Minn; Houra, Tomoya; Tagawa, Masato

    2013-04-01

    In temperature measurement of non-isothermal fluid flows by a contact-type temperature sensor, heat conduction along the sensor body can cause significant measurement error which is called "heat-conduction error." The conventional formula for estimating the heat-conduction error was derived under the condition that the fluid temperature to be measured is uniform. Thus, if we apply the conventional formula to a thermal field with temperature gradient, the heat-conduction error will be underestimated. In the present study, we have newly introduced a universal physical model of a temperature-measurement system to estimate accurately the heat-conduction error even if a temperature gradient exists in non-isothermal fluid flows. Accordingly, we have been able to successfully derive a widely applicable estimation and/or evaluation formula of the heat-conduction error. Then, we have verified experimentally the effectiveness of the proposed formula using the two non-isothermal fields-a wake flow formed behind a heated cylinder and a candle flame-whose fluid-dynamical characteristics should be quite different. As a result, it is confirmed that the proposed formula can represent accurately the experimental behaviors of the heat-conduction error which cannot be explained appropriately by the existing formula. In addition, we have analyzed theoretically the effects of the heat-conduction error on the fluctuating temperature measurement of a non-isothermal unsteady fluid flow to derive the frequency response of the temperature sensor to be used. The analysis result shows that the heat-conduction error in temperature-fluctuation measurement appears only in a low-frequency range. Therefore, if the power-spectrum distribution of temperature fluctuations to be measured is sufficiently away from the low-frequency range, the heat-conduction error has virtually no effect on the temperature-fluctuation measurements even by the temperature sensor accompanying the heat-conduction error in

  7. Multiphase flow in the advanced fluid dynamics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Berthier, J.; Parker, F.P.; Ichikawa, S.; Goutagny, L.; Ninokata, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling used in the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM), a computer code to investigate new approaches to simulating severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, the dominant liquid, and the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas also are modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer generally is treated using engineering correlations. Liquid/vapor phase transitions are handled with a nonequililbrium heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. The Los Alamos SESAME equation of state (EOS) has been inplemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. A summary description of the AFDM numerical algorithm is provided. The AFDM code currently is being debugged and checked out. Two sample three-field calculations also are presented. The first is a three-phase bubble column mixing experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory; the second is a liquid-liquid mixing experiment performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, that resulted in rapid vapor production. We conclude that only qualitative comparisons currently are possible for complex multiphase situations. Many further model developments can be pursued, but there are limits because of the lack of a comprehensive theory, the lack of detailed multicomponent experimental data, and the difficulties in keeping the resulting model complexities tractable.

  8. Lubrication process at the wall in foam flow : application to pressure drop estimation in underbalanced drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Herzhaft, B. [Institut Francais du Petrole (France)

    2005-07-01

    Underbalanced drilling (UBD) is an effective solution to prevent formation damage, differential sticking or fluid losses. Low density drilling fluids such as gas, aerated mud or foams are used for underbalanced drilling, and the pressure of the drilling fluid is maintained at a value below the formation pressure. Foam is particularly useful for drilling because of its low density and good carrying capability, but its use remains hazardous due to the incomplete knowledge of its bottom-hole properties and flowing properties. Pressure drop estimation is crucial for UBD operations. This study evaluated the pressure drop variation with the flow rate in a circular pipe for different foam qualities and formulations. Experiments conducted in a pressure and temperature circular conduct flow showed that lubrication at the wall plays a crucial role. The intrinsic viscosity of the foam can be very high leading to the development of a water layer at the wall responsible for the lubrication of the flow. A two-phase description of the system allows the analytical estimation of the pressure drop. The size of the lubricated layer was then deduced and discussion of its range of existence was presented. Main parameters of its formation were also discussed. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Multiphase Fluid Flow in Deformable Variable-Aperture Fractures - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detwiler, Russell

    2014-04-30

    capillary forces and redistribution of fluids. These coupled processes enhance channel formation and the potential for development of fast flow paths through fractures. (2) Dissolution in fractures subjected to normal stress can result in behaviors ranging from development of dissolution channels and rapid permeability increases to fracture healing and significant permeability decreases. The timescales associated with advective transport of dissolved ions in the fracture, mineral dissolution rates, and diffusion within the adjacent porous matrix dictate the sign and magnitude of the resulting permeability changes. Furthermore, a high--resolution mechanistic model that couples elastic deformation of contacts and aperture-­dependent dissolution rates predicts the range of observed behaviors reasonably well. (3) ERT has potential as a tool for monitoring gas leakage in deep formations. Using probabilistic inversion methods further enhances the results by providing uncertainty estimates of inverted parameters.

  10. Control grid motion estimation for efficient application of optical flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Motion estimation is a long-standing cornerstone of image and video processing. Most notably, motion estimation serves as the foundation for many of today's ubiquitous video coding standards including H.264. Motion estimators also play key roles in countless other applications that serve the consumer, industrial, biomedical, and military sectors. Of the many available motion estimation techniques, optical flow is widely regarded as most flexible. The flexibility offered by optical flow is particularly useful for complex registration and interpolation problems, but comes at a considerable compu

  11. Maximum Likelihood Blood Velocity Estimator Incorporating Properties of Flow Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    of simulated and in vivo data from the carotid artery. The estimator is meant for two-dimensional (2-D) color flow imaging. The resulting mathematical relation for the estimator consists of two terms. The first term performs a cross-correlation analysis on the signal segment in the radio frequency (RF......)-data under investigation. The flow physic properties are exploited in the second term, as the range of velocity values investigated in the cross-correlation analysis are compared to the velocity estimates in the temporal and spatial neighborhood of the signal segment under investigation. The new estimator...

  12. Novel multi-functional fluid flow device for studying cellular mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, James S; Iyer, Shama R; Lovering, Richard M; Ward, Christopher W; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-12-08

    Cells respond to their mechanical environment by initiating multiple mechanotransduction signaling pathways. Defects in mechanotransduction have been implicated in a number of pathologies; thus, there is need for convenient and efficient methods for studying the mechanisms underlying these processes. A widely used and accepted technique for mechanically stimulating cells in culture is the introduction of fluid flow on cell monolayers. Here, we describe a novel, multifunctional fluid flow device for exposing cells to fluid flow in culture. This device integrates with common lab equipment including routine cell culture plates and peristaltic pumps. Further, it allows the fluid flow treated cells to be examined with outcomes at the cell and molecular level. We validated the device using the biologic response of cultured UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells in comparison to a commercially available system of laminar sheer stress to track live cell calcium influx in response to fluid flow. In addition, we demonstrate the fluid flow-dependent activation of phospho-ERK in these cells, consistent with the findings in other fluid flow devices. This device provides a low cost, multi-functional alternative to currently available systems, while still providing the ability to generate physiologically relevant conditions for studying processes involved in mechanotransduction in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluid mechanics of the stagnation point flow chamber and its platelet deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affeld, K; Reininger, A J; Gadischke, J; Grunert, K; Schmidt, S; Thiele, F

    1995-07-01

    The interaction of flow and thrombus generation often is a crucial question for the engineer working in the field of artificial organs. However, this interaction is only incompletely known, and quantitative data under well-defined experimental conditions are especially rare. These can be attained with the stagnation point flow chamber. This flow model applies platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as fluid. Its flow conditions are assessed with the help of computational fluid mechanics. In addition, the concept of the boundary layer is introduced, which permits assessment of the platelet flow along the wall. The results of the experiment indicate that platelets are deposited at a defined shear rate.

  14. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  15. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B., E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m{sup 2} s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  16. Tactile soft-sparse mean fluid-flow imaging with a robotic whisker array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Cagdas; Jones, Douglas L; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2015-08-04

    An array of whiskers is critical to many mammals to survive in their environment. However, current engineered systems generally employ vision, radar or sonar to explore the surroundings, not having sufficiently benefited from tactile perception. Inspired by the whisking animals, we present here a novel tomography-based tactile fluid-flow imaging technique for the reconstruction of surroundings with an artificial whisker array. The moment sensed at the whisker base is the weighted integral of the drag force per length, which is proportional to the relative velocity squared on a whisker segment. We demonstrate that the 2D cross-sectional mean fluid-flow velocity-field can be successfully mapped out by collecting moment measurements at different angular positions with the whisker array. We use a regularized version of the FOCal underdetermined system solver algorithm with a smoothness constraint to obtain soft-sparse static estimates of the 2D cross-sectional velocity-squared distribution. This new proposed approach has the strong potential to be an alternative environmental sensing technology, particularly in dark or murky environments.

  17. Economic method for measuring ultra-low flow rates of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovic, J. A.; Keller, W. F.

    1970-01-01

    Capillary tube flowmeter measures ultra-low flows of very corrosive fluids /such as chlorine trifluoride and liquid fluorine/ and other liquids with reasonable accuracy. Flowmeter utilizes differential pressure transducer and operates on the principle that for laminar flow in the tube, pressure drop is proportional to flow rate.

  18. TGV-based flow estimation for 4D leukocyte transmigration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frerking, L.; Burger, M.; Vestweber, D.; Brune, Christoph; Louis, Alfred K.; Arridge, Simon; Rundell, Bill

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to track transmigrating leukocytes via TGV flow estimation. Recent results have shown the advantages of the nonlinear and higher order terms of TGV regularizers, especially in static models for denoising and medical reconstruction. We present TGV-based models for flow

  19. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Thomsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented. The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames/s in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional image plane. The method is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared with the expected 79.8 L/min, and to 2.68 ± 0.04 mL/stroke in the pulsating environment compared with the expected 2.57 ± 0.08 mL/stroke. Flow rates estimated in the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer are compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured flow rates using a 1-D through-plane velocity sequence. Mean flow rates were 333 ± 31 mL/min for the presented method and 346 ± 2 mL/min for the MRI measurements.

  20. Measurements of electrical impedance and elastic wave velocity of reservoir rock under fluid-flow test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawayama, Kazuki; Kitamura, Keigo; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of water saturation under the ground is essential in geothermal fields, particularly for EGS (enhanced geothermal system). To estimate water saturation, recently, electromagnetic exploration using Magnetotelluric (MT) method has been applied in the geothermal fields. However, the relationship between electrical impedance obtained from this method and water saturation in the reservoir rock has not been well known. Our goal is to elucidate this basic relationship by fluid-flow experiments. As our first step to this goal, we developed the technique to measure and analyze the electrical impedance of the cracked rock in the geothermal reservoir. The fluid-flow test has been conducted as following procedures. At first, reservoir rock sample (pyroxene andesite, Makizono lava formation, Japan) was filled with nitrogen gas (Pp = 10 MPa) under 20 MPa of confining pressure. This nitrogen gas imitates the overheated steam in the geothermal fields. Then, brine (1wt.%-KCl, 1.75 S/m) which imitates the artificial recharge to the reservoir was injected to the samples. After flow rate of drainage fluid becomes stable, injection pressure was increased (11, 12, 14, 16, 18 MPa) and decreased (18, 16, 14, 12, 11 MPa) to vary the water saturation in the samples. During the test, water saturation, permeability, electrical impedance (10-2-105 Hz of frequency) and elastic wave velocity were measured. As a result of andesite, electrical impedance dramatically decreased from 105 to 103 Ω and P-wave velocity increased by 2% due to the brine injection. This remarkable change of the electrical impedance could be due to the replacement of pre-filled nitrogen gas to the brine. After the brine injection, electrical impedance decreased with injection pressure (small change of water saturation) by up to 40% while P-wave velocity was almost constant (less than 1%). This decrease of electrical impedance with injection pressure could be related to the flow to the narrow path (microcrack

  1. a modified power law for determinig flow characteristics of fluid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1986-09-01

    Sep 1, 1986 ... shear-thinning (pseudoplastic) and shear-thickening. (dilatant) tendencies in the blended fluid foods as a manner of testing the modified formula. 2. EXPERIMENTAL. Material: The fluid foods used in this study were honey (H) corn syrup. (CS) and emulsion salad cream (SC) which were numerical materials.

  2. Parcel Eulerian-Lagrangian fluid dynamics for rotating geophysical flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; Oliver, M.

    2006-01-01

    Parcel Eulerian-Lagrangian Hamiltonian formulations have recently been used in structure-preserving numerical schemes, asymptotic calculations and in alternative explanations of fluid parcel (in) stabilities. A parcel formulation describes the dynamics of one fluid parcel with a Lagrangian kinetic

  3. A two-fluid model for vertical flow applied to CO2 injection wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linga, Gaute; Lund, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    the well, including tubing, packer fluid, casing, cement or drilling mud, and rock formation. This enables prediction of the temperature in the well fluid and in each layer of the well. The model is applied to sudden shut-in and blowout cases of a CO2 injection well, where we employ the highly accurate...... to thermal stresses and subsequent loss of well integrity, and it is therefore crucial to employ models that can predict this accurately. In this work, we present a model for vertical well flow that includes both two-phase flow and heat conduction. The flow is described by a two-fluid model, where mass...

  4. Hodographic study of non-Newtonian MHD aligned steady plane fluid flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Nguyen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of non-Newtonian HHD aligned steady plane fluid flows to find exact solutions for various flow configurations. The equations of motion have been transformed to the hodograph plane. A Legendre-transform function is used to recast the equations in the hodograph plane in terms of this transform function. Solutions for various flow configurations are obtained. Applications are investigated for the fluids of finite and infinite electrical conductivity bringing out the similarities and contrasts in the solutions of these types of fluids.

  5. Simulation of fluid-solid coupling flow of coal-bed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Yang, J.; Zeng, M. [Tiandi Science and Technology Co. Ltd., Beijing (China). Coal Mining Branch

    2001-06-01

    Combining the fluid mechanics in porous media with the theory of elastic-plastic theory, and considering the interaction between deformation of coal framework and coal-bed flow, the mathematical models of coal-bed methane fluid-solid coupling flow and its numerical solution are given. Using finite element method the equations of fluid flow and coal framework deformation are dispersed. The functional equations were also given. Based on the FEM principle, the method to solving the coupling is developed. Lastly, a case study is carried out, and its simulation results show that the theory set out in this paper is correct. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a reactor with mechanical mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecheva, A., E-mail: alecheva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Mathematics, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria); Zheleva, I., E-mail: izheleva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Heat Technology, Hydraulics and Ecology, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria)

    2015-10-28

    Fluid flow structure around the mixer in a cylindrical reactor with mechanical mixing is studied and numerical results are presented in this article. The model area is complex because of the presence of convex corners of the mixer in the fluid flow. Proper boundary conditions for the vorticity calculated on the base of the stream function values near solid boundaries of the examined area are presented. The boundary value problem of motion of swirling incompressible viscous fluid in a vertical tank reactor with a mixer is solved numerically. The calculations are made by a computer code, written in MATLAB. The complex structure of the flow around the mixing disk is described and commented.

  7. Free surface flow of a suspension of rigid particles in a non-Newtonian fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A numerical framework capable of predicting the free surface flow of a suspension of rigid particles in a non-Newtonian fluid is described. The framework is a combination of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flow, the mass tracking algorithm for free surface representation, the immersed...... boundary method for two-way coupled interactions between fluid and rigid particles and an algorithm for the dynamics and mutual interactions of rigid particles. The framework is able to simulate the flow of suspensions at the level of the largest suspended particles and, at the same time, the model is very...

  8. Regulation of fluid flow through the mammary gland of dairy cows and its effect on milk production: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Wang, Diming; Liu, Jianxin

    2017-07-31

    Dairy milk consists of more than 85% water. Therefore, understanding the regulation of fluid absorption in the mammary gland is relevant to improving milk production. In recent decades, studies using different approaches, including blood flow, transmembrane fluid flow, tight junction, fluid flow of the paracellular pathway and functional mammary epithelial cell state, have been conducted aiming to investigate how mammary gland fluid absorption is regulated. However, the relationship between regulation mechanisms of fluid flow and milk production has not been studied systematically. The present review summarizes a series of key milk yield regulatory factors mediated by whole-mammary fluid flow, including milk, mammary blood flow, blood/tissue fluid-cell fluid flow and cell-alveolus fluid flow. Whole-mammary fluid flow regulates milk production by altering transporter activity, ion channels, local microcirculation-related factors, driving force of fluid transport (osmotic pressure or electrochemical gradient), cellular connection state and a cell volume sensitive mechanism. In addition, whole-mammary fluid flow plays important roles in milk synthesis and secretion. Knowledge gained from fluid flow-mediated regulatory mechanisms of the dairy mammary gland will lead to a fundamental understanding of lactation biology and will be beneficial for the improvement of dairy productivity. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Using Caspar Creek flow records to test peak flow estimation methods applicable to crossing design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter H. Cafferata; Leslie M. Reid

    2017-01-01

    Long-term flow records from sub-watersheds in the Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds were used to test the accuracy of four methods commonly used to estimate peak flows in small forested watersheds: the Rational Method, the updated USGS Magnitude and Frequency Method, flow transference methods, and the NRCS curve number method. Comparison of measured and calculated...

  10. Flow of a blood analogue fluid in a compliant abdominal aortic aneurysm model: experimental modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplano, Valérie; Knapp, Yannick; Bailly, Lucie; Bertrand, Eric

    2014-04-11

    The aim of this work is to develop a unique in vitro set-up in order to analyse the influence of the shear thinning fluid-properties on the flow dynamics within the bulge of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). From an experimental point of view, the goals are to elaborate an analogue shear thinning fluid mimicking the macroscopic blood behaviour, to characterise its rheology at low shear rates and to propose an experimental device able to manage such an analogue fluid without altering its feature while reproducing physiological flow rate and pressure, through compliant AAA. Once these experimental prerequisites achieved, the results obtained in the present work show that the flow dynamics is highly dependent on the fluid rheology. The main results point out that the propagation of the vortex ring, generated in the AAA bulge, is slower for shear thinning fluids inducing a smaller travelled distance by the vortex ring so that it never impacts the anterior wall in the distal region, in opposition to Newtonian fluids. Moreover, scalar shear rate values are globally lower for shear thinning fluids inducing higher maximum stress values than those for the Newtonian fluids. Consequently, this work highlights that a Newtonian fluid model is finally inadequate to obtain a reliable prediction of the flow dynamics within AAA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics modeling of fluid flow in fine-grained nanoporous shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yidong; Goral, Jan; Huang, Hai; Miskovic, Ilija; Meakin, Paul; Deo, Milind

    2017-05-01

    A many-body dissipative particle dynamics model, namely, MDPD, is applied for simulation of pore-scale, multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in fine-grained, nanoporous shales. Since this model is able to simultaneously capture the discrete features of fluid molecules in nanometer size pores and continuum fluid dynamics in larger pores, and is relatively easy to parameterize, it has been recognized as being particularly suitable for simulating complex fluid flow in multi-length-scale nanopore networks of shales. A remarkable feature of this work is the integration of a high-resolution FIB-SEM (focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy) digital imaging technique to the MDPD model for providing 3D voxel data that contain the invaluable geometrical and compositional information of shale samples. This is the first time that FIB-SEM is seamlessly linked to a Lagrangian model like MDPD for fluid flow simulation, which offers a robust approach to bridging gaps between the molecular- and continuum-scales, since the relevant spatial and temporal scales are too big for molecular dynamics, and too small for computational fluid dynamics with known constitutive models. Simulations ranging from a number of benchmark problems to a forced two-fluid flow in a Woodford shale sample are presented. Results indicate that this model can be used to deliver reasonable simulations for multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in arbitrarily complex pore networks in shales.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  13. A variational approach to estimate incompressible fluid flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences. Current Issue : Vol. 127, Issue 5. Current Issue Volume 127 | Issue 5. November 2017. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  14. Combined multi-fluid and drift-flux approaches for analysis of pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnopolsky, B.; Starostin, A.; Spesivtsev, P.; Shaposhnikov, D.; Osiptsov, A.

