WorldWideScience

Sample records for essentially saturated peat

  1. Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article looks at the U.S. peat market as of July 2013. Peat is produced from deposits of plant organic materials in wetlands and includes varieties such as reed-sedge, sphagnum moss, and humus. Use for peat include horticultural soil additives, filtration, and adsorbents. Other topics include effects of environmental protection regulations on peat extraction, competition from products such as coir, composted organic waste, and wood products, and peatland carbon sinks.

  2. Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, domestic production of peat, excluding Alaska, was estimated to be 560 kt (617,000 st), compared with 568 kt (626,000 st) in 2011. In 2012, imports decreased to 940 kt (1 million st) compared with 982 kt (1.1 million st) in 2011, and exports were estimated to have increased to 75 kt (82,600 st) in 2012. U.S. apparent consumption for 2012 was estimated to have remained the same as that of 2011. World production was estimated to be about 27 Mt (30 million st) in 2012, which was slightly higher than 2011.

  3. Transport properties and pore-network structure in variably-saturated Sphagnum peat soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Dissanayaka, Shiromi Himalika; Kawamoto, K.

    2016-01-01

    ) of layers in peat soil from two profiles were measured under different moisture conditions. A two-region Archie's Law (2RAL)-type model was applied successfully to the four properties; the reference point was taken at -9.8kPa of soil-water matric potential where volume shrinkage typically started to occur...... a need for specific hydraulic functions for peat soil. The 2RAL model for Dg agreed well with measured data, and performed better than existing unimodal models. To facilitate use of the 2RAL for Dg, we developed a simple predictive expression for Dg at the reference point. The pore-network tortuosity......Gas and water transport in peat soil are of increasing interest because of their potentially large environmental and climatic effects under different types of land use. In this research, the water retention curve (WRC), gas diffusion coefficient (Dg) and air and water permeabilities (ka and kw...

  4. Comprehensive Essentiality Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genome via Saturating Transposon Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Michael A; Gerrick, Elias R; Xu, Weizhen; Park, Sae Woong; Long, Jarukit E; Boutte, Cara C; Rubin, Eric J; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2017-01-17

    For decades, identifying the regions of a bacterial chromosome that are necessary for viability has relied on mapping integration sites in libraries of random transposon mutants to find loci that are unable to sustain insertion. To date, these studies have analyzed subsaturated libraries, necessitating the application of statistical methods to estimate the likelihood that a gap in transposon coverage is the result of biological selection and not the stochasticity of insertion. As a result, the essentiality of many genomic features, particularly small ones, could not be reliably assessed. We sought to overcome this limitation by creating a completely saturated transposon library in Mycobacterium tuberculosis In assessing the composition of this highly saturated library by deep sequencing, we discovered that a previously unknown sequence bias of the Himar1 element rendered approximately 9% of potential TA dinucleotide insertion sites less permissible for insertion. We used a hidden Markov model of essentiality that accounted for this unanticipated bias, allowing us to confidently evaluate the essentiality of features that contained as few as 2 TA sites, including open reading frames (ORF), experimentally identified noncoding RNAs, methylation sites, and promoters. In addition, several essential regions that did not correspond to known features were identified, suggesting uncharacterized functions that are necessary for growth. This work provides an authoritative catalog of essential regions of the M. tuberculosis genome and a statistical framework for applying saturating mutagenesis to other bacteria. Sequencing of transposon-insertion mutant libraries has become a widely used tool for probing the functions of genes under various conditions. The Himar1 transposon is generally believed to insert with equal probabilities at all TA dinucleotides, and therefore its absence in a mutant library is taken to indicate biological selection against the corresponding mutant

  5. Growing peat

    OpenAIRE

    Harpenslager, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Peat formation is a slow process and the formation of thick peat layers in large parts of e.g. Russia, Canada and Indonesia has generally taken thousands of years. Due to degradation of peatlands throughout the world, as a result of changed land use and pollution, many ecosystem services provided by peatlands have disappeared. It is therefore necessary to restore degraded systems or create new peat-forming wetlands. Information on the early stages of peat formation is scarce, however, and the...

  6. Growing peat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harpenslager, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Peat formation is a slow process and the formation of thick peat layers in large parts of e.g. Russia, Canada and Indonesia has generally taken thousands of years. Due to degradation of peatlands throughout the world, as a result of changed land use and pollution, many ecosystem services provided by

  7. The dominant detritus-feeding invertebrate in Arctic peat soils derives its essential amino acids from gut symbionts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Maraldo, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    of amino acids to bacteria, fungi and plants in enchytraeids. 4. Enchytraeids collected from Arctic peatlands derived more than 80% of their EAA from bacteria. In a controlled feeding study with the enchytraeid Enchytraeus crypticus, EAA derived almost exclusively from gut bacteria when the worms fed......1. Supplementation of nutrients by symbionts enables consumers to thrive on resources that might otherwise be insufficient to meet nutritional demands. Such nutritional subsidies by intracellular symbionts have been well studied; however, supplementation of de novo synthesized nutrients to hosts...... insufficiencies of macronutrients such as essential amino acids (EAA). Documenting whether gut symbionts also function as partners for symbiotic EAA supplementation is important because the question of how some detritivores are able to subsist on nutritionally insufficient diets has remained unresolved. 3...

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Sature jahortensis Against Multi-DrugResistant Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeide Saeidi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of resistance to many of the commonly used antibiotics is an impetus for further attempts to search for new antimicrobial agents. Objectives: In the present study, the antibacterial activity of Saturejahortensis essential oil against multi-drug resistant bacteria isolated from the urinary tract infections was investigated. Materials and Methods: During the years 2011 to 2012 a total of 36 strains of pathogenic bacteria including 12 Klebsiellapneumoniae, 12 Escherichia coli and 12 Staphylococcus aureus species were isolated from urine samples of hospitalized patients (Amir Al-Momenin Hospital, Zabol, South-eastern Iran suffering from urinary tract infections. After bacteriological confirmatory tests, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the essential oil of Saturejahortensis were determined using micro-dilution method. Results: The antibiotic resistance profile of the E. coli isolates were as follows: ceftazidime (50% cefixime (41.6%, tetracycline (75%, erythromycin (58.3%. However K. pneumoniae isolates showed resistance to ceftazidime (33.3%, cefixime (58.3%, erythromycin (75% and S. aureus isolates were resistant to cefixime (33.3%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (41.66%, penicillin (50%, oxacillin (83.3%, ceftazidime (66.6% and vancomycin (8.3%. The essential oil of this plant had inhibitory effect against most isolates. More than 1/3 of the E. coli isolates showed the lowest MIC (10 ppm whereas more than 1/3 of the K. pneumoniae isolates showed the highest (250 ppm MIC values. In contrast ,equal number of S. aureus isolates showed the low MIC values (10 and 50 ppm, while the heighest MIC (250 ppm was seen in 1/3 of isolates and moderate MIC (100 ppm was seen in one isolate only. Conclusions: The Saturejahortensis essential oil has a potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria. The present study confirms the usefullness of this essential oil as antibacterial agent but further research is

  9. Peat Bog Ecosystems: Commercial peat extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Richard; Birnie, Richard; Clough, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Removal of peat for commercial use, now largely as a horticultural growing medium but in earlier times as litter for stables, results in large-scale removal of the living vegetation, the peat and the carbon stored within the peat. The UK Government is seeking to replace the use of peat with sustainable peat alternatives by 2030. Restoration of cut-over bogs involves blocking the drainage system and encouraging growth of terrestrial Sphagnum species.\\ud \\ud This briefing note is part of a seri...

  10. Peat Bog Ecosystems: Domestic peat extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Richard; Birnie, Richard; Clough, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale peat extraction for fuel has probably been a feature of peat-dominated landscapes for many thousands of years. The cumulative scale and extent of this activity is often under-estimated, particularly in areas which are now remote parts of the landscape. A cut peat face acts as a one-sided drain and thus has a number of hydrological and morphological effects, including potentially the creation of weak zones within the peat which may trigger mass movement.\\ud \\ud This briefing note i...

  11. Geotechnical Characteristics of Peat

    OpenAIRE

    Zainorabidin, Adnan; Wijeyesekera, D.Chitral

    2008-01-01

    Peat soil is encountered in many areas and generally originates from plant/animal remains and is considered partly as decomposed biomass (Adnan and Wijeyesekera, 2007). Due to this composition, the structure of this soil is very different when compared with inorganic soils like clay, sand and gravel. Peat has a high compressibility, low shear strength, high moisture content and low bearing capacity (Bujang, 2004, Adnan et al., 2007). The behaviour and composition of peats in different geograp...

  12. Method of peat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheyde, V.P.; Remizov, V.V.; Serov, N.N.

    1982-07-07

    The proposed method of peat recovery includes cutting bricks from the bed, and lifting and storing them in drying platforms. In order to increase efficiency of the recovery process, the peat is excavated from longitudinal parallel strips located between peat brick cutting strips at the same time as bricks are cut from the bed. The deep-slit method is used. The depth of excavation strips is greater than the depth of the strips that are cut.

  13. The Comparative Study of Element Accumulation in Wood Fen Peat (Latvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumins, Janis; Klavins, Maris; Kuske, Eliza; Seglins, Valdis; Kaup, Enn

    2013-04-01

    -sedge peat. All sampled sediments are characterized as peat with high calcium content (>10g/kg). The highest content of calcium was evident in wood-reed peat, but the lowest was in wood-sphagnum peat. Also, the statistical analysis shows on a different pattern of accumulation among wood peat types. Correlations between elements are distinctly different among peat types. There are significant correlations between calcium and magnesium in all kinds of analysed wood peat, but the situation is different with other elements. For example, in wood-grass peat several element correlate with potassium (Fe, Mn, etc.), while in wood-sedge fen peat there is no significant correlations with potassium at all. In wood-sphagnum peat, with low saturation of iron, several elements significantly correlate with iron (Mn, Co, etc.). The presence of moss remains in peat decreases the accumulation of particular elements. There is a reason to believe that plant remains in botanical composition of fen peat, which are characteristic for raised bogs reduce the absorption capacity, but the presence of fen plant remains in turn increase accumulation abilities, thus fen peat is more saturated with chemical elements.

  14. Chemical properties of peat used in balneology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajdak, L.; Hładoń, T.

    2009-04-01

    The physiological activity of peats is observed in human peat-bath therapy and in the promotion of growth in some plants. Balneological peat as an ecologically clean and natural substance is perceived as being more 'human friendly' than synthetic compounds. Poland has a long tradition of using balneological peat for therapeutic purposes. Balneological peat reveals a physical effect by altering temperature and biochemical effects through biologically active substances. It is mainly used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases that are quite common in Poland. Peat represents natural product. Physico-chemical properties of peat in particular surface-active, sorption and ion exchanges, defining their biological function, depend mainly on the chemical composition and molecular structure of humic substances representing the major constituent of organic soil (peat). The carbon of organic matter of peats is composed of 10 to 20% carbohydrates, primarily of microbial origin; 20% nitrogen-containing constituents, such as amino acids and amino sugars; 10 to 20% aliphatic fatty acids, alkanes, etc.; with the rest of carbon being aromatic. For balneology peat should be highly decomposed (preferably H8), natural and clean. The content of humic acids should exceed 20% of dry weight, ash content will be less than 15 15% of dry weight, sulphur content less than 0.3% of dry weight and the amount of water more than 85%. It will not contain harmful bacteria and heavy metals. Humic substances (HS) of peat are known to be macromolecular polydisperse biphyllic systems including both hydrophobic domains (saturated hydrocarbon chains, aromatic structural units) and hydrophilic functional groups, i. e having amphiphilic character. Amphiphilic properties of FA are responsible for their solubility, viscosity, conformation, surfactant-like character and a variety of physicochemical properties of considerable biologically practical significance. The chemical composition of peats depends

  15. Peat Bog Ecosystems: Burning

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Richard; Birnie, Richard; Clough, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Fires occur naturally on bogs through lightning strikes, but for any given location this is a rare occurrence - perhaps once every 200 or 300 years. Current burning practice for grazing or to encourage grouse means that ground is burnt 10x more frequently than this, resulting in loss of natural peat bog biodiversity and peat-forming species. Full recovery may take considerably more than a century.\\ud \\ud This briefing note is part of a series aimed at policy makers, practitioners and academic...

  16. adsorption, eosin, humic, peat

    OpenAIRE

    Anshar, Andi Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Eosin is one of the dyes commonly used in the industry and has the potential to cause pollution of the water environment. The Eosin pollution treatment methods used in this study was the adsorption method using humin fraction obtained from the peat land comes from Kalimantan. From the research data showed that the adsorption of eosin in humin result of washing with HCl / HF optimum at pH 4 and a contact time of 60 minutes with the adsorption-order rate was 8,4 x 10-3 min-1

  17. An overview of peat gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punwani, D. V.

    Thermal and biological peat gasification processes are reviewed, with research showing that peat is high in both oxygen and hydrogen, and also nitrogen, which can be used to form ammonia as a byproduct. The hydrogen-carbon ratio of peat has been shown to exceed that of subbituminous coal, indicating less of a need to supply more hydrogen in the formation of gaseous fuels. The gasification process involves crushing the peat into particles smaller than 2 mm, which cascade through drying air into a gasifier, where gases from the hydrogasifier induce hydropyrolysis. The char then flows into a reactor with steam and oxygen to make synthesis gas. Minnesota peat has shown the highest hydrocarbon yields in the U.S., and economic comparisons show peak gasification has economic parity with other means of producing SNG. Experiments have also shown the feasibility of wet peat conversion using a peat-water slurry in an anaerobic digestor to produce methane. Building of pilot plants is suggested as necessary to verify existing processes.

  18. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  19. On the possibility of allochtonous peat on the inner shelf off Karwar

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.; Paropkari, A.L.; PrakashBabu, C.

    environment, lack of favourable substrates for mangrove colonization), it is obvious that mangroves could not have prograded 18 km seaward as they essentially require a low energy and sheltered habitat. We therefore propose that these peat deposits were...

  20. Third technical contractors' conference on peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The conference dealt with the estimation of US peat reserves, methods for the gasification of peat, including biogasification, techniques for dewatering peat, and the harvesting of peat. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

  1. Enhancing peat metal sorption and settling characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiviskä, Tiina; Khalid, Muhammad Kamran; Gogoi, Harshita; Tanskanen, Juha

    2017-10-29

    Peat is an excellent material for metal sorption since it naturally contains different kinds of functional groups that can sorb metal cations from water. The main objective of this work was to test low-cost treatment (acid and alkali) methods for natural peat, which would improve the settling properties of peat particles while maintaining its metal removal efficiency. Particularly, the poor settling properties of peat hinder its practical application. The study revealed that NaOH-treated peat (0.1M) had excellent settling properties and could be applied in wastewater applications having mixing and settling systems without a settling aid. The superior leaching of humic and fulvic acids in alkaline treatment caused a change in morphology, making it a harder and sticky material. Moreover, the NaOH-treated (0.1M) peat was proven to be the most efficient material for nickel removal followed by the HCl-treated (0.2M) peat, citric acid-treated (0.16M) peat and water-treated peat. A higher temperature and longer time slightly increased the Ni removal efficiency with NaOH-treated peat material. The settling of HCl-treated peat was studied further using polyacrylamide flocculants (cationic, neutral, anionic). Cationic flocculants performed best and the cationic charge density also had an effect on the flocculation performance of peat particles. This study provides further evidence that peat can be applied in the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fourth technical contractors' conference on peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The papers presented dealt with peat dewatering, international peat programs, environmental and socio-economic factors, peat gasification, peat harvesting, and the state peat surveys for 14 states. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

  3. Remote Sensing of Wetland Types: Peat Swamps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, D.H.

    2017-01-01

    Deposits of peat underneath peat swamp forests are among the world’s largest reservoirs of carbon. Although tropical peatlands occupy only about 0.3 % of the global land surface, they could contain as much as 20 % of the global soil carbon stock, representing 63–148 Gt of carbon.

    Peat swamp

  4. Thermal properties of degraded lowland peat-moorsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties, i.e.: specific heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (K), volumetric heat capacity (C) govern the thermal environment and heat transport through the soil. Hence the precise knowledge and accurate predictions of these properties for peaty soils with high amount of organic matter are especially important for the proper forecasting of soil temperature and thus it may lead to a better assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions created by microbiological activity of the peatlands. The objective of the study was to develop the predictive models of the selected thermal parameters of peat-moorsh soils in terms of their potential applicability for forecasting changes of soil temperature in degraded ecosystems of the Middle Biebrza River Valley area. Evaluation of the soil thermal properties was conducted for the parameters: specific heat capacity (c), volumetric heat capacities of the dry and saturated soil (Cdry, Csat) and thermal conductivities of the dry and saturated soil (Kdry, Ksat). The thermal parameters were measured using the dual-needle probe (KD2-Pro) on soil samples collected from seven peaty soils, representing total 24 horizons. The surface layers were characterized by different degrees of advancement of soil degradation dependent on intensiveness of the cultivation practises (peaty and humic moorsh). The underlying soil layers contain peat deposits of different botanical composition (peat-moss, sedge-reed, reed and alder) and varying degrees of decomposition of the organic matter, from H1 to H7 (von Post scale). Based on the research results it has been shown that the specific heat capacity of the soils differs depending on the type of soil (type of moorsh and type of peat). The range of changes varied from 1276 J.kg-1.K-1 in the humic moorsh soil to 1944 J.kg-1.K-1 in the low decomposed sedge-moss peat. It has also been stated that in degraded peat soils with the increasing of the ash content in the soil the value of specific heat

  5. Age Determination of the Remaining Peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California was once a 1,400 square kilometer (km2) tidal marsh, which contained a vast layer of peat ranging up to 15 meters (m) thick (Atwater and Belknap, 1980). Because of its favorable climate and highly fertile peat soils, the majority of the Delta was drained and reclaimed for agriculture during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Drainage of the peat soils changed the conditions in the surface layers of peat from anaerobic (having no free oxygen present) to aerobic (exposed to the atmosphere). This change in conditions greatly increased the decomposition rate of the peat, which consists largely of organic (plant) matter. Thus began the process of land-surface subsidence, which initially was a result of peat shrinkage and compaction, and later largely was a result of oxidation by which organic carbon in the peat essentially vaporized to carbon dioxide (Deverel and others, 1998; Ingebritsen and Ikehara, 1999). Because of subsidence, the land-surface elevation on farmed islands in the Delta has decreased from a few meters to as much as 8 m below local mean sea level (California Department of Water Resources, 1995; Steve Deverel, Hydrofocus, Inc., written commun., 2007). The USGS, in collaboration with the University of California at Davis, and Hydrofocus Inc. of Davis, California, has been studying the formation of the Delta and the impact of wetland reclamation on the peat column as part of a project called Rates and Evolution of Peat Accretion through Time (REPEAT). The purpose of this report is to provide results on the age of the remaining peat soils on four farmed islands in the Delta.

  6. Buoyancy-driven flow in a peat moss layer as a mechanism for solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C.; Pieters, G.J.J.M.; Adema, E.B.; Baaijens, G.J.; Grootjans, A.P.; Duijn, van C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of nutrients, CO2, methane, and oxygen plays an important ecological role at the surface of wetland ecosystems. A possibly important transport mechanism in a water-saturated peat moss layer (usually Sphagnum cuspidatum) is nocturnal buoyancy flow, the downward flow of relatively cold

  7. Ash contents of Costa Rican peat deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Cohen, A.D.; Bish, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen sites within 6 Costa Rican peat localities were sampled using MacCaulay samplers and soil augers. Sample localities included high mountain (>2500 meters), river floodplain, and Gulf coastal plain. Peat deposits ranged from as thin as 20 cm to greater than 460 cm. Within the peat deposits, ash (that material which will remain following combustion) occurs both dispersed within the peat layers and as layers containing nearly 100% inorganic material interstratified with the peat layers. Ash in Costa Rican peats includes material derived from both organic and inorganic origins. The predominant inorganically derived material is volcanic and may result from direct volcanic ashfall into the peat environment or as detritus transported into the peat areas. Volcanic ash is rapidly altered within the peats, leaving little if any relict structures. Alteration products are pedominantly kaolin and smectite clays and gibbsite. Unaltered minerals identified by x-ray diffraction include quartz, cristobalite, plagiolase feldspar, and anatase. Hematite and bassanite (identified by x-ray diffraction) are present but result from the alteration of iron-bearing minerals and organic sulfur or gypsum during sample preparation. Pyrite is present as a very minor component of some Costa Rican peats. Organically-derived ash constituents in Costa Rican peats include siliceous diatoms, siliceous sponge spicules, and silica phytoliths. The type and abundance of ash constituents within Costa Rican peats can be evaluated based on geographic location of the peat deposits, the geologic conditions affecting their deposition, and the plant communities existing during deposition. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. PwC's 3-Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifeld, Lorri

    2010-01-01

    PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) is giving the Chicago Bulls a run for their money when it comes to three-peats. The professional services firm scored the top spot on the Training Top 125 for a record third year in a row. So, just how did PwC nail No. 1 again? For starters, it met and exceeded a hefty challenge in fiscal year 2009: cutting training…

  9. Dissolved organic carbon and major and trace elements in peat porewater of sporadic, discontinuous, and continuous permafrost zones of western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudina, Tatiana V.; Loiko, Sergey V.; Lim, Artyom G.; Krickov, Ivan V.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Istigechev, Georgy I.; Kuzmina, Daria M.; Kulizhsky, Sergey P.; Vorobyev, Sergey N.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2017-07-01

    Mobilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and related trace elements (TEs) from the frozen peat to surface waters in the permafrost zone is expected to enhance under ongoing permafrost thaw and active layer thickness (ALT) deepening in high-latitude regions. The interstitial soil solutions are efficient tracers of ongoing bio-geochemical processes in the critical zone and can help to decipher the intensity of carbon and metals migration from the soil to the rivers and further to the ocean. To this end, we collected, across a 640 km latitudinal transect of the sporadic to continuous permafrost zone of western Siberia peatlands, soil porewaters from 30 cm depth using suction cups and we analyzed DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and 40 major elements and TEs in 0.45 µm filtered fraction of 80 soil porewaters. Despite an expected decrease in the intensity of DOC and TE mobilization from the soil and vegetation litter to the interstitial fluids with the increase in the permafrost coverage and a decrease in the annual temperature and ALT, the DOC and many major and trace elements did not exhibit any distinct decrease in concentration along the latitudinal transect from 62.2 to 67.4° N. The DOC demonstrated a maximum of concentration at 66° N, on the border of the discontinuous/continuous permafrost zone, whereas the DOC concentration in peat soil solutions from the continuous permafrost zone was equal to or higher than that in the sporadic/discontinuous permafrost zone. Moreover, a number of major (Ca, Mg) and trace (Al, Ti, Sr, Ga, rare earth elements (REEs), Zr, Hf, Th) elements exhibited an increasing, not decreasing, northward concentration trend. We hypothesize that the effects of temperature and thickness of the ALT are of secondary importance relative to the leaching capacity of peat, which is in turn controlled by the water saturation of the peat core. The water residence time in peat pores also plays a role in enriching the fluids in some elements

  10. Dissolved organic carbon and major and trace elements in peat porewater of sporadic, discontinuous, and continuous permafrost zones of western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Raudina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and related trace elements (TEs from the frozen peat to surface waters in the permafrost zone is expected to enhance under ongoing permafrost thaw and active layer thickness (ALT deepening in high-latitude regions. The interstitial soil solutions are efficient tracers of ongoing bio-geochemical processes in the critical zone and can help to decipher the intensity of carbon and metals migration from the soil to the rivers and further to the ocean. To this end, we collected, across a 640 km latitudinal transect of the sporadic to continuous permafrost zone of western Siberia peatlands, soil porewaters from 30 cm depth using suction cups and we analyzed DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, and 40 major elements and TEs in 0.45 µm filtered fraction of 80 soil porewaters. Despite an expected decrease in the intensity of DOC and TE mobilization from the soil and vegetation litter to the interstitial fluids with the increase in the permafrost coverage and a decrease in the annual temperature and ALT, the DOC and many major and trace elements did not exhibit any distinct decrease in concentration along the latitudinal transect from 62.2 to 67.4° N. The DOC demonstrated a maximum of concentration at 66° N, on the border of the discontinuous/continuous permafrost zone, whereas the DOC concentration in peat soil solutions from the continuous permafrost zone was equal to or higher than that in the sporadic/discontinuous permafrost zone. Moreover, a number of major (Ca, Mg and trace (Al, Ti, Sr, Ga, rare earth elements (REEs, Zr, Hf, Th elements exhibited an increasing, not decreasing, northward concentration trend. We hypothesize that the effects of temperature and thickness of the ALT are of secondary importance relative to the leaching capacity of peat, which is in turn controlled by the water saturation of the peat core. The water residence time in peat pores also plays a role in enriching the

  11. Excavating and loading equipment for peat mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Zhigulskaya, A. I.; Yakonovskaya, T. B.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, the issues of sustainable development of Russian regions, related to ensuring energy security, are more urgent than ever. To achieve sustainable development, an integrated approach to the use of local natural resources is needed. Practically in all north regions of the Russian Federation, peat as a local natural resource is widespread, which has a practical application in the area of housing services. The paper presents the evaluation of technologies for open-pit peat mining, as well as analysis of technological equipment for peat production. Special attention is paid to a question of peat materials excavating and loading. The problem of equipment selection in a peat surface mine is complex. Many features, restrictions and criteria need to be considered. Use of low and ultra-low ground pressure excavators and low ground pressure front-end loaders with full-range tires to provide the necessary floatation in the peat bog environment is offered.

  12. Biosorption of Metallic Elements onto Fen Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumins, Janis; Robalds, Artis

    2014-12-01

    Industrial development and anthropogenic activity have a huge impact on the environment, forcing society to find new and cost-effective environment treatment technologies. One of the most effective and environmentally friendly methods is the use of biosorbents, for which peat is one of the most cost-effective materials. The adsorption capabilities of peat sediments are well known; however, mainly raised bog peat is used for environmental treatment, and thus the abilities of fen peat are underestimated. The aim of this research was to assess the fen peat suitability as an adsorbent for metallic elements. In this study we have determined the sorption characteristics of Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cu and Pb and results show that fen peat deposits have a huge variability as a biosorbent due to their variable botanical composition and complex properties, for instance, under equal conditions, wood-sedge peat can have higher lead adsorption capacity than wood peat. However, due to its natural content of metallic elements, the sorption capacity overall is lower than it is for raised bog peat, although the high pH reaction encourage a high mobility metals.

  13. Ecohydrological Controls on Peat Consumption During Wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. K.; Wotton, M.; Turetsky, M. R.; Flannigan, M.; Benscoter, B.; Waddington, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Peat oxidation by smouldering combustion during wildfire represents a carbon flux, though episodic, able to release over 3 kg C ^{m-2} to the atmosphere, along with numerous trace-gas by-products of combustion. In peatlands, smouldering is dominated by a vertical heat transfer and combustion mechanism. We conducted laboratory and modelling studies to examine the interaction of peatland microtopography and hydrology on depth of burn during wildfire. Many peat profiles show a distinct thermodynamic resistance to combustion. Except in cases of extreme drought, Sphagnum fuscum hummocks have sufficiently high water retention such that more energy is required to drive off the water in the upper moss layers than is derived by the combustion of the dry peat. Although our model runs suggest if hummocks of S. fuscum are dry enough to burn the uppermost moss layers (2-3 cm), there is a higher probability of deep ( 30 cm) burning in the hummock due to a 'chain reaction' of combustion through the physically similar peat layers underneath. Enhanced summer water table draw-down and fire intensity serves to increase depth of burn only slightly into deeper humic peat layers in the presence of a water table and hydrostatic equilibrium. However, laboratory water retention analyses show that this humified peat retains less water per unit mass, despite being of greater average bulk density to less humified peat. Thus, smouldering combustion of humic peat has the potential to be more severe compared to less humified peat given the same distance from the water table. In shallow peatlands where the water table can fall beyond the basal mineral layer, evaporative demand is entirely satisfied by loss of water stored in the unsaturated zone. Similarly, in peatlands drained for forestry, transpiration can draw water out of the rooting zone in excess of rates of capillary rise, resulting in non-equilibrium conditions and enhanced risk of deep combustion. In both cases, upper peat horizons can

  14. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine waterbalance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schwaerzel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which reduces both time and financial effort significantly. The method was applied on several sites in the Rhinluch, a fen peat land 60 km northwest of Berlin, Germany. Over a two-year period, upward capillary flow and evapotranspiration rates under grassland with different groundwater levels were measured. The installation of tensiometers and TDR probes additionally allowed the in situ determination of the soil hydraulic properties (water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The results of the measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity demonstrate that more than one single method has to be applied if the whole range of the conductivity function from saturation to highly unsaturated is to be covered. Measuring the unsaturated conductivity can be done only in the lab for an adequately wide range of soil moisture conditions. Keywords: peat soils, soil hydraulic properties, evapotranspiration, capillary flow, root distribution, unsaturated zone

  15. Physical and chemical characteristics of fibrous peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutejo, Yulindasari; Saggaff, Anis; Rahayu, Wiwik; Hanafiah

    2017-11-01

    Banyuasin is one of the regency in South Sumatera which has an area of 200.000 Ha of peat land. Peat soil are characterized by high compressibility parameters and low initial shear strength. Block sampling method was used to obtain undisturbed sample. The results of this paper describe the characteristics of peat soil from physical and chemical testing. The physical and chemical characteristics of peat include water content (ω), specific gravity (Gs), Acidity (pH), unit weight (γ), and ignition loss tests. SEM and EDS test was done to determine the differences in fiber content and to analyze chemical elements of the specimen. The average results ω, Gs, and pH are 263.538 %, 1.847, and 3.353. Peat is classified in H4 (by Von Post). The results of organic content (OC), ash content (AC), and fiber content (FC) are found 78.693 %, 21.310 %, and 73.703 %. From the results of physical and chemical tests, the peat in Banyuasin is classified as fibrous peat. All the results of the characteristics and classification of fibrous peat compared with published data were close.

  16. Some Aspects of Thermochemical Decomposition of Peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Losiuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers peculiar features of thermochemical decomposition of peat as a result of quick pyrolysis. Evaluation of energy and economic expediency of the preliminary peat decomposition process for obtaining liquid and gaseous products has been made in the paper. The paper reveals prospects pertaining to application of the given technology while generating electric power and heat.

  17. Impact of the water salinity on the hydraulic conductivity of fen peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosch, Lennart; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Coastal peatlands represent an interface between marine and terrestrial ecosystems; their hydrology is affected by salt and fresh water inflow alike. Previous studies on bog peat have shown that pore water salinity can have an impact on the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of peat because of chemical pore dilation effects. In this ongoing study, we are aiming at quantifying the impact of higher salinities (up to 3.5 %) on Ks of fen peat to get a better understanding of the water and solute exchange between coastal peatlands and the adjacent sea. Two approaches differing in measurement duration employing a constant-head upward-flow permeameter were conducted. At first, Ks was measured at an initial salinity for several hours before the salinity was abruptly increased and the measurement continued. In the second approach, Ks was measured for 15 min at the salt content observed during sampling. Then, samples were completely (de)salinized via diffusion for several days/weeks before a comparison measurement was carried out. The results for degraded fen peats show a decrease of Ks during long-term measurements which does not depend on the water salinity. A slow, diffusion-controlled change in salinity does not modify the overall outcome that the duration of measurements has a stronger impact on Ks than the salinity. Further experiments will show if fen peat soils differing in their state of degradation exhibit a different behavior. A preliminary conclusion is that salinity might have a less important effect on hydraulic properties of fen peat than it was observed for bog peat.

  18. Solute Transport Properties of Fen Peat Differing in Organic Matter Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haojie; Forsmann, Ditte M; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Saki, Hermin; Lennartz, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    There is a limited understanding of solute transport properties of degraded peat soils as compared to mineral substrates. A lower organic matter (OM) content is often the result of peat degradation and mineralization following artificial drainage. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in solute transport properties of peat soils differing in OM content. Miscible displacement experiments were conducted on 70 undisturbed soil columns with OM contents ranging from 11 to 86% w/w under saturated steady-state conditions using tritium and bromide as conservative tracers. Measured breakthrough curves (BTCs) were subjected to model analysis using three different approaches: single-porosity model (SPM), mobile-immobile model (MIM), and two-flow region model (TFRM). The results indicated that (i) nonequilibrium solute transport processes are common in peat soils; (ii) the TFRM improved predictions of BTCs with heavy tailing or two peaks; (iii) applied tracers, tritium and bromide, were retarded in peat soils with higher OM content; and (iv) pronounced preferential flow mainly occurred in peat soils with lower OM content. This type of strong preferential flow had a small ratio of measured to fitted pore water velocity and a greater ratio of velocities (/ > 3.0) in the fast and slow transport region as obtained from the TFRM. We conclude that shallow groundwater resources are more likely to become polluted in drained and degraded fen peats that are used for agricultural purposes. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Geotechnical properties of peat soil stabilised with shredded waste tyre chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rahgozar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To accommodate major civil engineering projects in or in the vicinity of peatlands, it is essential to stabilise peat deposits. On the other hand, the accumulation of waste tyres in recent decades has caused environmental problems around the world. An effective remedy for both issues is to use scrap tyre material to stabilise problematic peat soils. This article reports an experimental investigation of the effects of adding shredded tyre chips on the stability and bearing capacity of peat soil. Peat soil samples from the Chaghakhor Wetland (Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari Province, Iran were mixed with sand at a constant dosage of 400 kg m-3 and different percentages (0 %, 5 %, 10 %, 15 % and 20 % by weight of shredded tyre chips. The unconfined compressive strength, effective cohesion, angle of internal friction and coefficient of permeability were measured for all of these mixtures. The results showed that adding shredded tyre chips significantly improved the geotechnical properties of the peat soil. The mixture with 10 % shredded tyre chips showed the highest unconfined compressive strength; the one with 15 % tyre chips exhibited the highest ductility; and adding 20 % shredded tyre chips provided the highest values for angle of internal friction, effective cohesion and coefficient of permeability. Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM showed that the pore spaces in the stabilised peat were mostly filled with sand.

  20. Agricultural management impact on physical and chemical functions of European peat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Bechtold, Michel; Buschmann, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Peat soils offer numerous functions from the global to the local scale: they constitute the biggest terrestrial carbon storage on the globe, form important nutrient filters for catchments and provide hydrological buffer capacities for local ecosystems. Peat soils represent a large share of soils suitable for agriculture in temperate and boreal Europe, pressurized by increasing demands for production. Cultivated peat soils, however, show extreme mineralization rates of the organic substance and turn into hotspots for green house gas emissions, are highly vulnerable to land surface subsidence, soil and water quality deterioration and thus crop failure. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of past agricultural management on soil physical and chemical functions of peat soils in six European countries. We conducted standardized soil mapping, soil physical/chemical analysis, ground water table monitoring and farm business surveys across 7 to 10 sites in Germany, The Netherlands, Denmark, Estonia, Finland and Sweden. The results show a strong impact of past agricultural management on peat soil functions across Europe. Peat soil under intensive arable land use consistently offer lowest bearing capacities in the upper 10 cm compared to extensive and intensive grassland use, which is a major limiting factor for successful agricultural practice on peat soils. The difference can be explained by root mat stabilization solely, since soil compaction in the upper 25cm is highest under arable land use. A strong decrease of available water capacity and saturated hydraulic conductivity is consequently observed under arable land use, further intensifying hydrological problems like ponding, drought stress and reductions of hydrological buffer capacities frequently present on cultivated peat soils. Soil carbon stocks clearly decrease with increasing land use intensity, showing highest carbon stocks on extensive grassland. This is supported by the degree of decomposition, which

  1. Estimating sphagnum peat hydraulic properties from laboratory evaporation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Durner, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    In ombrotrophic peatlands, the equilibrium between the production and decay of organic matter is principally controlled by the moisture state and its oxic/anoxic conditions in the vadose zone. In order to predict a peatland's fate, it is necessary to describe the hydraulic processes with models correctly. However, no suitable systematic and mechanistic model exists to date. This knowledge gap is attributed to the complexity of peatland ecosystem processes. The reasons for this probably include spatial and temporal heterogeneities, swelling and shrinkage phenomena, hydrophobicity and difficulties in representative sampling. For a valid description of the non-linear processes involved, peat soil hydraulic properties play an intricate part. Their determination requires taking the characteristics mentioned into considered. Our research aims to quantify these characteristics and, eventually, to establish a model in order to numerically simulate the water fluxes in the unsaturated zone. We started with laboratory measurements with which we determined peat soil hydraulic properties. Our study is based on an ombrotrophic peatland site in the Harz Mountains (Germany). Samples were taken over the entire unsaturated part of a Histosol profile. Before the laboratory experiments, samples were frozen, cut to shape and subsequently fully saturated in a vacuum. We used the same sample specimen for the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the simplified evaporation method. Results show that the hydraulic properties rapidly change in the upper-most layers with a step-like change over a small distance, close to the permanently saturated zone. We also show that the swelling and shrinkage is considerable, which means that traditional concepts based on the rigidity of the porous media are not applicable. Furthermore, the results indicate that the frequently used van Genuchten model cannot describe our data very well.

  2. Second technical contractors' conference on peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The program includes peat resource surveys of eleven states, peat gasification process and equipment studies, dewatering studies, and environmental and socioeconomic factors in the development of peat technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for selected papers. (CKK)

  3. The history of the peat manufacturing industry in The Netherlands: Peat moss litter and active carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.W. Gerding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of three major forms of peat processing by the manufacturing industry in The Netherlands since the last quarter of the 19th century. At a time when peat as a fuel was gradually being replaced by coal, the first form was the peat moss litter industry. Peat moss litter was made from white peat that was ground and sieved in factories which were located mainly in bog areas in the south-east of the province of Drenthe. It served as excellent bedding for horses and cattle. The second form of industrial peat processing was the manufacture, from 1921 onwards, of active carbon made from black peat. The Purit (Norit factory, now part of the Cabot Corporation, is still the only active carbon factory using peat as a raw material. The third form of peat processing was the production of garden peat and potting soil. This is still a widespread activity in peat areas all over the world. The peat moss litter industry thrived from the 1880s until shortly after the First World War. The arrival of the horse-drawn tram in all of the major cities of Europe created a great demand for animal bedding to be used in the vast stables of the tramway companies. Peat moss litter was cleaner, healthier and easier to handle than straw. There was similar demand from the armies, which used millions of horses during the First World War. Owing to the development of motorised vehicles, the peat market collapsed after the war and this plunged the industry into a prolonged crisis which was not overcome until peat was found to be a suitable growing medium for horticulture in the 1950s. Living and working conditions in peatlands were harsh, earnings irregular and labourers’ rights limited. The peat manufacturing industry was the first to introduce collective labour agreements, medical benefits and pension plans. Nonetheless massive unemployment, poverty and the necessity to migrate to other parts of the country were clear signs that the era of

  4. A new soil mechanics approach to quantify and predict land subsidence by peat compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, K.; Erkens, G.; Zwanenburg, C.

    2016-01-01

    Land subsidence threatens many coastal areas. Quantifying current and predicting future subsidence are essential to sustain the viability of these areas with respect to rising sea levels. Despite its scale and severity, methods to quantify subsidence are scarce. In peat-rich subsidence hot spots,

  5. Active Pore Volume in Danish Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus release within the soil matrix caused by the changed redox conditions due to re-establishment of a riparian wetland can be critical for the aquatic environment. However, phosphorous released in the soil will not always result in an immediate contribution to this loss to the aquatic...... environment. Lowland soils are primarily peat soils, and only a minor part of the total soil volume of peat soils is occupied by macropores (>30 µm). Since water primarily flows in these macropores, the majority of the soil matrix is bypassed (the immobile domain). Phosphorus released in the immobile domain...... is not actively transported out of the system, but is only transported via diffusion, which is a very slow process. Thus it is interesting to investigate the size of the active pore volume in peat soils. The hypothesis of this study is that the active pores volume of a peat soil can be expressed using bulk...

  6. Peat power: fuel by the bog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronson, R.B.

    1979-10-11

    The article reviews harvesting techniques and the use of peat in Europe, especially Russia, Ireland, and Finland. US peat reserves are estimated at 240 billion barrels of oil equivalent and DOE is researching new techniques for its harvesting and use. Advantages of peat are its low sulfur content (about 1%) and the fact that it is highly reactive, making it suitable for gasification. Disadvantages occur in reducing the water content from over 90% to below 50% and its low heating value relative to its bulk. Ash content varies from 2 to 70%. It looks at the first major attempt in the US to commercially harvest peat for fuel on about 150,000 acres near Creswell, NC.

  7. ON BASIS OF PEAT AND GYPSUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyumdzhjan Perch Pogosovich

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study on the creation of composite materials based on peat use-cation gypsum binder with improved thermal characteristics which en-rectifying to apply it during the construction of various buildings.

  8. Radioactivity of peat mud used in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska, Maria; Mnich, Krystian; Kapała, Jacek; Bielawska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Grzegorz; Mnich, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the contents of natural and artificial isotopes in peat mud and to estimate the radiation dose absorbed via skin in patients during standard peat mud treatment. The analysis included 37 samples collected from 8 spas in Poland. The measurements of isotope concentration activity were conducted with the use of gamma spectrometry methods. The skin dose in a standard peat mud bath therapy is approximately 300 nSv. The effective dose of such therapy is considered to be 22 nSv. The doses absorbed during peat mud therapy are 5 orders of magnitude lower than effective annual dose absorbed from the natural radiation background by a statistical Pole (3.5 mSv). Neither therapeutic nor harmful effect is probable in case of such a small dose of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peat briquette production in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greshnov, L.S. (and others)

    1987-01-01

    An historical view of Soviet briquetting from the commissioning of the first 180,000 tonnes/year briquette factory in 1937 throughout its expansion to the current 5 million tonnes/year. Improvements being considered are: pneumatic transport of milled peat (instead of wagon tippler and elevators) combined with the removal of timber, etc., milled peat drying in a fluidised bed of inert particles (already satisfactorily tested in 1986-7); computer-controlled automated briquetting. 2 figs.

  10. The frost peat production; Routapalaturpeen tuotantoketjun tekniikka, talous ja ympaeristoevaikutukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyroenen, T. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Leiviskae, V. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Thule Inst.

    1997-12-01

    The frost peat production means the cutting of frozen peat in the winter time. The aim of this study is to test the possibilities to prolong the peat production season and to produce peat pieces for the horticultural peat industry. In the frost peat production method the frozen peat field is sawed throughout the length and breadth of by a circle saw. The sawed peat pieces are loosened from the field by a so-called `splitter`. The circle saw is equipped with the five circle saw blades (diameter 90 cm). The distance of the blades is adjustable. The splitter is equipped with a horizontal position blade (width 35 cm). The dimensions of the peat pieces are changeable, but from the point of drying the upper limit of the side of the peat cube can be 15-20 cm. The frost peat production method is technically suitable for production of slightly decomposed (H1-5) energy and horticultural peat. The energy peat pieces are allowed to dry up 70-75 % moisture content on the cutting field and then the pieces can be ridged by the screening ridger. If necessary, the ridges can be turned over. In the frost peat production, the conventional sod peat winning machines can be used in the following stages of the working tasks: harrowing, ridging, loading, turning of ridges and stockpiling. The measured output of the circle saw was about 45-50 m{sup 3}/h of energy peat and 58-63 m{sup 3}/h of horticultural peat. The output of the splitter was 120-150 m{sup 3}/h. Theoretically, the output of circle saw and the splitter can easily be doubled. Thereafter the production costs will be about 19 FIM/MWh of energy peat and 18,6 FIM/m{sup 3} of horticultural peat

  11. Origins of mineral matter in peat marsh and peat bog deposits, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. [Unidad Tecnica del Marmol, AIDICO, Cami de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Whateley, M.K.G. [Rio Tinto Technical Services, Castlemead, Lower Castlemead, BS99 7YR Bristol (United Kingdom); Bastida, J.; Urquiola, M.M. [Dpto. Geologia, Univ. Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50. 46100 Burjasot, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-07-02

    The mineralogy of three back-barrier peat marshes (Torreblanca, Benicasim and Moncofar marshes) from Eastern Spain and one peat bog (Orihuela del Tremedal bog) from central east Spain have been investigated, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) techniques. A combination of XRD methods was used to quantify the mineralogy of dried bulk peat samples. The water source in the peat marshes is both continental and marine. Water is highly mineralised. Water flow is both low and slow (accumulative system). The water source in the peat bog is continental, draining from the hill. The higher concentration of ions in the water of the back-barrier peat marshes leads to a higher concentration of authigenic minerals in the peat marshes compared to the peat bog. Three main mineral origins have been recognized, namely: detrital, syngenetic-epigenetic and biogenic. The more important contribution comes from the detrital system. Biogenic and bio-influenced minerals are the main non-detrital minerals in the peatlands. This paper discusses the biogenic origin of halite (and other minor halides and sulphates, such as, sylvite, carnalite, epsomite, glauberite, mirabilite and anhydrite?) from halophytic plants, as well as amorphous silica (opal-A) from sponge spicules and phytoliths of several plants. Pyrite in the peat bog has both syngenetic and epigenetic origins from plant decomposition and sulphur release. In the peat marsh the pyrite has a syngenetic origin from sulphate reduction (S{sub sulphate} {yields} S{sub pyritic}), and an epigenetic origin in the older peat, from plant decomposition (S{sub organic} {yields} S{sub pyritic}). (author)

  12. Soil hydraulic properties of sphagnum moss and peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Scharnagl, Benedikt; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The moisture state of the vadose zone (acrotelm) of ombrotrophic peatlands decisively determines whether carbon is contained in soil organic matter or released to the atmosphere. As the pore space is variably saturated with water throughout the year, oxygen diffusion, heat, and solute transport and thus the redox state are a function of water content over time. For prediction purposes, the hydrological processes must be epitomised in computer models which establish a link between the terrestrial water cycle and the carbon cycle. This requires a proper representation of effective soil hydraulic properties which are a mandatory input to the Richards equation, the standard model for variably-saturated flow processes in porous media. By applying the Richards equation to peatlands, one assumes that the acrotelm can be conceptualised as a rigid porous material. To test this approximation and select the most adequate set of soil hydraulic property functions, we conducted a series of specifically designed laboratory evaporation experiments on sphagnum moss and decomposed sphagnum peat. Sampling was carried out in five centimeter depth increments of an ombrotrophic bog profile in the Harz mountains. We selected sphagnum moss as it is a predominant plant species colonising bogs of the Boreal. Inverse modelling was used to test the adequacy of different parameterizations of soil hydraulic property functions. We used pressure head data measured by two tensiometers in the objective function to identify soil hydraulic properties. The Richards equation was used as process model. We critically assess the applicability of the van Genuchten/Mualem model, which finds frequent application in peatland hydrology, and discuss alternatives which account for (1) multimodal pore size distributions, (2) physical plausibility towards the dry end, (3) capillary and non-capillary storage and flow, and (4) isothermal flow of water vapour. Finally, our results indicate that applying the Richards

  13. Facts about saturated fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fat diary with low-fat or nonfat milk, yogurt, and cheese. Eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other foods with low or no saturated fat. Alternative Names Cholesterol - saturated fat; Atherosclerosis - saturated fat; Hardening of the ...

  14. Saturated fat (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and can put you at risk for heart disease and stroke. You should ... limit any foods that are high in saturated fat. Sources of saturated fat include whole-milk dairy ...

  15. The use of saturation in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Janiece L

    2012-01-01

    Understanding qualitative research is an important component of cardiovascular nurses' practice and allows them to understand the experiences, stories, and perceptions of patients with cardiovascular conditions. In understanding qualitative research methods, it is essential that the cardiovascular nurse understands the process of saturation within qualitative methods. Saturation is a tool used for ensuring that adequate and quality data are collected to support the study. Saturation is frequently reported in qualitative research and may be the gold standard. However, the use of saturation within methods has varied. Hence, the purpose of this column is to provide insight for the cardiovascular nurse regarding the use of saturation by reviewing the recommendations for which qualitative research methods it is appropriate to use and how to know when saturation is achieved. In understanding saturation, the cardiovascular nurse can be a better consumer of qualitative research.

  16. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 11. Gasification of Minnesota peat. [Peat pellets and peat sods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a coooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eleventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of peat pellets and peat sods during 3 different test periods. 2 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting information Tables S3 and S4 list emission factors in g/kg of speciated volatile and particulate organic compounds emitted from peat burning. Peat samples...

  18. Climate impact from peat utilisation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppenberg, S.; Zetterberg, L.; Aahman, M.

    2001-08-01

    The climate impact from the use of peat for energy production in Sweden has been evaluated in terms of contribution to atmospheric radiative forcing. This was done by attempting to answer the question 'What will be the climate impact if one would use 1 m{sup 2} of mire for peat extraction during 20 years?'. Two different methods of after-treatment were studied: afforestation and restoration of wetland. The climate impact from a peatland - wetland energy scenario and a peatland - forestry energy scenario was compared to the climate impact from coal, natural gas and forest residues. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate which parameters that are important to take into consideration in order to minimize the climate impact from peat utilisation.

  19. Potential Phosphorus Mobilisation in Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Re-establishment of wetlands on peat soils containing phosphorus bound to iron(III)-oxides can lead to an undesirable phosphorus loss to the aquatic environment due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III)-oxides. Thus it is important to be able to assess the potential phosphorus mobilisation from...... peat soils before a re-establishment takes place. The potential phosphorus mobilisation from a peat soil depends not only on the geochemical characteristics but also on the redox conditions, the hydrological regime in the area as well as the hydro-physical properties of the soil. The hypothesis....... Batch experiments were used to determine the potential phosphorus release for each location. The measured phosphorus release was related to the geochemical characteristic for the respective location. Furthermore, the potential phosphorus release was compared with the measured phosphorus mobilisation...

  20. Oxidative ratio (OR) of UK peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, G. D.; Worrall, F.; Masiello, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils (Histosols) from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Initial results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.94 and 1.1 with a median value of 1.05 which similar to the median value of World soils but the range is at the more reduced end. There was significant variation between peat cores, even between peat cores on the same site and the peat showed significant reduction in OR with depth in the core.

  1. Major food sources of calories, added sugars, and saturated fat and their contribution to essential nutrient intakes in the U.S. diet: data from the national health and nutrition examination survey (2003–2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of chronic disease cannot be predicted simply by the content of a single nutrient in a food or food group in the diet. The contribution of food sources of calories, added sugars and saturated fat (SFA) to intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients of public health importance is also relevant to understanding the overall dietary impact of these foods. Objective Identify the top food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA in the U.S. diet and quantify their contribution to fiber and micronutrient intakes. Methods Single 24-hour dietary recalls (Day 1) collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 16,822) of the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA/NHANES 2003–2006) were analyzed. All analyses included sample weights to account for the survey design. Calorie and nutrient intakes from foods included contributions from disaggregated food mixtures and tabulated by rank order. Results No one food category contributes more than 7.2% of calories to the overall U.S. diet, but half of the top 10 contribute 10% or more of total dietary fiber and micronutrients. Three of the top 10 sources of calories and SFA (beef, milk and cheese) contribute 46.3% of the calcium, 49.5% of the vitamin D, 42.3% of the vitamin B12 as well as other essential nutrients to the American diet. On the other hand, foods categorized as desserts, snacks, or beverages, contribute 13.6% of total calories, 83% of added sugar intake, and provide little or no nutritional value. Including food components of disaggregated recipes more accurately estimated the contribution of foods like beef, milk or cheese to overall nutrient intake compared to “as consumed” food categorizations. Conclusions Some food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA make major contributions to American dietary fiber and micronutrient intakes. Dietary modifications targeting reductions in calories, added sugar, or SFA need to take these key micronutrient

  2. Major food sources of calories, added sugars, and saturated fat and their contribution to essential nutrient intakes in the U.S. diet: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Peter J; Fulgoni, Victor L; Keast, Debra R; Park, Keigan; Auestad, Nancy

    2013-08-08

    The risk of chronic disease cannot be predicted simply by the content of a single nutrient in a food or food group in the diet. The contribution of food sources of calories, added sugars and saturated fat (SFA) to intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients of public health importance is also relevant to understanding the overall dietary impact of these foods. Identify the top food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA in the U.S. diet and quantify their contribution to fiber and micronutrient intakes. Single 24-hour dietary recalls (Day 1) collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 16,822) of the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA/NHANES 2003-2006) were analyzed. All analyses included sample weights to account for the survey design. Calorie and nutrient intakes from foods included contributions from disaggregated food mixtures and tabulated by rank order. No one food category contributes more than 7.2% of calories to the overall U.S. diet, but half of the top 10 contribute 10% or more of total dietary fiber and micronutrients. Three of the top 10 sources of calories and SFA (beef, milk and cheese) contribute 46.3% of the calcium, 49.5% of the vitamin D, 42.3% of the vitamin B12 as well as other essential nutrients to the American diet. On the other hand, foods categorized as desserts, snacks, or beverages, contribute 13.6% of total calories, 83% of added sugar intake, and provide little or no nutritional value. Including food components of disaggregated recipes more accurately estimated the contribution of foods like beef, milk or cheese to overall nutrient intake compared to "as consumed" food categorizations. Some food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA make major contributions to American dietary fiber and micronutrient intakes. Dietary modifications targeting reductions in calories, added sugar, or SFA need to take these key micronutrient sources into account so as not to have the unintended

  3. Behavior of Stabilized Peat Soils in Unconfined Compression Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Wong L. Sing; Roslan Hashim; Faisal H. Ali

    2008-01-01

    Problem statement: Deep stabilized peat columns were known to be economical at forming foundations to support highway embankments constructed on deep peat land. However, failure in the formation of the columns with adequate strength was often attributed to unsuitable type and insufficient dosage of binder added to the soil. Organic matter in peat was known to impede the cementing process in the soil, thus retarding the early strength gain of stabilized peat. Approach: To evaluate the strength...

  4. Peat accumulation in kettle holes: bottom up or top down?

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gaudig; Couwenberg, J; Joosten, H.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid peat formation in kettle hole-shaped basins may take place either a) by peat forming downwards (top down) from a floating mat under stable water level conditions (terrestrialisation), or b) by peat forming upwards (bottom up) as humus colloids seal off the basin, causing the water level to rise progressively (“kettle hole mire mechanism”). The latter mechanism has hardly been considered in the international literature. The floating-mat mechanism must lead to concave peat isochrones thro...

  5. Approaches to estimating humification indicators for peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klavins

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Degree of decomposition is an important property of the organic matter in soils and other deposits which contain fossil carbon. It describes the intensity of transformation, or the humification degree (HD, of the original living organic matter. In this article, approaches to the determination of HD are thoroughly described and 14C dated peat columns extracted from several bogs in Latvia are investigated and compared. A new humification indicator is suggested, namely the quantity of humic substances as a fraction of the total amount of organic matter in the peat.

  6. Presence of carotinoids in peat wax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurkevich, E.A.; Dolidovich, E.F.; Bel' kevich, P.I.; Sheremet, L.S.; Drozdovskaya, S.V.

    1986-05-01

    Discusses biologically active substances present in peat which have various pharmacological properties. Describes separation of fractions rich in carotinoids from extracts of wax tar obtained by benzine treatment of highly decomposed pine-cotton grass peat. Extraction was carried out using hot ethanol. States that although identification of individual carotinoid in the fractions separated is very difficult due to complicity of composition, the tests carried out made it possible to infer that fractions studied contain not only xanthophylls but also fucoxanthains (formed in small amounts in nature) with fairly stable structure. Ultraviolet and infrared spectra of the carotinoid containing fraction in ethanol extracts are given. 6 refs.

  7. Growing reforestation conifer stock: Utilizing peat/sawdust medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice K. Schaefer

    2009-01-01

    Western Forest Systems, Incorporated (WFS) (Lewiston, ID) has been utilizing a peat/sawdust blended mix as our growing medium for the past 10 years. Our decision to change from a peat/vermiculite blend to a peat/Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) sawdust blend involved worker health and safety issues, seedling culture, seedling production, and...

  8. Peat compaction in deltas : implications for Holocene delta evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselen, S.

    2010-01-01

    Many deltas contain substantial amounts of peat, which is the most compressible soil type. Therefore, peat compaction potentially leads to high amounts of subsidence in deltas. The main objective of this research was to quantify subsidence due to peat compaction in Holocene fluvial-deltaic settings

  9. The Limits to Peat Bog Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clymo, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Not less than 2% of the Earth's land surface is peat-covered, so it is important to try to understand the dynamics of peat accumulation. Peat-forming systems (mires) accumulate peat because conditions within them impede the decay of the plant material produced by their surface vegetation. This paper concerns the rate of peat production and some unexpected consequences of the processes of decay. These consequences are likely to be of interest to those concerned with mire ecology and with the history of vegetation during Flandrian times. Most peat-forming systems consist of two layers: an upper 10-50 cm deep aerobic layer of high hydraulic conductivity, the acrotelm, in which the rate of decay is relatively high; and a thicker, usually anaerobic, lower layer, the catotelm, of low conductivity and with a much lower rate of decay. Plant structure at the base of the acrotelm collapses as a consequence of aerobic decay, and the hydraulic conductivity consequently decreases. As long as precipitation continues the water table therefore rises to this level, thus engulfing material at the base of the acrotelm. The rate, p_c, of this input to the catotelm is exactly analogous to the rate, p_a, of input to the acrotelm i.e. of primary productivity of the vegetation. During passage through the acrotelm the peat becomes richer in the more slowly decaying components. The depth of, and the time for transit through, the acrotelm thus control p_c. The catotelm, however, usually forms much the largest part of the peat mass. Selective decay may continue in the catotelm. The specific composition of the peat thus becomes a progressively poorer indicator of the surface vegetation that formed it, and to a degree that is not generally realized: reconstructions of the past surface vegetation may become very inaccurate. If p_c were constant and there were no decay in the catotelm then for the centre of a peat bog the profile of age against depth (measured as cumulative mass below the surface

  10. Time-scales of hydrological forcing on the geochemistry and bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Flavia L D; Aquilina, Luc; de Ridder, Jo; Francez, André-Jean; Quaiser, Achim; Caudal, Jean-Pierre; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Dufresne, Alexis

    2015-10-06

    Peatlands are an important global carbon reservoir. The continued accumulation of carbon in peatlands depends on the persistence of anoxic conditions, in part induced by water saturation, which prevents oxidation of organic matter, and slows down decomposition. Here we investigate how and over what time scales the hydrological regime impacts the geochemistry and the bacterial community structure of temperate peat soils. Peat cores from two sites having contrasting groundwater budgets were subjected to four controlled drought-rewetting cycles. Pore water geochemistry and metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities showed that frequent water table drawdown induced lower concentrations of dissolved carbon, higher concentrations of sulfate and iron and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in the peat soil and water. Short-term drought cycles (3-9 day frequency) resulted in different communities from continuously saturated environments. Furthermore, the site that has more frequently experienced water table drawdown during the last two decades presented the most striking shifts in bacterial community structure, altering biogeochemical functioning of peat soils. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency and duration of drought conditions under changing climatic conditions or water resource use can induce profound changes in bacterial communities, with potentially severe consequences for carbon storage in temperate peatlands.

  11. Impact of prescribed and repeated vegetation burning on blanket peat hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Joseph; Brown, Lee; Palmer, Sheila; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Wearing, Catherine; Irvine, Brian

    2013-04-01

    dominated by saturation processes rather than infiltration-excess overland flow. In this presentation we focus on the hydrological findings from the EMBER project but where relevant we relate these to other supporting environmental data we collected in order to interrogate process explanations for the differences we observed. For example, surface and near-surface peat temperatures were significantly more variable (both warmer and cooler depending on season and time of day) for burnt sites (and for patches burnt results provide clear evidence that prescribed vegetation burning on blanket peat significantly impacts peatland hydrology at both the plot and stream scale and therefore raises issues for government bodies who have legal responsibility to protect many peatland landscapes, their integrity, their biogeochemical functions and the ecosystem services that peatlands provide.