    2013-10-01

    We propose an approach for generalization of 1D transient model for multiphase flows. It allows to combine an arbitrary number of phases with interaction defined by multi-fluid and drift-flux models. Commonly a fluid carries a number of components. The model is based on a graph of fluids and components, where on higher level the flow of several fluids is governed by the multi-fluid approach, while on lower level the relative motion of components within each fluid is described by drift-flux relations. The proposed model is applied to flows in oil and gas wells. The model is implemented numerically using a SIMPLE-like iterative scheme with the geometry conservation based algorithm (GCBA). The numerical realization of the algorithm for an arbitrary number of fluids and components is presented. For illustration, particular cases are considered which are relevant to wellbore flows in oil and gas applications. The introduction of drift-flux correlations into the numerical implementation is discussed. The code is validated against experimental flow patterns and stability study of stratified flows. The typical graphs for gas/liquid transport are discussed. The simulation of phase segregation in a vertical pipe demonstrates the flexibility of model.

  15. A power function method for estimating base flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Darline A; Stewart, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    Analytical base flow separation techniques are often used to determine the base flow contribution to total stream flow. Most analytical methods derive base flow from discharge records alone without using basin-specific variables other than basin area. This paper derives a power function for estimating base flow, the form being aQ(b) + cQ, an analytical method calibrated against an integrated basin variable, specific conductance, relating base flow to total discharge, and is consistent with observed mathematical behavior of dissolved solids in stream flow with varying discharge. Advantages of the method are being uncomplicated, reproducible, and applicable to hydrograph separation in basins with limited specific conductance data. The power function relationship between base flow and discharge holds over a wide range of basin areas. It better replicates base flow determined by mass balance methods than analytical methods such as filters or smoothing routines that are not calibrated to natural tracers or empirical basin and gauge-specific variables. Also, it can be used with discharge during periods without specific conductance values, including separating base flow from quick flow for single events. However, it may overestimate base flow during very high flow events. Application of geochemical mass balance and power function base flow separation methods to stream flow and specific conductance records from multiple gauges in the same basin suggests that analytical base flow separation methods must be calibrated at each gauge. Using average values of coefficients introduces a potentially significant and unknown error in base flow as compared with mass balance methods. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  16. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a ful...

  17. Quantitative analysis of continuous intravenous infusions in pediatric anesthesia: safety implications of dead volume, flow rates, and fluid delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haobo; Lovich, Mark A; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of continuous pediatric drug infusions. The dynamics of drug delivery by continuous infusion to pediatric patients have not been systematically examined. This study extends previously described analytic models to propofol and remifentanil delivery, focusing on infants and toddlers. We postulated that infusion system dead volume, and drug and carrier flow rates, significantly influence drug delivery. We studied effects of patient weight, infusion system dead volume, drug and carrier flow rates, along with drug stock concentration and dose, on propofol and remifentanil delivery to the circulation. We calculated the drug mass available for inadvertent bolus in the dead volume, the volume of fluid supplied by drug infusions, and model-based estimates of the range of lag times to achieve a targeted steady-state rate of drug delivery. The drug mass in the dead volume at steady state increased with dead volume size and drug dose. For infants, this drug mass could exceed 100% of commonly used loading doses. Predicted lag times to steady state depend on patient size, fluid flow rates, and the mixing behavior of the drug entering the main fluid pathway. Neonates have the longest lag times to achieve steady state. Fluid quantities delivered by drug infusions increase with drug flow rate and can represent a large fraction of estimated maintenance fluid requirements. Fluid delivery increases if stock drug concentrations are diluted. These relationships were qualitatively similar for propofol and remifentanil. Traditional studies focus on drug disposition once a drug enters the circulation. Our analysis shows the potential importance of factors influencing drug delivery to the patient's circulation, focusing on propofol and remifentanil administration to small patients. The drug mass available for inadvertent bolus residing in the reservoir of the dead volume at steady state may be large and clinically relevant. Lag times to achieve steady

  18. Effect of microscale protrusions on local fluid flow and mass transport in the presence of forced convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzen, Gehard W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional creeping flow around single, axisymmetric protrusions is studied numerically using the boundary-integral technique. Emphasis is placed upon cylindrical protrusions on plane walls for various height-to-radius (h-to-a) aspect ratios, but cones and sections of spheres protruding from plane walls are also briefly examined. The presented items include shear-stress distributions, shear-stress contours, extents of the fluid-flow disturbance, total forces and torques on the cylinders, streamlines, and skin-friction lines. Also included is a discussion of flow topology around axisymmetric geometries. No flow reversal is observed for cylindrical protrusions with aspect ratios greater than 2.4 to 2.6. At higher aspect ratios, the fluid tends to be swept around cylindrical protrusions with little vertical motion. At lower aspect ratios, the strength of the recirculation increases, and the recirculation region becomes wider in the transverse direction and narrower in the flow direction. Also, the recirculation pattern begins to resemble the closed streamline patterns in two-dimensional flow over square ridges. However, unlike two-dimensional flow, closed streamline patterns are not observed. For arbitrary axisymmetric geometries, the extent of the fluid-flow disturbance can be estimated with the total force that is exerted on the protrusion. When the same force is exerted on protrusions with different aspect ratios, the protrusion with the higher aspect ratio tends to have a greater disturbance in the flow direction and a smaller disturbance in the transverse direction. The total force exerted on cylindrical protrusions with rounded corners is only slightly lower than the total force exerted on cylindrical protrusions with sharp corners.

  19. A Simplified Model Applied to the Barite Sag and Fluid Flow in Drilling Muds: Simulation and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messias Ribeiro José

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a study on the modeling of sedimentation and transport of barite particles in drilling fluids was developed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a simplified two-phase model based on conservation equations to describe the sedimentation of particulate material in drilling fluids. The model was evaluated in three different case studies, where the transport and the sedimentation of solid particles in a carrying fluid were simulated. The simulation results included a two-dimensional flow of liquid in the absence of particles; the axial flow of fluid and particles to investigate the existence of the slip velocity; and the one-dimensional particle settling in drilling fluids. The resulting model used to predict the barite sag is based on the conservation equations and uses the Eulerian approach to take into account the two-phase flow. The model was able to predict the barite sedimentation as well as the formation and properties of the bed of particles. Moreover, the proposed model can be used to evaluate the influence of the particle size, the liquid viscosity, and the solids concentration on the sedimentation process of particles in drilling fluids. Experimental work was also conducted in order to estimate the parameters of the proposed model related to the solid-solid force interaction due to solid particles, and the contribution of the pressure gradient. The results were analyzed by using the one-way ANOVA test for a 95% confidence level, and showed significant reproducibility. Therefore, despite to the simplicity of the proposed model, it could be used as a first approach to the modeling of the barite sag in drilling fluids.

  20. Thermo-fluid dynamics of two-phase flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamoru; Ishii, Mamoru; Ishii, M

    2006-01-01

    Provides a very systematic treatment of two phase flow problems from a theoretical perspectiveProvides an easy to follow treatment of modeling and code devlopemnt of two phase flow related phenomenaCovers new results of two phase flow research such as coverage of fuel cells technology.

  1. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reges, José E O; Salazar, A O; Maitelli, Carla W S P; Carvalho, Lucas G; Britto, Ursula J B

    2016-07-13

    This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential) model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1); 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2). Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved.

  2. Flow Rates Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis in Multiple-Zone Water-Injection Wells from Fluid Temperature Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. O. Reges

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is a contribution to the development of flow sensors in the oil and gas industry. It presents a methodology to measure the flow rates into multiple-zone water-injection wells from fluid temperature profiles and estimate the measurement uncertainty. First, a method to iteratively calculate the zonal flow rates using the Ramey (exponential model was described. Next, this model was linearized to perform an uncertainty analysis. Then, a computer program to calculate the injected flow rates from experimental temperature profiles was developed. In the experimental part, a fluid temperature profile from a dual-zone water-injection well located in the Northeast Brazilian region was collected. Thus, calculated and measured flow rates were compared. The results proved that linearization error is negligible for practical purposes and the relative uncertainty increases as the flow rate decreases. The calculated values from both the Ramey and linear models were very close to the measured flow rates, presenting a difference of only 4.58 m³/d and 2.38 m³/d, respectively. Finally, the measurement uncertainties from the Ramey and linear models were equal to 1.22% and 1.40% (for injection zone 1; 10.47% and 9.88% (for injection zone 2. Therefore, the methodology was successfully validated and all objectives of this work were achieved.

  3. Fluid flow in a reservoir drained by a multiple fractured horizontal well

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, S V

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model for computation of the fluid pressure in a reservoir drained by a horizontal multiple fractured well is proposed. The model is applicable for an arbitrary network of fractures with different finite conductivities of each segment, for variable in space and time physical parameters of the reservoir and for different field development plans. The variational formulation of the model allows effective numerical simulation using the finite element method. Case studies demonstrate how the main flow characteristics (well productivity, pressure distribution) depend on the geometrical and physical characteristics of the reservoir and of the fracture network. The presented model is suitable for estimation of the productivity of a multiple fractured well and as an optimization tool for efficient reservoir development.

  4. Applying Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling for Investigating Conical Reverse-Flow Cyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Jakštonienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the efficiency of cyclones, devices for separating heavy particles from their carrying fluid, is examined. A review of experimental and theoretical papers is conducted introducing three dimensional differential equations for transfer processes and the Reynolds stress model of turbulence. The paper describes the numerical modelling of the swirling fluid flow in the conical reverse-flow cyclone the height of which is 0.50 m and diameter – 0.20 m. The governing fluid flow equations are solved using the finite volume method in a body-fitted coordinate system. A reasonable agreement between the presented results of numerical calculations (inlet velocity - 4.64 m/s and fluid flow rate - 0.28 m3/s and experimental and numerical data obtained by other authors is found (mean relative error did not exceed ± 5%. Article in Lithuanian

  5. Non‐Darcian flow experiments of shear‐thinning fluids through rough‐walled rock fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodríguez de Castro, Antonio; Radilla, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Understanding non‐Darcian flow of shear‐thinning fluids through rough‐walled rock fractures is of vital importance in a number of industrial applications such as hydrogeology or petroleum engineering...

  6. Star-Shaped Fluid Flow Tool for Use in Making Differential Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid flow tool's plate-like structure has a ring portion defining a flow hole, a support portion extending radially away from the ring portion and adapted to be coupled to conduit wall, and extensions extending radially away from the ring portion such that a periphery of the plate-like structure is defined by the extensions and trough regions between adjacent extensions. One or more ports formed in the ring portion are in fluid communication with the flow hole. A first manifold in the plate-like structure is in fluid communication with each port communicating with the flow hole. One or more ports are formed in the periphery of the plate-like structure. A second manifold in the plate-like structure is in fluid communication with each port formed in the periphery. The first and second manifolds extend through the plate-like structure to terminate and be accessible at the conduit wall.

  7. Existence of solutions of a nonlinear system modelling fluid flow in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dam Besenyei

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence of weak solutions for nonlinear differential equations that describe fluid flow through a porous medium. Existence is proved using the theory of monotone operators, and some examples are given.

  8. Averaged equations for an isothermal, developing flow of a fluid- solid mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K.R.; Johnson, G. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Massoudi, M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    A mathematical description of a flowing fluid with entrained particulate solids is presented within the context of Mixture Theory. The mixture is considered to consist of a linearly viscous fluid and a granular solid. The balance of mass and balance of linear momentum equations for each component are averaged over the cross section of the flow to obtain ordinary differential equations describing developing flow between parallel plates. The resulting coupled equations describe the variation of the average velocities and volume fraction in the direction of flow, and represent a simplified approximate set of equations which are easier to use in engineering applications.

  9. Estimation of blood flow rates in large microvascular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Brendan C; Lee, Jack; Smith, Nicolas P; Secomb, Timothy W

    2012-08-01

    Recent methods for imaging microvascular structures provide geometrical data on networks containing thousands of segments. Prediction of functional properties, such as solute transport, requires information on blood flow rates also, but experimental measurement of many individual flows is difficult. Here, a method is presented for estimating flow rates in a microvascular network based on incomplete information on the flows in the boundary segments that feed and drain the network. With incomplete boundary data, the equations governing blood flow form an underdetermined linear system. An algorithm was developed that uses independent information about the distribution of wall shear stresses and pressures in microvessels to resolve this indeterminacy, by minimizing the deviation of pressures and wall shear stresses from target values. The algorithm was tested using previously obtained experimental flow data from four microvascular networks in the rat mesentery. With two or three prescribed boundary conditions, predicted flows showed relatively small errors in most segments and fewer than 10% incorrect flow directions on average. The proposed method can be used to estimate flow rates in microvascular networks, based on incomplete boundary data, and provides a basis for deducing functional properties of microvessel networks. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Estimation of flow direction in meandering compound channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingnian; Zhou, Qin; Huang, Sheng; Guo, Yakun; Liu, Chao

    2018-01-01

    The flow in the main channel of a meandering compound channel does not occur in the ridge direction because of the effect of the upstream floodplain flows. This study proposes a model for estimating the flow direction in the depth-averaged two-dimensional domain (depth-averaged flow angles) between the entrance and the apex sections. Detailed velocity measurements were performed in the region between the meander entrance section and apex section in a large-scale meandering compound channel. The vertical size of the secondary current cell is highly related to the depth-averaged flow angle; thus, the means of the local flow angles above the secondary current cell and within the cell are separately discussed. The experimental measurements indicate that the mean local flow angle above the cell is equal to the section angle, whereas the mean local flow angle within the cell is equal to zero. The proposed model is validated using published data from five sources. Good agreement is obtained between the predictions and measurements, indicating that the proposed model can accurately estimate the depth-averaged flow direction in the meandering compound channels. Finally, the limitations and application ranges of the model are discussed.

  11. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. I - Unsteady flow concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced military aircraft 'supermaneuverability' requirements entail the sustained operation of airfoils at stalled flow conditions. The present work addresses the effects of separated flow on vehicle dynamics; an analytic method is presented which employs static experimental data to predict the separated flow effect on incompressible unsteady aerodynamics. The key parameters in the analytic relationship between steady and nonsteady aerodynamics are the time-lag before a change of flow conditions can affect the separation-induced aerodynamic loads, the accelerated flow effect, and the moving wall effect.

  12. Plastic bottle oscillator: Rhythmicity and mode bifurcation of fluid flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kohira, Masahiro I.; Magome, Nobuyuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2007-01-01

    The oscillatory flow of water draining from an upside-down plastic bottle with a thin pipe attached to its head is studied as an example of a dissipative structure generated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. Mode bifurcation was observed in the water/air flow: no flow, oscillatory flow, and counter flow were found when the inner diameter of the thin pipe was changed. The modes are stable against perturbations. A coupled two-bottle system exhibits either in-phase or anti-phase self-synchr...

  13. Computational and experimental investigation of flow and fluid mixing in the roller bottle bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, D R; Muzzio, F J; Aunins, J G; Singhvi, R

    2000-10-20

    The fully three-dimensional velocity field in a roller bottle bioreactor is simulated for two systems (creeping flow and inertial flow conditions) using a control volume-finite element method, and validated experimentally using particle imaging velocimetry. The velocity fields and flow patterns are described in detail using velocity contour plots and tracer particle pathline computations. Bulk fluid mixing in the roller bottle is then examined using a computational fluid tracer program and flow visualization experiments. It is shown that the velocity fields and flow patterns are substantially different for each of these flow cases. For creeping flow conditions the flow streamlines consist of symmetric, closed three-dimensional loops; and for inertial flow conditions, streamlines consist of asymmetric toroidal surfaces. Fluid tracers remain trapped on these streamlines and are unable to contact other regions of the flow domain. As a result, fluid mixing is greatly hindered, especially in the axial direction. The lack of efficient axial mixing is verified computationally and experimentally. Such mixing limitations, however, are readily overcome by introducing a small-amplitude vertical rocking motion that disrupts both symmetry and recirculation, leading to much faster and complete axial mixing. The frequency of such motion is shown to have a significant effect on mixing rate, which is a critical parameter in the overall performance of roller bottles. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. CFD Study of Fluid Flow in an All-glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ai, Ning; Fan, Jianhua; Li, Yumin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: The all-glass evacuated tube solar water heater is one of the most widely used solar thermal technologies. The aim of the paper is to investigate fluid flow in the solar water heater by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The investigation was carried out with a focus...

  15. Non-Newtonian fluid flow in annular pipes and entropy generation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    non-Newtonian parameter, while it is the reverse for the viscosity parame- ter, which is more pronounced in the region close to the annular pipe inner wall. Keywords. Non-Newtonian fluid; third-grade fluid; variable viscosity; entropy; entropy generation number. 1. Introduction. Flow through annular pipes finds application in ...

  16. Analytical Solution of Unsteady Gravity Flows of A Power-Law Fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present an analytical study of unsteady non-linear rheological effects of a power-law fluid under gravity. The fluid flows through a porous medium. The governing equations are derived and similarity solutions are determined. The results show the existence of traveling waves. It is assumed that the viscosity is temperature ...

  17. Asymptotic expansion of unsteady gravity flow of a power-law fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a paper on the asymptotic expansion of unsteady non-linear rheological effects of a power-law fluid under gravity. The fluid flows through a porous medium. The asymptotic expansion is employed to obtain solution of the nonlinear problem. The results show the existence of traveling waves. It is assumed that the ...

  18. Stagnation-point flow of the Walters' B' fluid with slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Labropulu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The steady two-dimensional stagnation point flow of a non-Newtonian Walters' B' fluid with slip is studied. The fluid impinges on the wall either orthogonally or obliquely. A finite difference technique is employed to obtain solutions.

  19. Validation of a new blood-mimicking fluid for use in Doppler flow test objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramnarine, KV; Nassiri, DK; Hoskins, PR; Lubbers, J

    A blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) suitable for use in Doppler flow test objects is described and characterised, The BMF consists of 5 mu m diameter nylon scattering particles suspended in a fluid base of water, glycerol, dextran and surfactant, The acoustical properties of various BMF preparations were

  20. Exchange flow of two immiscible fluids and the principle of maximum flux

    OpenAIRE

    Kerswell, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    The steady, coaxial flow in which two immiscible, incompressible fluids move past each other in a cylindrical tube has a continuum of possibilities due to the arbitrariness of the interface between the fluids. By invoking the presence of surface tension to at least restrict the shape of any interface to that of a circular arc or full circle, we consider the following question: which flow will maximise the exchange when there is only one dividing interface Gamma? Surprisingly, the answer diffe...

  1. The dynamic interplay between saline fluid flow and rock permeability in magmatic-hydrothermal systems

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Weis

    2015-01-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits document the interplay between saline fluid flow and rock permeability. Numerical simulations of multiphase flow of variably miscible, compressible H2O–NaCl fluids in concert with a dynamic permeability model can reproduce characteristics of porphyry copper and epithermal gold systems. This dynamic permeability model uses values between 10−22 and 10−13 m2, incorporating depth-dependent permeability profiles characteristic for tectonically active crust as wel...

  2. Effect of sample size on the fluid flow through a single fractured granitoid

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kunal Kumar; Singh, Devendra Narain; Gamage, Ranjith Pathegama

    2016-01-01

    Most of deep geological engineered structures, such as rock caverns, nuclear waste disposal repositories, metro rail tunnels, multi-layer underground parking, are constructed within hard crystalline rocks because of their high quality and low matrix permeability. In such rocks, fluid flows mainly through fractures. Quantification of fractures along with the behavior of the fluid flow through them, at different scales, becomes quite important. Earlier studies have revealed the influence of sam...

  3. Fluid flows and forces in development: functions, features and biophysical principles

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Jacky G Goetz; Kent L Hill; Vermot, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Throughout morphogenesis, cells experience intracellular tensile and contractile forces on microscopic scales. Cells also experience extracellular forces, such as static forces mediated by the extracellular matrix and forces resulting from microscopic fluid flow. Although the biological ramifications of static forces have received much attention, little is known about the roles of fluid flows and forces during embryogenesis. Here, we focus on the microfluidic forces generated by cilia-driven ...

  4. Similarity Solutions for Flow and Heat Transfer of Non-Newtonian Fluid over a Stretching Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Atta Sojoudi; Ali Mazloomi; Saha, Suvash C.; Gu, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    Similarity solutions are carried out for flow of power law non-Newtonian fluid film on unsteady stretching surface subjected to constant heat flux. Free convection heat transfer induces thermal boundary layer within a semi-infinite layer of Boussinesq fluid. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations (PDE) governing the flow and the boundary conditions are converted to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) using two-parameter groups. This technique reduces the number of ...

  5. High order methods for incompressible fluid flow: Application to moving boundary problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoentegaard, Tormod

    2008-04-15

    Fluid flows with moving boundaries are encountered in a large number of real life situations, with two such types being fluid-structure interaction and free-surface flows. Fluid-structure phenomena are for instance apparent in many hydrodynamic applications; wave effects on offshore structures, sloshing and fluid induced vibrations, and aeroelasticity; flutter and dynamic response. Free-surface flows can be considered as a special case of a fluid-fluid interaction where one of the fluids are practically inviscid, such as air. This type of flows arise in many disciplines such as marine hydrodynamics, chemical engineering, material processing, and geophysics. The driving forces for free-surface flows may be of large scale such as gravity or inertial forces, or forces due to surface tension which operate on a much smaller scale. Free-surface flows with surface tension as a driving mechanism include the flow of bubbles and droplets, and the evolution of capillary waves. In this work we consider incompressible fluid flow, which are governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. There are several challenges when simulating moving boundary problems numerically, and these include - Spatial discretization - Temporal discretization - Imposition of boundary conditions - Solution strategy for the linear equations. These are some of the issues which will be addressed in this introduction. We will first formulate the problem in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework, and introduce the weak formulation of the problem. Next, we discuss the spatial and temporal discretization before we move to the imposition of surface tension boundary conditions. In the final section we discuss the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  6. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Porous Medium Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Imam; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    Fluid flow and heat transfer in porous medium are an interesting phenomena to study. One kind example of porous medium is geothermal reservoir. By understanding the fluid flow and heat transfer in porous medium, it help us to understand the phenomena in geothermal reservoir, such as thermal change because of injection process. Thermal change in the reservoir is the most important physical property to known since it has correlation with performance of the reservoir, such as the electrical energy produced by reservoir. In this simulation, we investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer in geothermal reservoir as a simple flow in porous medium canal using Lattice Boltzmann Method. In this simulation, we worked on 2 dimension with nine vectors velocity (D2Q9). To understand the fluid flow and heat transfer in reservoir, we varied the fluid temperature that inject into the reservoir and set the heat source constant at 410°C. The first variation we set the fluid temperature 45°C, second 102.5°C, and the last 307.5°C. Furthermore, we also set the parameter of reservoir such as porosity, density, and injected fluid velocity are constant. Our results show that for the first temperature variation distribution between experiment and simulation is 92.86% match. From second variation shows that there is one pick of thermal distribution and one of turbulence zone, and from the last variation show that there are two pick of thermal distribution and two of turbulence zone.

  7. Parametric study of fluid flow manipulation with piezoelectric macrofiber composite flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, O.; Tarazaga, P.; Stremler, M.; Shahab, S.

    2017-04-01

    Active Fluid Flow Control (AFFC) has received great research attention due to its significant potential in engineering applications. It is known that drag reduction, turbulence management, flow separation delay and noise suppression through active control can result in significantly increased efficiency of future commercial transport vehicles and gas turbine engines. In microfluidics systems, AFFC has mainly been used to manipulate fluid passing through the microfluidic device. We put forward a conceptual approach for fluid flow manipulation by coupling multiple vibrating structures through flow interactions in an otherwise quiescent fluid. Previous investigations of piezoelectric flaps interacting with a fluid have focused on a single flap. In this work, arrays of closely-spaced, free-standing piezoelectric flaps are attached perpendicular to the bottom surface of a tank. The coupling of vibrating flaps due to their interacting with the surrounding fluid is investigated in air (for calibration) and under water. Actuated flaps are driven with a harmonic input voltage, which results in bending vibration of the flaps that can work with or against the flow-induced bending. The size and spatial distribution of the attached flaps, and the phase and frequency of the input actuation voltage are the key parameters to be investigated in this work. Our analysis will characterize the electrohydroelastic dynamics of active, interacting flaps and the fluid motion induced by the system.

  8. A parallel offline CFD and closed-form approximation strategy for computationally efficient analysis of complex fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allphin, Devin

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution approximations for complex fluid flow problems have become a common and powerful engineering analysis technique. These tools, though qualitatively useful, remain limited in practice by their underlying inverse relationship between simulation accuracy and overall computational expense. While a great volume of research has focused on remedying these issues inherent to CFD, one traditionally overlooked area of resource reduction for engineering analysis concerns the basic definition and determination of functional relationships for the studied fluid flow variables. This artificial relationship-building technique, called meta-modeling or surrogate/offline approximation, uses design of experiments (DOE) theory to efficiently approximate non-physical coupling between the variables of interest in a fluid flow analysis problem. By mathematically approximating these variables, DOE methods can effectively reduce the required quantity of CFD simulations, freeing computational resources for other analytical focuses. An idealized interpretation of a fluid flow problem can also be employed to create suitably accurate approximations of fluid flow variables for the purposes of engineering analysis. When used in parallel with a meta-modeling approximation, a closed-form approximation can provide useful feedback concerning proper construction, suitability, or even necessity of an offline approximation tool. It also provides a short-circuit pathway for further reducing the overall computational demands of a fluid flow analysis, again freeing resources for otherwise unsuitable resource expenditures. To validate these inferences, a design optimization problem was presented requiring the inexpensive estimation of aerodynamic forces applied to a valve operating on a simulated piston-cylinder heat engine. The determination of these forces was to be found using parallel surrogate and exact approximation methods, thus evidencing the comparative

  9. Extended lubrication theory: improved estimates of flow in channels with variable geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Behrouz; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Holmes, Douglas P; Stone, Howard A

    2017-10-01

    Lubrication theory is broadly applicable to the flow characterization of thin fluid films and the motion of particles near surfaces. We offer an extension to lubrication theory by starting with Stokes equations and considering higher-order terms in a systematic perturbation expansion to describe the fluid flow in a channel with features of a modest aspect ratio. Experimental results qualitatively confirm the higher-order analytical solutions, while numerical results are in very good agreement with the higher-order analytical results. We show that the extended lubrication theory is a robust tool for an accurate estimate of pressure drop in channels with shape changes on the order of the channel height, accounting for both smooth and sharp changes in geometry.

  10. A study of methods to estimate debris flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flow velocities are commonly back-calculated from superelevation events which require subjective estimates of radii of curvature of bends in the debris flow channel or predicted using flow equations that require the selection of appropriate rheological models and material property inputs. This research investigated difficulties associated with the use of these conventional velocity estimation methods. Radii of curvature estimates were found to vary with the extent of the channel investigated and with the scale of the media used, and back-calculated velocities varied among different investigated locations along a channel. Distinct populations of Bingham properties were found to exist between those measured by laboratory tests and those back-calculated from field data; thus, laboratory-obtained values would not be representative of field-scale debris flow behavior. To avoid these difficulties with conventional methods, a new preliminary velocity estimation method is presented that statistically relates flow velocity to the channel slope and the flow depth. This method presents ranges of reasonable velocity predictions based on 30 previously measured velocities. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Penetrometry and estimation of the flow rate of powder excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatloukal, Z; Sklubalová, Z

    2007-03-01

    In this work, penetrometry with a sphere was employed to study the flow properties of non-consolidated pharmaceutical powder excipients: sodium chloride, sodium citrate, boric acid, and sorbitol. In order to estimate flow rate, the pressure of penetration in Pascals was used. Penetrometry measurement with a sphere requires modification of the measurement container, in particular by decreasing the diameter of the container, to prevent undesirable movement of material in a direction opposite to that in which the sphere penetrates. Thus penetrometry by a sphere seems to be similar to indentation by the Brinell hardness tester. The pressure of penetration was determined from the depth of penetration by analogy with the Brinell hardness number and an equation for the inter conversion of the two variables is presented. The penetration pressure allowed direct estimation of the flow rate only for those powder excipients with a size fraction in the range of 0.250-0.630 mm. Using the ratio of penetration pressure to bulk density, a polynomial quadratic equation was generated from which the flow rates for the group of all tested powders could be estimated. Finally, if the inverse ratio of bulk density and penetration pressure was used as an independent variable, the flow rate could be estimated by linear regression with the coefficient of determination r2 = 0.9941. In conclusion, using sphere penetrometry, the flow properties of non-consolidated powder samples could be investigated by indentation. As a result, a linear regression in which the flow rate was directly proportional to the powder bulk density and inversely proportional to the penetration pressure could be best recommended for the estimation of the flow rate of powder excipients.

  12. Estimation of overland flow metrics at semiarid condition: Patagonian Monte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M. J.; Ares, J. O.

    2012-05-01

    Water infiltration and overland flow (WIOF) processes are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological management. WIOF processes in arid and semiarid regions present regional characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina) was performed in order to estimate infiltration-overland descriptive flow parameters. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots at z-scale depression storage intensity. The experimental procedure presented supplies plot-scale estimates of overland flow and infiltration intensities at various intensities of water input which can be incorporated in larger-scale hydrological grid-models of arid regions. Findings were: (1) Overland flow velocities as well as infiltration-overland flow mass balances are consistently modelled by considering variable infiltration rates corresponding to depression storage and/or non-ponded areas. (2) The statistical relations presented allow the estimation of theoretical hydrodynamic parameters (Chezy's frictional C, average overland flow depth d*) through measurable characteristics of the surface soil and overland flow kinetics. (3) A protocol of field experiments and coupled time-distributed modelling to 1-2 above is described. The methodology and results obtained in this study are probably relevant to similar arid-semiarid areas of the world.

  13. Leveraging Understanding of Flow of Variable Complex Fluid to Design Better Absorbent Hygiene Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautkramer, C.; Rend, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Menstrual flow, which is a result of shedding of uterus endometrium, occurs periodically in sync with a women's hormonal cycle. Management of this flow while allowing women to pursue their normal daily lives is the purpose of many commercial products. Some of these products, e.g. feminine hygiene pads and tampons, utilize porous materials in achieving their goal. In this paper we will demonstrate different phenomena that have been observed in flow of menstrual fluid through these porous materials, share some of the advances made in experimental and analytical study of these phenomena, and also present some of the unsolved challenges and difficulties encountered while studying this kind of flow. Menstrual fluid is generally composed of four main components: blood plasma, blood cells, cervical mucus, and tissue debris. This non-homogeneous, multiphase fluid displays very complex rheological behavior, e. g., yield stress, thixotropy, and visco-elasticity, that varies throughout and between menstrual cycles and among women due to various factors. Flow rates are also highly variable during menstruation and across the population and the rheological properties of the fluid change during the flow into and through the product. In addition to these phenomena, changes to the structure of the porous medium within the product can also be seen due to fouling and/or swelling of the material. This paper will, also, share how the fluid components impact the flow and the consequences for computer simulation, the creation of a simulant fluid and testing methods, and for designing products that best meet consumer needs. We hope to bring to light the challenges of managing this complex flow to meet a basic need of women all over the world. An opportunity exists to apply learnings from research in other disciplines to improve the scientific knowledge related to the flow of this complex fluid through the porous medium that is a sanitary product.

  14. Estimation of Saturation Flow Rates at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-qiao Shao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The saturation flow rate is a fundamental parameter to measure the intersection capacity and time the traffic signals. However, it is revealed that traditional methods which are mainly developed using the average value of observed queue discharge headways to estimate the saturation headway might lead to underestimate saturation flow rate. The goal of this paper is to study the stochastic nature of queue discharge headways and to develop a more accurate estimate method for saturation headway and saturation flow rate. Based on the surveyed data, the characteristics of queue discharge headways and the estimation method of saturated flow rate are studied. It is found that the average value of queue discharge headways is greater than the median value and that the skewness of the headways is positive. Normal distribution tests were conducted before and after a log transformation of the headways. The goodness-of-fit test showed that for some surveyed sites, the queue discharge headways can be fitted by the normal distribution and for other surveyed sites, the headways can be fitted by lognormal distribution. According to the queue discharge headway characteristics, the median value of queue discharge headways is suggested to estimate the saturation headway and a new method of estimation saturation flow rates is developed.

  15. Fluid-driven metamorphism of the continental crust governed by nanoscale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plümper, Oliver; Botan, Alexandru; Los, Catharina; Liu, Yang; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-09-01

    The transport of fluids through the Earth's crust controls the redistribution of elements to form mineral and hydrocarbon deposits, the release and sequestration of greenhouse gases, and facilitates metamorphic reactions that influence lithospheric rheology. In permeable systems with a well-connected porosity, fluid transport is largely driven by fluid pressure gradients. In less permeable rocks, deformation may induce permeability by creating interconnected heterogeneities, but without these perturbations, mass transport is limited along grain boundaries or relies on transformation processes that self-generate transient fluid pathways. The latter can facilitate large-scale fluid and mass transport in nominally impermeable rocks without large-scale fluid transport pathways. Here, we show that pervasive, fluid-driven metamorphism of crustal igneous rocks is directly coupled to the production of nanoscale porosity. Using multi-dimensional nano-imaging and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that in feldspar, the most abundant mineral family in the Earth's crust, electrokinetic transport through reaction-induced nanopores (mediated mineral transformation reactions can be considerably influenced by nanofluidic transport phenomena.

  16. Soft Sensing of Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in Open Venturi Channel Using an Array of Ultrasonic Level Sensors-AI Models and Their Validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhantyal, Khim; Viumdal, Håkon; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2017-10-26

    In oil and gas and geothermal installations, open channels followed by sieves for removal of drill cuttings, are used to monitor the quality and quantity of the drilling fluids. Drilling fluid flow rate is difficult to measure due to the varying flow conditions (e.g., wavy, turbulent and irregular) and the presence of drilling cuttings and gas bubbles. Inclusion of a Venturi section in the open channel and an array of ultrasonic level sensors above it at locations in the vicinity of and above the Venturi constriction gives the varying levels of the drilling fluid in the channel. The time series of the levels from this array of ultrasonic level sensors are used to estimate the drilling fluid flow rate, which is compared with Coriolis meter measurements. Fuzzy logic, neural networks and support vector regression algorithms applied to the data from temporal and spatial ultrasonic level measurements of the drilling fluid in the open channel give estimates of its flow rate with sufficient reliability, repeatability and uncertainty, providing a novel soft sensing of an important process variable. Simulations, cross-validations and experimental results show that feedforward neural networks with the Bayesian regularization learning algorithm provide the best flow rate estimates. Finally, the benefits of using this soft sensing technique combined with Venturi constriction in open channels are discussed.

  17. Soft Sensing of Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in Open Venturi Channel Using an Array of Ultrasonic Level Sensors—AI Models and Their Validations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khim Chhantyal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In oil and gas and geothermal installations, open channels followed by sieves for removal of drill cuttings, are used to monitor the quality and quantity of the drilling fluids. Drilling fluid flow rate is difficult to measure due to the varying flow conditions (e.g., wavy, turbulent and irregular and the presence of drilling cuttings and gas bubbles. Inclusion of a Venturi section in the open channel and an array of ultrasonic level sensors above it at locations in the vicinity of and above the Venturi constriction gives the varying levels of the drilling fluid in the channel. The time series of the levels from this array of ultrasonic level sensors are used to estimate the drilling fluid flow rate, which is compared with Coriolis meter measurements. Fuzzy logic, neural networks and support vector regression algorithms applied to the data from temporal and spatial ultrasonic level measurements of the drilling fluid in the open channel give estimates of its flow rate with sufficient reliability, repeatability and uncertainty, providing a novel soft sensing of an important process variable. Simulations, cross-validations and experimental results show that feedforward neural networks with the Bayesian regularization learning algorithm provide the best flow rate estimates. Finally, the benefits of using this soft sensing technique combined with Venturi constriction in open channels are discussed.

  18. Understanding Angiography-Based Aneurysm Flow Fields through Comparison with Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebral, J R; Mut, F; Chung, B J; Spelle, L; Moret, J; van Nijnatten, F; Ruijters, D

    2017-06-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to be an important factor for aneurysm progression and rupture. Our aim was to evaluate whether flow fields reconstructed from dynamic angiography data can be used to realistically represent the main flow structures in intracranial aneurysms. DSA-based flow reconstructions, obtained during interventional treatment, were compared qualitatively with flow fields obtained from patient-specific computational fluid dynamics models and quantitatively with projections of the computational fluid dynamics fields (by computing a directional similarity of the vector fields) in 15 cerebral aneurysms. The average similarity between the DSA and the projected computational fluid dynamics flow fields was 78% in the parent artery, while it was only 30% in the aneurysm region. Qualitatively, both the DSA and projected computational fluid dynamics flow fields captured the location of the inflow jet, the main vortex structure, the intrasaccular flow split, and the main rotation direction in approximately 60% of the cases. Several factors affect the reconstruction of 2D flow fields from dynamic angiography sequences. The most important factors are the 3-dimensionality of the intrasaccular flow patterns and inflow jets, the alignment of the main vortex structure with the line of sight, the overlapping of surrounding vessels, and possibly frame rate undersampling. Flow visualization with DSA from >1 projection is required for understanding of the 3D intrasaccular flow patterns. Although these DSA-based flow quantification techniques do not capture swirling or secondary flows in the parent artery, they still provide a good representation of the mean axial flow and the corresponding flow rate. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Dynamic fluid connectivity during steady-state multiphase flow in a sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catriona A; Menke, Hannah; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin J; Krevor, Samuel

    2017-08-01

    The current conceptual picture of steady-state multiphase Darcy flow in porous media is that the fluid phases organize into separate flow pathways with stable interfaces. Here we demonstrate a previously unobserved type of steady-state flow behavior, which we term "dynamic connectivity," using fast pore-scale X-ray imaging. We image the flow of N 2 and brine through a permeable sandstone at subsurface reservoir conditions, and low capillary numbers, and at constant fluid saturation. At any instant, the network of pores filled with the nonwetting phase is not necessarily connected. Flow occurs along pathways that periodically reconnect, like cars controlled by traffic lights. This behavior is consistent with an energy balance, where some of the energy of the injected fluids is sporadically converted to create new interfaces.

  20. Dynamic fluid connectivity during steady-state multiphase flow in a sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catriona A.; Menke, Hannah; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin J.; Krevor, Samuel

    2017-08-01

    The current conceptual picture of steady-state multiphase Darcy flow in porous media is that the fluid phases organize into separate flow pathways with stable interfaces. Here we demonstrate a previously unobserved type of steady-state flow behavior, which we term “dynamic connectivity,” using fast pore-scale X-ray imaging. We image the flow of N2 and brine through a permeable sandstone at subsurface reservoir conditions, and low capillary numbers, and at constant fluid saturation. At any instant, the network of pores filled with the nonwetting phase is not necessarily connected. Flow occurs along pathways that periodically reconnect, like cars controlled by traffic lights. This behavior is consistent with an energy balance, where some of the energy of the injected fluids is sporadically converted to create new interfaces.