  12. CO2 efflux from cleared mangrove peat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Lovelock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CO(2 emissions from cleared mangrove areas may be substantial, increasing the costs of continued losses of these ecosystems, particularly in mangroves that have highly organic soils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured CO(2 efflux from mangrove soils that had been cleared for up to 20 years on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance of soils after clearing may have on CO(2 efflux. CO(2 efflux from soils declines from time of clearing from ∼10,600 tonnes km(-2 year(-1 in the first year to 3000 tonnes km(2 year(-1 after 20 years since clearing. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO(2 efflux (27 umol m(-2 s(-1, but this had returned to baseline levels within 2 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Deforesting mangroves that grow on peat soils results in CO(2 emissions that are comparable to rates estimated for peat collapse in other tropical ecosystems. Preventing deforestation presents an opportunity for countries to benefit from carbon payments for preservation of threatened carbon stocks.

  13. Feasibility of a peat biogasification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buivid, M. G.; Wise, D. L.; Rader, A. M.; McCarty, P. L.; Owen, W. F.

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of a two-stage biogasification process for the conversion of peat reserves, the energy content of which in the United States is greater than that of uranium, shale oil or petroleum and natural gas combined, into pipeline-quality methane is investigated. Samples of wet-harvested reed-sedge peat were pretreated in alkaline and nonalkaline conditions in the presence and absence of oxidation in order to determine the most favorable conditions for the conversion of cellulosic and lignaceous fractions to water-soluble, fermentable compounds, and the resulting products were subjected to anaerobic fermentation to methane. Conversion efficiencies obtained reveal that up to 26% of the initial heat content of peat was converted to methane when alkaline heat pretreatment was employed. Analysis of the process parameters by a computer model to determine equipment sizes, mass and energy balances and costs indicates that for a 79,200 GJ/day plant the total capital requirement would be $323,000,000, annual operating costs would be $44,000,000 and average SNG cost would be $3.16/GJ, assuming a 90% stream factor with a delivered peat slurry costing $0.0033/kg.

  14. The peat resources of Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, E. [Geological Survey, Kuopio (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The wetlands of Sri Lanka cover a total area of somewhat less than 150 km{sup 2}. The wetlands of the coast are tidal flats and lagoons with small mangrove areas. In addition to these, small, locally eroding mires occur in the mountains of the island`s interior. The most significant peatland is, however, the Muthurajawela mire north of Colombo, the capital city. On this extension of the Negombo lagoon there are 29 km{sup 2} of peatland. Since paludification started there 7 400 years ago, the long-term average peat growth increment has been 0.6 mm y-i, and the average rate of accumulation of dry matter 80.4 g m-2 y{sup -1}. The average carbon content of the peat is 42.8 %, the hydrogen content 4.20 %, the nitrogen content 0.79 % and the phosphorus content 0.14 %. The area of 165 ha suitable for energy production contains 3.14 Mm{sup 3} of peat and 258 000 tonnes of dry matter. The ash content of mineable peat is 14.5 %, dry bulk density 82.4 kg m{sup -3} and the sulphur content 5.86 %, on average. (orig.) (7 refs.)

  15. Development of small-scale peat production; Pienturvetuotannon kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Kallio, E. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of the project is to develop production conditions, methods and technology of small-scale peat production to such a level that the productivity is improved and competitivity maintained. The aim in 1996 was to survey the present status of small-scale peat production, and research and development needs and to prepare a development plan for small-scale peat production for a continued project in 1997 and for the longer term. A questionnaire was sent to producers by mail, and its results were completed by phone interviews. Response was obtained from 164 producers, i.e. from about 75 - 85 % of small-scale peat producers. The quantity of energy peat produced by these amounted to 3.3 TWh and that of other peat to 265 000 m{sup 3}. The total production of energy peat (large- scale producers Vapo Oy and Turveruukki Oy included) amounted to 25.0 TWh in 1996 in Finland, of which 91 % (22.8 TWh) was milled peat and 9 % (2.2 TWh) of sod peat. The total production of peat other than energy peat amounted to 1.4 million m{sup 3}. The proportion of small-scale peat production was 13 % of energy peat, 11 % of milled peat and 38 % of sod peat. The proportion of small-scale producers was 18 % of other peat production. The results deviate clearly from those obtained in a study of small-scale production in the 1980s. The amount of small-scale production is clearly larger than generally assessed. Small-scale production focuses more on milled peat than on sod peat. The work will be continued in 1997. Based on development needs appeared in the questionnaire, the aim is to reduce environmental impacts and runoff effluents from small- scale production, to increase the efficiency of peat deliveries and to reduce peat production costs by improving the service value of machines by increasing co-operative use. (orig.)

  16. The Cultivation of Arabidopsis for Experimental Research Using Commercially Available Peat-Based and Peat-Free Growing Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Tiffany; Keating, Mia; Summers, Rebecca; Yochikawa, Aline; Pitman, Tom; Dodd, Antony N

    2016-01-01

    Experimental research involving Arabidopsis thaliana often involves the quantification of phenotypic traits during cultivation on compost or other growing media. Many commercially-available growing media contain peat, but peat extraction is not sustainable due to its very slow rate of formation. Moreover, peat extraction reduces peatland biodiversity and releases stored carbon and methane into the atmosphere. Here, we compared the experimental performance of Arabidopsis on peat-based and several types of commercially-available peat-free growing media (variously formed from coir, composted bark, wood-fibre, and domestic compost), to provide guidance for reducing peat use in plant sciences research with Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis biomass accumulation and seed yield were reduced by cultivation on several types of peat-free growing media. Arabidopsis performed extremely poorly on coir alone, presumably because this medium was completely nitrate-free. Some peat-free growing media were more susceptible to fungal contamination. We found that autoclaving of control (peat-based) growing media had no effect upon any physiological parameters that we examined, compared with non-autoclaved control growing media, under our experimental conditions. Overall, we conclude that Arabidopsis performs best when cultivated on peat-based growing media because seed yield was almost always reduced when peat-free media were used. This may be because standard laboratory protocols and growth conditions for Arabidopsis are optimized for peat-based media. However, during the vegetative growth phase several phenotypic traits were comparable between plants cultivated on peat-based and some peat-free media, suggesting that under certain circumstances peat-free media can be suitable for phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis.

  17. Software for Automated Production Line of Peat Briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the software development of peat briquette production. Integrated peat development is one of the important tasks of peat industry. The importance of peat as local raw material increases with the increase in demand for various products. The production efficiency can be improved with new automated peat processing technologies based on advanced engineering. In view of market and technology requirements the peat industry development is hampered by slow development of automated peat processing and utilization technologies. The acceleration of technological progress can be achieved by designing automated lines of advanced peat processing. In accordance with this mission the development of technological process monitoring parameters is of great importance thanks to the possibility of end product physicochemical properties being predicted and managed to make efficient use of peat products for energy needs. The software with an intuitive interface for automated production line of peat briquettes has been developed. This provides means for managing and controlling the peat briquette production process.

  18. Interaction of Peat Soil and Sulphidic Material Substratum: Role of Peat Layer and Groundwater Level Fluctuations on Phosphorus Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Heru Purwanto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P often becomes limiting factor for plants growth. Phosphorus geochemistry in peatland soil is associated with the presence of peat layer and groundwater level fluctuations. The research was conducted to study the role of peat layer and groundwater level fluctuations on P concentration in peatland. The research was conducted on deep, moderate and shallow peat with sulphidic material as substratum, peaty acid sulphate soil, and potential acid sulphate soil. While P concentration was observed in wet season, in transition from wet to dry season, and in dry season. Soil samples were collected by using peat borer according to interlayer and soil horizon. The results showed that peat layer might act as the main source of P in peatland with sulphidic material substratum. The upper peat layer on sulphidic material caused by groundwater level fluctuations had no directly effect on P concentration in the peat layers. Increased of P concentration in the lowest sulphidic layer might relate to redox reaction of iron in the sulphidic layer and precipitation process. Phosphorus concentration in peatland with sulphidic material as substratum was not influenced by peat thickness. However, depletion or disappearance of peat layer decreased P concentration in soil solution. Disappearance of peat layer means loss of a natural source of P for peatland with sulphidic material as substratum, therefore peat layer must be kept in order to maintain of peatlands.

  19. Relating changes of organic matter composition of two German peats to climatic conditions during peat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike; Nikolova, Radoslava; Rumpel, Cornelia; González-Vila, Francisco, J.; Drösler, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Peatlands have been recognized as an important factor within the global C-cycle, since they store about one-third of the global terrestrial C-pool. Furthermore, peat deposits have the potential to record detailed paleoclimatic and - vegetational changes. They are formed in peculiar paleoecosystems where the slow biodegradation of plant residues depends on a series of pedo-climatic and hydromorphic factors leading to a progressive accumulation of organic matter stabilized in different evolutionary stages. Thus, its chemical composition should be applicable as a fingerprint of former prevailing environmental conditions and vegetation configurations. The aim of the present work was to identify this fingerprint in the cores of two German fens, one derived from the Havelland close to Berlin (Großer Bolchow) and the other derived from the alpine region of Bavaria (Kendlmühlfilzen) by investigating the organic matter transformation as a function of peat depths. The C/N ratios and δ13C values revealed several distinctive trends in the two profiles related to prevailing peat forming conditions. Compared to the other layers, at depths of 14-85 cm and 132-324 cm in the Kendlmühlfilzen fen, high C/N ratios and less depleted δ13C values, indicated that the accumulation of these two layers occurred during a humid and cold period. In the case of the "Großer Bolchow", algal contributions were clearly detected using δ13C values. Solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy demonstrated loss of celluloses and accumulation of lipids and lignin derivatives during peatification, confirming that under the mostly O2-depleted conditions in peats, decomposition was selective. The results obtained by pyrolysis-GC/MS were in good agreement with the NMR data showing that processes ascribed to gradual biotransformation of the lignin occurred in both peats. However, the "Großer Bolchow" peat revealed a more advanced decomposition stage then the "Kendlmühlfilzen" peat, which is in agreement with

  20. Peat or no peat: Why do the Rajang and Mahakam Deltas differ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldo, Robert A. [Department of Geology, Colby College, 5807 Mayflower Hill Drive, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Coastal and deltaic Holocene peat accumulations around the equatorial island of Borneo, Southeast Asia, have served as models for economic coal-bearing sequences in the stratigraphic record. Although climatic conditions, vegetational communities, and sedimentary regimes are comparable, peat accumulations are not found on both the western and eastern sides of the island. The Rajang River delta and coastal plain, Sarawak, East Malaysia, are covered in areally extensive, thick peat deposits that have attained at least a thickness of > 13 m in ombrogenous peat domes (Marudi, Baram River). Peat-swamp biomass began to accumulate over Pleistocene podzols when sea level stabilized {proportional_to} 7.5 ka and delta progradation was initiated. The Mahakam River delta and coastal plain, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, also began progradation at this time, but there is no evidence in any part of the coastal region for peat accumulation. Rather, poorly developed organic-rich gleysols occur throughout the delta plain. Both the Rajang River and Mahakam River deltas are tidally influenced, fine-grained systems, with a sediment provenance in the Central Massif. Sediment transported through the Rajang River delta differs in that as much as 60% of the clay minerals deposited in the system are mixed layer (I/S) and expandable (K/E) clays that act to restrict pore water flow in the tidal and overbank deposits that comprise the delta plain. These result in the development of an aquiclude above which paludal conditions develop, promoting accumulation of organic matter. In contrast, there is a low proportion of mixed layer and expandable clays transported in the Mahakam River system. This precludes the development of a stilted water table within the delta, allowing for organic matter recycling without peat accumulation. The presence of a high proportion of expandable clay minerals on the western side of Borneo is a reflection of the weathering and eroding source rocks on this side of the

  1. Peat and bark extractives and their behaviour in drying processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagernaes, L. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Fuel and Process Technology

    1992-12-31

    The organic compounds released in the thermal drying of peat and bark, and their behaviour in downstream sections, were studied to determine their impact on the formation of deposits in processes and on the environment. The releases were studied using laboratory-scale fluidized-bed drying experiments carried out on peat, pine bark and birch bark at different temperatures. In addition, peat particle and deposit samples were taken from the drying system of a peat power plans and bark, condensate and deposit samples from a pressurized steam dryer at a pulp mill. The hydrophillic compounds released were analysed using different chromatographic methods. All the samples were analysed for lipophilic extractives using capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The lipid composition of Finnish peat and peat extracts was investigated at the beginning of the study. The main hydrophillic compounds released from peat and barks were short-chain carboxylic acids, methanol, aliphatic aldehydes, anhydroglucoses and furanoic compounds. The hydrophillic compounds may cause organic load on the recipient or emissions to the air. Their amounts can be decreased by using lower drying temperatures. The major lipophilic compound groups released from peat consisted of fatty acids, those from pine bark of fatty acids and resin acids, and those from birch bark of triterpenoid alcohols. The peat lipids, and particularly the fatty acids, were enriched in the particle samples from the gas flows and in the deposit samples from the drying mill and the flue gas blower of the peat power plans.

  2. Peat and bark extractives and their behaviour in drying processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagernaes, L. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Fuel and Process Technology)

    1992-01-01

    The organic compounds released in the thermal drying of peat and bark, and their behaviour in downstream sections, were studied to determine their impact on the formation of deposits in processes and on the environment. The releases were studied using laboratory-scale fluidized-bed drying experiments carried out on peat, pine bark and birch bark at different temperatures. In addition, peat particle and deposit samples were taken from the drying system of a peat power plans and bark, condensate and deposit samples from a pressurized steam dryer at a pulp mill. The hydrophillic compounds released were analysed using different chromatographic methods. All the samples were analysed for lipophilic extractives using capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The lipid composition of Finnish peat and peat extracts was investigated at the beginning of the study. The main hydrophillic compounds released from peat and barks were short-chain carboxylic acids, methanol, aliphatic aldehydes, anhydroglucoses and furanoic compounds. The hydrophillic compounds may cause organic load on the recipient or emissions to the air. Their amounts can be decreased by using lower drying temperatures. The major lipophilic compound groups released from peat consisted of fatty acids, those from pine bark of fatty acids and resin acids, and those from birch bark of triterpenoid alcohols. The peat lipids, and particularly the fatty acids, were enriched in the particle samples from the gas flows and in the deposit samples from the drying mill and the flue gas blower of the peat power plans.

  3. Physical and chemical properties of two Iranian peat types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rahgozar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because peat has high organic content and high natural water content, it is potentially problematic for civil engineering projects involving construction on peatland. Therefore, it is important to understand the physical, chemical and geotechnical properties of the peat. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the properties of two Iranian peat types. Peat and water samples were collected from sites within two extensive wetland areas (Chaghakhor Wetland and Gavkhuni Swamp where construction works are planned. Both sites had peat layers more than three metres thick, which were sampled at depths of 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, 2.4 and 3.0 metres below ground level with four replicates per site. Degree of humification was determined in the field. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the pH of water and peat; and the natural (field moisture content, organic content, ash content, bulk density, dry density, density of solids, liquid limit, initial void ratio, linear shrinkage, unconfined compressive strength, shear strength and falling-head permeability of each peat sample. We also investigated the elemental compositions and microstructure of the peats using X-Ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. The laboratory tests of physical and geotechnical properties indicated that, for construction purposes, Chaghakhor peat is weaker than Gavkhuni peat.

  4. Study of the production of compacted peat; Tiivistetyn turpeen tuotantotutkimus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The so-called Compeat method developed at VTT Energy is applied by field experiments to peat production. The aim of the two-year project (1996 - 1997) is to achieve an increase of 20 % in hectare yield with this new production method of compacted peat in pilot scale in field conditions without any increase in production costs. The aim of the 1996 study was to construct a prototype mining machine for compacted peat and to produce compacted peat from Carex and Sphagnum peat fields in test runs. The operation of the mining machine was studied and drying of compacted peat with that of milled peat were compared at peat production sites of Vapo Oy and Turveruukki Oy. The results of the drying studies were along the same lines with previous laboratory drying tests. The dry matter yield of Compeat was more than twice that of milled peat in the Carex peat field and 1.1-1.5-fold in the Sphagnum field. Compeat moistened significantly less in the rain than normally milled peat. Compeat was ridged with a scraper-ridger. The mining machine produced sufficiently compacted and well-drying peat, but its power demand was too high. The aim is to reduce the power consumption of the mining machine significantly to make it possible to use a wheel- tractor for pulling and to reduce the production costs of the method lower than those of the milled peat method. The drying results of Compeat were so promising that the development of the field machine will be continued. (orig.)

  5. Saturated Switching Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Benzaouia, Abdellah

    2012-01-01

    Saturated Switching Systems treats the problem of actuator saturation, inherent in all dynamical systems by using two approaches: positive invariance in which the controller is designed to work within a region of non-saturating linear behaviour; and saturation technique which allows saturation but guarantees asymptotic stability. The results obtained are extended from the linear systems in which they were first developed to switching systems with uncertainties, 2D switching systems, switching systems with Markovian jumping and switching systems of the Takagi-Sugeno type. The text represents a thoroughly referenced distillation of results obtained in this field during the last decade. The selected tool for analysis and design of stabilizing controllers is based on multiple Lyapunov functions and linear matrix inequalities. All the results are illustrated with numerical examples and figures many of them being modelled using MATLAB®. Saturated Switching Systems will be of interest to academic researchers in con...

  6. Transport, anoxia and energy control on anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis in anoxic peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuti, Simona; Blodau, Christian; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2017-04-01

    In deep and permanently water saturated peat deposits, extremely low diffusive transport and concomitant build-up of metabolic end-products, i.e of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4), have been found to slow-down anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. Such accumulation of DIC and CH4 lowers the Gibbs free energy yield of terminal respiration and methanogenesis, which can inhibit the course of anaerobic metabolic processes. In particular, this affects terminal steps of the breakdown of organic carbon (C), such as methanogenesis, acetogenesis and fermentation processes, which occur near thermodynamic minimum energy thresholds. This effect is thus of critical importance for the long-term C sequestration, as the slow-down of decomposition ultimately regulates the long-term fate of C in deep peat deposits. The exact controls of this observed slow-down of organic matter mineralization are not yet fully understood. Moreover, altered patterns of water or gas transport due to predicted changes in climate may affect these controls in peat soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how burial of peat leads to an inactivation of anaerobic decomposition and to investigate the effects of advective water transport and persistently anoxic conditions on anaerobic decomposition, temporal evolution of thermodynamic energy yields to methanogenesis and methanogenic pathways. To this end, we conducted a column experiment with homogenized, ombrotrophic peat over a period of 300 days at 20˚ C. We tested i) a control treatment under diffusive transport only, ii) an advective flow treatment with a flow of 10 mm d-1, and iv) an anoxic treatment to evaluate changes in decomposition in absence of oxygen in the unsaturated zone of the cores. A slow-down of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis generally set in at larger depths after 150 days at CH4 concentrations of 0.6-0.9 mmol L-1 and DIC concentrations of 6-12 mmol L-1. This effect occurred at higher

  7. Nonspecific organic compounds in peat soils of the Subpolar Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizovtsev, N. A.; Kholodov, V. A.; Ivanov, V. A.; Farkhodov, Yu. R.; Dymov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Specific features of organic matter, molecular composition and distribution of oxygen-containing nonspecific organic compounds (fatty acids, long-chain aliphatic alcohols, and ketones) were revealed in two peat soils on slopes of the Subpolar Urals: the eutrophic peat soil of the spring mire (Hemic Histosols) and the peat soil of a slope mire (Fibric Histosols). Compounds that can serve as molecular markers for some evolutionary stages of peats were determined for this area. Based on the data obtained, the most probable causes of differences in the composition of organic compounds in the peats studied were found to be the following: environmental conditions, water and mineral regime of bog, and differences in the composition of peat-forming plants.

  8. OSPW contamination transport through peat soils : laboratory and greenhouse study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Price, J.S. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Rochefort, L.; Pouliot, R. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Phytology; Andersen, R. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Phytology; Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Daly, C. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Large portions of northern Canada are covered by peatlands, and the majority of post-mined landscapes have increased salinity, heavy metals and naphthenic acids (NA). This PowerPoint presentation discussed laboratory and greenhouse studies conducted to determine oil sands process water (OSPW) contamination transport through peat soils. Peat is a highly complex porous media. The presence of sodium and NA has a toxic effect on aquatic life. Greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the changes caused by OSPW in the microbial community of a peat matrix over 2 growing seasons. The study showed that peat has an exceptional ability to absorb the contaminants in OSPW water. NA and sodium transport through peat was significantly delayed by sorption, and by diffusion into immobile water contained in the peat matrix. The vegetation in the study was healthy and tolerant to the contaminants in the OSPW. tabs., figs.

  9. Continuous measurements of CO2 emission from cultivated peat soil - effect of tillage intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands process and transfer significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Most natural water-saturated peatlands sequester large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere and emit CH4. Drainage and cultivation of peat soils increase soil aeration and reverse the carbon flux into net CO2 emissions, while CH4 emissions decrease and cultivated peat soils may even act as sinks for CH4. Fertile peat soils are potential sources of N2O when drained. In this investigation we used automatic dark chambers (ADC BioScientific Ltd) to measure CO2 emissions from plots with different soil tillage intensities. The field trial is located on the island Gotland east of the Swedish main land (57.584825N 18.47691E) and the soil is a peat soil with high pH (7.5) and organic content of 46.4 % (loss on ignition). The set-up was 4 treatments repeated in 4 blocks. Each plot was 18 by 25 meters and the following treatments were tested: A. Ploughing every year B. Ploughing 1 out of 4 years C. Only stubble cultivation D. Permanent ley One chamber was put in each plot and connected to a master control unit to create a network with 16 chambers. Measurements were made every hour during most of 2012 (17/4- 6/11 with some gaps) and every second hour during 2013 (22/4-27/6). Higher emissions could be observed just after cultivation and that effect lasted for about one day. The average emission was highest from treatment D during 2012 (4.53 μmol m-2 s-1) and treatment C and D during 2013 (3.85 μmol m-2 s-1).

  10. Field Research of Firing Stored Peat Critical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesh Roman N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents field research: influence of different factors on peat massif firing with local outside heat source. Minimum temperatures of defined size heat source which fires the peat under the wide range of moisture value and heat-exchange conditions with terrestrial environment were found. Besides, peat massif moisture values whereby no firing is undergoing within the range of the researched temperatures of ignition source were defined.

  11. Seasonal methane dynamics in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Carolyn; Elsgaard, Lars; Hoffmann, Carl Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Drained peatlands are considered to be insignificant CH4 sources, but the effect of drainage on CH4 dynamics has not been extensively studied. We investigated seasonal dynamics of CH4 in two fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark. Methods Soil...... of aerenchymous plants should be considered before dismissing grasslands on peat as CH4 sources....

  12. Peat production. Review of research projects; Turvetuotanto. Tutkimusalueen katsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, A. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The development target in the research area of peat production is to improve the competitiveness of peat by reducing production costs by 20 % (by FIM 5 - 6/MWh) from the level of the year 1992 and to reduce environmental impacts. The most important research objects by which the target in peat production technology will be achieved are drawing and preparation technology, drying technology, mechanical technology, method technology, integration of wood harvesting and peat production, and the application of the results of the OPTIMITURVE Research Programme in practice. (orig.)

  13. Testing of in situ and ex situ bioremediation approaches for an oil-contaminated peat bog following a pipeline break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.J.; Lee, D.W.; Yeske, B.M. [Sorel Environmental Sciences Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Kuipers, F. [Pembina Pipeline Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    The feasibility of treating a 1985 pipeline spill of light Pembina Cardium crude oil at a bog near Violet Grove, Alberta was discussed. Pembina Pipeline Corporation arranged for a treatability test to be conducted on oil-contaminated sphagnum peat moss from the site to determine effective in situ or ex situ remediation options for the site. The test was used to evaluate the biodegradation potential of contaminants. Four tests were designed to simulate field different field treatment approaches and to collect critical data on toxicity and leachability of the peat moss. The tests included a bioslurry test, a soil microcosm test, an aerated water saturated peat column test, and a standard toxicity characteristic leachate potential test. The first three tests gave similar results of at least 74 per cent biodegradation of the residual crude oil on the peat solids and no residual toxicity as measured by the Microtox Assay. It was determined that both in situ bioremediation using an aerated water injection system or an ex situ landfarming approach would achieve required criteria and no fertilizers would be necessary to maintain active bioremediation. The new gas-liquid reactor (GLR) aeration technology used in these tests creates a constant supply of hyperoxygenated water prior to column injection. The continuous release of tiny air bubbles maximizes air surface area and increases the gas transfer rates. 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  14. How do peat type, sand addition and soil moisture influence the soil organic matter mineralization in anthropogenically disturbed organic soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säurich, Annelie; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Don, Axel; Burkart, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Drained peatlands are hotspots of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from agriculture. As a consequence of both drainage induced mineralization and anthropogenic sand mixing, large areas of former peatlands under agricultural use contain soil organic carbon (SOC) at the boundary between mineral and organic soils. Studies on SOC dynamics of such "low carbon organic soils" are rare as the focus of previous studies was mainly either on mineral soils or "true" peat soil. However, the variability of CO2 emissions increases with disturbance and therefore, we have yet to understand the reasons behind the relatively high CO2 emissions of these soils. Peat properties, soil organic matter (SOM) quality and water content are obviously influencing the rate of CO2 emissions, but a systematic evaluation of the hydrological and biogeochemical drivers for mineralization of disturbed peatlands is missing. With this incubation experiment, we aim at assessing the drivers of the high variability of CO2 emissions from strongly anthropogenically disturbed organic soil by systematically comparing strongly degraded peat with and without addition of sand under different moisture conditions and for different peat types. The selection of samples was based on results of a previous incubation study, using disturbed samples from the German Agricultural Soil Inventory. We sampled undisturbed soil columns from topsoil and subsoil (three replicates of each) of ten peatland sites all used as grassland. Peat types comprise six fens (sedge, Phragmites and wood peat) and four bogs (Sphagnum peat). All sites have an intact peat horizon that is permanently below groundwater level and a strongly disturbed topsoil horizon. Three of the fen and two of the bog sites have a topsoil horizon altered by sand-mixing. In addition the soil profile was mapped and samples for the determination of soil hydraulic properties were collected. All 64 soil columns (including four additional reference samples) will be installed

  15. Peat origin and land use effects on microbial activity, respiration dynamics and exo-enzyme activities in drained peat soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Keuskamp, Joost; Potkamp, Gerrit; Verhoeven, J.T.A.; Hefting, Mariet M.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the risk of decomposition-driven soil subsidence in drained peat soils in the Netherlands, contrasting in peat origin and current land use. In a full factorial design, fen peat and bog peat were sampled from sites in use for nature conservation and for dairy farming, which

  16. Comparison of different methods to determine the degree of peat decomposition in peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biester, H.; Knorr, K.-H.; Schellekens, J.; Basler, A.; Hermanns, Y.-M.

    2014-05-01

    Peat humification or decomposition is a frequently used proxy to extract past time changes in hydrology and climate from peat bogs. During the past century several methods to determine changes in peat decomposition have been introduced. Most of these methods are operationally defined only and the chemical changes underlying the decomposition process are often poorly understood and lack validation. Owing to the chemically undefined nature of many humification analyses the comparison of results obtained by different methods is difficult. In this study we compared changes in peat decomposition proxies in cores of two peat bogs (Königsmoor, KK; Kleines Rotes Bruch, KRB) from the Harz Mountains (Germany) using C / N ratios, Fourier transform infrared spectra absorption (FTIR) intensities, Rock Eva® oxygen and hydrogen indices, δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures and UV-absorption (UV-ABS) of NaOH peat extracts. In order to explain parallels and discrepancies between these methods, one of the cores was additionally analysed by pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS). Pyrolysis-GC-MS data provide detailed information on a molecular level, which allows differentiation of both changes attributed to decomposition processes and changes in vegetation. Principal component analysis was used to identify and separate the effects of changes in vegetation pattern and decomposition processes because both may occur simultaneously upon changes in bog hydrology. Records of decomposition proxies show similar historical development at both sites, indicating external forcing such as climate as controlling the process. All decomposition proxies except UV-ABS and δ15N isotopes show similar patterns in their records and reflect to different extents signals of decomposition. The molecular composition of the KK core reveals that these changes are mainly attributed to decomposition processes and to a lesser extent to changes in vegetation. Changes in the molecular

  17. Halogens in pore water of peat bogs – the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Biester

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Halogens are strongly enriched in peat and peatlands and such they are one of their largest active terrestrial reservoir. The enrichment of halogens in peat is mainly attributed to the formation of organohalogens and climatically controlled humification processes. However, little is known about release of halogens from the peat substrate and the distribution of halogens in the peat pore water. In this study we have investigated the distribution of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water of three pristine peat bogs located in the Magellanic Moorlands, southern Chile. Peat pore waters were collected using a sipping technique, which allows in situ sampling down to a depth greater than 6m. Halogens and halogen species in pore water were determined by ion-chromatography (IC (chlorine and IC-ICP-MS (bromine and iodine. Results show that halogen concentrations in pore water are 15–30 times higher than in rainwater. Mean concentrations of chlorine, bromine and iodine in pore water were 7–15 mg l−1, 56–123 μg l−1, and 10–20 μg l−1, which correspond to mean proportions of 10–15%, 1–2.3% and 0.5–2.2% of total concentrations in peat, respectively. Organobromine and organoiodine were the predominant species in pore waters, whereas chlorine in pore water was mostly chloride. Advection and diffusion of halogens were found to be generally low and halogen concentrations appear to reflect release from the peat substrate. Release of bromine and iodine from peat depend on the degree of peat degradation, whereas this relationship is weak for chlorine. Relatively higher release of bromine and iodine was observed in less degraded peat sections, where the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC was also the most intensive. It has been concluded that the release of halogenated dissolved organic matter (DOM is the predominant mechanism of iodine and bromine release from peat.

  18. Impact of fire on macropore flow and the hydraulic conductivity of near-surface blanket peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Joseph; Wearing, Catherine; Palmer, Sheila; Jackson, Benjamin; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Brown, Lee

    2013-04-01

    Peatlands can be subject to wildfire or deliberate burning in many locations. Wildfires are known to impact soil properties and runoff production in most soil types but relatively little work has been conducted on peatlands. Furthermore in large parts of the UK uplands prescribed vegetation burning on peat has taken place at regular intervals (e.g. every 8-25 years) on patches of around 300-900 sq. metres over the past century to support increased grouse populations for sport shooting. However, there have been few studies on how these prescribed fires influence near-surface hydrology. It is known that macropores transport a large proportion of flow in near-surface peat layers and we investigated their role in flow transport for fire sites using tension infiltrometers. Measurements were performed, at replicated hillslope positions to control for slope position effects, on unburnt peat (U) and where prescribed burning had taken place two years (P2), four years (P4) and >15 years (P15+) prior to sampling. For the prescribed burning plots, vegetation burning had also occurred at around a 15-20 year interval for most of the past century. We also sampled a nearby wildfire site (W) with the same sampling design where wildfire had occurred four months prior to sampling. Both the contribution of macropore flow to overall infiltration, and the saturated hydraulic conductivity, were significantly lower in the recently burnt sites (W, P2, P4), compared to P15+ and U. There was no significant difference in macropore flow contributions, effective macroporosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity between P15+ and U. The results suggest fire influences the near-surface hydrological functioning of peatlands but that 'recovery' for some hydrological processes to prescribed vegetation burning may be possible within two decades if there are no further fires.

  19. Acidophilic methanotrophic communities from Sphagnum peat bogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedysh, S N; Panikov, N S; Tiedje, J M

    1998-03-01

    Highly enriched methanotrophic communities (> 25 serial transfers) were obtained from acidic ombrotrophic peat bogs from four boreal forest sites. The enrichment strategy involved using media conditions that were associated with the highest rates of methane uptake by the original peat samples, namely, the use of diluted mineral medium of low buffering capacity, moderate incubation temperature (20 degrees C), and pH values of 3 to 6. Enriched communities contained a mixture of rod-shaped bacteria arranged in aggregates with a minor contribution of Hyphomicrobium-like cells. The growth stoichiometry of isolates was characteristic of methanotrophic bacteria (CH4/O2/CO2 = 1:1.1:0.59), with an average apparent yield of 0.41 +/- 0.03 g of biomass C/g of CH4-C. DNA from each enrichment yielded a PCR product of the expected size with primers for both mmoX and mmoY genes of soluble methane monooxygenase. Two types of sequences were obtained for PCR-amplified fragments of mmoX. One of them exhibited high identity to the mmoX protein of the Methylocystis-Methylosinus group, whereas the other showed an equal level of divergence from both the Methylosinus-Methylocystis group and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and formed a distinct branch. The pH optimum for growth and for CH4 uptake was 4.5 to 5.5, which is very similar to that for the optimum CH4 uptake observed in the original peat samples. These methanotrophs are moderate acidophiles rather than acidotolerant organisms, since their growth rate and methane uptake were much lower at neutral pH. The growth of the methanotrophic community was enhanced by using media with a very low salt content (20 to 200 mg/liter), more typical of their natural environment. All four enriched communities grew on N-free medium.

  20. Peat in the mountains of New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Hope

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands are common in montane areas above 1,000 m in New Guinea and become extensive above 3,000 m in the subalpine zone. In the montane mires, swamp forests and grass or sedge fens predominate on swampy valley bottoms. These mires may be 4–8 m in depth and up to 30,000 years in age. In Papua New Guinea (PNG there is about 2,250 km2 of montane peatland, and Papua Province (the Indonesian western half of the island probably contains much more. Above 3,000 m, peat soils form under blanket bog on slopes as well as on valley floors. Vegetation types include cushion bog, grass bog and sedge fen. Typical peat depths are 0.5‒1 m on slopes, but valley floors and hollows contain up to 10 m of peat. The estimated total extent of mountain peatland is 14,800 km2 with 5,965 km2 in PNG and about 8,800 km2 in Papua Province. The stratigraphy, age structure and vegetation histories of 45 peatland or organic limnic sites above 750 m have been investigated since 1965. These record major vegetation shifts at 28,000, 17,000‒14,000 and 9,000 years ago and a variable history of human disturbance from 14,000 years ago with extensive clearance by the mid-Holocene at some sites. While montane peatlands were important agricultural centres in the Holocene, the introduction of new dryland crops has resulted in the abandonment of some peatlands in the last few centuries. Despite several decades of research, detailed knowledge of the mountain peatlands is poor and this is an obstacle to scientific management.

  1. Peat decomposition indicators of two contrasting peat bogs in the Eastern Alps, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drollinger, Simon; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Glatzel, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Worldwide ˜612 Pg of carbon (C) is stored in peat, of which ˜270 to 370 Pg C have been removed from the atmosphere by peat growth since the last glacial period. Since C in peatlands is labile and sensitive to disturbances, peatlands entail the potential to release high amounts of C in the course of land use changes and proceeding global warming. Therefore, adequate peat decomposition indicators (PDI) are necessary to assess the peatland degradation status and potential C release of peatlands. In order to assess the degradation status of Alpine peat bogs and to evaluate the PDI, we compare PDI in two Alpine peat bogs with contrasting land-use histories located in the Enns valley, Austria. We evaluate the conventional PDI loss on ignition, bulk density, C:N ratios, water table depths (WTD) and the recently introduced PDI stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and stable nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) at nine study sites. We detected significant differences in PDI between the two bogs and between the study sites, which vary in WTD and degree of decomposition. Moreover, we demonstrate strong relationships and similar depth profiles of the variables. Loss on ignition of strongly degraded sites decrease from the acrotelm (94.77%) to the catotelm (80.02%), but remain stable at less degraded sites (˜97.76%). Bulk density generally increases with depth, featuring lowest values in the acrotelm of the central bog area (0.05 g cm-3) and highest values in the catotelm of the former peat cutting areas (0.18 g cm-3). C:N ratios exhibit large variations at most sites, but demonstrate differences in the degree of decomposition. Regarding the δ13C and δ15N, we observed an increase in the uppermost layers down to depths of -24 to -42 cm at all study sites. In the catotelm, δ13C are significantly lower in strongly decomposed peat (-27.44 ±0.37‰) in contrast to the less degraded sites (-26.09 ±0.59‰). δ15N are significantly higher at strongly degraded sites in both

  2. Climate mitigation scenarios of drained peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimir Klemedtsson, Åsa; Coria, Jessica; He, Hongxing; Liu, Xiangping; Nordén, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The national inventory reports (NIR) submitted to the UNFCCC show Sweden - which as many other countries has wetlands where parts have been drained for agriculture and forestry purposes, - to annually emit 12 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalents, which is more GHG'es than industrial energy use release in Sweden. Similar conditions can be found in other northern countries, having cool and wet conditions, naturally promoting peat accumulation, and where land use management over the last centuries have promoted draining activities. These drained peatland, though covering only 2% of the land area, have emissions corresponding to 20% of the total reported NIR emissions. This substantial emission contribution, however, is hidden within the Land Use Land Use Change and Forestry sector (LULUCF) where the forest Carbon uptake is even larger, which causes the peat soil emissions become invisible. The only drained soil emission accounted in the Swedish Kyoto reporting is the N2O emission from agricultural drained organic soils of the size 0.5 million tonnes CO2e yr-1. This lack of visibility has made incentives for land use change and management neither implemented nor suggested, however with large potential. Rewetting has the potential to decrease soil mineralization, why CO2 and N2O emissions are mitigated. However if the soil becomes very wet CH4 emission will increase together with hampered plant growth. By ecological modeling, using the CoupModel the climate change mitigation potential have been estimated for four different land use scenarios; 1, Drained peat soil with Spruce (business as usual scenario), 2, raised ground water level to 20 cm depth and Willow plantation, 3, raised ground water level to 10 cm depth and Reed Canary Grass, and 4, rewetting to an average water level in the soil surface with recolonizing wetland plants and mosses. We calculate the volume of biomass production per year, peat decomposition, N2O emission together with nitrate and DOC

  3. Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, C C; Wollheim, W M; Varner, R K; Grandy, A S; Talbot, J; Frolking, S

    2014-08-01

    Controls on the fate of ~277 Pg of soil organic carbon (C) stored in permafrost peatland soils remain poorly understood despite the potential for a significant positive feedback to climate change. Our objective was to quantify the temperature, moisture, organic matter, and microbial controls on soil organic carbon (SOC) losses following permafrost thaw in peat soils across Alaska. We compared the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) emissions from peat samples collected at active layer and permafrost depths when incubated aerobically and anaerobically at -5, -0.5, +4, and +20 °C. Temperature had a strong, positive effect on C emissions; global warming potential (GWP) was >3× larger at 20 °C than at 4 °C. Anaerobic conditions significantly reduced CO2 emissions and GWP by 47% at 20 °C but did not have a significant effect at -0.5 °C. Net anaerobic CH4 production over 30 days was 7.1 ± 2.8 μg CH4 -C gC(-1) at 20 °C. Cumulative CO2 emissions were related to organic matter chemistry and best predicted by the relative abundance of polysaccharides and proteins (R(2) = 0.81) in SOC. Carbon emissions (CO2 -C + CH4 -C) from the active layer depth peat ranged from 77% larger to not significantly different than permafrost depths and varied depending on the peat type and peat decomposition stage rather than thermal state. Potential SOC losses with warming depend not only on the magnitude of temperature increase and hydrology but also organic matter quality, permafrost history, and vegetation dynamics, which will ultimately determine net radiative forcing due to permafrost thaw. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Peat: A natural source for dermatocosmetics and dermatotherapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the interest for natural substances in dermatotherapy and cosmetics has increased. Peat is a complex natural source of humic substances that are of potential interest in both dermatology and cosmetology. Humic substances in peat have been partially characterized and pharmacologic and biologic activities have been documented. Possible clinical applications are outlined.

  5. Np-237 in peat and lichen in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salminen, S.; Paatero, J.; Roos, Per

    2009-01-01

    Activity concentrations of 237Np in peat and lichen samples in Finland were determined and contributions from nuclear weapons testing in 1950–1960s and the Chernobyl accident were estimated. 237Np was determined with ICP-MS using 235Np as a tracer. Activity concentrations of 237Np in peat samples...

  6. Development and refinement of proxy-climate indicators from peats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, F.M.; Booth, R.K.; De Vleeschouer, F.; Lamentowicz, M.; Le Roux, G.; Mauquoy, D.; Nichols, J.E.; van Geel, B.

    2012-01-01

    Peat, especially from acidic mires (bogs), is a natural archive of past environmental change. Reconstructions of past climate from bogs commenced in the 19th Century through examination of visible peat stratigraphy, and later formed the basis for a postglacial climatic scheme widely used in

  7. Short period of oxygenation releases latch on peat decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-01-01

    Extreme summer droughts are expected to occur more often in the future in NW Europe due to climate change. These droughts might accelerate the rate of peat oxidation in drained peat areas, with impacts on soil subsidence, GHG emission and water quality. This study aimed at providing more insight in

  8. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particula...

  9. Peat: A Natural Source for Dermatocosmetics and Dermatotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the interest for natural substances in dermatotherapy and cosmetics has increased. Peat is a complex natural source of humic substances that are of potential interest in both dermatology and cosmetology. Humic substances in peat have been partially characterized and pharmacologic and biologic activities have been documented. Possible clinical applications are outlined. PMID:20300366

  10. Peat accumulation in kettle holes: bottom up or top down?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gaudig

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid peat formation in kettle hole-shaped basins may take place either a by peat forming downwards (top down from a floating mat under stable water level conditions (terrestrialisation, or b by peat forming upwards (bottom up as humus colloids seal off the basin, causing the water level to rise progressively (“kettle hole mire mechanism”. The latter mechanism has hardly been considered in the international literature. The floating-mat mechanism must lead to concave peat isochrones throughout the basin, whereas the kettle hole mire mechanism will yield surface-parallel isochrones. Peat isochrones were studied in three mires occupying kettle hole-shaped basins in north-eastern Germany by comparing pollen samples from the mineral soil–peat interface at different distances from the centre of each mire with the pollen assemblage profile of a central peat core. All three mires appeared to have largely surface-parallel isochrones and must have developed by the kettle hole mire mechanism. In one mire, this mechanism alternated and took place in combination with terrestrialisation following karst subsidence. The fact that evidence of the kettle hole mire mechanism was found at all of the sites investigated indicates that it may be a common peat forming mechanism in kettle hole-shaped basins worldwide.

  11. Investigation of smoldering combustion propagation of dried peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamba, Pither; Ramadhan, M. L.; Imran, F. A.; Kosasih, E. A.; Nugroho, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Smoldering is a form of combustion characterised by flameless burning of porous materials. Smoldering combustion of porous and organic soil such as peat, is considered as a major contributor to haze problem during wildland fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. With almost half of tropical peatland worldwide, and vast area that resulted in its rich agricultural diversity, Indonesia possessed many variants of peat throughout the region. Thus, further highlighting the importance of characterizing the thermal properties of different varieties of peats for further analysis. An experimental test method was built to analyse the differences of varying peats from different parts of Indonesia, regarding its smoldering combustion propagation. In this case, peat from Papua and South Sumatera were analysed. A cylindrical wire meshed container of 190 cm3 in volume, was filled with dried peat. The temperature data and mass loss during the smoldering combustion was gathered using thermocouples and a DAQ system. After the experimental apparatus was set, a smoldering combustion of the dried peats was initiated at the top of the container using an electric heater. The results of the experiment showed a smoldering temperature of about 600°C and with a smoldering propagation rate of about 4.50 to 4.75 cm/h for both peat samples.

  12. Investigation of metal ions sorption of brown peat moss powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelus, Nadezhda; Blokhina, Elena; Novikov, Dmitry; Novikova, Yaroslavna; Chuchalin, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    For regularities research of sorptive extraction of heavy metal ions by cellulose and its derivates from aquatic solution of electrolytes it is necessary to find possible mechanism of sorption process and to choice a model describing this process. The present article investigates the regularities of aliovalent metals sorption on brown peat moss powder. The results show that sorption isotherm of Al3+ ions is described by Freundlich isotherm and sorption isotherms of Na+ i Ni2+ are described by Langmuir isotherm. To identify the mechanisms of brown peat moss powder sorption the IR-spectra of the initial brown peat moss powder samples and brown peat moss powder samples after Ni (II) sorption were studied. Metal ion binding mechanisms by brown peat moss powder points to ion exchange, physical adsorption, and complex formation with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups.

  13. Sterilization of peat by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, F.E.; Vincent, J.M. (New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). School of Microbiology)

    1981-01-01

    The effect of gamma-radiation on the survival of microorganisms has been quantified for the natural population of two types of peat. Data for several microbial types have been separately determined by regular plating and by indirect statistical probability estimates including, a wholly enclosed 'inverted-bottle' technique for higher dose levels to exclude any possibility of post-treatment contamination. The most persistent microorganisms at intermediate dosage (2.5-3.5 Mrad) were commonly a micrococcus (which closely resembled Micrococcus radiodurans) arthrobacter-like rods, myxobacteria and amoeboid forms. The persistent organisms all survived because of high resistance to ..gamma..-irradiation, not because of high initial numbers. The most numerous true bacteria (including spore-formers), actinomycetes, filamentous fungi and yeasts were all readily destroyed. Although the safety margin with the commercially recommended dose of 5 Mrad is low for some of the more resistant organisms, no change is justified at this stage since the organisms most likely to survive such a dose do not seem to seriously affect the subsequent growth and survival of rhizobia. Moreover there would be some risk of radiation-induced peat toxicity if higher doses were applied and some post-irradiation contamination will be difficult to avoid in commercial production.

  14. TEMPORAL VEGETATION DYNAMICS IN PEAT SWAMP AREA USING MODIS TIME-SERIES IMAGERY: A MONITORING APPROACH OF HIGH-SENSITIVE ECOSYSTEM IN REGIONAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Setiawan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peat swamp area is an essential ecosystem due to high vulnerability of functions and services. As the change of forest cover in peat swamp area has increased considerably, many studies on peat swamp have focused on forest conversion or forest degradation. Meanwhile, in the context of changes in the forestlands are the sum of several processes such as deforestation, reforestation/afforestation, regeneration of previously deforested areas, and the changing spatial location of the forest boundary. Remote sensing technology seems to be a powerful tool to provide information required following that concerns. A comparison imagery taken at the different dates over the same locations for assessing those changes tends to be limited by the vegetation phenology and land-management practices. Consequently, the simultaneous analysis seems to be a way to deal with the issues above, as a means for better understanding of the dynamics changes in peat swamp area. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using MODIS images during the last 14 years for detecting and monitoring the changes in peat swamp area. We identified several significant patterns that have been assigned as the specific peat swamp ecosystem. The results indicate that a different type of ecosystem and its response to the environmental changes can be portrayed well by the significant patterns. In understanding the complex situations of each pattern, several vegetation dynamics patterns were characterized by physical land characteristics, such as peat depth, land use, concessions and others. Characterizing the pathways of dynamics change in peat swamp area will allow further identification for the range of proximate and underlying factors of the forest cover change that can help to develop useful policy interventions in peatland management.

  15. Peats from West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia: The Distribution, Formation, Disturbances, Utilization and Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, G. Z.

    2011-12-01

    A major portion of tropical peats, approximately between 180,000 and 210,000 km2, occurs in Indonesia. Peat is a water body that preserves and stores enormous organic Carbon of dead biomass vegetation. In a natural state, peat helps to maintain Carbon balance, hydrological cycle, and supply of dissolved and particulate organic matters into adjacent waters. Peat disturbances drive the change from Carbon sink function into Carbon source. This paper aims to discuss variability of tropical peats and peat degradation in West Kalimantan Province. The discussions include extent and formation, biodiversity, Carbon and water storage, major properties, utilization, peat disturbances (i.e. logging, forest conversion, drainage affects, and recurrent peat fires), and peat conservation. Management options for reducing peat fires and developing sustainable peat utilization are also explored. Data were collected from both coastal and inland peats in West Kalimantan Province. This paper declares that degradation of tropical peats in Indonesia is strongly associated with anthropogenic fires, peat forest conversion, and logging. To reduce speeds of peat degradation, the current utilization of peats needs being more intensive than extensive, and preventing water table drop by managing excessive drainage that leads to substantial decline of moisture in the upper peat layer, which is subsequently dry and flammable.

  16. Post-Fire Peat Land Understory Plant in Rimba Panjang, Sumatera, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, L. N.; Nursal; Wulandari, Sri; Syafi’i, Wan; Fauziah, Yuslim

    2017-12-01

    The existence of understory plants during early post-fire succession is essential in term of natural post-fire ecological restoration. More than fifty percent of fire incidents in Riau, Sumatera, Indonesia occurred in shallow peat lands which have the huge impact on vegetation damage. This study aims to explore the understory plants species and diversity in post-fire peat land at Rimba Panjang, Kampar Regency, Sumatera, Indonesia. By using survey method, the observations were conducted on 150 plots which were distributed randomly over four locations based on the year after fire: 2009, 2014, 2015 and 2016. We found respectively 12, 14, 19 and 17 species at that sites with respective Shannon Wiener diversity index were 1.72, 2.00, 2.14 and 2.40. All the sites were dominated by Stenochlaena palustris (Burm.). Coverage percentage of understory vegetation were respectively 28.87%, 25.50%, 51.60% and 54.13%. Overall, we found 31 species of 17 familia. The result showed that the species composition, diversity index and coverage percentage of understory plant are likely to decrease in line with the length of time after the fire. Post peatland fires in Rimba Panjang are still having the characteristics of the peat swamp habitat which was dominated by Stenochlaena palustris (Burm.). Ecological restoration of that habitat is still possible, but it is necessary to consider technological and socio-economical aspects of local communities.

  17. Environmental Controls over Peat Accumulation in Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, C. A.; Mann, D. H.; Heiser, P. A.; Kunz, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Wide spread accumulation of peat (paludification) began on Alaska's North Slope during the Pleistocene/Holocene transition starting ca. 12,000 14C years ago and established this region as a carbon sink. Its status as a C sink is in question today because of rapid climate change. Our project's focus is on the relationship between peat, microclimate, and topography in a portion of the Arctic Foothills 300-350 km south of Point Barrow on the northern flank of the Brooks Range. Our objectives are 1) Quantify how varying microclimate factors found along a climosequence determine the thickness of the thin surface peats (soil temperature regimes; 4) Develop a GIS-based peat-prediction model for a 50 km2 study area and estimate this area's pool of standing carbon. We used a combination of remotely sensed data, field measurements, and a GIS to gather data regarding slope, aspect, elevation, near-ground temperature, soil moisture, temperature at the organic/mineral horizon interface, solar radiation, upslope drainage area, and lastly, peat thickness. Peat is defined here as any near-surface soil horizon containing >25% organic carbon by volume. We employ statistical analyses to examine how each factor independently influences peat thickness and what suite of factors best explains peat distribution and thickness across the landscape. Results show a significant inverse relationship (R2 = 0.27, p-value temperature regimes are highly correlated. We estimated time to paludification to be 300-600 years. Initial peat accumulation rates are 0.015 - 0.031 cm/yr (R2 = 0.56, P-value <<.001). There appears to be a temporal threshold along the chronosequence at approximately 400 years. After this point the peat accumulation rate is near zero and statistically insignificant (R2 = 0.02, P-value = 0.49). This could indicate that landscapes in the Arctic Foothills approach a stable state with regards to peat development rather quickly on the geologic time scale and challenges the idea of

  18. Determination of the water retention of peat soils in the range of the permanent wilting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nünning, Lena; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Global coverage of peatlands decreases due to the use of peat for horticulture and to the drainage of peatlands for agriculture and forestry. While alternatives for peat in horticulture exist, profitable agriculture on peatlands and climate protection are far more difficult to combine. A controlled water management that is optimized to stabilize yields while reducing peat degradation provides a promising path in this direction. For this goal, profound knowledge of hydraulic properties of organic soil is essential, for which, however, literature is scarce. This study aimed to compare different methods to determine the water retention of organic soils in the dry range (pF 3 to 4.5). Three common methods were compared: two pressure based apparatus (ceramic plate vs. membrane, Eijkelkamp) and a dew point potentiameter (WP4C, Decagon Devices), which is based on the equilibrium of soil water potential and air humidity. Two different types of organic soil samples were analyzed: i) samples wet from the field and ii) samples that were rewetted after oven-drying. Additional WP4C measurements were performed at samples from standard evaporation experiments directly after they have been finished. Results were: 1) no systematic differences between pressure apparatus and WP4C measurements, 2) however, high moisture variability of the samples from the pressure apparatus as well as high variability of the WP4C measurements at these samples when they were removed from these devices which indicated that applied pressure did not establish well in all samples, 3) rewetted oven-dried samples resulted in up to three times lower soil moistures even after long equilibrium times, i.e. there was a strong and long-lasting hysteresis effect that was highest for less degraded peat samples, 4) and highly consistent WP4C measurements at samples from the end of the evaporation experiment. Results provide useful information for deriving reliable water retention characteristics for organic soils.

  19. Contributions of organic matter and organic sulfur redox processes to electron flow in anoxic incubations of peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    YU, Zhiguo; Peiffer, Stefan; Göttlicher, Jörg; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    i) directly by electron accepting capacity of redox active functional groups ii) directly by oxidized organic sulfur and iii) indirectly by recycling of sulfide to maintain BSR. Moreover, investigating the stability of organic sulfur compounds in peat soil towards abiotic and biotic reduction and oxidation is essential for the understanding of environmental sulfur cycling in anaerobic systems. Keywords: Methanogenesis; Electron transfer; organic sulfur; Redox processes; Freshwater systems;

  20. Methane and CO2 fluxes from peat soil, palm stems and field drains in two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Borneo, on different tropical peat soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Frances; Lip Khoon, Kho; Hill, Tim; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    Oil palm plantations have been expanding rapidly on tropical peat soils in the last 20 years, with 50 % of SE Asian peatlands now managed as industrial or small-holder plantations, up from 11% in 1990. Tropical peat soils are an important carbon (C) store, containing an estimated 17 % of total peatland C. There are large uncertainties as to the soil C dynamics in oil palm plantations on peat due to a shortage of available data. It is therefore essential to understand the soil C cycle in order to promote effective management strategies that optimise yields, whilst maintaining the high C storage capacity of the soil. Here we present CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Malaysia on peat soils. Data were collected from different surface microforms within each plantation that experienced different surface management practices. These included the area next to the palm, in bare soil harvest paths, beneath frond piles, underneath cover crops, from the surface of drains, and from palm stems. Data were collected continuously over one year and analysed with different environmental variables, including soil temperature, WTD, O2, soil moisture and weather data in order to best determine the constraints on the dataset. Total soil respiration (Rtot) varied between 0.09 and 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1. The largest fluxes (0.59 - 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1) were measured next to the palms. Larger CO2 fluxes were observed beneath the cover crops than in the bare soil. This trend was attributed to priming effects from the input of fresh plant litter and exudates. Peat soil type was shown to have significantly different fluxes. The different plantations also had different environmental drivers best explaining the variation in Rtot - with soil moisture being the most significant variable on Sabaju series soil and soil temperature being the most significant environmental variable in the plantation with the Teraja series soil. Rtot was shown to reduce significantly with increasing

  1. Construction of Infrastructure on Peat: Case Studies and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Ling Jen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction of infrastructures on peat land is a very challenging task due to its properties of low shear strength, high compressibility and high water content. This paper summarizes various solutions which could be adopted for the construction of infrastructure on peat, as reviewed by the experts and panels during IConCEES International Workshop 2015. Engineers could (a avoid peat, such as to transfer the load to the hard layers through end bearing piles or to replace the peat with the other soils, or (b construct on peat with special precautions, such as by reducing the weight of the construction materials and dewatering the peat to improve the engineering properties. This paper serves to generate new ideas and give insights of the problems commonly encountered by the industry. Some of the proposed solutions might never be tested on peat. This would rely on the researchers to take up the challenge to further investigate and address the technical issues outlined in this paper.

  2. Growing Tomato Plantlets on Various Mixtures of Peat and Sand or Peat and Perlite. Note 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Patruno

    Full Text Available Given the considerable interest in use of substrates derived from various mixtures in the nursery sector and in light of the enormous variety of possibilities offered by this technique, in contrast with the still small number of researches dedicated to this theme, this study was set out to examine in-depth the growing of tomato plantlets on peat-based substrates. Two series of peat mixtures were produced, one with sand and the other with perlite, with a volume ratio of the other two components with respect to the peat of 1:0, 2.5:1, 1:1 and 1:2.5. Tomato seedlings were cultivated for 30 or 25 days in small perforated pots containing these mixtures. The irrigation was calculated by weighing each pot daily, measuring the water lost by evaporation-transpiration, then just past an established lower threshold value bringing the water back up to a defined upper threshold. Two water regimes were compared in the sand series and three in the perlite series.

  3. Organic matter loss from cultivated peat soils in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of drained peat soils in agricultural use is an underestimated source of loss of organic matter. Oxidation (biological degradation) of agricultural peat soils causes a loss of organic matter (OM) of 11 - 22 t ha-1 y-1 causing a CO2 emission of 20 - 40 t ha-1 y-1. Together with the associated N2O emissions from mineralized N this totals in the EU to about 98.5 Mton CO2 eq per year. Peat soils are very prone to climate change and it is expected that at the end of this century these values are doubled. The degradation products pollute surface waters. Wind erosion of peat soils in arable agriculture can cause losses of 3 - 30 t ha-1 y-1 peat also causing air pollution (fine organic particles). Subsidence rates are 1 - 2 cm per year which leads to deteriorating drainage effect and make peat soils below sea or inland water levels prone to flooding. Flooding agricultural peat soils is in many cases not possible without high costs, high GHG emissions and severe water pollution. Moreover sometimes cultural and historic landscapes are lost and meadow birds areas are lost. In areas where the possibility to regulate the water table is limited the mitigation options are either to increase biomass production that can be used as bioenergy to substitute some fossil fuel, try to slow down the break-down of the peat by different amendments that inhibit microbial activity, or permanent flooding. The negative effects of wind erosion can be mitigated by reducing wind speed or different ways to protect the soil by crops or fiber sheets. In a newly started project in Sweden a typical peat soil with and without amendment of foundry sand is cropped with reed canary grass, tall fescue and timothy to investigate the yield and greenhouse gas emissions from the different crops and how the sand effect the trafficability and GHG emissions.

  4. Speciated organic VOC and PM emissions from peat burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supporting information Tables S3 and S4 list emission factors in g/kg of speciated volatile and particulate organic compounds emitted from peat burning. Peat samples were acquired from Alligator River (AR) and Pocosin Lakes (PL) National Wildlife Refuges. This dataset is associated with the following publication:George , I., R. Black, J. Walker , C. Geron , J. Aurell , M. Hays , W. Preston, and B. Gullett. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 132: 163-170, (2016).