  1. Plastic bottle oscillator: Rhythmicity and mode bifurcation of fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohira, Masahiro I.; Magome, Nobuyuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2007-10-01

    The oscillatory flow of water draining from an upside-down plastic bottle with a thin pipe attached to its head is studied as an example of a dissipative structure generated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. Mode bifurcation was observed in the water/air flow: no flow, oscillatory flow, and counter flow were found when the inner diameter of the thin pipe was changed. The modes are stable against perturbations. A coupled two-bottle system exhibits either in-phase or anti-phase self-synchronization. These characteristic behaviors imply that the essential features of the oscillatory flow in a single bottle system can be described as a limit-cycle oscillation.

  2. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan R Mahale; Anish Mehta; Sudhir Uchil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5?10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70?80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular m...

  3. Numerical solution of the start-up of well drilling fluid flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Gabriel Merhy de; Negrao, Cezar Otaviano Ribeiro; Franco, Admilson Teixeira [UTFPR - Federal University of Technology - Parana - Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mails: gabrielm@utfpr.edu.br, negrao@utfpr.edu.br, admilson@utfpr.edu.br; Martins, Andre Leibsohn; Gandelman, Roni Abensur [TEP/CENPES - PETROBRAS S/A, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br, roniag@petrobras.com.br

    2010-07-01

    The drilling fluid is designed to build up a gel-like structure, when at rest, in order to avoid cuttings to drop at the bore bottom and therefore to prevent the bit obstruction. As consequence, high pressures, which can be larger than the formation pressure and can damage the well, are needed to break up the gel when circulation resumes. Due to its thixotropic effect, the gel viscosity remains high for a while after the circulation restarts. The gelation may have significant importance, specially, in deep waters where high pressures and low temperatures take place. The current work presents a compressible transient flow model of the start-up flow of drilling fluids, in order to predict borehole pressures. The model comprises one-dimensional conservation equations of mass and momentum and one state equation for the calculation of the fluid density as a function of the pressure. The considered geometry is a concentric annular pipe of length L. Its internal diameter is D1 and external one, D2. For a circular pipe, the internal diameter is made equal to zero. The main difference from previous model was the type of boundary condition: Constant flow rate at the pipe inlet rather than the constant pressure. Both Newtonian and non-Newtonian Bingham fluid flows are considered. The governing equations are discretized by the Finite Volume Method using the fully implicit formulation and the first-order upwind scheme. The resulting non-linear algebraic equations are iteratively solved. The model results were corroborated with an analytical solution for Newtonian flows. Case studies are conducted to evaluate the effect of fluid flow properties, well geometry and flow rate on borehole pressures. For Bingham fluid flow one can observe that large pressures (compared with Newtonian fluid flow) are observed when constant flow rate are input as boundary condition. Pressure peaks caused by the acoustic wave propagation can be more intense in low compressible fluid flow, low viscosity

  4. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Buoyancy alters the flow in continuous flow electrophoresis chambers through the mechanism of hydrodynamic instability and, when the instability is supressed by careful cooling of the chamber boundaries, by restructuring the axial flow. The expanded roles of buoyancy follow upon adapting the size of the chamber and the electric field so as to fractionate certain sorts of cell populations. Scale-up problems, hydrodynamic stability and the altered flow fields are discussed to show how phenomena overlooked in the design and operations of narrow-gap devices take on an overwhelming importance in wide-gap chambers

  5. Numerical solutions for the fluid flow and the heat transfer of viscoplastic-type non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, A.; Pérez-Segarra, C. D.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Oliva, A.

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work is to provide numerical solutions for the fluid flow and the heat transfer generated in closed systems containing viscoplastic-type non-Newtonian fluids. A lid driven cavity (LDC) and a differentially heated cavity (DHC) are used as test cases. These numerical solutions can be an appropriate tool for verifying CFD codes which have been developed or adapted to deal with this kind of non-Newtonian fluids. In order to achieve this objective, an in-house CFD code has been implemented and correctly verified by the method of manufactured solutions and by some numerical solutions too. Furthermore, a high-performance CFD code (Termo Fluids S.L.) has been adapted and properly verified, by the corresponding numerical solutions, to deal with this kind of non-Newtonian fluids. The viscoplastic behaviour of certain non-Newtonian fluids will be generated from a viscous stress which has been defined by a potential-type rheological law. The pseudoplastic and dilatant behaviours will be studied. On this matter, the influence of different physical aspects on the numerical simulations will be analysed, e.g. different exponent values in the potential-type rheological law and different values of the non-dimensional numbers. Moreover, the influence of different numerical aspects on the numerical simulations will also be analysed, e.g. unstructured meshes, conservative numerical schemes and more efficient and parallel algorithms and solvers.

  6. Dynamic Fluid Flow and Geomechanical Coupling to Assess the CO2 Storage Integrity in Faulted Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baroni A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The SiteChar research on the Southern Adriatic Sea site focused on the investigation of the geomechanical and hydrodynamic behaviour of the storage complex in the case of CO2 injection in a reservoir consisting of fractured carbonate formations. Special attention was paid to the effects that natural faults and fractures might have on CO2 migration, and the effects that injection might have on the stability of faults. This assessment was originally performed via a hydro-geomechanical one-way coupling which relies on an adequate representation of faults in the model, allowing one to simulate fluid flow along the fault plane and inside faults as well as evolution of the stress state due to CO2 injection. The geological model was populated with petrophysical and geomechanical parameters derived either from laboratory measurements performed on samples from a reservoir analogue, or published literature. Since only sparse data were available, various scenarios were simulated to take into account the uncertainties in the fluid flow and geomechanical properties of the model: the different state of faults (i.e., open or closed and various in situ stress state, commonly named geostatic stresses as the earth’s crust deformation is assumed to be slow regarding the short-term study. Various fluid flow parameters were also considered, although only one set of petrophysical data corresponding to the most realistic ones is considered here. Faults modeled as volumetric elements behave as flow pathways for fluids when they are conductive. The injected CO2 migrates inside and through the Rovesti fault, which is located near the injection well. The fluid flow also induces overpressure in the faults. The overpressure in the Rovesti fault reaches 2.2 MPa while it reaches 4.4 MPa at the bottom hole of the injector. Extending to about 30 km, the pore pressure field reaches the Gondola fault located at 15 km from the injection zone but the overpressure does not exceed

  7. Axisymmetric stagnation-point flow of a third-grade fluid over a lubricated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sajid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, axisymmetric stagnation-point flow of a third-grade fluid over a disk lubricated with a power law fluid is considered. Due to thin lubrication layer of variable thickness, third-grade fluid experiences a partial slip on the surface. The flow problem is governed through a system of nonlinear partial differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions. A nonsimilar solution is presented in this article by implementing hybrid homotopy analysis method. This method combines the features of homotopy analysis and shooting methods. The results varying from no-slip to full-slip case are discussed under the influence of pertinent parameters.

  8. Off-centered stagnation point flow of a couple stress fluid towards a rotating disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Riaz, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    An investigation has been made to study the off-centered stagnation flow of a couple stress fluid over a rotating disk. The model developed for the governing problem in the form of partial differential equations has been converted to ordinary differential equations with the use of suitable similarity transformation. The analytical approximation has been made with the most promising analytical approach, homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence region of the obtained solution is determined and plotted. The effects of couple stress and nondimensional parameters have been observed on the flows of couple stress fluid. Also comparison has been made with the Newtonian fluid as the special case of considered problem.

  9. An adaptation of the low Mach number approximation for supercritical fluid buoyant flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accary, Gilbert; Raspo, Isabelle; Bontoux, Patrick; Zappoli, Bernard

    2005-05-01

    This Note describes an acoustic filtering of the equations governing the supercritical fluid buoyant flow driven by a weak heating. The resulting low Mach number approximation takes into account the compressibility of the fluid with respect to the hydrostatic pressure. Using the direct numerical simulation of a supercritical fluid flow in the Rayleigh-Bénard configuration, we show that the density stratification may be taken into account without further numerical effort and is fundamental for the prediction of the convective instability threshold induced by a weak heating. To cite this article: G. Accary et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  10. Numerical study of deformation-induced fluid flows in periodic osteonal matrix under harmonic axial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Lemaire, Thibault; Naili, Salah

    2009-05-01

    Living bone is a tissue that is constantly renewed. It has been demonstrated that bone fluid flow and induced shear effects on the bone cells are important players in triggering and signaling bone formation and remodelling. This Note presents a model studying interstitial fluid flow in cortical bone under axial harmonic loads. These living tissues are considered as saturated anisotropic poroelastic material characterized by three-dimensional periodic groups of osteons. Using a frequency-domain analysis, the fluid shear stress variations are studied for various loading conditions and geometrical or physical bone matrix parameters. To cite this article: V.-H. Nguyen et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  11. Self Calibrating Flow Estimation in Waste Water Pumping Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about where waste water is flowing in waste water networks is essential to optimize the operation of the network pumping stations. However, installation of flow sensors is expensive and requires regular maintenance. This paper proposes an alternative approach where the pumps and the waste...... water pit are used for estimating both the inflow and the pump flow of the pumping station. Due to the nature of waste water, the waste water pumps are heavily affected by wear and tear. To compensate for the wear of the pumps, the pump parameters, used for the flow estimation, are automatically...... calibrated. This calibration is done based on data batches stored at each pump cycle, hence makes the approach a self calibrating system. The approach is tested on a pumping station operating in a real waste water network....

  12. Fluid Flow and Heat Transport Computation for Power-Law Scaling Poroperm Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Leary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In applying Darcy’s law to fluid flow in geologic formations, it is generally assumed that flow variations average to an effectively constant formation flow property. This assumption is, however, fundamentally inaccurate for the ambient crust. Well-log, well-core, and well-flow empirics show that crustal flow spatial variations are systematically correlated from mm to km. Translating crustal flow spatial correlation empirics into numerical form for fluid flow/transport simulation requires computations to be performed on a single global mesh that supports long-range spatial correlation flow structures. Global meshes populated by spatially correlated stochastic poroperm distributions can be processed by 3D finite-element solvers. We model wellbore-logged Dm-scale temperature data due to heat advective flow into a well transecting small faults in a Hm-scale sandstone volume. Wellbore-centric thermal transport is described by Peclet number Pe ≡ a0φv0/D (a0 = wellbore radius, v0 = fluid velocity at a0, φ = mean crustal porosity, and D = rock-water thermal diffusivity. The modelling schema is (i 3D global mesh for spatially correlated stochastic poropermeability; (ii ambient percolation flow calibrated by well-core porosity-controlled permeability; (iii advection via fault-like structures calibrated by well-log neutron porosity; (iv flow Pe ~ 0.5 in ambient crust and Pe ~ 5 for fault-borne advection.

  13. Estimating flow using tracers and hydraulics in synthetic heterogeneous aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Marie; Cook, Peter G; Haaken, Klaus; Simmons, Craig T

    2009-01-01

    Regional ground water flow is most usually estimated using Darcy's law, with hydraulic conductivities estimated from pumping tests, but can also be estimated using ground water residence times derived from radioactive tracers. The two methods agree reasonably well in relatively homogeneous aquifers but it is not clear which is likely to produce more reliable estimates of ground water flow rates in heterogeneous systems. The aim of this paper is to compare bias and uncertainty of tracer and hydraulic approaches to assess ground water flow in heterogeneous aquifers. Synthetic two-dimensional aquifers with different levels of heterogeneity (correlation lengths, variances) are used to simulate ground water flow, pumping tests, and transport of radioactive tracers. Results show that bias and uncertainty of flow rates increase with the variance of the hydraulic conductivity for both methods. The bias resulting from the nonlinearity of the concentration-time relationship can be reduced by choosing a tracer with a decay rate similar to the mean ground water residence time. The bias on flow rates estimated from pumping tests is reduced when performing long duration tests. The uncertainty on ground water flow is minimized when the sampling volume is large compared to the correlation length. For tracers, the uncertainty is related to the ratio of correlation length to the distance between sampling wells. For pumping tests, it is related to the ratio of correlation length to the pumping test's radius of influence. In regional systems, it may be easier to minimize this ratio for tracers than for pumping tests. Copyright © 2009 The Author(s). Journal Compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  14. Entropy generation of micropolar fluid flow in an inclined porous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Srinivasacharya

    collectors and geothermal energy systems depend on entropy generation. The concept of entropy generation rate in flow and thermal systems was introduced by Bejan [1]. It is observed that the thermal system efficiency is enhanced by minimizing the entropy generation of the system [2–4]. The flow through ducts or pipes is ...

  15. Controllability of Non-Newtonian Fluids Under Homogeneous Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Lynda M

    2007-01-01

    .... The constitutive models are as follows: the Phan-Thien-Tanner model; the Johnson-Segalman model; and the Doi model. The effect of extensional flow on these models and the effect of shear flow on the Doi model have not been explored previous to this work...

  16. Fluid/Vapor Separator for Variable Flow Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. M.; Chuang, C.; Frederking, T. H.; Brown, G. S.; Kamioka, Y.; Vorreiter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Shutter varies gas throughput of porous plug. Variable area exposed on porous plug allows to pass varying rates of vapor flow while blocking flow of liquid helium II from cryogenic bath. Applications in refining operations, industrial chemistry, and steam-powered equipment.

  17. Electrostatically frequency tunable micro-beam-based piezoelectric fluid flow energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mousa; Sharafkhani, Naser

    2017-07-01

    This research investigates the dynamic behavior of a sandwich micro-beam based piezoelectric energy harvester with electrostatically adjustable resonance frequency. The system consists of a cantilever micro-beam immersed in a fluid domain and is subjected to the simultaneous action of cross fluid flow and nonlinear electrostatic force. Two parallel piezoelectric laminates are extended along the length of the micro-beam and connected to an external electric circuit which generates an output power as a result of the micro-beam oscillations. The fluid-coupled structure is modeled using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and the equivalent force terms for the fluid flow. Fluid induced forces comprise the added inertia force which is evaluated using equivalent added mass and the drag and lift forces which are evaluated using relative velocity and Van der Pol equation. In addition to flow velocity and fluid density, the influence of several design parameters such as external electrical resistance, piezo layer position, and dc voltage on the generated power are investigated by using Galerkin and step by step linearization method. It is shown that for given flowing fluid parameters, i.e., density and velocity, one can adjust the applied dc voltage to tune resonance frequency so that the lock-in phenomenon with steady large amplitude oscillations happens, also by adjusting the harvester parameters including the mechanical and electrical ones, the maximal output power of the harvester becomes possible.

  18. Polygon formation and surface flow on a rotating fluid surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Raymond; Tophøj, Laust Emil Hjerrild; Homan, T. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    'wet' or with a 'dry' centre. For the dry structures, we present measurements of the surface shapes and the process of formation. We show experimental evidence that the formation can take place as a two-stage process: first the system approaches an almost stable rotationally symmetric state and from......, we measure the surface flows by particle image velocimetry (PIV) and show that there are three vortices present, but that the strength of these vortices is far too weak to account for the rotation velocity of the polygon. We show that partial blocking of the surface flow destroys the polygons and re......-establishes the rotational symmetry. For the rotationally symmetric state our theoretical analysis of the surface flow shows that it consists of two distinct regions: an inner, rigidly rotating centre and an outer annulus, where the surface flow is that of a point vortex with a weak secondary flow. This prediction...

  19. Modeling of movement-induced and flow-induced fluid forces in fast switching valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Schmidt, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Fast switching fluid power valves set strict requirements on performance, size and energy efficiency and simulation models are therefore needed to obtain good designs of such components. The valve moving member is subject to fluid forces depending on the valve flow rate and movement of the valve......-pressure relationship of a switching valve based on CFD results is presented along with the fluid force model, to constitute a complete valve fluid model. The parameters needed for the proposed model are determined based on CFD analyses, and the process of finding these parameters are described based on a reference...

  20. Modeling the Effect of Fluid Flow on a Growing Network of Fractures in a Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhashim, Mohammed; Koch, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The injection of a viscous fluid at high pressure in a geological formation induces the fracturing of pre-existing joints. Assuming a constant solid-matrix stress field, a weak joint saturated with fluid is fractured when the fluid pressure exceeds a critical value that depends on the joint's orientation. In this work, the formation of a network of fractures in a porous medium is modeled. When the average length of the fractures is much smaller than the radius of a cluster of fractured joints, the fluid flow within the network can be described as Darcy flow in a permeable medium consisting of the fracture network. The permeability and porosity of the medium are functions of the number density of activated joints and consequently depend on the fluid pressure. We demonstrate conditions under which these relationships can be derived from percolation theory. Fluid may also be lost from the fracture network by flowing into the permeable rock matrix. The solution of the model shows that the cluster radius grows as a power law with time in two regimes: (1) an intermediate time regime when the network contains many fractures but fluid loss is negligible; and (2) a long time regime when fluid loss dominates. In both regimes, the power law exponent depends on the Euclidean dimension and the injection rate dependence on time.

  1. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer for a viscoelastic fluid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M REZA

    2017-11-09

    Nov 9, 2017 ... increasing lateral interface velocity. It is observed that lateral interface velocity increases with increasing viscoelastic parameter for fixed values of density and viscosity ratio of the two fluids. The convective heat transfer is investigated base on the similarity solutions for the temperature distribution of the two ...

  2. Fluid Dynamic Mechanisms and Interactions within Separated Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    of redevelop- It is now worthwhile to note that with ZR and 6,*,, as the charn ’ . ., eter .o.. I ., . ’ i rre,; pond - ’.,-’A 392 W. L. CHOW AIAA...161. 12. Mazumder, M. K., B. D. Hoyle , and K. J. Kirsch, "Generation and Fluid Dynamics of Scattering Aerosols in Laser Doppler Velocimetry," Proc. of

  3. Stability of fluid flow through deformable tubes and channels: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    many applications in microfluidic devices use the soft elastomer polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) as the material for fabrication ..... this expectation proves to be incorrect, as will be explained later in this review. Some studies ... fluid stress at the interface, and tj is the unit vector tangential to the flexible surface. Dn is the z = 1.

  4. Numerical solution of chemically reactive non-Newtonian fluid flow: Dual stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Malik, M. Y.; Khan, Abid Ali; Zehra, Iffat; Zahri, Mostafa; Tahir, M.

    2017-12-01

    We have found that only a few attempts are available in the literature relatively to the tangent hyperbolic fluid flow induced by stretching cylindrical surfaces. In particular, temperature and concentration stratification effects have not been investigated until now with respect to the tangent hyperbolic fluid model. Therefore, we have considered the tangent hyperbolic fluid flow induced by an acutely inclined cylindrical surface in the presence of both temperature and concentration stratification effects. To be more specific, the fluid flow is attained with the no slip condition, which implies that the bulk motion of the fluid particles is the same as the stretching velocity of a cylindrical surface. Additionally, the flow field situation is manifested with heat generation, mixed convection and chemical reaction effects. The flow partial differential equations give a complete description of the present problem. Therefore, to trace out the solution, a set of suitable transformations is introduced to convert these equations into ordinary differential equations. In addition, a self-coded computational algorithm is executed to inspect the numerical solution of these reduced equations. The effect logs of the involved parameters are provided graphically. Furthermore, the variations of the physical quantities are examined and given with the aid of tables. It is observed that the fluid temperature is a decreasing function of the thermal stratification parameter and a similar trend is noticed for the concentration via the solutal stratification parameter.

  5. Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport invariably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2000-08-08

    Reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in unsaturated fractured rocks has received increasing attention for studies of contaminant transport, groundwater quality, waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposits, sedimentary diagenesis, and fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems. This paper presents methods for modeling geochemical systems that emphasize: (1) involvement of the gas phase in addition to liquid and solid phases in fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) treatment of physically and chemically heterogeneous and fractured rocks, (3) the effect of heat on fluid flow and reaction properties and processes, and (4) the kinetics of fluid-rock interaction. The physical and chemical process model is embodied in a system of partial differential equations for flow and transport, coupled to algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations for chemical interactions. For numerical solution, the continuum equations are discretized in space and time. Space discretization is based on a flexible integral finite difference approach that can use irregular gridding to model geologic structure; time is discretized fully implicitly as a first-order finite difference. Heterogeneous and fractured media are treated with a general multiple interacting continua method that includes double-porosity, dual-permeability, and multi-region models as special cases. A sequential iteration approach is used to treat the coupling between fluid flow and mass transport on the one hand, chemical reactions on the other. Applications of the methods developed here to variably saturated geochemical systems are presented in a companion paper (part 2, this issue).

  6. Vorticity transport in shock driven plasma flows: A comparison of MHD and two-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Daryl; Wheatley, Vincent; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in a plasma, through the application of a seed magnetic field, has been studied in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodymanics. These studies have shown that suppression is achieved through the transport of vorticity by magnetohydrodynamic waves away from a perturbed fluid-fluid interface where it was baroclinically generated by shock impact. The implementation of a more physically accurate, fully electromagnetic, two-fluid plasma representation allows a more realistic investigation of vorticity transport in shock driven plasma flows. Results comparing ideal one-dimensional two-fluid and magnetohydrodymanic flows are presented. Substantial increases in the complexity of the flow field and vorticity transport dynamics are observed with important ramifications for the stabilization of shock driven interfaces. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  7. Slip effects on a generalized Burgers’ fluid flow between two side walls with fractional derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihao Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research for the 3D flow of a generalized Burgers’ fluid between two side walls generated by an exponential accelerating plate and a constant pressure gradient, where the no-slip assumption between the exponential accelerating plate and the Burgers’ fluid is no longer valid. The governing equations of the generalized Burgers’ fluid flow are established by using the fractional calculus approach. Exact analytic solutions for the 3D flow are established by employing the Laplace transform and the finite Fourier sine transform. Furthermore, some 3D and 2D figures for the fluid velocity and shear stress are plotted to analyze and discuss the effects of various parameters.

  8. An Estimate of Fluid-Flux in Fast-Spreading East Pacific Rise Crust Exposed at Hess Deep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, K.; Coogan, L.; Pedersen, R.

    2003-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges (MORs) has a profound influence on the heat and chemical budgets of the oceanic lithosphere. A geochemical approach for examining the hydrothermal fluid flux at MORs is based on the exchange of Sr-isotopes during fluid-rock interaction recorded by hydrothermally altered rocks. We present a new Sr isotopic dataset for sheeted dykes recovered from tectonic scarps at Hess Deep that in order to evaluate the controls on Sr mobility and Sr-isotopic exchange and calculate the time-integrated fluid flux of this section of fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust. Similar to hydrothermal alteration patterns evident from mineral assemblages and O-isotope data, Sr-isotope data are spatially complex and do not systematically change with depth. All samples have 87Sr/86Sr ratios that are shifted towards higher values (0.70251 to 0.70391) than fresh mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)(0.70245), due to interaction with seawater-derived, hydrothermal fluids. Strontium concentrations vary from 72 to 121ppm; some dykes are Sr-depleted, others are Sr-enriched, whereas others have Sr contents typical of fresh MORB. Sr mobility is mineralogically controlled such that Sr is liberated where plagioclase is replaced by chlorite plus quartz and is enriched where a small amount (<2%) of epidote is present. Interestingly, the degree of albitization was found to have little control on Sr mobility even though the albite structure favours Sr partitioning. Sr-isotopic exchange was far less influenced by secondary mineral assemblages, except for epidote-bearing samples. In order to gain an estimate of the time-integrated fluid flux we have applied a linear-kinetic fluid-rock exchange model applied by Teagle et al. [2003] for sheeted dykes recovered at ODP Hole 504B. The fluid flux of 1.1 x 106 kg2/m for Hess Deep is lower than that calculated for Hole 504B dykes and far lower than fluid flux estimates based on thermal constraints. We explore the significance of

  9. Clinical relevance of sonographically estimated amniotic fluid volume: polyhydramnios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Adam T; Chauhan, Suneet P; Magann, Everett F

    2013-05-01

    Polyhydramnios is an excessive amount of amniotic fluid within the amniotic cavity. The etiology of polyhydramnios may be idiopathic, the consequence of fetal structural anomalies, or the consequence of various fetal and maternal conditions. The clinical importance of polyhydramnios is found in its association with adverse pregnancy outcomes and the risk of perinatal mortality. The antenatal management of polyhydramnios can be challenging as there are no formalized guidelines on the topic. The purpose of this review is to provide a literature-based overview on the subject of polyhydramnios in singleton pregnancies, demonstrate its clinical implications, and describe a practical approach to its management.

  10. A smoothed finite element approach for computational fluid dynamics: applications to incompressible flows and fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhang, Hexin; Zhang, Kai

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the cell-based smoothed finite element method (CS-FEM) is introduced into two mainstream aspects of computational fluid dynamics: incompressible flows and fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The emphasis is placed on the fluid gradient smoothing which simply requires equal numbers of Gaussian points and smoothing cells in each four-node quadrilateral element. The second-order, smoothed characteristic-based split scheme in conjunction with a pressure stabilization is then presented to settle the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. As for FSI, CS-FEM is applied to the geometrically nonlinear solid as usual. Following an efficient mesh deformation strategy, block-Gauss-Seidel procedure is adopted to couple all individual fields under the arbitrary Lagriangian-Eulerian description. The proposed solvers are carefully validated against the previously published data for several benchmarks, revealing visible improvements in computed results.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics aspects of subcritical transitions and singular flows in viscoelastic fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becherer, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in theoretical aspects of flows of viscoelastic fluids (such as dilute polymer solutions). This thesis addresses two distinct issues related to such flows. Motivated by the possible occurrence of subcritical (finite-amplitude) instabilities in parallel

  12. Fluid flow due to collective non-reciprocal motion of symmetrically-beating artificial cilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaderi, S. N.; den Toonder, J.M.J.; Onck, P. R.

    Using a magneto-mechanical solid-fluid numerical model for permanently magnetic artificial cilia, we show that the metachronal motion of symmetrically beating cilia establishes a net pressure gradient in the direction of the metachronal wave, which creates a unidirectional flow. The flow generated

  13. The Hydrodynamic Stability of a Fluid-Particle Flow: Instabilities in Gas-Fluidized Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Howley, Maureen A.; Johri, Jayati; Glasser, Benjamin J.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified model of an industrially relevant fluid-particle flow system is analyzed using linear stability theory. Instabilities of the uniform state of a fluidized bed are investigated in response to small flow perturbations. Students are expected to perform each step of the computational analysis, and physical insight into key mechanistic…

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  15. Asymptotic expansion of unsteady gravity flow of a power-law fluid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigate the effects of velocity on the temperature field. We investigate the power-law viscosity exponent on the flow, the Darcy parameter on the temperature profiles and the results obtained are discussed. Keywords: Unsteady gravity flows; Porous media; Non – Newtonian power- law fluid and Asymptotic expansion.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow and Thermal Transport in Gravity-Dominated 3D Microchannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odesola, Isaac F.; Ashaju, Abimbola Ayodeji; Ige, Ebenezer O.

    The success recorded by the usage of microchannel in high flux cooling application, has led to several studies aimed at advancement in microchannel fluid flow and heat transfer technology. A recent study area with promising breakthrough is the effects of gravity on microscale flow. Numerical

  17. Optical flow estimation on image sequences with differently exposed frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Tomas; McKelvey, Tomas; Lindström, Konstantin

    2015-09-01

    Optical flow (OF) methods are used to estimate dense motion information between consecutive frames in image sequences. In addition to the specific OF estimation method itself, the quality of the input image sequence is of crucial importance to the quality of the resulting flow estimates. For instance, lack of texture in image frames caused by saturation of the camera sensor during exposure can significantly deteriorate the performance. An approach to avoid this negative effect is to use different camera settings when capturing the individual frames. We provide a framework for OF estimation on such sequences that contain differently exposed frames. Information from multiple frames are combined into a total cost functional such that the lack of an active data term for saturated image areas is avoided. Experimental results demonstrate that using alternate camera settings to capture the full dynamic range of an underlying scene can clearly improve the quality of flow estimates. When saturation of image data is significant, the proposed methods show superior performance in terms of lower endpoint errors of the flow vectors compared to a set of baseline methods. Furthermore, we provide some qualitative examples of how and when our method should be used.

  18. A hydroelastic investigation of circular cylindrical shells-containing flowing fluid with different end conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğurlu, B.; Ergin, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the effects of different end conditions on the response behavior of thin circular cylindrical shell structures fully in contact with flowing fluid. The investigated end conditions are as follows: simply supported, clamped-clamped, clamped-simply supported and clamped-free (cantilever shell) ends. Additionally, the dynamic responses of a tapered cylindrical shell conveying flowing fluid and simply supported at its ends were investigated. The method employed in this study is a hybrid method—a boundary integral equation method for the calculation of the fluid-structure interaction effects and a finite element method for the structural analysis. In this study, the mathematical model presented before [B. Uğurlu, A. Ergin, A hydroelasticity method for vibrating structures containing and/or submerged in flowing fluid, Journal of Sound and Vibration 290 (2006) 572-596] is extended by applying the direct boundary integral equation method, and by using a higher-order panel method (linear distribution). It should also be said that the method used in this study could be applied to any shape of cylindrical structure in contact with internal and/or external flowing fluid, in contrast to the studies found in the literature. In the analysis of the linear fluid-structure system, it is assumed that the fluid is ideal, i.e., inviscid, incompressible and its motion is irrotational. It is assumed that the flexible structure vibrates in its in-vacuo modes when it is in contact with flowing fluid, and that each mode gives rise to a corresponding surface pressure distribution on the wetted surface of the structure. The in-vacuo dynamic properties of the dry structure are obtained by using a standard finite element software. In the wet part of the analysis, the wetted surface is idealized by using appropriate boundary elements, referred to as hydrodynamic panels. The fluid-structure interaction forces are calculated in terms of the generalized added mass coefficients

  19. Use of flow cytometry in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders in fluid specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gordon H; Vergara, Norge; Moore, Erika M; King, Rebecca L

    2014-08-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of fluid specimens, including serous effusions and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs), can be challenging for a number of reasons. The evaluation of lymphoid proliferations in these specimens can be particularly problematic, given the frequent presence of coexisting inflammatory conditions and the manner in which these specimens are processed. As a result, immunophenotypic analysis of hematopoietic cell populations by flow cytometry has emerged as a useful ancillary study in the diagnosis of these specimens, both in patients with and without a previous history of a lymphoproliferative disorder. In this study, we review our experience with flow cytometry in fluid specimens over a four-year period. Flow cytometry was performed in 184 of 6,925 total cases (2.7% of all fluids). Flow cytometry was performed in 4.8% of pleural fluids (positive findings in 38%, negative in 40%, and atypical in 18%), 1.1% of peritoneal fluids (positive in 40%, negative in 50%, and atypical in 10%), 1.9% of pericardial fluids (positive in 67%, negative in 33%), and 1.9% of CSFs (positive in 23%, negative in 55%, atypical in 3%). The specimen submitted was inadequate for analysis in 9.2% of cases, most commonly with CSF specimens, but was not related to the volume of fluid submitted. Atypical flow cytometry findings and atypical morphologic findings in the context of negative flow cytometry results led to the definitive diagnosis of a lymphoproliferative disorder in a significant number of cases when repeat procedures and ancillary studies were performed. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fluid Flow Mechanotransduction in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong-Dong; Tarbell, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how vascular wall endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and fibroblasts (FBs) sense and transduce the stimuli of hemodynamic forces (shear stress, cyclic strain, and hydrostatic pressure) into intracellular biochemical signals is critical to prevent vascular disease development and progression. ECs lining the vessel lumen directly sense alterations in blood flow shear stress and then communicate with medial SMCs and adventitial FBs to regulate vessel function and disease. Shear stress mechanotransduction in ECs has been extensively studied and reviewed. In the case of endothelial damage, blood flow shear stress may directly act on the superficial layer of SMCs and transmural interstitial flow may be elevated on medial SMCs and adventitial FBs. Therefore, it is also important to investigate direct shear effects on vascular SMCs as well as FBs. The work published in the last two decades has shown that shear stress and interstitial flow have significant influences on vascular SMCs and FBs. This review summarizes work that considered direct shear effects on SMCs and FBs and provides the first comprehensive overview of the underlying mechanisms that modulate SMC secretion, alignment, contraction, proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and migration in response to 2-dimensional (2D) laminar, pulsatile, and oscillating flow shear stresses and 3D interstitial flow. A mechanistic model of flow sensing by SMCs is also provided to elucidate possible mechanotransduction pathways through surface glycocalyx, integrins, membrane receptors, ion channels, and primary cilia. Understanding flow-mediated mechanotransduction in SMCs and FBs and the interplay with ECs should be helpful in exploring strategies to prevent flow-initiated atherosclerosis and neointima formation and has implications in vascular tissue engineering. PMID:21479754

  1. Quantitative description of fluid flows produced by left-right cilia in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Craig; Manning, M Lisa; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia generate directional flows that move mucus through airways, cerebrospinal fluid through brain ventricles, and oocytes through fallopian tubes. In addition, specialized monocilia beat in a rotational pattern to create asymmetric flows that are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryogenesis. These monocilia, which we refer to as "left-right cilia," produce a leftward flow of extraembryonic fluid in a transient "organ of asymmetry" that directs asymmetric signaling and development of LR asymmetries in the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract. The asymmetric flows are thought to establish a chemical gradient and/or activate mechanosensitive cilia to initiate calcium ion signals and a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) pathway on the left side of the embryo, but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. The zebrafish organ of asymmetry, called Kupffer's vesicle, provides a useful model system for investigating LR cilia and cilia-powered fluid flows. Here, we describe methods to visualize flows in Kupffer's vesicle using fluorescent microspheres and introduce a new and freely available MATLAB particle tracking code to quantitatively describe these flows. Analysis of normal and aberrant flows indicates this approach is useful for characterizing flow properties that impact LR asymmetry and may be more broadly applicable for quantifying other cilia flows. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unsteady compressible two-fluid flow model for interface capturing. On the dynamics of a shock-bubble interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Kreeft (Jasper)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractMulti-fluid flows are found in many applications in engineering and physics. Examples of these flows from engineering are water-air flows in ship hydrodynamics, exhaust-air flows behind rockets, gas-petrolea flows in upstream pipes of oil rigs, air-fuel bubble interaction flows in

  3. Flow of an Eyring-Powell Model Fluid between Coaxial Cylinders with Variable Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flow of Eyring-Powell model fluid in the annulus between two cylinders whose viscosity depends upon the temperature. We consider the steady flow in the annulus due to the motion of inner cylinder and constant pressure gradient. In the problem considered the flow is found to be remarkedly different from that for the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid with constant viscosity. An analytical solution of the nonlinear problem is obtained using homotopy analysis method. The behavior of pertinent parameters is analyzed and depicted through graphs.

  4. The primary cilium as sensor of fluid flow: new building blocks to the model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Helle

    2015-01-01

    functionally as an organelle that makes cells more susceptible to changes in fluid flow. Thus the primary cilium was suggested to function as a flow-sensing device. This characterization has been substantiated for many epithelial cell types over the years. Nevertheless, part of the central mechanism of signal...... transduction has not been explained, largely because of the substantial technical challenges of working with this delicate organelle. The current review considers the recent advances that allow us to fill some of the holes in the model of signal transduction in cilium-mediated responses to fluid flow...

  5. Effects of mass transfer on MHD flow of casson fluid with chemical reaction and suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shehzad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of mass transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic flow of a Casson fluid over a porous stretching sheet is addressed in the presence of a chemical reaction. A series solution for the resulting nonlinear flow is computed. The skin friction coefficient and local Sherwood number are analyzed through numerical values for various parameters of interest. The velocity and concentration fields are illustrated for several pertinent flow parameters. We observed that the Casson parameter and Hartman number have similar effects on the velocity in a qualitative sense. We further analyzed that the concentration profile decreases rapidly in comparison to the fluid velocity when we increased the values of the suction parameter.

  6. Trillion dollar estimate: Illicit financial flows from developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Nitsch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that developing countries lose about 1 trillion US dollars each year due to illicit financial flows. This paper reviews the empirical methodology that underlies those estimates. Various critical aspects of the analytical approach are highlighted, focusing in particular on deficiencies in the use of mirror trade statistics to quantify the extent of capital outflows due to trade misinvoicing. Serious issues in the empirical analysis include, among others, arbitrary assu...

  7. Scale Effects in the Flow of a Shear-Thinning Fluid in Rough Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meheust, Y.; Roques, C.; Le Borgne, T.; Selker, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of flow processes involving non-Newtonian fluids in the subsurface is of interest for many engineering applications, from in-situ remediation to enhanced oil recovery. The fluids of interest in such applications (f.e., polymers in remediation) often present shear-thinning properties, i.e., their viscosity decreases as a function of the local shear rate. We investigate how fracture wall roughness impacts the flow of a shear-thinning fluid. Numerical simulations of flow in 3D fracture geometries are carried out by solving a modified Navier-Stokes equation incorporating the Carreau viscous-shear model. The synthetic fractures consist of two rough surfaces which are isotropic self-affine geometries and correlated with each other above a scale which we denote correlation length (see Méheust et al. PAGEOPH 2003). Perfect plastic closing is assumed when the surfaces touch each other. The objective is to test how varying the correlation length impacts the flow behavior, for different degrees of closure, and how this behavior diverges for shear-thinning fluids from what is known for Newtonian fluids. The results from the 3D simulations are also compared to 2D simulations based on the lubrication theory, which we have developed as an extension of the Reynolds equation for Newtonian fluids. We also discuss the implications of our results for the general understanding of the flows of shear-thinning fluids in fractured media and of solute transport by such flows. References:Méheust, Y., & Schmittbuhl, J. (2003). Scale effects related to flow in rough fractures. Pure and Applied Geophysics, 160(5-6), 1023-1050.

  8. Streaming flows produced by oscillating interface of magnetic fluid adsorbed on a permanent magnet in alternating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, S.; Ito, M.; Ishimoto, Y.; Nix, S.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes microstreaming flows generated by oscillating interface of magnetic fluid adsorbed on a circular cylindrical permanent magnet in alternating magnetic field. The interface of magnetic fluid adsorbed on the NdFeB magnet responds to the external alternating magnetic flied as harmonic oscillation. The directions of alternating magnetic field are parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field of permanent magnet. The oscillation of magnetic fluid interface generates streaming flow around the magnet-magnetic fluid element in water. Microstreaming flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The flow pattern generated by magnetic fluid motion depends on the Keulegan-Carpenter number and the Reynolds number.