  5. Retention of As and Sb in ombrotrophic peat bogs: records of As, Sb, and Pb deposition at four Scottish sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joanna M. Cloy; John G. Farmer; Margaret C. Graham; Angus B. MacKenzie [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of GeoSciences

    2009-03-15

    Possible postdepositional As migration in ombrotrophic peat bogs was investigated by comparing depth profiles of As with those of Sb and Pb, two elements considered to be essentially immobile in peat, and those of redox-sensitive, potentially mobile nutrient elements such as Mn, Fe, P, and S in {sup 210}Pb-dated cores from four Scottish bogs. Concentration profiles of As were similar to those of Sb and Pb rather than these other elements, indicating that As is bound strongly to organic matter and is relatively immobile in ombrotrophic peat. Historical records of atmospheric anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition during the industrial and postindustrial periods were derived, site-specific maxima (up to 1.55, 1.33, and 45 mg m{sup -2} y{sup -1}, respectively) occurring between the late 1890s and 1960s, reflecting emissions from diverse sources such as mining and smelting, coal combustion, and also, in the case of Pb, exhaust emissions from the use of leaded gasoline. Since the mid-1980s, fluxes of Pb decreased (4-7 fold) more rapidly than those of As and Sb (2-3 fold), attributable to both the gradual elimination of leaded gasoline and recent new sources of the latter elements. Relative trends in derived anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition largely agreed with other Scottish peat and moss archive records, direct measurements of deposition, and UK emissions, i.e., four different types of data source. 36 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Retention of As and Sb in ombrotrophic peat bogs: records of As, Sb, and Pb deposition at four Scottish sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloy, Joanna M; Farmer, John G; Graham, Margaret C; MacKenzie, Angus B

    2009-03-15

    Possible postdepositional As migration in ombrotrophic peat bogs was investigated by comparing depth profiles of As with those of Sb and Pb, two elements considered to be essentially immobile in peat, and those of redox-sensitive, potentially mobile nutrient elements such as Mn, Fe, P, and S in 210Pb-dated cores from four Scottish bogs. Concentration profiles of As were similar to those of Sb and Pb rather than these other elements, indicating that As is bound strongly to organic matter and is relatively immobile in ombrotrophic peat. Historical records of atmospheric anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition during the industrial and postindustrial periods were derived, site-specific maxima (up to 1.55, 1.33, and 45 mg m(-2) y(-1), respectively) occurring between the late 1890s and 1960s, reflecting emissions from diverse sources such as mining and smelting, coal combustion, and also, in the case of Pb, exhaust emissions from the use of leaded gasoline. Since the mid-1980s, fluxes of Pb decreased (4-7 fold) more rapidly than those of As and Sb (2-3 fold), attributable to both the gradual elimination of leaded gasoline and recent new sources of the latter elements. Relative trends in derived anthropogenic As, Sb, and Pb deposition largely agreed with other Scottish peat and moss archive records, direct measurements of deposition, and UK emissions, i.e., four different types of data source.

  7. Sedimentology and Rock Magnetism of Bailey River Peat Cores, Sudbury Area: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtseven, A.; Cioppa, M. T.; Dean, K.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic measurements on peat can reveal atmospheric anthropogenic contamination. Two cores were collected from a marsh surrounding the Bailey River, 10 km north of Sudbury, Ontario, using a Russian peat borer. The BR1 core (1.4 m) was collected right at the river's edge, whereas the BR2 core (2.5 m) was collected about 50 m away from the river's edge, close to the edge of the marsh and near the forest. Significant sedimentological variation between the two cores was observed: core BR1 had several centimeter to decimeter scale fine to coarse grey sand layers at 0.14 m, 0.46 m and 0.87 m between thicker organic-rich (peat) zones, whereas core BR2 had only one 5 cm sand-rich layer at 0.94 m within the organic-rich material. The cores were subsampled at 2.5 cm intervals for laboratory magnetic analysis. Volume susceptibility was measured using a Bartington MS2B meter, and mass-specific susceptibility was then calculated. In core BR1, the sand layers had relatively higher susceptibility (13 x 10-8 m3/kg) , while the organic rich layers had very low susceptibility (0 - 2 x 10-8 m3/kg). In core BR2, which had little sand, the susceptibility variation was dominated by higher values near-surface (10 x 10-8 m3/kg), and very low susceptibility (0.3 x 10-8 m3/kg) below 0.3 m depth. Since the lithology in this core did not vary substantially, susceptibility variations may be controlled by anthropogenic deposition in the near-surface during the peak mining and smelting decades. These preliminary results suggest that any anthropogenic signal in core BR1 appears to be masked by the sedimentological variation. On pilot results from eight samples in core BR1, saturation isothermal remanence acquisition showed 95% saturation by 200 mT, and the S-ratios (0.3T/0.9T) were above 0.93, suggesting that magnetite is the major magnetization carrier. In core BR2, six out of eight samples showed similar results; however, two samples had slightly more higher coercivity minerals (90% saturation

  8. Serum albumin--a non-saturable carrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B; Larsen, F G

    1984-01-01

    The shape of binding isotherms for sixteen ligands to human serum albumin showed no signs of approaching saturation at high ligand concentrations. It is suggested that ligand binding to serum albumin is essentially different from saturable binding of substrates to enzymes, of oxygen to haemoglobi...

  9. Venous oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metamaterial saturable absorber mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Govind; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2013-02-01

    We propose a metamaterial saturable absorber mirror at midinfrared wavelengths that can show a saturation of absorption with intensity of incident light and switch to a reflecting state. The design consists of an array of circular metallic disks separated by a thin film of vanadium dioxide (VO(2)) from a continuous metallic film. The heating due to the absorption in the absorptive state causes the VO(2) to transit to a metallic phase from the low temperature insulating phase. The metamaterial switches from an absorptive state (R≃0.1%) to a reflective state (R>95%) for a specific threshold intensity of the incident radiation corresponding to the phase transition of VO(2), resulting in the saturation of absorption in the metamaterial. The computer simulations show over 99.9% peak absorbance, a resonant bandwidth of about 0.8 μm at 10.22 μm wavelengths, and saturation intensity of 140 mW cm(-2) for undoped VO(2) at room temperature. We also carried out numerical simulations to investigate the effects of localized heating and temperature distribution by solving the heat diffusion problem.

  11. Alfred P. Dachnowski and the scientific study of peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, E.R.; Cohen, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Botanist Alfred Paul Dachnowski (1875–1949) was a major contributor to efforts at mapping organic soils in the United States during the early 20th century. He began his career at The Ohio State University, and spent most of his professional life at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC. His work spanned a diversity of topics, including bog ecology and the ecosystem services provided by wetlands, the mapping and chemical characterization of peat, and the commercial applications of peat. We present a biography and overview of his work. Dachnowski is best known today for the peat sampler that bears his name. The details of its operation are described here, and its place in modern peat studies is discussed.

  12. Peat Resources Of North Carolina A Progress Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project is part of DOE Caroliina’s inventory of the peat resources of the United States. With support from DOE and the North Carolina Energy Institute we are...

  13. Fuel peat utilisation in Finland: resource use and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijting, J.

    1999-11-01

    The aim of the study was to inventorize the emissions and other stressors caused by fuel peat use in Finland. The life cycle approach was used to organise and compile the burdens associated with the fuel peat utilisation sector in the years 1994 and 1995. Fuel peat accounts for about 6.5 % of the total primary energy production in Finland. The study showed that most emissions out into the air occur during combustion of peat in energy plants. The emissions account for about 13 - 14 % of the CO{sub 2} emissions released by fossil fuel utilisation in Finland, for 12 % of the SO{sub 2} for 8 % of the N{sub 2}O and approximately 4 % of the NOR emissions released by anthropogenic sources in Finland. Phosphorus releases into waters contributes for about 0.2 % while nitrogen releases account for 0.3 % in the total anthropogenic discharge in Finland. (orig.) 88 refs.

  14. Weeds optimally grow in peat swamp after burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Susanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available After clearing land by burning the peat, then the weeds and undergrowth will flourish. Even sometimes, the weeds are eventually burned again. Weed is known as a destroyer plant that has to be controlled. Through proper treatment, the existing weeds in peatlands can be potentiallly exploited. The purpose of this study was to determine the calorific value of briquettes as one of peatland weeds utilization. The results showed that the calorific value ranged from 2,492 cal/g to 5,230 cal/g. The lowest calorific value was on ‘teki kecil’ grass (Scirpus grossus Lf, while the highest calorific value was observed for ‘bantalaki grass’ (Hymenachne amplexicaulis Nees. The high calorific value of the peat weeds are potential for biomass briquettes raw materials. The utilization and use of peat weed briquettes as a raw materials expected can reduce land degradation due to peat swamp burning

  15. TEHOPALA - Intensification of peat production; TEHOPALA - palaturvetuotannon tehostaminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurminen, T.; Katainen, E. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Leinonen, A.; Aalto, J. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hoelttae, P. [Biomasters Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Tehopala project is to increase the hectare yield of sod peat by 50 % and to reduce the production costs by 30 % by developing the sod peat production methods and equipment. The main aim of the research is in machine development, the target of which is to develop a new efficient machine chain for ridge-drying method. A new more effective cutting disc, suitable for 600 mm nozzles for production wave-like sod, has been developed for PK-1S sod peat excavator. The RYT-MP excavator has been developed to operationally reliable stage, and a nozzle for production of wave-like sod has been constructed for it. Prototype machines have been developed for ridging and loading. The development work of these will be carried out further. Ridge-drying method and wave-like sod peat method have been proven to be more effective than the cylindrical sod technology and field-drying method

  16. Constructing deposition chronologies for peat deposits using radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Piotrowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon dating is one of the main methods used to establish peat chronologies. This article reviews the basis of the method and its application to dating of peat deposits. Important steps in the radiocarbon dating procedure are described, including selection and extraction of material (and fractions for dating, chemical and physical preparation of media suitable for measurements, measurements of 14C activity or concentration, calculations, calibration of results and age-depth modelling.

  17. Significance of peat on the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    is to trace the course of Holocene marine transgression. Incidentally, a similar situation is observed considering avail able dates (Nambiar and Rajagopalan, 1995) off south India. These cases can probably be attributed to sediment reworking. Further.... Geological Society of America Bulletin, v.81, pp.2477-2482. COHEN. A.D., RAYMOND, R., RAMIREZ, A., MORALES, Z. and PONCE, F. (1989). The Changuinola peat deposit of northwestern Panama: a tropical back·barrier, peat (coal)-fonning environment. International...

  18. Fluvial organic carbon losses from oil palm plantations on tropical peat, Sarawak, Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sarah; Page, Susan; Evans, Chris; Whelan, Mick; Gauci, Vincent; Lip Khoon, Kho

    2017-04-01

    peatland carbon budget. Given the increasing expansion of oil palm plantations on tropical peat, within Southeast Asia, it is essential that fluvial organic carbon data is incorporated into assessment criteria, helping countries to better monitor, report and verify their land-based greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  20. Aged anthropogenic iodine in a boreal peat bog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillant, S. [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, UMR 1120 INPL-INRA, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Andra, Direction Scientifique, Service Transferts, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Sheppard, M.I. [ECOMatters, P.O. Box 430, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Echevarria, G. [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, UMR 1120 INPL-INRA, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)]. E-mail: Guillaume.Echevarria@ensaia.inpl-nancy.fr; Denys, S. [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, UMR 1120 INPL-INRA, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Andra, Direction Scientifique, Service Transferts, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Villemin, G. [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, UMR 1120 INPL-INRA, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Tekely, P. [Laboratoire de Methodologie RMN, FRE CNRS 2415, Universite Henri Poincare, Nancy 1, Faculte des Sciences, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Leclerc-Cessac, E. [Andra, Direction Scientifique, Service Transferts, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Morel, J.L. [Laboratoire Sols et Environnement, UMR 1120 INPL-INRA, 54500 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2007-05-15

    This in situ study assesses the long term sorption of I in a natural peat bog, a matter that is scarcely addressed but required for safety studies such as for radioactive waste disposal. Fifteen years after the artificial contamination of a boreal peat bog, the groundwater (piezometers), the peat and the vegetation were resampled to determine I distribution with comparison to the initial situation (1989). Spectroscopic analyses (SS-NMR, electronic microscopy and EDX spectroscopy) were carried out on the peat solids to identify the sorption processes. Over the past 15 a the I has been spreading mostly outwards and possibly upwards in the groundwater. Sorption of I is higher at the surface of the bog (K {sub d} = 37.6 L kg{sup -1}) than at the bottom (K {sub d} = 5.1 L kg{sup -1}), and this is attributed to the oxic/anoxic conditions of the peat layers. The average surface K {sub d} values showed more than a 2-fold increase after 15 a. TEM-EDX analyses of the surface peat showed here for the first time that I was only associated with natural polyphenolic substances contained in humified plant tissues. Plants growing in the bog have not taken up much I with the exception of sedge species ([I]{sub sedgeleaves} is up to 283 mg kg{sup -1})

  1. Saturated and trans fats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shader, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    ... Original Pancake Mix plus ingredients suggested by the recipe: 2 g saturated fat (SF) and no trans fatty acids or trans fat (TFA); bacon, Oscar Mayer Lower Sodium Bacon: 2.5 g SF and no TFA; sausages, Jimmy Dean Original Pork Sausage Links: 8 g SF and no TFA; potatoes, Ore-Ida Mini Tater Tots: 2 g SF and no TFA; and nondairy creamer, Nestlé Coffee-...

  2. Factors affecting oxidative peat decomposition due to land use in tropical peat swamp forests in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Okimoto, Yosuke; Hirano, Takashi; Kusin, Kitso

    2017-12-31

    The increasing frequency of fire due to drainage of tropical peatland has become a major environmental problem in Southeast Asia. To clarify the effects of changes in land use on carbon dioxide emissions, we measured oxidative peat decomposition (PD) at different stages of disturbance at three sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia: an undrained peat swamp forest (UF), a heavily drained peat swamp forest (DF), and a drained and burned ex-forest (DB). PD exhibited seasonality, being less in the wet season and greater in the dry season. From February 2014 to December 2015, mean PD (±SE) were 1.90±0.19, 2.30±0.33, and 1.97±0.25μmolm(-2)s(-1) at UF, DF, and DB, respectively. The groundwater level (GWL) was a major controlling factor of PD at all sites. At UF and DF, PD and GWL showed significant quadratic relationships. At DB, PD and GWL showed significant positive and negative relationships during the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Using these relationships, we estimated annual PD from GWL data for 2014 and 2015 as 698 and 745gCm(-2)yr(-1) at UF (mean GWL: -0.23 and -0.39m), 775 and 825gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DF (-0.55 and -0.59m), and 646 and 748gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DB (-0.22 and -0.62m), respectively. The annual PD was significantly higher in DF than in UF or DB, in both years. Despite the very dry conditions, the annual PD values at these sites were much lower than those reported for tropical peat at plantations (e.g., oil palm, rubber, and acacia). The differences in the relationship between PD and GWL indicate that separate estimations are required for each type of land. Moreover, our results suggest that PD can be enhanced by drainage both in forests and at burned sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A pore-size classification for peat bogs derived from unsaturated hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias Karl David; Iden, Sascha Christian; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    In ombrotrophic peatlands, the moisture content of the acrotelm (vadoze zone) controls oxygen diffusion rates, redox state, and the turnover of organic matter. Thus, variably saturated flow processes determine whether peatlands act as sinks or sources of atmospheric carbon, and modelling these processes is crucial to assess effects of changed environmental conditions on the future development of these ecosystems. We show that the Richards equation can be used to accurately describe the moisture dynamics under evaporative conditions in variably saturated peat soil, encompassing the transition from the topmost living moss layer to the decomposed peat as part of the vadose zone. Soil hydraulic properties (SHP) were identified by inverse simulation of evaporation experiments on samples from the entire acrotelm. To obtain consistent descriptions of the observations, the traditional van Genuchten-Mualem model was extended to account for non-capillary water storage and flow. We found that the SHP of the uppermost moss layer reflect a pore-size distribution (PSD) that combines three distinct pore systems of the Sphagnum moss. For deeper samples, acrotelm pedogenesis changes the shape of the SHP due to the collapse of inter-plant pores and an infill with smaller particles. This leads to gradually more homogeneous and bi-modal PSDs with increasing depth, which in turn can serve as a proxy for increasing state of pedogenesis in peatlands. From this, we derive a nomenclature and size classification for the pore spaces of Sphagnum mosses and define inter-, intra-, and inner-plant pore spaces, with effective pore diameters of > 300, 300-30, and 30-10 µm, respectively.

  4. A pore-size classification for peat bogs derived from unsaturated hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. D. Weber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In ombrotrophic peatlands, the moisture content of the acrotelm (vadoze zone controls oxygen diffusion rates, redox state, and the turnover of organic matter. Thus, variably saturated flow processes determine whether peatlands act as sinks or sources of atmospheric carbon, and modelling these processes is crucial to assess effects of changed environmental conditions on the future development of these ecosystems. We show that the Richards equation can be used to accurately describe the moisture dynamics under evaporative conditions in variably saturated peat soil, encompassing the transition from the topmost living moss layer to the decomposed peat as part of the vadose zone. Soil hydraulic properties (SHP were identified by inverse simulation of evaporation experiments on samples from the entire acrotelm. To obtain consistent descriptions of the observations, the traditional van Genuchten–Mualem model was extended to account for non-capillary water storage and flow. We found that the SHP of the uppermost moss layer reflect a pore-size distribution (PSD that combines three distinct pore systems of the Sphagnum moss. For deeper samples, acrotelm pedogenesis changes the shape of the SHP due to the collapse of inter-plant pores and an infill with smaller particles. This leads to gradually more homogeneous and bi-modal PSDs with increasing depth, which in turn can serve as a proxy for increasing state of pedogenesis in peatlands. From this, we derive a nomenclature and size classification for the pore spaces of Sphagnum mosses and define inter-, intra-, and inner-plant pore spaces, with effective pore diameters of >  300, 300–30, and 30–10 µm, respectively.

  5. Lignin-derived phenolic compounds in different types of peat profiles in Hokkaido, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsuki, K.; Kondo, R. [Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    How is the composition of organic matter of peat related to the environment of the peatland? How does it change with the process of peat formation? How does it change when the peatland is affected by the lowering of the ground water table? What are the relationships between the organic matter composition of peat and peatland plants? These are problems which we attempted to address in this study. Peat samples were collected layer-wise from four different peat profiles formed under different environments in Hokkaido, Japan. The basic properties of the peat profiles, i.e. major peat-forming plants, contents of carbon and nitrogen, C/N ratio, pH, degree of humidification analyzed by several methods, are described and compared. As one of the keys to answering the above-mentioned questions, we selected lignin-derived phenolic compounds that are released by CuO-NaOH oxidation. The composition of the phenolic compounds varied remarkably among the peat layers differing in peat-forming plants and in the mode of accumulation. The classification into high-moor, transitional moor, and low-moor peat was not sufficient to explain the composition of the phenolic compounds of peat. Differences in major peat-forming plants, i.e. sphagnum moss or sedges in high-moor peat, and Phragmites or Alnus in low-moor peat exerted significant effects on the phenolic composition.

  6. Isotope evidence for N2-fixation in Sphagnum peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Martin; Jackova, Ivana; Buzek, Frantisek; Stepanova, Marketa; Veselovsky, Frantisek; Curik, Jan; Prechova, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Waterlogged organic soils store as much as 30 % of the world's soil carbon (C), and 15 % of the world's soil nitrogen (N). In the era of climate change, wetlands are vulnerable to increasing temperatures and prolonged periods of low rainfall. Higher rates of microbial processes and/or changing availability of oxygen may lead to peat thinning and elevated emissions of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2, but also CH4 and N2O). Biogeochemical cycling of C and N in peat bogs is coupled. Under low levels of pollution by reactive nitrogen (NO3-, NH4+), increasing N inputs may positively affect C storage in peat. Recent studies in North America and Scandinavia have suggested that pristine bogs are characterized by significant rates of microbial N2 fixation that augments C storage in the peat substrate. We present a nitrogen isotope study aimed at corroborating these findings. We conducted an isotope inventory of N fluxes and pools at two Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic peat bogs in the Czech Republic (Central Europe). For the first time, we present a time-series of del15N values of atmospheric input at the same locations as del15N values of living Sphagnum and peat. The mean del15N values systematically increased in the order: input NH4+ (-10.0 ‰) NO3- (-7.9 ‰) < peat porewater (-5.6 ‰) < Sphagnum (-5.0 ‰) < shallow peat (-4.2 ‰) < deep peat (-2.2 ‰) < runoff (-1.4 ‰) < porewater N2O (1.4 ‰). Importantly, N of Sphagnum was isotopically heavier than N of the atmospheric input (p < 0.001). If partial incorporation of reactive N from the atmosphere into Sphagnum was isotopically selective, the residual N would have to be isotopically extremely light. Such N, however, was not identified anywhere in the ecosystem. Alternatively, Sphagnum may have contained an admixture of isotopically heavier N from atmospheric N2 (del15N N2 = 0 ‰). We conlude that the N isotope systematics at the two Czech sites is consistent with the concept of significant N2 fixation rates in

  7. Peat fires and air quality: volatile organic compounds and particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D; Hinwood, A L; Horwitz, P

    2009-07-01

    There are numerous localized peat deposits on the Swan Coastal Plain, an urban and rural bioregion otherwise dominated by wetland ecosystems in southwestern Australia. Hydrological change is significant in the bioregion: urban development encroaches on wetlands, groundwater extraction provides the city population with most of its water, and rainfall declines will not recharge aquifers in the future. The wetland processes which contribute to the formation of these peat deposits have therefore changed and are becoming vulnerable to fire events with residents increasingly exposed to peat smoke. There is an imperative to characterise this peat smoke to determine if exposures are harmful or toxic, and opportunities to do so in this setting arise due to the absence of bushfire smoke which has confounded other international studies. We have measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate concentrations from an opportunistic assessment of two peat fires. SUMMA canister grab samples and a portable GCMS were used to determine the VOCs with high 1h benzene concentrations of 16 and 30 ppm v/v. PM10 and PM2.5 particulate data were collected using an Osiris continuous analyser with 24h concentrations recorded at varying time periods (within a 5 months timeframe) ranging from 1h maximums of between 23-37 microgm(-3) for PM10 and 50.5-106 microgm(-3) for PM2.5. While the 24h averages were generally below national air quality standards, elevated 1h concentrations were observed on numerous occasions and on most days. Given the proximity of residential development to many peat deposits, a drying climate and the increased risk of arson in peri-urban environments, the health impacts of exposure to peat smoke need to be determined and if necessary measures developed to prevent exposure (which would include maintaining wetland sediment integrity so as to reduce its vulnerability to fire).

  8. Non-destructive methods for peat layer assessment in oligotrophic peat bogs: a case study from Poiana Ştampei, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana F. Gheorghe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Practices currently employed in the investigation and characterisation of peat deposits are destructive and may irremediable perturb peat bog development even in cases when exploitation is not carried out. We investigated the correlation between vegetation characteristics in the active area of Poiana Ştampei peat bog, Romania, and the underlying peat layer depth, aiming at establishing a non-destructive method of peat layer depth estimation. The presence of the Sphagneto-Eriophoretum vaginati association, dominated by Sphagnum fimbriatum, Eriophorum vaginatum, Andromeda polifolia, Vaccinium oxycoccos, V. myrtillus, V. vitis-idaea, Polytrichum commune, Picea excelsa, Pinus sylvestris and Betula verrucosa was found to predict the existence of the peat layer but not its depth. Out of the seven identified vegetation types, one type was associated with a very thin or no peat layer, one type was characterised by the presence of a thick (over 100 cm peat layer and five types indicated the presence of variable average depths of the peat layer. pH values correlated with peat layer depth only within the vegetation type associated with thick peat layers.

  9. Saturation in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, T

    2010-01-01

    This talk discusses some recent studies of gluon saturation in nuclei. We stress the connection between the initial condition in heavy ion collisions and observables in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). The dominant degree of freedom in the small x nuclear wavefunction is a nonperturbatively strong classical gluon field, which determines the initial condition for the glasma fields in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision. A correlator of Wilson lines from the same classical fields, known as the dipole cross section, can be used to compute many inclusive and exclusive observables in DIS.

  10. Study of the interaction mechanism in the biosorption of copper(II) ions onto posidonia oceanica and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, Marta; Marzal, Paula; Gabaldon, Carmen [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali e Agrarie e Biotecnologie Agro-Alimentari, Sez. Chimica Agraria ed Ambientale, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    A systematic approach was used to characterize the biosorption of copper(II) onto two biosorbents, Posidonia oceanica and peat, focusing on the interaction mechanisms, the copper(II) sorption-desorption process and the thermal behavior of the biosorbents. Sorption isotherms at pH 4-6 were obtained and the experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir model with a maximum uptake (q{sub max}) at pH 6 of 85.78 and 49.69 mg g{sup -1}, for P. oceanica and peat, respectively. A sequential desorption (SD) with water, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and EDTA was applied to copper-saturated biosorbents. Around 65-70% copper(II) were desorbed with EDTA, indicating that this heavy metal was strongly bound. The reversibility of copper(II) sorption was obtained by desorption with HCl and SD. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis detected the presence of peaks associated with OH groups in aromatic and aliphatic structures, CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} in aliphatic structures, COO{sup -} and COOH groups and unsaturated aromatic structures on the surface of both biosorbents, as well as peaks corresponding to Si-O groups on the surface of peat. The results of SEM-EDX and FTIR analysis of copper-saturated samples demonstrated that ion exchange was one of the mechanisms involved in copper(II) retention. Thermal analysis of biosorbent samples showed that copper(II) sorption-desorption processes affected the thermal stability of the biosorbents. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Excavation and drying of compressed peat; Tiivistetyn turpeen nosto ja kuivaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Frilander, P.; Hillebrand, K.; Nurmi, H.

    1996-12-31

    The target of this three year (1993 - 1995) project was to improve the peat product-ion efficiency by developing an energy economical excavation method for compressed peat, by which it is possible to obtain best possible degree of compression and load from the DS-production point of view. It is possible to improve the degree of utilization of solar radiation in drying from 30 % to 40 %. The main research areas were drying of the compressed peat and peat compression. The third sub-task for 1995 was demonstration of the main parts of the method in laboratory scale. Experimental compressed peat (Compeat) drying models were made for peats Carex-peat H7, Carex-peat H5 and Carex-Sphagnum-peat H7. Compeat dried without turning in best circumstances in 34 % shorter time than milled layer made of the same peat turned twice, the initial moisture content being 4 kgH2OkgDS-1. In the tests carried out in 1995 with Carex-peat the compression had not corresponding effect on intensifying of the drying of peat. Compression of Carex-Sphagnum peat H7 increased the drying speed by about 10 % compared with the drying time of uncompressed milled layer. In the sprinkling test about 30-50 % of the sprinkled water was sucked into the compressed peat layer, while about 70 % of the rain is sucked into the corresponding uncompressed milled layer. Use of vibration decreased the energy consumption of the steel-surfaced nozzles about 20 % in the maximum, but the effect depend on the rotation speed of the macerator and the vibration power. In the new Compeat method (production method for compressed peat), developed in the research, the peat is loosened from the field surface by milling 3-5 cm thick layer of peat of moisture content 75-80 %

  12. High nitrogen availability reduces polyphenol content in Sphagnum peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazza, Luca; Freeman, Chris

    2007-05-15

    Peat mosses of the genus Sphagnum constitute the bulk of living and dead biomass in bogs. These plants contain peculiar polyphenols which hamper litter peat decomposition through their inhibitory activity on microbial breakdown. In the light of the increasing availability of biologically active nitrogen in natural ecosystems, litter derived from Sphagnum mosses is an ideal substrate to test the potential effects of increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition on polyphenol content in litter peat. To this aim, we measured total nitrogen and soluble polyphenol concentration in Sphagnum litter peat collected in 11 European bogs under a chronic gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results demonstrate that increasing nitrogen concentration in Sphagnum litter, as a consequence of increased exogenous nitrogen availability, is accompanied by a decreasing concentration of polyphenols. This inverse relationship is consistent with reports that in Sphagnum mosses, polyphenol and protein biosynthesis compete for the same precursor. Our observation of modified Sphagnum litter chemistry under chronic nitrogen eutrophication has implications in the context of the global carbon balance, because a lower content of decay-inhibiting polyphenols would accelerate litter peat decomposition.

  13. Tree-mediated methane emissions along a tropical peat dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangala, Sunitha; Hoyt, Alison; Cobb, Alex; Harvey, Charles; Gauci, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Methane production and transport processes in peatlands are fairly well understood, but growing evidence for emission of methane through trees has highlighted the need to revisit methane transport processes. We examined methane emissions from all pathways including stem and leaf emissions in one of the last remaining pristine tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia: Belait peat swamp forests, Brunei Darussalam. Methane emissions along with a range of biotic and abiotic factors were measured within three 20 x 30 m plots along transects from the edge to the center of the peat done which is dominated by Shorea albida. Tree-mediated methane emissions were the dominant means of methane emissions from all three plots, with soil emissions equating to less than 30% of the total ecosystem methane flux. Both tree and soil emissions varied between and within the three plots, with soil emissions decreasing from the edge to the center of the peat dome with increasing peat depth and decreasing water table depths and tree emissions following an opposite trend. Within each plot, tree-mediated methane emissions displayed large variability with fluxes ranging between 0.2 - 9.4 mg m-2 hr-1. Relationships between tree-mediated methane emissions and pore-water methane concentrations point towards the possibility of some of these trees transporting methane produced in the deeper layers of the peat profile to the atmosphere. Taken together, these observations highlight that methane emissions through tree stems play a more central role in methane cycling in tropical peatlands.

  14. Vegetation analyses of Sebangau peat swamp forest, Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDI MIRMANTO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mirmanto E (2010 Vegetation analyses of Sebangau peat swamp forest, Central Kalimantan. Biodiversitas 11: 82-88. The vegetation analysis study has been made in Sebangau peat-swamp forest, Central Kalimantan. Eight permanent plots of 50-m x 50-m were set-up distribute from close to the river with shallow peat-layer up to the inland with relatively deep peat-layer. Enumeration of trees (GBH > 15 cm was conducted in all of 8 plots. Overall there are 133 species (taxa were recorded within 8 plots belong to 34 families where Dipterocarpaceae, Clusiaceae, Myrtaceae and Sapotaceae were the most dominant family. Out of all species recorded, Combretocarpus rotundatus, Palaquium leiocarpum, Stemonurus scorpioides and Tristania whittiana were the most dominant species. Two community’s types namely Combretocarpus rotundatus-Shorea balangeran community and Palaquium leiocarpum-Eugenia densinervium community were recognized and they distributed in slightly different habitat condition. The sequence of these two communities’ shows significantly related to both distances to river and peat-depth. In addition there was indication the presence of habitat preference among tree species.

  15. Effect of Different Peat Size and Pre-Consolidation Pressure of Reconstituted Peat on Effective Undrained Shear Strength Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, ATS; Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Ezree, AM; Nizam, ZM

    2017-08-01

    Shear strength of the soil is one of the most important parameters in engineering design, especially during the pre- or post-construction periods, since it is mainly used to measure and evaluate the foundation or slope stability of soil. Peat normally known as a soil that has a very low value of shear strength, and in order to determine and understand the shear strength of the peat, it is a difficult task in geotechnical engineering due to several factors such as types of fabrics, the origin of the soil, water content, organic matter and the degree of humification. The aim of this study is to determine the effective undrained shear strength properties of reconstituted peat of different sizes. All the reconstituted peat samples were formed with the size that passed the opening sieve of 0.425 mm (peat peat peat peat peat

  16. Peat deposits Of Dismal Swamp Pocosins, Camdem, Currituck, Gates, Pasquotank, And Perquimans Counties, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Peat is present in the Dismal Swamp of northeastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia. In North Carolina the peat is in 4 separate deposits located west,...

  17. Stable strontium isotopic ratios from archaeological organic remains from the Thorsberg peat bog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech; von Carnap-Bornheim, Claus; Grupe, Gisela

    2007-01-01

    Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog.......Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog....

  18. POTENCY OF BIOCONTROL AGENTS ISOLATED FROM COMPOST AND PEAT SOIL OF TROPICAL PEAT SWAMP FOREST IN KALAMPANGAN ZONE, CENTRAL KALIMANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliar Yuliar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani is a soil pathogen that causes diseases in wide range of hosts of agricultural, horticultural and flower crops. Biological control is the most promising way for the diseases management and it is environment friendly too. The objective of this study was to isolate and screen the potency of soil bacteria as biological control from various local compost and peat soil of tropical peat swamp forest in Kalampangan Zone, Central Kalimantan. Forty seven isolates from peat soil and compost were screened for biocontrol agent of Rhizoctonia solani . R. Solani Seven out of thirteen peat soil isolates, and six out of thirty three compost isolates showed antagonistic activity against in Potato Dextrose Agar. The cultivation of the antagonistic isolates in Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB was extracted and analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC column. The HPLC analyzes indicated that the antagonistic isolates produce an antifungal iturin A. Macroscopic observation of isolates colonies showed that form of their colonies were amuboid, myceloid, curled, circular, rhizoid, irregular and filamentous. These achievement indicate peat swamp forest not only offer a potential biocontrol agents of damping off but also provide a new source for production of antibiotics.

  19. Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robroek, Bjorn J M; Jassey, Vincent E J; Payne, Richard J; Martí, Magalí; Bragazza, Luca; Bleeker, Albert; Buttler, Alexandre; Caporn, Simon J M; Dise, Nancy B; Kattge, Jens; Zając, Katarzyna; Svensson, Bo H; van Ruijven, Jasper; Verhoeven, Jos T A

    2017-10-27

    In peatland ecosystems, plant communities mediate a globally significant carbon store. The effects of global environmental change on plant assemblages are expected to be a factor in determining how ecosystem functions such as carbon uptake will respond. Using vegetation data from 56 Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs across Europe, we show that in these ecosystems plant species aggregate into two major clusters that are each defined by shared response to environmental conditions. Across environmental gradients, we find significant taxonomic turnover in both clusters. However, functional identity and functional redundancy of the community as a whole remain unchanged. This strongly suggests that in peat bogs, species turnover across environmental gradients is restricted to functionally similar species. Our results demonstrate that plant taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled, which may allow these peat bogs to maintain ecosystem functioning when subject to future environmental change.

  20. Forest Dynamics of Peat Swamp Forest in Sebangau, Central Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDI MIRMANTO

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Forest dynamics were studied from 1999 to 2001 for individuals > 15 cm in girth of 24 most common species in six 0.25-ha plots. The plots were set up in natural peat swamp forest in the upper catchments of Sebangau, Central Kalimantan. Aim of the study is to understand the dynamics and vegetation changes of forest studied during period of study. The peat swamp forest in the study site might be categorized as moderately forest dynamic in term of rate of growth, mortality and recruitment. Annual relative growth rate and mortality rate was comparable to previous study but recruitment rate relatively higher. There was significant effect of diameter class on annual growth rate, but not to mortality rate. Even not too strong two environment factors (peat depth and distance to river were significant correlated with rate of mortality and recruitment. During two-year period study there was no significant changes in vegetation structure.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-08-13

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions. Copyright © 2015 Kalischuk et al.

  2. Shallow peatland ecohydrology - the control of peat depth on moss productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Simon; Kettridge, Nicholas; Moore, Paul; Devito, Kevin; Tilak, Amey; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Northern peatlands represent an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Shallow peatlands and marginal connective wetlands can be essential components of many northern peatland landscape mosaics, playing a vital role in landscape connectivity and wider landscape hydrology. However the ecohydrological function of these shallow, marginal systems has been largely overlooked, with peatland hydrology research focused on relatively deep bog systems. In order to predict landscape scale wetland function and its vulnerability to climate change we need to understand how these shallow connective systems function. The balance between moss productivity and water loss provide a key component of these systems, as water use efficiency controls the rate of moss growth and thus controls the amount of atmospheric carbon sequestered in peat. Understanding how productivity of shallow peatland systems responds to changes in evaporative stress will aid predictions of peatland landscape hydrological function in a changing climate. To determine the factors influencing peat productivity, water balance simulations using Hydrus 1-D were conducted over annual growing seasons for different soil profile depths, compositions and antecedent moisture conditions. Our results demonstrate a bimodal distribution of peatland responses; either primarily conserving water by limiting evapotranspiration or, maximizing productivity. For sustained periods of evaporative stress, shallow marginal systems are least able to buffer periods of evaporative stress due to limited labile water storage, and will limit evaporation, conserve water and be less productive. Conversely, where present, both deep water storage and a shallow initial water table prolong the onset of high vegetative stress, thus maximizing moss productivity. However, a total depth of 0.8 m is identified as the threshold above which increasing peat depth has no further effect on changing vegetative stress response and thus landscape function

  3. Uncertainty in peat volume and soil carbon estimated using ground-penetrating radar and probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Parsekian; Lee Slater; Dimitrios Ntarlagiannis; James Nolan; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Randall K. Kolka; Paul J. Hanson

    2012-01-01

    Estimating soil C stock in a peatland is highly dependent on accurate measurement of the peat volume. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty in calculations of peat volume using high-resolution data to resolve the three-dimensional structure of a peat basin based on both direct (push probes) and indirect geophysical (ground-penetrating radar) measurements. We...

  4. Greenhouse gas balances of Frisian peat pastures. Long term effects of land use options.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Peat pastures in the Dutch province of Friesland emit high amounts of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O, and CH4). These high emissions are the results of deep drainage of the peat for agricultural purposes and consequently oxidation of the peat. Other

  5. Soil ecology and ecosystem services of dairy and semi-natural grasslands on peat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deru, Joachim G.C.; Bloem, Jaap; Goede, de Ron; Keidel, Harm; Kloen, Henk; Rutgers, Michiel; Akker, van den Jan; Brussaard, Lijbert; Eekeren, van Nick

    2017-01-01

    Peat wetlands are of major importance for ecosystem services such as carbon storage, water regulation and maintenance of biodiversity. However, peat drainage for farming leads to CO2 emission, soil subsidence and biodiversity losses. In the peat areas in the Netherlands, solutions are

  6. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on Archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark...

  7. Tropical Peat and Peatland Development in the Floodplains of the Greater Pamba Basin, South-Western India during the Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Navnith K P; Padmalal, Damodaran; Limaye, Ruta B; S, Vishnu Mohan; Jennerjahn, Tim; Gamre, Pradeep G

    2016-01-01

    Holocene sequences in the humid tropical region of Kerala, South-western (SW) India have preserved abundance of organic-rich sediments in the form of peat and its rapid development in a narrow time frame towards Middle Holocene has been found to be significant. The sub-coastal areas and flood plains of the Greater Pamba Basin have provided palaeorecords of peat indicating that the deposits are essentially formed within freshwater. The combination of factors like stabilized sea level and its subsequent fall since the Middle Holocene, topographic relief and climatic conditions led to rapid peat accumulation across the coastal lowlands. The high rainfall and massive floods coupled with a rising sea level must have inundated > 75% of the coastal plain land converting it into a veritable lagoon-lake system that eventually led to abrupt termination of the forest ecosystem and also converted the floodplains into peatland where accumulation of peat almost to 2.0-3.0 m thickness in coastal lowlands and river basins during the shorter interval in the Middle Holocene. Vast areas of the coastal plains of Kerala have been converted into carbon rich peatland during the Middle Holocene and transforming the entire coastal stretch and associated landforms as one of the relatively youngest peatlands in the extreme southern tip of India. Unlike the uninterrupted formation of peatlands of considerable extent during the Holocene in Southeast Asia, the south Peninsular Indian region has restricted and short intervals of peatlands in the floodplains and coastal lowlands. Such a scenario is attributed to the topographic relief of the terrain and the prevailing hydrological regimes and environmental conditions as a consequence of monsoon variability since Middle Holocene in SW India. Considering the tropical coastal lowlands and associated peatlands are excellent repositories of carbon, they are very important for regional carbon cycling and habitat diversity. The alarming rate of land

  8. Soil organic matter mineralization of permafrost peat lands and sensitivity to temperature and lack of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Richard E.; Diáková, Kateřina; Voigt, Carolina; Šantrůčková, Hana; Martikainen, Pertti; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    aerobic decomposition dominated over C-loss from anaerobic decomposition with clear temperature sensitivities in different peat layers. Moreover, the peat layers showed definite patterns especially to N2O losses, less for CO2 losses. This study addresses the essential question to which extent deeper soil horizons of subarctic organic depositions contribute to the total soil GHG fluxes, and whether the nutrient availability, microbial community and environmental factors (i.e. temperature, O2 availability) constrain the SOM mineralization. REFERENCES Marushchak ME, Pitkämäki A, Koponen H, Biasi C, Seppälä M, Martikainen PJ (2011) Hot spots for nitrous oxide emissions found in different types of permafrost peatlands. Global Change Biol 17:2601-2614 Tarnocai C, Canadell JG, Schuur EAG, Kuhry P, Mazhitova G, Zimov S (2009) Soil organic carbon pools in the northern circumpolar permafrost region. Global Biogeochem Cycles 23

  9. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  10. The Use of Ameliorant Fe3+ and Rock Phosphates in Peat Soil at Several Water Condition on the P Content of Plants Rice and Carbon Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelvia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The addition of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation can reduce effect of toxic organic acids, increase peat stability through formation of complex compounds and reduce carbon emission. The research was conducted in the laboratory and green house of the Departement of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agriculture University. Peat samples with hemic degree of decomposition were taken from Riau. Rock phosphates were taken from the rock phosphates of PT. Petrokimia Gresik, Christmas Island phosphates, and Huinan China and FeCl3.6H2O was used as the other Fe3+ source. The aims of the research were to study (a the effect of the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates on the P content of plants dan (b the effect of the application ameliorant Fe3+ and the contribution of Fe cation in rock phosphates in the decrease of carbon emission. The results showed that the P content of plants rice increased 58 – 286% with the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates. The estimation of carbon loss through CO2 and CH4 emissions from peats if planted continuously with rice was around 2.5, 2.2 and 2.6 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 respectively in field capacity condition, two times of field capacity condition, and 5 cm of saturated condition. The application of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation increased the stability of peats and reduced the carbon loss around 1.7 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (64% in 5 cm of saturated condition, 1.3 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (58% in two times of field capacity condition, and 1.0 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (41% in field capacity condition.

  11. Influence of porewater velocity and ionic strength on DOC concentrations in and losses from peat-sand mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffner, Nora; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Fiedler, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Organic soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle as they can act as a source or a sink for greenhouse gas emissions. The new IPCC Wetlands Supplement accounts for the first time for CO2 emissions from the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). While there is a wealth of studies on "true" peat soils, knowledge on DOC losses from organic soils heavily disturbed by e.g. mixing with sand is fragmentary. Moreover, there are only a few studies on the influence of soil hydrological properties on DOC transport. This study investigates physico-chemical controls on the concentration and losses of DOC from a peat-sand mixture in a saturated column experiment with undisturbed columns. The soil originates from the study site "Grosses Moor" (Northern Germany) which is a former bog where peat layers remaining after peat mining were mixed with the underlying mineral soil. We studied the influence of the flow regime and the ionic strength of the irrigation solution on DOC concentrations and losses. Three different pumping rates and two different ionic strengths determined by different concentrations of a sodium chloride-calcium chloride mixture in the irrigation solution were applied. Transport properties of the soil were obtained by analyzing breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (potassium bromide). For interpretation of the BTCs, the transport model STANMOD which is based on the two-region (mobile/immobile) non-equilibrium concept was fitted to the data. The shape of the BTCs and the STANMOD results showed that three of the four columns had a dual porosity structure, which affects the porewater velocity and the contact area. After a large initial peak, DOC concentrations equilibrated to nearly constant values. Increased porewater velocities decreased the concentration of DOC, but increased the losses. A new equilibrium concentration was reached after nearly all changes of the porewater velocity. At maximum pumping rates as determined from

  12. Effects of freezing on soil temperature, freezing front propagation and moisture redistribution in peat: laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Nagare

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There are not many studies that report water movement in freezing peat. Soil column studies under controlled laboratory settings can help isolate and understand the effects of different factors controlling freezing of the active layer in organic covered permafrost terrain. In this study, four peat Mesocosms were subjected to temperature gradients by bringing the Mesocosm tops in contact with sub-zero air temperature while maintaining a continuously frozen layer at the bottom (proxy permafrost. Soil water movement towards the freezing front (from warmer to colder regions was inferred from soil freezing curves, liquid water content time series and from the total water content of frozen core samples collected at the end of freezing cycle. A substantial amount of water, enough to raise the upper surface of frozen saturated soil within 15 cm of the soil surface at the end of freezing period appeared to have moved upwards during freezing. Diffusion under moisture gradients and effects of temperature on soil matric potential, at least in the initial period, appear to drive such movement as seen from analysis of freezing curves. Freezing front (separation front between soil zones containing and free of ice propagation is controlled by latent heat for a long time during freezing. A simple conceptual model describing freezing of an organic active layer initially resembling a variable moisture landscape is proposed based upon the results of this study. The results of this study will help in understanding, and ultimately forecasting, the hydrologic response of wetland-dominated terrain underlain by discontinuous permafrost.

  13. Essential tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremor - essential; Familial tremor; Tremor - familial; Benign essential tremor; Shaking - essential tremor ... ET is the most common type of tremor. Everyone has some tremor, but the movements are often so small that they can't be seen. ET affects both men and women. ...

  14. Developmental History of an Intriguing Peat-Forming Community Along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, J.; Yu, Z.; Beilman, D.; Kaiser, K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost peatbanks along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) have become valuable high-resolution archives for late-Holocene climatic conditions recently. We recently observed and studied a few water-saturated peatlands that had formed in rocky depressions near Vernadsky Station and in mainland Antarctica (~ 65°S, 64°W). Remarkably, we seem to be the very first ones to analyze these systems for environmental reconstructions. The similarity between these peatlands and fens from the lower latitudes is striking, and the rarity of these systems along the WAP is intriguing. We present a high-resolution, multi-proxy record of ecosystem development and paleoenvironmental conditions for Rasmussen peatland. The ecosystem is ~100 m2 in size and is characterized by a shallow water table depth at 7 cm below the surface. Surface vegetation is dominated by Calliergon spp., a wet-adapted moss found along the WAP. The studied moss deposit is 50 cm thick and has a high organic matter content (> 90% dry weight). Plant macrofossil analysis reveals that the peatland was initially a wet Sanionia spp. carpet and that a sharp transition to Calliergon spp. occurred about half way through the deposit. A distinct layer of highly decomposed organic matter was observed from 32 to 40 cm and could indicate a period of slowed peat formation, potentially due to dry conditions (enhanced peat decay) or perennial snow cover (limited plant growth). Biochemical decomposition indicators such as carbohydrate yields, acid:aldehyde ratios of lignin phenols, and hydroxyproline yields are being determined to better understand the extent of peat decay that has occurred at this site throughout its development, particularly to further address the nature of the observed stratigraphic changes. Preliminary results indicate that carbohydrate yields of the bottom half of the core are about 1/3 smaller than those of the top half, indicating substantial carbon loss due to decomposition. Overall, these peatlands

  15. Peat Deposits Of Light Ground Pocosin, Pamlico County, North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Light Ground Pocosin peat deposit is located in south central Pamlico County, 13 miles east of New Bern. Except for a narrow channel 8 to 12 feet deep, and two...

  16. Health burden from peat wildfire in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 2008, a wildfire smoldering through rich peat deposits in the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge produced massive amounts of smoke and exposed a largely rural North Carolina area to air pollution in access of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. In this talk, w...

  17. Dating recent peat profiles using spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Swindles

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a brief overview of spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs as age-equivalent stratigraphic markers in recent peat profiles. A detailed method for the extraction and analysis of SCPs is provided and specific limitations of the technique are discussed.

  18. A statistical approach to determining the uncertainty of peat thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Torppa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents statistical studies of peat thickness to define its expected maximum variation (∆dm(∆r as a function of separation distance Δr. The aim was to provide an estimate of the observational uncertainty in peat depth due to positioning error, and the prediction uncertainty of the computed model. The data were GPS position and ground penetrating radar depth measurements of six mires in different parts of Finland. The calculated observational uncertainty for Finnish mires in general caused, for example, by a 20 m positioning error, is 43 cm in depth with 95 % confidence. The peat depth statistics differed among the six mires, and it is recommended that the mire specific function ∆dm(∆r is defined for each individual mire to obtain the best estimate of observational uncertainty. Knowledge of the observational error and function ∆dm(∆r should be used in peat depth modelling for defining the uncertainty of depth predictions.

  19. Physical and mathematical modeling of pollutant emissions when burning peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A.; Lozhkin, V.; Tarkhov, D.; Lozhkina, O.; Timofeev, V.

    2017-11-01

    The article presents an original neural network model of CO dispersion around the experimentally simulated peat fire. It is a self-learning model considering both the measured CO concentrations in the smoke cloud and the refined coefficients of the main equation. The method is recommended for the development of air quality control and forecasting systems.

  20. Peat Biomass Smoke Particle Exposure in Rats Decreases ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildland fires, favored by prolonged drought and rising temperatures, generate significant amounts of ambient particulate matter (PM), which has been linked to adverse health outcomes. The eastern North Carolina peat fires of Pocosin Lake in 2008 and Pains Bay in 2011 were some of the more prominent recent wildland fires and were associated with increased cardiovascular hospitalizations. The biological impacts of peat biomass emissions and the specific mechanisms driving these responses are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiopulmonary responses of peat biomass smoke exposure in rats. We hypothesized that PM exposure would dose-dependently alter cardiopulmonary function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 30 µg (Lo PM) or 300 µg (Hi PM) of peat biomass smoke PM extracts suspended in 200 µL of saline, or saline vehicle alone by oropharyngeal aspiration (OA). Immediately following OA rats were placed in a whole-body plethysmograph and ventilatory data were recorded for 12 minutes. One day following OA, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane for ultrasound assessment of cardiovascular function. Hi PM caused decreases in expiratory timing as early as 4-6 minutes after exposure relative to Lo PM (p = 0.02) and Vehicle (p= 0.06), which resolved shortly thereafter. One day after OA, ultrasounds revealed that Hi PM exposure increased end diastolic volume (EDV) by 16% (p = 0.03) over Vehicle and 13% (p = 0.06) over Lo PM. In addition,

  1. Page 1 - EVALUATION OF MAIZE COB PEAT FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    earth, bauxite, etc. has been investigated. The use of peat as an adsorbent has been reported'''. Maize cob has ... selected to exclude earth and rubbish. Dye solutions. Each dye was made to contain (), 1 g ()() ppm) in one .... An all-round quality improve- ment can be realised by applying this beat, at a particle size range of ...

  2. Geotechnical characterization of peat-based landfill cover materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Khoshand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural methane (CH4 oxidation that is carried out through the use of landfill covers (biocovers is a promising method for reducing CH4 emissions from landfills. Previous studies on peat-based landfill covers have mainly focused on their biochemical properties (e.g. CH4 oxidation capacity. However, the utilization of peat as a cover material also requires a solid understanding of its geotechnical properties (thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical, which are critical to the performance of any biocover. Therefore, the objective of this context is to investigate and assess the geotechnical properties of peat-based cover materials (peat, peat–sand mixture, including compaction, consolidation, and hydraulic and thermal conductivities. The studied materials show high compressibility to the increase of vertical stress, with compression index (Cc values ranging from 0.16 to 0.358. The compressibility is a function of sand content such that the peat–sand mixture (1:3 has the lowest Cc value. Both the thermal and hydraulic conductivities are functions of moisture content, dry density, and sand content. The hydraulic conductivity varies from 1.74 × 10−9 m/s to 7.35 × 10−9 m/s, and increases with the increase in sand content. The thermal conductivity of the studied samples varies between 0.54 W/(m K and 1.41 W/(m K and it increases with the increases in moisture and sand contents. Increases in sand content generally increase the mechanical behavior of peat-based covers; however, they also cause relatively high hydraulic and thermal conductivities which are not favored properties for biocovers.

  3. Microbial liquefaction of peat for the production of synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekaran, M.

    1988-01-01

    Objectives of this study were: to evaluate the potential of using various microorganisms to hydrolyse and liquify peat; to determine the optimal conditions for peat hydrolysis and liquefaction; to study the co-metabolizable substances; to separate the compounds present in liquified peat by alumina and silica acid chromatography and capillary gas chromatography; and to identify the compounds in liquified peat by capillary GC-Mass spectrometry. Organisms used in the study include: Coprinus comatus, Coriolus hirsutus, Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Lenzites trabea, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sapidus, Polyporus adjustus, Neurospora sitophila, Rhizophus arrhizus, Bacillus subtilis, Acinetobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. The fungi were maintained and cultivated in potato dextrose agar at 30 C. The bacteria were maintained in nutrient agar at 30 C. We have also initiated work on coal solubilization in addition to the studies on peat liquefaction. A relatively new substratum or semi-solid base for culture media called Pluronic F-127, or Polyol (BASF, New Jersey). Objectives of this study were: (1) to study the growth patterns of Candida ML 13 on pluronic as substratum; (2) to determine the rate of microbial coal solubilization on pluronic F-127 amended in different growth media; (3) to separate the mycelial mat of Candida ML 13 from unsolubilized coal particles and solubilized coal products from pluronic F-127; (4) to determine the effects of pH on microbial coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media; (5) the effect of concentration of pluronic F-127 in media on coal solubilization; and, (6) to study the role of extracellular factors secreted by Candida ML 13 on coal solubilization in pluronic F-127 media. Results are discussed. 4 refs.

  4. The history, present status and future prospects of the Russian fuel peat industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Tcvetkov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Russian fuel peat industry, analyse the prospects for its further development, and draw attention to its significant technical and economic potential. Russian peat resources represent more than 30 % of the global total. Peat production peaked during 1960–1980, when the volume of peat extraction was two orders of magnitude higher than it is now. The key factors that prevented further development of the Russian fuel peat industry were an inadequate regulatory framework for peat processing and the inability of peat extraction enterprises to overcome the energy supply monopoly of the coal, oil and gas industries. At present, the peat industry of the Russian Federation is in decline and its potential has been lost. Most of the power plants that previously operated on peat have been converted to coal and other fuels and, as a result, the occurrence of peatland fires has increased greatly. A case is made for revival of the industry to exploit peat as a local energy resource, employing modern processing techniques that can achieve full utilisation of the peat whilst reducing air pollution and generating little waste.

  5. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of Sphagnum moss and peat reveal trimodal pore-size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    In ombrotrophic peatlands, the moisture content of the vadose zone (acrotelm) controls oxygen diffusion rates, redox state, and the turnover of organic matter. Whether peatlands act as sinks or sources of atmospheric carbon thus relies on variably saturated flow processes. The Richards equation is the standard model for water flow in soils, but it is not clear whether it can be applied to simulate water flow in live Sphagnum moss. Transient laboratory evaporation experiments were conducted to observe evaporative water fluxes in the acrotelm, containing living Sphagnum moss, and a deeper layer containing decomposed moss peat. The experimental data were evaluated by inverse modeling using the Richards equation as process model for variably-saturated flow. It was tested whether water fluxes and time series of measured pressure heads during evaporation could be simulated. The results showed that the measurements could be matched very well providing the hydraulic properties are represented by a suitable model. For this, a trimodal parametrization of the underlying pore-size distribution was necessary which reflects three distinct pore systems of the Sphagnum constituted by inter-, intra-, and inner-plant water. While the traditional van Genuchten-Mualem model led to great discrepancies, the physically more comprehensive Peters-Durner-Iden model which accounts for capillary and noncapillary flow, led to a more consistent description of the observations. We conclude that the Richards equation is a valid process description for variably saturated moisture fluxes over a wide pressure range in peatlands supporting the conceptualization of the live moss as part of the vadose zone.

  6. Effects of peat fires on the characteristics of humic acid extracted from peat soil in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustiawati; Kihara, Yusuke; Sazawa, Kazuto; Kuramitz, Hideki; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Syawal, M Suhaemi; Wulandari, Linda; Hendri I; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2015-02-01

    When peat forest fires happen, it leads to burn soil and also humic acids as a dominant organic matter contained in peat soil as well as the forest. The structure and properties of humic acids vary depending on their origin and environment, therefore the transformation of humic acid is also diverse. The impacts of the peat fires on peat soil from Central Kalimantan, Indonesia were investigated through the characterization of humic acids, extracted from soil in burnt and unburnt sites. The characterization of humic acids was performed by elemental composition, functional groups, molecular weight by HPSEC, pyrolysate compounds by pyrolysis-GC/MS, fluorescence spectrum by 3DEEM spectrofluorometer, and thermogravimetry. The elemental composition of each humic substance indicated that the value of H/C and O/C of humic acids from burnt sites were lower than that from unburnt sites. The molecular weight of humic acids from burnt sites was also lower than that from unburnt sites. Pyrolysate compounds of humic acids from unburnt sites differed from those of humic acids from burnt soil. The heating experiment showed that burning process caused the significant change in the properties of humic acids such as increasing the aromaticity and decreasing the molecular weight.

  7. Brine Distribution after Vacuum Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Kathrine; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs...

  8. Misconceptions in Reporting Oxygen Saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toffaletti, John; Zijlstra, Willem G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We describe some misconceptions that have become common practice in reporting blood gas and cooximetry results. In 1980, oxygen saturation was incorrectly redefined in a report of a new instrument for analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) derivatives. Oxygen saturation (sO(2)) was redefined as the

  9. What controls the oxidative ratio of UK peats? A multi-site study of elemental CHNO concentrations in peat cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Gareth; Worrall, Fred; Masiello, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.82 and 1.27 with a median value of 1.08 which is within the range of world soils. There were significant differences in OR of the peat between sites with the data falling into two broad groupings - Group 1: Forsinard, Auchencorth, Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor; Group 2: Moor House, Thorne Moor, Westhay Moor, Whixhall Moss. Whilst there were significant changes (p < 0.05) in elemental ratios with increasing peat depth (increasing C:N ratio and decreasing O:C ratio) there was no significant difference overall in OR with depth. This paper will explore some of the possible controlling factors on these ratios. Local

  10. Excavation and drying of compressed peat; Tiivistetyn turpeen nosto ja kuivaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Hillebrand, K.; Nurmi, H.; Frilander, P. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this three year project (1993 - 95) is to develop an energy economical excavation method for compressed peat, by which it is possible to improve the peat production efficiency. The main research areas of the project are the drying of compressed peat and the compression of the peat. The optimal density, the load carrying capacity, the degree of maceration and the shape of the drying layer of the milled compressed peat will be determined in the drying research. Energy economical excavation, maceration and compression method, by which it is possible to optimize the drying layer, will be sought using peat compression research and equipment research carried out in laboratory. An experimental model for compressed milled layer, which was in contact with the field, made of Carex peat, was compiled in 1993. Compression tests were made using roller-press equipment, and peat treatability tests with a piston- press and DMTA equipment. An experimental drying model for compressed peat layer (C-t, H7), which is partially isolated from the field, was compiled in 1994. Means for reduction of energy consumption of extrusion were sought in compression studies of 1994 by investigating the friction between peat and 20 different materials and surface coatings, and by studying the effect of electric current on the friction between peat and a nozzle. Additionally, a peat excavation research equipment was constructed, by which the factors effecting on the forming of peat were studied and extruded compressed peat was produced using a nozzle of about 1.0 m width

  11. Smouldering fires and environmental reconstructions using ombrotrophic peat cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Claudio; Rein, Guillermo; Ciavatta, Claudio; Knicker, Heike; Shotyk, William; Miano, Teodoro M.