  9. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat, E-mail: Bhushan.2@osu.ed [Nanoprobe Laboratory for Bio- and Nanotechnology and Biomimetics (NLB2), Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2010-01-27

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  10. New imaging tools in cardiovascular medicine: computational fluid dynamics and 4D flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatani, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Shohei; Furusawa, Tokoki; Numata, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Sachiko; Morimoto, Kazuki; Makino, Rina; Morichi, Hiroko; Nishino, Teruyasu; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2017-11-01

    Blood flow imaging is a novel technology in cardiovascular medicine and surgery. Today, two types of blood flow imaging tools are available: measurement-based flow visualization including 4D flow MRI (or 3D cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging), or echocardiography flow visualization software, and computer flow simulation modeling based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). MRI and echocardiography flow visualization provide measured blood flow but have limitations in temporal and spatial resolution, whereas CFD flow calculates the flow according to assumptions instead of flow measurement, and it has sufficiently fine resolution up to the computer memory limit, and it enables even virtual surgery when combined with computer graphics. Blood flow imaging provides profound insight into the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases, because it quantifies and visualizes mechanical stress on the vessel walls or heart ventricle. Wall shear stress (WSS) is a stress on the endothelial wall caused by the near wall blood flow, and it is thought to be a predictor of atherosclerosis progression in coronary or aortic diseases. Flow energy loss (EL) is the loss of blood flow energy caused by viscous friction of turbulent diseased flow, and it is expected to be a predictor of ventricular workload on various heart diseases including heart valve disease, cardiomyopathy, and congenital heart diseases. Blood flow imaging can provide useful information for developing predictive medicine in cardiovascular diseases, and may lead to breakthroughs in cardiovascular surgery, especially in the decision-making process.

  11. [Quantification of fluid flow in magnetic resonance tomography: an experimental study of a flow model and liquid flow measurements in the cerebral aqueduct in volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, G; Harlandt, O; Muhle, C; Brossmann, J; Heller, M

    2000-12-01

    To study the feasibility o MRI for quantification of fluid flow in a tube model and the cerebral aqueduct (CA) in volunteers. All studies were performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a head coil and a FLASH 2D phase contrast sequence with a velocity encoding at 20 cm/s. Flow (real value, ml/sec) of a saline fluid was measured in a flexible tube model with different inside diameters: 0.75-3 mm. Three flow velocities were given (normal value). To test the reproducibility, three studies were done using a flow of 0.12 or 0.14 ml/sec and a tube diameter of 0.75 and 2.0 mm. The ratio of normal to real flow value was calculated (ideal ratio = 1). MRI of CA and flow quantification was done in 24 volunteers (28 +/- 4 years). Using tubes with a diameter of 0.75 and 1.5 mm the real flow was sometimes higher than the velocity encoding of the phase contrast sequences. Because of this measurements of the fluid flow and the flow velocities were impossible. There was agreement for fluid flow quantification in the tube of 3.0 mm and high agreement in the tube of 2.0 mm in diameter with reproducible results. The mean diameter of the CA in normal subjects was 2.0 +/- 0.3 mm, the mean cerebral flow was 0.04 +/- 0.02 ml/sec and the peak velocity 3.06 +/- 1.59 cm/sec. Reliable flow quantification with MRI is feasible if the diameter of the lumen is greater than 1.5 mm, and if the flow velocity is lower than the velocity encoding. In cases of smaller diameters and higher flow velocities the velocity encoding has to be changed. Because of this the quantification seems to be inaccurate in cases of aqueductal stenosis with the method we used.

  12. The use of gamma radiation in fluid flow measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Tjugum, S A; Holstad, M B

    2001-01-01

    Different measurement techniques involving the use of gamma radiation in flow measurement are discussed. In the Dual Modality Densitometry project at the University of Bergen, salinity-independent gas volume fraction measurements are obtained by combining scattered and transmitted radiation.

  13. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  14. Two-fluid model for reacting turbulent two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S. H.; Abou-Ellail, M. M. M.

    1994-05-01

    A reacting two-fluid model, based on the solution of separate transport equations for reacting gas-liquid two-phase flow, is presented. New time-mean transport equations for two-phase mixture fraction bar-f and its variance g are derived. The new two-fluid transport equations for bar-f and g are useful for two-phase reacting flows in which phases strongly interact. They are applicable to both submerged and nonsubmerged combustion. A pdf approach to the reaction process is adopted. The mixture fraction pdf assumes the shape of a beta function while the instantaneous thermochemical properties are computed from an equilibrium model. The proposed two-fluid model is verified by predicting turbulent flow structures of an n-pentane spray flame and a nonreacting bubbly jet flow for which experimental data exist. Good agreement is found between the predictions and the corresponding experimental data.

  15. Experimental study of pseudoplastic fluid flows in a square duct of strong curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Yuan, Shiwei; Chang, Huaijian; Lai, Huanxin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, laminar and turbulent flows of pseudoplastic fluids (0.1% and 0.2% by weight aqueous solutions of carboxymethylcellulose) in a square duct of strong curvature were measured using an ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry and microphones. Streamwise velocity in cross-sections of the duct and the fluctuating pressure on walls were measured for different flow rates. The velocity contours and their development along the duct were presented and compared with benchmark experiments by Taylor, Whitelaw and Yianneskis (1982) which were for the laminar and turbulent flows of water. The spectra of fluctuating wall pressures were also presented and analyzed. The objective of this paper was to provide a basis for understanding the pseudoplastic fluid flows in curved ducts. The results were also intended for use in the further development of numerical methods and turbulence models for shear-thinning fluids.

  16. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  17. Temperature and concentration stratification effects on non-Newtonian fluid flow past a cylindrical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khalil Ur; Khan, Abid Ali; Malik, M. Y.; Zehra, Iffat; Ali, Usman

    The theme of present work is to report the numerical solution of mixed convection tangent hyperbolic fluid flow towards stretching cylindrical surface immersed in a double stratified media. The fluid flow is attained through no slip condition. The flow regime characteristics are modelled in terms of partial differential equations. A similarity transformation is used to transform partial differential equations into coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations. A computational algorithm is executed to predict numerical results. The effects of flow controlling parameters namely, mixed convection parameter, thermal stratification and solutal stratification parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration are examined and offered by means of graphical outcomes. It is noticed that in the presence of mixed convection effect both the fluid temperature and concentration are decreasing function of thermal stratification and solutal stratification parameters respectively. The obtained values are certified by developing comparison with existing values and an excellent agreement is observed which confirms the execution of computational algorithm.

  18. Steady State Stokes Flow Interpolation for Fluid Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatacharya, Haimasree; Nielsen, Michael Bang; Bridson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    — suffer from a common problem. They fail to capture the rotational components of the velocity field, although extrapolation in the normal direction does consider the tangential component. We address this problem by casting the interpolation as a steady state Stokes flow. This type of flow captures...... the rotational components and is suitable for controlling liquid animations where tangential motion is pronounced, such as in a breaking wave...

  19. Generation of zonal flows in rotating fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    near the centre with low potential vorticity from the outside, which will imply the formation of a large-scale flow. The experimental results are supported by direct numerical solutions of the quasi-geostrophic vorticity equation in the beta-plane approximation modelling the experimental situation....... The analogy to large-scale flow generation in drift-wave turbulence dynamics in magnetized plasma is briefly discussed....

  20. Ludwig Prandtl and Boundary Layers in Fluid Flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is a matter of common experience that when we stand in a breeze or wade in water we feel a force which is called the drag force. We now know that the drag is caused by fluid friction or viscosity. However, for long it was believed that the viscosity shouldn't enter the pic- ture at all since it was so small in value for both water.

  1. The CABARET method for a weakly compressible fluid flows in one- and two-dimensional implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Yu M.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The CABARET method implementation for a weakly compressible fluid flow is in the focus of present paper. Testing both one-dimensional pressure balancing problem and a classical plane Poiseuille flow, we analyze this method in terms of discontinuity resolution, dispersion and dissipation. The method is proved to have an adequate convergence to an analytical solution for a velocity profile. We also show that a flow formation process represents a set of self-similar solutions under varying pressure differential and sound speed.

  2. Revised Estimate of Earth's Surface Heat Flow: 47 +- 2 TW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. H.; Davies, D. R.

    2012-04-01

    Earth's surface heat flow provides a fundamental constraint on solid Earth dynamics. However, deriving an estimate of the total surface heat flux is complex, due to the inhomogeneous distribution of heat flow measurements and difficulties in measuring heat flux in young oceanic crust, arising due to hydrothermal circulation. A database of 38347 measurements (provided by G. Laske & G. Masters), representing a 55% increase on the number of measurements used previously, and the methods of Geographical Information Science (GIS), is used to derive a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux (Davies & Davies, 2010). To account for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust, we use a model estimate of the heat flux, following the work of Jaupart et al., 2007; while for the rest of the globe, in an attempt to overcome the inhomogeneous distribution of measurements, we develop an average for different geological units. Two digital geology data sets are used to define the global geology: (i) continental geology - Hearn et al., 2003; and (ii) the global data-set of CCGM - Commission de la Carte Géologique du Monde, 2000. This leads to > 93,000 polygons defining Earth's geology. The influence of clustering is limited by intersecting the geology polygons with a 1 by 1 degree (at the equator) equal area grid. The average heat flow is evaluated for each geology class. The contribution of each geology class to the global surface heat flow is derived by multiplying this estimated average surface heat flux with the area of that geology class. The surface heat flow contributions of all the geology classes are summed. For Antarctica we use an estimate based on depth to Curie temperature and include a 1TW contribution from hot-spots in young ocean age. Geology classes with less than 50 readings are excluded. The raw data suggests that this method of correlating heat flux with geology has some power. Our revised estimate for Earth's global surface heat flux is 47 ± 2 TW

  3. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambeau, C.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself.

  4. Some analytical tools for fluids management in space: Isothermal capillary flows along interior corners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, M. M.

    2003-07-01

    Recent advances in the analysis of a class of capillary-driven flows relevant to materials processing and general fluids management in space have been made. The class of flows addressed concern spontaneous capillary flows in complex containers with interior comers. Such flows are commonplace in space-based fluid systems and arise from the particular container geometry and wetting properties of the system. Important applications for this work involve low-g liquid fill and drain operations where the container geometry is complex, possessing interior corners, and where quantitative information of fluid location, transients, flow rates, and stability is critical. Examples include the storage and handling of liquid propellants and cryogens, water conditioning for life support, fluid phase-change thermal systems for temperature control and power production, materials processing in the liquid state, and on-orbit biofluids processing. For several important problems, closed-form expressions to transient three-dimensional flows are possible that, as design tools, compliment if not replace difficult, time-consuming, and rarely performed numerical calculations. The theory is readily extended to address more complex flows. An overview of a selection of solutions in-hand is presented. Drop tower and low-g aircraft experimental results are cited to support the theoretical findings.

  5. Estimation of preferred water flow parameters for four species of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mean water column velocities at each sampled stone were measured using a mini current meter, while flow velocities closer to the boundary layer where blackfly larvae occurred were estimated using indirect techniques (standard hemispheres and aerating tablets). Standard hemispheres were also used to calculate more ...

  6. A new approach to estimating Mean Flow in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. R. Holmes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the estimation of Mean Flow (MF in ungauged catchments has been approached using conceptual water balance models or empirical formulae relating climatic inputs to stream flow. In the UK, these types of models have difficulty in predicting MF in low rainfall areas because the conceptualisation of soil moisture behaviour and its relationship with evaporation rates used is rather simplistic. However, it is in these dry regions where the accurate estimation of flows is most critical to effective management of a scarce resource. A novel approach to estimating MF, specifically designed to improve estimation of runoff in dry catchments, has been developed using a regionalisation of the Penman drying curve theory. The dynamic water balance style Daily Soil Moisture Accounting (DSMA model operates at a daily time step, using inputs of precipitation and potential evaporation and simulates the development of soil moisture deficits explicitly. The model has been calibrated using measured MFs from a large data set of catchments in the United Kingdom. The performance of the DSMA model is superior to existing established steady state and dynamic water-balance models over the entire data set considered and the largest improvement is observed in very low rainfall catchments. It is concluded that the performance of all models in high rainfall areas is likely to be limited by the spatial representation of rainfall. Keywords: hydrological models, regionalisation, water resources, mean flow, runoff, water balance, Penman drying curve, soil moisture model

  7. Energy balance and mass conservation in reduced order models of fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebujjaman, Muhammad; Rebholz, Leo G.; Xie, Xuping; Iliescu, Traian

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate theoretically and computationally the conservation properties of reduced order models (ROMs) for fluid flows. Specifically, we investigate whether the ROMs satisfy the same (or similar) energy balance and mass conservation as those satisfied by the Navier-Stokes equations. All of our theoretical findings are illustrated and tested in numerical simulations of a 2D flow past a circular cylinder at a Reynolds number Re = 100. First, we investigate the ROM energy balance. We show that using the snapshot average for the centering trajectory (which is a popular treatment of nonhomogeneous boundary conditions in ROMs) yields an incorrect energy balance. Then, we propose a new approach, in which we replace the snapshot average with the Stokes extension. Theoretically, the Stokes extension produces an accurate energy balance. Numerically, the Stokes extension yields more accurate results than the standard snapshot average, especially for longer time intervals. Our second contribution centers around ROM mass conservation. We consider ROMs created using two types of finite elements: the standard Taylor-Hood (TH) element, which satisfies the mass conservation weakly, and the Scott-Vogelius (SV) element, which satisfies the mass conservation pointwise. Theoretically, the error estimates for the SV-ROM are sharper than those for the TH-ROM. Numerically, the SV-ROM yields significantly more accurate results, especially for coarser meshes and longer time intervals.

  8. Fluid flow in porous media using image-based modelling to parametrize Richards' equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L. J.; Daly, K. R.; Hallett, P. D.; Naveed, M.; Koebernick, N.; Bengough, A. G.; George, T. S.; Roose, T.

    2017-11-01

    The parameters in Richards' equation are usually calculated from experimentally measured values of the soil-water characteristic curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The complex pore structures that often occur in porous media complicate such parametrization due to hysteresis between wetting and drying and the effects of tortuosity. Rather than estimate the parameters in Richards' equation from these indirect measurements, image-based modelling is used to investigate the relationship between the pore structure and the parameters. A three-dimensional, X-ray computed tomography image stack of a soil sample with voxel resolution of 6 μm has been used to create a computational mesh. The Cahn-Hilliard-Stokes equations for two-fluid flow, in this case water and air, were applied to this mesh and solved using the finite-element method in COMSOL Multiphysics. The upscaled parameters in Richards' equation are then obtained via homogenization. The effect on the soil-water retention curve due to three different contact angles, 0°, 20° and 60°, was also investigated. The results show that the pore structure affects the properties of the flow on the large scale, and different contact angles can change the parameters for Richards' equation.

  9. Fluid flow in porous media using image-based modelling to parametrize Richards' equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L J; Daly, K R; Hallett, P D; Naveed, M; Koebernick, N; Bengough, A G; George, T S; Roose, T

    2017-11-01

    The parameters in Richards' equation are usually calculated from experimentally measured values of the soil-water characteristic curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The complex pore structures that often occur in porous media complicate such parametrization due to hysteresis between wetting and drying and the effects of tortuosity. Rather than estimate the parameters in Richards' equation from these indirect measurements, image-based modelling is used to investigate the relationship between the pore structure and the parameters. A three-dimensional, X-ray computed tomography image stack of a soil sample with voxel resolution of 6 μm has been used to create a computational mesh. The Cahn-Hilliard-Stokes equations for two-fluid flow, in this case water and air, were applied to this mesh and solved using the finite-element method in COMSOL Multiphysics. The upscaled parameters in Richards' equation are then obtained via homogenization. The effect on the soil-water retention curve due to three different contact angles, 0°, 20° and 60°, was also investigated. The results show that the pore structure affects the properties of the flow on the large scale, and different contact angles can change the parameters for Richards' equation.

  10. Vibration energy harvesting in a small channel fluid flow using piezoelectric transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Md. Mehedi, E-mail: buetmehedi10@gmail.com; Hossain, Md. Yeam, E-mail: yeamhossain@gmail.com; Mazumder, Rakib, E-mail: rakibmazumder46075@gmail.com; Rahman, Roussel, E-mail: roussel.rahman@gmail.com; Rahman, Md. Ashiqur, E-mail: ashiqurrahman@me.buet.ac.bd [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    This work is aimed at developing a way to harvest energy from a fluid stream with the application of piezoelectric transducers in a small channel. In this COMSOL Multiphysics based simulation study, it is attempted to harvest energy from the abundant renewable source of energy available in the form of kinetic energy of naturally occurring flow of fluids. The strategy involves harnessing energy from a fluid-actuator through generation of couples, eddies and vortices, resulting from the stagnation and separation of flow around a semi-circular bluff-body attached to a cantilever beam containing a piezoceramic layer. Fluctuation of fluidic pressure impulse on the beam due to vortex shedding and varying lift forces causes the flexible cantilever beam to oscillate in the direction normal to the fluid flow in a periodic manner. The periodic application and release of a mechanical strain upon the beam effected a generation of electric potential within the piezoelectric layer, thus enabling extraction of electrical energy from the kinetic energy of the fluid. The piezoelectric material properties and transducer design are kept unchanged throughout the study, whereas the configuration is tested with different fluids and varying flow characteristics. The size and geometry of the obstructing entity are systematically varied to closely inspect the output from different iterations and for finding the optimum design parameters. The intermittent changes in the generated forces and subsequent variation in the strain on the beam are also monitored to find definitive relationship with the electrical energy output.

  11. Estimating blood flow velocity in angiographic image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Clemens M.; Serowy, Steffen; Janiga, Gábor; Rose, Georg; Tönnies, Klaus D.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a system to estimate blood flow velocity in angiographic image data for patient-specific blood flow simulations. Angiographies are acquired routinely for diagnosis and before treatment of vascular diseases. Projective blood flow is measured in digital subtraction X-ray angiography (2D-DSA) images by tracking contrast agent propagation. Spatial information is added by re-projecting 2D centerline pixels to the reconstructed 3D X-ray rotation angiography (3D-RA) data of the same subject. Ambiguities caused by occluding vessels from the virtual viewpoint of the acquired 2D-DSA image are resolved by a graph-based approach. The blood flow velocity can be used as boundary condition for exact blood flow simulations that can help physicians to understand hemodynamics of the vasculature. Our focus is to analyze cerebral angiographic data. We performed several experiments with phantom and patient data that proved the accuracy and the functionality of our method. We evaluated experimentally the projective flow estimation method and the re-projection method. We measured mean deviations to the ground truth between 11 % and 15.7 % for phantom data. We also showed the ability of our method to produce plausible results with patient-data.

  12. A novel optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction in granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Luca; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Carleo, Luigi; Tai, Yih-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical phenomena, such as debris flows, pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches, involve the rapid flow of granular mixtures. Today the dynamics of these flows is far from being deeply understood, due to their huge complexity compared to clear water or monophasic fluids. To this regard, physical models at laboratory scale represent important tools for understanding the still unclear properties of granular flows and their constitutive laws, under simplified experimental conditions. Beside the velocity and the shear rate, the volume fraction is also strongly interlinked with the rheology of granular materials. Yet, a reliable estimation of this quantity is not easy through non-invasive techniques. In this work a novel cost-effective optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction is presented and, then, applied to a laboratory study on steady-state granular flows. A preliminary numerical investigation, through Monte-Carlo generations of grain distributions under controlled illumination conditions, allowed to find the stochastic relationship between the near-wall volume fraction, c3D, and a measurable quantity (the two-dimensional volume fraction), c2D, obtainable through an appropriate binarization of gray-scale images captured by a camera placed in front of the transparent boundary. Such a relation can be well described by c3D = aexp(bc2D), with parameters only depending on the angle of incidence of light, ζ. An experimental validation of the proposed approach is carried out on dispersions of white plastic grains, immersed in various ambient fluids. The mixture, confined in a box with a transparent window, is illuminated by a flickering-free LED lamp, placed so as to form a given ζ with the measuring surface, and is photographed by a camera, placed in front of the same window. The predicted exponential law is found to be in sound agreement with experiments for a wide range of ζ (10° digital scale at the channel outlet for measuring the mass flow

  13. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three-dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the heat transfer and collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Simulations were completed for free stream velocities ranging from 85-135 meters per second, and free stream total pressure of 44.8 and 93.1 kilopascals (6.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch absolute). In addition, the effect of angle of attack and yaw were investigated by including 5 degree deviations from straight for one of the flow conditions. All but one of the cases simulated a probe in isolation (i.e. in a very large domain without any support strut). One case is included which represents a probe mounted on a support strut within a finite sized wind tunnel. Collection efficiencies were generated, using the LEWICE3D code, for four spherical particle sizes, 100, 50, 20, and 5 micron in diameter. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 20% occurred, for all cases, as the flow entered the shroud of the probe. The reduction in velocity within the shroud is not indicative of any error in the probe measurement accuracy. Heat transfer results are presented which agree quite well with a correlation for the circular cross section heated elements. Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than the previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the reduced flow within the protective shroud. As particle size increases differences between the two

  14. A New Approach in Pressure Transient Analysis: Using Numerical Density Derivatives to Improve Diagnosis of Flow Regimes and Estimation of Reservoir Properties for Multiple Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Torkiowei Biu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical density derivative approach (another phase of numerical welltesting in which each fluid’s densities around the wellbore are measured and used to generate pressure equivalent for each phase using simplified pressure-density correlation, as well as new statistical derivative methods to determine each fluid phase’s permeabilities, and the average effective permeability for the system with a new empirical model. Also density related radial flow equations for each fluid phase are derived and semilog specialised plot of density versus Horner time is used to estimate k relative to each phase. Results from 2 examples of oil and gas condensate reservoirs show that the derivatives of the fluid phase pressure-densities equivalent display the same wellbore and reservoir fingerprint as the conventional bottom-hole pressure BPR method. It also indicates that the average effective kave ranges between 43 and 57 mD for scenarios (a to (d in Example 1.0 and 404 mD for scenarios (a to (b in Example 2.0 using the new fluid phase empirical model for K estimation. This is within the k value used in the simulation model and likewise that estimated from the conventional BPR method. Results also discovered that in all six scenarios investigated, the heavier fluid such as water and the weighted average pressure-density equivalent of all fluid gives exact effective k as the conventional BPR method. This approach provides an estimate of the possible fluid phase permeabilities and the % of each phase contribution to flow at a given point. Hence, at several dp' stabilisation points, the relative k can be generated.

  15. Armoring, stability, and transport driven by fluid flow over a granular bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-03-01

    We discuss experiments investigating the evolution of a granular bed by a fluid flow as a function of shear rate at the fluid-bed interface. This is a model system to investigate a variety of physical examples including wind blowing over sand, sediment transport in rivers, tidal flows interacting with beaches, flows in slurry pipelines, and sand proppants in hydraulic fracturing. In order to examine the onset and entrainment of the granular bed under steady state conditions, we have constructed a novel conical rheometer system which allows a variable amount of shear to be applied to the granular bed. The grain-fluid system is index matched so that we can visualize the grains away from the sides as well as visualize the fluid flow above and below the interface by using fluorescent tracer particles. We demonstrate that the onset of erosion arises as particles rotate out of their stable position highlighting the importance of torque balance to onset. We find significant armoring of the bed, as the bed is sheared by the fluid flow. Above onset, at least three distinct regions of bed mobility can be found. We will discuss the measured integrated granular flux as a function of shear rate and compare them with empirical laws found in the geophysical literature. Supported by NSF Grant Number CBET 1335928.

  16. Sphere interaction in bounded shear flow of Oldroyd-B fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shang-Huan; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2017-11-01

    It is well-known that, up to the initial sphere displacement, binary encounters of spheres in bounded shear flow of a Newtonian fluid can have either swapping or non-swapping trajectories under creeping flow conditions. The motion of dilute sphere suspensions in bounded shear flow of Oldroyd-B fluids at zero Reynolds number has been studied. The pass and return trajectories of the two ball mass centers in a two wall driven shear flow are similar to those in a Newtonian fluid; but they lose the symmetry due to the effect of elastic force arising from viscoelastic fluids. A tumbling chain of two balls (a dipole) may occur, depending on the value of the Weissenberg number and the initial vertical displacement of the ball mass center to the middle plane between two walls. The two ball tumbling motion has also been compared with that of an ellipsoid in bounded shear flow Oldroyd-B fluids. This work was supported by NSF (Grant DMS-1418308).

  17. Chronic fluid flow is an environmental modifier of renal epithelial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Resnick

    Full Text Available Although solitary or sensory cilia are present in most cells of the body and their existence has been known since the sixties, very little is been known about their functions. One suspected function is fluid flow sensing- physical bending of cilia produces an influx of Ca(++, which can then result in a variety of activated signaling pathways. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD is a progressive disease, typically appearing in the 5(th decade of life and is one of the most common monogenetic inherited human diseases, affecting approximately 600,000 people in the United States. Because ADPKD is a slowly progressing disease, I asked how fluid flow may act, via the primary cilium, to alter epithelial physiology during the course of cell turnover. I performed an experiment to determine under what conditions fluid flow can result in a change of function of renal epithelial tissue. A wildtype epithelial cell line derived the cortical collecting duct of a heterozygous offspring of the Immortomouse (Charles River Laboratory was selected as our model system. Gentle orbital shaking was used to induce physiologically relevant fluid flow, and periodic measurements of the transepithelial Sodium current were performed. At the conclusion of the experiment, mechanosensitive proteins of interest were visualized by immunostaining. I found that fluid flow, in itself, modifies the transepithelial sodium current, cell proliferation, and the actin cytoskeleton. These results significantly impact the understanding of both the mechanosensation function of primary cilia as well as the understanding of ADPKD disease progression.

  18. Influence of boundary conditions on fluid flow on hydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simona, Fialová; František, Pochylý; Michal, Havlásek; Jiři, Malík

    2017-09-01

    The work is focused on the shape of velocity profiles of viscous liquid (water) in contact with hydrophobic surface. A demonstration is done on an example of liquid flow between two parallel plates. The solution is carried out at both the constant and variable viscosity of the liquid near the wall. The slip boundary condition of the liquid on the wall is expressed by the coefficient of adhesion and the shear stress on the wall. As a result, presented are the shapes of the velocity profiles in dependence on the coefficient of adhesion and the slip velocity on the wall. This solution is for laminar flow.

  19. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  20. Rolie-Poly fluid flowing through constrictions: Two distinct instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic instabilities of entangled polymer melts are common in industrial processes but the physics responsible is not well understood. We present a numerical linear stability study of a molecular based constitutive model which grants us physical insight into the underlying mechanics involved. Two constriction flows are considered - one shear dominated, the other extension dominated - and two distinct instabilities are found. The influence of the molecular structure and the behaviour of the polymer dynamics are investigated and in both cases chain relaxation and orientation play a crucial role. This suggests a molecular-based physical interpretation of the underlying mechanisms responsible for flow instabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  1. BASIC program estimates steam flow in blowoff lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1985-07-01

    This article provides in detail the computer program designed to estimate steam blowing of pipelines, performed to remove such things as mill scale and debris. Too high a steam flow results in pipe erosion, while too low a flow may not adequately clean the lines. The general procedure is to operate the boiler at a pressure that will produce the required flow when the steam is allowed to escape to the atmosphere through the pipelines being cleaned. Under these conditions, usually, sonic velocity is achieved at the pipe exit and the usual formula which relates flow to pressure drop is not applicable. The program provided can be run directly on the IBM PC or equivalent systems.

  2. The effect of resolution on viscous dissipation measured with 4D flow MRI in patients with Fontan circulation: Evaluation using computational fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cibiş (Merih); K. Jarvis (Kelly); M. Markl (Michael); M. Rose (Michael); C. Rigsby (Cynthia); A.J. Barker (Alex); J.J. Wentzel (Jolanda)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractViscous dissipation inside Fontan circulation, a parameter associated with the exercise intolerance of Fontan patients, can be derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or 4D flow MRI velocities. However, the impact of spatial resolution and measurement noise on the estimation of

  3. Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Simulation of Dense Granular Flows With Dilatancy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Narbona-Reina, Gladys; Kone, El Hadj

    2017-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [1]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/ dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [2]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson [3] and the mixture equations are closed by a weak compressibility relation. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To account for this transfer of fluid into and out of the mixture, a two-layer model is proposed with a fluid or a solid layer on top of the two-phase mixture layer. Mass and momentum conservation are satisfied for the two phases, and mass and momentum are transferred between the two layers. A thin-layer approximation is used to derive average equations. Special attention is paid to the drag friction terms that are responsible for the transfer of momentum between the two phases and for the appearance of an excess pore pressure with respect to the hydrostatic pressure. Interestingly, when removing the role of water, our model reduces to a dry granular flow model including dilatancy. We first compare experimental and numerical results of dilatant dry granular flows. Then, by quantitatively comparing the results of simulation and laboratory experiments on submerged granular flows, we show that our model

  4. Metamorphic assemblages and the direction of flow of metamorphic fluids in four instances of serpentinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, I.; Rapp, J.B.; O'Neil, J.R.; Sheppard, R.A.; Gude, A.J.

    1972-01-01

    Fluids related to Serpentinization are of at least three types. The first reported (Barnes and O'Neil, 1969) is a fluid of local meteoric origin, the chemical and thermodynamic properties of which are entirely controlled by olivine, orthopyroxene, brucite, and serpentine reactions. It is a Ca+2-OH-1 type and is shown experimentally to be capable of reacting with albite to yield calcium hydroxy silicates. Rodingites may form where the Ca+2-OH-1 type waters flow across the ultramafic contact and react with siliceous country rock. The second type of fluid has its chemical composition largely controlled before it enters the ultramafic rocks, but reactions within the ultramafic rocks fix the thermodynamic properties by reactions of orthopyroxene, olivine, calcite, brucite, and serpentine. The precipitation of brucite from this fluid clearly shows that fluid flow allows reaction products to be deposited at a distance from the point of solution. Thus, textural evidence for volume relations during Serpentinization may not be valid. The third type of fluid has its chemical properties fixed in part before the reactions with ultramafic rocks, in part by the reactions of orthopyroxene, olivine, and serpentine and in part by reactions with siliceous country rock at the contact. The reactions of the ultramafic rock and country rock with the fluid must be contemporaneous and require flow to be along the contact. This third type of fluid is grossly supersaturated with talc and tremolite, both found along the contact. The occurrence of magadiite, kenyaite, mountainite, and rhodesite along the contact is probably due to a late stage low-temperature reaction of fluids of the same thermodynamic properties as those that formed the talc and tremolite at higher temperatures. Oxygen isotope analyses of some of these minerals supports this conclusion. Rodingites form from Ca+2-rich fluids flowing across the contact; talc and tremolite form from silica-rich fluids flowing along the contact

  5. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a mixed flow pump impeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ATHARVA

    CFD) analysis is one of the advanced tools used in the pump industry. A detailed CFD analysis was done to predict the flow pattern inside the impeller which is an active pump component. From the results of CFD analysis, the velocity and ...

  6. Characterization and Low-Dimensional Modeling of Urban Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-06

    form of entry is the last name, first name, middle initial, and additional qualifiers separated by commas , e.g. Smith, Richard, J, Jr. 7...Mathematics and Scientific Computation, Oxford University Press, 2005. P. Kastner-Klein and M. Rotach. Mean flow and turbulence characteristics in an

  7. The Challenge of Fluid Flow -R-ES-ONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Do the same laws govern all that extraordinary variety? We begin with a picture gallery of a number of visible or visualized flows, and consider which ones we understand and which ones we do .... Saree-border type organization may also be seen in a variety of other situations ... McGraw-Hili International. Editions, 1991).

  8. Enhancement of flow measurements using fluid-dynamic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, H.; Seitz, T.; Tropea, C.

    2017-09-01

    Novel experimental modalities acquire spatially resolved velocity measurements for steady state and transient flows which are of interest for engineering and biological applications. One of the drawbacks of such high resolution velocity data is their susceptibility to measurement errors. In this paper, we propose a novel filtering strategy that allows enhancement of the noisy measurements to obtain reconstruction of smooth divergence free velocity and corresponding pressure fields which together approximately comply to a prescribed flow model. The main step in our approach consists of the appropriate use of the velocity measurements in the design of a linearized flow model which can be shown to be well-posed and consistent with the true velocity and pressure fields up to measurement and modeling errors. The reconstruction procedure is then formulated as an optimal control problem for this linearized flow model. The resulting filter has analyzable smoothing and approximation properties. We briefly discuss the discretization of the approach by finite element methods and comment on the efficient solution by iterative methods. The capability of the proposed filter to significantly reduce data noise is demonstrated by numerical tests including the application to experimental data. In addition, we compare with other methods like smoothing and solenoidal filtering.

  9. Radiative Fluid Flow Between Fixed Vertical Plates With Suction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiating MHD free convective slip flow with mass transfer and chemical reaction is presented. The governing particles are solved by perturbation method. The temperature, velocity and concentration profiles are presented graphically. The effects of magnetic, Prandtl, Schmidt, radiation, chemical, wave numbers are ...

  10. Free Convective Flow of a Reacting Fluid between Vertical Porous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates free convective flow between vertical porous plates. The energy and momentum equations which arise from the definitions of temperature and velocity are written in dimensionless forms. The resulting second order equations are solved to obtain expressions for the velocity, temperature, mass transfer ...

  11. Singularities at rims in three-dimensional fluid flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driesen, C.H.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are presented for Stokes flow near circular rims in three-dimensional geometries. Using nonstandard toroidal coordinates, asymptotic analytical expressions are derived for different corner angles. In comparison to the two-dimensional case, an extra critical corner angle value is

  12. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a mixed flow pump impeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The CAD models of the mixed flow impeller with optimum inlet and outlet angles are modeled using CAD modelling software ProE WF3. To find the relationship between the vane angles and the impeller performance the optimum vane angle is achieved step by step. Three CAD models are modeled with the vane angles ...

  13. Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

  14. Dissolved noble gases and stable isotopes as tracers of preferential fluid flow along faults in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumm, L. P.; Bense, V. F.; Dennis, P. F.; Hiscock, K. M.; Cremer, N.; Simon, S.

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater in shallow unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers close to the Bornheim fault in the Lower Rhine Embayment (LRE), Germany, has relatively low δ2H and δ18O values in comparison to regional modern groundwater recharge, and 4He concentrations up to 1.7 × 10-4 cm3 (STP) g-1 ± 2.2 % which is approximately four orders of magnitude higher than expected due to solubility equilibrium with the atmosphere. Groundwater age dating based on estimated in situ production and terrigenic flux of helium provides a groundwater residence time of ˜107 years. Although fluid exchange between the deep basal aquifer system and the upper aquifer layers is generally impeded by confining clay layers and lignite, this study's geochemical data suggest, for the first time, that deep circulating fluids penetrate shallow aquifers in the locality of fault zones, implying that sub-vertical fluid flow occurs along faults in the LRE. However, large hydraulic-head gradients observed across many faults suggest that they act as barriers to lateral groundwater flow. Therefore, the geochemical data reported here also substantiate a conduit-barrier model of fault-zone hydrogeology in unconsolidated sedimentary deposits, as well as corroborating the concept that faults in unconsolidated aquifer systems can act as loci for hydraulic connectivity between deep and shallow aquifers. The implications of fluid flow along faults in sedimentary basins worldwide are far reaching and of particular concern for carbon capture and storage (CCS) programmes, impacts of deep shale gas recovery for shallow groundwater aquifers, and nuclear waste storage sites where fault zones could act as potential leakage pathways for hazardous fluids.

  15. Dissolved noble gases, stable isotopes and heat as tracers of preferential fluid flow along faults in unconsolidated sedimentary aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, V.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater in shallow unconsolidated sedimentary aquifers close to the Bornheim fault in the Lower Rhine Embayment (LRE), Germany, has relatively low δ2H and δ18O values in comparison to regional modern groundwater recharge and 4He concentrations up to 1.7×10-4 cm³ (STP) gˉ¹ ± 2.2% which is approximately four orders of magnitude higher than expected due to solubility equilibrium with the atmosphere. Groundwater age-dating based on estimated in situ production and terrigenic flux of helium provides a groundwater residence time of 107 years. Although fluid exchange between the deep basal aquifer system and the upper aquifer layers is generally impeded by confining clay layers and lignite, our geochemical data suggest for the first time that deep circulating fluids penetrate shallow aquifers in the locality of fault zones and that sub-vertical fluid flow occurs along faults in the LRE. Large hydraulic head gradients observed across many faults in the LRE, but which is a global phenomenon, suggest that they act as barriers to lateral groundwater flow. Therefore, the geochemical data reported here also substantiate the previously proposed conduit-barrier model of fault zone hydrogeology in unconsolidated sedimentary deposits, as well as corroborating the concept that faults in unconsolidated aquifer systems can act as loci for hydraulic connectivity between deep and shallow aquifers. The implications of fluid flow along faults in sedimentary basins worldwide are far reaching and of particular concern for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) programmes, impacts of deep shale gas recovery for shallow groundwater aquifers, and nuclear waste storage sites where fault zones could act as potential leakage pathways for hazardous fluids.

  16. Advances in Fluid Dynamics of Subsurface Flow of Groundwater, Hydrocarbons, and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, the chemical methods of contaminant hydrogeology have dominated much of hydrogeological thinking. In their wake, understanding the physics of subsurface fluid flow and its application to practice and science seemingly has played a secondary role and it often has been replaced by numerical modelling only. Building an understanding of the actual physics of subsurface flow beyond numerical modelling, however, is a confusing experience exposing one to conflicting statements from the sides of engineers, hydrogeologists, and, for a decade or more, by the followers of free convection and density-driven flow. Within the physics of subsurface flow a number of questions arise, such as: Is water really incompressible as assumed in engineering hydraulics? How does buoyancy work? Are underground buoyancy forces generally directed vertically upwards or downwards? What is the consequential difference between hydrostatic and hydrodynamic conditions? What are the force fields causing subsurface flow for water, hydrocarbons and CO2? Is fluid flow really driven by pressure gradients as assumed in reservoir engineering? What is the effect of geothermal gradients on subsurface flow? Do convection cells and free convection exist on-shore? How does variable density flow work? Can today's numerical codes adequately determine variable density flow? Does saltwater really sink to the bottom of geologic systems due to its higher density? Aquitards create confining conditions and thereby confine fluid movements to aquifers? Does more water flow in aquifers than aquitards? The presentation will shed light on the maze of conflicting statements issued within engineering hydraulics and groundwater dynamics. It will also present a field case and its numerical modelling of variable density flow at a major industrial landfill site. The presentation will thereby foster the understanding of the correct physics involved and how this physics can be beneficially applied to practical cases

  17. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Thomas [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Efendiev, Yalchin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Tchelepi, Hamdi [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Durlofsky, Louis [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Our work in this project is aimed at making fundamental advances in multiscale methods for flow and transport in highly heterogeneous porous media. The main thrust of this research is to develop a systematic multiscale analysis and efficient coarse-scale models that can capture global effects and extend existing multiscale approaches to problems with additional physics and uncertainties. A key emphasis is on problems without an apparent scale separation. Multiscale solution methods are currently under active investigation for the simulation of subsurface flow in heterogeneous formations. These procedures capture the effects of fine-scale permeability variations through the calculation of specialized coarse-scale basis functions. Most of the multiscale techniques presented to date employ localization approximations in the calculation of these basis functions. For some highly correlated (e.g., channelized) formations, however, global effects are important and these may need to be incorporated into the multiscale basis functions. Other challenging issues facing multiscale simulations are the extension of existing multiscale techniques to problems with additional physics, such as compressibility, capillary effects, etc. In our project, we explore the improvement of multiscale methods through the incorporation of additional (single-phase flow) information and the development of a general multiscale framework for flows in the presence of uncertainties, compressible flow and heterogeneous transport, and geomechanics. We have considered (1) adaptive local-global multiscale methods, (2) multiscale methods for the transport equation, (3) operator-based multiscale methods and solvers, (4) multiscale methods in the presence of uncertainties and applications, (5) multiscale finite element methods for high contrast porous media and their generalizations, and (6) multiscale methods for geomechanics.