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands are the soil organic matter-rich ecosystem most affected by fire. When they burn, the dominating phenomenon is not flaming but rather smouldering combustion. Recent estimates suggest that mean annual greenhouse gas emissions from smouldering peat fires are equivalent to 15% of global anthropogenic emissions. Furthermore, warmer temperatures at high latitudes are already resulting in unprecedented permafrost thaw, leaving large organic C pools exposed to fires for the first time in millennia. Much of our knowledge of past fire events is based on the abundance of charcoal particles in fossil and sub-fossil records. The combustion of char by the smouldering process implies that the record of past fires in peat cores may be entirely hidden. Three Sphagnum peat columns (26 cm deep) having different initial moisture contents (MC, in dry weight basis), i.e., 50, 100 and 200%MC, were prepared for this study. In a previous work, we tried to identify palaeofires by the physical and chemical signature that they leave behind in the soil profile. In the present one, we employ solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Isotope-Ratio Mass Spectroscopy (IRMS) characterization of peat organic matter, as well as results regarding and measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) production and metal concentration changes following smouldering fires. The 15N spectrum of fresh peat (FP) used as control shows only an amide signal, which is in agreement with the 13C NMR spectrum where mainly signals of carbohydrates and alkyl C can be observed. Further signals can be observed in the aromatic region, most probably due to lignin derivatives. Following the smouldering event, selected peat samples from both the 50% and 100% MC series show signals supporting the occurrence of fire. In detail, the 15N-signals between -200 and -250 ppm are typical for pyrrole or indole type N. This is in accordance with the 13C NMR spectra showing considerable intensity in the aromatic region

  12. South Florida wetlands ecosystem; biogeochemical processes in peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, William; ,

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida wetlands ecosystem is an environment of great size and ecological diversity (figs. 1 and 2). The landscape diversity and subtropical setting of this ecosystem provide a habitat for an abundance of plants and wildlife, some of which are unique to South Florida. South Florida wetlands are currently in crisis, however, due to the combined effects of agriculture, urbanization, and nearly 100 years of water management. Serious problems facing this ecosystem include (1) phosphorus contamination producing nutrient enrichment, which is causing changes in the native vegetation, (2) methylmercury contamination of fish and other wildlife, which poses a potential threat to human health, (3) changes in the natural flow of water in the region, resulting in more frequent drying of wetlands, loss of organic soils, and a reduction in freshwater flow to Florida Bay, (4) hypersalinity, massive algal blooms, and seagrass loss in parts of Florida Bay, and (5) a decrease in wildlife populations, especially those of wading birds. This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project focuses on the role of organic-rich sediments (peat) of South Florida wetlands in regulating the concentrations and impact of important chemical species in the environment. The cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in peat is an important factor in the regulation of water quality in the South Florida wetlands ecosystem. These elements are central to many of the contamination issues facing South Florida wetlands, such as nutrient enrichment, mercury toxicity, and loss of peat. Many important chemical and biological reactions occur in peat and control the fate of chemical species in wetlands. Wetland scientists often refer to these reactions as biogeochemical processes, because they are chemical reactions usually mediated by microorganisms in a geological environment. An understanding of the biogeochemical processes in peat of South Florida wetlands will provide a basis for evaluating the

  13. Regional Haze Evolved from Peat Fires - an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuqi; Rein, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    This work provides an overview of haze episodes, their cause, emissions and health effects found in the scientific literature. Peatlands, the terrestrial ecosystems resulting from the accumulation of partially decayed vegetation, become susceptible to smouldering fires because of natural droughts or anthropogenic-induced drainages. Once ignited, smouldering peat fires persistently consume large amounts of soil carbon in a flameless form. It is estimated that the average annual carbon gas emissions (mainly CO2 and CO) from peat fires are equivalent to 15% of manmade emissions, representing influential perturbation of global carbon circle. In addition to carbon emissions, smouldering peat fires emit substantial quantities of heterogeneous smoke, which is responsible for haze phenomena, has not yet been fully studied. Peat-fire-derived smoke is characterized by high concentration of particulate matter (PM), ranging from nano-scale ultrafine fraction (PM1, particle diameter smoke could be blocked due to the stagnant weather condition, and then low buoyant smoke plume could accumulate and migrate long distances, leading to regional haze. Apart from air quality deterioration, haze leads to severe reduction in visibility, which strongly affects local transportation, construction, tourism and agriculture-based industries. For example, an unprecedented peatland mega-fire burst on the Indonesian islands Kalimantan and Sumatra during the 1997 El-Niño event, resulting in transboundary smoke-haze disaster. Severe haze events continue to appear in Southeast Asia every few years due to periodical peat fires in this region. In addition, smouldering peat fires have been frequently reported in tropical, temperate and boreal regions (Botswana in 2000, North America in 2004, Scotland in 2006 and Central Russia in 2010 et al.), peat-fire-induced haze has become a regional seasonal phenomenon. Exposure to smoky haze results in deleterious physiologic responses, predominantly to the

  14. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  15. KNIME essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    KNIME Essentials is a practical guide aimed at getting the results you want, as quickly as possible.""Knime Essentials"" is written for data analysts looking to quickly get up to speed using the market leader in data processing tools, KNIME. No knowledge of KNIME is required, but we will assume that you have some background in data processing.

  16. The Characteristics of Peats and Co2 Emission Due to Fire in Industrial Plant Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnaningsih, Ambar Tri; Rayahu Prasytaningsih, Sri

    2017-12-01

    Riau Province has a high threat to forest fire in peat soils, especially in industrial forest areas. The impact of fires will produce carbon (CO2) emissions in the atmosphere. The magnitude of carbon losses from the burning of peatlands can be estimated by knowing the characteristics of the fire peat and estimating CO2 emissions produced. The objectives of the study are to find out the characteristics of fire-burning peat, and to estimate carbon storage and CO2 emissions. The location of the research is in the area of industrial forest plantations located in Bengkalis Regency, Riau Province. The method used to measure peat carbon is the method of lost in ignation. The results showed that the research location has a peat depth of 600-800 cm which is considered very deep. The Peat fiber content ranges from 38 to 75, classified as hemic peat. The average bulk density was 0.253 gram cm-3 (0.087-0,896 gram cm-3). The soil ash content is 2.24% and the stored peat carbon stock with 8 meter peat thickness is 10723,69 ton ha-1. Forest fire was predicted to burn peat to a depth of 100 cm and produced CO2 emissions of 6,355,809 tons ha-1.

  17. The effects of salinization on aerobic and anaerobic decomposition and mineralization in peat meadows : the roles of peat type and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-01-01

    Peat soils comprise a large part of the western and northern Netherlands. Drainage for agriculture has caused increased soil aeration which has stimulated decomposition and, hence, soil subsidence, currently amounting to 1-2 cm/yr. River water is supplied to these peat areas in summer to prevent

  18. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  19. Pollution abatement with peat onsite wastewater treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.L. (University of Maine, Orano, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of onsite wastewater treatment is to provide economical removal of dissolved nutrients, pathogens and other contaminates from septic tank effluent to avoid the pollution of groundwater or creation of other health hazards. The effective use of conventional soil adsorption systems is limited by a number of factors including site characteristics, soil type and condition, and the proximity of the system to surface waters or a source of potable water. On adverse sites, where the use of conventional subsurface soil adsorption systems does not provide acceptable levels of treatment, Sphagnum peat may be used as an economical method of onsite wastewater treatment. The peat system, when properly designed and constructed, is relatively simple to install, requires minimal energy and maintenance, and provides a high quality effluent without additional disinfection. 19 refs.

  20. Circumstances surrounding the First Colony peat-to-methanol project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-11-10

    On December 13, 1982, the Chairman of the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation signed a letter of intent to favorably recommend to the Board of Directors the initial award of up to $465 million in loan and price guarantees for a project to produce 60 million gallons per year of methanol fuel from North Carolina peat lands. The project is scheduled to start production by December 1986 and will be situated on a 15,000 acre tract of peat land near Creswell, North Carolina. GAO addresses questions regarding this project, including the legal authority for the letter of intent. Corporation staff recommendations against federal backing of the project, specific criticisms of the project by North Carolina environmentalists, and the justification for the project's receiving Corporation price guarantees.

  1. Multifractal Characterization of Pore Size Distributions of Peat Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Sampurno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a multifractal analysis of the microscopic structure of peat soil. The aim of this study was to apply the multifractal technique to analyze the properties of five slices of peat soil (L1-L5. Binary images (220 x 220 pixels, with a conversion value of 9.41 μm/pixel were made from the thin slices and then analyzed. This analysis was conducted to obtain the relationship between physical parameters and complexity parameters. The results showed that the spectrum of f(α can describe well the pore size distribution and average size of pores correlated with the value of D(0. A high value of the average pore size is followed by a low D value and vice versa.

  2. [The release of biologically active compounds from peat peloids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    This work had the objective to study kinetics of the release of flavonoides from peat peloid compositions containing extracts of medicinal herbs in model systems.The key parameters of the process are defined. The rate of liberation of flavonoides is shown to depend on their initial concentration in the compositions being used. The influence of the flavonoide composition of the tested extracts and dimethylsulfoxide on the release of biologically active compounds contained in the starting material in the model environment is estimated. The possibility of the layer-by-layer deposition of the compositions and peat peloids in order to increase the efficacy of flavonoide release from the starting composition and to ensure more rational utilization of the extracts of medicinal plants is demonstrated.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cryogenic peat plateaus of northeastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, A. V.; Kaverin, D. A.; Gabov, D. N.

    2017-07-01

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in peat plateaus at the southern boundary of the permafrost zone in northeastern Europe, where degradation of permafrost occurs because of climate warming, has been studied by high-performance liquid chromatography in gradient mode. PAH concentrations vary from 150 to 3700 ng/g with their average content of about 1500 ± 1000 ng/g. The variation of data is primarily due to the large contribution of heavy PAHs.

  4. Development of an underdrained peat production field; Salaojitetun tuotantokentaen kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillebrand, K.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the study is to examine the possibilities to improve the drainage of a peat production field using a numerical groundwater model. The effects of the ditch spacing and the drainage method on the groundwater level are studied. The way of ditching for basic drainage of virgin peatland, and the calculation of possible additional ditching in peat production fields, including the shallow areas, are considered. Also, the possibility of increasing the customary ditch spacing of 20 m is examined. The objective for drainage techniques is to cut the time for peatland preparation in half, and to increase the space between open field ditches from the present 20 meters to 60 - 80 meters by making use of underdrains. In this way it is possible to reduce the peat production costs about 5%. In 1995 the numerical groundwater model has been validated at Pajusuo drainage area. According to the comparison of the groundwater level calculated with the model and measured at Pajusuo, the agreement was very satisfactory. Uncertainty in the calculations derived mainly from the difficulties of assessing the pF curve and the hydraulic conductivity of the soil, as well as the water-carrying capacity of the mole drains. In general one can predict the groundwater level with an accuracy of +- 10 cm. Also the possibility to increase the hydraulic conductivity of peat by a chemical additive was studied. Adding 3 kg chemical per 1 kg dry matter it was possible to increase the hydraulic conductivity over twenty fold. In this way it is possible to construct vertical underdrains to improve the infiltration after rainfall

  5. Astronomy essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Brass, Charles O

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Astronomy includes the historical perspective of astronomy, sky basics and the celestial coordinate systems, a model and the origin of the solar system, the sun, the planets, Kepler'

  6. Topology essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2013-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Topology includes an overview of elementary set theory, relations and functions, ordinals and cardinals, topological spaces, continuous functions, metric spaces and normed spaces, co

  7. Contribution of peat fires to the 2015 Indonesian fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Johannes W.; Heil, Angelika; Wooster, Martin J.; van der Werf, Guido R.

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia experienced widespread fires and severe air quality degradation due to smoke during September and October 2015. The fires are thought to have originated from the combination of El-Niño-induced drought and human activities. Fires ignited for land clearing escaped into drained peatlands and burned until the onset of the monsoonal rain. In addition to the health impact, these fires are thought to have emitted large amounts of greenhouse gases, e.g. more than Japan over the entire year. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) has detected and quantified the fires with the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) and the smoke dispersion with the Chemistry-Integrated Forecasting System (C-IFS) in near real time. GFAS and C-IFS are constrained by satellite-based observations of fire and smoke constituents, respectively. The distinction between peat and above-ground fires is a crucial and difficult step in fire emission estimation as it introduces errors of up to one order of magnitude. Here, we quantify the contribution of peat fires to the total emission flux of the 2015 Indonesian fires by (1) using an improved peat map in GFAS and (2) analysing the observed diurnal cycle of the fire activity as represented in a new development for GFAS. Furthermore, we link the fires occurrence to economic activity by analysing the coincidence with concessions for palm oil plantations and other industrial forest uses.

  8. Carbon dioxide emission from raised bog surface after peat extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turbiak Janusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on CO2 emission from a raised bog after completion of peat extraction was performed in 2011–2013. CO2 emissions were determined by the chamber method. Twenty years after the termination of peat extraction, the bog surface was almost entirely devoid of plants. CO2 emission from the bog varied depending on temperature and water conditions and was 418 mg·m−2·h−1 on average during the research period. CO2 losses on the raised bog were on average 19.7 Mg·ha−1·year−1 during the research period which corresponded to a carbon loss of 5.37 Mg·ha−1·year−1 or mineralisation of 9.6 Mg·ha−1·year−1 of organic mass of 56% carbon content. It is possible to reduce organic mass losses and CO2 emission to the atmosphere from the bog surface after peat extraction has been terminated by reconstruction of initial water conditions, i.e. retaining a high ground water level and restoration of aquatic plant communities.

  9. Interactions between Nitrogen Fixation and Methane Cycling in Northern Minnesota Peat Bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M. J.; Gaby, J. C.; Lin, X.; Morton, P. L.; Kostka, J. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands cover only 3% of the Earth's surface, yet store a third of soil carbon. Increasing global temperatures have the potential to change peatlands from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. N is a limiting nutrient in oligotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peatlands and biological N2 fixation likely supplies a significant but unknown fraction of N inputs. Moreover, environmental controls on diazotrophic community composition in N-limited peatlands are poorly constrained. Thus, improved understanding of feedbacks between the CH4 and N cycles is critical for predicting future changes to CH4 flux from peat bogs. We coupled measurements of N2 fixation activity measured by the acetylene (C2H2) reduction assay (ARA) with molecular analyses of expression and diversity of nifH genes encoding the molybdenum (Mo)-containing nitrogenase from two peat bogs in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA. The top 10 cm of peat was sampled from the high CH4 flux S1 bog and the low CH4 flux Zim bog in April and June 2014. Despite similar N concentrations in the top 10 cm of both bogs (0.5-1.0 μM NO2-+NO3- and 2-3 μM NH4+), the S1 bog displayed variable ARA activity (1-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1) whereas the Zim bog had consistently low ARA activity (hollows with higher moisture content incubated without O2 in the light (20-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Dissolved Fe (1-25 μM) was higher in hollow vs. hummock samples, and at S1 vs. Zim bog, while dissolved V (4-14 nM) was consistently higher than Mo (1-4 nM), suggesting that alternative V or Fe-containing nitrogenases might be present in these bogs. In contrast, Cu, an essential micronutrient for aerobic methanotrophs, was higher in hummocks (25-48 nM) than hollows (6-17 nM). The facultative methanotroph Methylocella was the dominant diazotroph in the S1 bog based on high throughput next generation sequencing of nifH cDNA amplicons. Given previous reports of C2H2 inhibition of methanotrophy, we measured CH4 consumption in the

  10. An analytical protocol for the determination of total mercury concentrations in solid peat samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos-Barraclough, F; Givelet, N; Martinez-Cortizas, A

    2002-01-01

    Traditional peat sample preparation methods such as drying at high temperatures and milling may be unsuitable for Hg concentration determination in peats due to the possible presence of volatile Hg species, which could be lost during drying. Here, the effects of sample preparation and natural....... A comparison of two Hg profiles from an Arctic peat core, measured in frozen samples and in air-dried samples, revealed that no Hg losses occurred upon air-drying. A comparison of Hg concentrations in several plant species that make up peat, showed that some species (Pinus mugo, Sphagnum recurvum...... concentration in individual peat slices. Several subsamples from each peat slice are air dried, combined and measured for Hg using the AMA254, using a program of 30 s (drying), 125 s (decomposition) and 45 s (waiting). Bulk density and water content measurements are performed on every slice using separate...

  11. Palaeoecology of Holocene peat deposits from Nordvestø, north-west Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Ole; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Heinemeier, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Two extensive peat deposits on Nordvestø, between Greenland and Canada, were examined for macroscopic remains of plants and animals. One of the peat deposits accumulated during the period from c. 7,100 to 5,100 cal. years BP. This peat is guanogenic and completely dominated by the coprophilous...... bryophyte Aplodon wormskioldii, and also contains frequent remains of feathers. The peat formed close to a large former sea bird colony, probably a puffin (Fratercula arctica) colony. Puffins are now rare in the region, but the population may have been larger during the mid Holocene, when the sea was ice......-free for a longer period than at present. The other peat deposit is dated to c. 9,300-7,400 cal. years BP, it is minerogenic and the macrofossils reflect deposition in a shallow, richly vegetated pond. This peat formed during warmer summers than at present....

  12. Carbohydrates and phenols as quantitative molecular vegetation proxies in peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, K.; Benner, R. H.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation in peatlands is intricately linked to local environmental conditions and climate. Here we use chemical analyses of carbohydrates and phenols to reconstruct paleovegetation in peat cores collected from 56.8°N (SIB04), 58.4°N (SIB06), 63.8°N (G137) and 66.5°N (E113) in the Western Siberian Lowland. Lignin phenols (vanillyl and syringyl phenols) were sensitive biomarkers for vascular plant contributions and provided additional information on the relative contributions of angiosperm and gymnosperm plants. Specific neutral sugar compositions allowed identification of sphagnum mosses, sedges (Cyperaceae) and lichens. Hydroxyphenols released by CuO oxidation were useful tracers of sphagnum moss contributions. The three independent molecular proxies were calibrated with a diverse group of peat-forming plants to yield quantitative estimates (%C) of vascular plant, sphagnum moss and lichen contributions in peat core samples. Correlation analysis indicated the three molecular proxies produced fairly similar results for paleovegetation compositions, generally within the error interval of each approach (≤26%). The lignin-based method generally lead to higher estimates of vascular plant vegetation. Several significant deviations were also observed due to different reactivities of carbohydrate and phenolic polymers during peat decomposition. Rapid vegetation changes on timescales of 50-200 years were observed in the southern cores SIB04 and SIB06 over the last 2000 years. Vanillyl and syringyl phenol ratios indicated these vegetation changes were largely due to varying inputs of angiosperm and gymnosperm plants. The northern permafrost cores G137 and E113 showed a more stable development. Lichens briefly replaced sphagnum mosses and vascular plants in both of these cores. Shifts in vegetation did not correlate well with Northern hemisphere climate variability over the last 2000 years. This suggested that direct climate forcing of peatland dynamics was overridden

  13. Substrate quality and nutrient availability influence CO2 production from tropical peat decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swails, E.; Jaye, D.; Verchot, L. V.; Hergoualc'h, K.; Wahyuni, N. S.; Borchard, N.; Lawrence, D.

    2015-12-01

    In Indonesia, peatlands are a major and growing source of greenhouse gas emissions due to increasing pressure from oil palm and pulp wood plantations. We are using a combination of field measures, laboratory experiments, and remote sensing to investigate relationships among land use, climatic factors and biogeochemical controls, and their influence on trace gas fluxes from tropical peat soils. Analysis of soils collected from peat sites on two major islands indicated substantial variation in peat substrate quality and nutrient content among land uses and geographic location. We conducted laboratory incubations to test the influence of substrate quality and nutrient availability on CO2 production from peat decomposition. Differences in peat characteristics attributable to land use change were tested by comparison of forest and oil palm peat samples collected from the same peat dome in Kalimantan. Regional differences in peat characteristics were tested by comparison of samples from Sumatra with samples from Kalimantan. We conducted additional experiments to test the influence of N and P availability and labile carbon on CO2 production. Under moisture conditions typical of oil palm plantations, CO2 production was higher from peat forest samples than from oil palm samples. CO2 production from Sumatra and Kalimantan oil palm samples was not different, despite apparent differences in nutrient content of these soils. N and P treatments representative of fertilizer application rates raised CO2 production from forest samples but not oil palm samples. Labile carbon treatments raised CO2 production in all samples. Our results suggest that decomposition of peat forest soils is nutrient limited, while substrate quality controls decomposition of oil palm soils post-conversion. Though fertilizer application could accelerate peat decomposition initially, fertilizer application may not influence long-term CO2 emissions from oil palm on peat.

  14. Retention of nitrogen and phosphorous from liquid swine and poultry manures using highly characterized peats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuti, Anthony M; Cohen, Arthur D; Hunt, Patrick G; Ellison, Aprel Q

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports on research designed to test the hypothesis that differences in peat composition will cause differences in amounts of N and P retained during contact with liquid swine manure (LSM) and liquid poultry manure (LPM). Peat types representing a wide range of properties were tested in order to establish which chemical and physical properties might be most indicative of their capacities to retain N and P from LSM and LPM. Eight-percent slurries (peat/LSM and peat/LPM) were measured for total nitrogen (TKN) and total phosphorous (TP) after 6, 24 and 96 hours. Tests were done to determine the TKN and TP contents of these peats, the LSM, and the LPM, both before and after they were mixed together. The N and P retention results revealed that most peats worked reasonably well at retaining N and P from either LSM or LPM. However, some peats were more effective than others. These peats also decreased the N and P levels in the liquid portion of the LSM. Peats with higher N retention capacities tended to have lower ash contents, but higher macroporosities and total cellulose contents. Peats with higher P retention capacities tended to have lower bulk densities, ash contents, total guaiacyl lignins contents, fulvic acids contents, but higher microporosities, macroporosities, H contents, and total cellulose contents. Peats with higher N and P retention capacities also had humic acid contents between 5-7%. The results of this study suggest that if these peats are used to reduce odors and N and P contamination, possible byproducts could be the production of odorless fertilizers.

  15. Population density of red langurs in Sabangau tropical peat-swamp forest, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers Smith, David A; Ehlers Smith, Yvette C

    2013-08-01

    Because of the large-scale destruction of Borneo's rainforests on mineral soils, tropical peat-swamp forests (TPSFs) are increasingly essential for conserving remnant biodiversity, particularly in the lowlands where the majority of habitat conversion has occurred. Consequently, effective strategies for biodiversity conservation are required, which rely on accurate population density and distribution estimates as a baseline. We sought to establish the first population density estimates of the endemic red langur (Presbytis rubicunda) in Sabangau TPSF, the largest remaining contiguous lowland forest-block on Borneo. Using Distance sampling principles, we conducted line transect surveys in two of Sabangau's three principle habitat sub-classes and calculated group density at 2.52 groups km⁻² (95% CI 1.56-4.08) in the mixed-swamp forest sub-class. Based on an average recorded group size of 6.95 individuals, population density was 17.51 ind km⁻², the second highest density recorded in this species. The accessible area of the tall-interior forest, however, was too disturbed to yield density estimates representative of the entire sub-class, and P. rubicunda was absent from the low-pole forest, likely as a result of the low availability of the species' preferred foods. This absence in 30% of Sabangau's total area indicates the importance of in situ population surveys at the habitat-specific level for accurately informing conservation strategies. We highlight the conservation value of TPSFs for P. rubicunda given the high population density and large areas remaining, and recommend 1) quantifying the response of P. rubicunda to the logging and burning of its habitats; 2) surveying degraded TPSFs for viable populations, and 3) effectively delineating TPSF sub-class boundaries from remote imagery to facilitate population estimates across the wider peat landscape, given the stark contrast in densities found across the habitat sub-classes of Sabangau. © 2013 Wiley

  16. Peat soil composition as indicator of plants growth environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormets, M.; Tonutare, T.; Kauer, K.; Szajdak, L.; Kolli, R.

    2009-04-01

    Exhausted milled peat areas have been left behind as a result of decades-lasting intensive peat production in Estonia and Europe. According to different data there in Estonia is 10 000 - 15 000 ha of exhausted milled peat areas that should be vegetated. Restoration using Sphagnum species is most advantageous, as it creates ecological conditions closest to the natural succession towards a natural bog area. It is also thought that the large scale translocation of vegetation from intact bogs, as used in some Canadian restoration trials, is not applicable in most of European sites due to limited availability of suitable donor areas. Another possibility to reduce the CO2 emission in these areas is their use for cultivation of species that requires minimum agrotechnical measures exploitation. It is found by experiments that it is possible to establish on Vaccinium species for revegetation of exhausted milled peat areas. Several physiological activity of the plant is regulated by the number of phytohormones. These substances in low quantities move within the plant from a site of production to a site of action. Phytohormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is formed in soils from tryptophane by enzymatic conversion. This compound seems to play an important function in nature as result to its influence in regulation of plant growth and development. A principal feature of IAA is its ability to affect growth, development and health of plants. This compound activates root morphology and metabolic changes in the host plant. The physiological impact of this substance is involved in cell elongation, apical dominance, root initiation, parthenocarpy, abscission, callus formation and the respiration. The investigation areas are located in the county of Tartu (58˚ 22' N, 26˚ 43' E), in the southern part of Estonia. The soil of the experimental fields belongs according to the WRB soil classification, to the soils subgroups of Fibri-Dystric Histosols. The investigation areas were

  17. Modelling methane ebullition from sub-tropical peat reveals the importance of pore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jorge; Wright, William; Comas, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential much greater than carbon dioxide, and one of the major sources of naturally occurring CH4 are peatlands. Large amounts of CH4 can be transported from peat to the atmosphere through bubbles (ebullition). Sources of CH4 from tropical/subtropical peats may have an important role in mediating the Earth's climate and predicting present and future bubble emissions from these peat soils is necessary. Numerical modeling offers the possibility to quantitatively investigate ebullition, and much progress has been made in predicting bubble dynamics using modeling approaches with various levels of physical rigour and process complexity. Here in this study we present a simple model that is able to reproduce the process of CH4 bubble loss from peat. The model includes a spatially-explicit representation of the peat pore structure and replicates bubble accumulation, storage, and release within peat. In this study the model of ebullition was setup to replicate field scale datasets collected using hydrogeophysical methods describing observed CH4 accumulation and ebullition from subtropical peat soils in the Florida Everglades, USA. This study demonstrates: 1) the predictive potential of numerical modelling to describe biogenic gas dynamics in peat soils; 2) the importance of combining modelling with "real" datasets; and 3) the importance of peat structure as a control for gas storage and subsequent ebullition.

  18. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 6. Peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    The requirements and potential for development of US peat resources for energy use are reviewed. Factors analyzed include the occurrence and properties of major peat deposits; technologies for extraction, dewatering, preparation, combustion, and conversion of peat to solid, liquid, or gaseous fuels; environmental, regulatory, and market constraints; and research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) needs. Based on a review of existing research efforts, recommendations are made for a comprehensive national RD and D program to enhance the use of peat as an energy source.

  19. Change in peat coverage in Danish cultivated soils during the past 35 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2014-01-01

    .35. Results revealed there has been a total areal coverage loss of 35%(37,786 ha) of the Danish organic cultivated wetlands during a period of 35 years (map 1975 had 107,962-ha coverage of peat). The peat depletion is related to peat mining and agricultural drainage/tillage activities, rather than natural...... protocol) across the cultivated wetlands of Denmark and compares this actual map to a historical 1975 peat coverage map using simple indicator kriging. For the contemporary peatland mapping, extensive soil sampling databases consisting of 42,568points with 32,817 historical samples and 9,751 contemporary...

  20. Diagenesis of sulphur in a peat forming environment: a case study from Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senaratne, A.; Tobschall, H.J.; Dissanayake, C.B. (Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften)

    1990-03-01

    The sulphur geochemistry of the Muthurajawela peat deposit in Sri Lanka was studied. Due to the reducing conditions prevailing within the peat bog, sulphur was mainly in the sulphide form and almost all of the iron in the peat was in the form of iron sulphide. By releasing organically bound sulphur, the organic matter contributed significantly to the content of sulphur required for pyrite formation. It was found that the pyrite distribution in the peat bog did not depend on the depth of the organic matter, but on the state of decomposition. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Ecology of the peat-bogs of Quebec-Labrador; Ecologie des tourbieres du Quebec-Labrador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payette, S.; Rochefort, L. (comps.)

    2001-07-01

    The 24 chapters are arranged into five parts. The structure of peat bogs covers physical and geographical environment, types of peat bogs, mosses, vegetation gradients, hydrology, diversity and distribution of birds, and arthropods. Functioning of peat bogs describes biochemical processes, gases emitted, drainage, climate change, glaciation; and organic sols. Fossil analysis, morphology, entomology, pollen, diatoms, and ligneous fossils are discussed in the section on methods for bog reconstitution. In the evolution of peat bogs in the Holocene, stratigraphy and paleohydrology are described. The utilization of peat bogs contains chapters on history of the landscape transformed by harvesting, economics and value of peat, agricultural use of bogs, forestry, restoration, and conservation. 2000 refs.

  2. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A.; Cox, J. D.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    Saturable absorption is a nonperturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a semianalytical nonperturbative single-particle approach, describing electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics nonperturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. We obtain results in qualitative agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations of graphene nanoribbons including electron-electron interactions, finite-size, and higher-band effects. Remarkably, such effects are found to affect mainly the linear absorption, while the predicted saturation intensities are in good quantitative agreement in the limit of extended graphene. Additionally, we find that the modulation depth of saturable absorption in graphene can be electrically manipulated through an externally applied gate voltage. Our results are relevant for the development of graphene-based optoelectronic devices, as well as for applications in mode-locking and random lasers.

  3. Impact of Reed Canary Grass Cultivation and Mineral Fertilisation on the Microbial Abundance and Genetic Potential for Methane Production in Residual Peat of an Abandoned Peat Extraction Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikk Espenberg

    Full Text Available This study examined physiochemical conditions and prokaryotic community structure (the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA gene abundances and proportions, and evaluated the effect of reed canary grass cultivation and mineral fertilisation on these factors, in the 60 cm thick residual peat layer of experimental plots located on an abandoned peat extraction area. The archaeal proportion was 0.67-39.56% in the prokaryotic community and the methanogens proportion was 0.01-1.77% in the archaeal community. When bacterial abundance was higher in the top 20 cm of peat, the archaea were more abundant in the 20-60 cm layer and methanogens in the 40-60 cm layer of the residual peat. The bacterial abundance was significantly increased, but archaeal abundance was not affected by cultivation. The fertiliser application had a slight effect on peat properties and on archaeal and methanogen abundances in the deeper layer of cultivated peat. The CH4 emission was positively related to mcrA abundance in the 20-60 cm of the bare peat, while in case of reed canary grass cultivation these two parameters were not correlated. Reed canary grass cultivation mitigated CH4 emission, although methanogen abundance remained approximately the same or even increased in different layers of residual peat under cultivated sites over time. This study supports the outlook of using abandoned peat extraction areas to produce reed canary grass for energy purposes as an advisable land-use practice from the perspective of atmospheric impact in peatland-rich Northern Europe.

  4. Impact of Reed Canary Grass Cultivation and Mineral Fertilisation on the Microbial Abundance and Genetic Potential for Methane Production in Residual Peat of an Abandoned Peat Extraction Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenberg, Mikk; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Maddison, Martin; Nõlvak, Hiie; Järveoja, Järvi; Mander, Ülo

    This study examined physiochemical conditions and prokaryotic community structure (the bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes and mcrA gene abundances and proportions), and evaluated the effect of reed canary grass cultivation and mineral fertilisation on these factors, in the 60 cm thick residual peat layer of experimental plots located on an abandoned peat extraction area. The archaeal proportion was 0.67-39.56% in the prokaryotic community and the methanogens proportion was 0.01-1.77% in the archaeal community. When bacterial abundance was higher in the top 20 cm of peat, the archaea were more abundant in the 20-60 cm layer and methanogens in the 40-60 cm layer of the residual peat. The bacterial abundance was significantly increased, but archaeal abundance was not affected by cultivation. The fertiliser application had a slight effect on peat properties and on archaeal and methanogen abundances in the deeper layer of cultivated peat. The CH4 emission was positively related to mcrA abundance in the 20-60 cm of the bare peat, while in case of reed canary grass cultivation these two parameters were not correlated. Reed canary grass cultivation mitigated CH4 emission, although methanogen abundance remained approximately the same or even increased in different layers of residual peat under cultivated sites over time. This study supports the outlook of using abandoned peat extraction areas to produce reed canary grass for energy purposes as an advisable land-use practice from the perspective of atmospheric impact in peatland-rich Northern Europe.

  5. Essential Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    The secret to teaching may be as simple as asking students good questions--and then giving them the opportunity to find the answers. The author shares how he uses essential questions that set the class off on an inquiry. Rather than consuming information that he distributes and then repeating it on a test, students carry out their own…

  6. Essential AOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Fraine, Bruno; Ernst, Erik; Südholt, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Aspect-oriented programming (AOP) has produced interesting language designs, but also ad hoc semantics that needs clarification. We contribute to this clarification with a calculus that models essential AOP, both simpler and more general than existing formalizations. In AOP, advice may intercept ...

  7. Highcharts essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Shahid, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web developer with a basic knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript and want to quickly get started with this web charting technology, this is the book for you. This book will also serve as an essential guide to those who have probably used a similar library and are now looking at migrating to Highcharts.

  8. Swift essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Whether you are a seasoned Objective-C developer or new to the Xcode platform, Swift Essentials will provide you with all you need to know to get started with the language. Prior experience with iOS development is not necessary, but will be helpful to get the most out of the book.

  9. The effect of peat swamp forest degradation on greenhouse gas fluxes in the Peruvian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Jeffrey; Hergoualc'h, Kristell; Verchot, Louis; van Groeningen, Jan Willem; Oenema, Oene

    2017-04-01

    Carbon-dense peat swamp forests in Peru are recurrently harvested for M. flexuosa fruits, which is typically performed by cutting down entire palms. This research aimed to evaluate how biogeochemical cycles are affected by this type of forest degradation. Total soil respiration (Rs), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), CH4 and N2O fluxes, litterfall and environmental parameters were monitored monthly for two years in an undisturbed (UD), a moderately disturbed (MD), and a highly degraded site (HD). The experimental setup entailed measurements in hollows and hummocks with standing live or dead palms. Rh rates were higher in hummocks than in hollows (UD: 25.9±0.5 and 17.5±0.3, MD: 14.1±1.3 and 12.4±1.2, HD: 26.8±4.7 and 18.8±3.0 kg C-CO2 ha-1 d-1, respectively). Unexpectedly, CH4 fluxes did not vary significantly between hummocks and hollows, whereas N2O fluxes followed the same trend as Rh. GHG fluxes from hummocks with a standing live or a standing dead palm were similar. However, degradation did reduce the relative hummock area (relative areas: 18, 10 and 4% for UD, MD, and HD, respectively). As a result, the overall weighted average Rh in the MD site (12.4±1.6 kg C-CO2 ha-1 d-1) was lower than the UD one (18.4±1.0 kg C-CO2 ha-1 d-1), while litter input was higher (12.2±0.3 and 9.3±0.4 kg d.w. ha-1 d-1in the MD and UD, respectively). The HD site exhibited Rh (17.5±1.2 kg C-CO2 ha-1 d-1) and litter input (9.4±0.2 kg d.w. ha-1 d-1) rates similar to those of the UD site. CH4 fluxes were 0.75±0.10, 0.62±0.08, 0.89±0.05 kg C-CH4 ha-1 d-1 and N2O fluxes 1.7±0.2, 1.2±0.1, 2.0±0.3 g N-N2O ha-1 d-1 in the UD, MD and HD site, respectively. These findings suggest that differentiating hummocks and hollows in GHG flux assessments and accounting for changes in relative hummock areas are essential for evaluating degradation impacts on peat C and N cycling in Amazonian peat swamp forests. These results contribute to building knowledge on emission factors for

  10. Experimental evaluation of drainage filters sealing in peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzorov Aleksandr Leonidovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with research results of the sealing of pores in drainage filters by organic particles. Permeability tests were carried out with the constant gradient 1.5. The water flow through the sample of soil was top-down.The tests were carried out with 2 types of samples: the first part of samples had layers (from up to down 300 mm peat and 2 layers of geotextile, the second part consisted of 250 mm peat, 200 mm fine sand and 2 layers of geotextile. Well decomposed peatsamples were used. Peat had the following characteristics: density is 1,05...1,06 g/cm3, specific density — 1,53...1,56 g/cm3, void ratio — 12,0...12,5. The duration of each test was 15 days. During testing the hydraulic conductivity of samples was decreased by 1.3...1.9.After completing the tests the hydraulic conductivity of sand and geotextile were measured. The content of organic matter in geotextile and fine sand was determined as well. Dry mass of organic matter in the first layer of geotextile in the first type of samples were 1,0…1,3 g per 75 cm2. The organic matter in the second layer of geotextile in the first type of samples and in the first layer of geotextile in the second type wasn’t exposed. Fine sands protected the drainage geotextile as a result of sealing of pore space of sands by organic matter.

  11. Diatoms in peat – dominant producers in a changing environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokfelt, Ulla; Struyf, Eric; Randsalu, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Changes in hydrology and temperature can induce rapid changes in boreal wetland ecosystems. Factors such as hydrosere, permafrost, climate and human interference may disturb the prevailing mire vegetation, whereby a new dominant assemblage can develop. At the transition from one vegetation type...... to another, the old vegetation may be suppressed, die out or start to decay, and some time may pass until a new mire vegetation is fully established. Here, we demonstrate that diatoms may thrive during such transitions, creating isolated and shallow peat layers with significantly elevated biogenic silica...

  12. Towards sustainable ecological networks of peat bogs in central Russia; development of local environmental action program (LEAP) as a practical tool for protection and restoration of peat bogs in Egorievsk sub region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butovsky, R.O.; Reijnen, R.; Bondartchuk, E.A.; Otchagov, D.M.; Melik-Bagdasarov, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    In central and northern Meshera the habitats for many characteristic peat bog species now show a very fragmented pattern. As a result, the potential for viable populations of characteristic peat bog species has decreased considerably. Peat-mining and other human influences are the most important

  13. Potential Carbon Losses From Peat Profiles: Effects of Temperature, Drought Cycles, and Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Edward H; Lieffers, Victor J; Wein, Ross W

    1992-08-01

    Global warming and the resultant increase in evapotranspiration might lead to lowered water tables in peatlands and an increase in fire frequency. The objective of this study was to investigate some of the potential effects of these changes on peat decomposition. Dry mass losses and emissions of CO2 and CH4 from peat samples taken from three depth layers (0-10, 10-20, and 30-40 cm) of a black spruce peatland were measured in the laboratory at 8°, 16°, and 24°C under two moisture treatments. Effects of deep peat fire on decomposition were also simulated by burning the upper layer (0-10 cm) of peat and adding the ash to peat samples from the 10-20 cm layer. CH4 release averaged decomposition of samples exposed to drying cycles but had little effect on decomposition of continuously flooded samples. Ash addition had variable effects on CO2 emissions but may have promoted CH4 production. It is suggested that in certain situations, global warming may not cause appreciable increases in carbon loss from peat deposits. The results indicate that some deeper peats are resistant to decay even when exposed to warm, aerobic conditions. However, further experimental work is needed to predict the long-term response of peat deposits to changes in water levels in different peatland types. © 1992 by the Ecological Society of America.

  14. Temperature-Induced Increase in Methane Release from Peat Bogs: A Mesocosm Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winden, J.F.; Reichart, G.J.; McNamara, N.P.; Benthien, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and

  15. Temperature-induced increase in methane release from peat bogs: A mesocosm experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winden, J.F. van; Reichart, G.-J.; McNamara, N.P.; Benthien, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Peat bogs are primarily situated at mid to high latitudes and future climatic change projections indicate that these areas may become increasingly wetter and warmer. Methane emissions from peat bogs are reduced by symbiotic methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs). Higher temperatures and

  16. Emissions of volatile organic compounds and particulate matter from small-scale peat fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution emitted from peat fires can negatively impact regional air quality, visibility, climate, and human health. Peat fires can smolder over long periods of time and, therefore, can release significantly greater amounts of carbon into the atmosphere per unit area compared...

  17. Investigation of bacterial communities in peat land of the Gahai Lake natural conservation area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yani; Wang, Jinchang; Zhan, Zhigao; Guan, Limei; Jin, Liang; Zheng, Guohua

    2017-10-01

    Peat is involved in the global carbon cycle and water conservation; therefore, it is implicated in global environmental change. Microorganisms play an important role in the function of peat. To investigate the bacterial communities in peat of Gahai Lake, different locations and depths were sampled and Illumina Miseq sequencing was used to analyze the microbial community. Chemical properties of peat samples were analyzed by China state standard methods (GB methods). The results showed that bacterial communities were affected by depth, with bacterial diversity and community structure at 90 and 120 cm significantly different from that at 10, 30 and 50 cm depth from the peat surface. Chemical properties of peat land including organic matter, total nitrogen and humus content did not significantly influence bacterial community structure in peat, with only one group from genus Rhizomicrobium that was significantly correlated with total nitrogen. A substantial proportion of the bacterial sequences were unclassified (1.4%), which indicates the great application potential of peat in the Gahai Lake natural conservation area in the future.

  18. Emissions of volatile organic compounds and particulate matter from small-scale peat fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution emitted from peat fires can negatively impact regional air quality, visibility, climate, and human health. Peat fires can smolder over long periods of time and, therefore, can release significantly greater amounts of carbon into the atmosphere per unit area compared...

  19. Peat in horticulture and conservation: the UK response to a changing world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Alexander

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Peat bogs are increasingly recognised as valuable habitats for wildlife and important stores of carbon. Yet the UK horticultural industry relies heavily on peat sourced from bogs in the UK and Republic of Ireland. Environmentalists, government and horticultural businesses in the UK now recognise the environmental consequences of using peat in horticulture, and the industry is turning increasingly to sustainable raw materials. In this paper, the strengths and weaknesses of campaigning since 1990 to implement this change are analysed, with the intention of providing useful information for other countries facing similar challenges. The campaign encountered deeply-ingrained practices so that the shift in behaviour has been slow and, although now widespread, still meets resistance in some quarters. The UK Government introduced targets for peat replacement which have helped stimulate the industry to develop suitable alternatives. The major gardening retailers have included peat replacement targets in their environmental codes of practice, and these are being met through incremental peat dilution with alternative materials such as green compost and processed timber by-products. Legislative requirements for European biodiversity conservation have led the UK government to terminate peat extraction on significant areas of former commercial extraction. The importance of peatlands for carbon sequestration and the major issue of climate change are increasingly focusing attention on peatland conservation, pointing towards the need for a more consistent approach to the use of peat across the European Community.

  20. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, T.; Verwer, C.; Demies, M.; Kaliang, H.; Meer, van der P.J.

    2011-01-01

    VAESSEN T, VERWER C, DEMIES M, KALIANG H & VAN DER MEER PJ. 2011. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia. In this study we assessed the species density and relative abundance of termites in peat land in Sarawak, Malaysia. Termites were

  1. Cardiopulmonary toxicity of peat wildfire particulate matter and the predictive utility of precision cut lung slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Emissions from a large peat fire in North Carolina were associated with increased hospital admissions for asthma and the rate of heart failure in the exposed population. Peat fires often produce larger amounts of smoke and last longer than forest fires, however few st...

  2. Effects of surfactant treatment on the wettability and wetting rate of a Sphagnum peat growing medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Oostindie, K.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a new wetting agent, PsiMATRIC, on the wettability of a Sphagnum peat growing medium. A mixture of Sphagnum peat, perlite and vermiculite treated with 0.26 g of PsiMATRIC per litre was compared with the untreated blend. Water repellency tests (water drop

  3. Oxidation and compaction of a collapsed peat dome in Central Kalimantan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, D.M.; Buurman, P.; Hoekman, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Peat domes in Kalimantan (Indonesia) are reported to loose their dome shape as a result of disturbance such as logging and artificial drainage. The loss of the dome shape can be caused by (a combination of) two major processes: compaction and oxidation. Because natural, undisturbed peat is a major

  4. Production of fuel ethanol from cellulosic peat for future transportation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    The production of bioethanol from peat is proposed. A search of the available : literature yields no prior information on the use of peat as a carbon source for : bioethanol. This proposal addresses the production in the most cost-effective manner : ...

  5. Variability of humic acid properties depending on their precursor material: a study of peat profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of variation of peat composition, presence of trace elements in the peat and HSs within peat profiles can give information on the character of transformation of organic matter, important for C biogeochemical cycling, but also about impacts of climate change and human activities. In peat the transformation and decay process of living organic matter (humification) is retarded by the acidic and anaerobic environment, but at the same time the peat can provide information on environmental and paleo-environmental conditions of the past. The aim of the present study is to analyze the elemental and functional composition, spectral characteristics of humic acids isolated from a well characterized raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the impact of the character of humification processes on the peat HA properties. A comparative and complex characterization of humic acids (HAs) isolated from peat profiles of different origin in Latvia was carried out. Elemental and functional analysis of the isolated HAs was done, their acidity and molecular weights estimated. Spectral characterization included UV-Vis, IR, and electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectra. Structural characterization of HAs was by both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Comparison of position of studied humic acids in the Van Krevelen graph was done, thus locating them in the biogeochemical transformation processes of organic matter. Properties of HAs isolated from the Latvian peat were compared with HA from other sources (soil, water, coal and synthetic humic substances). Major properties of peat HAs depended on their origin, indicating the importance of humification processes. HAs isolated from peat of more recent origin were more similar to soil HAs, but from older sources there was a greater degree of humification. Changes of surface tension of solutions of humic acids stress the differences in aggregation character - ability to form supramacromolecular complexes of humic substances

  6. Preliminary evaluation of environmental issues on the use of peat as an energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.; Richardson, S.; Walters, A.; Boesch, L.; Thomson, W.; Irons, J.

    1980-03-14

    A study to characterize the environmental issues, that would arise from an extensive peat utilization program has been initiated. The objectives of this preliminary report are to: identify the environmental issues and potential problems; examine the significance of issues in the geographical regions where peat use could be developed; and establish a methodology by which issues can be resolved or clarified through future coordinated private, state, and federal programs. An overview of peat development including discussions on conversion technologies, extraction and harvesting procedures, and land reclamation is presented. Environmental concerns are in the areas of water resources and quality, air quality, health and safety issues, solid waste management, and land reclamation. The general environmental issues, resource availability, and attitudes associated with potential peat development in ten states, containing an estimated 90 percent of US peat resources were described. The ten states reviewed are Alaska, Minnesota, Michigan, Maine, North and South Carolina, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, and Louisiana. (DMC)

  7. Score Mining Rents in Terms of Investment Attractiveness of Peat Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Gennady; Yablonev, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    In this article, as determinants in the system factors underlying the investment attractiveness of the peat industry is considered a rental factor, which predetermines the significant differences and peculiarities of the investment climate in the mining business and, in particular, in the sphere of peat mining. In contrast to modern studies treated the essence and role of rents in the economic mechanism, is proposed for a new approach to solving the problems of its formation. Our approach differs in that it, firstly, adequate rental relations, objectively in extractive industries, secondly, provides consensus in the interests of the owner of peat deposits and entrepreneurs, businesses in these deposits and, thus, thirdly, contributes to the creation of a favourable investment climate in the peat extraction industry. In practical terms, in accordance with the proposed approach, we have proposed specific allocation algorithm of mining rents from the profits of peat extraction enterprises.

  8. Energy research program 1978/79-1980/81. Survey of the performance of the peat line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, B.

    1982-09-01

    This critical review presents the projects concerning research, development and demonstration which were completed during the period. Preparation for the production on a large scale and to using peat for firing the boilers of industrial heating centers has started. The amount of available peat supplies has been evaluated and varous methods of peat utilization have been studied. The studies of environmental effects are at a preliminary stage. The infromation seems to be adequate to motivate a use of peat from 6 to 11 TWh the year 1990. A long term estimate of the place of peat in energy systems is not yet possible. The advice from the industry is anticipated. It is recommended that future development should take place by means of an institution. This organisation will take care of national and international information services as well.

  9. Carbon balance of rewetted and drained peat soils used for biomass production: A mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karki, Sandhya; Elsgaard, Lars; Kandel, Tanka

    2016-01-01

    Rewetting of drained peatlands has been recommended to reduce CO2 emissions and to restore the carbon sink function of peatlands. Recently, the combination of rewetting and biomass production (paludiculture) has gained interest as a possible land use option in peatlands for obtaining such benefits...... of lower CO2 emissions without losing agricultural land. The present study quantified the carbon balance (CO2, CH4 and harvested biomass C) of rewetted and drained peat soils under intensively managed reed canary grass (RCG) cultivation. Mesocosms were maintained at five different ground water levels (GWL...... closed chamber methods. The average dry biomass yield was significantly lower from rewetted peat soils (12 Mg ha−1) than drained peat soils (15 Mg ha−1). Also, CO2 fluxes of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) from rewetted peat soils were significantly lower than drained peat...

  10. Deletion of the sclerotome-enriched lncRNA PEAT augments ribosomal protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, David A; Dichmann, Darwin S; Chang, Jessica K; Harland, Richard M

    2017-01-03

    To define a complete catalog of the genes that are activated during mouse sclerotome formation, we sequenced RNA from embryonic mouse tissue directed to form sclerotome in culture. In addition to well-known early markers of sclerotome, such as Pax1, Pax9, and the Bapx2/Nkx3-2 homolog Nkx3-1, the long-noncoding RNA PEAT (Pax1 enhancer antisense transcript) was induced in sclerotome-directed samples. Strikingly, PEAT is located just upstream of the Pax1 gene. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we generated a mouse line bearing a complete deletion of the PEAT-transcribed unit. RNA-seq on PEAT mutant embryos showed that loss of PEAT modestly increases bone morphogenetic protein target gene expression and also elevates the expression of a large subset of ribosomal protein mRNAs.

  11. Uncertainties in peat volume and soil carbon estimated using ground penetrating radar and probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsekian, Andrew D. [Rutgers University; Slater, Lee [Rutgers University; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios [Rutgers University; Nolan, James [Rutgers University; Sebestyen, Stephen D [USDA Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MN; Kolka, Randall K [USDA Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MN; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the uncertainty in calculations of peat basin volume using high-resolution data . to resolve the three-dimensional structure of a peat basin using both direct (push probes) and indirect geophysical (ground penetrating radar) measurements. We compared volumetric estimates from both approaches with values from literature. We identified subsurface features that can introduce uncertainties into direct peat thickness measurements including the presence of woody peat and soft clay or gyttja. We demonstrate that a simple geophysical technique that is easily scalable to larger peatlands can be used to rapidly and cost effectively obtain more accurate and less uncertain estimates of peat basin volumes critical to improving understanding of the total terrestrial carbon pool in peatlands.

  12. Biodiversity on mire ecosystems and drained peatlands - a basis for environmental peat harvesting; Biologisk maangfald paa myrar och dikad torvmark - underlag foer ett miljoemaessigt torvbruk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stedingk, Henrik von (Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-07-01

    biodiversity than not drained peatlands. The plant succession following drainage leads to denser vegetation and dominance of forest plants. Often drainage is followed by forestry, leading to even lower nature conservation values. Conservation values on drained peatlands are rarely studied. Potential environments for nature conservation in drained peatlands are: 1) Areas with little drainage influence and preserved mire function. 2) Late forest successions after drainage with deciduous trees and dead wood. 3) Open pine forest or swamp forest that act as refugia for old growth lichens and wood fungi. 4) Pools and stream like older ditches with running water. An inventory focused on conservation values on drained peatlands is recommended. Peat harvesting causes ecosystem shift and species living on the mire disappear. An estimation of biodiversity effects from peat harvesting must include the lost mire, time of exploitation, as well as the after-treatment. A longer time perspective is therefore required when evaluating consequences of peat harvesting. The development of a broader spectra of after-treatment involving biodiversity is essential, as well as a system that guarantees a long term perspective in after-treatment for biodiversity. Methods for evaluating effects on the landscape level from increased peat harvesting are required. Increased peat harvesting on drained peatlands could be in convergence with the Swedish environmental goals, if choice of site and after-treatment is based on landscape analysis focusing on biodiversity

  13. Evaluation of the influence of mountain peat bogs restoration measures on the groundwater level: case study Rokytka peat bog, the Šumava Mts., Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Doležal

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates measures taken to restore mountain Peat Bogs and their effect on hydrological regime, with the main focus on groundwater levels. The level of groundwater is a key factor in maintaining the character of mountain Peat Bogs and the main objective of restoration is to increase and stabilize the groundwater level in disturbed Peat Bogs. At the same time, the paper provides a complex overview of the topic, which is being often discussed nowadays, mostly due to a big retention potential of mountain Peat Bogs. The paper is based on detailed measurements of groundwater levels in a selected experimental drainage ditch in the catchment of the Rokytka stream. Basic statistical characteristics, the equation of Penman-Montheit or antecedent precipitation index were used to show the dependence of groundwater level on precipitation or evapotranspiration. The results show a positive influence of the restoration measures on Peat Bogs. In this case it has been confirmed that restoration measures cause increase of groundwater level and decrease its fluctuation in the Peat Bog.

  14. Evolution of niche preference in Sphagnum peat mosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew G; Granath, Gustaf; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Pouliot, Remy; Stenøien, Hans K; Rochefort, Line; Rydin, Håkan; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Peat mosses (Sphagnum) are ecosystem engineers-species in boreal peatlands simultaneously create and inhabit narrow habitat preferences along two microhabitat gradients: an ionic gradient and a hydrological hummock-hollow gradient. In this article, we demonstrate the connections between microhabitat preference and phylogeny in Sphagnum. Using a dataset of 39 species of Sphagnum, with an 18-locus DNA alignment and an ecological dataset encompassing three large published studies, we tested for phylogenetic signal and within-genus changes in evolutionary rate of eight niche descriptors and two multivariate niche gradients. We find little to no evidence for phylogenetic signal in most component descriptors of the ionic gradient, but interspecific variation along the hummock-hollow gradient shows considerable phylogenetic signal. We find support for a change in the rate of niche evolution within the genus-the hummock-forming subgenus Acutifolia has evolved along the multivariate hummock-hollow gradient faster than the hollow-inhabiting subgenus Cuspidata. Because peat mosses themselves create some of the ecological gradients constituting their own habitats, the classic microtopography of Sphagnum-dominated peatlands is maintained by evolutionary constraints and the biological properties of related Sphagnum species. The patterns of phylogenetic signal observed here will instruct future study on the role of functional traits in peatland growth and reconstruction. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Metatranscriptomics reveals the hydrolytic potential of peat-inhabiting Planctomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia A; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2017-11-13

    Members of the phylum Planctomycetes are common inhabitants of northern Sphagnum-dominated wetlands. Evidence is accumulating that, in these environments, some planctomycetes may be involved in degrading polymeric organic matter. The experimental data, however, remain scarce due to the low number of characterized representatives of this phylum. In a previous study, we used metatranscriptomics to assess the activity response of peat-inhabiting microorganisms to biopolymers abundantly present in native peat. The community responses to cellulose, xylan, pectin, and chitin availability were analysed relative to unamended controls. Here, we re-analysed these metatranscriptomes and retrieved a total of 1,602,783 rRNA and 35,522 mRNA sequences affiliated with the Planctomycetes. Each of the four polymers induced specific planctomycete responses. These were most pronounced on chitin. The two groups with increased 16S rRNA transcript pools were Gemmata- and Phycisphaera-like planctomycetes. Among uncultivated members of the Planctomycetaceae, two increased transcript pools were detected in pectin-amended samples and belonged to Pirellula-like bacteria. The analysis of taxonomically assigned mRNA reads confirmed the specific response of Gemmata-related planctomycetes to chitin amendment suggesting the presence of chitinolytic capabilities in these bacteria.

  16. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanitsa, Natalya, E-mail: kopanitsa@mail.ru; Sarkisov, Yurij, E-mail: sarkisov@tsuab.ru; Gorshkova, Aleksandra, E-mail: kasatkina.alexandra@gmail.com; Demyanenko, Olga, E-mail: angel-n@sibmail.com [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya sq., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  17. Ground-penetrating radar study of the Rahivere peat bog, eastern Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Plado

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The current case study presents results of the ground-penetrating radar (GPR profiling at one of the Saadjärve drumlin field interstitial troughs, the Rahivere bog, eastern Estonia. The study was conducted in order to identify the bog morphology, and the thickness and geometry of the peat body. The method was also used to describe the applicability of GPR in the evaluation of the peat deposit reserve as the Rahivere bog belongs among the officially registered peat reserves. Fourteen GPR profiles, ~ 100 m apart and oriented perpendicular to the long axis of the depression, covering the bog and its surrounding areas, were acquired. In order to verify the radar image interpretation as well as to evaluate the velocity of electromagnetic waves in peat, a common source configuration was utilized and thirteen boreholes were drilled on the GPR profiles. A mean value of 0.036 m ns–1 corresponding to relative dielectric permittivity of 69.7 was used for the time–depth conversion. Radar images reveal major reflection from the peat–soil interface up to a depth of about 4 m, whereas drillings showed a maximum thickness of 4.5 m of peat. Minor reflections appear from the upper peat and mineral soil. According to the borehole data, undecomposed peat is underlain by decomposed one, but identifying them by GPR is complicated. Mineral soil consists of glaciolimnic silty sand in the peripheral areas of the trough, overlain by limnic clay in the central part. The calculated peat volumes (1 200 000 m3 were found to exceed the earlier estimation (979 000 m3 that was based solely on drilling data. Ground-penetrating radar, as a method that allows mapping horizontal continuity of the sub-peat interface in a non-destructive way, was found to provide detailed information for evaluating peat depth and extent.

  18. Soil carbon dioxide emissions from a rubber plantation on tropical peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhid, Nur; Hirano, Takashi; Okimoto, Yosuke; Nurzakiah, Siti; Nursyamsi, Dedi

    2017-03-01

    Land-use change in tropical peatland potentially results in a large amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions owing to drainage, which lowers groundwater level (GWL) and consequently enhances oxidative peat decomposition. However, field information on carbon balance is lacking for rubber plantations, which are expanding into Indonesia's peatlands. To assess soil CO 2 emissions from an eight-year-old rubber plantation established on peat after compaction, soil CO 2 efflux was measured monthly using a closed chamber system from December 2014 to December 2015, in which a strong El Niño event occurred, and consequently GWL lowered deeply. Total soil respiration (SR) and oxidative peat decomposition (PD) were separately quantified by trenching. In addition, peat surface elevation was measured to determine annual subsidence along with GWL. With GWL, SR showed a negative logarithmic relationship (p0.05). Peat surface elevation varied seasonally in almost parallel with GWL. After correcting for GWL difference, annual total subsidence was determined at 5.64±3.20 and 5.96±0.43cmyr -1 outside and inside the trenching, respectively. Annual subsidence only through peat oxidation that was calculated from the annual PD, peat bulk density and peat carbon content was 1.50cmyr -1 . As a result, oxidative peat decomposition accounted for 25% of total subsidence (5.96cmyr -1 ) on average on an annual basis. The contribution of peat oxidation was lower than those of previous studies probably because of compaction through land preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prezi essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Domi

    2014-01-01

    If you want to learn Prezi, and specifically design within Prezi, this is the book for you. Perhaps you already know a bit about Prezi but have never used it, or perhaps you have used Prezi before but want to learn how to incorporate your own custom design elements. In either case, this book will get you up and running quickly. It would be helpful to have a bit of familiarity with basic design concepts and the use of Prezi, but prior experience is not essential.

  20. Linux Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Roderick W

    2012-01-01

    A unique, full-color introduction to Linux fundamentals Serving as a low-cost, secure alternative to expensive operating systems, Linux is a UNIX-based, open source operating system. Full-color and concise, this beginner's guide takes a learning-by-doing approach to understanding the essentials of Linux. Each chapter begins by clearly identifying what you will learn in the chapter, followed by a straightforward discussion of concepts that leads you right into hands-on tutorials. Chapters conclude with additional exercises and review questions, allowing you to reinforce and measure your underst

  1. Essential SQLAlchemy

    CERN Document Server

    Copeland, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Essential SQLAlchemy introduces a high-level open-source code library that makes it easier for Python programmers to access relational databases such as Oracle, DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQLite. SQLAlchemy has become increasingly popular since its release, but it still lacks good offline documentation. This practical book fills the gap, and because a developer wrote it, you get an objective look at SQLAlchemy's tools rather than an advocate's description of all the "cool" features. SQLAlchemy includes both a database server-independent SQL expression language and an object-relational mappe

  2. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  3. Slow light in saturable absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In connection with the experiments recently achieved on doped crystals, biological samples, doped optical fibers and semiconductor heterostructures, we revisit the theory of the propagation of a pulse-modulated light in a saturable absorber. Explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted pulse are obtained, enabling us to determine the parameters optimizing the time-delay of the transmitted pulse with respect to the incident pulse. We finally compare the maximum fr...