  18. Bernstein method for the MHD flow and heat transfer of a second grade fluid in a channel with porous wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sami Bataineh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an approximate solution method for the problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow and heat transfer of a second grade fluid in a channel with a porous wall. The method is based on the Bernstein polynomials with their operational matrices and collocation method. Under some regularity conditions, upper bounds of the absolute errors are given. We apply the residual correction procedure which may estimate the absolute error to the problem. We may estimate the absolute error by using a procedure depends on the sequence of the approximate solutions. For some certain cases, we apply the method to the problem in the numerical examples. Moreover, we test the impact of changing the flow parameters numerically. The results are consistent with the results of Runge-Kutta fourth order method and homotopy analysis method.

  19. A Study of Flow Separation in Transonic Flow Using Inviscid and Viscous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. A.; Tiwari, S. N.; Vonlavante, E.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of flow separation in transonic flows is made using various computational schemes which solve the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid mechanics. The flows examined are computed using several simple two-dimensional configurations including a backward facing step and a bump in a channel. Comparison of the results obtained using shock fitting and flux vector splitting methods are presented and the results obtained using the Euler codes are compared to results on the same configurations using a code which solves the Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Unsteady three-dimensional flow of Casson–Carreau fluids past a stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S.K. Raju

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of nonlinear thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink in unsteady three-dimensional flow of Carreau and Casson fluids past a stretching surface in the presence of homogeneous–heterogeneous reactions. The transformed governing equations are solved numerically using Runge–Kutta based shooting technique. We obtained good accuracy of the present results by comparing with the already published literature. The influence of dimensionless governing parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles along with the friction factors, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers is discussed and presented graphically. We presented dual solutions for flow, heat and mass transfer in Carreau and Casson fluids. It is found that the heat and mass transfer rate in Casson fluid is significantly high while compared with the Carreau fluid.

  1. Gravitary Free Surface Flows Used as a Rheometrical Tool: The Case of Viscoplastic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghemmour, Assia; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2008-07-01

    We present experimental results concerning the behaviour of two viscoplastic fluids (Carbopol gel and kaolin slurry) in a free surface flow configuration. Our experiments are conducted in a 3 meter long and 0.4 meter wide inclined channel whose bottom consists of a conveyor belt moving upstream with a controlled velocity. At channel upper boundary, fluid recirculation is forced by a rigid wall perpendicular to the bottom. These specificities allow us to generate gravitary surges that are stationary in the laboratory frame. We compare the properties of these surges (height and non dimensional characteristic numbers) to predictions based on independent measurements of the fluid rheological parameters. Lastly, the perspectives offered by the conveyor belt channel to characterize the rheological behaviour of complex natural fluids, such as muddy debris flow matrix, are discussed.

  2. A fast numerical method for ideal fluid flow in domains with multiple stirrers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mohamed M. S.; Green, Christopher C.

    2018-03-01

    A collection of arbitrarily-shaped solid objects, each moving at a constant speed, can be used to mix or stir ideal fluid, and can give rise to interesting flow patterns. Assuming these systems of fluid stirrers are two-dimensional, the mathematical problem of resolving the flow field—given a particular distribution of any finite number of stirrers of specified shape and speed—can be formulated as a Riemann–Hilbert (R–H) problem. We show that this R–H problem can be solved numerically using a fast and accurate algorithm for any finite number of stirrers based around a boundary integral equation with the generalized Neumann kernel. Various systems of fluid stirrers are considered, and our numerical scheme is shown to handle highly multiply connected domains (i.e. systems of many fluid stirrers) with minimal computational expense.

  3. How to teach computational fluid dynamics: explore the method or explore the flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marc K.

    2007-11-01

    A traditional course in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at the senior or first-year graduate level has one main goal. The student should finish the course with a clear understanding of the numerical techniques involved in CFD and how they are used to solve the specific partial differential equations (PDEs) that describe fluid motion. Typically, the instructor chooses a specific numerical technique, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, or finite element, teaches the fundamentals of that technique, and possibly reviews the others. This lecture material is followed by a project in which each student writes their own Navier-Stokes solver, uses it to solve a simple flow problem, and validates the code by comparison of the numerical results to experimental data for their flow geometry. The educational pedagogy of this course format is that the only way one can truly learn and appreciate CFD is to work through the underlying nuts-and-bolts of these respective numerical methods and see how they work in code. The evolution of CFD software over the past twenty years has brought us to the point where a challenge to this traditional pedagogy is in order. In this paper, a CFD course given during the Spring 2007 term at Georgia Tech will be described that was based on the idea that a tool to successfully solve the PDEs for an incompressible, Newtonian flow in any geometry is available. In this GT course, the flow solver used was COMSOL Multiphysics. The course involved the exploration of a number of fluid flows with the intent of developing a deep understanding of the underlying fluid mechanical mechanisms involved in the flow. Along the way, the student learned about the finite element method used in the software, how to properly pose the underlying mathematical model for the fluid flow, the limitations of the modeling process, and how to properly validate the flow solution. Specific examples from the course that illustrate these ideas will be discussed.

  4. Two-phase flow patterns recognition and parameters estimation through natural circulation test loop image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, R.N.; Libardi, R.M.P.; Masotti, P.H.F.; Sabundjian, G.; Andrade, D.A.; Umbehaun, P.E.; Torres, W.M.; Conti, T.N.; Macedo, L.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Engineering Center], e-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Visualization of natural circulation test loop cycles is used to study two-phase flow patterns associated with phase transients and static instabilities of flow. Experimental studies on natural circulation flow were originally related to accidents and transient simulations relative to nuclear reactor systems with light water refrigeration. In this regime, fluid circulation is mainly caused by a driving force ('thermal head') which arises from density differences due to temperature gradient. Natural circulation phenomenon has been important to provide residual heat removal in cases of 'loss of pump power' or plant shutdown in nuclear power plant accidents. The new generation of compact nuclear reactors includes natural circulation of their refrigerant fluid as a security mechanism in their projects. Two-phase flow patterns have been studied for many decades, and the related instabilities have been object of special attention recently. Experimental facility is an all glass-made cylindrical tubes loop which contains about twelve demineralized water liters, a heat source by an electrical resistor immersion heater controlled by a Variac, and a helicoidal heat exchanger working as cold source. Data is obtained through thermo-pairs distributed over the loop and CCD cameras. Artificial intelligence based algorithms are used to improve (bubble) border detection and patterns recognition, in order to estimate and characterize, phase transitions patterns and correlate them with the periodic static instability (chugging) cycle observed in this circuit. Most of initial results show good agreement with previous numerical studies in this same facility. (author)

  5. Electrowetting (EW)-based valve combined with hydrophilic teflon microfluidic guidance in controlling continuous fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-Yen; Hsiung, Lo-Chang

    2004-12-01

    Electrowetting (EW)-based techniques have been widely used in manipulating discrete liquid. However, few articles discussed the controlling of continuous fluid flow by using EW-based techniques. In this paper, an EW-based valve combined with plasma-modified Teflon surface, which serves as a microfluidic guidance, in controlling continuous fluid flow has been demonstrated. The plasma-modified Teflon surface is firstly demonstrated for confining continuous fluid flow. The EW-based microfluidic device possesses the functions of a valve and a microchannel without complex moving parts and grooved microchannels. The quantitative characteristics of the EW-based valve are also studied. Propylene carbonate (PC) is firstly demonstrated as the working liquid in the EW-based device because of its applications in parallel oligonucleotide synthesis. It is found that lower valve actuation voltage reduces the deterioration of the valve and improves the valve stability.

  6. Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Takizawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    This contributed volume celebrates the work of Tayfun E. Tezduyar on the occasion of his 60th birthday. The articles it contains were born out of the Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation (AFSI 2014) conference, also dedicated to Prof. Tezduyar and held at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan on March 19-21, 2014. The contributing authors represent a group of international experts in the field who discuss recent trends and new directions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Organized into seven distinct parts arranged by thematic topics, the papers included cover basic methods and applications of CFD, flows with moving boundaries and interfaces, phase-field modeling, computer science and high-performance computing (HPC) aspects of flow simulation, mathematical methods, biomedical applications, and FSI. Researchers, practitioners, and advanced graduate students working on CFD, FSI, and related topics will find this collection to be a defi...

  7. Second law analysis for hydromagnetic couple stress fluid flow through a porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O. Kareem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the combined effects of magnetic field and ohmic heating on the entropy generation rate in the flow of couple stress fluid through a porous channel are investigated. The equations governing the fluid flow are formulated, non-dimensionalised and solved using a rapidly convergent semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method (ADM. The result of the computation shows a significant dependence of fluid’s thermophysical parameters on Joule’s dissipation as well as decline in the rate of change of fluid momentum due to the interplay between Lorentz and viscous forces. Moreover, the rate of entropy generation in the flow system drops as the magnitude of the magnetic field increases.

  8. Frictional Fluid Dynamics and Plug Formation in Multiphase Millifluidic Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumazer, Guillaume; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Ayaz, Monem; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude

    2016-07-08

    We study experimentally the flow and patterning of a granular suspension displaced by air inside a narrow tube. The invading air-liquid interface accumulates a plug of granular material that clogs the tube due to friction with the confining walls. The gas percolates through the static plug once the gas pressure exceeds the pore capillary entry pressure of the packed grains, and a moving accumulation front is reestablished at the far side of the plug. The process repeats, such that the advancing interface leaves a trail of plugs in its wake. Further, we show that the system undergoes a fluidization transition-and complete evacuation of the granular suspension-when the liquid withdrawal rate increases beyond a critical value. An analytical model of the stability condition for the granular accumulation predicts the flow regime.

  9. Control of Low Reynolds Number Flows with Fluid Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-02

    public release; distribution is unlimited. 15 The second parameter is more relevant to the thrust generation. The history of the subject is given in the...airfoil. This form of flow field (no convected LEV) does not arise abruptly; Figure 14(d) shows a mixed mode. A time history of a mode-2 vortex... Zoology , Vol. 193, No. APR, 1981, pp. 447-468. [16] Steppan, S.J., "Flexural Stiffness Patterns of Butterfly Wings (Papilionoidea)," Journal of Research

  10. Computations of incompressible fluid flow around a long square ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEEPAK KUMAR

    laterally on decreasing gap ratio from 1 to 0.25. On increasing Re, this wake flattens along the channel wall and hence its size increases. The flow is observed to be steady for Re up to 121 at G = 0.5. The conversion to a time-periodic regime from a steady regime is presented in figure 5a–5b by providing the temporal ...

  11. Theoretical treatment of fluid flow for accelerating bodies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available in acceleration, deceleration and steady state at specific Mach numbers during flight revealed significant differences between the steady and unsteady scenarios. Acceleration dependent behaviour for bow shocks, tail shocks and trailing compression waves were... to the formulation of the Basset-Bousinessq-Oseen equation for the motion of a particle in the limit of low Mach and Reynolds numbers and its subsequent extension to compressible flow [11]. The terms Bousinessq-Basset force, Basset force [12] or history force...

  12. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models of lava flow simulation for hazard assessment, forecasting, and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi; Richardson, Jacob A.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, designing flow mitigation measures, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, COMSOL, and MOLASSES. We model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal planes, sloping surfaces, and into topographic obstacles. We compare model results to physical observations made during well-controlled analogue and molten basalt experiments, and to analytical theory when available. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We assess the goodness-of-fit of the simulation results and the computational cost. Our results guide the selection of numerical simulation codes for different applications, including inferring emplacement conditions of past lava flows, modeling the temporal evolution of ongoing flows during eruption, and probabilistic assessment of lava flow hazard prior to eruption. Finally, we outline potential experiments and desired key observational data from future flows that would extend existing benchmarking data sets.

  13. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutnak, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ground surface displacement (GSD) in large calderas is often interpreted as resulting from magma intrusion at depth. Recent advances in geodetic measurements of GSD, notably interferometric synthetic aperture radar, reveal complex and multifaceted deformation patterns that often require complex source models to explain the observed GSD. Although hydrothermal fluids have been discussed as a possible deformation agent, very few quantitative studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent increases in the power and availability of computing resources allow robust quantitative assessment of the complex time-variant thermal interplay between aqueous fluid flow and crustal deformation. We carry out numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H 2O-CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow and poroelastic deformation using a range of realistic physical parameters and processes. Hydrothermal fluid injection, circulation, and gas formation can generate complex, temporally and spatially varying patterns of GSD, with deformation rates, magnitudes, and geometries (including subsidence) similar to those observed in several large calderas. The potential for both rapid and gradual deformation resulting from magma-derived fluids suggests that hydrothermal fluid circulation may help explain deformation episodes at calderas that have not culminated in magmatic eruption.

  14. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2014-11-14

    A multiscale linear-solver framework for the pressure equation associated with flow in highly heterogeneous porous formations was developed. The multiscale based approach is cast in a general algebraic form, which facilitates integration of the new scalable linear solver in existing flow simulators. The Algebraic Multiscale Solver (AMS) is employed as a preconditioner within a multi-stage strategy. The formulations investigated include the standard MultiScale Finite-Element (MSFE) andMultiScale Finite-Volume (MSFV) methods. The local-stage solvers include incomplete factorization and the so-called Correction Functions (CF) associated with the MSFV approach. Extensive testing of AMS, as an iterative linear solver, indicate excellent convergence rates and computational scalability. AMS compares favorably with advanced Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) solvers for highly detailed three-dimensional heterogeneous models. Moreover, AMS is expected to be especially beneficial in solving time-dependent problems of coupled multiphase flow and transport in large-scale subsurface formations.

  15. Safety System for Controlling Fluid Flow into a Suction Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A safety system includes a sleeve fitted within a pool's suction line at the inlet thereof. An open end of the sleeve is approximately aligned with the suction line's inlet. The sleeve terminates with a plate that resides within the suction line. The plate has holes formed therethrough. A housing defining a plurality of distinct channels is fitted in the sleeve so that the distinct channels lie within the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels has a first opening on one end thereof and a second opening on another end thereof. The second openings reside in the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels is at least approximately three feet in length. The first openings are in fluid communication with the water in the pool, and are distributed around a periphery of an area of the housing that prevents coverage of all the first openings when a human interacts therewith.

  16. Effects of porosity and mixed convection on MHD two phase fluid flow in an inclined channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Jafar; Abbas, Zaheer; Sajid, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the flow and heat transfer analysis of two immiscible fluids in an inclined channel embedded in a porous medium. The channel is divided in two phases such that a third grade fluid occupies the phase I and a viscous fluid occupies the phase II. Both viscous and third grade fluids are electrically conducting. A constant magnetic field is imposed perpendicular to the channel walls. The mathematical model is developed by using Darcy's and modified Darcy's laws for viscous and third grade fluids respectively. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. The obtained results are presented graphically and influence of emerging parameters is discussed in detail.

  17. Estimating Natural Flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, G.; Kadir, T.; Chung, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta under predevelopment vegetative conditions, if and when reconstructed, can serve as a useful guide to establish minimum stream flows, restoration targets, and a basis for assessing impacts of global warming in the Bay-Delta System. Daily simulations of natural Delta flows for the period 1922-2009 were obtained using precipitation-snowmelt-runoff models for the upper watersheds that are tributaries to the California's Central Valley, and then routing the water through the Central Valley floor area using a modified version of the California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) for water years 1922 through 2009. Daily stream inflows from all major upper watersheds were simulated using 23 Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) models. Historical precipitation and reference evapotranspiration data were extracted from the SIMETAW2 with the 4km gridded meteorological data. The Historical natural and riparian vegetation distributions were compiled from several pre-1900 historical vegetation maps of the Central Valley. Wetlands were dynamically simulated using interconnected lakes. Flows overtopping natural levees were simulated using flow rating curves. New estimates of potential evapotranspiration from different vegetative classes under natural conditions were also used. Sensitivity simulations demonstrate that evapotranspiration estimates, native vegetation distribution, surface-groundwater interaction parameters, extinction depth for groundwater uptake, and other physical processes play a key role in the magnitude and timing of upstream flows arriving at the Delta. Findings contradict a common misconception that the magnitude of inflows to the Delta under natural vegetative conditions is greater than those under the historical agricultural and urban land use development. The developed models also enable to study the impacts of global warming by modifying meteorological and

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic pump with a system for promoting flow of fluid in one direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoff, Asuncion V [Union City, CA; Lee, Abraham P [Irvine, CA

    2010-07-13

    A magnetohydrodynamic pump for pumping a fluid. The pump includes a microfluidic channel for channeling the fluid, a MHD electrode/magnet system operatively connected to the microfluidic channel, and a system for promoting flow of the fluid in one direction in the microfluidic channel. The pump has uses in the medical and biotechnology industries for blood-cell-separation equipment, biochemical assays, chemical synthesis, genetic analysis, drug screening, an array of antigen-antibody reactions, combinatorial chemistry, drug testing, medical and biological diagnostics, and combinatorial chemistry. The pump also has uses in electrochromatography, surface micromachining, laser ablation, inkjet printers, and mechanical micromilling.

  19. Boundary layer flow and heat transfer to Carreau fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Khan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the Carreau viscosity model (which is a generalized Newtonian model and then use it to obtain a formulation for the boundary layer equations of the Carreau fluid. The boundary layer flow and heat transfer to a Carreau model over a nonlinear stretching surface is discussed. The Carreau model, adequate for many non-Newtonian fluids, is used to characterize the behavior of the fluids having shear thinning properties and fluids with shear thickening properties for numerical values of the power law exponent n. The modeled boundary layer conservation equations are converted to non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. Numerical solution of the resulting equations are obtained by using the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method along with shooting technique. This analysis reveals many important physical aspects of flow and heat transfer. Computations are performed for different values of the stretching parameter (m, the Weissenberg number (We and the Prandtl number (Pr. The obtained results show that for shear thinning fluid the fluid velocity is depressed by the Weissenberg number while opposite behavior for the shear thickening fluid is observed. A comparison with previously published data in limiting cases is performed and they are in excellent agreement.

  20. Initial susceptibility, flow curves, and magneto-optics of inverse magnetic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raşa, M; Philipse, A P; Jamon, D

    2003-09-01

    We introduce inverse magnetic fluids, consisting of gibbsite [Al(OH)(3)] platelets and alumina (Al2O3) spheres dispersed in a magnetic fluid, studied together with silica (SiO2) dispersions based on the same magnetic fluid matrix. Atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, and alternate gradient magnetometry confirm the remarkable stability of the samples. Optical microscopy shows aggregation of nonmagnetic spheres, which, surprisingly, strongly depends on the concentration of the magnetic fluid rather than the concentration of nonmagnetic particles. Our model for the initial susceptibility of inverse magnetic fluids agrees very well with experimental data for systems containing spherical particles. The flow curves in an external magnetic field are strongly influenced by the aggregation of nonmagnetic particles or preformed nonmagnetic particle clusters, and by their disruption due to the shear flow. Static linear magnetobirefringence and magnetodichroism of all samples are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. These effects, which occur in all magnetic fluids, can be enhanced by the additional anisotropy due to the magnetic holes. The experiments we performed showed that, at a wavelength of 820 nm, the magnetodichroism is increased while the magneto-birefringence decreases when nonmagnetic particles were dispersed in the magnetic fluid. Magneto-birefringence is expected to be increased at large enough wavelengths only.