  4. Saturation of Van Allen's belts

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bel, E

    2002-01-01

    The maximum number of electrons that can be trapped in van Allen's belts has been evaluated at CEA-DAM more precisely than that commonly used in the space community. The modelization that we have developed allows to understand the disagreement (factor 50) observed between the measured and predicted electrons flux by US satellites and theory. This saturation level allows sizing-up of the protection on a satellite in case of energetic events. (authors)

  5. 13C/Palynological evidence of differential residence times of organic carbon prior to its sedimentation in East African Rift Lakes and peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Aucour, Anne-Marie; Bonnefille, Raymonde; Riollet, Guy; Vincens, Annie; Williamson, David

    Most terrestrial plants producing large amounts of organic matter in the East African Rift follow the Calvin (C3) photosynthetic pathway. Their end products have δ13C values of ca. -27 ± 2‰ (vs. PDB). On the contrary, most Cyperaceae (notably Cyperus papyrus and C. latifolius) are characterized by higher 13C contents ° 13C = -10.5 ± 1‰ ) in relation to their Hatch and Slack (C4) photosynthetic cycle. In consequence, δ13C values in total organic matter (TOM) from peat bog or lake cores essentially responded to the proportion of detritus from C4-Cyperaceae. Immediate evidence of the development or disappearance of Cyperaceae around lake margins or in peat bogs can be found in pollen assemblages. Lag times between pollen signals and correlative ° 13C shifts in TOM from cores are therefore indicative of the residence time of organic matter prior to its sedimentation. Delayed sedimentation of TOM will result in 14C anomalies which depend on several parameters, most of them being site specific as shown by examples from a peat bog in Burundi and from southern Lake Tanganyika. An independent assessment of the chronology by high resolution paleomagnetic correlations indicates a ca. 1.5 ka apparent 14C age of TOM in Lake Tanganyika at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition.

  6. Transition to Turbulent Dynamo Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshasayanan, Kannabiran; Gallet, Basile; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2017-11-01

    While the saturated magnetic energy is independent of viscosity in dynamo experiments, it remains viscosity dependent in state-of-the-art 3D direct numerical simulations (DNS). Extrapolating such viscous scaling laws to realistic parameter values leads to an underestimation of the magnetic energy by several orders of magnitude. The origin of this discrepancy is that fully 3D DNS cannot reach low enough values of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. To bypass this limitation and investigate dynamo saturation at very low Pm, we focus on the vicinity of the dynamo threshold in a rapidly rotating flow: the velocity field then depends on two spatial coordinates only, while the magnetic field consists of a single Fourier mode in the third direction. We perform numerical simulations of the resulting set of reduced equations for Pm down to 2 ×10-5. This parameter regime is currently out of reach to fully 3D DNS. We show that the magnetic energy transitions from a high-Pm viscous scaling regime to a low-Pm turbulent scaling regime, the latter being independent of viscosity. The transition to the turbulent saturation regime occurs at a low value of the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm ≃10-3 , which explains why it has been overlooked by numerical studies so far.

  7. SATURATED PICRIC ACID PREVENTS AUTOPHAGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Rahimi-Movaghar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nThe dysesthesia and paresthesia that occurs in laboratory rats after spinal cord injury (SCI results in autophagia. This self-destructive behavior interferes with functional assessments in designed studies and jeopardizes the health of the injured rat. In this study, we evaluated role of saturated picric acid in the prevention of autophagia and self-mutilation. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a mixture of ketamine (100 mg/kg and xylazine (10 mg/kg for the SCI procedures. In the first 39 rats, no solution applied to the hind limbs, but in the next 26 cases, we smeared the saturated picric acid on the tail, lower extremities, pelvic, and abdomen of the rats immediately after SCI. In the rats without picric acid, 23 rats died following autophagia, but in the 26 rats with picric acid, there was no autophagia (P < 0.001. Picric acid side effects in skin and gastrointestinal signs such as irritation, redness and diarrhea were not seen in any rat. Saturated picric acid is a topical solution that if used appropriately and carefully, might be safe and effectively prevents autophagia and self-mutilation. When the solution is applied to the lower abdomen and limbs, we presume that its bitterness effectively prevents the rat from licking and biting the limb.

  8. The paleoecology, peat chemistry and carbon storage of a discontinuous permafrost peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Julie; Pelletier, Nicolas; Olefeldt, David; Turetsky, Merritt; Blodau, Christian; Sonnentag, Oliver; Quinton, William

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost in peatlands strongly influences ecosystem biogeochemical functioning, vegetation composition and hydrological functions. Permafrost peatlands of northwestern Canada store large amounts of carbon but the peatlands located at the southern margin of the permafrost zone are thawing rapidly. This thaw triggers changes in vegetation, hydrology and peat characteristics, and may affect carbon stocks. We present data from a permafrost plateau to thermokarst bog chronosequence located in the southern portion of the Scotty Creek watershed near Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories, Canada. We assessed changes in plant communities, hydrology, biogeochemistry and permafrost status over 9000 years of peatland development using plant macrofossil, testate amoeba and peat chemical characteristics. Peat accumulation started after the infilling of a lake 8500 cal. yr BP. Minerotrophic peat prevailed at the site until permafrost formed around 5000 cal. yr BP. Permafrost apparently formed three times, although there is spatial variability in the permafrost aggradation - degradation cycles. Permafrost thawed 550 cal. yr BP in the center of the thermokarst bog. Ombrotrophic peat is a fairly recent feature of the peat profiles, only appearing after the most recent permafrost thaw event. Both allogenic (temperature/precipitation/snow cover changes and wildfire) and autogenic (peat accumulation, Sphagnum growth) processes likely influenced permafrost aggradation and thaw. While apparent carbon accumulation rates were lower during present and past permafrost periods than during non-permafrost periods, long term carbon accumulation remained similar between cores with different permafrost period lengths. Deep peat was more decomposed in the thermokarst bog peat profile than in the permafrost plateau profile, highlighting the importance of considering potential deep peat carbon losses to project the fate of thawing permafrost peat carbon stores. Average long-term carbon accumulation

  9. Why doesn't the ring current injection rate saturate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lyon, J. G.; Mitchell, E.; Bruntz, R.; Merkin, V. G.; Brogl, S.; Toffoletto, F.; Wiltberger, M.

    2009-02-01

    For low values of the solar wind electric field, the response of the polar cap potential is essentially linear, but at high values of VB s, the polar cap potential saturates and does not increase further with increasing VB s. On the other hand, the ring current injection rate does increase linearly with VB s and shows no evidence of saturating. If enhanced convection is the origin of the ring current, this poses a paradox. How can the polar cap potential, and thus convection, saturate when the ring current does not? We examine a possible explanation based on the reexamination of the Burton equation by Vasyliunas (2006). We show that this explanation is not a viable solution to the paradox since it would require a changing polar cap flux, and we demonstrate that the polar cap flux saturates (at around 1 GWb) as the polar cap potential saturates. Instead, we argue that during storms a quasi-steady reconnection region forms in the tail near the Earth. This reconnection region moves closer to the Earth for higher values of solar wind B s, although the polar cap potential, the dayside merging and nightside reconnection rates, and the amount of open flux do not change much as a function of B s once the polar cap potential has become saturated. As the neutral line moves closer, the volume per unit magnetic flux in the closed field line region is less. Flux tubes leaving the reconnection region in general have lower PV γ as B s increases, and lower PV γ flux tubes can penetrate deeper into the inner magnetosphere, leading to a corresponding greater injection of particles into the inner magnetosphere. Thus a reconnection region that is closer to Earth is more effective in creating a strong ring current. This leads to a continued dependence of the ring current injection rate on VB s, although the polar cap potential has saturated.

  10. Essential astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Essential Astrophysics is a book to learn or teach from, as well as a fundamental reference volume for anyone interested in astronomy and astrophysics. It presents astrophysics from basic principles without requiring any previous study of astronomy or astrophysics. It serves as a comprehensive introductory text, which takes the student through the field of astrophysics in lecture-sized chapters of basic physical principles applied to the cosmos. This one-semester overview will be enjoyed by undergraduate students with an interest in the physical sciences, such as astronomy, chemistry, engineering or physics, as well as by any curious student interested in learning about our celestial science. The mathematics required for understanding the text is on the level of simple algebra, for that is all that is needed to describe the fundamental principles. The text is of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare the interested student for more advanced specialized courses in the future. Astronomical examples are provide...

  11. Peat properties and water retention in boreal forested peatlands subject to wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dan K.; Waddington, James M.

    2013-06-01

    Peat cores from a recently burned peatland and one over 75 years since fire in Alberta, Canada were analyzed for physical properties and water retention. Wildfire exposed denser peat at the peat surface, more so in hollow than hummock microforms. Water retention in peat has implications for postfire Sphagnum regeneration, as this more dense peat requires smaller volumes of water loss before a critical growth-inhibiting pore-water pressure of -100 mb is reached. Simulations of water retention after fire showed that hollow microforms are at a higher risk of losing low-density surface peat, which moderates water table (WT) declines via high specific yield. Exposure of dense peat to the surface after fire increases surface moisture under a constant WT. The net effect of decreasing specific yield and increasing water retention at the surface has implications on hydrologic stability and resilience of boreal peatlands to future wildfire risk under a changing climate. Earth system models incorporating wildfire disturbance in boreal peatlands would benefit from the inclusion of these hydrological feedbacks in this globally significant carbon reservoir.

  12. State Regulation Of Licensing In The Sphere Of Production Of Peat In Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Byshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article features of legal regulation of production and state licensing of peat in the modern legislation and laws of the Russian Federation are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the understanding of peat as a mineral that is important for the country's energy. The process of securing right of the peat use in the modern Russian law is analyzed. The question of the relationship of legislation on the subsoil and water legislation is researched, as well as issues of the Law of the Russian Federation "On Subsoil" and the Water Code of the Russian Federation are correlated. In addition the term "swamp", as the object of peat occurrence is considered. In the broader concept of the "wetland" exists in the Ramsar Convention of the 1971. The order of occurrence, termination, as well as the content of a license for the peat use is analyzed. The license is considered as a special governmental approval, including the prescribed form of the document with the State Emblem of the Russian Federation, as well as text, graphics and other supplements that are an integral part of the license and the fundamental conditions for the subsoil use. Rights and obligations of peat users in Russia are analyzed. Importance of the legal regulation of peat extraction as a common mineral in the Russian law understanding is highlighted.

  13. Spatial variation of peat soil properties in the oil-producing region of northeastern Sakhalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, D. N.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Manakhov, D. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Rozanova, M. S.; Brekhov, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Morphology and properties of medium-deep oligotrophic peat, oligotrophic peat gley, pyrogenic oligotrophic peat gley, and peat gley soils on subshrub-cotton grass-sphagnum bogs and in swampy larch forests of northeastern Sakhalin have been studied. Variation in the thickness and reserves of litters in the studied bog and forest biogeocenoses has been analyzed. The profile distribution and spatial variability of moisture, density, ash, and pHKCl in separate groups of peat soils have been described. The content and spatial variability of petroleum hydrocarbons have been considered in relation to the accumulation of natural bitumoids by peat soils and the technogenic pressing in the oil-producing region. Variation of each parameter at different distances (10, 50, and 1000 m) has been estimated using a hierarchical sampling scheme. The spatial conjugation of soil parameters has been studied by factor analysis using the principal components method and Spearman correlation coefficients. Regression equations have been proposed to describe relationships of ash content with soil density and content of petroleum hydrocarbons in peat horizons.

  14. Identification of mycobacteria in peat moss processing plants : application of molecular biology approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayer, M.P.; Veillette, M.; Pageau, P.; Cormier, Y.; Duchaine, C.; Meriaux, A. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Inst. Universitaire de pneumologie et de cardiologie; Veillette, M.; Meriaux, A.; Cormier, Y. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Biology and Microbiology; Hamelin, R.; Bergeron, M.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Sainte-Foy, PQ (Canada). Canadian Forest Service

    2007-01-15

    Health concerns regarding environmental mycobacteria has led to the development of exposure assessment methods for the evaluation of certain workplaces where the presence of these agents is suspected. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) has been described in peat moss workers who are regularly exposed to significant levels of bioaerosols in peat moss processing plants. Although mycobacteria have been cultured from peat moss, plant workers exposure to mycobacterial bioaerosols has never been studied. This article presented the results of a study that evaluated the presence of mycobacteria in air samples from peat moss processing plants using molecular biology approaches (cloning-sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) and the workers exposure using immunoglobin G (IgG) complexes to mycobacteria. It also compared species detected in air samples and in peat moss. Two peat moss processing plants were chosen among 14 previously studied and a total of 49 clones were sequenced. Real-time PCR was also performed on the same air samples to evaluate the airborne concentration of mycobacteria and estimate exposure levels. The article discussed the materials and methods used in the study, the results of the study, and subsequent discussion of the results. It was concluded that peat moss processing plants workers are exposed to mycobacteria in addition to other biological agents. It was suggested that further studies are needed to confirm the specificity of the mycobacterial IgG. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Excavation-drier method of energy-peat extraction reduces long-term climatic impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvan, N.; Silvan, K.; Laine, J. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Parkano (Finland)], e-mail: niko.silvan@metla.fi; Vaisanen, S.; Soukka, R. [Lappeenranta Univ.of Techology (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    Climatic impacts of energy-peat extraction are of increasing concern due to EU emissions trading requirements. A new excavation-drier peat extraction method has been developed to reduce the climatic impact and increase the efficiency of peat extraction. To quantify and compare the soil GHG fluxes of the excavation drier and the traditional milling methods, as well as the areas from which the energy peat is planned to be extracted in the future (extraction reserve area types), soil CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes were measured during 2006-2007 at three sites in Finland. Within each site, fluxes were measured from drained extraction reserve areas, extraction fields and stockpiles of both methods and additionally from the biomass driers of the excavation-drier method. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), described at a principal level in ISO Standards 14040:2006 and 14044:2006, was used to assess the long-term (100 years) climatic impact from peatland utilisation with respect to land use and energy production chains where utilisation of coal was replaced with peat. Coal was used as a reference since in many cases peat and coal can replace each other in same power plants. According to this study, the peat extraction method used was of lesser significance than the extraction reserve area type in regards to the climatic impact. However, the excavation-drier method seems to cause a slightly reduced climatic impact as compared with the prevailing milling method. (orig.)

  16. Peat form and distribution – acrotelm hydrology and topographic wetness index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Mike; Irvine, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Away from the divide in a peat mire, steadily increasing volumes of rainwater flowing through and over the peat can only be transported by increasing surface and water table gradient, forcing development of a domed form for a raised bog. Simple models assume either a groundwater mound in which the peat surface is defined by the water table, or a surface limited by the balance between growth and decomposition. Recognised complications to the hydrology include the observations of substantial flow both close to the bog surface and through pipes within the peat mass and the near-random heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity values in the peat. In addition the assumptions of these end member models interact, since increases in peat depth allow more water to flow through the catotelm, thereby increasing seasonal drying near the surface and raising decomposition rates. These competing factors have been built into a model which combines TOPmodel near-surface with Darcian flow at depth, creating a dynamic oxic layer within which rates of decomposition are highest. This enriched mire model, distinguishes bogs, and regions within bogs, dominated by surface or internal flow and those that are limited by growth and decomposition. The model also helps to clarify the important role of seasonality in bog growth, provides some guidance on where peat can become established, on the basis of climate and local topography, and how this may evolve as global temperatures rise.

  17. Peat decomposition – shaping factors, significance in environmental studies and methods of determination; a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drzymulska Danuta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of literature data on the degree of peat decomposition – an important parameter that yields data on environmental conditions during the peat-forming process, i.e., humidity of the mire surface, is presented. A decrease in the rate of peat decomposition indicates a rise of the ground water table. In the case of bogs, which receive exclusively atmospheric (meteoric water, data on changes in the wetness of past mire surfaces could even be treated as data on past climates. Different factors shaping the process of peat decomposition are also discussed, such as humidity of the substratum and climatic conditions, as well as the chemical composition of peat-forming plants. Methods for the determination of the degree of peat decomposition are also outlined, maintaining the division into field and laboratory analyses. Among the latter are methods based on physical and chemical features of peat and microscopic methods. Comparisons of results obtained by different methods can occasionally be difficult, which may be ascribed to different experience of researchers or the chemically undefined nature of many analyses of humification.

  18. Thermomagnetic properties of peat-soil layers from Sag pond near Lembang Fault, West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iryanti, Mimin; Wibowo, Dimas Maulana; Bijaksana, Satria

    2015-09-01

    Sag pond is a body of water near fault system as water flows blocked by the fault. Sag pond is a special type of environment for peat formation as peat layers in were deposited as the fault moves in episodic fashion. Depending on the history of the fault, peat layers are often interrupted by soil layers. In this study, core of peat-soil layers from a Sag pond in Karyawangi Village near Lembang Fault was obtained and analyzed for its magnetic properties. The 5 m core was obtained using a hand auger. Individual samples were obtained every cm and measured for their magnetic susceptibility. In general, there are three distinct magnetic susceptibility layers that were associated with peat and soil layers. The upper first 1 m is unconsolidated mud layer with its relatively high magnetic susceptibility. Between 1-2.81 m, there is consolidated mud layer and the lowest part (2.82-5) m is basically peat layer. Six samples were then measured for their thermomagnetic properties by measuring their susceptibility during heating and cooling from room temperature to 700°C. The thermomagnetic profiles provide Curie temperatures for various magnetic minerals in the cores. It was found that the upper part (unconsolidated mud) contains predominantly iron-oxides, such as magnetite while the lowest part (peat layer) contains significant amount of iron-sulphides, presumably greigite.

  19. GIS-based examination of peats and soils in Surfers Paradise, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ani Haider

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The subsoil conditions of Surfers Paradise in Southeast Queensland of Australia have been examined in terms of soil stiffness by using geographic information system (GIS. Peat is a highly organic and compressible material. Surfers Paradise (as a study area has problematic peat layer due to its high water content, high compressibility, and low shear strength. This layer has various thicknesses at different locations ranging between R.L. . 10 to R.L. -19.6 m. Buildings in Surfers Paradise are using piled foundations to avoid the high compressibility and low shear strength peat layer. Spatial Analyst extension in the GIS ArcMap10 has been utilised to develop zonation maps for different depths in the study area. Each depth has been interpolated as a surface to create Standard Penetration Test SPT-N value GIS-based zonation maps for each depth. In addition, 8 interpolation techniques have been examined to evaluate which technique gives better representation for the Standard Penetration Test (SPT data. Inverse Distance weighing (IDW method in Spatial Analyst extension gives better representation for the utilised data with certain parameters. Two different cross sections have been performed in the core of the study area to determine the extent and the depth of the peat layer underneath already erected buildings. Physical and engineering properties of the Surfers Paradise peat have been obtained and showed that this peat falls within the category of tropical peat.

  20. Utilization of new materials in peat machines; Uusien materiaalien kaeyttoe turvekoneissa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, M.; Poeyhoenen, P. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this three year research (1993-1995) was to study the suitability of new materials for different applications in peat production industry, exploiting the plastic and brush technologies, and surface coatings. The peat production machines will be intensified, lightened, made more firesafe, and ergonomical by using new materials (plastics, composites, compound metals and surface coatings). The research targets and materials were surveyed in 1993, the possibilities to construct an unsparkling miller were investigated, and low-friction materials, on which the peat glides easily, were sought in the beginning of the research. The unsparkling miller was studied and developed further in 1994 using plastic blades, the application of brushing technology in sod peat technology, and a ridger, equipped with horizontal brushes, for sod peat were studied, and the possibilities to lighten the construction of the collector-wagon using light materials was investigated. The tasks for 1995 were to study the brushing technology for peat production, the properties of the bristle, and the applications of new materials for milling and sieving of peat using laboratory tests. This work continued partly in 1996

  1. The structure of the microbial communities in low-moor and high-moor peat bogs of Tomsk oblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovol'skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Kukharenko, O. S.; Yakushev, A. V.; Semenova, T. A.; Inisheva, L. A.

    2012-03-01

    The number, structure, and physical state of the microbial communities in high-moor and low-moor peat bogs were compared. Distinct differences in these characteristics were revealed. The microbial biomass in the high-moor peat exceeded that in the low-moor peat by 2-9 times. Fungi predominated in the high-moor peat, whereas bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in the low-moor peat. The micromycetal complexes of the high-moor peat were characterized by a high portion of dark-colored representatives; the complexes of the low-moor peat were dominated by fast-growing fungi. The species of the Penicillum genus were dominant in the high-moor peat; the species of Trichoderma were abundant in the low-moor peat. In the former, the bacteria were distinguished as minor components; in the latter, they predominated in the saprotrophic bacterial complex. In the high-moor peat, the microorganisms were represented by bacilli, while, in the low-moor peat, by cytophages, myxobacteria, and actinobacteria. The different physiological states of the bacteria in the studied objects reflecting the duration of the lag phase and the readiness of the metabolic system to consume different substrates were demonstrated for the first time. The relationships between the trophic characteristics of bacterial habitats and the capacity of the bacteria to consume substrates were established.

  2. Monitoring cerebral tissue oxygen saturation during surgery: a clinician's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingzhong; Gelb, Adrian W.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Mantulin, William W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Organ protection and physiology optimization are important goals when taking care of anesthetized patients undergoing surgery. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction and perioperative stroke are unwarranted potential outcomes. Neurovascular coupling, the match between cerebral metabolic demand and substrate supply, should be regarded as the essential cerebral physiology which needs to be monitored during surgery. The brain-targeting near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology has the potential to fulfill this goal. Proposition of why and how to monitor essential cerebral physiology via advanced NIRS technologies is discussed. We also discussed the limits of the current NIRS technologies which merely measure cerebral tissue oxygen saturation in pooled cerebral arterial, capillary, and venous blood.

  3. Pressurized gasification solves many problems. IVOSDIG process for peat, wood and sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, O.; Repo, A.

    1996-11-01

    Research is now being done on one of the essential elements of pressurized gasification: the feeding of fuel into high pressure. At the IVOSDIG pilot plant in Jyvaeskylae, a pilot-scale piston feeder for peat, wood and sludge has been tested. A piston feeder achieves pressurization through the movement of the piston, not by inert pressurization gas. The feeder cylinder then turns 180 degrees to another position, and the piston forces the fuel contained in the cylinder into the pressure vessel, which is at the process pressure. The feeder has to cylinders; one is filled while the other is being emptied. In pilot-scale tests, the capacity of the feeder is ten cubic metres of fuel per hour. The commercial-scale feeder has been designed for a capacity of fifty cubic metres per hour. The feeder operates hydraulically, and the hydraulic system can be assembled from commercially available components. IVO began development work to devise a feeder based on the piston technique in 1992. During 1993, short tests were performed with the pilot-scale feeder. Tests under real conditions were begun during 1994 at the laboratory of VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae, which houses the IVOSDIG pressurized gasification pilot plant for moist fuels developed by IVO

  4. Improving conceptual models of water and carbon transfer through peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jeffery M.; Siegel, Donald I.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Baird, Andrew J.; Belyea, Lisa R.; Comas, Xavier; Reeve, A.S.; Slater, Lee D.

    2009-01-01

    Northern peatlands store 500 × 1015 g of organic carbon and are very sensitive to climate change. There is a strong conceptual model of sources, sinks, and pathways of carbon within peatlands, but challenges remain both in understanding the hydrogeology and the linkages between carbon cycling and peat pore water flow. In this chapter, research findings from the glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands are used to develop a conceptual framework for peatland hydrogeology and identify four challenges related to northern peatlands yet to be addressed: (1) develop a better understanding of the extent and net impact of climate-driven groundwater flushing in peatlands; (2) quantify the complexities of heterogeneity on pore water flow and, in particular, reconcile contradictions between peatland hydrogeologic interpretations and isotopic data; (3) understand the hydrogeologic implications of free-phase methane production, entrapment, and release in peatlands; and (4) quantify the impact of arctic and subarctic warming on peatland hydrogeology and its linkage to carbon cycling.

  5. The analysis of charcoal in peat and organic sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.D. Mooney

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of charcoal in sediments has been interpreted as a ‘fire history’ at about 1,000 sites across the globe. This research effort reflects the importance of fire in many ecosystems, and the diversity of processes that can be affected by fire in many landscapes. Fire appears to reflect climate through the intermediary of vegetation, but arguably responds faster than vegetation to climate change or variability. Fire and humans are also intricately linked, meaning that the activity of fire in the past is also of relevance to prehistoric and historic human transitions and to contemporary natural resource management. This article describes recent advances in the analysis of charcoal in peat and other sediments, and offers a simple method for the quantification of larger charcoal fragments (>100 µm and a standardised method for the quantification of microscopic charcoal on pollen slides. We also comment on the challenges that the discipline still faces.

  6. Wood fuels and peat prices; Traedbraensle- och torvpriser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    This fuel price statistics is shown in nominal average prices quarterly, or monthly, or for earlier years. The latest prices are preliminary. The fuel prices are shown without taxes (delivered free at plant) and are divided into densified and non-densified wood fuels and peat. The fuel prices are shown for district heating plants and industry (not including internal use) for the whole country and in some cases for different regions in Sweden. The district heat prices refer to user category 'multi-dwelling buildings'. These prices are shown as monthly averages for the whole country after combustion and distribution to customers including all taxes (also VAT) This publication is released four times a year and may be quoted when the source is mentioned. Next publication will be released on the 2:nd of December 2013.

  7. Promoter analysis by saturation mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baliga Nitin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression and regulation are mediated by DNA sequences, in most instances, directly upstream to the coding sequences by recruiting transcription factors, regulators, and a RNA polymerase in a spatially defined fashion. Few nucleotides within a promoter make contact with the bound proteins. The minimal set of nucleotides that can recruit a protein factor is called a cis-acting element. This article addresses a powerful mutagenesis strategy that can be employed to define cis-acting elements at a molecular level. Technical details including primer design, saturation mutagenesis, construction of promoter libraries, phenotypic analysis, data analysis, and interpretation are discussed.

  8. Mobile geophysical study of peat deposits in Fuhrberger Field, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, T.; Petersen, H.; Hagrey, S. A. al; Rabbel, W.

    2012-04-01

    In the water protection area of Fuhrberger Field, north of Hanover, geophysical techniques were applied to study the stakeholder problem of the source detection for nitrate accumulations in the ground water. We used our mobile multisensor platform to conduct measurements using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR, 200 MHz antenna) and Electromagnetic Induction (EMI, EM31). This aims to study the subsurface occurrences of peat deposits (surplus of organic carbon) supposed to be a source of nitrate emissions due to the aeration and the drawdown of groundwater levels (e.g. by pumping, drainage etc.). Resulting EMI and GPR signals show high data quality. Measured apparent electrical conductivity shows very low values (<10 mS/m) due to the mainly sandy subsurface. For this medium, both methods are expected to penetrate down to 3-5 m depth. GPR radargrams, time slices of GPR reflection energy and EMI apparent electrical conductivities are plotted on aerial photographs and compared to each other's and with vegetation intensity. We could separate areas characterized by low reflection energy and high conductivity, and vice versa. Briefly, organic rich sediments such as peats are assumed to have a relative high conductivity and thus low GPR reflectivity. Some areas of local conductivity increase correspond to a deep reflection interface (as seen in the radargrams), which even vanishes due to the high attenuation caused by the high conductivity. This implies that the upper layer is more conductive than the lower layer. Several local areas with these characteristics are found at the study sites. We recommend shallow drillings at representative points to deliver the necessary confirmation with ground truth information. Acknowledgments: iSOIL (Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping) is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities

  9. Drainage of shallow peat harvesting areas with pipe drains; Mataloituneen turvekentaen kuivatus putkisalaojilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemetti, V.; Saenkiaho, K. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rautiainen, O. [Ojamarkkinointi Oy, Heinola (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    This study aims to develop pipe draining technics in peat harvesting areas, which have been in active use so long time that the remaining peat layer is about one meter thick. The method should be technically and economically feasible as well as environmentally acceptable. Special attention is paid to pipe installation techniques, drain spacing and impacts on watercourses, which receive the drainage waters. After pipe installation the area is monitored by measuring pipe runoffs, water tables, moisture content of peat and quality of drain water

  10. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  11. Electron transfer properties of peat organic matter: from electrochemical analysis to redox processes in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Michael; Getzinger, Gordon; Walpen, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Peat organic matter contains redox-active functional groups that can accept and/or donate electrons from and to biotic and abiotic reaction partners present in peatlands. Several studies have provided evidence that electron accepting quinone moieties in the peat organic matter may act as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial respiration. This respiration pathway may competitively suppress methanogenesis and thereby lead to excess carbon dioxide to methane formation in peatlands. Electron donating phenolic moieties in peat organic matter have long been considered to inhibit microbial and enzymatic activities in peatlands, thereby contributing to carbon stabilization and accumulation in these systems. Phenols are expected to be comparatively stable in anoxic parts of the peats as phenoloxidases, a class of enzymes capable of oxidatively degrading phenols, require molecular oxygen as co-substrate. Despite the general recognition of the importance of redox-active moieties in peat organic matter, the abundance, redox properties and reactivities of these moieties remain poorly studied and understood, in large part due to analytical challenges. This contribution will, in a first part, summarize recent advances in our research group on the analytical chemistry of redox-active moieties in peat organic matter. We will show how mediated electrochemical analysis can be used to quantify the capacities of electron accepting and donating moieties in both dissolved and particulate peat organic matter. We will link these capacities to the physicochemical properties of peat organic matter and provide evidence for quinones and phenols as major electron accepting and donating moieties, respectively. The second part of this contribution will highlight how these electroanalytical techniques can be utilized to advance a more fundamental understanding of electron transfer processes involving peat organic matter. These processes include the redox cycling (i.e., repeated

  12. Drainage of shallow peat harvesting areas with pipe drains; Madaltuneen turvetuotantokentaen kuivatustutkimus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemetti, V. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    This study aims to develop pipe draining techniques in peat harvesting areas, which have been in active use so long time that the remaining peat layer is about one meter thick. The method should be technically and economically feasible as well as environmentally acceptable. Special attention is paid to pipe installation techniques, drain spacing and impacts on watercourses, which receive the drainage waters. After pipe installation the area was monitored by measuring pipe runoffs, water tables, moisture content of peat and quality of drain water. These are the results of second year. (orig.)

  13. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in the terahertz THz frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum states, due to conduction band onparabolicity and scattering into satellite valleys in strong THz fields. Saturable absorber parameters, such as linear and nonsaturable transmission, and saturation fluen...

  14. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductorsGaAs,GaP, and Ge in the terahertz (THz) frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum states, due to conduction band nonparabolicity and scattering into satellite valleys in strong THz fields. Saturable absorber parameters, such as linear and nonsaturable transmission, and saturation flue...

  15. Transformation of organo-ferric peat colloids by a heterotrophic bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikova, Olga V.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Gérard, Emmanuele; Drozdova, Olga Yu.; Lapitskiy, Sergey A.; Bychkov, Andrey Yu.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial mineralization of allochthonous (soil) dissolved organic matter (DOM) in boreal waters governs the CO2 flux from the lakes and rivers to the atmosphere, which is one of the main factor of carbon balance in high latitudes. However, the fate of colloidal trace element (TE) during bacterial processing of DOM remains poorly constrained. We separated monoculture of Pseudomonas saponiphila from a boreal creek and allowed it to react with boreal Fe-rich peat leachate of approximate colloidal (3 kDa-0.45 μm) composition C1000Fe12Al3.3Mg2Ca3.7P1.2Mn0.1Ba0.5 in nutrient-free media. The total net decrease of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) concentration over 4 day of exposure was within 5% of the initial value, whereas the low molecular weight fraction of Corg (LMW<3 kDa) yielded a 16%-decrease due to long-term bio-uptake or coagulation. There was a relative depletion in Fe over Corg of 0.45 μm, colloidal and LMW fraction in the course of peat leachate interaction with P. saponiphila. Al, Mn, Ni, Cu, Ga, REEs, Y, U were mostly affected by bacterial presence and exhibited essentially the adsorption at the cell surface over first hours of reaction, in contrast to Fe, Ti, Zr, and Nb that showed both short-term adsorption and long-term removal by physical coagulation/coprecipitation with Fe hydroxide. The low molecular weight fraction (LMW<3 kDa) of most TE was a factor of 2-5 less affected by microbial presence via adsorption or removal than the high molecular weight (HMW) colloidal fractions (<0.45 μm and <50 kDa). The climate change-induced acceleration of heterotrophic bacterial activity in boreal and subarctic waters may lead to preferential removal of Fe over DOC from conventionally dissolved fraction and the decrease of the proportion of LMW < 3 kDa fraction and the increase of HMW colloids. Enhanced heterotrophic mineralization of organo-ferric colloids under climate warming scenario may compensate for on-going "browning" of surface waters.

  16. Influence of different kind of peats on some physic-chemical properties, biochemical activity, the content of different forms of nitrogen and fractions of humic substances of The Great Vasyugan Mire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inisheva, L. I.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    Mires, or peatlands belong to the wetlands ecosystems where carbon is bounded in primary production and deposited as peat in water saturated, anoxic conditions. In those conditions, the rate of the supply of new organic matter has exceeded that the decomposition, resulting in carbon accumulation. Place of sampling belongs to an oligotrophic landscapes of the river Klyuch basin in spurs of Vasyugan mire. The catchment represents reference system for Bokchar swampy area (political district of Tomsk region). Landscape profile crosses main kinds of swampy biogeocoenosis (BGC) toward the mire center: paludal tall mixed forest, pine undershrub Sphagnum (high riam, trans-accumulative part of a profile, P2), pine-undershrub Sphagnum (low riam, transit part, P3), sedge-moss swamp (eluvial part, P5). The latter represents an eluvial part of a slope of watershed massif where it is accomplished discharge of excess, surface, soil-mire waters. The depth of peat deposit of sedge-moss swamp reaches 2,5m. To the depth of 0,6m there is a layer of Sphagnum raised bog peat, then it is a mesotrophic Scheuchzeria Sphagnum layer and at the bottom there is a thick layer of low-mire horsetail peat. The samples of peats were taken from two places (P2 and P3), both from the depth 0-75 cm of the great Vasyugan Mire. These materials represent (P2) Sphagnum fuscum peat (ash content ranged from 10.8 to 15.1%), but samples P3 belong to low-moor sedge peat (ash content ranged from 4.5-4.8%). The differences in water level, redox potential, pH, degree of degradation, bulk density, number of microorganisms, activity of enzymes, different kinds of nitrogen and humic substances were studied in two different peat soils characterized by different type of peat. In general in P2 the redox potential changed from 858 to /-140/ mV, higher activity of xanthine oxidase and peroxidase, different kinds of microorganisms (ammonifing bacteria and cellulose decomposing microorganisms) and different kinds of

  17. Essential thrombocythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brière Jean B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Essential thrombocythemia (ET is an acquired myeloproliferative disorder (MPD characterized by a sustained elevation of platelet number with a tendency for thrombosis and hemorrhage. The prevalence in the general population is approximately 30/100,000. The median age at diagnosis is 65 to 70 years, but the disease may occur at any age. The female to male ratio is about 2:1. The clinical picture is dominated by a predisposition to vascular occlusive events (involving the cerebrovascular, coronary and peripheral circulation and hemorrhages. Some patients with ET are asymptomatic, others may experience vasomotor (headaches, visual disturbances, lightheadedness, atypical chest pain, distal paresthesias, erythromelalgia, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic disturbances. Arterial and venous thromboses, as well as platelet-mediated transient occlusions of the microcirculation and bleeding, represent the main risks for ET patients. Thromboses of large arteries represent a major cause of mortality associated with ET or can induce severe neurological, cardiac or peripheral artery manifestations. Acute leukemia or myelodysplasia represent only rare and frequently later-onset events. The molecular pathogenesis of ET, which leads to the overproduction of mature blood cells, is similar to that found in other clonal MPDs such as chronic myeloid leukemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. Polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia of the spleen and ET are generally associated under the common denomination of Philadelphia (Ph-negative MPDs. Despite the recent identification of the JAK2 V617F mutation in a subset of patients with Ph-negative MPDs, the detailed pathogenetic mechanism is still a matter of discussion. Therapeutic interventions in ET are limited to decisions concerning the introduction of anti-aggregation therapy and/or starting platelet cytoreduction. The therapeutic value of hydroxycarbamide

  18. Perspectives for application of moulded sorption materials based on peat and mineral compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misnikov, Oleg

    2017-11-01

    The paper discusses scientific and technological grounds for using peat, its wastes and processing products as sorption materials for liquidation of pollutions on water and oil basis. A negative effect on the hydro-physical properties of peat by hysteresis phenomena occurring during drying is noted. Use of optimal concentrations of mineral hydrophilic additives in peat matrix allows to increase speed and capacity of sorption. A working hypothesis is proposed that explains the physical and chemical mechanism for increasing quality of composite sorbents. A principal technological scheme for obtaining sorption materials based on peat is developed. It allows to take into account possible transitions between stages of the technological process, which reduce its cost.

  19. The climate impact of energy peat utilisation - comparison and sensitivity analysis of Finnish and Swedish results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, Kristina; Kirkinen, Johanna; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2006-06-15

    The climate impact of energy peat utilisation have been studied both in Finland by VTT Technical Research Centre and in Sweden by IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd. The main objective of this study is to compare the results of earlier studies by VTT and IVL and to perform a sensitivity analysis of previous and new results. The scientific approach of the two studies is very similar. The climate impact of peat utilisation is considered from a life-cycle point of view by taking into account all phases of the peat utilisation chain. Peat reserves can be both sinks and sources of greenhouse gas emissions as well as there are both uptake and emissions of greenhouse gases during the utilisation chain. The net impact of the utilisation chain is assessed as the climate impact due to the utilisation chain minus the climate impact of non-utilisation chain. The instantaneous radiative forcing and accumulated radiative forcing are used in both studies as the indicator of the climate impact. Radiative forcing is calculated on the basis of the concentration changes due to emissions and uptake of greenhouse gases. The differences in the models for calculating concentrations and radiative forcing are minor. There are some differences in the definitions and boundaries of the considered peat utilisation chains, although the differences in the results due to differences in the chain definitions are small. The main reason for the differences in results between the two studies is differences in emission (and uptake) estimates for the after-treatment phase and the non-utilisation chain. Both Swedish and Finnish studies show that the use of cultivated peatland for energy peat utilisation results in lower climate impact than using coal (within 100 years). Both studies show that the use of pristine mires for peat production will result in larger climate impact than the use of already drained peatlands. The climate impact of peat utilisation chains where fens and forestry

  20. Distribution of 35 Elements in Peat Cores from Ombrotrophic Bogs Studied by Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Frontasyeva, M V

    2004-01-01

    In ombrotrophic bogs the surface peat layer is supplied with chemical substances only from the atmosphere. Peat cores from these bogs therefore can be used to study temporal trends in atmospheric deposition of pollutants. In this work epithermal neutron activation analysis was applied for the first time to study the distribution of 35 elements in peat profiles from ombrotrophic bogs. The selected examples were from Finnmark county in northern Norway: one pristine site far from any local pollution source, and another strongly affected by long-term operation of Russian copper-nickel smelters located close to the border. The elements are classified with respect to their behavior in the uppermost 40 cm of the peat, and similarities and differences between the two profiles are discussed. As compared with other more commonly used analytical techniques based on acid decomposition of the sample ENAA has the advantage of providing the total concentrations of the elements.

  1. Environmental aspects of alternative wet technologies for producing energy/fuel from peat. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.T.

    1981-05-01

    Peat in situ contains up to 90% moisture, with about 50% of this moisture trapped as a colloidal gel. This colloidal moisture cannot be removed by conventional dewatering methods (filter presses, etc.) and must be removed by thermal drying, solvent extraction, or solar drying before the peat can be utilized as a fuel feedstock for direct combustion or gasification. To circumvent the drying problem, alternative technologies such as wet oxidation, wet carbonization, and biogasification are possible for producing energy or enhanced fuel from peat. This report describes these three alternative technologies, calculates material balances for given raw peat feed rates of 1000 tph, and evaluates the environmental consequences of all process effluent discharges. Wastewater discharges represent the most significant effluent due to the relatively large quantities of water removed during processing. Treated process water returned to the harvested bog may force in situ, acidic bog water into recieving streams, disrupting local aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Alkaline extraction of humic substances from peat applied to organic-mineral fertilizer production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Saito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An organic-mineral fertilizer based on humic substances (HSs and potassium was developed based on the alkaline extraction of HSs from peat. The HSs have interesting properties for use as a fertilizer since they improve the physical and chemical structure of the soil and provide a source of organic carbon which is readily absorbable by the plants, whereas potassium is a primary nutrient for plants. It was found that highly decomposed peats containing a small inorganic fraction are more favorable for the extraction of HSs. Using these peats, organic-mineral fertilizers that meet the Brazilian legislation have been obtained for a peat-extractant mixture containing 2.57 wt% total organic content (TOC, a K2O/TOC ratio of 1 wt% and an extraction time of 12 hours.

  3. Application of Kinetic Models to the Sorption of Copper(II) on to Peat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Y.S; McKay, G

    2002-01-01

    ...) concentrations and peat doses was made. The Elovich model and the pseudo-second order model both provided a high degree of correlation with the experimental data for most of the sorption process...

  4. Subsidence due to peat compaction and oxidation in built-up deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselen, Sanneke; Erkens, Gilles; Stouthamer, Esther; Hefting, Mariet

    2017-04-01

    Deltas are often densely populated, and are predicted to face continued population growth and urbanization. At the same time, deltas are threatened by relative sea-level rise due to the combined effect of land subsidence and global sea-level rise. Many deltaic sequences contain large amounts of peat. In such organo-clastic deltas, peat compaction and oxidation are important contributors to total subsidence. Especially in built-up areas, (differential) subsidence and associated increased flood risk, result in high costs related to damage to buildings and infrastructure. Yet, subsidence due to peat compaction and oxidation in built-up deltaic areas has not been given sufficient attention. These processes have mostly been studied separately, in rural or pristine areas. To develop tailor-made subsidence management strategies for built-up areas in organo-clastic deltas, a thorough understanding of peat compaction and oxidation, and their spatial and temporal variability, is needed. Therefore, we investigated the relative contribution of both peat compaction and oxidation to subsidence in three built-up areas in the Rhine-Meuse delta, The Netherlands. We used (1) borehole data to construct lithological cross sections of the Holocene sequence, (2) dry bulk density and organic-matter content measurements to assess the degree of compaction, and (3) respiration measurements to determine the oxidation potential. We assessed subsidence due to peat compaction or oxidation of up to 2 meters over the last 1000 years, and subsidence rates of up to 16 cm·yr-1. The amount and rate of subsidence due to peat compaction and oxidation, and the relative contribution of both processes, is however highly variable in time and space, depending on the Holocene sequence composition, loading conditions, and groundwater-table lowering. For example, subsidence in a sequence with a heavily loaded peat layer will have been mostly caused by peat compaction, while subsidence in a sequence with a

  5. Impact of water content and decomposition stage on the soil water repellency of peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmann, Ullrich; Sokolowsky, Liv; Piayda, Arndt; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bachmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Soil water repellency is widely reported for all kinds of soils and mainly caused by hydrophobic organic compounds. It has a substantial influence on soil hydraulic processes such as water infiltration, preferential flow paths and evaporation and therefore on hydrological processes in general. The severity of soil water repellency strongly depends on the soil water content and the amount of soil organic carbon. Although peat soils are characterized by high soil organic carbon contents, studies about peat soils are rare and mostly available for horticultural substrates. Here, we present soil water repellency measurements for peat soils with varying porosities, bulk densities and stages of decomposition. The peat soils were sampled at two different sites in a bog complex. The sites have been drained for 1 and 100 years. Samples were taken from each soil layer and, additionally, in a vertical resolution of 0.03 m. To determine the soil water contents at which the peat becomes water repellent, we applied the commonly used water drop penetration time test on progressively dewatered samples. In order to identify the influence of the decomposition stage as determined by the depth within the soil profile and duration of drainage, the potential soil water repellency was measured at air-dried sieved samples by the sessile drop method. First results show that the soil water repellency of peat soils is strongly dependent on the soil water content. For air-dried peat samples, the influence of different decomposition stages of the bog peat is negligible. All air-dried samples are extremely water repellent with contact angles > 130°. However, comparing the results with the soil organic matter content shows a slightly tendency of increasing soil water repellency with increasing soil organic matter contents.

  6. Strong degradation of palsas and peat plateaus in northern Norway during the last 60 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge, Amund F.; Westermann, Sebastian; Solheim, Ingvild; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Palsas and peat plateaus are permafrost landforms occurring in subarctic mires which constitute sensitive ecosystems with strong significance for vegetation, wildlife, hydrology and carbon cycle. Firstly, we have systematically mapped the occurrence of palsas and peat plateaus in the northernmost county of Norway (Finnmark, ˜ 50 000 km2) by manual interpretation of aerial images from 2005 to 2014 at a spatial resolution of 250 m. At this resolution, mires and wetlands with palsas or peat plateaus occur in about 850 km2 of Finnmark, with the actual palsas and peat plateaus underlain by permafrost covering a surface area of approximately 110 km2. Secondly, we have quantified the lateral changes of the extent of palsas and peat plateaus for four study areas located along a NW-SE transect through Finnmark by utilizing repeat aerial imagery from the 1950s to the 2010s. The results of the lateral changes reveal a total decrease of 33-71 % in the areal extent of palsas and peat plateaus during the study period, with the largest lateral change rates observed in the last decade. However, the results indicate that degradation of palsas and peat plateaus in northern Norway has been a consistent process during the second half of the 20th century and possibly even earlier. Significant rates of areal change are observed in all investigated time periods since the 1950s, and thermokarst landforms observed on aerial images from the 1950s suggest that lateral degradation was already an ongoing process at this time. The results of this study show that lateral erosion of palsas and peat plateaus is an important pathway for permafrost degradation in the sporadic permafrost zone in northern Scandinavia. While the environmental factors governing the rate of erosion are not yet fully understood, we note a moderate increase in air temperature, precipitation and snow depth during the last few decades in the region.

  7. Assessment of the peat resources of Florida, with a detailed survey of the northern everglades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.M.; Wieland, C.C.; Hood, L.Q.; Goode, R.W. III; Sawyer, R.K.; McNeill, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Available data, including previous publications, modern soil surveys, and detailed coring in the Northern Everglades for this project have been used to update information on Florida's peat resources. It is now estimated that Florida could, if no other constraints existed, produce 606 million tons of moisture-free fuel-grade peat, which may yield approximately 10.0 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy. These estimates are much lower than previously published projections for the state. The principal effort of this survey was in the largest peat region of the state, the Northern Everglades of Palm Beach and adjacent counties, where more than 800 core holes were drilled. Based on analyses of these cores, the Northern Everglades is now estimated to contain 191 million tons of moisture-free peat, with a potential energy yield of 2.98 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. These values are considerably less than previously published estimates, probably due to bacterial oxidation and other forms of drainage-induced subsidence in the Everglades agricultural areas. The present fuel-peat resources of the Northern Everglades occur in 19 separate deposits. Of these, the deposits in the Port Mayaca, Bryant, Six Mile Bend, and Loxahatchee Quadrangles comprise the highest concentration of the resource. These lands are generally privately owned and used for sugar cane and other crops, and the conversion of these lands to peat removal seems unlikely. It seems even less likely that the extensive peat deposits within the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge will be available for fuel use, barring a dire national emergency. The utilization of peat as a fuel must be approached with caution and careful study; large scale use may require state or federal action. 34 references.

  8. The Climate Impact of Energy Peat Utilisation in Sweden - the Effect of former Land-Use and After-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Kristina [Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, Mats [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    2004-12-01

    The potential climate impact from the use of peat for energy production in Sweden was evaluated in terms of contribution to atmospheric radiative forcing. The calculations consider emissions from combustion and from the peatlands before, during and after harvesting. Four main groups of peatlands in use for peat harvesting were identified: 1. pristine peatlands; 2. drained peatlands used for agriculture; 3. drained peatlands used for forestry (low productive); 4. peatlands previously (historically) used for peat harvesting. The radiative forcing of different scenarios using the mentioned peatland types for energy peat production was calculated, using literature and empirical data related to peat harvesting, at these four types of mires. In the calculations the original land-use was set as reference scenario. The radiative forcing caused by using agricultural peatlands for energy peat production was much lower than for the corresponding use of pristine peatlands and old peat harvesting areas. The calculated value for the radiative forcing of current (20-year period of harvesting and combustion) peat utilisation for energy in a 100-year perspective ranges between 80-90% of the corresponding radiative forcing from using coal and 165-180% from using natural gas. The scenarios for different peatland types and the currently used peatlands show that there is a potential to reduce the radiative forcing caused by energy peat production and utilisation in Sweden by selecting peat harvesting area and after-treatment method. It was concluded that both the greenhouse gas balance of the peatland before harvesting and the after-treatment methods strongly impact the radiative forcing from energy peat utilisation. The radiative forcing from continuous utilisation of energy peat was also calculated a few scenarios. The results show a slower development than the shorter harvesting/combustion scenarios. Since new peat continuously is burnt it will take longer time before the benefit of

  9. A sulfide-saturated lunar mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenan, James M.; Mungall, James E.

    2017-04-01

    Although much work has been done to understand the controls on the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) for terrestrial melt compositions, little information exists to evaluate the SCSS for the high FeO compositions typical of lunar magmas, and at the reduced conditions of the Moon's interior. Experiments were done to measure the SCSS for a model low Ti mare basalt with 20 wt% FeO at 1400oC as a function of fO2 and pressure. Synthetic lunar basalt was encapsulated along with stoichiometric FeS in capsules made from Fe-Ir alloy. The fO2 of the experiment can be estimated by the heterogeneous equilibrium: Femetal + 1 /2 O2 = FeOsilicate Variation in the metal composition, by addition of Ir, serves to change the fO2 of the experiment. Capsule compositions spanning the range Fe25Ir75 to Fe96Ir4 (at%) were synthesized by sintering of pressed powders under reducing conditions. Fe100 capsules were fabricated from pure Fe rod. For a melt with 20 wt% FeO, this range in capsule composition spans the fO2 interval of ˜IW-1 (Fe100, Fe96Ir4) to IW+2.2 (Fe25Ir75). Experiments were done over the pressure interval of 0.1 MPa to 2 GPa. Results for experiments involving Fe100capsules indicate that the SCSS decreases from ˜2000 ppm (0.1 MPa) to 700 ppm (2 GPa). Experiments done thus far at 1 GPa, involving the range of capsule compositions indicated, show a marked decrease in SCSS as the Fe content of the capsule increases (fO2 decreases). Complementary to the decrease in SCSS is a drop in the sulfur content of the coexisting sulfide melt, from ˜50 at% at ΔIW = +2.2 to ˜20 at% at ΔIW-1. In fact, both the composition of the sulfide melt and the SCSS are essentially indistinguishable for Fe96Ir4 and Fe100 compositions. Results thus far indicate that at reduced conditions and high pressure, the SCSS for high FeO lunar compositions is low, and overlaps with Apollo 11 melt inclusion data. Importantly, such low SCSS does not require Fe metal saturation, and suggests that some

  10. Use of biochar as peat substitute for growing substrates of Euphorbia × lomi potted plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Dispenza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biochar from conifers wood was used in soilless culture as growing substrate alternative to peat for ornamental crops. Potted plants of Euphorbia × lomi Rauh cv. ‘Ilaria’ were grown with different mixtures (v:v of brown peat and biochar in order to evaluate main physical and chemical characteristics of this biomaterial as well as its effect on plant growth, ornamental characteristics and nutrients uptake. Biochar addition to peat increased pH, EC and K content of the growing substrates, as well as air content and bulk density. Biochar content of substrates significantly affected plant growth and biomass partitioning: higher number of shoots and leaves, leaf area and leaf dry weight were recorded in plants grown in 40% peat-60% biochar, with respect to plants grown in 100% peat and secondarily in 100% biochar. Leaf chlorophyll content was higher in plants grown in 60% and 80% biochar, while biomass water use efficiency was higher with 60% biochar. Plant uptake of K and Ca increased as biochar content of the substrates increased. Hence, a growing substrate containing 40% brown peat and 60% conifers wood biochar was identified as the more suitable mixture allowing to have a high-quality production of Euphorbia × lomi potted plants.

  11. Immune Responses of Wistar Rat (Rattus novergicus on Adduction of Humid Acid from Borneo Peat Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Wulandari Rousdy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peat soil is a type of soil that dominates the island of Borneo. Typical compounds in peat soil is humic acid. Various in vitro studies performed have shown peat subtropical humic compounds can stimulate the immune system. However, in vivo study on animal has not been done. This study aimed to determine the effect of humic acid extracted from peat soil of Borneo against the immune system, both of non-specific and specific immunity Wistar rats (Rattus novergicus. Research using a completely randomized design with five treatments and five replicates, the normal controls, a positive control (isoprinosine, humic acid 125; 250; 500 mg/kg. Humic acid was administered orally for 10 days. The results showed humic acid adduction did not significantly affect levels of hemoglobin, erythrocytes and hematocrit. Humic acid adduction of 125 mg/kg significantly affects the total leukocyte count and differential leukocyte. Humic acid 125 mg/kg also showed increased phagocytic index better than normal controls. All humic acid treatments do not provide a significant effect on the total amount of antibody. The results of this study can be used for the development of Borneo tropical peat resources as natural imunostimulant.How to CiteRousdy, D. W., Rahmawati, R. & Kurniatuhadi, R. (2016. Immune Responses of Wistar Rat (Rattus novergicus on Adduction of Humid Acid from Borneo Peat Soil. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 401-406. 

  12. THE CONSTRUCTION OF A COMPOSITION BASED ON MAGNESIA BINDER WITH PEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedeva Natalia Shamilievna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Obtained building material based on magnesia binder with different content of peat (0 to 90 %, on a specially developed technique. As a binder used PMK 87, for mixing mixtures used aqueous solution of magnesium chloride and peat from the Ivanovo region. It were determined such physical and physico-mechanical properties of the investigated material as the compressive strength and the density. The strength characteristics of silicate bricks, ceramic bricks and the investigated material based on magnesia binder and peat was analyzed and compared. It is established that the samples of construction material with content of peat not exceeding 40 wt.% can be attributed to the materials of structural purpose by its compressive strength. Samples of the material with content of the peat 40% have a density 943,75 kg/m3, that provides good heat and sound insulation properties. It is revealed that the solution of the raw material mixture of magnesia binder, peat, the solution of bischofite is optimized to place, and the material gets at least 85% of its strength during 30 days.

  13. Spring barley yield and nitrogen recovery after application of peat manure and pig slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. MATTILA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of peat manure, manufactured of pig slurry and moderately humified Sphagnum peat (slurry:peat ca. 1:1.5 v/v, as nitrogen (N source for spring barley was investigated in a four.year field experiment on a clay loam soil in south-western Finland. Pig slurry, NPK fertilizer and plain peat were used as references. Manures were incorporated before sowing or surface-applied after sowing in spring at an ammoniacal N rate of.54.106 kg.ha-1 with or without supplementary NPK fertilizer (40.kg N.ha-1. Soil moisture conditions were varied by different irrigation treatments. Peat manure produced 5.15% higher grain yields than pig slurry, with the largest difference after surface application. Incorporation was more important for slurry than for peat manure in increasing N uptake and yield. Soil moisture deficit in spring and early summer limited the availability of manure N. Part of the manure N that was not available in the early growing period was apparently taken up by the crop later. Consequently, N concentration tended to be higher with lower yields, and differences in the recovery of manure N were smaller than the differences in grain yield. Supplementation of manures with inorganic fertilizer N increased yield by 37%, on average, and improved the N recovery.;

  14. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in vertical peat profiles of natural and drained boreal peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Hannu; Mpamah, Promise; Rissanen, Antti; Pitkänen, Aki; Turunen, Jukka; Simola, Heikki

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands form a significant carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Change in peat hydrology, due to global warming is projected to change microbiological processes and peat carbon pool. We tested if bulk stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes serve as indicators of severe long term drying in peatlands drained for forestry. Depth profile analysis of peat, for their carbon and nitrogen content as well as their carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signatures, were conducted for peatlands in southern and eastern Finland, having ombrotrophic and minerotrophic natural and corresponding drained pairs or separate drained sites. The selection of sites allowed us to compare changes due to different fertility and changes due to long term artificial drying. Drainage lasting over 40 years has led to changes in hydrology, vegetation, nutrient mineralization and respiration. Furthermore, increased nutrient uptake and possible recycling of peat nitrogen and carbon trough vegetation back to the peat surface, also possibly has an effect on the stable isotopic composition of peat carbon and nitrogen. We think that drainage induced changes somehow correspond to those caused by changed hydrology due to climate change. We will present data from these measurements and discuss their implications for carbon and nitrogen flows in peatlands.

  15. Resilient modulus characteristics of soil subgrade with geopolymer additive in peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Nasuhi; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit Pranowo; Rahayu, Wiwik

    2017-06-01

    Resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil are generally very low with high potential of deformation and low bearing capacity. The efforts to improve the peat subgrade resilient modulus characteristics is required, one among them is by adding the geopolymer additive. Geopolymer was made as an alternative to replace portland cement binder in the concrete mix in order to promote environmentally friendly, low shrinkage value, low creep value, and fire resistant material. The use of geopolymer to improve the mechanical properties of peat as a road construction subgrade, hence it becomes important to identify the effect of geopolymer addition on the resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil. This study investigated the addition of 0% - 20% geopolymer content on peat soil derived from Ogan Komering Ilir, South Sumatera Province. Resilient modulus measurement was performed by using cyclic triaxial test to determine the resilience modulus model as a function of deviator stresses and radial stresses. The test results showed that an increase in radial stresses did not necessarily lead to an increase in modulus resilient, and on the contrary, an increase in deviator stresses led to a decrease in modulus resilient. The addition of geopolymer in peat soil provided an insignificant effect on the increase of resilient modulus value.

  16. Spatial distribution and seasonal changes of mayflies (Insecta, Ephemeroptera in a Western Balkan peat bog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vilenica

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peat bogs are unique wetland ecosystems of high conservation value all over the world, yet data on the macroinvertebrates (including mayfly assemblages in these habitats are still scarce. Over the course of one growing season, mayfly assemblages were sampled each month, along with other macroinvertebrates, in the largest and oldest Croatian peat bog and an adjacent stream. In total, ten mayfly species were recorded: two species in low abundance in the peat bog, and nine species in significantly higher abundance in the stream. Low species richness and abundance in the peat bog were most likely related to the harsh environmental conditions and mayfly habitat preferences. In comparison, due to the more favourable habitat conditions, higher species richness and abundance were observed in the nearby stream. Three of the recorded species, Caenis luctuosa from the peat bog, and Eurylophella karelica and Leptophlebia marginata from the stream are new records for the Croatian mayfly fauna. Typical Central European life cycle patterns were confirmed for several species (e.g. Baetis vernus, Nigrobaetis niger, Electrogena ujhelyii, while for several others (e.g. Habrophlebia fusca, Paraleptophlebia submarginata some discrepancies were observed. Therefore, these results provide new and valuable information on the ecology of mayflies in peat bog habitats.

  17. Spatial distribution and seasonal changes of mayflies (Insecta, Ephemeroptera) in a Western Balkan peat bog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilenica, Marina; Brigić, Andreja; Kerovec, Mladen; Gottstein, Sanja; Ternjej, Ivančica

    2016-01-01

    Peat bogs are unique wetland ecosystems of high conservation value all over the world, yet data on the macroinvertebrates (including mayfly assemblages) in these habitats are still scarce. Over the course of one growing season, mayfly assemblages were sampled each month, along with other macroinvertebrates, in the largest and oldest Croatian peat bog and an adjacent stream. In total, ten mayfly species were recorded: two species in low abundance in the peat bog, and nine species in significantly higher abundance in the stream. Low species richness and abundance in the peat bog were most likely related to the harsh environmental conditions and mayfly habitat preferences. In comparison, due to the more favourable habitat conditions, higher species richness and abundance were observed in the nearby stream. Three of the recorded species, Caenis luctuosa from the peat bog, and Eurylophella karelica and Leptophlebia marginata from the stream are new records for the Croatian mayfly fauna. Typical Central European life cycle patterns were confirmed for several species (e.g. Baetis vernus, Nigrobaetis niger, Electrogena ujhelyii), while for several others (e.g. Habrophlebia fusca, Paraleptophlebia submarginata) some discrepancies were observed. Therefore, these results provide new and valuable information on the ecology of mayflies in peat bog habitats.

  18. Saprophytic and Potentially Pathogenic Fusarium Species from Peat Soil in Perak and Pahang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Nurul Farah Abdul; Mohd, Masratulhawa; Nor, Nik Mohd Izham Mohd; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of Fusarium were discovered in peat soil samples collected from peat swamp forest, waterlogged peat soil, and peat soil from oil palm plantations. Morphological characteristics were used to tentatively identify the isolates, and species confirmation was based on the sequence of translation elongation factor-1α (TEF-1α) and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the closest match of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) searches against the GenBank and Fusarium-ID databases, five Fusarium species were identified, namely F. oxysporum (60%), F. solani (23%), F. proliferatum (14%), F. semitectum (1%), and F. verticillioides (1%). From a neighbour-joining tree of combined TEF-1α and β-tubulin sequences, isolates from the same species were clustered in the same clade, though intraspecies variations were observed from the phylogenetic analysis. The Fusarium species isolated in the present study are soil inhabitants and are widely distributed worldwide. These species can act as saprophytes and decomposers as well as plant pathogens. The presence of Fusarium species in peat soils suggested that peat soils could be a reservoir of plant pathogens, as well-known plant pathogenic species such F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. proliferatum, and F. verticillioides were identified. The results of the present study provide knowledge on the survival and distribution of Fusarium species. PMID:27019679

  19. Indonesian smoke aerosols from peat fires and the contribution from volcanic sulfur emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmann, Bärbel; Graf, Hans F.

    2003-06-01

    The island arc volcanoes in and around Indonesia have been permanently degassing for thousands of years, thereby contributing significantly to the total emissions of sulfur species in that region. The hot and wet tropical weather conditions with high solar irradiation and regular daily precipitation during the wet season lead to efficient removal of oxidised sulfate by wet deposition. This is accumulated in the Indonesian peat areas, which serve as natural sponges, soaking up rain during the wet season and slowly releasing moisture into the atmosphere during the dry season. When peat forests are drained for land clearing purposes, the peat quickly dries out and becomes extremely flammable. When ignited, the composition of the burning peat mainly determines the fire aerosol chemical composition and microphysical properties. In this paper we investigate the contribution of volcanic sulfur emissions to wet deposition of sulfur in Indonesian peat swamp areas based on numerical simulations carried out with a global atmospheric circulation model including the tropospheric sulfur cycle. Our study suggests that the observed hygroscopicity and elevated sulfur content of the Indonesian peat fire aerosols is due to accumulated volcanic sulfur.

  20. Use of biochar as peat substitute for growing substrates of Euphorbia × lomi potted plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dispenza, V.; Pasquale, C. de; Fascella, G.; Mammano, M.M.; Alonzo, G.

    2016-07-01

    Biochar from conifers wood was used in soilless culture as growing substrate alternative to peat for ornamental crops. Potted plants of Euphorbia × lomi Rauh cv. ‘Ilaria’ were grown with different mixtures (v:v) of brown peat and biochar in order to evaluate main physical and chemical characteristics of this biomaterial as well as its effect on plant growth, ornamental characteristics and nutrients uptake. Biochar addition to peat increased pH, EC and K content of the growing substrates, as well as air content and bulk density. Biochar content of substrates significantly affected plant growth and biomass partitioning: higher number of shoots and leaves, leaf area and leaf dry weight were recorded in plants grown in 40% peat-60% biochar, with respect to plants grown in 100% peat and secondarily in 100% biochar. Leaf chlorophyll content was higher in plants grown in 60% and 80% biochar, while biomass water use efficiency was higher with 60% biochar. Plant uptake of K and Ca increased as biochar content of the substrates increased. Hence, a growing substrate containing 40% brown peat and 60% conifers wood biochar was identified as the more suitable mixture allowing to have a high-quality production of Euphorbia × lomi potted plants.

  1. Biochar from deinking paper sludge as a peat replacement in growing media preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Eva; Méndez, Ana; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Fernández, José Manuel; Plaza, César; Gascó, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, there is an important trend in Europe for peat replacement with biochar in growing media formulation in order to reduce the environmental impact of peat exploitation. One evidence is the the creation of a working group on peat replacement within the framework of an EU COST action Biochar as option for sustainable resource management funded by the European Union. The use of biochar can reduce the environmental impact peat uses and also it can diminish the economic cost of different growing media ingredients as coir, bark or green waste compost in soil-less cultivation. The objective of this work was to study the use of biochar from deinking paper sludge in the formulation of growing media. For this reason, peat and coir were replaced by prepared biochar. Hydrophysical and chemical properties of different substrates were tested. At the same time, plant growth assay was designed. Results shown that is possible to use biochar to replace peat in growing media formulation obtaining similar crop yields.

  2. Effect of soil properties and hydrology on archaeal community composition in three temperate grasslands on peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Conrad, Ralf; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-08-01

    Grasslands established on drained peat soils are regarded as negligible methane (CH4 ) sources; however, they can still exhibit considerable soil CH4 dynamics. We investigated archaeal community composition in two different fen peat soils and one bog peat soil under permanent grassland in Denmark. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting and clone libraries to characterize the soils' archaeal community composition to gain a better understanding of relationships between peat properties and land use, respectively, and CH4 dynamics. Samples were taken at three different depths and at four different seasons. Archaeal community composition varied considerably between the three peatlands and, to a certain degree, also with peat depth, but seemed to be quite stable at individual sampling depths throughout the year. Archaeal community composition was mainly linked to soil pH. No methanogens were detected at one fen site with soil pH ranging from 3.2 to 4.4. The methanogenic community of the bog (soil pH 3.9-4.6) was dominated by hydrogenotrophs, whereas the second fen site (soil pH 5.0-5.3) comprised both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Overall, there seemed to be a significant coupling between peat type and archaeal community composition, with local hydrology modifying the strength of this coupling. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  4. Carbon storage change in a partially forestry-drained boreal mire determined through peat column inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkanen, A.; Tahvanainen, T.; Simola, H. [Univ. of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland). Dept. pf Biology; Turunen, J. [Geological Survey of Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2013-09-01

    To study the impact of forestry drainage on peat carbon storage, we cored paired quantitative peat samples from undrained and drained sides of an eccentric bog. Five pairs of 0 to {<=} 100-cm-deep surface-peat cores, and a pair of profiles representing the full peat deposit provided stratigraphic evidence of marked loss of surface peat due to drainage. For the drained side cores, we found a relative subsidence of 25-37 cm of the surface, and a loss of about 10 kg{sub DW}{sup m-2}, corresponding to 131 {+-} 28 g C m{sup -2} a{sup -1} (mean {+-} SE) for the post-drainage period. Similar peat loss was also found in the full deposit profiles, thus lending credibility to the whole-column inventory approach, even though the decrease (9 kg{sub DW} m{sup -2}) was relatively small in comparison with the total carbon storage (233 and 224 kg{sub DW} m{sup -2} for the undrained and drained sides, respectively). (orig.)

  5. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 1, October 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Batch experiments have been performed to determine the effects of different alkalis, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures on the solubility of peat organic material. Multi-stage pretreatment was investigated by pretreating the effluent from previous NaOH pretreatment cooks. Bacteria from three inoculation sources are being grown anaerobically on a growth medium containing a standard nutrient medium and one of twelve aromatic compounds. The concentration of aromatic compound is increased gradually to acclimate the bacteria to compounds which may result from peat pretreatment. These bacteria are being prepared for future digestion of pretreated peat. Laboratory procedures to determine pretreated solids energy content and pretreated solids dewatering characteristics are being developed. The environmental effects of liquid effluent disposal into the peat bog is being evaluated through a review of relevant literature. A preliminary design for a full scale peat biogasification plant has been developed. The plant is designed to produce 75 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD of pipeline quality methane. Major segments of the plant are concerned with the transport, handling, pretreating, and fermenting of the aqueous peat slurry, and the purification of the resulting methane gas. The information necessary for continuous PDU scale operation is being evaluated as part of Task 4. A detailed proposal for specific design plans and experiments has not yet begun yet, however.

  6. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 5, for period October 1 - December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Dr., Donald L.

    1981-01-15

    Progress is reported in the peat biogasification development program. The objective of the research is to compile the necessary data for the design and operation of a peat anaerobic digestion process development unit. Five areas are addressed: pretreatment information; anaerobic digestion; evaluation of waste streams; process model development and economic analysis; and planning for the process development unit. During the reporting period extensive data was taken for the development of the predictive process model. A number of batch and continuous pretreatment experiments were completed and analyzed. The four samples being analyzed through solvent extration were completed, and the results are presented. Work on High Pressure Liquid Chromatography continued, and the development of the gradient elution solvent system was completed with encouraging results. Pretreated peat has been batch fermented; the continuously oxidized peat has shown conversions of close to 30%. This is significantly higher than the conversions for the batch oxidized peat. Continuous digesters have been in operation for approximately one month. Development of a predictive process model for the three phases of peat biogasification, solubilization, oxidation, and fermentation, continued with very good results. The models for solubilization and oxidation were developed and experimental data are being gathered for the fermentation phase of the process model. (DMC)

  7. Holocene climate variability in the western Mediterranean through a multiproxy analysis from Padul peat bog (Sierra Nevada, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Román, María J.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Camuera, Jon; García-Alix, Antonio; Anderson, R. Scott; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Sachse, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula, located in the Mediterranean area, is an interesting location for paleoclimate studies due to its geographic situation between arid and humid climates. Sediments from peat bogs and lakes from Sierra Nevada, in southeastern Iberian Peninsula, have been very informative in terms of how vegetation and wetland environments were impacted by Holocene climate change. These studies are essential if we want to understand the past climate change in the area, which is the key to identify the possible environmental response of the Sierra Nevada ecosystems to future climate scenarios. Padul basin, located in the southwest of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, contains a ca. 100 m-thick peat bog sedimentary sequence that was deposited during the past 1 Ma making this area interesting for paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic reconstructions. A new 43 m-long sedimentary record has recently been retrieved from the Padul peat bog. In this study we have developed a multiproxy analysis of the Holocene part of the Padul-15-05 core including pollen analysis, XRF-core scanner, magnetic susceptibility and organic geochemistry, supported by an age control based on AMS radiocarbon dates, providing with information about vegetation and climate variability during the past 9.9 cal ka BP. This multiproxy reconstruction of the Padul-15-05 evidences the Mediterranean as a sensitive area with respect to global-scale climate system, showing relevant climate episodes such as the ca. 8, 7.5, 6.5 and 5.5 cal ka BP events during the early and middle Holocene. The trend to aridification to the late Holocene is interrupted by more arid and humid periods as the Iberian Roman Humid Period (from ca. 3 to 1.6 cal ka BP), the Dark Ages (from ca. 1.5 to 1.1 cal ka BP), the Medieval Climate Anomaly (from ca. 1.1 to 1.3 cal ka BP) and the Little Ice Age period (from ca. 500 to 100 cal yr BP).

  8. Monitoring the effects of manure policy in the Peat region, Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijboer, Arno; Buis, Eke; Fraters, Dico; Boumans, Leo; Lukacs, Saskia; Vrijhoef, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    Total N concentrations in farm ditches in the Peat region of the Netherlands are on the average twice as high as the Good Ecological Potential value of the Water Framework Directive. Since ditches are connected to regional surface water, they may contribute to eutrophication. The minerals policy aims to improve the water quality. In the Netherlands, the effectiveness of the minerals policy on water quality is evaluated with data from the National Minerals Policy Monitoring Programme (LMM). This regards farm data on the quality of water leaching from the root zone and on farm practices. The soil balance nitrogen surpluses decreased between 1996 and 2003 on dairy farms in the Peat region. However, no effect on root zone leaching was found. This study aims to show how monitoring in the Peat region can be improved in order to link water quality to agricultural practice. Contrary to the other Dutch regions, nitrate concentrations in root zone leaching on farms in the Peat region are often very low (90% of the farms below 25 mg/l) due to the reduction of nitrate (denitrification). The main nitrogen (N) components in the peat region waters are ammonium and organic N. Total N is therefore a better measure for N concentrations in the Peat region. The ammonium concentration in groundwater in Dutch peat soils increases with depth. It is assumed that the deeper ammonia-rich water is older and relates to anaerobic peat decomposition instead of agricultural practice. Recent infiltrated low-ammonium water, lies like a thin freshwater lens on the older water. In the Peat region, root zone leaching is monitored by taking samples from the upper meter of groundwater. Unintended, often both lens water and older water are sampled and this distorts the relation between agricultural practice and water quality. In the Peat region, the N surplus is transported with the precipitation surplus to ditches. The relation between the N surplus and the total N in ditch water is therefore better

  9. Microtopography of bare peat: an objective classification from high-resolution topographic survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark; Warburton, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands globally are at risk of degradation through increased susceptibility to erosion as a result of climate change. For peatland restoration practices to be designed efficiently and evaluated effectively, quantification of eroded peat volumes is required alongside an understanding of the processes responsible for their degradation. Owing to the unique material properties of peat, fine-scale microtopographic expressions of surface processes are especially pronounced and present a potentially rich source of geomorphological information; providing valuable insights into the stability and dominant surface process regimes. Bare peat is highly responsive to changing environmental forces acting at the near surface and characteristic microtopographies emerge in response to rainfall, surface wash, wind action and fluctuations in surface temperature (both drying and freezing). Spatial and temporal variations in surface roughness reflect contrasts in the physical properties of the peat and key erosion processes acting in combination. We present the first conceptual framework to rigorously describe bare peat microtopography and use Structure-from-Motion (SfM) surveys to quantify roughness for different peat surfaces. Through application of a survey-grade structured-light hand-held 3D imager (Mantis Vision F5-Short Range) which can represent sub-millimetre topographic variability in field conditions, we present the most reliable field validation of SfM at the plot scale (<1 m2). Peat microtopography is quantified using 26 roughness metrics that cover a range of surface features (including amplitude, spacing, hybrid, multi-scale and anisotropy parameters). SfM reconstructs peat microtopography effectively, although some smoothing is observed. Over 55 plots, the roughness of microtopographic types is quantified and an objective classification system derived from decision tree analysis. After training on 66% of the data, the decision tree correctly classified 85% of plots

  10. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  11. Avalanche effect and gain saturation in high harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Serrat, Carles; Budesca, Josep M; Seres, Jozsef; Seres, Enikoe; Aurand, Bastian; Hoffmann, Andreas; Namba, Shinichi; Kuehl, Thomas; Spielmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Optical amplifiers in all ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum exhibit two essential characteristics: i) the input signal during the propagation in the medium is multiplied by the avalanche effect of the stimulated emission to produce exponential growth and ii) the amplification saturates at increasing input signal. We demonstrate that the strong-field theory in the frame of high harmonic generation fully supports the appearance of both the avalanche and saturation effects in the amplification of extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse trains. We confirm that the amplification takes place only if the seed pulses are perfectly synchronized with the driving strong field in the amplifier. We performed an experimental study and subsequent model calculation on He gas driven by intense 30-fs-long laser pulses, which was seeded with an attosecond pulse train at 110 eV generated in a separated Ne gas jet. The comparison of the performed calculations with the measurements clearly demonstrates that the pumped He gas med...

  12. Composted Green Waste as a Substitute for Peat in Growth Media: Effects on Growth and Nutrition of Calathea insignis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lu; Sun, Xiangyang; Tian, Yun; Gong, Xiaoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Peat mined from endangered wetland ecosystems is generally used as a component in soilless potting media in horticulture but is a costly and non-renewable natural resource. The objective of this work was to study the feasibility of replacing peat with different percentages (0, 10, 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100%) of composted green waste (CGW) as growth media for the production of the ornamental plant Calathea insignis. Compared with 100% peat media, media containing CGW had improved physical and ch...

  13. OPTIMITURVE - Peat production based on solar energy. Final report on the energy research programme 1988-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, A.; Erkkilae, A. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Combustion and Thermal Engineering Lab.

    1994-06-01

    The aim of the Optimiturve research programme was to develop a peat production method based on solar energy, the efficiency and the profitability of which would be twice as high as those of previous methods. Due to the efficiency, which means a higher peat yield per hectare, the circulation of the capital invested in peat production increases and further boosts the competitiveness of peat. It was calculated that if the target of the research programme can be fulfilled, peat production costs could be reduced by 20 %. The total budget of the programme amounted to 44,3 million FIM. Basic knowledge for ditching of the bog, drying of milled peat, milling, pneumatic harvesting, drying of sod peat, maceration and excavation have been developed in the course of the Optimiturve research programme. Additionally, peat production planning and control have been studied and developed. A new milled peat production method, the so called TEHOTURVE method, and a new combined production method for milled and sod peat, the MULTI method, have been developed on this basis. The guiding principle of the TEHOTURVE method is that the average grain size of the milled layer to be dried increased from 5 mm to 15 mm and the collection coefficient of the ridger increased from 50 % to 80 %. Ridging of several harvests on the same ridge, efficient loading and driving are also typical of the method. The MULTI method is a combined production method for milled and sod peat. The method is based on sod peat production using the ridge drying method (TUPLA), in which two harvests are produced simultaneously. The first harvest is dried on the field and the other on the ridge

  14. Linking High Frequency Variations in Stream Water DOC to Ages of Water Sources in Peat-Dominated Montane Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaley, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Lessels, J. S.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    We combined time series of inferred DOC (from optical sensors) and stable isotopes in streams and watershed source areas to assess the link between water age and C fluxes. We monitored temporal dynamics of FDOM for 2 yrs at nested scales (0.9, 3.0 and 30km2) in a montane Scottish watershed. FDOM was strongly correlated (r2 ~ 0.8) with DOC allowing inference of 15 min timeseries. Marked seasonality was observed, with highest DOC concentrations (~25 mg l-1) in summer events and lower concentrations (~5mg l-1) in winter. During events, anticlockwise hysteresis was observed; consistent with expansion of the riparian saturation zone, increasing hydrological connectivity across peat soils and mobilizing DOC. Lag times for peak discharge and DOC were 1-12 hrs depending on event characteristics and antecedent conditions. Isotope time series from precipitation, streams and catchment source waters (overland flow and hillslope drainage) were also generated. These allowed us to model the non-stationary characteristics of their ages. Stream water age ranges from 3 months at high flows when overland flow dominates runoff to 4 yrs under baseflow. Overland flow age was a dominant influence on DOC transport. Highest concentrations occurred in small summer events with relatively young (management strategies.

  15. Using X-ray computed tomography to evaluate the initial saturation resulting from different saturation procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun; Wildenschild, D; Jensen, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    for saturation. Evaluation of the different enhanced saturation techniques was done with Xray computed tomography (CT) and gravimetrically. The use of CT scanning makes it possible to observe the spatial distribution of wetting and non-wetting phases in the porous medium in a non-destructive way. In this case...... with pressurized nitrogen between each saturation and allowed to saturate for the same length of time for all the different procedures. Both gravimetric measurements and CT attenuation levels showed that venting the sample with carbon dioxide prior to saturation clearly improved initial saturation whereas the use...

  16. TARKKATURVE - Peat production on shallow fields; TARKKATURVE - mataloituvien soiden tuotantomenetelmien ja laitteiden kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurminen, T. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Aho, V.J.; Tiihonen, I. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    It is important to produce the peat of the bogs under production as completely as possible when improving the efficiency and economy of milled peat production. Hence the service life of bog areas is being extended, and the investment costs per produced peat mass are decreased. Research, in which new planning, production and ditching methods, as well as production machines for production from shallowing fields, has been carried out in order to obtain the targets. Data obtained from charting of the bog, by which it is possible to take the regional differences of the production areas into account while planning and making of the production strips and ditching, is used in planning of the production fields. Stones are removed from the strips on the mineral soil areas during preparation of the fields, and peat is conveyed from the depleted areas into production strips, hence it is possible to make ditching with open ditches excavated into mineral soil. The new milled peat production machines are lighter than the older ones, and non-sparkling materials, e.g. plastics, are used in the construction of them in every phase of the production. The new machines are able to operate on strips of varying width and on the fields of poor load carrying capacity. Brushing technology is used in collection of peat. By this method it is possible to improve in addition to the fire safety, also the collecting accuracy, and hence the efficiency of the production. The new methods and equipment developed in the researches are now in wide utilization in Finnish peat production

  17. Tarkkaturve - Peat production on shallow fields; Tarkkaturve - mataloituvien soiden tuotantomenetelmien ja laitteiden kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurminen, T.; Honkanen, J.; Jormalainen, R.; Laaksoharju, T.; Rytkoenen, P.; Viitanen, J. [Vapo Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Aho, V.J.; Aalto, J.; Kallio, M.; Leinonen, A.; Tiihonen, I. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    It is important to produce the peat of the bogs under production as completely as possible when improving the efficiency and economy of milled peat production. Hence the service life of bog areas is being extended, and the investment costs per produced peat mass are decreased. Research, in which new planning, production and ditching methods, as well as production machines for production from shallowing fields, has been carried out in order to obtain the targets. Data obtained from charting of the bog, by which it is possible to take the regional differences of the production areas into account while planning and making of the production strips and ditching, is used in planning of the production fields. Stones are removed from the strips on the mineral soil areas during preparation of the fields, and peat is conveyed from the depletable areas into production strips, hence it is possible to make ditching with open ditches excavated into mineral soil. The new milled peat production machines are lighter than the older ones, and non-sparkling materials, e.g. plastics, are used in the construction of them in every phase of the production. The new machines are able to operate on strips of varying width and on the fields of poor load carrying capacity. Brushing technology is used in collection of peat. By this method it is possible to improve in addition to the fire safety, also the collecting accuracy, and hence the efficiency of the production. The new methods and equipment developed in the researches are now in wide utilisation in Finnish peat production. (orig.)

  18. Utilization of new materials in peat machines; Uusien materiaalien kaeyttoe turvekoneissa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallio, M.; Poeyhoenen, P.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this three year research (1993-1995) was to study the suitability of new materials for different applications in peat production industry, exploiting the plastic and brush technologies, and surface coatings. The peat production machines will be intensified, lightened, made more firesafe, and ergonomical by using new materials (plastics, composites, metals and surface coatings). The research targets and materials were surveyed, the possibilities to construct an unsparkling miller were investigated, and low-friction materials, on which the peat glides easily, were sought in the beginning of the research. The unsparkling miller was studied and developed further in 1994 using platic plates, the application of brushing technology in sod peat technology, and a ridger, equipped with horizontal brushes, for sod peat were studied, and the possibilities to lighten the construction of the collector-wagon using light materials was investigated. The tasks for 1995 were to study the brushing technology for peat production, the properties of the bristle, and the applications of new materials for milling and sewing of peat using laboratory tests. The brush-ridger tests were made in cooperation with the brush experts of the NIITP. A rotating brush harrower mixed and ruffled the milled layer. The brush-harrower seemed to be more effective than the spoon-harrower with the driving speed higher than 8 km/h. The power consumption of the brush varied in between 1.5 - 4 kW/m, when the rotation speed was 200-300 1/min, the milled layer load 44 mm and the deformation of the bristles 20 mm

  19. Essential Oils and Fatty Acids Composition of Dry Fruits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fatty acid was about 54% saturated and 46% unsaturated with omega-6 and omega-3 constituting 27% and omega-9 (20%). The effectiveness of T.tetraptera to the treatment of variety of ailments does not depend largely on the essential oils composition of the plant since the oil is dominated by acetic acid. Any essential ...

  20. Determining the degree of peat decomposition - A comparison of different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biester, Harald; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schellekens, Judith; Basler, Anna; Hermanns, Yvonne-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Peat humification or decomposition is a frequently used proxy to extract past time changes in hydrology and climate from peat bogs. During the past century several methods to determine changes in peat decomposition have been introduced. Most of these methods are operationally defined only and the chemical changes underlying the decomposition process are often poorly understood and lack validation. Due to the chemically undefined nature of many humification analyses the comparison of results obtained by different methods is difficult if not misleading. In this study we compared changes in peat decomposition in cores of two peat bogs (Königsmoor (KK), Kleines Rotes Bruch (KRB)) from the Harz Mountains (Germany) using C/N ratios, Fourier Transform Infrared spectra absorption (FTIR) intensities, Rock Eval® oxygen- and hydrogen indices, δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures and UV-absorption of NaOH peat extracts. In addition, one of the cores was analysed for changes in the peat's molecular composition using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS). Records of decomposition proxies show similar historical development at both sites, indicating external forcing such as climate as controlling process. Moreover, all decomposition proxies except UV-ABS and δ15N isotopes show similar patterns in their records and thus reflect in different extents signals of decomposition. Pyrolysis-GC-MS analyses of the KK core reveal that changes in peat molecular chemistry are mainly attributed to decomposition processes and to a lesser extend to changes in vegetation. Changes in the abundance of molecular compounds indicate that peat decomposition in the KK bog is mainly characterized by preferential decomposition of phenols and polysaccharides and relative enrichment of aliphatics during drier periods. Enrichment of lignin and other aromatics during decomposition was also observed but showed less variation, and presumably reflects changes in vegetation associated

  1. Heterotrophic respiration in drained tropical peat temperatures influenced by shading gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Kerojoki, Otto; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2015-04-01

    Lowland peatlands in Southeast Asia constitute a highly concentrated carbon (C) pool of global significance. These peatlands have formed over periods of several millennia by forest vegetation tolerant to flooding and poor substrates. Uncontrollable drainage and reoccurring wild fires in lack of management after removal of forest cover has impaired the C-storing functions in large reclaimed areas. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reporting sees drained tropical organic soils as one of the largest greenhouse gas emissions releasing terrestrial systems. Vast areas of deforested tropical peatlands do not receive noteworthy shading by vegetation, which increases the amount of solar radiation reaching the peat surface. We studied heterotrophic carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) fluxes in tropical peat in conditions, where; (i) peat temperatures were modified by artificial shading (no shade, 28%, 51% and 90% from the full sun exposure), (ii) root respiration was minimized, (iii) nutrient availability for peat decomposer community was changed (NPK fertilization of 0 and 313 kg ha-1). The experiment was repeated at two over 20 years ago drained fallow agricultural- and degraded sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Enhanced shading created a lasting decrease in peat temperatures, and decreased diurnal temperature fluctuations, in comparison to less shaded plots. The largest peat temperature difference was between the unshaded and 90% shaded peat surface, where the average temperatures within the topmost 50-cm peat profile differed 3 °C, and diurnal temperatures at 5 cm depth varied up to 4.2 °C in the unshaded and 0.4 °C in the 90% shaded conditions. Highest impacts on the heterotrophic CO2 fluxes caused by the treatments were on agricultural land, where 90% shading from the full exposure resulted in a 33% lower CO2 emission average on the unfertilised plots and a 66% lower emission average on the fertilised plots. Correlation

  2. Peat decomposition records in three pristine ombrotrophic bogs in southern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Broder

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ombrotrophic bogs in southern Patagonia have been examined with regard to paleoclimatic and geochemical research questions but knowledge about organic matter decomposition in these bogs is limited. Therefore, we examined peat humification with depth by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR measurements of solid peat, C/N ratio, and δ13C and δ15N isotope measurements in three bog sites. Peat decomposition generally increased with depth but distinct small scale variation occurred, reflecting fluctuations in factors controlling decomposition. C/N ratios varied mostly between 40 and 120 and were significantly correlated (R2 > 0.55, p < 0.01 with FTIR-derived humification indices. The degree of decomposition was lowest at a site presently dominated by Sphagnum mosses. The peat was most strongly decomposed at the driest site, where currently peat-forming vegetation produced less refractory organic material, possibly due to fertilizing effects of high sea spray deposition. Decomposition of peat was also advanced near ash layers, suggesting a stimulation of decomposition by ash deposition. Values of δ13C were 26.5 ± 2‰ in the peat and partly related to decomposition indices, while δ15N in the peat varied around zero and did not consistently relate to any decomposition index. Concentrations of DOM partly related to C/N ratios, partly to FTIR derived indices. They were not conclusively linked to the decomposition degree of the peat. DOM was enriched in 13C and in 15N relative to the solid phase probably due to multiple microbial modifications and recycling of N in these N-poor environments. In summary, the depth profiles of C/N ratios, δ13C values, and FTIR spectra seemed to reflect changes in environmental conditions affecting decomposition, such as bog wetness, but were dominated by site specific factors, and are further influenced by ash

  3. Synthesis and characterization of saturated polyester and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and nanocomposites derived from glycolyzed PET waste with varied compositions. SUNAIN KATOCH. ∗ ... Water vapour transmission (WVT) was determined for saturated polyester nanocomposite sheets according to ... ing the synthesis of saturated polyester (from GPET waste). This has been done for the estimation of the ...

  4. Ultrafast THz Saturable Absorption in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in a nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy experiment. Saturable absorption is caused by sample conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite valley scattering in the field of a strong THz pulse....

  5. Fault tolerant control of systems with saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents framework for fault tolerant controllers (FTC) that includes input saturation. The controller architecture known from FTC is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization is extended to handle input saturation. Applying this controller architecture in connec...

  6. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in the terahertz THz frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum...

  7. Determination of saturation functions and wettability for chalk based on measured fluid saturations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.; Bech, N.; Moeller Nielsen, C.

    1998-08-01

    The end effect of displacement experiments on low permeable porous media is used for determination of relative permeability functions and capillary pressure functions. Saturation functions for a drainage process are determined from a primary drainage experiment. A reversal of the flooding direction creates an intrinsic imbibition process in the sample, which enables determination if imbibition saturation functions. The saturation functions are determined by a parameter estimation technique. Scanning effects are modelled by the method of Killough. Saturation profiles are determined by NMR. (au)

  8. Geoinformatics meets education for a peat bog information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Ulrich; Fiene, Christina; Plass, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Within the project "Expedition Bog: Young researchers are experimenting, exploring and discovering" a bog-information- system is developed by the Department of Geography (University of Education Heidelberg, Germany), the Institute for Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing (University of Osnabrueck, Germany; the NABU Umweltpyramide gGmbH. This information system will be available for schools and to the public. It is supplemented by teaching units on various topics around the bog via an online platform. The focus of the project, however, is the original encounter with the bog habitat. This is realized by a GPS scavenger hunt with small research tasks and observations, mapping and experiments. The project areas are the Huvenhoops bog and the Lauenbruecker bog in Rotenburg in Lower Saxony, Germany. Equipped with a researcher backpack, GPS device and a mobile bog book by means of a pocket PC, students can discover different learning stations in the project bogs. In our areas the students can learn more about different topics such as "the historical memory of the bog", "water", "peat moss and other plants" and "animals of the bog". Moreover small inquiry research projects can be executed. Experimenting on site helps students to develop important scientific findings and increases their curiosity and enthusiasm for nature. It also promotes a number of other basic skills such as literacy, language skills, social skills or fine motor skills. Moreover it also fosters the development of a positive attitude to science in general. The main objective of the project is to promote sustainable environmental education, as well as the development of environmental awareness. This will be accomplished through the imparting of knowledge but also through experiencing nature with all senses in the context of original encounters.

  9. Microbial Community Structure and Function in Peat Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Ausec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many peatlands in Europe have been subjected to land reclamation and systematic drainage, which have substantially affected nutrient cycles in the soil. This work reviews published studies on microbial processes linked to carbon and nitrogen transformations in the soils of the Ljubljana marsh, a drained peatland positioned close to Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. This region is known for its dramatic diversity of animal and plant life, but below ground it hides diverse bacterial and archaeal communities that are highly responsive to environmental changes and make the Ljubljana marsh soils a good source of N2O and CO2, and a sink for CH4. Methanogenesis is highly restricted in these soils due to competition for electron donors with iron reducers. In addition, methane is efficiently removed by methanotrophs, which are highly active, especially in the soil layers exposed to the changing water table. Denitrification is limited by electron acceptors and in deeper soil layers also by carbon, which becomes more recalcitrant with depth. Nitrification involves bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers with ammonia oxidation rates being among the highest in the world. Interestingly, ammonia-oxidising Thaumarchaeota in acidic bog soils thrive only on ammonia released through mineralisation of organic matter and are incapable of oxidising added mineral ammonia. The soils of the Ljubljana marsh are rich in bacterial laccase-like genes, which may encode enzymes involved in lignin degradation and are therefore interesting for bioexploitations. Future challenges involve designing studies that will reveal specific physiological functions of phenol oxidases and other enzymes involved in peat transformations and address relations between microbial diversity, function and ecosystem responses to anthropogenic disturbances.

  10. Nonomuraea rhodomycinica sp. nov., isolated from peat swamp forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripreechasak, Paranee; Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Supong, Khomsan; Pittayakhajonwut, Pattama; Kudo, Takuji; Ohkuma, Moriya; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2017-06-01

    The taxonomic position of an actinomycete, strain NR4-ASC07T, isolated from a soil sample collected from Sirindhorn peat swamp forest, Narathiwat Province, Thailand, was clarified using a polyphasic approach. On the basis of morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, it was classified among the members of the genus Nonomuraea. It produced tightly closed spiral spore chains on aerial mycelium as well as forming a pseudosporangium. Whole-cell hydrolysates contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, glucose, ribose, madurose and mannose. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, hydroxyphosphatidylethanolamine, lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannosides, unknown ninhydrin-positive phosphoglycolipids and unknown glycolipid. Menaquiones were MK-9(H4), MK-9(H0), MK-9(H2), MK-10(H4) and MK-9(H6). Predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C16 : 0, C17 : 0 10-methyl, C16 : 0, C17 : 1ω8c, C16 : 0 2-OH and iso-C15 : 0. The phylogenetic tree reconstructed on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain fell within the clade containing Nonomuraea muscovyensis FMN03T, Nonomuraea roseoviolacea subsp. roseoviolaceaNBRC 14098T and Nonomuraea roseoviolacea subsp. carminataNBRC 15903T. The DNA-DNA relatedness and phenotypic data supported that strain NR4-ASC07T was clearly distinguished from the closely related species and represents a novel species of the genus Nonomuraea for which the name Nonomuraea rhodomycinica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NR4-ASC07T (=NBRC 112327T=TISTR 2465T).

  11. Trophic Status Controls Mercury Methylation Pathways in Northern Peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Barkay, T.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Schaefer, J.; Hu, H.; Sidelinger, W.; Liu, X.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) can be produced by a variety of microbes including syntrophs, methanogens, acetogens, and fermenters, besides sulfate (SO42-, SRB) and iron- reducing bacteria. Many freshwater wetlands are deficient in electron acceptors that support the traditional respiratory pathways of methylation, yet they accumulate high levels of MeHg. To investigate methylation in these wetlands and to connect these pathways with vegetation and microbial communities, incubation experiments were conducted using peats from 26 sites in Alaska. The sites were clustered using multiple factor analysis based on pH, temp, CH4 and volatile fatty acids production rates, and surface vegetation composition. Three clusters were generated and corresponded to three trophic levels that were manifested by three pH levels (3.5, 4.5, and 5). Hg methylation activity in laboratory incubations was determined using the short-lived radioisotope 197Hg. In the low pH, Sphagnum-dominated cluster, methylation rates were less than 1% day-1 and likely conducted by primary fermenters. Conversely, the high pH trophic cluster dominated by Carex aquatilis and active syntrophy exhibited Hg methylation rates as high as 12% day-1. In intermediate sites, rich in Sphagnum magellanicum with less Carex, a gradient in syntrophy and Hg methylation paths was observed. Amendments with process-stimulators and inhibitors revealed no evidence of SO42- reduction, but suggested that SRB, metabolizing either syntrophically with methanogens and/or by fermentation, likely methylated Hg. While on going metatranscriptomics studies are required to verify the role of syntrophs, fermenters, and methanogens as methylators, these results revealed that Hg methylation pathways change greatly along trophic gradients with a dominance of respiratory pathways in mineral-rich sites, syntrophy dominance in intermediate sites, and fermentation dominance in nutrient-poor sites.

  12. Modeling the Effect of Plants and Peat on Evapotranspiration in Constructed Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Chazarenc

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET in constructed wetlands (CWs represents a major factor affecting hydrodynamics and treatment performances. The presence of high ET was shown to improve global treatment performances, however ET is affected by a wide range of parameters including plant development and CWs age. Our study aimed at modelling the effect of plants and peat on ET in CWs; since we hypothesized peat could behave like the presence of accumulated organic matter in old CWs. Treatment performances, hydraulic behaviour, and ET rates were measured in eight 1 m2 CWs mesocosm (1 unplanted, 1 unplanted with peat, 2 planted with Phragmites australis, 2 planted with Typha latifolia and 2 planted with Phragmites australis with peat. Two models were built using first order kinetics to simulate COD and TKN removal with ET as an input. The effect of peat was positive on ET and was related to the better growth conditions it offered to macrophytes. Removal efficiency in pilot units with larger ET was higher for TKN. On average, results show for COD a k20 value of 0.88 d-1 and 0.36 d-1 for TKN. We hypothesized that the main effect of ET was to concentrate effluent, thus enhancing degradation rates.

  13. Drainage design on peat land and its utilization for fish culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribowo, R. Ismu; Novianti, Fithria

    2017-11-01

    The utilization of drainage technique developed by Hooghoudt and Ernst since 1940 can be applied for lowering ground water surface. Water in the drainage canal is able to be used for fresh water fish culture. Horizon Layer of Homogeneous Peat Soil has a hydraulic conductivity as high as 4.5 meters per day. The distance between drainage canals is 118 meters. Drainage water debit for every 23,600 square meter of land is 23.76 liters per minute. Horizon Layer of Heterogeneous Peat Soil has a hydraulic conductivity of peat soil as first soil layer as high as 4.5 meters per day and a hydraulic conductivity of sandy loam as second soil layer as high as 0.8 meters per day. The distance between drainage canals is 329 meters. Drainage water debit for every 65,800 square meter of land is 66.25 liters per minute. When the pH of the water has reached 5 up till 6, then spreading the fish seed can be conducted. Some types of fish that have been introduced in the peat land water are Patin Siam (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus), Lele Dumbo (Clarias gariepinus) and Nila (Oreochromis niloticus). Furthermore, the introduced fish into the peat land water must have an economic value for the people who grow the fish.

  14. Smouldering peat fires in polluted landscapes and their impact on heavy metal mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Gareth; Rothwell, James; Shuttleworth, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Whilst wildfires are commonly viewed as a threat confined to Southern Europe, Australia, and North America, recognition of wildfire hazard in the UK has been growing in recent years. UK wildfires often occur on heathland vegetation underlain by peat. These areas can contain industrially-derived legacy pollutants, such as mercury, lead, and arsenic. Ignition of the peat can lead to long-term smouldering fires that are difficult to extinguish, leading to large-scale damage. While work on assessing post-fire damage of peatlands has focussed on carbon and nutrient dynamics, there has been little attention on the release of heavy metals following wildfires. This paper presents initial data from a preliminary study to assess heavy metal release from smouldering peat fires. A homogenised sample of peat from the Peak District National Park, UK was ignited, monitored using thermocouples and an IR camera, and left to smoulder until self-extinguished (~9 hours). Total mass loss was 61%. Samples of pre- and post-burn peat were analysed for their heavy metal concentrations using XRF, ICP-MS, and CVAFS. Sample analysis is ongoing, but initial data shows that there is a substantial (3x) relative enrichment in heavy metal concentrations in post-fire ash. This has important implications for subsequent mobilisation in the aquatic and terrestrial environments, as well as consequences for human health risk through atmospheric redistribution.

  15. PEAT: an intelligent and efficient paired-end sequencing adapter trimming algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Lung; Weng, Jui-Cheng; Hsiao, Chiung-Chih; Chou, Min-Te; Tseng, Chin-Wen; Hung, Jui-Hung

    2015-01-01

    In modern paired-end sequencing protocols short DNA fragments lead to adapter-appended reads. Current paired-end adapter removal approaches trim adapter by scanning the fragment of adapter on the 3' end of the reads, which are not competent in some applications. Here, we propose a fast and highly accurate adapter-trimming algorithm, PEAT, designed specifically for paired-end sequencing. PEAT requires no a priori adaptor sequence, which is convenient for large-scale meta-analyses. We assessed the performance of PEAT with many adapter trimmers in both simulated and real life paired-end sequencing libraries. The importance of adapter trimming was exemplified by the influence of the downstream analyses on RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and MNase-seq. Several useful guidelines of applying adapter trimmers with aligners were suggested. PEAT can be easily included in the routine paired-end sequencing pipeline. The executable binaries and the standalone C++ source code package of PEAT are freely available online.

  16. Peat biogasification development program. Quarterly progress report No. 2, January 1-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Donald L.; Buivid, Michael G.

    1980-01-01

    Batch experiments have been performed to determine the effects of different alkalis, temperatures, retention times, solids loading, and oxygen partial pressures on the solubility of peat organic material. Oxidation experiments have been performed simultaneously with and separately from solubilization. In both cases kinetic information has been developed based on oxygen consumption. Kinetics based on fermentable product formation are dependent on satisfactory identification methods. Development of analytical procedures for product identification have included: Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), solvent extraction, aldehyde precipitation, and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC). Microorganisms from three inoculation sources are being grown anaerobically using a growth medium containing a standard nutrient and a specific substrate, one of twelve aromatic compounds. The concentration of aromatic compound was increased gradually in order that bacteria acclimate for future use as inocula with pretreated peat liquors. Acids and methane production are being monitored for pretreated peat liquor fermentations using an acclimated microorganism inocula. Apparent viscosity and apparent heat transfer coefficient data are being obtained at three peat slurry solids concentrations (3-5, 10, 15% total solids). A 75% heat recovery would give a positive energy balance around the pretreatment reactor. Development has continued in regards to full scale peat biogasification design (75 x 10/sup 6/ SCFD, pipeline quality methane). The information necessary for continuous PDU scale operation is being evaluated in terms of what processing information may be obtained from various scale units, batch and continuous.

  17. Application of computerized image analysis techniques to the study of structural properties of peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    Many of the properties of peat are related to its structure, e.g. water retention and conductivity, ion-exchange capacity, and coking behaviour. Traditionally, the analysis of peat structure has included relatively crude macroscopic estimates of humification, porosity, and particle size fractioning. Studies by means of the light or electron microscope of peat microstructure have not been common in the past but may become of great significance in the future, aided by newly developed techniques for computerized image analysis. These techniques include: image generation by means of a TV camera attached to the microscope, image digitalization that results in a grid of image points (pixels), image enhancement that serves to eliminate non-informant picture elements, and pixel-by-pixel measurement of selected variables. This paper presents the concept of computerized image analysis and describes how embedded thin sections of peat can be analyzed for particle or pore size and shape, total porosity, and total surface area. In combination with suitable microscopy techniques, the content, size and distribution of e.g. cellulose fibres can also be analyzed, and periodicity in the peat structure can be revealed by means of Fourier transform analysis. Recorded data are immediately available to the computer for further processing. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Spatial variability of selected physicochemical parameters within peat deposits in small valley mire: a geostatistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawłowski Dominik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geostatistical methods for 2D and 3D modelling spatial variability of selected physicochemical properties of biogenic sediments were applied to a small valley mire in order to identify the processes that lead to the formation of various types of peat. A sequential Gaussian simulation was performed to reproduce the statistical distribution of the input data (pH and organic matter and their semivariances, as well as to honouring of data values, yielding more ‘realistic’ models that show microscale spatial variability, despite the fact that the input sample cores were sparsely distributed in the X-Y space of the study area. The stratigraphy of peat deposits in the Ldzań mire shows a record of long-term evolution of water conditions, which is associated with the variability in water supply over time. Ldzań is a fen (a rheotrophic mire with a through-flow of groundwater. Additionally, the vicinity of the Grabia River is marked by seasonal inundations of the southwest part of the mire and increased participation of mineral matter in the peat. In turn, the upper peat layers of some of the central part of Ldzań mire are rather spongy, and these peat-forming phytocoenoses probably formed during permanent waterlogging.

  19. Palaeoecological studies as a source of peat depth data: A discussion and data compilation for Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ratcliffe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The regional/national carbon (C stock of peatlands is often poorly characterised, even for comparatively well-studied areas. A key obstacle to better estimates of landscape C stock is the scarcity of data on peat depth, leading to simplistic assumptions. New measurements of peat depth become unrealistically resource-intensive when considering large areas. Therefore, it is imperative to maximise the use of pre-existing datasets. Here we propose that one potentially valuable and currently unexploited source of peat depth data is palaeoecological studies. We discuss the value of these data and present an initial compilation for Scotland (United Kingdom which consists of records from 437 sites and yields an average depth of 282 cm per site. This figure is likely to be an over-estimate of true average peat depth and is greater than figures used in current estimates of peatland C stock. Depth data from palaeoecological studies have the advantages of wide distribution, high quality, and often the inclusion of valuable supporting information; but also the disadvantage of spatial bias due to the differing motivations of the original researchers. When combined with other data sources, each with its own advantages and limitations, we believe that palaeoecological datasets can make an important contribution to better-constrained estimates of peat depth which, in turn, will lead to better estimates of peatland landscape carbon stock.

  20. Degradation potentials of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from thawed permafrost peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneer Selvam, Balathandayuthabani; Lapierre, Jean-François; Guillemette, Francois; Voigt, Carolina; Lamprecht, Richard E.; Biasi, Christina; Christensen, Torben R.; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Berggren, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Global warming can substantially affect the export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from peat-permafrost to aquatic systems. The direct degradability of such peat-derived DOC, however, is poorly constrained because previous permafrost thaw studies have mainly addressed mineral soil catchments or DOC pools that have already been processed in surface waters. We incubated peat cores from a palsa mire to compare an active layer and an experimentally thawed permafrost layer with regard to DOC composition and degradation potentials of pore water DOC. Our results show that DOC from the thawed permafrost layer had high initial degradation potentials compared with DOC from the active layer. In fact, the DOC that showed the highest bio- and photo-degradability, respectively, originated in the thawed permafrost layer. Our study sheds new light on the DOC composition of peat-permafrost directly upon thaw and suggests that past estimates of carbon-dioxide emissions from thawed peat permafrost may be biased as they have overlooked the initial mineralization potential of the exported DOC.

  1. Immobilization of Lead from Pb-Contaminated Soil Amended with Peat Moss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul-Ji Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization of lead (Pb using soil amendments can reduce Pb toxicity and bioavailability in soil. This study evaluated Pb immobilization in a Pb-contaminated soil by using peat moss through various tests. The Pb-contaminated soil (2000 mg Pb·kg−1 was amended with 1%, 5%, and 10% of peat moss to immobilize Pb in the soil. The immobilization properties of Pb in the contaminated soil were evaluated by a column leaching experiment, a microcosm test, and a batch incubation test. Peat moss significantly reduced the Pb leaching in all of the experiments and more effectively reduced mobility and toxicity of Pb in the column leaching and microcosm tests than bioavailability in the batch incubation test. The immobilized lead from the soils amended with 1%, 5%, and 10% of peat moss was 37.9%, 87.1%, and 95.4% from the column leaching test, 18.5%, 90.9%, and 96.4% from the microcosm test, and 2.0%, 36.9%, and 57.9% from the NH4NO3 extraction method, respectively, indicating that peat moss can be effectively used for the remediation of Pb-contaminated soil.

  2. Sorption of V and VI group metalloids (As, Sb, Te on modified peat sorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansone-Bertina Linda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates arsenic, antimony and tellurium sorption using iron modified peat. The results were obtained using batch tests and the sorption was studied as a function of initial metalloid concentration, pH and sorption time, as well as the presence of competing substances. The obtained results indicate that modification of peat with Fe compounds significantly enhances the sorption capacity of the sorbents used for sorption of arsenic, antimony and tellurium. The optimal pH interval for the sorption of Sb(III is 6.5–9 and for As(V and Sb(V – 3–6, while As(III and tellurium sorption using Fe-modified peat is favourable in a wider interval of 3–9. The presence of competing ions as well as HA affect sorption of metalloids on Fe-modified peat. A minor impact on the reduction of metalloid sorption was detected in the presence of nitrate, sulphate, carbonate and tartrate ions, while in the presence of phosphate and HA the sorption ability of metalloids can be considerably reduced. The obtained results of kinetic experiments indicate that sorption of metalloids on Fe-modified peat mainly occurs relying on mechanisms of physical sorption processes.

  3. Influence of pore structure on solute transport in degraded and undegraded fen peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kleimeier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In peat soils, decomposition and degradation reduce the proportion of large pores by breaking down plant debris into smaller fragments and infilling inter-particle pore spaces. This affects water flow and solute migration which, in turn, influence reactive transport processes and biogeochemical functions. In this study we conducted flow-through reactor experiments to investigate the interplay between pore structure and solute transport in samples of undegraded and degraded peat collected in Canada and Germany, respectively. The pore size distributions and transport parameters were characterised using the breakthrough curve and two-region non-equilibrium transport model analyses for a non-reactive solute. The results of transport characterisation showed a higher fraction of immobile pores in the degraded peat with higher diffusive exchanges of solutes between the mobile and immobile pores associated with the dual-porosity structure. The rates of steady-state potential nitrate reduction were compared with pore fractions and exchange coefficients to investigate the influence of pore structure on the rates of nitrate reduction. The results indicated that the degraded peat has potential to provide the necessary boundary conditions to support nitrate removal and serves as a favourable substrate for denitrification, due to the nature of its pore structure and its lower organic carbon content compared to undegraded peat.

  4. Tropical Peat Swamp Management Options: A Case Study Using System Dynamic in Southern Aceh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswandi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical peat forest ecosystems have multiple benefits as regulating hydrological system, carbon storage, timber and non-timber products, and protecting the biodiversity. Lack of understanding of these functions, short-term economic benefits is more preferable despite reducing its ecological benefits. This study proposed a system dynamics model of tropical peat forest ecosystem in determining its optimum management for extractive utilizations (timber and non-timber forest products, environmental services, and biodiversity. A dynamics model was used to describe changes in peatland and forest cover, biomass accumulation and carbon storage, and total economic value of tropical peat forest ecosystem in Trumon and Singkil, Southern Aceh. The projection showed that peat forest ecosystem benefits would decline in the long term if degradations continue at the same rate over last decade. Efforts to change the primary peat forest to plantation would reduce the total economic value of ecosystem and biodiversity values at level -19.63% and -26.28% from current conditions. Carbon emissions were increased at 117.32 ton CO2 eq ha-1 year-1, higher than average of carbon losses from peatland oxidation. Preserving 50% of forest vegetation on moderate depth and protection very deep peatlands would reduce emission -6.96% to -35.06% and increase forest carbon storage at significant rate +15.06% to +63.32%, respectively. These mitigation schemes would improve the biodiversity and hydrological function. Forest rehabilitation with agroforestry practices will enhance carbon uptake, especially on degraded lands.

  5. Effect of fire on phosphorus forms in Sphagnum moss and peat soils of ombrotrophic bogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoping; Yu, Xiaofei; Bao, Kunshan; Xing, Wei; Gao, Chuanyu; Lin, Qianxin; Lu, Xianguo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of burning Sphagnum moss and peat on phosphorus forms was studied with controlled combustion in the laboratory. Two fire treatments, a light fire (250 °C) and a severe fire (600 °C), were performed in a muffle furnace with 1-h residence time to simulate the effects of different forest fire conditions. The results showed that fire burning Sphagnum moss and peat soils resulted in losses of organic phosphorus (Po), while inorganic phosphorus (Pi) concentrations increased. Burning significantly changed detailed phosphorus composition and availability, with severe fires destroying over 90% of organic phosphorus and increasing the availability of inorganic P by more than twofold. Our study suggest that, while decomposition processes in ombrotrophic bogs occur very slowly, rapid changes in the form and availability of phosphorus in vegetation and litter may occur as the result of forest fires on peat soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adsorption kinetics of Cu in peat; Cinetica de adsorcao de Cu em turfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroni, Sergio L.G.; Pires, Maria A.F.; Munita, Casimiro S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study adsorption kinetics of Cu{sup 2+} ions from aqueous solution on peat from Santa Catarina State. Kinetics studies were carried out in batch with the peat in contact with copper solutions at different initial concentrations at pH 4,5. Radiotracer {sup 64} Cu (T1/2 12,8 h) was used to evaluate the behavior of copper ions in solutions submitted to peat contact. The obtained experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-second order equation. Information obtained from the kinetic model are possible to be used on the development of a system for the removal of copper from effluents and wastewaters. (author)

  7. Dicranochaete quadriseta (Korš. Nov. and Pop. from an oligominerotrophic peat bog in Lower Silesia (South-Western Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Matuła

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dicranochaete quadriseta (Korš. Nov. and Pop. was collected during investigations of algae from mountain peat bogs of the Sudeten Mts (Poland. The paper describes the morphology, taxanomy, geographical distribution and ecological conditions of this species. This very rare species was found in an oligominerotrophic peat bog called "Topieliska-Zieleniec" near Duszniki (Orlickie Mts.

  8. An appraisal of Indonesia's immense peat carbon stock using national peatland maps: uncertainties and potential losses from conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Warren; Kristell Hergoualc' h; J. Boone Kauffman; Daniel Murdiyarso; Randall Kolka

    2017-01-01

    Background: A large proportion of the world's tropical peatlands occur in Indonesia where rapid conversion and associated losses of carbon, biodiversity and ecosystem services have brought peatland management to the forefront of Indonesia's climate mitigation efforts. We evaluated peat volume from two commonly referenced maps of peat distribution and depth...

  9. Predicting Calcite (CaCO3) Requirements of Sphagnum Peat Moss from pH Titration Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming materials are required to neutralize acidity in peat moss to make it a suitable substrate for growing container crops. A series of time-consuming incubations of peat:lime mixtures are typically used to determine the liming rate to achieve a desired pH. Our objective was to evaluate the util...

  10. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Thorn

    Full Text Available Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  11. Nitrosation and nitration of fulvic acid, peat and coal with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  12. Environmental impact of peat mining. Development of storm water treatment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeve, Bjoern

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this series of studies has been to develop methods to reduce the environmental impacts of peat mining, that function when the pollution load is high and that are economically viable for all peat mines. Sediment transport and nutrient leaving were studied with the purpose of establishing more efficient treatment alternatives. A controlled experiment was set up to measure the erosion of peat from the soil surface and from ditch beds during heavy rainfall and runoff events and to measure the settling characteristics of base soil peat and peat deposited in channels. The study demonstrates the importance of channel bed erosion as the main source of sediment during peak runoff. Sediment transport and nutrient leaching were further observed in the field during 1995 and 1996. The study showed that suspended solids (SS) is mainly generated during extreme events, such as flooding. These high flow events erode the material deposited on the channel bed during low flows. The leaching of nitrogen occurs after large rain events, while high phosphorous concentrations occur when the water table is low. Treatment alternatives were developed to improve removal of SS and nutrients. Different types of ponds were tested in a laboratory study. The study showed that the main factor affecting the settling of small peat particles is the depth of the settling basin. A mathematical model showed that in the case of bare soil erosion, the best treatment alternative would be to store the water in the large drainage network rather than in the sedimentation basin. Different structures suitable for peak runoff control were tested under laboratory and field conditions 54 refs, 11 figs

  13. Use of sewage sludge and coconut coir mix as a peat substitute for potted chrysanthemum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenani, A.B.; Lim, F.Y.; Thohirah, L.A.; Fauziah, C.I.

    2003-07-01

    Recent central processing of domestic wastewater in Malaysia has initiated investigations into the disposal/utilization of the sewage sludge produced. We had conducted an experiment to investigate the feasibility of using dewatered sewage sludge and coconut coir as a peat substitute in a potting medium for chrysanthemum. The experiment involved 9 treatments with sewage sludge (SS) and coconut coir (CC) mixed in different ratios (v/v) to replace peat in the standard potting medium of 3:2:1 (soil: peat: sand).The potting medium contained the following treatments, T1: peat + recommended rates of Agroblend (Ag), a slow release fertilizer, and Grofas (Gf), a foliar fertilizer (commonly used medium and fertilization), T2: [1SS:1CC] + Ag, T3: [1SS:1CC] + half recommended rates of Agroblend and Grofas (1/2Ag + 1/2Gf), T4: [2SS:1CC] + Ag, T5: [2SS:1CC] + 1/2Ag + 1/2Gf, T6: [3SS:1CC] + Ag, T7: [3SS:1CC] + 1/2Ag + 1/2Gf, T8: [4SS:1CC] + Ag, and T9: [4SS:1CC] + 1/2Ag + 1/2Gf; laid-out in a randomized complete block design with 5 replications. Results of the study show that in general the media with sludge and coconut coir mixtures produced better plant growth and higher total number of flowers than peat. However, the higher ratio of SS:CC, (4SS:1CC) produced poorer plant growth and less number of flowers. Increase in sewage sludge in the medium resulted in increase in foliar contents of heavy metals. This study demonstrates that sewage sludge and coconut coir mixture in the ratio of 1:1 may best substitute peat in the potting medium for chrysanthemum with only Agroblend fertilizer application. (author)

  14. Rhizosphere impacts on peat decomposition and nutrient cycling across a natural water table gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, A. L.; Finzi, A.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude forest and peatland soils represent a major terrestrial carbon store sensitive to climate change. Warming temperatures and increased growing-season evapotranspiration are projected to reduce water table (WT) height in continental peatlands. WT reduction increases peat aerobicity and facilitates vascular plant and root growth. Root-associated microbial communities are exposed to a different physical and chemical environment than microbial communities in non-root associated "bulk" peat, and therefore have distinct composition and function within the soil system. As the size of the peatland rhizosphere impacts resources available to the microbial communities, transitions from a root-free high water table peatland to a root-dominated low WT peatland may alter seasonal patterns of microbial community dynamics, enzyme production, and carbon storage within the system. We used a natural water table gradient in Caribou Bog near Orono, ME to explore the influence of species composition, root biomass, and rhizosphere size on seasonal patterns in microbial community structure, enzyme production, and carbon mineralization. We quantified root biomass across the water table gradient and measured microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, C mineralization, N mineralization, and exoenzyme activity in root-associated and bulk peat samples throughout the 2013 growing season. Microbial biomass was consistently higher in rhizosphere-associated soils and peaked in the spring. Microbial biomass CN and enzyme activity was higher in rhizosphere-associated soil, likely due to increased mycorrhizal abundance. Exoenzyme activity peaked in the fall, with a larger relative increase in enzyme activity in rhizosphere peat, while carbon mineralization rates did not demonstrate a strong seasonal pattern. The results suggest that rhizosphere-associated peat sustains higher and more variable rates of enzyme activity throughout the growing season, which results in higher rates of carbon

  15. Benchmarking Environmental Impacts of Peat Use for Electricity Generation in Ireland—A Life Cycle Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionnuala Murphy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The combustion of peat for energy generation accounts for approximately 4.1% of Ireland’s overall greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, with current levels of combustion resulting in the emission of 2.8 Mt of CO2 per annum. The aim of this research is to evaluate the life cycle environmental impacts of peat use for energy generation in Ireland, from peatland drainage and industrial extraction, to transportation, combustion, and subsequent after-use of the cutaway area, utilising Irish-specific emission factors. The environmental impacts considered are global warming potential, acidification potential, and eutrophication potential. In addition, the cumulative energy demand of the system is evaluated. Previous studies on the environmental impact of peat for energy in Ireland relied on default Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC emission factors (EFs. This research utilises Irish-specific EFs and input data to reduce uncertainty associated with the use of default IPCC EFs, and finds that using default IPCC EFs overestimates the global warming potential when compared to Irish-specific EFs by approximately 2%. The greatest contribution to each of the environmental impacts considered arises from emissions generated during peat combustion, which accounts for approximately 95% of each of the environmental impact categories considered. Other stages of the life-cycle, such as impacts emanating from the peat extraction area, fossil fuel usage in harvesting and transportation machinery, and after-use of the cutaway area have much smaller effects on overall results. The transformation of cutaway peatlands to different after-use alternatives has the potential to mitigate some of the effects of peatland degradation and peat combustion.

  16. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  17. Investigating carbon dynamics in Siberian peat bogs using molecular-level analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, K.; Benner, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Total hydrolysable carbohydrates, and lignin and cutin acid compounds were analyzed in peat cores collected 56.8 N (SIB04), 58.4 N (SIB06), 63.8 N (G137) and 66.5 N (E113) in the Western Siberian Lowland to investigate vegetation, chemical compositions and the stage of decomposition. Sphagnum mosses dominated peatland vegetation in all four cores. High-resolution molecular analyses revealed rapid vegetation changes on timescales of 50-200 years in the southern cores Sib4 and Sib6. Syringyl and vanillyl (S/V) ratios and cutin acids indicated these vegetation changes were due to varying inputs of angiosperm and gymnosperm and root material. In the G137 and E113 cores lichens briefly replaced sphagnum mosses and vascular plants. Molecular decomposition indicators used in this study tracked the decomposition of different organic constituents of peat organic matter. The carbohydrate decomposition index was sensitive to the polysaccharide component of all peat-forming plants, whereas acid/aldehyde ratios of S and V phenols (Ac/AlS,V) followed the lignin component of vascular plants. Low carbohydrate decomposition indices in peat layers corresponded well with elevated (Ad/Al)S,V ratios. This suggested both classes of biochemicals were simultaneously decomposed, and decomposition processes were associated with extensive total mass loss in these ombrotrophic systems. Selective decomposition or transformation of lignin was observed in the permafrost-influenced northern cores G137 and E113. Both cores exhibited the highest (Ad/Al)S,V ratios, almost four-fold higher than measured in peat-forming plants. The extent of decomposition in the four peat cores did not uniformly increase with age, but showed episodic extensive decomposition events. Variable decomposition events independent of climatic conditions and vegetation shifts highlight the complexity of peatland dynamics.

  18. The inorganic chemistry of peat from the Maunachira channel-swamp system, Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, T.S.; McIver, J.R.; Cairncross, B.; Ellery, W.N.; Ellery, K.

    1989-05-01

    The Okavango Delta is a large (18000 km/sup 2/), low gradient (1:3600), alluvial fan situated in the semi-arid Kalahari basin of northern Botswana. Seasonal floodwaters from tropical Angola disperse on the fan creating both perennial (6000 km/sup 2/) and seasonal (7000 to 12000 km/sup 2/) swamps. Ninety-five percent of this water is lost annually by evapotranspiration. Organic rich sediment (peat) is a major sediment of the perennial swamps. Peat formation commences during senescence of the plants, when certain nutrients are recycled while others are lost by rainwater leaching. Further changes in chemistry occur during subaqueous decay of the plants which involve both gains and losses of constituents. Decaying plants trap detrital mineral matter which becomes an integral part of the peat. The main sources and forms of inorganic matter in the peat are: allochthonous kaolinite (40%) and quartz (20%) and both allochthonous and autochthonous phytolithic silica (30%). several inorganic components (Fe, K, P, Na, Ca and Mg) which make up the remaining 10% are associated with the organic fraction. Ion exchange plays only a minor part in their uptake and it seems that these metals are taken up during bacterial activity in the peat. The weight proportion of inorganic matter (ash) decreases downstream, mainly due to a decrease in allochthonous mineral matter. Volume percentage also decreases but is low throughout, generally less than five percent. This study has revealed that the low-quantity allochthonous mineral matter is the main reason for the long-term survival of this ecosystem. Uptake of soluble ions by the peat is important in off-setting evaporative concentration of metals. 36 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Characterization of peat-electrical properties by means of geoelectrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Judith; Lück, Erika; Zeitz, Jutta

    2013-04-01

    Peatlands have an important function for the storage of global carbon. These functions are reduced significantly due to intensive agricultural drainage which leads to decomposition of the organic material and hence to the loss of carbon. In order to reduce these losses, assessments of the peatlands in their current function as a carbon sink, and adequate management are required. In this context, information about both the peat thickness and their condition (degree of decomposition) are crucial. Methods which can estimate the latter in the field other than time-consuming conventional coring techniques are still missing in practice. Our approach is to gather this information in fen soils by means of non-intrusive geoelectrical techniques through the measurement of electrical conductivity of bulk soil (ECb), which is correlated with parameters such as cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic carbon (OC) and the electrical conductivity of the soil solution (ECe), which, furthermore, are functions of the peat condition. In order to assess the field-applicability of this technique, we examined as a first step the electrical properties of peat in different stages of decomposition by measuring ECb of undisturbed samples derived from various study sites in the laboratory. All parameters (ECe, CEC, OC, bulk density, pH-value and volumetric water content), which may potentially influence the ECb of peat were analyzed simultaneously. Multiple regression analysis revealed a strong response of ECb on ECe followed by CEC and water content if all samples from different locations were incorporated. ECe explained about 60%, CEC 30% and volumetric water content 10% of variability in ECb. Whereas CEC was primarily a function of the degree of decomposition of the peat, ECe levels varied from site to site and no correlation with the latter could be identified. Therefore, we assume that the estimation of peat properties, describing its condition, through electrical measurements is

  20. Peat-based organic growbags as a solution to the mineral wool waste problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Grunert

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of solid waste produced each year is one of the greatest problems associated with greenhouse horticulture in some European countries. In particular, the disposal of used growing media arising from the soil-less cultivation of vegetables in mineral wool creates serious difficulties. The non-biodegradability of these mainly inorganic substrates causes environmental concern and has prompted the search for alternative growing media such as cocos derivatives, perlite and resin foam (Fytocell®. Organic substrates in combination with biodegradable material such as plastic, rope and clippings have the advantage that re-use or recycling of the waste is easier, cheaper and more environmentally friendly than for mineral wool. However, the differing physical and chemical characteristics of the alternative substrates may affect yield significantly. Substrates based respectively on peat and peat with cocos derivatives were tested against a mineral wool control for the production of tomato in three consecutive years. Both organic substrates were placed in biodegradable plastic bags. Greenhouse experiments demonstrated that plants grown in the pure peat substrate rooted more easily than plants grown in the peat-cocos substrate or mineral wool, and that they developed less blossom-end rot in both peat substrates than in mineral wool. Due to the buffering capacity of the organic substrates, the electrical conductivity of the draining water appeared to be more stable during cultivation. The total yield of tomato fruits was similar for all substrates, and no differences between substrates could be observed in the quality of the fruits produced. On the other hand, flavour tests demonstrated that plants grown on peat substrate produced more tasty fruits under certain conditions. The results of this study show that organic growbags are promising and competitive alternatives to mineral wool.

  1. Maximization of the sod peat load and treatment; Palaturpeen kuormituksen maksimointi ja kaesittely

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Nurmi, H.; Paappanen, T.; Frilander, P.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this two year (1994-1995) project was to improve especially the efficiency of sod peat production, carried out using a spreading wagon, by increasing the sod peat load set for the field to value 20 kgDS/m{sup 2} (original value 10-14 kgDS/m{sup 2}), and by studying and developing a collection method for ridging and ridge processing, suitable for high-loads. The research was emphasized to laboratory tests, but some field test were also made. It was possible to increase the sod peat load most accurately to 20 kgDS/m{sup 2} by using wave-like sod peat. The drying speeds of horizontal and vertical wave-like sod peats were near to each other. The functioning of active-sod was rendered by the unevenness of the field. Production of active-sod requires less energy than production of wave-like sod. Horizontal wave-like sod was scaled using Malkov`s drying model, adjusted in cooperation with the researchers of the Russian research centre NIITP to suit better for wave-like sod peat. The best dimensions for wave were calculated for the horizontal wave-like sod using long-term weather conditions data (Pudasjaervi 1971-1990). The picking device of the ridger, developed using laboratory tests, consisted of a grid moving on the field, standing the sod up, above which there is a rotating truncheon coil which transfers the sod along the grid for further processing. The share of the fines by weight, loosened from the field during picking up the sod was 0.5 % of the sod-mass, and the losses were 11 % of the number of the sod. At the driving speed 2.9 km/h the suitable coil rotation speed was about 20 r/min, hence the rotation speed of the truncheons was twice as high as the driving speed

  2. The relationship between dissolved organic carbon and hydro-climatic factors in peat-muck soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaszczyński Jacek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in soil solution related to groundwater table, soil temperature, moisture, redox potential and intensive storm rain and their changes during ten years (2001–2010. The studies were localized in drained and agriculturally used Kuwasy Mire situated in the middle basin of the Biebrza River, north-eastern Poland. The study site was situated on a low peat soil managed as intensively used grassland. The soil was recognized as peat-muck in the second stage of the mucking process. DOC concentration was determined by means of the flow colorimetric method using the Skalar equipment.

  3. Reductive transformation and inhibitory effect of ethylene under methanogenic conditions in peat-soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    stoichiometrically (89–92%) to ethane (C2H6) in peat-soil microcosms incubated under methanogenic conditions. Methanogenesis started after a prolonged anoxic lag-phase (>29 weeks) where added ethylene prevailed despite the availability of nitrate (NO3−) as an alternative electron acceptor. Methanogenesis, as well...... settings for ethylene reduction to ethane, which has been occasionally reported for aquatic sediments. The importance of ethylene turn-over in anoxic peat-soils should be substantiated by studies of the abundance and activity of the relevant microorganisms in native peatlands....

  4. The Peat and Wood Gasification at Different Conditions of the Pyrolysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portnov Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article are described the prospects of peat and wood using as a raw material for gasification with producing of high potential synthesis gas. It is shown that the low-grade fuel recycling, in particular wood and peat makes a use of this energy sources a possible alternative to the using a more traditional coal and natural gas. The features of low-temperature pyrolysis are analyzed and computer modeling of this process at different conditions is conducted. The temperature influence of recycling to main parameters (calorific value, elementary composition of gaseous components of produced gas is established.

  5. Some genetic implications of silica and aluminosilicates in peat and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Russell, S.J.; Rimmer, S.M.; Yeakel, J.D.

    1984-04-01

    The inorganic content of Okefenokee peat (Georgia, USA) in the absence of a significant detrital contribution, is a function of sponge spicule, phytolith, and diatom abundance in addition to the degree of organic matter decomposition and the frequency of fires. The detrital component (quartz) dominates ash composition where it is present. No clear correlation has been observed between the inorganic content of coals examined in this study and their maceral composition. Vitrinite-rich coals have a wide range of ash yield. These observations suggest that the minerals have been introduced detritally rather than accumulated as a result of peat degradation. (40 refs.)

  6. Long-term disturbance dynamics and resilience of tropical peat swamp forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lydia E S; Bhagwat, Shonil A; Willis, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    1. The coastal peat swamp forests of Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, are undergoing rapid conversion, predominantly into oil palm plantations. This wetland ecosystem is assumed to have experienced insignificant disturbance in the past, persisting under a single ecologically-stable regime. However, there is limited knowledge of the past disturbance regime, long-term functioning and fundamentally the resilience of this ecosystem to changing natural and anthropogenic perturbations through time. 2. In this study, long-term ecological data sets from three degraded peatlands in Sarawak were collected to shed light on peat swamp forest dynamics. Fossil pollen and charcoal were counted in each sedimentary sequence to reconstruct vegetation and investigate responses to past environmental disturbance, both natural and anthropogenic. 3. Results demonstrate that peat swamp forest taxa have dominated these vegetation profiles throughout the last c. 2000-year period despite the presence of various drivers of disturbance. Evidence for episodes of climatic variability, predominantly linked to ENSO events, and wildfires is present throughout. However, in the last c. 500 years, burning and indicators of human disturbance have elevated beyond past levels at these sites, concurrent with a reduction in peat swamp forest pollen. 4. Two key insights have been gained through this palaeoecological analysis: (i) peat swamp forest vegetation has demonstrated resilience to disturbance caused by burning and climatic variability in Sarawak in the late Holocene, however (ii) coincident with increased fire combined with human impact c. 500 years ago, these communities started to decline. 5.Synthesis. Sarawak's coastal peat swamps have demonstrated resilience to past natural disturbances, with forest vegetation persisting through episodes of fire and climatic variability. However, palaeoecological data presented here suggest that recent, anthropogenic disturbances are of a greater magnitude, causing

  7. Management of Peat Fires on Smoldering Phase (Case Study: District Siak and District Kampar Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafrudin Syafrudin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty of finding land for farming activities in Indonesia caused some communities began to switch utilizing peat land for agricultural areas such as oil palm. Oil palm plantation is a commodity that has been developed in Indonesia.Oil palm planted area has increased rapidly.Since 1967 extensive oil palm plantations has increased 35times to 5.6 million ha in 2005 and about 7.8 million ha in 2009. The biggest expansion of oil palm plantations occur in 6 province,one of them is Riau.Most people take a practical way to open agricultural areas by burning peat.Riau Province in Indonesia is one of the major hotspots for peat fires during the dry season. Peat fire at smouldering phaseemits a lot of compounds that are not completely oxidized (e.g. CO, VOCs, PAHs that more dangerous than the emissions released during combustion at flaming fires. Particulate Matter (PM 2.5 is one of the emissions from peat fires too.However, existing data on VOCs and PM 2.5 of smoke from peat fires Indonesia is still limited.The aim of this study was to analyze the concentration of VOCs and PM 2.5 on emissions from peat fires in the Langkai Village Siak District and RimboPanjang Village Kampar District Riau Province when compared with background site and the permissible exposure limit and provide recommendations based on the results of this research.VOCs measurement method is based on NIOSH 1500 and EPA TO-17 while the PM 2.5 based on IMPROVE A method. The average concentration of PM 2.5 is 996.72 ± 531.01μg/m3. PM2.5 concentrations increased (compared with the background site was very high at 4,838%.This condition causes a decrease in air quality and serious health problems. While the results of the maximum TVOCs concentration obtained in Siak District was 391,880 g/m3, while in Kampar Districtwas 195,940 g/m3. TVOCs concentration atSiak Districtwas 130.63 times greater than the existing quality standards, while at Kampar District regency was 65.31 times

  8. Covering of milled peat stockpile with wood chips; Jyrsinturveauman peittaeminen hakkeella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franssila, T.; Leinonen, A.

    1996-12-31

    The aim of this project is to research the applicability of wooden materials for protection of milled peat stockpile against losses during storaging. Water transmission features of sawdust, wastewood chip and whole tree chip were investigated in laboratory with raining experiments. The plan for raining experiments was made with experiment planning program and results were analysed with multivariate analysis. Freezing features were investigated thorough breaking tests with hydraulic piston vice. Laboratory experiments were completed with field tests in Laakasuo near Sotkamo. On the basis of results covering peat stockpiles with sawdust is fully competitive comparing to present covering methods. Chip materials are technically not as good covering materials as sawdust

  9. Influence of external factors on the accumulation of heat in stacks of cut peat during the process of their production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkov, L.M.; Grebennikov, V.Y.

    1981-01-01

    For decreasing heat build-up in stacks during the period of their production, the following is recommended: in a projection of the peat industries, one must consider the influence of the orientation of the stacks on admission of solar radiation: in 24-hour periods when air temperature is higher than 24 degrees C, and peat temperature is higher than 45 degrees C, the more peat added during stacking and harvesting (MTF-62), the les heat accumulates: building up storage units of peat with uniform sides decreases the inflow of solar radiation and moisture accumulation; during a selection of technological sites and the destination sequence of peat delivery to the consumer, heterogeneity of the composition of the bed must be considered as well as the unequal heat accumulation and the heat evolution in the stored mass.

  10. Peat formation processes through the millennia in tidal marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine peat formation processes throughout the millennia in four tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Peat cores collected at each site were analyzed for bulk density, loss on ignition, and percent organic carbon. Core data and spline fit age-depth models were used to estimate inorganic sedimentation, organic accumulation, and carbon sequestration rates in the marshes. Bulk density and percent organic matter content of peat fluctuated through time at all sites, suggesting that peat formation processes are dynamic and responsive to watershed conditions. The balance between inorganic sedimentation and organic accumulation at the sites also varied through time, indicating that marshes may rely more strongly on either norganic or organic matter for peat formation at particular times in their existence. Mean carbon sequestration rates found in this study (0.38-0.79 Mg C ha-1 year-1) were similar to other long-term estimates for temperate peatlands.

  11. Atmospheric mercury accumulation between 5900 and 800 calibrated years BP in the high arctic of Canada recorded by Peat Hummocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givelet, N.; Roos-Barraclough, F.; Goodsite, Michael Evan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first comprehensive long-term record of preanthropogenic rates of atmospheric mercury accumulation in dated peat deposits for the High Arctic of Canada. Geochemical studies of two peat hummocks from Bathurst Island, Nunavut reveal substantial inputs from soil dust...... (titanium), marine aerosols (bromine), and mineral-water interactions (uranium). Mercury, however, was supplied to these peat mounds exclusively by atmospheric deposition. Mercury concentration measurements and age dating of the peat profiles indicate rather constant natural "background" mercury flux of ca....... 1 microgram per square meter per year from 5900 to 800 calibrated years BP. These values are well within the range of the mercury fluxes reported from other Arctic locations, but also by peat cores from southern Canada that provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back 8000 years...

  12. The estimation of antistress properties of peat degradation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorna, V. I.; Lyanna, O. L.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction. It is known that polyphenol preparations, produced from peat, represent adaptogens, immunomodulators and can participate in regulation of genetic informational realization as triggers of nonspecific nature. These compounds promote launching of protein-synthesizing system that is very important under unfavorable influence on organism. The experimental data of last years confirmed doth therapeutic value of humic acids as adaptogenes and their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutogenic, radioprotective and other properties. Lysosomes take the key positions in many physiological and pathological processes of organism owing to their unique structural-functional properties, reactivity and plasticity. These organelles take especial meaning in increased functional activity under stress factors influence. In this way lysosomes become modulators of intracellular processes. It is known that under chronic stress, the systems of neurohumoral regulation and adaptation gradually run out, the function of brain cellular membrane structures disturbs. Understanding of stress developing mechanisms is necessary condition for means development of operative avoiding of the harmful consequences. Purpose. The aim of the work was to investigate corrective influence of hydrohumates on compartmentalization changing of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin H (EC 3.4.22.16) in different rat brain structures. The experiment was held on Wistar's rats (160-200 g weight) which were divided into 4 groups: 1 - the control group; 2 - the animals which were received the hydrohumate with water (10 mg hydrohumate (0,1% solution) per 1 kg of weight) during 3 weeks; 3 - the group of stressed rats (test "forced swimming" for 2 hours); 4 - the stressed rats which received the hydrohumate. The activity of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin H was determined spectrophotometerically by hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl-amid L-leucine (Koch-Light Lab., England). It was found out that intracellular compartmentalization

  13. Assessment of the humification degree of peat soil under sago (Metroxylon sagu cultivation based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis spectroscopic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Sim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu is a tropical crop that can survive the acidic conditions of peat soil, which is cultivated at large scale in Sarawak (Malaysia. The performance of sago palm on deep peat is variable, and not all specimens are able to grow to maturity and produce a trunk. It is hypothesised that sago growth may be influenced by peat humification because a positive relationship between the fertility of peat soil and its degree of humification has been well reported. This article investigates the humification degree of peat soil used for cultivation of sago palms, as indicated by spectroscopic characteristics. The peat soil adjacent to trunking and non-trunking palms was sampled and compared with exposed uncultivated peat. The results showed that, where largely undecomposed woody material predominated in the underlying peat, degree of humification decreased with increasing depth. Uncultivated peat was more highly humified than cultivated peat because the latter was continuously replenished with new plant matter. On the basis of FTIR spectroscopy, no significant difference was found between cultivated peat sampled adjacent to trunking and non-trunking palms. On the other hand, the UV-Vis and FTIR data suggested lower humification degree in the underlying peat which may have led to inconsistent growth.

  14. Microbial activity and biomass of peats in relation to the intrinsic organic matter composition, pH, moisture, and C and N inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amha Amde, Yosef

    2011-03-25

    Excessive decomposition of organic matter (OM) from the potting media (e.g. peat) is known to influence plant growth by decreasing the total porosity, altering the chemical properties (pH, electrical conductivity), and releasing organic compounds that might have phytotoxic or stimulating effects. When peats are used as constitutes of the potting media, they should, therefore, maintain stability during plant production. In this study, twenty peat samples from Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden were evaluated for their microbial activity (measured as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions) and biomass with a special emphasis to the intrinsic organic matter composition, pH, moisture, and C and N inputs as such information on a wide range of peat samples is largely missing from published literature. Overall, the whole peat samples were broadly classified into three distinct groups using the hierarchical cluster analysis: the Irish and two of German peats produced the lowest CO{sub 2} while most peats from Finland produced the highest CO{sub 2}. With few exceptions, peats from the Baltic States occupied the middle ranges. Excessive decomposition of organic matter in the Finish peats might have unintended consequences if these peats are used for long-term pot plant production. With regard to botanical composition, peats containing Sphagnum imbricatum produced the lowest CO{sub 2} and S. angustifolium dominated peats mostly produced the highest CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  15. High-resolution records of late-Holocene climate change and carbon accumulation in two north-west European ombrotrophic peat bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauquoy, D; Engelkes, T; Groot, MHM; Markesteijn, F; Oudejans, MG; van der Plicht, J; van Geel, B

    2002-01-01

    The peat stratigraphy (plant macrofossils, colorimetric humification, pollen/non-pollen microfossils, carbon/nitrogen ratios) of three replicate cores from a raised peat bog in the UK (Walton Moss) and a single core from a raised peat bog in Denmark (Lille Vildmose) were examined in an attempt to

  16. Anomalous gold contents in brown coals and peat in the south-eastern region of the Western-Siberian platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, S.I.; Rikhvanov, L.P.; Maslov, S.G.; Arhipov, V.S.; Belyaeva, A.M. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-02

    One hundred twenty-two samples of Jurassic and Paleogene brown coals and 1254 peat samples from the south-eastern region of the Western-Siberian platform were analyzed for gold by the neutron-activation method. Mean content of Au in Jurassic coals is 30+/-8 ppb, in Paleogene coals is 10.6+/-4.8 ppb, and in peat is 6+/-1.4 ppb. Concentrations of gold as high as 4.4 ppm were found in coal ash and 0.48 ppm in the peat ash. Coal beds with anomalous gold contents were found at Western-Siberian platform for the first time. Negative correlation between gold and ash yield in coals and peat and highest gold concentrations were found in low-ash and ultra-low-ash coals and peat. Primarily this is due to gold's association with organic matter. For the investigation of mode of occurrence of Au in peat the bitumen, water-soluble and high-hydrolyzed substances, humic acids, cellulose and lignin were extracted from it. It was determined that in peat about 95% of gold is combined with organic matter. Forty to sixty percent of Au is contained in humic acids and the same content is in lignin. Bitumens, water-soluble and high-hydrolyzed substances contain no more than 1% of general gold quantity in peat. The conditions of accumulation of high gold concentrations were considered. The authors suggest that Au accumulation in peat and brown coals and the connection between anomalous gold concentrations and organic matter in low-ash coals and peat can explain a biogenic-sorption mechanism of Au accumulation. The sources of formation of Au high concentration were various Au-Sb, Au-Ag Au-As-Sb deposits that are abundant in the Southern and South-Eastern peripheries of the coal basin. (author)

  17. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  18. Saturated fat, carbohydrate, and cardiovascular disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W; Sun, Qi; Hu, Frank B; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    A focus of dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment has been a reduction in saturated fat intake, primarily as a means of lowering LDL-cholesterol concentrations...

  19. Saturated thickness, High Plains aquifer, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents the saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer of the United States, 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  20. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast THz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors in the THz frequency range using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. Further, we observe THz pulse shortening and increase of the group refractive index at high field strengths.......We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors in the THz frequency range using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. Further, we observe THz pulse shortening and increase of the group refractive index at high field strengths....

  1. The geology of selected peat-forming environments in temperate and tropical latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C.C.; Palmer, C.A.; Esterle, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    We studied peat in several geologic and climatic settings: (1) a glaciated terrain in cold-temperate Maine and Minnesota, U.S.A.; (2) an island in a temperate maritime climate in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Maine, U.S.A., where sea level is rising rapidly and changing the environment of peat accumulation; (3) swamps along the warm-temperate U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, where sea level has changed often, thus creating sites for accumulation; and (4) in a tropical climate along the coast of Sarawak, Malaysia, and the delta of the Batang Hari River, Sumatra, Indonesia (Figs. 1 and 2). With the exception of the deposits on the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, most of the deposits described are domed bogs in which peat accumulation continued above the surface of the surrounding soil. The bogs of the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains have almost level surfaces. All domed bogs are not entirely ombrotrophic (watered only from precipitation); multidomed bogs that rise from irregular or hilly surfaces may be crossed by streams that supply water to the bogs. The geologic processes or organic sedimentation, namely terrestrialization and paludification, are similar in all peat deposits considered here. Differences in geomorphology affecting the quantity and that quality of peat that has ash contents of less than 25%, which are desirable for commercial purposes, depend chiefly on: (1) high humidity, which is favorable to luxuriant growth of peat-forming vegetation; (2) a depositional setting that permits extensive accumulation relatively free from inorganic contamination from sea water and streams and from dust and volcanic ash; and (3) a stable regional water table that controls the rate of decomposition under aerobic conditions and protects the deposit against the ravages of fire. Differences in peat textures are due to the type of vegetation and to the degree of decomposition. The rate of decomposition is largely the result of the amount of oxidation

  2. Nonlinear Effects in CW Mode-Locked Solid-State Lasers with Semiconductor Saturable Absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Krimer, D.O.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of nonlinear properties of semiconductor saturable absorbers on ultrashort pulse generation was investigated. It was shown, that linewidth enhancement, quadratic and linear ac Stark effect contribute essentially to the mode locking in cw solid-state lasers, that can increase the pulse stability, decrease pulse duration and reduce the mode locking threshold

  3. Pore water chemistry in a disturbed and an undisturbed peat forests in Brunei Darussalam: Nutrient and carbon contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandois, L.; Cobb, A.; Abu Salim, K.; Chieng Hei, I.; Lim Biaw Leng, L.; Corlett, R.; Harvey, C.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical peat swamp forests in their natural state are important reservoir of biodiversity, carbon and water. However, they are rapidly vanishing due to agricultural conversion (mainly to oil palms), logging, drainage and fire. Peat swamp forests constitute an important contribution to global and regional biodiversity, providing an habitat to rare and threatened species. They encompass a sequence of forest types from the perimeter to the center of mildely elevated domes, and at our site in Brunei, are host to Shorea Albida trees (Anderson, 1983). They constitute a large terrestrial carbon reservoir (tropical peat soils contain up to 70 Pg C, which accounts for 20% of global peat soil carbon and 2% of the global soil carbon (Hirano et al., 2007)). In tropical peat swamp forests, the most important factors controling organic matter accumulation, as well as the biodiversity and structure of the forest, are hydrology and nutrients availability (Page et al., 1999). Study of pore water in peat swamp forest can provide key information on carbon cycle, including biomass production, organic matter decomposition and leaching of carbon in draining water. However, data on pore water chemistry and nutrient concentrations in pristine tropical peatlands, as well as the effect of forest exploitation are scarce. The study area is located in the Belait district in Brunei Darussalam in Borneo Island. Brunei is perhaps the best of the regional guardians of peat forest systems; potentially irreversible damage to peat forest ecosystems has been widespread elsewhere. Two sites, one pristine dome and a logging concession, are being investigated. In order to assess the chemical status of the peat soil, pore water is sampled at different depth along the dome radius. The chemistry of pore water, including pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, concentration of major elements, as well as organic carbon content and properties are analyzed. References: Anderson, 1983. The tropical peat swamp of

  4. SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.W. REIMUS

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvial Testing Complex (ATC) located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass

  5. Selected Trace Element Concentrations in Peat Used for Cosmetic Production - A Case Study from Southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Bartłomiej

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the concentration of selected trace elements in organic soils used as a source to obtain a unique peat extract for cosmetics production. Peat material for laboratory analysis were collected from fen peatland located in the Prosna River Valley (Borek village). Studied peatland is managed by "Torf Corporation" company as a source of material to obtain peat extract for cosmetics production. In the collected soil samples (four soil profiles) Zn, Cu and Pb concentrations were determined by using atomic absorption spectrometer SpectraAA 220 (Varian), after acid digestion. Obtained results showed that the highest concentrations of selected trace elements were recorded in the surface horizons of organic soils. This fact might be the results of Prosna river flooding or air deposition. Howevere, according to the new Polish regulations (Ordinance of the Minister for Environment 01.09.2016 - the way of conducting contamination assessment of the earth surface), the content of trace elements in the examined soils was greatly belowe the permissible limit for areas from group IV (mine lands). Thus, described soils are proper to obtain peat extract used as a component in cosmetic production.

  6. Modelling the subsidence of peat soils in the Dutch coastal area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, T.; Akker, van den J.J.H.; Brus, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    In large parts of the western coastal region of the Netherlands peat soils occur. Historic land use resulted in decomposition of organic matter and compaction of these soils and as a consequence the land surface subsided. Along with sea level rise and tectonic subsidence since the end of the

  7. Holocene elemental, lead isotope and charcoal record from peat in southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tudyka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a mid-resolution elemental, isotopic and charcoal record from 10700 BC to AD 500 in a peat core located in Żyglin (southern Poland. The objective is to give insight into the proxies with emphasis on lead (Pb sources in this minerogenic peat deposit. During the Early Holocene (10700–7550 BC the average 206Pb/207Pb quotient was around 1.196. This isotopic signature is consistent with natural dust derived from long-distance soil and rock weathering. The Mid-Holocene period (7550–3200 BC shows a significant change in the peat accumulation conditions. The growth rate is approximately 0.04 mm yr-1 and the 206Pb/207Pb quotients are shifted toward values that are found in local galena ores. This is simultaneous with a significantly increased lead flux which further confirms local sources of material in this peat deposit. In the Late Holocene period (3200 BC–AD 500 a large quantity of charcoal particles with diameters ranging from 2 mm up to 3 cm is found; also, Pb, Zn and Cu fluxes reach their highest values. This period corresponds to the Eneolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, and human impact is recorded as charcoal.

  8. Calculation Method of Kinetic Constants for the Mathematical Model Peat Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plakhova Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the work is related to necessity to simplify the calculation of kinetic constants for the mathematical model peat pyrolysis. Execute transformations of formula Arrhenius law. Degree of conversion is expressed in terms mass changes of sample. The obtained formulas help to calculate the kinetic constants for any type of solid organic fuels

  9. Features of the determination of photosynthetic pigments in peats of different genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Merkushina

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the results on working out spectrophotometric procedure for determination of photosynthetic pigments in peat samples of different origin. According to the results of implementation of this technique at conditions of inter-laboratory precision; relative error in determination of chlorophyll "a" does not exceed 20%; chlorophyll «b» - 32%.

  10. Are colorimetric assays appropriate for measuring phenol oxidase activity in peat soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena M. Wiedermann; Evan S. Kane; Timothy J. Veverica; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2017-01-01

    The activity of extracellular phenol oxidases is believed to play a critical role in decomposition processes in peatlands. The water logged, acidic conditions, and recalcitrant litter from the peatland vegetation, lead to exceptionally high phenolics in the peat. In order to quantify the activity of oxidative enzymes involved in the modification and break down of...

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Peat Soils Cultivated to Rice Field, Oil Palm and Vegetable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenani Abu Bakar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Presently, about 20% of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq fields in Indonesia are on peat soil, in addition to that otherarea of peat soil has been conventionally used for rice field and vegetables. To elucidate the global warmingpotentials of peat soils cultivated to oil palm, vegetable or rice field, field experiment has been carried out in SouthKalimantan. Air samples were taken from rice field, oil palm and vegetable fields in weekly basis for six month periodand analyzed for concentrations of N2O, CH4 and CO2. The global warming potentials (GWP of the three gases werecalculated by multiplying the emission of each gas with their respective mole warming potential. This step wasfollowed by the addition of the three gases’ GWP to have the total GWP. The results showed that the emissions ofgreenhouse gases from peat soils changed seasonally and varied with the crops cultivated. Oil palm has resultedthe highest GWP, mostly contributed by N2O. There was no statistical different in total GWP of paddy andvegetable fields. The annual N2O emission from oil palm field was 4,582 g N ha-1 yr-1. Water, nutrients and organicmatter managements are among the potential techniques to minimize gas emissions from oil palm field which needfield trials.

  12. Responsible management of peatlands in Canada, from peat industry to oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, Line

    2013-04-01

    Canada harbors one third of the peat resources of the world. Peat is an accumulated organic matter composed of dead and partly decomposed plant material, forming huge deposit through time in wetlands like peatlands and boreal coniferous swamps. Peat is a valuable resource as a growing media and soil amendments, an eco-friendly absorbent, also used as biofilters, for body care and for wastewater treatment. Peatlands also offer valuable ecological services : for example, they are the most efficient terrestrial ecosystem to store carbon on a long-term basis. Their ability to "cool off" the planet warrants a good look at their management. The horticultural peat industry of Canada has invested 22 years in R&D in habitat restoration and is now a strong leader in managing industrial peatlands in a sustainable way. The oil sand industry, which is strongly impacting the wetland landscapes of northern Canada, does realize that it has to reduce its ecological footprint, which is heavily criticized around the world. Decommissioned open mines near Fort McMurray have already begun recreating peatland ecosystems, and some restoration attempts of former oil pads are underway in the Peace River region. But the restoration of the largely disturbed wetland landscape of the oil sands is commanding innovative solutions.

  13. Managing Vegetation on Peat-Sand Filter Beds for Wastewater Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur E. Elling

    1985-01-01

    Five species of grass, one sedge, and cattail were grown on a peat-sand filter bed irrigated with sewage effluent. Yields, uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus, and lodging problems were determined for all species when grown to various heights ranging from 5 to 75 cm.

  14. Effect of drainage on CO2 exchange patterns in an intensively managed peat pasture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, B.O.M.; Hensen, A.; Goudriaan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of CO2 exchange were made in intensively managed peat pastures at 2 different groundwater tables during most of a growing season. F was separated into a respiratory and an assimilatory CO2 flux. The fit of the Arrhenius temperature response to Fr showed that Fr was

  15. Behaviour of carbon dioxide and water vapour flux densities from a disturbed raised peat bog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieveen, J.P.; Jacobs, A.F.G.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour flux densities were carried out for a disturbed raised peat bog in the north of the Netherlands during an 18 month continuous experiment. Tussock grass (sp. Molinea caerulae) mainly dominated the vegetation of the bog area. The maximum leaf area index

  16. Late Holocene human impact and climate change recorded in a North Swedish peat deposit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, M.; Barke, J.; Vickery, E.; Charman, D.J.; van Geel, B.

    2008-01-01

    A peat core from a mire with poor fen lawns and ombrotrophic hummock strings in Northern Sweden was examined (plant macrofossils, pollen/non-pollen microfossils, testate amoebae, colorimetric humification, carbon/nitrogen ratios, bulk densities, loss on ignition) to investigate the effects of

  17. Effect of light Sphagnum peat on odour formation in the early stages of biowaste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurola, Jukka M; Arnold, Mona; Kontro, Merja H; Talves, Matti; Romantschuk, Martin

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of two bulking materials, Sphagnum peat and pine wood chips, on the early stages of biowaste composting in two pilot-scale processes. Emphasis was placed on studying the formation conditions of malodorous compost gases in the initial phases of the processes. The results showed that gas emission leaving an open windrow and a closed drum composting system contained elevated concentrations of fermentative microbial metabolites when acid Sphagnum peat (pH 3.2) was used as a bulking material. Moreover, the gas emission of the peat amended drum composter contained a high concentration of odour (up to 450,000oum(-3) of air). The highest odour values in the outlet gas of peat amended composts coincided with the elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds such as acetoin and buthanedion. We conclude that the acidifying qualities of composting substrates or bulking material may intensify odour emission from biowaste composts and prolong the early stages of the composting process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Patterns and drivers of fungal community depth stratification in Sphagnum peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamit, Louis J; Romanowicz, Karl J; Potvin, Lynette R; Rivers, Adam R; Singh, Kanwar; Lennon, Jay T; Tringe, Susannah G; Kane, Evan S; Lilleskov, Erik A

    2017-07-01

    Peatlands store an immense pool of soil carbon vulnerable to microbial oxidation due to drought and intentional draining. We used amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR to (i) examine how fungi are influenced by depth in the peat profile, water table and plant functional group at the onset of a multiyear mesocosm experiment, and (ii) test if fungi are correlated with abiotic variables of peat and pore water. We hypothesized that each factor influenced fungi, but that depth would have the strongest effect early in the experiment. We found that (i) communities were strongly depth stratified; fungi were four times more abundant in the upper (10-20 cm) than the lower (30-40 cm) depth, and dominance shifted from ericoid mycorrhizal fungi to saprotrophs and endophytes with increasing depth; (ii) the influence of plant functional group was depth dependent, with Ericaceae structuring the community in the upper peat only; (iii) water table had minor influences; and (iv) communities strongly covaried with abiotic variables, including indices of peat and pore water carbon quality. Our results highlight the importance of vertical stratification to peatland fungi, and the depth dependency of plant functional group effects, which must be considered when elucidating the role of fungi in peatland carbon dynamics. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Effect of conservation tillage and peat application on weed infestation on a clay soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. VANHALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Amendment of soil with peat is an attempt to avoid crop yield variation in the transition to conservation tillage, as it improves seedbed conditions and crop growth in drought-sensitive clay soils. Weed infestations were compared in 1999-2000 between the original and peat-amended clay (Typic Cryaquept, very fine, illitic or mixed under different autumn tillage systems in an oats-barley rotation. In a field experiment, sphagnum peat (H = 4 had been spread (0.02 m 3 m -2 on the soil surface in August 1995. Tillage treatments included mouldboard ploughing (to 20 cm and stubble cultivations of different working depths (8 or 15 cm and intensity (once or twice. Weed biomass and density were assessed by an area of 1 m 2 per field plot in August 1999-2000 and June 2000. The 1999 season was dry, but soil moisture conditions were more favourable in 2000. Peat application tended to increase the number of volunteer oats and Chenopodium album in 1999, while decreasing Galium spurium biomass. Ploughing significantly increased the abundance of Chenopodium album and Lamium purpureum in barley (Hordeum vulgare in 1999. Weed infestation was much lower in 2000, and tillage effect on Chenopodium album was minor in oats (Avena sativa. Growth of Lamium purpureum and Fumaria officinalis was stimulated in ploughed soils both years. Intensity and working depth of stubble cultivation had no significant effect on weeds.;

  20. Depositional setting and paleobotany of Permian and Triassic permineralized peat from the central Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, E.L.; Taylor, T.N.; Collinson, J.W. (Ohio State University, Columbus (USA). Byrd Polar Research Center)

    1989-06-01

    Silicified peat is known from two sites in the central Transantarctic Mountains. Both are within a 2-km-thick Permo-Triassic sandstone-shale sequence that was deposited by braided streams in a rapidly subsiding foreland basin along the paleo-Pacific margin of Antarctica. Upper Permian permineralized peat occurs as scattered boulders just above a channel-form sandstone in the upper part of the Buckley Formation on Skaar Ridge overlooking the Beardmore Glacier. These boulders are erosional remnants of fine-grained deposits that accumulated in shallow lakes or swamps on a flood plain. At Fremouw Peak, the peat occurs near the top of the Fremouw Formation in strata that are probably Middle to Late Triassic in age. The peat consists of large blocks that were rafted into a sandy braided stream channel during a flood and then stranded and buried as flood waters receded. Both sites are characterized by exceptionally well-preserved plant material, although the composition and diversity of the two floras are very different. Permineralization apparently took place rapidly and was enhanced by the dissolution of siliceous volcanic detritus that is abundant in both formations.

  1. Characterization of Gas and Particle Emissions from Laboratory Burns of Peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat cores collected from two locations in eastern North Carolina (NC, USA) were burned in a laboratory facility to characterize emissions during simulated field combustion. Particle and gas samples were analyzed to quantify emission factors for particulate matter (PM2.5), organi...

  2. Magnetic susceptibility and dielectric properties of peat in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Pranitha Septiana; Zulaikah, Siti; Hidayat, Arif; Azzahro, Rosyida

    2017-07-01

    Peatlands dominate almost all regions of Borneo, yet its utilization has not been developed optimally. Any information in this field could be obtained using soil magnetization methods by determining the magnetic succeptibility in terms of magnetic susceptibility value that could describe the source and type of magnetic minerals which could describe the source and type of magnetic minerals. Moreover, the dielectric properties of peat soil were also investigated to determine the level of water content by using the dielectric constant value. Samples was taken at six different locations along Pulang pisau to Berengbengkel. Magnetic susceptibility mass value at these locations ranged between -0.0009 - 0.712 (×10-6 m3/kg). Based on the average magnetic susceptibility value, samples that were taken from T1, T3 and T5 belonged to the type of paramagnetic mineral, while samples which were taken from T2, T4 and T6 belonged to the group of diamagnetic mineral. The low value of magnetic susceptibility of peat was probably derived from the pedogenic process. The average value of peat soil in six locations has a large dielectric constant value that is 28.2 which indicated that there was considerable moisture content due to the hydrophilic nature of peatland which means that the ability of peat in water binding is considerably high.

  3. The effect of sampling effort on estimates of methane ebullition from peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Baird, Andy J.; Coulthard, Tom J.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effect of sample size and sampling duration on methane bubble flux (ebullition) estimates from peat using a computer model. A field scale (10 m), seasonal (>100 days) simulation of ebullition from a two-dimensional (2-D) structurally varying peat profile was modeled at fine spatial resolution (1 mm × 1 mm). The spatial and temporal scale of this simulation was possible because of the computational efficiency of the reduced-complexity approach that was implemented, and patterns of simulated ebullition were consistent with those found in the field and laboratory. The simulated ebullition from the peat profile suggested that decreases in peat porosity—which cause increases in gas storage—produce ebullition that becomes increasingly patchy in space and erratic in time. By applying different amounts of spatial and temporal sampling effort, it was possible to determine the uncertainty in ebullition estimates from the peatland. The results suggest that traditional methods to measure ebullition can equally overestimate and underestimate flux by 20% and large ebullition events can lead to large overestimations of flux when sampling effort is low. Our findings support those of field studies, and we recommend that ebullition should be measured frequently (hourly to daily) and at many locations (n > 14).

  4. 3D characterization of Holocene peat in the Netherlands : Implications for coastal-deltaic subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374860890

    2017-01-01

    Human-induced subsidence threatens many coastal-deltaic plains, due to the amplifying effects it has on sea-level rise and flood risk. In the coastal-deltaic plain of the Netherlands, subsidence is primarily caused by the compression and oxidation of Holocene peat. The understanding of subsidence in

  5. Persistent versus transient tree encroachment of temperate peat bogs: effects of climate warming and drought events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Knaap, Y.A.M.; Holmgren, M.; Limpens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Peatlands store approximately 30% of global soil carbon, most in moss-dominated bogs. Future climatic changes, such as changes in precipitation patterns and warming, are expected to affect peat bog vegetation composition and thereby its long-term carbon sequestration capacity. Theoretical work

  6. Multi-technique assessment of spatial and temporal variability of methane fluxes in a peat meadow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, D.M.D.; van Huissteden, J.; Dolman, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Methane fluxes measured in a eutrophic peat meadow in The Netherlands dominated by vascular plants showed high spatial and temporal variability. To elucidate this variability as well as the underlying processes, various measurement techniques were used: soil gradients of methane concentrations, the

  7. Isolated peat bog habitats and their food connections: parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonoidea) and their lepidopteran hosts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lozan, Aurel; Spitzer, Karel; Jaroš, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2012), s. 391-397 ISSN 1366-638X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Paleorefugia * relict peat bogs * specific Lepidoptera Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.801, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/78u173hn60701033/

  8. Radioactivity of natural medicinal preparations contained extracts from peat mud available in retail trade used externally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska, Maria; Kapała, Jacek; Raciborska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Grzegorz; Milewska, Anna; Mnich, Stanisław

    2017-08-01

    In this work were identified and measured the activity of radioactive isotopes present in medicinal preparations from peat mud and estimated the doses obtained from them during therapy. Radioactivity of 22 preparations from peat mud and 20 water samples from water of the North-East region of Poland was studied. The median of the total activity was 24.8 Bq kg-1. Total maximal isotope activity was observed in the Iwonicka Cube 146 Bq kg-1 while considerable amounts of isotopes were found in the Kolobrzeska Peat Mud Paste 112 Bq kg-1. The doses obtained during therapy were within the range of 11 nSv-13 μSv depending on extracts of medicinal preparations from peat mud. The probability that such a small dose would stimulate biological effects is low. However, some clinicians believe that one of the possible therapeutic mechanisms in the treatment of rheumatoid disorders is the induction of immune response by ionising radiation.

  9. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    ...) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22...

  10. Effects of grassland management on the emission of methane from intensively managed grasslands on peat soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-van Dasselaar, van den A.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1997-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most important greenhouse gas next to CO2 and as such it contributes to the enhanced greenhouse effect. Peat soils are often considered as sources of CH4. Grasslands on the other hand are generally considered to be a net sink for atmospheric CH4. The aim of this study was

  11. Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian Deiss; Carl Byers; Dave Clover; Dave D' Amore; Alan Love; Malcolm A. Menzies; J. Powell; Todd M. Walter

    2004-01-01

    A set of peat column experiments was used to determine the transport potential of lead (Pb) and diesel range organics (DRO) in palustrine slope wetlands near Juneau, AK. This project is important to southeast Alaskan communities because limited land resources are forcing development of regional wetlands. This study was instigated by concerns that proposed modifications...

  12. A 30 year study of carbon, groundwater, and climate coupling in a large boreal peat basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, P. H.; Siegel, D. I.; Chanton, J. P.; Reeve, A. S.; Slater, L.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Morin, P. J.; Carpenter, M.; Rhoades, J.; Nolan, J.; Parsekian, A.; O'Brien, M.; Sarkar, S.; Corbett, J. E.; D'Andrilli, J.

    2007-12-01

    Scaling biogeochemical processes across complex regional landscapes remains one of the most important challenges for deciphering the global methane cycle. For the past 30 years we have investigated the coupling of climate, groundwater, and methane cycling in the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands in northern Minnesota. Periodic droughts perturb the local and regional groundwater flow systems in this region altering the transport of inorganic solutes, organic acids and labile carbon substrates within the thick peat deposits. Two instrument stations at the bog crest and fen water track in the Red Lake peatland showed that large volumes of free-phase gas are trapped under confining layers in the deeper peat that episodically rupture to release large masses of methane bubbles to the atmosphere. These ebullition events are marked by abrupt depressuring cycles at depth and also by significant vertical and horizontal displacements of the peat surface. In the most recent phase of our investigations an integrated set of GPS stations and instrumented piezometers were installed to continuously pinpoint the location and calculate the magnitude of methane ebullition across a 160 square kilometer bog complex. The similarity of the vegetation patterns in this large bog complex to those found in other large peat basins in North America facilitates the transfer of these regional-scale ebullition fluxes to a broad swath of boreal America.

  13. Effects of pine sawdust, hardwood sawdust, and peat on bareroot soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Koll; Martin F. Jurgensen; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of three organic amendments on soil properties and seedling growth at the USDA Forest Service JW Toumey Nursery in Watersmeet, MI. Pine sawdust (red pine, Pinus resinosa), hardwood sawdust (maple [Acer spp.] and aspen [Populus spp.]), and peat were individually incorporated into a loamy sand nursery soil in August 2006, and soil properties...

  14. Gasification of peat and biomass in suspension flow 2; Turpeen ja biomassan suspensiokaasutus 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Hepola, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Haukka, P.; Vehmaan-Kreula, M.; Raiko, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    This project was an extension of the earlier Liekki-project 402 carried out in 1993-1994. The aims of the 1995 project were: (1) to study the formation of problematic tar/soot compounds and nitrogen pounds in the conditions of entrained flow gasification of biomass and peat, (2) study the product yields and kinetics of pyrolysis, and (3) to develop simulation methods for entrained flow pyrolysis and gasification. Pyrolysis and gasification tests were carried out at a new entrained flow reactor of the Gasification Research Group of VTT using mainly peat as the feedstock. The pyrolysis kinetics was studies using three particle size distributions of fuel peat (0.075-0.125 mm, 0.16-0.25 mm and 0.315-0.5 mm). The char yields were determined at two temperatures (900 and 1000 deg C) and the effects fuel to gas ratio (suspension density) as well as the effects of gas atmosphere were determined. Limited amount of tests were also carried out with pine wood and dried de-inking sludge. The formation of tars and nitrogen compounds was studied with peat as the feedstock. Based on the test results of this project and the on earlier fluidized-bed gasification data of VTT, the following conclusions can be made: (1) the char yields in rapid entrained flow pyrolysis of small particles of peat and biomass are considerably lower than derived in fluid-bed pyrolysis of more coarse feedstocks. Consequently, simple entrained flow reactors without any recycling of char could already give rather high carbon conversions. However, high carbon conversions can also be easily achieved in fluidized-bed gasifiers with biomass fuels due to the high gasification reactivity of the char, (2) more tars were formed in entrained flow pyrolysis of peat than in fluidized-bed experiments carried out at the same temperature, (3) the total conversion of peat nitrogen to NH{sub 3}+HCN was as high in the entrained flow pyrolysis as in the fluid-bed pyrolysis experiments. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. A modification of the constant-head permeameter to measure saturated hydraulic conductivity of highly permeable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Metselaar, Klaas; Limpens, Juul; Gooren, Harm P A; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2017-01-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks ) is a key characteristic of porous media, describing the rate of water flow through saturated porous media. It is an indispensable parameter in a broad range of simulation models that quantify saturated and/or unsaturated water flow. The constant-head permeameter test is a common laboratory method to determine Ks on undisturbed soil samples collected from the field. In this paper we show that the application of this conventional method may result in a biased Ks in the case of highly permeable media, such as the top layer of Sphagnum peat and gravel. Tubes in the conventional permeameter, that collect water under the sample, introduce a hydraulic head-dependent resistance for highly permeable media and result in an underestimation of Ks . We present a simple and low-budget alternative of the constant-head permeameter test that overcomes the disadvantages of conventional permeameters. The new method was successfully tested on intact highly permeable peatmoss collected from a northern peatland. •Conventional constant-head permeameters underestimate Ks of highly permeable media due to flow resistance in tubing systems•We developed the low-resistance permeameter to overcome this disadvantage.•Testing of the low-resistance permeameter demonstrated no systematic bias and successful application for highly permeable media.

  16. Potentiostatically Poised Electrodes Mimic Iron Oxide and Interact with Soil Microbial Communities to Alter the Biogeochemistry of Arctic Peat Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Largus T. Angenent

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria are ubiquitous in soils worldwide, possess the ability to transfer electrons outside of their cell membranes, and are capable of respiring with various metal oxides. Reduction of iron oxides is one of the more energetically favorable forms of anaerobic respiration, with a higher energy yield than both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. As such, this process has significant implications for soil carbon balances, especially in the saturated, carbon-rich soils of the northern latitudes. However, the dynamics of these microbial processes within the context of the greater soil microbiome remain largely unstudied. Previously, we have demonstrated the capability of potentiostatically poised electrodes to mimic the redox potential of iron(III- and humic acid-compounds and obtain a measure of metal-reducing respiration. Here, we extend this work by utilizing poised electrodes to provide an inexaustable electron acceptor for iron- and humic acid-reducing microbes, and by measuring the effects on both microbial community structure and greenhouse gas emissions. The application of both nonpoised and poised graphite electrodes in peat soils stimulated methane emissions by 15%–43% compared to soils without electrodes. Poised electrodes resulted in higher (13%–24% methane emissions than the nonpoised electrodes. The stimulation of methane emissions for both nonpoised and poised electrodes correlated with the enrichment of proteobacteria, verrucomicrobia, and bacteroidetes. Here, we demonstrate a tool for precisely manipulating localized redox conditions in situ (via poised electrodes and for connecting microbial community dynamics with larger ecosystem processes. This work provides a foundation for further studies examining the role of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria in global biogeochemical cycles.

  17. Fire severity is more sensitive to low fuel moisture content on Calluna heathlands than on peat bogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Andrés, Roger; Davies, G Matt; Gray, Alan; Scott, E Marian; Waldron, Susan

    2017-10-27

    Moorland habitats dominated by the dwarf shrub Calluna vulgaris provide important ecosystem services. Drought is projected to intensify throughout their range, potentially leading to increased fire severity as moisture is a key control on severity. We studied the effect of low fuel moisture content (FMC) on fire severity by using 2×2m rain-out shelters prior to completing 19 experimental fires in two sites in Scotland (UK): a dry heath with thin organic soils and a raised bog with deep, saturated peat, both dominated by Calluna vulgaris. Reduced FMC of the moss and litter (M/L) layer at both sites, and the soil moisture of the dry heath, increased fire-induced consumption of the M/L layer and soil heating at both sites. Increase in fire severity was greater at the dry heath than at the raised bog, e.g. average maximum temperatures at the soil surface increased from 31°C to 189°C at the dry heath, but only from 10°C to 15°C at the raised bog. Substantial M/L layer consumption was observed when its FMC was below 150%. This led to larger seasonal and daily soil temperature fluctuation, particularly at the dry heath during warm months. The results suggest that low FMC following predicted changes in climate are likely to increase wildfire severity and that the impact on vegetation composition and carbon stores may be greater at heathlands than at peatlands. Managed burning aiming to minimise fire severity (e.g. ignition of the M/L layer and exposure to lethal temperatures of ericoid seeds) should be carried out when the FMC of the M/L layer is above 150% and the FMC of the soil is above 200-300%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Everglades peats: using historical and recent data to estimate predrainage and current volumes, masses and carbon contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Hohner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Florida Everglades is a patterned peatland formed from sawgrass and other aquatic plant material that has accumulated over millennia. This peatland was initially drained in the late 1800s for agricultural and urban development and has been highly modified by the construction of canals and levées. Restoration plans include providing additional surface water flow which should help to prevent further peat loss by oxidation and encourage the accretion of peat that has been lost through drainage and peat fires. But how much peat has been lost? We know that about 50 % of the original surface area is gone; but what about the driver of ecological processes, the soil? Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS technology, we compared predrainage and current peat volumes using historical and recent datasets, spatially-referenced soil bulk density values and carbon content to determine peat mass and carbon mass for each Everglades region. Given the uncertainties in the datasets, this analysis should be viewed as providing rough order-of-magnitude values. Our calculations indicate that the current Everglades contains less than 24 % of the original peat volume, 17 % of its mass and 19 % of its carbon.

  19. Study of removing a peat-layer from surface active agents; Deitanso ni yoru kaimen kasseizai no jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemiya, H.; Kitamura, K. [Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    An experiment was performed on a system for recycling water resources by using a peat-layer. A laboratory device was also made in order to examine the effects of a peat-layer on surface active agents. In the experiment, a water examination was carried out in which a mixture of water and kitchen detergent at the rate of 15,000 to 1 was filtered through a peat-layer of 2-3cm thick, as was a mixture of water, kitchen detergent and oil at the rate of 15,000 to 1 to 2. In the water examination, various measurements were done such as the measurement of COD by potassium permanganate acid process, measurement of pH by a pH meter with glass electrodes and measurement of coefficient of permeability by a variable water level permeability test. As a result of the experiment, it was revealed that a peat-layer had ability to remove surface active agents, that injection water tended to increase acidity in a peat-layer and that a peat-layer had ability to remove foaming of surface active agents. The COD of domestic waste water decreased from 12mg/l to 0.16mg/l in the system for recycling water resources using a peat-layer. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Measuring Outcomes for Dysphagia: Validity and Reliability of the European Portuguese Eating Assessment Tool (P-EAT-10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Dália Santos; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes; Reis, Elizabeth Azevedo; Lopes, Inês Sousa

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and the reliability of the European Portuguese version of the EAT-10 (P-EAT-10). This research was conducted in three phases: (i) cultural and linguistic adaptation; (ii) feasibility and reliability test; and (iii) validity tests. The final sample was formed by a cohort of 520 subjects. The P-EAT-10 index was compared for socio-demographic and clinic variables. It was also compared for both dysphagic and non-dysphagic groups as well as for the results of the 3Oz wst. Lastly, the P-EAT-10 scores were correlated with the EuroQol Group Portuguese EQ-5D index. The Cronbach's α obtained for the P-EAT-10 scale was 0.952 and it remained excellent even if any item was deleted. The item-total and the intraclass correlation coefficients were very good. The P-EAT-10 mean of the non-dysphagic cohort was 0.56 and that of the dysphagic cohort was 14.26, the mean comparison between the 3Oz wst groups and the P-EAT-10 scores were significant. A significant higher perception of QoL was also found among the non-dysphagic subjects. P-EAT-10 is a valid and reliable measure that may be used to document dysphagia which makes it useful both for screening in clinical practice and in research.

  1. Logged peat swamp forest supports greater macrofungal biodiversity than large-scale oil palm plantations and smallholdings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhada, Siti Noor; Salim, Sabiha; Nobilly, Frisco; Zubaid, Akbar; Azhar, Badrul

    2017-09-01

    Intensive land expansion of commercial oil palm agricultural lands results in reducing the size of peat swamp forests, particularly in Southeast Asia. The effect of this land conversion on macrofungal biodiversity is, however, understudied. We quantified macrofungal biodiversity by identifying mushroom sporocarps throughout four different habitats; logged peat swamp forest, large-scale oil palm plantation, monoculture, and polyculture smallholdings. We recorded a total of 757 clusters of macrofungi belonging to 127 morphospecies and found that substrates for growing macrofungi were abundant in peat swamp forest; hence, morphospecies richness and macrofungal clusters were significantly greater in logged peat swamp forest than converted oil palm agriculture lands. Environmental factors that influence macrofungi in logged peat swamp forests such as air temperature, humidity, wind speed, soil pH, and soil moisture were different from those in oil palm plantations and smallholdings. We conclude that peat swamp forests are irreplaceable with respect to macrofungal biodiversity. They host much greater macrofungal biodiversity than any of the oil palm agricultural lands. It is imperative that further expansion of oil palm plantation into remaining peat swamp forests should be prohibited in palm oil producing countries. These results imply that macrofungal distribution reflects changes in microclimate between habitats and reduced macrofungal biodiversity may adversely affect decomposition in human-modified landscapes.

  2. Evaluating peats for their capacities to remove odorous compounds from liquid swine manure using headspace "solid-phase microextraction".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuti, A M; Cohen, A D; Hunt, P G; Vanotti, M B

    1999-07-01

    This paper reports on research designed to investigate the capacities of different highly characterized peats to remove odorous compounds from liquid swine manure (LSM). Peat types representing a wide range of properties were tested in order to establish which chemical and physical properties might be most indicative of their capacities to remediate odors produced by LSM. Eight percent slurries (of peat/LSM) were measured for odor changes after 24 hours using odor panel and GC/MS-Solid-phase microextraction (GC/MS-SPME) analysis. The GC/MS-SPME and odor panel results indicated that, although all peats tested in this study were found to be effective at removing odor-causing compounds found in LSM, some peats tended to work better than others. Overall, the peats that were the most effective at removing odor-causing compounds tended to have lower bulk densities, ash contents, fulvic acids contents, and guaiacyl lignins contents, and higher water holding capacities, hydraulic conductivities, "total other lignins" contents, hydrogen contents, carbon contents, and total cellulose contents. GC/MS-SPME analysis was found to be a reasonably inexpensive and efficient way of conducting this type of research. It allows one to identify a large number of the odor-causing compounds found in LSM, and more importantly, to detect with some precision specific differences in the amounts of these compounds between peat types.

  3. Saturated fats and cardiovascular disease risk: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ishi Khosla; Gayatri C Khosla1

    2017-01-01

    Saturated fats have been in the line of fire for more than three decades. The major mistake in understanding fats was to equate all saturated fatty acids as one. The oversimplification of the relationship of saturated fats with cardiovascular disease (CVD) led to unwarranted removal of some valuable fats from our diets. Recently, the relationship of dietary saturated fats and that of individual saturated fatty acids (SFAs) to CVD risk has been reevaluated. All saturated fats are not equal and...

  4. Estimating the water budget for a peat filter treating septic tank effluent in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Geel, Paul J.; Parker, Wayne J.

    2003-02-01

    The use of peat as a filter medium for the treatment of a variety of liquid and gas waste streams has increased over the past decade. Peat has been used as an alternate treatment medium to treat septic tank effluent (STE) from domestic and small communal systems. Very little research has been completed to study the hydraulics and water budget of a peat filter operating in the field. This study evaluated the water budget of a peat filter operating at an elementary school near Ottawa, Canada. The peat filter was instrumented with tensiometers to measure the pore water pressures within the filter and a weather station to collect weather data required to estimate potential evapotranspiration. A one-dimensional unsaturated flow model, SoilCover, was calibrated using the pressure data and weather data collected in the field. The calibrated model was use to estimate the water budget for the filter operating with and without STE loading. The calibrated model predicted that the annual precipitation exceeded evapotranspiration for both scenarios. For the filter treating 50 mm/day of STE, there was a slight dilution due to the infiltration resulting in a net dilution factor of 0.97 (loading divided by the loading plus infiltration). The largest rainfall event of 49.9 mm resulted in a dilution factor of approximately 0.87, which corresponded to an approximate decrease in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of between 12 and 33% depending on the calculation used to determine the HRT. When the filter does not receive STE, the precipitation exceeds evapotranspiration and hence the filter should not dry out when the filter is not in use.

  5. Agroindustrial compost as a peat alternative in the horticultural industry of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilanes-Terán, Irene; Jara-Samaniego, Janneth; Idrovo-Novillo, Julio; Bustamante, Ma Angeles; Pérez-Murcia, Ma Dolores; Pérez-Espinosa, Aurelia; López, Marga; Paredes, Concepción

    2017-01-15

    This work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using different agroindustrial composts in the production of horticultural seedlings, thereby replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species differing in salt sensitivity - tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. Malpica) (the least sensitive), courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Mastil F1) (moderately sensitive) and pepper (Capsicum annuum L. var. Largo de Reus Pairal) (the most sensitive) - were grown in nine media containing three composts, prepared by co-composting vegetable waste (flower, broccoli or tomato waste) with laying hen manure and sawdust, as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of the three composts in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50% and 75% (v/v). A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design, with two replicates per treatment, under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and the seed germination and fresh and dry weights of the aerial parts and roots of the seedlings were also measured, as well as the mineral composition of the aerial parts of the plants. In most cases, the addition of compost to the growing media produced an increase in the pH, salt content and macronutrient concentrations, in comparison to peat, whereas the physical properties of the compost based-substrates had values very similar to those of an ideal substrate. Also, multivariate analysis showed that the media prepared with flower waste compost, at all concentrations, and the medium with tomato waste compost at 25% were the most suitable substrates for the three plant species tested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of the efficiency of sedimentation basins downstream of harvested peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson-Do, Myriam; St-Hilaire, André

    2015-04-01

    Peat harvesting is a very lucrative industry in the provinces of Quebec and New-Brunswick (Canada). Peat enters in many potting mix used for horticulture. However, harvesting this resource has some impacts on the environment. First, industries need to drain the peat bog to dry the superficial layer. Then, it is harvested with industrial vacuums and the underlying layer is allowed to dry. The drained water is laden with suspended sediments (mostly organic peat fibers) that may affect biota of the stream where it is discharged. To counter the problem, this water does not go directly on the stream but first flows through a sedimentation basin, built to reduce suspended sediment loads. This work focuses on characterizing and eventually modeling the efficiency of those sedimentation basins. Seven basins were studied in Rivière-du-Loup, St-Valère and Escoumins (Quebec, Canada). They each have a different ratio basin area/drained area (4.7 10-4 to 20.3 10-4). To continuously monitor the sediment loads (calculated from sediment concentrations and discharge) entering and leaving basins, a nephelometer and a level logger were installed in the water column upstream and downstream of sedimentation basins. Their trapping efficiency was measured during the ice-free period (May to October) and for each significant rain event, since it is known that the rain and subsequent runoff induce most of the peat transport in and out of the basin. Results show that the event efficiency decreases as the basin is filled up with trapped sediments. For one basin, the efficiency was 85August. Trapping efficiency can be used as a tool to estimate basin dimensions. This has been done for municipal sedimentation ponds that trap minerals and will be adapted to the current context, where the dominant sediment is organic.

  7. Reuse of Ablution Water to Improve Peat Soil Characteristics for Ornamental Landscape Plants Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radin Mohamed Radin Maya Saphira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to reuse of ablution water for washing peat soil in order to reduce the concentrations of heavy metals in these soils which might effect negatively on the plant growth. The washing process design was similar to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW consist of layers of peat and sand soil and surrounded by gravel on both sides. Strelitzia sp. was used to detect the presence negative effect of the washing process on the morphological characteristics of the plants. The physical and chemical characteristics of ablution water was examined before and after the washing process by using Inductively Couple Plasma- Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS. The characteristics of peat soil before and after the washing process were examined by using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The results revealed that the percentage of FeO3in peat soil reduced from 45.80 to 1.01%. The percentage of SiO2 in sand soil dropped from 87.7 to 67.10%. Parameters of ablution water resulted from the washing process which including Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5 and heavy metals have increased but still within the standard limits for the disposal of ablution water into the environment. No atrophy was observed in Strelitzia sp. leaves, indicating the ability of plant to grow normally. It can be concluded that the utilization of ablution water in the washing of peat soil has improve the characteristics of the soil without effect on their organic constitutes.

  8. Substrate-induced growth and isolation of Acidobacteria from acidic Sphagnum peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, Timofei A; Serkebaeva, Yulia M; Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2008-05-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to estimate the population size of the poorly characterized phylum Acidobacteria in acidic peat sampled from nine different Sphagnum-dominated wetlands of Northern Russia. The cell numbers of these bacteria in oxic peat layers ranged from 0.4 x 10(6) to 1.3 x 10(7) cells per g of wet peat, comprising up to 4% of total bacterial cells. Substrate-induced growth of acidobacteria was observed after amendment of peat samples with glucose, pectin, xylan, starch, ethanol and methanol, while weak or no response was obtained for acetate, pyruvate, mannitol and cellobiose. Using low-nutrient media and FISH-mediated monitoring of the isolation procedure, we succeeded in obtaining nine strains of acidobacteria in pure cultures. These strains belonged to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria and represented strictly aerobic, heterotrophic organisms. Except for methanol, the substrate utilization patterns of these isolates matched the results obtained in our substrate-amendment experiments with native peat. All strains were also capable of utilizing galacturonic acid, a characteristic component of the cell wall in Sphagnum spp, which is released during moss decomposition. Most isolates from subdivision 1 were truly acidophilic organisms with the growth optimum at pH 3.5-4.5, while the isolates from subdivision 3 grew optimally at pH 5.5-6.5. Another important phenotypic trait of novel strains was their capability of active growth at low temperatures. Both acidophily and low-temperature growth are consistent with the occurrence of acidobacteria in cold and acidic northern wetlands.

  9. Organic Matter Transformation in the Peat Column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and Vertical Stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tfaily, Malak [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Cooper, Bill [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Chanton, Patrick R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Chanton, Jeff P [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale ecosystem manipulation (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change, SPRUCE) is being constructed in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA, to determine the effects of climatic forcing on ecosystem processes in northern peatlands. Prior to the initiation of the manipulation, we characterized the solid-phase peat to a depth of 2 meters using a variety of techniques, including peat C:N ratios, 13C and 15N isotopic composition, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT IR), and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR). FT IR determined peat humification-levels increased rapidly between and 75 cm, indicating a highly reactive zone. We observed a rapid drop in the abundance of O-alkyl-C, carboxyl-C, and other oxygenated functionalities within this zone and a concomitant increase in the abundance of alkyl- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Below 75-cm, minimal change was observed except that aromatic functionalities accumulated with depth. Incubation studies revealed the highest methane production rates and greatest CH4:CO2 ratios within this and 75 cm zone. Hydrology and surface vegetation played a role in belowground carbon cycling. Radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in deeper porewaters resembled the signatures of dissolved organic carbon rather than solid phase peat, indicating that more recently photosynthesized organic matter fueled the bulk of subsurface microbial respiration. Oxygen-containing functionalities, especially O-alkyl-C, appear to serve as an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rate, and in addition should be a sensitive indicator of the response of the solid phase peat to the climatic manipulation.

  10. Mass tree mortality leads to mangrove peat collapse at Bay Islands, Honduras after Hurricane Mitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, D.R.; Hensel, P.; Rybczyk, J.; McKee, K.L.; Proffitt, C.E.; Perez, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    We measured sediment elevation and accretion dynamics in mangrove forests on the islands of Guanaja and Roatan, Honduras, impacted by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 to determine if collapse of underlying peat was occurring as a result of mass tree mortality. Little is known about the balance between production and decomposition of soil organic matter in the maintenance of sediment elevation of mangrove forests with biogenic soils. Sediment elevation change measured with the rod surface elevation table from 18 months to 33 months after the storm differed significantly among low, medium and high wind impact sites. Mangrove forests suffering minimal to partial mortality gained elevation at a rate (5 mm yeara??1) greater than vertical accretion (2 mm yeara??1) measured from artificial soil marker horizons, suggesting that root production contributed to sediment elevation. Basin forests that suffered mass tree mortality experienced peat collapse of about 11 mm yeara??1 as a result of decomposition of dead root material and sediment compaction. Low soil shear strength and lack of root growth accompanied elevation decreases. Model simulations using the Relative Elevation Model indicate that peat collapse in the high impact basin mangrove forest would be 37 mm yeara??1 for the 2 years immediately after the storm, as root material decomposed. In the absence of renewed root growth, the model predicts that peat collapse will continue for at least 8 more years at a rate (7 mm yeara??1) similar to that measured (11 mm yeara??1). Mass tree mortality caused rapid elevation loss. Few trees survived and recovery of the high impact forest will thus depend primarily on seedling recruitment. Because seedling establishment is controlled in large part by sediment elevation in relation to tide height, continued peat collapse could further impair recovery rates.

  11. Drained forest land and mires with thick peat as resources for sustainable peat harvesting in Sweden; Dikad skogsmark och myr med djup torv som resurser foer uthaalligt torvbruk i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haanell, Bjoern

    2006-04-15

    The aims of this study were to (i) calculate the coverage and location of drained peatlands which from an environmental perspective are the most suitable for peat harvesting in Sweden, and (ii) to calculate the volumes of peat on drained and un-drained peatlands as a basis for an analysis of the potential for sustainable future peat harvesting in the country. Data were selected from the Swedish National Forest Inventory of Forests, more specifically from the National Forest Inventory 1993-1997 and 1998-2002, and from the Swedish Forest Soil Inventory 2003-2004. The area of productive forest land covered with peat thicker than 1 m comprises about 700,000 ha, half on drained and half on un-drained sites. Deep peat layers are especially common in the provinces of Smaaland and Vaesterbotten (southern and coastal parts, respectively). The area of non-productive mires with thick (> 1 m) peat cover encompasses ca 2.6 million ha. About 200,000 of these mires are drained. Half of the drained forest land with thick peat, about 180,000 ha, belongs to peatland sites greater than 10 ha which can be regarded as the minimum size for profitable peat harvesting. As for the drained non-productive mires, less than a quarter of the area has to be rejected as potential sites for harvesting because of being too small size. In total, about 180,000 ha of drained forest land and 165,000 ha of drained non-productive mires with thick peat can be regarded as the country's potential for peat harvesting. The emission of greenhouse gases is greater from highly productive than from low-productive drained peatlands. The dominant part of the drained forest land belongs to the three most productive site types. A change in the ongoing land use, from forestry to peat harvesting, should be least expensive immediately after final felling of a mature forest (and before the establishment of a new generation of trees). The stands on the drained productive forest land are fairly evenly distributed

  12. Early age compressive strength, porosity, and sorptivity of concrete using peat water to produce and cure concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivia, Monita; Ismeddiyanto, Wibisono, Gunawan; Sitompul, Iskandar R.

    2017-09-01

    Construction in peatland has faced scarce water sources for mixing and curing concrete. It is known that peat water has high organic content and low pH that can be harmful to concrete in the environment. In some remote areas in Riau Province, contractors used peat water directly without sufficient treatments to comply with SKSNI requirements of concrete mixing water. This paper presents a study of compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and blended OPC-Palm Oil Fuel Ash (OPC-POFA) concrete. The specimens were mixed using natural water and peat water, then some of them were cured in fresh water and peat water. Six mixtures were investigated using a variation of cement, mixing water and curing water. Tap water is used as control mixing and curing water for all specimens. The compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity were calculated at seven and 28 days. Results indicate that the use of peat water will cause low compressive strength, high porosity and sorptivity for both OPC and OPC-POFA concrete. Using peat water and curing the specimens in tap water could improve the early strength, porosity and sorptivity of OPC concrete; however, it has an adverse effect on OPC-POFA specimens. The properties of early age concrete of both types (OPC and OPC-POFA) using peat water were as good as those with tap water. Therefore, it is suggested that peat water should be considered as mixing and curing water for concrete where tap water resources are scarce. Investigation of its long-term properties, as well as extending the observed age of concrete is recommended before any use of peat water.

  13. PRODUCTION OF PEPPER SEEDLINGS USING SUBSTRATES CONTAINING COMBINATIONS BASED COMMERCIAL SUBSTRATE (PEAT FÉRTIL®, EXPANDED VERMICULITE AND COCONUT FIBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Zeist

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For growing vegetables, seedling production is one of the most important stages of the process, and the use of suitable substrates as physical, chemical and biological characteristics for occur the formation of a quality seedling is necessary. In the context of information exposed the present study aimed to evaluate the production of pepper seedlings, using substrates of different mixtures of combinations (commercial substrate (Peat fertile®, expanded vermiculite and coconut fiber. To perform the experiment was carried sowing pepper cultivar All Big® in polystyrene trays (Styrofoam® 200 cells, filled with five treatments, combinations (C: 1 C1 (Peat fertile® (60%, vermiculite (20% and coconut fiber (20%; 2 C2 (Peat fertile® (60% and vermiculite (40%; 3 C3 (Peat fertile® (60% and coconut fiber (40%; 4- C4 ((Peat fertile® (40%, vermiculite (30% and coconut fiber (30%; and 5- C5 (Peat fertile® (100% at 42 days after germination (DAG seedlings, we assessed treatments for parameters: At 42 days after germination (DAG of the seedlings was evaluated treatments for parameters: seedlings height (AM, stem diameter (DC, length of the root system (CR and number of true leaves (NF. It was found that for the variable diameters and number of true leaves of the seedlings did not differ from the treatments, while for the variables plant height and root length, the combinations C1 (Peat fertile® (60% vermiculite expanded (20% and coconut fiber (20% and C4 ((Peat fertile® (40%, vermiculite (30% and coconut fiber (30%, provided the best and C5 treatment (Peat fertile® (100% the worst results.

  14. Peat accumulation in drained thermokarst lake basins in continuous, ice-rich permafrost, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Miriam C.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Anthony, Katey Walter

    2012-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and peat-accumulating drained lake basins cover a substantial portion of Arctic lowland landscapes, yet the role of thermokarst lake drainage and ensuing peat formation in landscape-scale carbon (C) budgets remains understudied. Here we use measurements of terrestrial peat thickness, bulk density, organic matter content, and basal radiocarbon age from permafrost cores, soil pits, and exposures in vegetated, drained lake basins to characterize regional lake drainage chronology, C accumulation rates, and the role of thermokarst-lake cycling in carbon dynamics throughout the Holocene on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Most detectable lake drainage events occurred within the last 4,000 years with the highest drainage frequency during the medieval climate anomaly. Peat accumulation rates were highest in young (50–500 years) drained lake basins (35.2 g C m−2 yr−1) and decreased exponentially with time since drainage to 9 g C m−2 yr−1 in the oldest basins. Spatial analyses of terrestrial peat depth, basal peat radiocarbon ages, basin geomorphology, and satellite-derived land surface properties (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF)) from Landsat satellite data revealed significant relationships between peat thickness and mean basin NDVI or MNF. By upscaling observed relationships, we infer that drained thermokarst lake basins, covering 391 km2 (76%) of the 515 km2 study region, store 6.4–6.6 Tg organic C in drained lake basin terrestrial peat. Peat accumulation in drained lake basins likely serves to offset greenhouse gas release from thermokarst-impacted landscapes and should be incorporated in landscape-scale C budgets.

  15. The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate - A European initiative for practical peat bog and climate protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Geerd; Tänzer, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The new European Competence Centre for Moor and Climate (EFMK) is an initiative by different local communities, environmental protection NGOs, agricultural services, and partners from the peat and other industries in Lower Saxony (Germany). The Centre aims to integrate practical peat bog conservation with a focus on green house gas emission after drainage and after water logging activities. Together with our partners we want to break new ground to protect the remaining bogs in the region. Sphagnum mosses will be produced in paludiculture on-site in cooperation with the local peat industry to provide economic and ecologic alternatives for peat products used in horticulture business. Land-use changes are needed in the region and will be stimulated in cooperation with agricultural services via compensation money transfers from environmental protection funds. On a global scale the ideas of Carbon Credit System have to be discussed to protect the peat bogs for climate protection issues. Environmental education is an important pillar of the EFMK. The local society is invited to explore the unique ecosystem and to participate in peat bog protection activities. Future generations will be taught to understand that the health of our peat bogs is interrelated with the health of the local and global climate. Besides extracurricular classes for schools the centre will provide infrastructure for Master and PhD students, as well for senior researchers for applied research in the surrounding moor. International partners in the scientific and practical fields of peat bog ecology, renaturation, green house gas emissions from peat bogs, and environmental policy are invited to participate in the European Competence Center for Moor and Climate.

  16. Current and Noise Saturation in Graphene Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Lu, Xiaobo; Berthou, Simon; Wilmart, Quentin; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Voisin, Christophe; Zhang, Guangyu; Placais, Bernard

    One of the merits of graphene is that the Fermi level can be easily tuned by electrical gating, which render charge carriers n type or p type, or even insulating around the Dirac point (DP). By aligning graphene on top of Boron Nitride (BN), the presence of graphene superlattice makes transport properties even more versatile owning to the emergence of secondary Dirac points (SDPs). Here we present a study of high electric field performance of graphene superlattice obtained from epitaxial approach. By using microwave cavity, noise produced from graphene by joule heating is recorded up to 5GHz. Current and noise saturation are observed and investigated. Depending on Fermi energy, saturation can be attributed to intrinsic optical or remote surface polar phonon scattering at a doping far away from DP, while no saturation are found around DP. Moreover, noise saturation is identified around Fermi energy between DP and SDP, which can be attributed to the influence of van Hove singularity arising from the superlattice. Lastly, saturation due to the bias induced shift of DP, or so called Dirac fermion pinch-off, is well observed by local top gate technique. EU Graphene flagship project (Contract No. 604391).

  17. Lipid order, saturation and surface property relationships: a study of human meibum saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Yappert, Marta C; Duran, Diana; Cox, Gregory W; Smith, Ryan J; Bhola, Rahul; Dennis, Gary R; Whitehall, John S

    2013-11-01

    Tear film stability decreases with age however the cause(s) of the instability are speculative. Perhaps the more saturated meibum from infants may contribute to tear film stability. The meibum lipid phase transition temperature and lipid hydrocarbon chain order at physiological temperature (33 °C) decrease with increasing age. It is reasonable that stronger lipid-lipid interactions could stabilize the tear film since these interactions must be broken for tear break up to occur. In this study, meibum from a pool of adult donors was saturated catalytically. The influence of saturation on meibum hydrocarbon chain order was determined by infrared spectroscopy. Meibum is in an anhydrous state in the meibomian glands and on the surface of the eyelid. The influence of saturation on the surface properties of meibum was determined using Langmuir trough technology. Saturation of native human meibum did not change the minimum or maximum values of hydrocarbon chain order so at temperatures far above or below the phase transition of human meibum, saturation does not play a role in ordering or disordering the lipid hydrocarbon chains. Saturation did increase the phase transition temperature in human meibum by over 20 °C, a relatively high amount. Surface pressure-area studies showing the late take off and higher maximum surface pressure of saturated meibum compared to native meibum suggest that the saturated meibum film is quite molecularly ordered (stiff molecular arrangement) and elastic (molecules are able to rearrange during compression and expansion) compared with native meibum films which are more fluid agreeing with the infrared spectroscopic results of this study. In saturated meibum, the formation of compacted ordered islands of lipids above the surfactant layer would be expected to decrease the rate of evaporation compared to fluid and more loosely packed native meibum. Higher surface pressure observed with films of saturated meibum compared to native meibum

  18. A Comparison of Coconut Coir and Sphagnum Peat as Soil-less Media Components for Plant Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Holman, Jason; Bugbee, Bruce; Chard, Julie K.

    2005-01-01

    Coconut coir, a by-product of the coconut industry, has been promoted as an alternative to peat moss in soil-less media. Sphagnum peat moss has long been a standard component of soil-less media, but some people have expressed concern that it is a non-renewable resource. Although it does not appear that world peat resources will be in short supply for a very long time, coconut coir may have characteristics that make it a useful component of soil-less media mixes. Coir has been considered to pr...

  19. Soil Structure and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskova, B.; Nagy, V.

    The role of soil structure on saturated hydraulic conductivity changes is studied in plough layers of texturally different soils. Three localities in western part of Slovakia in Zitny ostrov (Corn Island) were under investigation: locality Kalinkovo with light Calcaric Fluvisol (FAO 1970), Macov with medium heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol and Jurova with heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol. Soil structure was determined in dry as well as wet state and in size of macro and micro aggregates. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured by the help of double ring method. During the period of ring filling the soil surface was protected against aggregates damage by falling water drops. Spatial and temporal variability of studied parameters was evaluated. Cultivated crops were ensilage maize at medium heavy and heavy soil and colza at light soil. Textural composition of soil and actual water content at the beginning of measurement are one of major factor affecting aggregate stability and consequently also saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  20. Perturbative Saturation and the Soft Pomeron

    CERN Document Server

    Kovner, A; Kovner, Alex; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2002-01-01

    We show that perturbation theory provides two distinct mechanisms for the power like growth of hadronic cross sections at high energy. One, the leading BFKL effect is due to the growth of the parton density, and is characterized by the leading BFKL exponent. The other mechanism is due to the infrared diffusion, or the long range nature of the Coulomb field of perturbatively massless gluons. When perturbative saturation effects are taken into account, the first mechanism is rendered ineffective but the second one persists. We suggest that these two distinct mechanisms are responsible for the appearance of two pomerons. The density growth effects are responsible for the hard pomeron and manifest themselves in small systems (e.g. gamma^* or small size fluctuations in the proton wave function) where saturation effects are not important. The soft pomeron is the manifestation of the exponential growth of the black saturated regions which appear in typical hadronic systems. We point out that the nonlinear generaliza...

  1. Interger multiplication with overflow detection or saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, M.J.; Balzola, P.I.; Akkas, A.; Brocato, R.W.

    2000-01-11

    High-speed multiplication is frequently used in general-purpose and application-specific computer systems. These systems often support integer multiplication, where two n-bit integers are multiplied to produce a 2n-bit product. To prevent growth in word length, processors typically return the n least significant bits of the product and a flag that indicates whether or not overflow has occurred. Alternatively, some processors saturate results that overflow to the most positive or most negative representable number. This paper presents efficient methods for performing unsigned or two's complement integer multiplication with overflow detection or saturation. These methods have significantly less area and delay than conventional methods for integer multiplication with overflow detection and saturation.

  2. The Danish tax on saturated fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Signild; Holm, Lotte; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Health promoters have repeatedly proposed using economic policy tools, taxes and subsidies, as a means of changing consumer behaviour. As the first country in the world, Denmark introduced a tax on saturated fat in 2011. It was repealed in 2012. In this paper, we present...... on saturated fat had been suggested by two expert committees and was introduced with a majority in parliament, as a part of a larger economic reform package. Many actors, including representatives from the food industry and nutrition researchers, opposed the tax both before and after its introduction, claiming......, research was published showing that consumption of saturated fat had declined in Denmark. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis indicates that the Danish tax on fat was introduced mainly to increase public revenue. As the tax had no strong proponents and many influential adversaries, it was repealed. New research...

  3. Tracking Controller for Intrinsic Output Saturated Systems in Presence of Amplitude and Rate Input Saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chater, E.; Giri, F.; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of controlling plants that are subject to multiple saturation constraints. Especially, we are interested in linear systems whose input is subject to amplitude and rate constraints of saturation type. Furthermore, the considered systems output is also subject to an intrinsi...

  4. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated

  5. Saturated poroelastic actuators generated by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the fluid-structure interaction problem of a saturated porous media is considered. The pressure coupling properties of porous saturated materials change with the microstructure and this is utilized in the design of an actuator using a topology optimized porous material. By maximizing...... the coupling of internal fluid pressure and elastic shear stresses a slab of the optimized porous material deflects/deforms when a pressure is imposed and an actuator is created. Several phenomenologically based constraints are imposed in order to get a stable force transmitting actuator....

  6. On the saturation of astrophysical dynamos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil; Archontis, Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate in the li......In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate...

  7. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  8. Only low methane production and emission in degraded peat extraction sites after rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agethen, Svenja; Waldemer, Carolin; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    In Central Europe rewetting of bogs after peat extraction is a wide spread technique to halt secondary aerobic decomposition and to reestablish plant species such as Sphagnum spp. and Eriophorum spp. that initialize accumulation of organic carbon in peat. Before extraction, such sites are often used for agriculture causing the aerobic degradation of peat and mobilization of phosphorus, ammonia, and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In nutrient poor ecosystems such as bogs, additional supply of P and N does not only trigger the establishment of uncharacteristic vegetation but also the formation of more labile plant litter and DOM that is readily degradable. Therefore, after rewetting and the development of anoxic conditions especially in initial stages high methane (CH4) emissions are reported for these systems compared to pristine bogs. Regarding the potential of methane production and emissions we investigated three common practices to prepare extraction fields for restoration (years since rewetting): i) Filling of drainage ditches, passive rewetting (1 site, Altendorfer Moor, Stade, NW-Germany, ca. 20 yr.), ii) Removal of upper 30 cm peat layer, removed peat used for construction of polder dikes (2 sites, Königsmoor, Leer, NW-Germany, 2 and 3 yr.), iii) Removal upper peat layer down to 50 cm grown peat, not extracted peat used as polder walls (2 sites, Benthullener Moor, Wardenburg, NW-Germany, 3 and 7 yr.). In each site two vegetated replicate mesocosms (diam. 30 cm, depth 40 cm) were sampled and placed in a greenhouse from May-October 2014 to maintain the water table at surface level. Pore water concentrations of ions, fermentation products and DOM, DOM electron acceptor capacity (EAC), soil gas concentrations of CO2, CH4 and H2, gas fluxes as well as element composition and organic matter quality of DOM and SOM were analyzed. We found out that practice i) with least efforts of nutrient removal in the peat produced the highest CH4 emissions (3.5 mmol m-2 d-1

  9. Effect of peat characteristics on P, N and DOC mobilization from re-wetted peat soils - a laboratory column study for the impacts of restoration on forestry-drained peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Markku; Kaila, Annu; Asam, Zaki; Uusitalo, Risto; Smolander, Aino; Kiikkilä, Oili; Sarkkola, Sakari; Kitunen, Veikko; Fritze, Hannu; Nousiainen, Hannu; Tervahauta, Arja; Xiao, Liwen; Nieminen, Mika

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an integral part of the hydrological cycle in the boreal and temperate zones, providing ecosystem services such as water filtering. From the mid to late 1900's, over 15 ha of peatlands and wetlands were drained for forestry in the temperate and boreal zones, causing deterioration of biodiversity and loss of ecosystem services. They are now being restored in order to reverse this development. Restoration of pealands has been found to cause leaching of DOC and nutrients after water level rise and expansion of reducing conditions in the peat. A molar ratio between redox-sensitive Fe and P in the peat of Microbial biomass and mineralization potential of the peat were not found to be important for the export of DOC or P. High NO3 content in the peat predicted high export of NH4 under reducing conditions.

  10. Magnesium Oxide Carbonation Rate Law in Saturated Brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemer, M. B.; Allen, C.; Deng, H.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) is the only engineered barrier certified by the EPA for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a U.S. Department of Energy repository for transuranic waste in southeast New Mexico. MgO reduces actinide solubility by sequestering CO2 generated by the biodegradation of cellulosic, plastic, and rubber materials. Demonstration of the effectiveness of MgO is essential for WIPP recertification. In order to be an effective barrier, the rate of CO2 sequestration should be fast compared to the rate CO2 production, over the entire 10,000 year regulatory period. While much research has been conducted on the kinetics of magnesium oxide carbonation in waters with salinity up to that of sea water, we are not aware of any work on determining the carbonation rate law in saturated brines at low partial pressures of CO2 (PCO2 as low as 10-5.5 atm), which is important for performing safety assessments of bedded salt waste repositories. Using a Varian ion-trap gas- chromatograph/mass-spectrometer (GC/MS) we experimentally followed the CO2 sequestration kinetics of magnesium oxide in salt-saturated brines down to a PCO2 as low as 10-5.5 atm. This was performed in a closed reactor with a known initial PCO2. The results of this study show that carbonation is approximately first order in PCO2, in saturated brines. We believe that this method will benefit the study of the detailed kinetics of other similar processes.

  11. Treatment of Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES TREATMENT OF ESSENTIAL TREMOR This fact sheet is provided to help you understand which therapies help treat essential tremor. Neurologists from the American Academy of Neurology are ...

  12. Atmospheric Pb deposition in Spain during the last 4600 years recorded by two ombrotrophic peat bogs and implications for the use of peat as archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Cortiza, A; García-Rodeja, E; Pontevedra Pombal, X; Nóvoa Muñoz, J C; Weiss, D; Cheburkin, A

    2002-06-20

    Two ombrotrophic peat bogs in Northwestern Spain provided a history of 4600 years of Pb accumulation. Highest Pb concentrations (84-87 microg g(-1)) were found near the bogs' surface, but there were also other significant peaks (6-14 microg g(-1)), indicating pre-industrial atmospheric pollution. The enrichment factors (EFs) in both cores show a remarkably similar record. Atmospheric Pb pollution dates back to at least approximately 2500 years ago, reaching a first maximum during the Roman period. For the last 300 years, Pb EFs significantly increased due to industrial development, but the uppermost samples of the bogs show decreasing Pb EFs, probably due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. These results are also supported by 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios, as they continuously decrease from ca. 3000 BP until 2000 BP (from 1.275 at 4070 14C years BP to 1.182), indicating the growing importance of nonradiogenic Pb released from Iberian ores by ancient mining. Peat samples at a 3-5-cm depth are even less radiogenic (206Pb/107Pb = 1.157), indicating the strong influence of leaded gasoline. Despite the common history shared by the two bogs, striking differences were found for Pb enrichment, whether this was calculated by normalising to the Pb/Ti ratio of the upper continental crust or to the Pb/Ti ratios of peats from pre-anthropogenic times. This effect seems to be related to differences in Ti accumulation in both bogs, possibly due to physical fractionation of the airborne dust during wind transport. Enrichment has to be carefully considered when comparing the results obtained for different bogs, since our results suggest that normalising to crustal proportions is meaningless when the bulk of the deposition in an area is strongly influenced by short- and medium-range dust transport.

  13. Atmospheric Pb deposition in Spain during the last 4600 years recorded by two ombrotrophic peat bogs and implications for the use of peat as archive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Cortizas, A.; Garcia-Rodeja, E.; Pontevedra Pombal, X.; Novoa Munoz, J.C. [Departamento de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola, Faculdad de Biologia, Universidad de Santiago, Campus Sur E-15706, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Weiss, D. [T.H. Huxley School, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2BP London (United Kingdom); Cheburkin, A. [EMMA Analytical Inc Canada, ON Elmvale (Canada)

    2002-06-20

    Two ombrotrophic peat bogs in Northwestern Spain provided a history of 4600 years of Pb accumulation. Highest Pb concentrations (84-87 {mu}g g{sup -1}) were found near the bogs' surface, but there were also other significant peaks (6-14 {mu}g g{sup -1}), indicating pre-industrial atmospheric pollution. The enrichment factors (EFs) in both cores show a remarkably similar record. Atmospheric Pb pollution dates back to at least approximately 2500 years ago, reaching a first maximum during the Roman period. For the last 300 years, Pb EFs significantly increased due to industrial development, but the uppermost samples of the bogs show decreasing Pb EFs, probably due to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. These results are also supported by 206Pb/207Pb isotope ratios, as they continuously decrease from ca. 3000 BP until 2000 BP (from 1.275 at 4070 14C years BP to 1.182), indicating the growing importance of non-radiogenic Pb released from Iberian ores by ancient mining. Peat samples at a 3-5-cm depth are even less radiogenic (206Pb/107Pb=1.157), indicating the strong influence of leaded gasoline. Despite the common history shared by the two bogs, striking differences were found for Pb enrichment, whether this was calculated by normalising to the Pb/Ti ratio of the upper continental crust or to the Pb/Ti ratios of peats from pre-anthropogenic times. This effect seems to be related to differences in Ti accumulation in both bogs, possibly due to physical fractionation of the airborne dust during wind transport. Enrichment has to be carefully considered when comparing the results obtained for different bogs, since our results suggest that normalising to crustal proportions is meaningless when the bulk of the deposition in an area is strongly influenced by short- and medium-range dust transport.

  14. TECHNOLOGY AND EFFICIENT USE OF PEAT ASH IN MASTICS FOR WATERPROOFING OF BRIDGE AND TUNNEL STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Lyahevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective method for protection of  bridges and tunnels against aggressive water action is surface waterproofing on the basis of an organo-mineral binder. Its structural strength can be increased by introduction of particles which are similar to the size of  asphaltenes and an elasticity of disperse medium has been increased due to introduction of polymers. These theoretical suppositions point out the possibility for simultaneous provision of flexibility at low temperatures and high heat resistance for mastics on the basis  of organo-mineral binders. In this regard a goal has been set to obtain a mastic high flexibility and high heat resistance  while using finely divided activated peat ash.Rubber crushed in accordance with ТУ (Technical Specifications 38.108035–87,  divinyl-styrene thermoelastoplast DСT-30Р-20ПС,  bitumen of grade 20/30 in accordance with СТБ ЕН 12591–2010, ash from burning peat at the Lida Peat Briquette Plant, multi-purpose industrial oil of solvent refining with high viscosity index, super-plasticizer – sodium salt which is a condensation product of aromatic carbon sulfo-oxidation with formaldehyde and neutralization with the help of sodium hydroxide (type 1 have been used in order to obtain the stated objective. While using these materials compositions and technology for preparation of organo-mineral mastics have been developed in the paper. Their tests have shown that a modification of finely divided  mastics carried out with the help of peat ash which is activated by super-plasticizer НСПКСАУсФ-1, various polymer additives, contributes to an increase in their heat resistance, elasticity, water resistance, and also allows to control their technological and operational characteristics. The paper has experimentally confirmed that peat ash can be successfully used for preparation of high-quality waterproofing mastics which are so necessary for  protection of bridge and tunnel

  15. Historical peat loss explains limited short-term response of drained blanket bogs to rewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jennifer; Rowe, Edwin; Reed, David; Ruffino, Lucia; Jones, Peter; Dolan, Rachel; Buckingham, Helen; Norris, David; Astbury, Shaun; Evans, Chris D

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the short-term impacts of ditch blocking on water table depth and vegetation community structure in a historically drained blanket bog. A chronosequence approach was used to compare vegetation near ditches blocked 5 years, 4 years and 1 year prior to the study with vegetation near unblocked ditches. Plots adjacent to and 3 m away from 70 ditches within an area of blanket bog were assessed for floristic composition, aeration depth using steel bars, and topography using LiDAR data. No changes in aeration depth or vegetation parameters were detected as a function of ditch-blocking, time since blocking, or distance from the ditch, with the exception of non-Sphagnum bryophytes which had lower cover in quadrats adjacent to ditches that had been blocked for 5 years. Analysis of LiDAR data and the observed proximity of the water table to the peat surface led us to conclude that the subdued ecosystem responses to ditch-blocking were the result of historical peat subsidence within a 4-5 m zone either side of each ditch, which had effectively lowered the peat surface to the new, ditch-influenced water table. We estimate that this process led to the loss of around 500,000 m3 peat within the 38 km2 study area following drainage, due to a combination of oxidation and compaction. Assuming that 50% of the volume loss was due to oxidation, this amounts to a carbon loss of 11,000 Mg C over this area, i.e. 3 Mg C ha-1. The apparent 'self-rewetting' of blanket bogs in the decades following drainage has implications for their restoration as it suggests that there may not be large quantities of dry peat left to rewet, and that there is a risk of inundation (potentially leading to high methane emissions) along subsided ditch lines. Many peatland processes are likely to be maintained in drained blanket bog, including support of typical peatland vegetation, but infilling of lost peat and recovery of original C stocks are likely to take longer than is generally

  16. No limits to peat bog growth? Transport and thermodynamic constraints on anaerobic organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodau, C.; Julia, B.; Siems, M.

    2009-05-01

    In diffusion dominated systems, for which many thick peat deposits provide a model, slowness of transport and lack of free energy may pose a limit to methanogenic decomposition of organic matter and ultimately to closing the carbon cycle. To test this hypothesis we (I) conducted controlled column experiments with homogenized peat over an 18 month period, (II) investigated transport, in situ respiration pathways, rates and thermodynamic conditions in a nothern peatland, and (III) modelled depth profiles of CO2 and CH4 in the deposits. Vertical transport in the peatland was dominated by diffusion leading to the buildup of DIC and CH4 with depth (5500 µmol L 1 DIC, 500 µmol L 1 CH4). Highest DIC and CH4 production rates occurred close to the water table (decomposition constant kd ~10-3 to 10 4 a-1) and decreased to about kd = 10-7 a-1. The accumulation of metabolic end-products diminished in situ energy yields of acetoclastic methanogenesis to the threshold for microbially mediated processes (-20 to -25 kJ mol-1 CH4). The methanogenic precursor acetate also accumulated (150 µmol L 1). In line with these findings, CH4 was formed by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at Gibbs free energies of 35 to 40 kJ mol-1 CH4. This was indicated by an isotopic fractionation αCO2-CH4 of 1.069 to 1.079. Fermentative degradation of acetate, propionate and butyrate attained Gibbs free energies close to 0 kJ mol-1 substrate. In peat columns with homogenenous peat-sand mixtures of 50%, 15% and 5% dry weight, steady state CO2 production also decreased from about 10 to 0 nmol cm-3 d-1 and of CH4 from 1 to 0 nmol cm-3 d-1 with depth. Very similar depth profiles of concentrations and volumetric rates developed near endproduct thresholds of 600µmol CH4 and 10 mmol L-1 CO2, despite the differences in organic matter content. The modeling exercise showed that a consistent development of CH4 concentration profiles over time in the columns could only be accomplished with rates of acetoclastic

  17. Maximization and handling of sod peat loading. Final report; Palaturpeen kuormituksen maksimointi ja kaesittely. Loppuraportti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkkilae, A.; Nurmi, H.; Paappanen, T.; Frilander, P.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this two year (1994-1995) project was to improve especially the efficiency of sod peat production, carried out using spreading wagon method, by increasing the sod peat load set for the field to value 20 kgDgm{sup 2} (original value 10-14 kgDgm{sup 2}), and by studying and developing a collection method for ridging and ridge processing, suitable for high-loads. The research was emphasized to laboratory tests, but some field test were also made. Laboratory test equipment, to be mounted to peat machine simulator, were constructed, and picking-up of sod peat was tested in laboratory. It was possible to increase the sod peat load most accurately to 20 kgDgm{sup 2} by using wave-like sod peat. The picking device of the ridger consisted of a grid, standing the sod up, moving on the field. Above this there is a rotating truncheon coil which transfers the sod along the grid to further processing. The share of the fines by weight, loosened from the field during picking up of the sod was 0.5 % of the sod-mass, and the losses were 11 % of the number of the sod. At the driving speed 2.9 km/h the suitable coil rotation speed was about 20 r/min, hence the rotation speed of the truncheons was twice as high as the driving speed. A picking device, which consisted of two vertical truncheon-coils rotating into opposite directions, was constructed for collection of sod in the ridge. The operation of the device appeared to be good. While picking-up the sod in the ridge on the average 1.3 % of fines was loosened from the field with respect to the sod-mass. 41 % of the fines mixed with the ridge was sieved. The losses were on the average 3.9 % of the sod-mass. The highest measured power demand was 12 kW as the driving speed was 3.0 km/h. Collection method developed within this project, requires more field tests before commercial use

  18. Fullerene Transport in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effects of background solution chemistry and residence time within the soil column on the transport of aqu/C60 through saturated ultrapure quartz sand columns. Aqu/C60 breakthrough curves were obtained under different pore water velocities, solution pHs, and i...

  19. Oxygenation of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 5. Oxygenation of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons with sodium periodate catalyzed by manganese(III) tetra-arylporphyrins, to study the axial ligation of imidazole. Reza Tayebee. Volume 118 Issue 5 September 2006 pp 429-433 ...

  20. Nasal pulse oximetry overestimates oxygen saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H

    1990-01-01

    Ten surgical patients were monitored with nasal and finger pulse oximetry (Nellcor N-200) for five study periods with alternating mouth and nasal breathing and switching of cables and sensors. Nasal pulse oximetry was found to overestimate arterial oxygen saturation by 4.7 (SD 1.4%) (bias...

  1. Determination of saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The estimation of hydraulic conductivity indicates how fluids flow through a substance and thus determine the water balance in the soil profile. In determining the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil, five plots of 5.0 x 4.0 m were prepared with a PVC access tube installed in each plot. The plots were ...

  2. Understanding 'saturation' of radar signals over forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neha; Mitchard, Edward T A; Brolly, Matthew; Schumacher, Johannes; Fernández-Landa, Alfredo; Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Marchamalo, Miguel; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2017-06-14

    There is an urgent need to quantify anthropogenic influence on forest carbon stocks. Using satellite-based radar imagery for such purposes has been challenged by the apparent loss of signal sensitivity to changes in forest aboveground volume (AGV) above a certain 'saturation' point. The causes of saturation are debated and often inadequately addressed, posing a major limitation to mapping AGV with the latest radar satellites. Using ground- and lidar-measurements across La Rioja province (Spain) and Denmark, we investigate how various properties of forest structure (average stem height, size and number density; proportion of canopy and understory cover) simultaneously influence radar backscatter. It is found that increases in backscatter due to changes in some properties (e.g. increasing stem sizes) are often compensated by equal magnitude decreases caused by other properties (e.g. decreasing stem numbers and increasing heights), contributing to the apparent saturation of the AGV-backscatter trend. Thus, knowledge of the impact of management practices and disturbances on forest structure may allow the use of radar imagery for forest biomass estimates beyond commonly reported saturation points.

  3. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biot 's theory for wave propagation in saturated porous solid is modified to study the propagation of thermoelastic waves in poroelastic medium. Propagation of plane harmonic waves is considered in isotropic poroelastic medium. Relations are derived among the wave-induced temperature in the medium and the ...

  4. Spontaneous emission from saturated parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Steffensen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Noise performance of parametric amplifiers is typically calculated assuming un-depleted operation. However, in many applications especially when applied as regenerative amplifiers in systems based on phase shift keyed modulation schemes, this assumption is not valid. Here we show the impact...... on accumulated spontaneous emission for a parametric amplifier operated in saturation....

  5. Elevated transferrin saturation and risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Andersen, Henrik Ullits

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that elevated transferrin saturation is associated with an increased risk of any form of diabetes, as well as type 1 or type 2 diabetes separately. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used two general population studies, The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS, N = 9...

  6. Saturated fat, carbohydrates and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R. S.; de Graaf, D. J.; Luxwolda, M. F.; Muskiet, M. H. A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. J.; Muskiet, F. A. J.

    The dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) is associated with a modest increase in serum total cholesterol, but not with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Replacing dietary SAFA with carbohydrates (CHO), notably those with a high glycaemic index, is associated with an increase in CVD risk in

  7. Two-beam interaction in saturable media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Schmidt, Michel R.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of two coupled soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a saturable nonlinearity is investigated It is shown by means of a variational method and by direct numerical calculations that two well-separated solitons can orbit around each other, if their initial velocity...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of saturated polyester and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saturated polyester resin, derived from the glycolysis of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) was examined as an effective way for PET recycling. The glycolyzed PET (GPET) was reacted with the mixture of phthalic anhydride and ethylene glycol (EG) with varied compositions and their reaction kinetic were studied. During ...

  9. Multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Stratonnikov, Aleksander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2008-06-01

    The system of multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation is an instrument that can record both spectral and spatial information about a sample. In this project, the spectral imaging technique is used for monitoring of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in human tissues. This system can be used for monitoring spatial distribution of oxygen saturation in photodynamic therapy, surgery or sports medicine. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range is an effective and extensively used technique for the non-invasive study and characterization of various biological tissues. In this article, a short review of modeling techniques being currently in use for diffuse reflection from semi-infinite turbid media is presented. A simple and practical model for use with a real-time imaging system is proposed. This model is based on linear approximation of the dependence of the diffuse reflectance coefficient on relation between absorbance and reduced scattering coefficient. This dependence was obtained with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon propagation in turbid media. Spectra of the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin differ mostly in the red area (520 - 600 nm) and have several characteristic points there. Thus four band-pass filters were used for multi-spectral imaging. After having measured the reflectance, the data obtained are used for fitting the concentration of oxygenated and free hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

  10. Extensive Holocene tropical peat and carbon accumulation within a subsiding intraforeland basin (Pastaza fan and Ucamara floodbasin), Peruvian Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähteenoja, Outi; Räsänen, Matti; Rojas Reátegui, Yully; Del Castillo, Dennis; Oinonen, Markku

    2010-05-01

    Several studies discuss the role of the Amazon Basin in the global carbon cycle, but the existence of extensive tropical peat deposits in lowland Amazonia has been suggested only recently. These up to 5.9 m thick peat deposits documented from a floodplain environment in Western Amazonia have accumulated at high rates (0.94-4.88 mm per year) acting as a strong carbon sink (Lähteenoja et al. 2009). The tectonic environment of Western Amazonia is a foreland belt formed during the uplift of the Andes Mountains as a result of shallow subduction and compressive foreland shortening (Räsänen et al. 1987, Dumont 1996). These foreland basins are characterized by high subsidence rates, up to 4-11 km of sediment deposits as well as river aggradation and avulsions (Räsänen et al. 1987). We studied peat and carbon accumulation in the Pastaza-Marañón intraforeland basin, which consists of the volcanogenic Pastaza alluvial fan and the Ucamara meandering river floodbasin. Together, they form the largest modern tropical system of fluvial aggradation, whose potential to accumulate peat is considerable. In 13 wetland sites detected in Landsat TM satellite images, we measured peat thickness along a transect and collected peat samples for determination of total organic content, carbon content, dry bulk density, AMS radiocarbon age and peat and carbon accumulation rates. According to the results, the Pastaza fan and the Ucamara floodbasin harbor thick peatlands, whose existence has not been previously discussed. All the study sites had either a continuous peat deposit over clastic sediments or a complex stratigraphy of successive layers of clastic sediments, clayey peat and pure peat. Thickness of these heterogeneous deposits varied from 0.20 to 7.5 m. Bulk density, total organic content and carbon content varied from 0.01 to 0.26 g/cm3, from 37 to 99 %, and from 19 to 59 %, respectively. The complex stratigraphies (encountered especially in the Ucamara floodbasin) are obviously

  11. Influence of Humic Acids Extracted from Peat by Different Methods on Functional Activity of Macrophages in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, E S; Zykova, M V; Ligacheva, A A; Sherstoboev, E Y; Zhdanov, V V; Belousov, M V; Yusubov, M S; Krivoshchekov, S V; Danilets, M G; Dygai, A M

    2017-04-01

    We studied activation of macrophages with humic acids extracted from peat of large deposits in the Tomsk region by two extraction methods: by hydroxide or sodium pyrophosphate. Humic acid of lowland peat types containing large amounts of aromatic carbon, phenolic and alcohol groups, carbohydrate residues and ethers, irrespectively of the extraction methods contained LPS admixture that probably determines their activating properties. Humic acid of upland peat types characterized by high content of carbonyl, carboxyl, and ester groups enhance NO production and reduce arginase expression, but these effects were minimized when sodium hydroxide was used as an extraction solvent. Pyrophosphate samples of the upland peat types were characterized by aromaticity and diversity of functional groups and have a significant advantage because of they induce specific endotoxin-independent stimulating action on antigen presenting cells.

  12. Restoration ecology: aiding and abetting secondary succession on abandoned peat mines in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Vander Kloet

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of using vegetative clumps derived from seeds with a variety of origins to establish nuclei for regeneration of bog vegetation on abandoned peat mines in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick (Canada was tested using seeds within scats (excrement and seeds from berries, various techniques for creating clumps, and different clump sizes. Direct placement of scat pieces on peat in the field did not produce successful colonisation. Vegetative clumps begun in a greenhouse, whether from seeds extracted from scats or berries, were 60–100 % successful when transplanted into abandoned peat mines depending on the initial size of the transplant. Based on annual growth rate, Vaccinium oxycoccos has the greatest capacity to quickly colonise abandoned peat mines. Other promising taxa were Vaccinium vitis-ideae and the genus Empetrum.

  13. The genesis of the Nissi peatland (northwestern Greece) as an example of peat and lignite deposit formation in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianis, K. (University of Patras, Patras (Greece). Dept of Geology)

    1994-07-01

    The Nissi Fen is located in a 12 km[sup 2] intramontane basin in northwestern Greece. Since the last glacial, limnotelmatic and pure telmatic conditions, controlled mainly by karstic springs and partly by surface waters, favoured peat formation in the basin, resulting in the accumulation of a peat deposit up to 15 m thick. The present fen occupies a large area of almost 9 km[sup 2]. Flora cover comprises mainly Cyperaceae ([ital Cladium mariscus] and [ital Carex] species), while [ital Phragmites australis] extend along the banks of a river flowing through the basin, as well as around a lake in the southern part of the fen. These species also contributed to the peat formation. The Nissi peatland shows many genetic similarities to the Philippi peat deposit, Eastern Macedonia, and may be considered as a recent analogue to the lignite deposits in the basins of Ptolemais, Western Macedonia and Megalopolis, the Peloponnese. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Geochemical evidence for different peat sources in the Siak estuary and along the east coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wöstmann

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution pattern of selected biomarkers extracted from samples of outcropping peat from the Siak river, its estuary, the coast around Dumai and the island of Bengkalis have been investigated by gas chromatography (GC and combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS, and compared with samples of eroded peat washed ashore (re-deposited on the coastline of Sumatra. Geochemical analyses of n-alkanes, n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, steroids and triterpenoids show that outcropping and re-deposited peats have different chemical compositions. The outcropping peats around Dumai, Bengkalis and in the Siak River estuary contain high concentrations of the pentacyclic triterpenoid taraxerol, a typical constituent of the mangrove species Rhizophora. A comparison with the lipid composition of leaves from the fringing mangrove species (Avicennia alba, Sonneratia alba and Rhizophora apiculata showed that only R. apiculata contains significant amounts of taraxerol. Taraxerol was completely absent from the leaves of A. alba and S. alba. This suggests that the peats outcropping around Dumai, Bengkalis and in the Siak estuary must be formed by a dominant input of mangroves of the Rhizophora family. The n-alkane distribution patterns of the outcropping peats near Dumai and the Siak estuary are similar to those of the surrounding mangrove vegetation with a maximum at C31 and a strong predominance of odd over even carbon numbers in all samples. Biomarker analysis of eroded peats washed ashore along the coastline around Dumai and the Siak estuary shows a different lipid composition with high amounts of the triterpenoids friedelin, α-amyrin and β-amyrin. These compounds are typical biomarkers for tropical forest vegetation as found along the Siak River and for peats eroding at upstream river banks. The n-alkanol distribution patterns of re-deposited peats also indicate a different origin for their organic matter. Peats re-deposited in the Siak estuary

  15. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V. [Nonlinear Control Strategies, Inc., 3542 N. Geronimo Ave., Tucson, Arizona 85705 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Yang, H.-J.; Scheller, M. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Koch, S. W. [Department of Physics and Materials Sciences Center, Philipps Universität Marburg, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2016-02-07

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap, the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.

  16. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hader, J.; Yang, H.-J.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2016-02-01

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap, the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.

  17. Potential rates of anaerobic decomposition and experimental priming effects in thawed peats from discontinuous permafrost in western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estop Aragones, C.; Heffernan, L.; Olefeldt, D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent climate change has led to increased rates of warming and wildfire in the circumpolar region. It is predicted that this will promote the widespread thawing of permafrost and the development of thermokarst bogs in the peatlands of western Canada. Previously frozen deep organic matter becomes available to microbial activity with thermokarst with the potential loss of C stocks while liberating greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and creating a positive feedback to climate change. Although anoxic conditions in these waterlogged systems may reduce peat decomposition, fresh plant derived C inputs associated with high vegetation productivity post-thaw could increase peat decomposition. The effect of this potential mechanism on enhanced peat decomposition is poorly investigated though. We are measuring anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production rates from a peat plateau, an adjacent young and an old thermokarst feature in the discontinuous permafrost. Samples were selected from depths where peat has been exposed to seasonal thaw (active layer) and from deeper, previously frozen organic matter along 5 m profiles. Preliminary results indicate that most CO2 production is driven by the top meter of peat, especially in the recent thermokarst where the highest rates of CH4 production are also measured due to high vegetation productivity post-thaw. Data suggests that the decomposition of deeper peat is more temperature sensitive. We are considering a 13C labelling experiment to investigate the priming effects on heterotrophic respiration of organic matter heterotrophic respiration once the labile C pool has been depleted and production rates have become stable over time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be used to determine how peat quality is related to anaerobic decomposition rates, its temperature dependency, and priming effects. These measurements aim to constrain the fate of C through anaerobic decomposition upon permafrost thaw.

  18. The importance of pH and sand substrate in the revegetation of saline non-waterlogged peat fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor, Marilou B; Price, Jonathan; Rochefort, Line

    2015-11-01

    A partially peat-extracted coastal bog contaminated by seawater was barren and required revegetation as a wetland. Peat fields were rectangular in shape, cambered in cross-section profile, and separated by drainage ditches. Common to all peat fields were symmetrical patterns in micro-topography with slopes between differences in elevation. Saline non-waterlogged slopes of ∼5% occurred as a symmetrical pair on each side of the crest of the cambered profile, at one end of each peat field. Three rows were laid across this slope (Top, Middle, and Bottom rows) and transplanted with naturally-growing plant species with their sand substrate, in three experiments, and grown for a year. In the Spartina pectinata experiment, bare root stem sections were also planted. Another experiment was conducted to determine changes in the characteristics of a volume of sand when incubated in saline peat fields. We found the salinity of peat increased with moisture downslope, and pH decreased with increase in salinity. S. pectinata grew best when planted with its sand substrate compared with bare root stem section, and when planted in Bottom rows. Juncus balticus had excellent growth in all rows. Unexpectedly, Festuca rubra that was inconspicuous beneath the J. balticus canopy in the natural donor site grew densely within the J. balticus sods. Agrostis stolonifera grew well but seemed to show intolerance to the surrounding acidic peat by curling up its stolons. The pH of the incubated sand volume was much higher than the surrounding peat. These studies suggest that recognition of plant niches and pH manipulation are important in the revegetation of disturbed Sphagnum peatlands that are found abundantly in the northern hemisphere. Results are also relevant to the reclamation of other disturbed lands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Presentation of the results of 1993-1994 of the peat production research area; Turvetuotanto - tutkimusalueen katsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, A.

    1996-12-31

    The development target of the peat production research area of the Biomass research programme is to improve the competitivity of peat by reducing the production costs by 20 % (5-6 FIM/MWh) from the level of 1992 and to reduce the environmental load. The main targets of peat production, by which the target can be met, are ditching and preparation technologies, drying technology, machine technology, methodology, integration of wood harvesting and peat production, and application of the results of the Optimiturve research programme in practice. The objectives of the peat production research are possible to meet if the partial targets are met. Increment of the open-ditch distance from 20 m to 60 m reduces the production costs by 5.0 %, increment of the rate of utilization of solar radiation from 30 % to 40 % reduces the production costs by 8 %, reduction of the amount of residual peat from 3000 MWh to 1500 MWh reduces the costs by 6.5 %, development of light and firesafe machines by 3 %, and integrated harvesting of wood by 3 %. Meeting of the partial targets reduces the production costs by 24 %. The main research areas of peat production will be carried out further. The total funding of the peat production researches in 1993-1994 was 19.4 million FIM (9.7 million FIM/a). The share of the total funding of the research organization projects has been 6.7 million FIM and that of the company projects 12.7 million FIM. The share of the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry of the funding has been 9.0 million FIM (46 %)

  20. Acceleration of peat drying by intensifying the heat and mass transfer; Turpeen kuivumisen nopeuttaminen laemmoen- ja aineensiirtoa tehostamalla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillebrand, K.

    1996-12-31

    The efficiency of peat production can be increased by intensifying peat drying. To intensify drying one has to know the effects of the different factors affecting the heat and mass transfer in the drying layer and in the soil. The objective of the study is to increase the degree of utilization of solar energy in drying of peat from the present level of 30% to 40% of the total incoming solar energy. In this way it is possible to reduce the peat production costs about 10%. A numerical drying model has been developed which describes the transfer of liquid water, water vapor and heat in the drying layer and in the soil. In addition, the interaction between the atmosphere and the drying layer, as well as the rainfall interception by the layer, infiltration, evaporation, and drainage have been taking into account. Daily input requirements include global solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed and precipitation. In addition to the weather data one has to know the characteristics of the drying layer and the soil. The numerical drying model was also used to study the effect of soil frost on peat drying and the possibilities to hinder the frost formation. Producing peat on the field which is still partly frozen, the drying of peat takes 10 - 25% longer time than under normal conditions, which means 5 - 25 hours longer drying period. By forming a porous, insulating layer on the top of the soil surface, one can hinder the frost formation significantly. Raising the groundwater level prevents, however, only a little the frost formation in peat soil